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AT THE HEART OF IT ALL 2012 PUBLIC MARKET GIFTS

COOKBOOK & APRON

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contributors

CITIZEN CITIZEN MAG is an independent media company that promotes, encourages and inspires Rochesterians and their ideas. Publisher and Editor Christopher Goldan Assistant Editor Elizabeth Stull Art Direction Christopher Goldan Circulation Manager Northstar Distribution Administrative Assistant Lisa Goldan Design CG Design Studio LLC Subscription inquiries: info@cg-design.com Ad sales: info@cg-design.com Published by CG Design Studio LLC 137 East Avenue, Suite 201 Rochester, NY 14604 Tel: 585-286-1243 Printed in the U.S.A.

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Walter Colley

Walter started working at an early age in his family’s photo retail store in Pennsylvania. In the past 25 years, he has captured a large variety of subjects. Truly enjoying the process and the people he works with, makes one wonder what he would be doing if his “Papa” had handed him a Tonka truck instead of a Kodak camera. Walter says, “It’s really very simple… I love to take pictures… I always have.”

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Robin Flanigan

Robin L. Flanigan is an award-winning writer living in Rochester. Her career as a freelance journalist dates back to 1994 in Baltimore, where she lived in a cemetery caretaker's mansion and hosted poetry readings in the adjoining chapel. She loves to practice yoga, travel the world, and explore the region with her husband and daughter.

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Howard Decker, FAIA

Howard Decker is architect, urban designer, writer. He built a practice in his native Chicago before moving to Washington D.C., where he was chief curator of the National Building Museum. Now in Rochester, he’s on the Advisory Council of the RRCDC, helped create the transit advocacy group “Reconnect Rochester,” and blogs at “A Town Square: Conversations About Where We Live.”

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Rich Brainerd

Rich Brainerd is an advertising photographer at Studio 2B. He enjoys photographing anything and everything, but food and drink was enough of a passion to start a food blog on the weekends, as well. He is an RIT grad, and lives in Victor with his lovely wife and three sons.

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Erich Camping

Erich Camping is an award-winning professional photographer based in Rochester. He specializes in fine art wedding and portrait photography. Erich's work has been featured in local and national publications and blogs. Recently, Erich was nominated as 'Best Local Photographer' by City Newspaper. His personal time is spent with his wife and son in their century-old city home.

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Heather Brainerd

Heather Brainerd had a successful career in the workers' compensation insurance industry, but left that field behind to focus on what matters to her the most: her family and her writing. She lives in Victor with her husband, their three sons and a crazy pug/terrier named Desi.

Citizen Magazine © 2012 All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission is prohibited. All information is current at press time. The publisher cannot and does not guarantee the accuracy of all information and will not be responsible for errors, changes or omissions.

CITIZEN ISSUE #1 MARCH/APRIL 2012

Contact Information: CITIZEN ROCHESTER 137 East Avenue, Suite 201 Rochester, NY 14604 Tel: 585-286-1243 www.CitizenRochester.com Info@cg-design.com Twitter - @CitizenMag Facebook - CitizenMagazine

“The best way to predict the future is to create it.” – Peter Drucker

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features

greenlifestyle CITIZEN defines what it means to recycle as part of your everyday lifestyle

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MAIN STREET

What to do with Main St. we ask with increasing alarm?

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channel your inner rockstar

CTZNSNAPSHOT Bubbly Fingerlakes sparkling wines and simple syrup.

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NANCY ZAWACKI is photographed by ERICH CAMPING of Tammy Swales Studio, as part of our Hustle WHAT IS OUR VISION FOR ROCHESTER? EYE CANDY FABRICATED GREENING ROCHESTER

HUSTLE + FLOWTO NIGHT MORNING

+ Flow photo project. The photos featured in this project capture an eclectic mix of Rochester designers, creatives, architects, artists, environmentalists and entrepreneurs, among others. The subjects are followed and photographed throughout a typical day, illustrating that some citizens never rest. Camping is currently working for Tammy Swales Studios on Scio Street downtown. See more at TAMMYSWALES.COM. CITIZEN aims to explore ideas, challenges, and talents of the Greater Rochester area’s diverse communities. Know someone who would make a good subject for our next article? Email us at info@cg-design.com

Main Street | Poetry | Fashion | | Foodies | Local Cartoon INSIDE : Social Media

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publisher's note

opportunities for community gathering, and new small businesses have been opening up in almost every neighborhood. The list of great organizations and great people doing great things continues to grow. But there is more to be done, and we now dedicate CITIZEN to Chris has gained national recognition for his design expertise and innovation across a wide range of project that end. types while collaborating with some of the counttry's lead CITIZEN is a local magazine ing architects and institutions, artist and entrepreneurs, that will focus unabashedly writers, academics, and businesses. on Rochester and its many possibilities. In fact, calling CITIZEN a local magazine might not do it justice. It’s an ideas magazine really; a place, much like Rochester, to celebrate innovation; a place, as the magazine’s tagline reads, “Where people and ideas meet.” CITIZEN will focus on innovation, flexibility, and sustainability. With things being what they are right now, CITIZEN adopts a bit of a “we’re-all-in-this-together” tone. The magazine reads like one big self-help pep talk for the daily Rochester is filled with talented people. Based on Forbes' analysis grid: The rules have changed, everyone needs to evolve and of the most innovative cities in here are the people and ideas that the US, Rochester is ranked 5th will show you how. for patents per capita (2010). I CITIZEN is a magazine wondered whether we are doing ive years ago, my wife, to read my dreamy thoughts. He enough. Was I doing my share? I that will be produced entirely by Rochesterians committed wondered where the breakdown 6-year-old son, and I told me my talents were needed to improving life here in between untapped human moved back to Rochester here, in our own world. “Going potential and the condition of our Rochester. In CITIZEN, you to be closer to our family. I somewhere else to get a project decided to fulfill the lifelong isn’t necessary, plus we need your area occurs? And at what point do will see advertising from the we stop making excuses and start businesses that support your dream of starting my own design help here,” he wisely told me. neighborhood’s economy and making change? business – “I can do what I do I discovered that my fatherfrom Rochester” – working for in-law’s encouragement to focus At the same time, I realized that you will be able to enjoy the there are many encouraging signs. talents of local contributors. clients along the east coast. Like locally humbled my experience. Our focus on innovation, Rochester City public schools many new business owners, I I began to wonder how a city of flexibility and sustainability isn’t also secretly imagined that my 210,565 people allows its schools have progressively been getting one that only businesspeople can work would be more impressive to under-perform, housing stock better, many neighborhoods learn from and appreciate — it are experiencing healthy if only I could design in far away to deteriorate, streambeds to fill can appeal to all of us. revitalization, park reclamation places like L.A. or Portland. My with waste, and open space to father-in-law, however, seemed remain unclaimed for recreation. efforts are underway creating new After all, who couldn’t use a few more good ideas? - CG

CITIZEN: the next generation

SEPARATE NOTE: Are you an illustrator or photographer interested in contributing to CITIZEN? Please email Chris at info@cg-design.com for more details. Interested in carrying CITIZEN and giving it out to your customers for free? Become a valued distribution spot that keeps people coming back to your store every 2 months for the newest issue and see your name listed in future issues. Join our Community Partner Program! For more info contact us at info@cg-design.com

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This issue is dedicated to all the people who made it possible. Alexander Goldan Lisa Goldan Richard + Dottie Goldan Heather Goldan Tony + Linda Terra Anthony Terra Donna Terra Louie Terra Jeff + Theresa Klock Guy + Hellen Webster Elizabeth Galan Matt + Suzanne Moran

Tripp + Gina Muldrow Pat + Crista Brawley Greg Kauffman Sean Phelan Tony Zanni Bleu Cease Michael Philipson Lewis Stess Dave Mammano Tracy Till Tammy Swales Erich Camping

CITIZENROCHESTER.COM

Walter Colley Robin Flanigan Howard Decker Elizabeth Stull Rich + Heather Brainerd Matt Smythe Jonathan Everett Robin Lohkamp Jane Millman Pam Sherman Greg Marshall Mark Maddalina

Nancy Zawacki Nadie Ball Jay Claxton Brian Robbins Maria Friske Margret O'Neill Kay Leist Richard Holowka Anne Spaulding Jim Fonzi Michelle Ashby Tom Martin

Karen Sharp-Robinson Mike DiCaprio Meg Burton Dave North Gail Tregea Melissa Coleman Chelsy Vick Lisa Jennings Kelly Isles Michael Hardy Lydia Palmer Josh Pie

Carlo Jannotti Tim Wilt Richard Selby Michael Blok Sam + Jon Guzzetta John Bott Mark Cleary James Wondrack Joe Moore Chris Barry Patti Giordano Dual Printing

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fluffpiece

By Brian Robbins and Ray Claxton

POSTERS

WE BUY & SELL POSTERS


ON THE WEB

ctznpoetry

@citizenmag

jan+feb2012

DEAL By Matt Smythe This is how I run

One fall I saw about a thousand geese in a V fly over our house. When I was four or five, I saw my mother carrying me into the hospital. The sun is barely over Bear Hill. Certain thoughts should not be given this much light. This road heads south. Thinking Music Summer won’t last long at the speed I’m driving. Always accelerating out of the curves, hills pass with signs. These colors. Only in Upstate New York can such death leave an impression so deep that it makes it tough to leave. I could be wrong. This music isn’t helping. It’s De’ja vu, Moses At the end of this backbone will be the promised land. I’m sure. Signs in truck-stop windows tell me on the way in— cleanest restrooms, & on the way out— Please come again! I can’t say I won’t. I’ve been here before. And the Colored Girls Go… O to reach that promised land. O to drive until daylight’s gone. O to drive all night. O to find cheap gas. O why the hell am I leaving? O road (You’d better be worth it).

Stomping Ground Columbus, GA. Get behind me. I’m heading West. The old bar hasn’t changed, except for the employees. It’s been three years. Brandi & I talk about her fiancée over beers. I wish she’d say she always liked me. I’m in a hurry to leave. It’s quiet. An off night. I wanted the place to be packed like it was when I left. There’s too much space & I’m in a hurry to leave. I don’t drive on-post to my old barracks. I do stop for cheap gas & to buy an Air Assault sticker from U.S. Cavalry. I do make a couple phone calls to answering machines. I forgot everything just across the bridge in (Alabama) Phenix City. Carrying On

12:38 a.m. Somewhere between Beckley & the Appalachians. The waitress smokes between tables. Seven truckers use payphones. Two elderly couples are having eggs toast & sausage— a piece of cake for the short order. My coffee half empty, the waitress slides over with a refill, winks. She never brought the bill. I left two bucks & an empty cup. Sometimes Hughes& King, Sometimes Crane Dreams come. Almost always they involve great heights. Rooftops. Cliffs. Mountaintops. Bridges. I’m always surrounded by people I know, but do not recognize. There is always a woman. Always a woman there. I wake as she allows me to touch her. It is never daylight. This time I’m parked at a small gas station.

POSTS WITH FEEDBACK. Emails, Facebook, and Twitter posts with permissions. February 2012

Social media is a megaphone for your ideas, we can't help but pay it some mind. So we asked:

@CitizenMag: What's your vision for Rochester? Best of the comments...

I was used to forgetting in these parts. I had been this way with Eric (road trip, Memphis). Graceland would set us free & his Honda Civic would get us there. He hadn’t changed the oil in almost six thousand miles.

Bleu - Continue to help Rochester grow as a destination for Contemporary Art. facebook. com/rochester.contemporary.art.center

It was dead Elvis week. We forgot about the Army. We drank all the way. We mocked The King. We stumbled down Beale Street.

James - Shed the idea that Rochester is a 20th Century manufacturer and celebrate what it is: a conservative but innovative town. facebook. com/james.wondrack

Deal

Had I the Time

FEEDBACK ON THE MAGAZINE + THE ROC

Beale Street at night. It hadn’t moved. But something in me did. Everything did. I sat down on the curb. I was a hundred years old right then. Left over & full of nothing. That night I made a deal with myself over the toilet, I’d made this deal before with whiskey & beer. There’s something empowering about making a deal. The finality is settling. I’m Here for the Taking When I slept, it was like I was dead— all black & real quiet. That’s what I’ve heard. Death is all black & real quiet. Nothing comes & gets you. Nothing carries you away, screaming, to the fire & pain. Nothing takes you up either. No white wings, no gold, just dark & quiet & you never know you’re there. Like sleep. You never know you’re there. Like sleep.

Jeremy - A renewed sense of positivity for Rochester city schools, main street re-development, and entrepreneurialism. @mayor585 Pete - My vision for Rochester, NY, community revitalization. facebook.com/pete.bella Follow us on Twitter @CitizenMag Like us on Facebook at Citizen Magazine

RoCo6x6x2012: Accepting Entries!

coming soon:

Rochester's very own art phenomenon.

It's easy. Each artwork must be 6"x6". Due 5/6/12 FOR MORE INFO VISIT WWW.ROCO6X6.ORG

CITIZENROCHESTER.COM

Mortimer Street Bus Barn. After all these years, a bus barn is still in Rochester's future. CITIZEN will put the politics aside and study the pure essence of the project. What's 50 million get you? What will the bus barn's effect be on Main Street and MCC? We'll share comps from across the country and what our pros think of the idea. Basically, if there is a good reason for a bus barn, we'll find it. -CTZN PR EMIER E IS S U E

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snapshots

Hustle + Flow with Nancy Zawacki M O R N I N G TO N I G H T

PHOTOGRAPHER ERICH CAMPING FOR TAMMY SWALES STUDIO

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NANCY GOLDSMITH ZAWACKI

NEW DIRECTOR OF MARKETING GEORGE EASTMAN CIRCLE UNIVERSITY OF ROCHESTER

We caught up with Nancy in her previous position as communications manager at the Finger Lakes Health Systems Agency (FLHSA).

PM

7:50

A. M . And another day begins. Nancy has dressed for work, checked her calendar, eaten breakfast with the kids, packed their lunches and backpacks, and scooted out the door before the first school bus passes her suburban Pittsford home. “Just like everybody else,” she says.

7:52

A. M . She watches her youngest run out to meet the big yellow bus. As she waves good-bye, she hopes he’s going to have a good day.

12:26

P. M . Monday means lunch with friends and former colleagues from the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra. Clockwise from left: Charlie Owens, RPO president and CEO, and RPO administrative staff Pavel Sullivan, Nicole Milano, Sarah Goldstein Post and Nicole Philipp. Today they dine at Matthew's Bar & Grill in the East End.

1:48

P. M . Back at her desk, Nancy collects market research and data for a business meeting.

7 19 2:29

P. M . She joins Al Bradley, a senior project manager at FLHSA, and Phyllis Jackson, a community engagement specialist, to discuss outreach efforts to increase high blood pressure awareness.

5:10

P. M . The work day behind her, Nancy glances over her notes and heads home to cook a pasta dinner for her family and make sure homework is getting done.

7:19

P. M . Nancy beams as she listens to her daughter’s double bass lesson with Gaelen McCormick, a musician with the RPO. They drive straight home after the class – “Bedtime for everybody, I think!” she says. The bulldogs will be happy. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

•A huge thanks to our friends, Nancy Zawacki for being a good sport having us follow her around, and Erich Camping for Tammy Swales Studio, 100 Scio St., Rochester · TammySwales.com


thegoods

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trends we love

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Mix-n-match pieces from this season’s biggest trends. FASHION EDITORIAL: NADINE BALL // EYE-CANDY CLOTHING 3

Channel your inner Bret Michaels with a head wrap, or turn heads in some Gaga-inspired, sky-high booties. Just remember, sometimes less is more... but mostly, more is more!

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ROCK AND ROLL 1. BURN OUT TEE WITH PLAID POCKET - $68 2. VINTAGE SILK SKINNY TIES - $98 3. HAND PRINTED CUSTOM TUNIC - $68 4. PYRAMID ENAMEL RING - $48 5. CHAIN LINK HEAD WRAP SCARF - $36 6. VEGAN MOTO JACKET - $183 7. VEGAN LEATHER SHORTS - $78 8. BANDAGE CONTRAST BOOTIES - $78

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FURRY AND FUZZY 9. SHAG SWEATER - $135 10. FUZZY FAWN EYELASH CARDI - $88 11. RABBIT FUR COAT - $320 12. SHAGGY LEG WARMERS - $32 BLINGED OUT 13. ASSORTED CUFFS AND BELTS - $24 - $48 14. SKY-HIGH, MIRRORED HEEL BOOTIE - $78 15. COPPER SEQUIN TOP - $110 16. ELEGANTLY UNTAMED PHONE CASE - $300 17. PYRAMID STUD SKINNIES - $48

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>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> fashion ideas and great clothing, visit Nadine •andForhermore crew at Eye-Candy Clothes, 320 East Avenue, Rochester, NY 14607, (585) 454-4566

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PRODUCT IMAGES BY WALTERCOLLEYIMAGES.COM

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Product Images © www.WalterColleyImages.com

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inbrief

local bubbly Finger Lakes sparkling wines and simple syrup

PHOTO BY RICH BRAINERD

My husband Rich and I love to eat. We try to balance our passion for food with healthy choices, smallish portions and an active lifestyle. But mostly, we just love food – and we’re always in search of exciting culinary experiences, whether halfway across the country or right here in the Rochester area. This winter, we tried a few of the sparkling wines that are produced in the Finger Lakes region. First we sampled Hunt Country’s Chardonnay Champagne. This wine was deep, rich and delicious, with pear and apple flavors, a surprising hint of buttered popcorn, and a caramelizedbuttery finish. It reminded us of crème brulée, and we agreed that it would pair nicely with that dessert. Next up was the award-winning 2006 Chateau Frank Blanc de Blancs. We already knew we liked

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PHOTO BY RICH BRAINERD

WRITER: HEATHER BRAINERD // 2EAT2DRINK.COM

Chateau Frank Célèbre, as well as Célèbre Rosé. The 2006 Blanc de Blancs won gold at both the Tasters Guild International and the Los Angeles International Wine Competitions. It also received a 90-point rating by Wine and Spirits Magazine. It is made from 90 percent Chardonnay and 10 percent Pinot Blanc. The taste was light, refreshing and balanced. The slightly floral aroma led into a sweet start with citrus and pear flavors. The finish was dry and crisp. We agreed that it was the most “Champagne-like” of the sparkling wines we tasted, and deserving of its many honors. Finally, we indulged in Swedish Hill’s awardwinning Riesling Cuvée. This slightly sweet sparkling wine garnered the Governor’s Cup at

Each of these sparkling wines was fantastic on its own, but we decided to get a little creative…

the 2010 New York Wine and Food Classic. It was pleasantly light and crisp, with a fruity aroma and hints of peach on the palate. SIMPLE, TASTY COCKTAILS Each of these sparkling wines was fantastic on its own, but we decided to get a little creative. Mixing in a bit of flavored simple syrup to create a trio of tasty cocktails seemed like a fun idea, so we got busy in the kitchen. Making simple syrup is, well, simple. Combine equal parts water and sugar in a saucepan. (We use one cup of each, and sometimes substitute brown sugar for white.) Bring the mixture just shy of a boil while stirring until the sugar dissolves. Remove it from the heat and let cool. We bottle and store the syrup in the refrigerator. Simple syrup is an easy way to sweeten a drink, and using a flavored simple syrup is a great way to infuse some extra flavor and color. To go with our three wines, we decided to make three different simple syrups – rhubarb, cranberry cinnamon, and brown sugar orange. Flavoring simple syrups is quite easy. Once the sugar dissolves, stir in the desired ingredients. Our choices: chopped rhubarb; cranberries sprinkled with cinnamon and roasted for about an hour at 350 degrees; and an orange peel with half the juice of the orange. Remove the

CITIZENROCHESTER.COM


PHOTO BY RICH BRAINERD

mixture from the heat and let it steep for an hour. Strain the flavored syrup into containers and chill. It’s fun to get creative with flavorings, and you can use almost any spice, herb, or fruit you fancy. To create the cocktails pictured, pour one to two ounces of flavored simple syrup (depending on how sweet you like it) into a champagne flute then top it off with sparkling wine. Chateau Frank Blanc de Blancs mixed nicely with rhubarb-flavored simple syrup. Swedish Hill Riesling Cuvée was superb with cranberry-cinnamon simple syrup. Our favorite combination was Hunt Country Chardonnay Champagne with brown sugar-orange simple syrup. The deep caramelized flavors of this wine paired nicely with the brown sugar and citrus of the simple syrup, making for a deliciously decadent sparkling treat. I hope you get a chance to enjoy some of the many delicious sparkling wines our region has to offer, whether on their own or in your favorite drink recipe.

Midcentury aMerican art and design

through May 20, 2012

mag.rochester.edu 500 University Ave. Rochester NY 14607 585.276.8900

Sponsors

This exhibition is made possible through the generosity of the National Endowment for the Arts; the Henry Luce Foundation; and the Craft Research Fund of the Center for Craft, Creativity and Design. It was organized by the Museum of Arts and Design, New York City. In Rochester, it is sponsored by Harter Secrest & Emery LLP, with additional support from the Mabel Fenner Lyon Fund, the Gallery Council of the Memorial Art Gallery, Ron and Cathy Paprocki and Mann’s Jewelers.

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> more food & drink ideas and great pictures, •visitForHeather and Rich at 2eat2drink.com. Leave a blog comment letting them know your favorite Finger Lakes sparkling wine.

CITIZENROCHESTER.COM

(left to right): Isamu Noguchi, Akari 820 Lamp (1951–52), © 2010 The Isamu Noguchi Foundation and Garden Museum, New York/Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY., Photo by Kevin Noble; Rick Turner, Pretzel Guitar (1969), Collection of the artist; Harry Bertoia (Knoll International), “Bird” Lounge Chair and Ottoman (after 1952), Private collection.

CraftingMod_citizen.indd 1

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2/28/12 2:01:40 PM


feature

Rochester, NY Main and Clinton 1925

main street WRITER: HOWARD S. DECKER, FAIA

What to do with Main Street, we ask with increasing alarm?

What should Main Street become, as we reflect on the future of that important street and of our central city? Perhaps a look back will help us find our way forward.

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In 1928, the City asked noted urban planner and traffic engineer Harland Bartholomew to make a study of downtown traffic congestion. Between 1922 and 1928 the number of cars in our town had doubled to over 90,000 (there are over 800,000 in our region today), and we had begun to realize that all we wanted was one thing: OUT! Out of town, out of traffic jams, out of the crowds on Main Street, out of the streetcars and subway. Into the suburbs, into a parking space, into the comfort and autonomy of our own personal transit devices. Let’s go: faster, further, and alone. The Rochester that automobiles engulfed in the late 1920s was a breathtaking place. It was dense (nearly twice as dense as today, and nearly twice as populous), vital, bustling, alive, and importantly, designed for feet. And Main Street, in what some call its golden age, was a place meant for walking, strolling, or at most biking or streetcar-ing in. Photographs by the extraordinary photojournalist Albert Stone bring that other Rochester, that magnificent Rochester, into vivid and captivating focus. His images offer views of a city teeming with life and activity and energy. Not exactly neat and tidy, but surely a city that, if it were still with us, would be a prime vacation destination for us all – as good as anything we jet to across the globe these days. And we demolished it. On purpose. For a variety of reasons, that city and its Main Street are gone. Today, with almost half the land within the Inner Loop occupied by parking lots, we realize that we got what we wished for – our own place to park. Great. Now what? What we had was robust, durable, complicated. And that city was sustainable, in every sense of that word. CITIZENROCHESTER.COM


This city is what it is because our citizens are what they are. –Plato

Main Street was the backbone of a thriving metropolis – and a perfectly apt model for the next Rochester.

Clockwise from top left: Jimmy Mercury watches over his bananas at 62 East Main, 1910; Main and Graves, 1917; Looking east on Main from Four Corners, 1922, and recently (Photo: Howard Decker); two views of swelling traffic on Main, 1930; Crowded sidewalks and happy shoppers, Clinton and Main, 1925.

PHOTO BY H. DECKER

What we have now is mostly empty: empty of places to live, shop, hang out, places where we can watch, meet, and enjoy each other in all the wonderful, crazy ways that cities allow. But the conversations we hear, the newspaper reports, the talk show debates, tell us, if we’re listening, that what we yearn for, and need, is that long-lost Main Street, that long-lost downtown. Some things (mostly small things, which is probably good) are happening on Main Street. Lofts are being converted, a few new townhouses are under construction, a trickle of new life is slowly beginning to swell. No silver bullets (was Paetec ever a silver bullet? Really?) and some legacy disasters-in-the-making like the Mortimer Street bus barn, but slow, steady progress. And good timing, too. As our pockets are emptied by escalating taxes, as we contemplate fewer cops and firemen and teachers and libraries, as we increasingly can’t repair our failing bridges and roads and sewers, we know that we cannot sustain the region we have created in favor of the car, and our desire to get out of town, fast and alone. In a time of decreasing resources of all kinds, it’s easy to see that our region, with the sixth highest rate of suburban poverty in the nation, must change. We wanted to leave Main Street for the sake of our kids maybe, for a better classroom perhaps, for a chance to have some peace from the thrumming and sometimes scary city. We wanted to hop in the car and visit the mall, and to enjoy the 20-minute commute to anywhere in our region that we all brag about. But what we need now are places to go to, not through. Places for our feet, places that are filled with a mixture of uses and people. We need dense, lively places we can walk to: stores, work, cafés, taverns, libraries, doctors, churches, and schools. And we need other ways to get around that allow us to slip out of the driver’s seat. We need more than our unusual bus system – school buses disguised as public transit. We had a city, once, that had everything we need most today. Main Street was the backbone of a thriving metropolis – and a perfectly apt model for the next Rochester. Any future Main Street will never look like the city that Albert Stone showed us one hundred years ago. Those times, and that city, are gone for good. But that city, and that Main Street, have much to teach us about our best chance to prepare ourselves and our offspring for a successful and urban future.

Photographs accompanying this article are from The Albert R. Stone Negative Collection (1902-1936) at the Rochester Museum & Science Center. Albert Stone was a Rochester newspaper photographer in the first quarter of the twentieth century, a time period that includes World War I, a deadly flu pandemic, prohibition and women’s suffrage. He worked for the Rochester Herald and after 1927 for the Democrat & Chronicle. To see more photos by Albert Stone, visit the RMSC Collections, libcat.rmsc.org, or Rochester Images at the Monroe County Library, photo. libraryweb.org/ carlweb/jsp.

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concrete ideas: GREENING ROCHESTER

Big companies aren't the only ones to see the value in sustainability these days. Businesses of all shapes and sizes are getting in the game. BY ROBIN FLANIGAN

Michael Philipson and Lewis Stess PRINCIPALS, PHILIPSON GROUP CO-FOUNDERS, GREENTOPIA FESTIVAL Rochester was an entrepreneurial community. Then we became a corporate community, and we continue to be a corporate community. We believe that’s really what is holding us back. It’s not until we become a more entrepreneurial community again that we will move forward – as a city, and as an example to other communities. That’s where the green movement reflects the future. Philipson: Greentopia proved that this region is ripe with people in every type of entrepreneurial situation, and giving them the opportunity to come out and strut their stuff is essential given that these types of businesses will ultimately drive our economy. We knew we could create a pretty good event. That’s what our firm does – we’re a creative boutique and an ideation company. It’s about innovation and taking the risks it requires to create such things. But we didn’t know if people would actually come. Stess: The festival exceeded our expectations. It brought attention to green, healthier living and a green environment, as well as our overall objective to bring attention to the GardenAerial project we’re undertaking to transform the Genesee Gorge at High Falls into a unique, multi-use, elevated park. Philipson: I can’t tell you how many people came up and thanked us for doing this. We were lucky, in a sense, that we tapped into a movement whose time has come, and we think it will help Rochester take that leap into the future.

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the organizers

PHOTO BY WALTERCOLLEYIMAGES.COM

Stess: Many, many years ago,

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PHOTO BY CITIZEN

the architect

Mark Maddalina ARCHITECT, SWBR ARCHITECTS

The fact that we’re striving for sustainability is kind of ironic, because you’d think that we could try a little harder than that. We have a system in place that’s not sustainable, so fundamentally there’s a problem if we don’t even have something that can maintain itself. Our firm is designing an increasing number of green buildings, and our standards are broad. This

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is about more than energy. It’s about the quality of the air you breathe, where you get your materials, even the life-cycle impacts of some of those choices. It takes quite a lot of research to design a green building these days, and I’d like to see more people be a little more aggressive. The building code is just a baseline, and we can do better than that. All the time. It would make great business sense for Rochester to put into place a green development standard that would require all new development to save a significant percentage of the energy over what a baseline building of that type would normally use. As an aside, we have a great asset in our water. It’s dirt cheap – we pay a fraction of what other places pay. If we paid a little more,

maybe we could leverage our water to pay for other sustainable infrastructure. We’re trying to change a very slow-to-change industry. The progress we’re making is great and I want to see us raise the bar across the board. At least more people are starting to realize that we need to do more. It’s not always a good business case to look at the environment, but I think we should be a little more aware of what’s going on. I’d hate to see the environment go the way of our economy. And we know so much now – there’s plenty of research out there that anyone can look at and understand that shows that striving for sustainability is the right thing to do.

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PHOTO BY CITIZEN

the advocates

Margaret O'Neill, Richard Holowka, and Maria Friske PROGRAM MANAGER, FRIENDS OF PUBLIC MARKET VOLUNTEER, FRIENDS OF PUBLIC MARKET FOUNDER, ARIST ROW ROCHESTER PUBLIC MARKET

Friske: I hear people complaining about America

and what’s happening with it, and I say, ‘I’m America. You’re America. What are you doing?’ We’ve found that with the Rochester Public Market, we don’t have to reinvent the wheel. It’s already a multicultural treasure that brings the community together, and we’re going to keep growing it so that it keeps getting better. O’Neill: Our Market EBT Token Program is

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based on the philosophy that everyone should have access to healthy, affordable foods. Unfortunately, Rochester has such concentrations of poverty, where neighborhood stores don’t have fresh produce, and that puts low-income families at a much higher risk for obesity and chronic diseases. Holowka: The token program is about sustainability on a number of different levels. By providing EBT users with tokens to buy healthy foods, they can afford to eat better. In the first six months of the program, our vendors processed $53,000 in sales – almost equivalent to the previous four years combined. In its first full year the number was $237,000, and last year it was $357,000. That’s more than every other food stamp program at other farmer’s markets in the U.S. In part through a grant from the Greater Rochester Health Foundation, Friends of the Public Market has been increasing promotion

while developing business ventures to financially support the program without having to rely on grants. Friske: It pumps money right back into the local economy immediately, which is just making the market stronger. That’s also why I started Artist Row, to highlight the culture that’s being created in our own backyard. Holowka: When it began seven years ago, Artist Row had 69 artists and some 4,000 people attending. This year we had over 155 artists and 12,000 attendees. There are so many great activities here at the Public Market, supported by the City of Rochester and the Friends of the Public Market. We're going to keep actively building on the success of the Public Market as the ‘heart of our community’ so that it keeps getting better and better. We’re just scratching the surface. O’Neill: We think way outside the box. Friske: There’s a box?

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Anne Spaulding SENIOR ENVIRONMENTAL SPECIALIST, CITY OF ROCHESTER

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the official

PHOTO BY CITIZEN

The green initiatives we’re undertaking now are right in line with other cities our size. In 2009, the City Council passed a resolution in support of environmental and climate protection actions. It was a roadmap that gave us authorization to move forward with a lot of things in a proactive way. We’ve been on the forefront of installing green infrastructure, with rain gardens and permeable parking lots and sidewalks. We’re putting a green roof on the newer part of City Hall, in the B building, which mitigates stormwater runoff and reduces energy costs. We’re committed to increasing our use of alternative fuel vehicles. We now have more than 200 of them – they include E85 Flex Fuel, compressed natural gas, electric, and gasoline-electric hybrid vehicles. And we’re in the process of designing a new green fuel station for the city’s fleet, which will replace the current conventional station. That’s a joint project with Monroe County. Fortunate to get a $2.2 million block grant from the Department of Energy, we’re using the money for a greenhouse gas inventory and development of a climate action plan, energy audits and efficiency upgrades of city facilities, bicycle infrastructure improvements, and the installation of a solar panel at the Rochester Public Market. Lighting upgrades finished this fall at three parking garages – High Falls, Court Street and Washington Square – will save $68,000 annually, and we’ve increased the amount of wind power we purchase for all municipal buildings and street lighting from 15 percent in 2005 to the current 25 percent. There are many more examples. One of the big drivers of all these big projects is to save money for the city and taxpayers, and to make this a better place to live. We’re working hard to make Rochester as green as possible.

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Jim Fonzi PRESIDENT, GATES AUTOMOTIVE CENTER We started using two new tow trucks in early 2010. They were exactly the same, except one was a hybrid. From zero to 30 miles per hour the hybrid essentially runs on battery power, then from 30 to 40 miles per hour – depending on demand, like having to climb a hill – the diesel engine kicks in. The hybrid was considerably more expensive – $130,000 compared to $87,000 for the traditional one. So you really have to save a lot of fuel for that to make sense from an investment standpoint. We’ve had the hybrid on the road for

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about 20 months now, and we’re at right about 30 percent in fuel savings so far, which is wonderful and justifies the extra expense. It would be great if we were making or saving money in the process, but our carbon footprint is 30 percent lighter than it otherwise would be, so in the final analysis, it’s really not costing us anything to do that. And that’s the upside. The downside is that all trucks that perform the kind of services we do can have up to 100,000 miles put on them – and trucks break. With hybrids, because there’s a limited amount of them on the road, it’s harder to get parts and so they’re tied up longer. As a matter of fact, we’re dealing with that right now. This was an experiment. We wanted to see if it made sense to move the whole fleet over to hybrids, and honestly, with more improvements along the way, I can see that it will definitely

PHOTO BY CITIZEN

the businessman

make sense at some point. But right now we have contractual obligations that require us to be sure we can provide services the way we should. We need to have that reliability day in and day out. There are other things we do to be environmentally friendly. Three years ago, for example, we were one of the first people in the region to spray water-based automotive paint. In the world we live in today, there are technologies out there that definitely allow us to be able to make decisions that are good for the environment and still good for business. SUSTAINABLE TOW TRUCK VISIT OUR WEBSITE CITIZENROCHESTER.COM FOR MORE ON SUSTAINABLE TOW TRUCKS

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Spring '12 - CITIZEN - Premiere Issue  

Spring '12 Premiere Issue of CITIZEN - where people and ideas meet.