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BOOK OF WINNERS


PAUL & DIANE DUPERRON Diane and Paul Duperron started the Prince George chapter of the Kidney Foundation in 2006, the year before Paul started dialysis and his wait for a kidney transplant. Since that time, they have been tirelessly working to raise awareness and funds for the Kidney Foundation. They regularly visit Prince George’s transplant clinic, which has 94 clients, both for Paul’s dialysis and to visit with patients

MICHELLE JACKSON As a personal trainer at the Northern Sports Centre, Michelle is a true advocate for a healthy lifestyle thru positive training of body and soul. She has helped many clients achieve their goals for a healthier lifestyle by encouraging them to try new fitness routines and adopt healthier diets. She is a positive role model for both men and women.


NANCY GUPTA Nancy Gupta has completed a Bachelor in Medicine, as well as a Bachelor in Surgery (Doctor of Medicine) from the Baba Farid University of Health Sciences in 2011. Since receiving her Medical degree Nancy has worked as a Medical Officer for a Rural Health and Training Centre, the Department of Community Medicine, the World Health Organization, and the Government Medical College and Hospital (GMCH) in Chandigarh, India. Her experience includes research, consulting, investigation, and disease diagnosis and treatment: including, the treatment and prevention of communicable and non -communicable chronic diseases, such as Tuberculosis, Diabetes, Mellitus, and Hypertension. Her passion lies in research of disease prevention of infectious diseases. As a recent newcomer to Prince George she has already started contributing to the local community through volunteer advocacy work at the Canadian Red Cross Society, the Canadian Diabetes Association, and the Canadian Cancer society. Nancy Gupta is passionate about disease prevention advocacy with international experience researching, teaching, and developing new disease prevention protocols.

RYLEY NEWMAN Ryley Newman impacts the health & wellness of Northern BC in a very direct way – as a personal trainer at the Northern Sports Centre. He is extremely knowledgeable in his field and is an advocate in the very fundamental definition of the term – as he lives, eats, breathes and trains the very lifestyle he seeks to awaken in others.


IRENE STOYLES Irene Stoyles is a shining example of commitment and dedication to excellence in healthcare. Irene is a Respiratory Therapist in Chetwynd where she has lived and worked in this northern community for 21 years. She goes above and beyond with all her clients, be it for getting medication, equipment or appointments. She is invaluable in any situation whether it is the smallest concern to the worst trauma. There are no words to describe how compassionate and caring she is to the client and their families.

MARCENE BUCK Marcene Buck is a very enthusiastic and dedicated fitness and wellness instructor at the Northern Sport Centre. As a personal trainer, she leads by example. She is truly empathic, humble and compassionate. In her group classes, she goes over and above just instructing the group by giving them tidbits of information on fitness, wellness and eating healthy. She is an excellent motivator and extremely passionate about her job. She pushes every individual further than they could push themselves, and may I add with a smile always. I am one of the many individuals who have greatly enjoyed and benefitted from interacting with her.


BC generally has the healthiest population in Canada, with the lowest smoking rate. However, there are still over 563, 5293 British Columbians who smoke and tobacco use remains the leading cause of preventable death in the province. It is responsible for 30% of cancer deaths, and 85% of lung cancers. Making matters worse, an unacceptably high number of young people begin smoking each year. Smoke and vape-free public places protect children and youth from second-hand smoke, make nonsmoking the norm, and support smokers who want to quit. A year ago, there were no northern municipalities with comprehensive outdoor tobacco bylaws. Today, in part because of advocacy and support from the Canadian Cancer Society and Northern Health, Dawson Creek and Williams Lake have implemented outdoor tobacco bylaws, and Quesnel and Prince George are in the process of developing bylaws. At the provincial level, the Society advocated for e-cigarettes to be regulated in the same manner as tobacco products. Data indicates that e-cigarette use amongst youth is increasing, raising concerns that e-cigarettes may act as a gateway to nicotine addiction and tobacco use. Amendments to BC’s tobacco control act passed first reading March 2015, that will prohibit sales to minors, control where e-cigarettes are sold and how they are promoted, and regulate use in the same manner as regular tobacco products. Across Canada, the Society has been advocating for a ban on all flavoured tobacco products. Flavourants make tobacco products more palatable and attractive to new users, increase excitement, smoking enjoyment, and trigger the “curiosity to try factor,” making it easier for new users to become addicted. Effective December 14, 2015, the Federal Government of Canada’s regulations to ban most categories of flavoured cigarillos and cigars weighing 6 grams or less will come into force. The Society continues to advocate for healthy public policy that will prevent youth from starting to smoke, and support British Columbians who do smoke to quit.


MARY JACKSON - Northern HIV & Health Education Society Mary Jackson is the Executive Director of the Northern HIV and Health Education Society – an organization that facilitates health education in Prince George and the surrounding communities for ages ten through to seniors. Mary Jackson does education for many groups and is so passionate about reaching the community of Prince George with her message of awareness . Mary is a true example of a Health & Wellness Educator. She is very dedicated and takes great pride in her role as a Educator to Northern BC.

OVERHANG OVERhang is full-service fitness and education facility specializing in indoor climbing, outdoor safety, and wilderness recreation. They aim to get people of all ages and abilities outdoors and enjoying a variety of activities in a safe and responsible manner, all while getting the most out of the experience. Whether the intention is to work or play outside or are involved in emergency management, you’ll find courses, gear and information to get you doing it right. Since 2010 Overhang has offered courses in swiftwater safety, river ice rescue, safe ATV and snowmobile operation, wilderness first aid, avalanche awareness, wilderness survival, trip planning, and outdoor leadership workshops. Overhang also equip teams with the gear they need to operate safely in a range of natural environments, and provide safety standby services for resource industry workers operating in environments with higher risks.


Dr. Margo Greenwood and Dr. Sarah de Leeuw Margo Greenwood and Sarah de Leeuw are two of four co-editors of Determinants of Indigenous Peoples’ Health in Canada: Beyond the Social, which was published this summer. This new health textbook edited by these two University of Northern B.C. professors has gathered indigenous perspectives and experiences to offer a better look at the realities of healthcare in aboriginal communities. The text fills a huge gap of information in the Canadian health education landscape, offering students a greatly expanded opportunity to critically think about indigenous patient care and hopefully apply this knowledge to their future practice . Margo Greenwood is an education and First Nation studies professor at UNBC Sarah de Leeuw is an associate professor in the Northern Medical Program


Population Health Injury Prevention Team (Denise Foucher & Shellie O’Brien), Northern Health Faced with a broad and challenging array of topics (ranging from drowning and concussion prevention to distracted driving and preventing seniors’ falls) and high rates of preventable injury in northern B.C., Northern Health’s Population Health Injury Prevention Team (Shellie O’Brien and Denise Foucher) have initiated a thorough, creative, thoughtful, and wide-reaching approach to health and wellness education. Included in this nomination for “Health & Wellness Educator of the Year” is ongoing injury prevention education (via social media, posters, articles, and more) on a range of topics as well as a specific campaign (Concussions Matter!) that saw community members and health care providers trained in concussion best practice in advance of the Canada Winter Games. As a result of Denise & Shellie’s efforts, thousands of individuals in northern B.C. have access to appropriate and relevant injury prevention information on an ongoing basis and hundreds of health care professionals and community members have taken valuable concussion training.


MURRY KRAUSE Murry Krause is the Executive Director of the Central Interior Native Health Society Primary Health Care Clinic — a not for profit society dedicated to Aboriginal Health. Murry is also a longtime city councilor of Prince George. For many years now, Murry has been a leader in aboriginal health through the society and has championed many First Nations Initiatives in Northern BC. Most recently, Murry was at the forefront of the initiative to rename Fort George Park to Lheidli T’enneh Memorial Park aim to further educate the community on the history of the Lheidli T’enneh people.

ROD GEORGE DUDES CLUB Every second Monday, Rod George finds himself in the kitchen at the Fire Pit, cooking something warm for a core group of men who have joined a new wellness group. The program represents an initiative to help get local men living on the street to become more actively committed to something healthy George is the elder advisor at Prince George’s Dudes Club, one of three northern pilot projects started this year through a partnership with the Men’s Depression and Suicide Network at the University of British Columbia. Often a doctor from Central Interior Native Health is at the meetings to help answer questions, but many of the best moments have been from discussions with the group.


Dr. Margo Greenwood and Dr. Sarah de Leeuw Margo Greenwood and Sarah de Leeuw are two of four co-editors of Determinants of Indigenous Peoples’ Health in Canada: Beyond the Social, which was published this summer. This new health textbook edited by these two University of Northern B.C. professors has gathered indigenous perspectives and experiences to offer a better look at the realities of healthcare in aboriginal communities. The text fills a huge gap of information in the Canadian health education landscape, offering students a greatly expanded opportunity to critically think about indigenous patient care and hopefully apply this knowledge to their future practice . Margo Greenwood is an education and First Nation studies professor at UNBC Sarah de Leeuw is an associate professor in the Northern Medical Program


Dr. Vasiliki Douglas Dr. Vasiliki Douglas is a CNC nursing instructor and expert on Indigenous health care. Recognizing a lack of resources for educators and their students, she wrote Introduction to Aboriginal Health and Health Care in Canada, the first entry-level textbook of its kind. The text was produced with the intention that nurses also examine the pulse of the past and its impact on present health care realities to help reintroduce the respect that is still missing from aboriginal healthcare. The text provides a critical resource that is a must for professionals working in the north. Due to the number of aboriginals residing in remote and rural areas, awareness among medical professionals is both relevant and required

everywhere.


Dr. Terri Aldred Dr. Terri Aldred is a First Nations doctor who has dedicated herself to healing her people in northern communities. Dr. Terri Aldred is Carrier from the Tl’Azt’En Nation whose traditional territory is North of Fort St. James near the geographical centre of British Columbia. Tl’Azt’En are a matriarchal people and therefore she follows her greatgrandmother Cecilia Prince’s line and is from the Lusilyoo (frog) clan. Dr. Aldred went to medical school with this goal in mind and graduated in 2011 from the University of Alberta with a Bachelor of Science degree in Health Science and a Doctor of Medicine degree. Terri then continued on to join the Aboriginal Family Practice Residency in Victoria, BC which she completed in June 2013. During her studies, Terri was heavily involved in both Aboriginal Health initiatives as well as mentorship and admission programs. This past summer she started the road to living to her dream of bringing culturally appropriate health care to both the inner city population in Prince George and in First Nation’s communities in the area. She has grown up in both of these populations and this has shaped her into the person she is today; it is a privilege and honor to give back. Terri is a huge supporter of Arts in Medicine. She was fortunate that the University of Alberta Health Science department had quite an extensive program that worked tirelessly to incorporate the arts into medical training. Terri wants to express that she feels very honored to be involved in this initiative and can’t wait to see all the wonderful projects that will stem from it.


Dr. James Card & Dr. Richard Raymond Dr. James Card and Dr. Richard Raymond, in partnership with their Northern Health team, have changed the fate of MacKenzie. This small community had nearly no physician coverage, and this team took a proactive approach to education and supporting residents, as well as an innovative approach to supporting locums to invite their friends to the community. Part of this initiative included Dr. Card and Dr. Raymond marketing opportunities in Mackenzie and taking an innovative, integrated approach to recruitment. This included a recruiting postcard that the local practice support coach, Joy, created to lure more medical residents to Mackenzie. With financial support from Mackenzie, Joy, created postcards showcasing Mackenzie experience and slipped them into the mail slots of residents at University Hospital of Northern B.C. and shared them with the residents who came to the community. Beyond this, Dr. Card gave lunchtime presentations to medical residents working across the Northern Health region, which included free food. These promotional presentations eventually extended beyond northern Health to conferences including Whistler. With Dr. Raymond’s leadership and support for the team to take those extra steps, this team was able to do something very innovative to support their physician shortage.


Canadian Cancer Society/ Northern Health/BC Cancer Agency/University of British Columbia/Athabasca University The Canadian Cancer Society, Northern Health and BC Cancer Agency, along with researchers from the University of British Columbia and Athabasca University, capitalized on one another’s strengths and expertise in order to develop a new approach to address health challenges faced by northern men. POWERPLAY, a workplace wellness program that challenged participants to eat well and be more active, was piloted by four male-dominated businesses in Northern BC: Excel Transportation, Lomak Bulk Carriers, Ridley Terminals and the City of Terrace. Steve Dewalt, a shop manager from Lomak said, “Now with the POWERPLAY program everyone shares more; about their weekend, their activities, it has helped build the team.” “It’s fun, it brings everyone together and produces teamwork,” agreed Lorenzo Webb, a welder with Lomak. “In being more active I feel amazing. I have more energy to do more things in a day.”


Wael Fawzi Wael completed the Acupuncture and Traditional Chinese Medicine program in Victoria, BC. He also completed the Acupuncture diploma in India from the Indian Academy of Acupuncture. Wael’s medical career started in 2000, and he has always incorporated natural medicine in his practice. He was apprenticed by many famous Chinese, Syrian and Indian doctors. He is passionate about treating chronic diseases by using various techniques such as acupuncture, herbal medicine, cupping therapy, moxibustion, and massage. As well he treats his patients utilizing natural and non-chemical ways including food therapy, exercise and healthy lifestyle. Most recently, Wael has been hard at work developing and providing new approaches to medical treatments for numerous types of diseases and ailments through natural, less invasive, treatments.


Tammy Rizmayer Based in Prince George, Tammy Rizmayer works with over 800 patients and families throughout Northern Health who are dealing with kidney disease. The majority of these patients live outside of the Prince George area, and many of them also live on low incomes. Those that require dialysis may have their health outcomes impacted by stress caused by the financial burden associated with paying for travel or accommodation, or time spent not working.

overcome travel cost barriers.

To reduce this burden, Tammy has established connections with accommodation and travel providers to help patients and their families come to Prince George and Vancouver for appointments. Recently she played a critical role in establishing a $25,000 bursary fund that helps patients

Tammy’s team members have noticed a big difference in the quality of learning that patients and families are able to embrace when they have less finance-related stress. Bursary assistance has led to increased patient satisfaction, empowerment of patients to deal with their chronic disease, and improved quality of life. And her financial assistance extends to helping renal patients and their families prepare their taxes and claim expenses from their many appointments and travel requirements. She started a food bank initiative that collects donations for patients who are in need and, when needed, she seeks donations of clothing and equipment. Tammy has also led the roll out of an Advanced Care Planning initiative for renal patients across Northern Health. Prior to her first steps, there were no formal discussions with patients and their families about personal wishes regarding future treatment when health is in rapid decline – except when absolutely needed and a patient was already in crisis. Patients having difficulty navigating the medical and government systems can rely on Tammy for extra support, like when she attends appointments with them or advocates for needed resources. A good example is when one patient was in a very confused state of mind and unable to visit a doctor by herself; Tammy hired a taxi and went with her to the clinic. As Dr. Anurag Singh, the Northern Kidney Care Program’s nephrologist and medical lead, said: “Tammy has been a role model and an inspiration to me and other members of the renal team. She leads by example and always goes an ‘extra mile’ when it comes to her patients. Although she is not in a formal leadership position, quality of care is her passion.”


Dr. Haidar Hadi AND Dr. Dan Horvat: The Northern Race Line BMost communities in Northern BC have few, if any, medical or surgical specialists. Most specialist physicians are in Prince George. Northern Partners in Care (NPiC) has been supporting Northern family and specialist physicians to innovate in their communication with the aim of improving access to and quality of care for the citizens of Northern BC. The Northern R.A.C.E. (Rapid Access to Consultative Expertise) service enables family physicians to connect with specialists more rapidly and easily by phone. This has led to patient’s receiving better care more rapidly and has reduced the need for patient travel. It also provides enhanced support to family physicians and nurse practitioners. We believe that such enhanced professional support will assist with recruitment and retention. To date Northern RACE provides access to 13 specialty services including cardiology, nephrology, infectious diseases, oncology, gastroenterology, psychiatry, respirology, rheumatology, pediatrics, diabetes, orthopaedics, radiology and allergy/immunology. The service continues to expand. NPiC also supports outreach by specialist physicians as well as videoconferencing and other enhanced forms of enhanced communication. NPiC is based out of the Northern Medical Program which is housed at UNBC. It is supported by the Shared Care Committee, which represents Doctors of BC, the Ministry of Health and the province’s health authorities. We work closely with Northern Health, the BC Cancer Agency and others. NPiC is led by Dr. Dan Horvat and John Smith and managed by Matt Graveline. Dr. Haidar Hadi has been instrumental in getting Northern RACE up and running, as has Drs. Abu Hamour, Denise McLeod and Paul Winwood. Sheryl Edwards, administrative support for NPiC (along with others) has also been instrumental in this work, particularly the dedicated Northern physicians, who have created this service and other NPiC initiatives successful. Dr. Dan Horvat is local family physician and an Assistant Professor in the Department of Family Medicine within the Northern Medical Program, UBC Faculty of Medicine. He is also has an appointment with UNBC. Dr. Horvat’s academic focus is on health system improvement. He has extensive experience locally and provincially and has worked with leaders of healthcare organizations internationally recognized as the most effective and efficient. Dr. Haidar Hadi is a UK trained physician and cardiologist working full time at the University Hospital of Northern British Columbia. He is currently the regional cardiac lead for Northern Health and Clinical Assistant Professor in the Cardiology Division Department of Internal Medicine at the University of British Columbia position, quality of care is her passion.”


Dr. Anurag Singh Dr. Anurag Singh is a Nephrologist and Medical Director for Kidney Services at Northern Health, Clinical Assistant Professor, Faculty of Medicine, UBC & Adjunct Professor, School of Health Sciences, UNBC He is well recognized as a leader in both the multicultural and healthcare community. Dr. Singh is passionate about making real changes to improve care for people in communities across the north. This level of commitment and service stands as an example of success and inspiration for the multicultural community.

Ms Eleanor Taylor - BC Cancer Agency Eleanor is the Prevention Programs Administrator Northern Region for the BC Cancer Agency Centre for the North. She has been contributing to the multicultural community for more than 5 years. Her efforts include co-organizing activities with the Immigrant and Multicultural Services Society to raise awareness and prevention of breast cancer in women in the multicultural community. Her proactive approach and initiative have also found her acting as a liason to connect and introduce the Immigrant and Multicultural Services Society to other health agencies throughout British Columbia to extend the scope of access to information and programs. for the multicultural community.


Warner Adam Mr. Warner Adam is the Chief Executive Officer of Carrier Sekani Family Services for the past 21 years, which services eleven First Nations communities in the Northwestern region of BC. Mr. Adams mandate is to develop and deliver Family and Children, Health and Legal/Justice Services. Mr. Adam holds a certificate in Public Administration of Aboriginal Governments from the University of Victoria. He is a strong supporter of holistic healing using indigenous values and belief system. Warner is committed to community capacity building for the positive growth of children, and autonomy of indigenous peoples. The organization started with a staff of three in 1989 to a multi-cultural staff of over 150 employees. Mr. Adams other contribution includes the establishment of the BC Aboriginal Child Care Society. Mr. Adam has been instrumental in the development of Child Care programming in First Nation communities throughout BC. The society has created over 700 licensed childcare seats and develops resource materials for First Nations Early Childhood Education. Until the establishment of this society, First Nations communities had very minimal child care programs. Other contributions include the negotiations of agreements related to the transfer and devolution of Family and Child Services from the BC government as well as the negotiations of transferring health services from Health Canada to Carrier Sekani Family Services. Mr. Adam was instrumental in developing a training program for mediators resulting in certifying over 10 First Nations mediators for the north, prior to this training, the north had one non native mediator who flew in from Vancouver. Warner has served on numerous community, federal, provincial and first nations boards and committees. He has served on the Carrier Sekani Tribal Council executive, and the Lake Babine Nation Council and treaty tables. initiative have also found her acting as a liason to connect and introduce


Dr. Chris Opio Dr. Chris Opio is a Professor, Ecosystem Science and Management on University of Northern British Columbia. In 2007, he set up the Prince George-based Northern Uganda Development Foundation (NUDF) which mainly supports access to clean water but also seeks to improve farming techniques, purchase goats, provide health education and teach Ugandans how to establish small businesses. When he was five or six, Opio contracted bilharzia, a serious water-borne disease that compromises the immune system – which can, in some instances have devastating effects including sterility or insanity. His was the experience of many rural Ugandans. As the son of peasant farmers, he grew up in abject poverty. Even after he survived, he and the other villages faced constant suffering from other bacteria like E. coli, which often caused diarrhea and stomach illnesses. Upon leaving Uganda, Opio promised one thing – to do something to just make life better for people who are still drinking that water so that they don’t suffer the way he and his siblings did. By next month the organization will have built 74 wells that serve 120,000 rural people in the central east African country. Each well costs about $2,500 and the clean water has helped reduce sickness by 85 per cent.


Tammy Rizmayer Tammy Rizmayer has been the Renal Social Worker for Northern Health’s regional renal program since 2009, and is based at the University Hospital of Northern BC in Prince George. She is passionate about helping northerners with chronic kidney disease, and has led a variety of initiatives to improve quality of care. Tammy had an important role in the establishment of a bursary fund to help patients overcome cost barriers when having to travel to Prince George for specialist support, and she has played a very key part in implementing an Advanced Care planning initiative across the North. She goes out of her way to help connect people with appropriate community resources. When those resources are not readily available, she also coordinates donations of food, clothing and equipment (from both patients and staff) for needy patients and their families. Tammy is dedicated to providing quality of care and respects the individuality of each person in the renal program.

Suzanne Minck – YMCA Suzanne has volunteered at the YMCA for 29 years. She is an instructor and currently teaches four days a week; three circuit classes and a spin class. She is always positive, friendly and helpful. She is a great advocate for living a healthy lifestyle including exercise, laughter with friends and healthy eating. It’s a credit to her as a volunteer for 29 years at the YMCA.


Dr. Ian Schokking Dr. Schokking put his heart and soul into the health of our community and the education of our future health care providers. Behind the scenes, Dr. Schokking is the committed lead on the Continuing Education for Medical Education for our physicians in this region; Dr. Schokking leads the Northern Doctors Day event for all Northern physcians to come together in the spirit of education and learning. Dr. Schokking also runs the Residency Program four our physicians in training and ensures that their time in Prince George is full of meaningful educational opportunities, but also an experience of what Prince George can offer. Dr. Schokking will often be seen going above and beyond to show our residents what Northern living can be like, from inviting them to events like Doctors Day, to having them over for BBQs at his home. He truly is a champion for our region. Dr. Schokking can be found as part of various initiatives; including a founding member of the PG Division of Family Practice. Most recently, Dr. Schokking was the Northern champion for the provincial initiatives’ to advocate for less antipsychotics in residential care


Xconditioning Xconditioning is a locally owned and operated fitness facility led by Jay Cook and Mike Webber. Their roots began in the athletic community, working with talented athletes such as the NHL’s Brett Connolly, Brandon Manning, and Nick Drazenovic, as well as the Prince George Spruce Kings, Prince George Cougars, and the Cariboo (major midget) Cougars. Over the years, their focus has broadened to include the every day gym-goer, the first timer, and everything in between. Their work with athletes in just about every sport imaginable, including hockey, football, baseball, soccer, speed skating, figure skating, triathlon, cycling, golf, lacrosse, motocross, BMX, among others. Boasting a unique membership program with tailored workouts, this workout experience is something different and beneficial to Northern BC.


Jaylene Pfeifer Chinook Yoga Jaylene Pfeifer of Chinook Yoiga provides ongoing support and dedication to those with illness, injury, pain in their bodies to find ease and wellness through yoga therapy Jaylene has come to yoga with a 18 year background as a Kinesiologist. She has completed 500 hour level yoga teacher training programs, through both the South Okanagan Yoga Academy and Moksha Teacher Training Program. Jaylene did a year long yoga therapy training with Susi Hately of Functional

Synergy to improve her skills in providing tools to students of Chinook Yoga who move through the Yoga Therapy Program. A yoga therapy experience at Chinook Yoga gives more insight into how your body is built to move and give you strategies to nourish relaxation in your body and mind as well as gain ease, strength and overall improved function. just about every sport imaginable, including hockey, football, baseball, soccer, speed skating, figure


Jason Keller Fit as a Fighter 5 years ago, Jason Keller was a personal fitness trainer and MMA Fighter. After an accident left him with a fractured skull, broken nose, broken jaw, broken ribs, collapsed lung, and broken orbital, he spent a month in coma. After awakening from the coma, he spent nine months in the hospital, Keller had to relearn the basics. MMA isn’t an outlet for Keller anymore – he’s been warned by his doctors that he if steps into the ring again, it would be for the last time. But his desire to help people reach their physical and mental goals never wavered and he founded Fit as a Fighter Fitness Training because his fitness level and fighting mentality played a big part in keeping him alive. His daily commitment to fitness and positive change has included outreach programs for all ages and outreach programs with children.


Northern Sport Centre The Northern Sport Centre continues to provide world-class health, fitness, sport and recreational opportunities for thousands of Prince George and Northern BC residents on an annual basis! Perched atop Cranbrook Hill among the tall timbers on University of Northern B.C. Campus, the Charles Jago Northern Sport Centre is for the use and enjoyment of everyone. From memberships to rental space, to training opportunities for high-performance athletes, the Northern Sport Centre brings community together. Open in September 2007 in an effort to realize the full potential of Northern B.C. arising from the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games, community leaders from the City of Prince George, the University of Northern British Columbia, the Spirit of BC Prince George Community Committee and PacificSport came together to develop a plan to create a regional centre of excellence in sport. The resulting concept, the Charles Jago Northern Sport Centre, is a facility that brings athletes, coaches and communities together to foster a distinctive culture of excellence by integrating sport and education. The Northern Sport Centre is the result of a unique partnership between the City of Prince George and the University of Northern British Columbia, which recognizes the importance of linking sport, education and the community.


Alison Hagreen Alison Hagreen is the Executive Director of the Prince George Brain Injured Group. For over 25 years serving the community with brain injury awareness through education programs, education for those injured and their families and brain injury support on a local level as well as in the north. Prince George Brain Injured Group is one of the largest and most comprehensive brain injury programs in western Canada, actively serving more than 320 survivors of brain injury annually. For more than 10 years the NBIA has approached our MLA’s to encourage them to provide direct funding for acquired brain injury, something that is the norm in other parts of the country. In early 2014 we expanded our efforts and were joined by the brain injury societies in Kamloops and the Fraser Valley. This team has creating countless groups and raised endless funds through grants benefiting the Bain injured and their families.


Margot Parkes Margot Parkes is theCanada Research Chair in Health, Ecosystems and Society; Associate Professor, School of Health Sciences, UNBC; Cross Appointed, Northern Medical Program, UBC Margot’s current projects includes the Cumulative and Community Impacts Research Consortium - a new project by UNBC researchers is giving voice to communities affected by resource development. The CCIRC is working with First Nations, local businesses, industry groups, residents and government officials and seeks to integrate environmental, community, and health perspectives to improve policy and practice. This collaboration will lead to enhanced responses to community concerns.


Dr. Shannon Freeman Dr. Freeman is a post-doctoral fellow in the School of Health Sciences at the University of Northern British Columbia. She is a PhD graduate from the School of Public Health and Health Systems at the University of Waterloo (Aging, Health, and Well-being Program) and the current Vice President of the International Association on Geriatrics and Gerontology Coalition of Student Organizations (IAGG-CSO). Dr. Freeman holds a MSc degree from Tohoku University School of Medicine (Internal Medicine and Rehabilitation) in Sendai Japan, and an HBA from McMaster University (Gerontology and Political Science). Dr. Freeman’s research interests focus on the health and well being of vulnerable populations with specialization in the areas of aging, hospice palliative care, informal caregiving, and centenarians. Dr. Freeman took an active role in the creation of the interRAI Palliative Care Clinical Assessment Protocols. She is currently leading a collaborative multi-phase research project focussed on identifying and characterizing persons residing in long-term care (LTC) facilities in rural and remote areas who do not exhibit the clinical need for the level of care provided and looking for ways to better support them to receive care in their preferred community based setting.


Sabrina Dosanjh-Gantner & Theresa Healy Sabrina & Theresa worked jointly on the project Facilitating Relationships: Northern Health’s Partnering for Healthier Communities Approach which was delivered as part of the The Brown Bag Lunch series which is a joint initiative between Northern Health and UNBC to promote health research in the North. Northern Health has developed the Partnering for Healthier Communities (P4HC) approach in order to reduce the health inequities that exist in the north. This approach recognizes that improving the health of northern communities requires the coordinated effort of many sectors and aims to build healthier communities to reduce the incidence of chronic disease and injury through effective partnerships between Northern Health, local governments, and other key stakeholders, which could include university based researchers. While P4HC supports the objectives of the provincial Healthy Families BC framework, the strategies adopted speak specifically to the context of northern BC. This presentation will support participants in gaining a better understanding of Northern Health’s P4HC approach, as well as the strategies developed and implemented to meet the objectives of this approach. Sabrina is the lead for healthy community development with local governments with Northern Health’s population health team. Sabrina was born and raised in Terrace and loves calling northern BC home. She has been with Northern Health since 2007 and is passionate about empowering, supporting and partnering with northern communities as we collaboratively work towards building healthier communities. Theresa is the regional manager for healthy community development with Northern Health’s population health team and is passionate about the capacity of individuals, families and communities across northern B.C. to be partners in health and wellness. affected by resource development. The CCIRC


Dr. Sarah Gray Sarah Gray is a Northern Medical Program associate professor whose current research work includes studies which hormones play a role in regulating energy balance, and how the body manages energy consumption from food and energy expended through actions like metabolic rate. Dr Gray’s interests also lie in how changes in adipose tissue mass, as sseen in obesity, contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes. Obesity, diabetes and associated complications cause long term suffering for patients and are a massive economic burden to countries around the world. Understanding the mechanisms by which type 2 diabetes develops may lead to treatments to control or reverse the metabolic complications associated with obesity and importantly provide clear mechanistic data to suppor the promotion of a healthy lifestyle for the prevention of obesity and type 2 diabetes. The central theme of this research are the molecular mechanisms of type 2 diabetes, with specific focus on the following interrelated areas of research: -Adipose tissue expandability in the regulation of metabolic homeostasis -Endocrine regulation of glucose homeostasis -Molecular mechanisms that control energy expenditure

-Type 2 diabetes in First Nations popluations of British Columbia


Geriatric Assessment & Treatment Unit Northern Health The GAT Unit Day Hospital utilizes a full interdisciplinary team ( Charge Nurse: Terrie Zanette, LPN: Sherry Slovak, Recreational Therapist: Lynn Aucoin, Rehab Assistant: Kristi Wintemute, Occupational Therapist: Judy Wakabyashi, Physio Therapist: Anne Jenkins, Social Worker: Jennifer Davey, Nursing Unit Assistant: Brandy Reid and a group of pysicians specializing in older people) to partner with seniors in managing their own healthcare. Clients and families have come to appreciate the “one stop shop” atmosphere of the GAT Unit, whereby staff navigate clients through the medical system and provide supportive grouped services in one location. Each team member has the skill, knowledge and experience to assist clients to meet their own goals. The team’s goals are to support seniors in maximizing their function and independance. Enrolled clients tend to use the healthcare system less often because of the positive effect from individualized interdisciplinary care. Geriatric Day Hospital clients tend to be older persons living in the community, but teetering on the slippery sloap of functional decline leading to facility admissions. The GAT Unit is a non- threatening environment for integrating clients back into social networks, building friendships and establishing a sense of belonging along with participating in a medical, diagnostic and treatment based program.


Gurdeep Singh Powar Gurdeep is a longtime champion of fund raising for seniors health and wellness. His ongoing efforts through the BIKE-A-THON have been a major contributor to local initiative since 1995. During this time, his work and commitment to the cause have raised almost over $60,000/ year.

YXS Ambassador Program The Prince George Airport Authority introduced the YXS Volunteer Ambassador Program over 15 years ago. Between the ages of 60 and 89, the YXS Ambassadors are committed and proud community members that embrace that fact they are the first impression of our airport and the city of Prince George. YXS Ambassadors take great pride in welcoming arriving travellers, assisting meeters and greeters as well as providing direction and information about our fantastic city and region. Wearing green vests, they can be found roaming the airport with smiles or at the information booth located adjacent to the BG Urban Grill restaurant.


Prince George Community Response Network The Prince George Community Response Network organized a walk through the streets of downtown for World Elder Abuse Awareness Day The walk for awareness is one of more than 25 events across the province and saw many out in support. The motivation for the this walk was to raise community awareness of adult abuse and neglect using a unique community development approach.


Activity Centre for Empowerment Activity Centre for Empowerment is a Prince George project that prepares those with mental illness to take part in directing the activities that lead them to live healthier lifestyles. The project follows about 60 people and is a partnership between the Activity Centre for Empowerment (ACE), YMCA of Northern BC, the Northern Medical Program and Chinook Yoga studio. Some activities it offers include a walking program, yoga and fitness classes at the Sixth Avenue ACE location, a community kitchen program and a peer-led tobacco reduction program.


Car 60 - RCMP & Northern Health The Car 60 program is a community based program partnership between Northern Health and the RCMP to provide better support for the mentally ill on the street. Car 60 - comprised of a plain clothes RCMP officer and a psychiatric nurse - is now out on the road responding to calls involving people with mental health issues, often a big portion of the RCMP’s workload. Two intensive case management teams, each made up of a mental health and addiction clinician, a nurse and a life skills worker are providing follow-up support. Car 60 is available seven days a week for nine hours each day, from noon to 9 p.m., and the emergency room has a psychiatric nurse from 8 a.m. to 11 p.m. Since it’s been on the road, the Car 60 program has responded to over 200 calls


Crisis Prevention, Intervention and Information Centre for Northern B.C. The Crisis Centre for Northern BC is a volunteer based non-profit society that has been in operation since 1970. Their phone-line services are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. The majority of the crisis workers are volunteers who deal with over 7,000 calls per year. Approximately 30% of these calls are from people in crisis. The remainder are business and general information calls. The Youth Support Line was incorporated in 1987. The Youth Line operates 4pm - 10 pm daily, and calls are answered by youth 21 years and younger. In 1997 the service area was expanded to Northwestern BC, and in 2008 they expanded south to Quesnel and northeast to include the Peace and Rocky Mountain areas. At the Crisis Centre for Northern BC, they define a crisis as an emotionally significant event or moment of risk in a person’s life. It is the caller who decides what a crisis is - we deal with all situations without labeling them. To those in crisis, they provide peer support volunteers who have 60 hours of intensive training. Each caller is guaranteed confidential, non-judgmental service. Their phone-line volunteers are trained to help people help themselves, ensuring anyone calling is aware of all options that are open to them.The Crisis Centre for Northern BC is also a major community resource service. For anyone requiring information about community facilities or services, we have almost 2000 resource listings on major social services, self-help and support groups, health organizations, fraternal service groups, youth groups and activities, and Emergency services. with mental health issues, often a big portion of the RCMP’s workload.


Baldy Hughes Treatment Centre Baldy Hughes Treatment Centre is a dedicated to compassionately helping British Columbians and our communities to overcome the devastating effects of addiction. They seek to restore personal dignity through a balance of individual autonomy and participation within our programming and therapeutic community. Their program is delivered in a closed and isolated residential environment in which clients adhere to a highly structured and demanding daily regimen. Professional counselors and case managers guide residents through our abstinence-based / bio-psycho-social / community-as-method program. Their clinical, case management and support staff team assist residents in acquiring or regaining the skills necessary to reintegrate themselves as positive citizens within society at large. This program is affordable to all British Columbians and is made possible by the ongoing assistance and support of the local community, the Government of BC, and generous corporate and individual donors from around the province of British Columbia and beyond.


UNBC Wellness Centre The UNBC Wellness Centre office provides Northern Post-Secondary Students with the tools and support necessary to achieve their fullest potential. UNBC’s Wellness Center continuously supports the health and well-being of youth in our community and youth who have come to Prince George to pursue success in the North. UNBC Wellness Centre Health Services helps students manage illness and health concerns, obtain information on relevant health and lifestyle topics, engage in health promotion, and manage healthy lifestyle changes during their university experience. Health Services offers physician, nurse practitioner, and nurse clinics. Students are welcome to come in year-round for prescription renewals, health assessment and treatment, sexual wellness (including STI testing and pap smears), tobacco cessation counselling, referrals, and health education. Flu shots are also available in the fall.


Lauren Matheson Lauren Matheson is an exceptional candidate for the Youth initiative of the year award. Lauren was diagnosed with acute scoliosis of the spine that radiated in two separate curvatures. Undergoing treatment in 2014, she required two permanent steel rods to be fused to her spine. Difficult for any teenager to overcome, it had serious implications on her aspirations of continuing to compete in track and field at a national level (Prior to her surgery she was a nationally ranked sprinter in her age class). Since her surgery (one that saw her height increase by 4 inches after the treatment) Lauren has been in intense physio treatment and strength training. In just one year, Lauren was able to compete again at the provincial level, and again qualified for nationals (though she did not make the trip to Quebec this summer). What helps set her apart is her advocacy for the health industry. Since her surgery, Lauren has begun a fundraising campaign in Northern BC to donate to the BC Children’s Hospital annual fundraising campaign for 2016. Lauren is presently a northern health volunteer, spending tome in the Prince George Hospital. An honors student, Lauren is pursuing a post secondary education in the healthcare field with the goal of working in the healthcare profession.


YMCA of Northern BC The Grade 6 Initiative is a legacy program as a part of the YMCA of Northern BC’s partnership with the 2015 Canada Winter Games that saw free gym memberships given to local children. Grade 6 marks a pivotal year for youth as they are faced with many decisions that impact their development into active healthy teens. This age group marks the time that youth begin to age out of traditional care models such as after school care programs and begin to re-evaluate their participation in sports and activities. The YMCA is dedicated to providing youth with opportunities to reach their full potential: to live healthier, happier lives today, and grow into productive adults in the future.

Zaffron Cuisine Persian Cafe and Catering Zaffron Cuisine has taken the initiative to provide healthy food options for youth in Duchess Park high school in the past three years, and to UNBC students in the past four years. The healthy lunch options have been brought to the youth to promote healthy eating at young age. Students are now looking forward to the day that Zaffron Cuisine brings food to school. This healthy lunch option includes a balanced and nutritious lunch made from fresh ingredients with no preservatives.begin to re-evaluate their participation in sports and activities. The YMCA is dedicated to providing


The Canadian Cancer Society, Northern Health, BC Cancer Agency, University of British Columbia & Athabasca University The Canadian Cancer Society, Northern Health and BC Cancer Agency, along with researchers from the University of British Columbia and Athabasca University, capitalized on one another’s strengths and expertise in order to develop a new approach to address health challenges faced by northern men. POWERPLAY, a workplace wellness program that challenged participants to eat well and be more active, was piloted by four male-dominated businesses in Northern BC: Excel Transportation, Lomak Bulk Carriers, Ridley Terminals and the City of Terrace. Steve Dewalt, a shop manager from Lomak said, “Now with the POWERPLAY program everyone shares more; about their weekend, their activities, it has helped build the team.” “It’s fun, it brings everyone together and produces teamwork,” agreed Lorenzo Webb, a welder with Lomak. “In being more active I feel amazing. I have more energy to do more things in a day.”time that youth begin to age out of traditional care models such as after school care programs and begin to re-evaluate their participation in sports and activities. The YMCA is dedicated to providing


Joe Crump Joe Crump has been working at the PGRCC for over 20 years. He saw a rare opportunity to raise funds for the Cops for Cancer Tour de North and made a huge impact on not only the children that he raised money for, but also on the inmates at the prison. Even Joe was humbled that these inmates, who made between $1.50 to $9 a day working in the jail were willing to donate their money to Cops for Cancer for nothing in return. Half of the money was raised this way and the other half was by selling bannock- an idea that the women inmates came up with to contribute to the cause.

Rod George - Dudes Club Every second Monday, Rod George finds himself in the kitchen at the Fire Pit, cooking something warm for a core group of men who have joined a new wellness group. The program represents an initiative to help get local men living on the street to become more actively committed to something healthy George is the elder advisor at Prince George’s Dudes Club, one of three northern pilot projects started this year through a partnership with the Men’s Depression and Suicide Network at the University of British Columbia. Often a doctor from Central Interior Native Health is at the meetings to help answer questions, but many of the best moments have been from discussions with the group.


Wellness in Northern BC WINBC (Promotion of Wellness in Northern BC Association) was developed to promote health and wellness and reduce chronic disease through healthy living and physical activity, in Northern British Columbia. It’s objective is to build capacity for wellness through education, research and community development. WINBC is committed to collaboration, education and research in relation to improving health through physical activity and this necessarily includes reducing injuries and advocating for safety in play, activity and sport. WINBC is pleased to partner in opportunities to educate, share knowledge and contribute to research.


Vanderhoof Men’s Shed Vanderhoof Men’s Shed is a communitybased, non-commercial organization which is open to all men where the primary activity is the provision of a safe, friendly, and inclusive environment where men are able to gather and/or work on other meaningful projects at their own pace, in their own time, and in the company of other men, and where the primary objective is to advance the health and wellbeing of the participating men Their vision was to make it an updated version of the shed in the backyard to provide a physical space to address men’s tendency to suffer from isolation, loneliness and depression after retirement


Applied Informatics for Health Society (Medical Office Information System team) AIHS (MOIS team); The MOIS infrastructure for electronic medical records has already won awards across Canada- with Dr. Bill Clifford ‘s brain child. Dr. Clifford’s team at AIHS continued that legacy and take dreams and make them reality. Two major accomplishments this year for this team- making the idea of different systems being able to talk to each other, while ensuring patient privacy, is really an incredible innovation that has been highlighted at the provincial level. The AIHS team has looked at how the family physician can send patient information to the hospital team in an electronic care plan- which is scrambled for privacy- and then reestablished in a secure hospital setting for the appropriate care provider.the other half was by selling bannock- an idea that the women inmates came up with to contribute to the cause.


Dr. Ray Markham & the Valemount Team Dr. Ray Markham ad the Valemount team: This innovative team has worked with Northern Health Information Technology Services to put together a proposal to expand their virtual reach to patients. They have developed a way to connect the physicians in Valemount to the sole practitioner in Valemount to ensure the Emergency Room practitioner is not isolated and has access to their peers. Siimlarly, they are connecting these rural practitioners to the Prince George ER; as well as looking at how to connect the physician in the ambulance to the Prince George ER. This novel approach to rural medicine is just the start for this innovative team, who have put their heads together (and hearts) to learn how to better work with a team approach, use their data to inform how they can improve practice and are catching the eye of many teams provincially- they are a shining star in rural patient care!


Northern Health ICCIS Team within Information Technology Services This innovative team of Information Technology experts and health care providers has been building a revised version of MOIS (electronic medical record). MOIS, the brainchild of Dr. Bill Clifford, has since become the most used electronic medical record for family physicians in the Northern Health region and has gained national recognition by numerous awards. This team, led by Darren Ditto (IT) and Gail Elliot (Nurse/IT) have adapted this physician system to be used by the entire integrated health team- nurses can access it, the occupational therapist, the mental health therapist and the dietician- anyone that needs to be part of the patient journey. They have taken this award winning electronic medical record to the next level to support an integrated approach to primary care.


Wael Fawzi Wael Fawzi is a Registered Acunucturist of BC working at the Prince George Family Chiropractic. He has been nominated for developing and providing new approaches to medical treatments for numerous types of diseases and ailments through natural, less invasive, treatments. Wael completed the Acupuncture and Traditional Chinese Medicine program in Victoria, BC. He also completed the Acupuncture diploma in India from the Indian Academy of Acupuncture. Wael’s medical career started in 2000, and he has always incorporated natural medicine in his practice. He was apprenticed by many famous Chinese, Syrian and Indian doctors. He is passionate about treating chronic diseases by using various techniques such as acupuncture, herbal medicine, cupping therapy, moxibustion, and massage. As well he treats his patients utilizing natural and non-chemical ways including food therapy, exercise and healthy lifestyle.


Congratulations to all of the winners and nominees of the 2015 Healthier You Awards!

Healthier You Awards 2015  

An awards show recognizing those individuals and businesses who have made outstanding contributions to the health and wellness of Northern B...

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