Page 79

TEXTILE LOGIC FOR A SOFT SPACE

(5,338) (y)

(22,332) (47,324) (71,315)

(12,258)

(35,240)

(58,223)

(79,205)

(21,122)

(14,24)

(0,0) (x,y)

(49,117)

(40,21)

(72,114)

(64,18)

(x)

Coordinate drawing of curvature in skin pattern

Woven Wood: First test for making a skin for the structure

The full scale demonstrator The digital material simulation investigation of Woven Wood was tested through the making of a full scale demonstrator. The demonstrator tested the developed techniques and engages with the structural and tectonic principles of the weaving structure in full scale. Woven Wood is made of ash slats braced together by steel joints. To join the wooden slats a metal customised angel joint was developed. Each joint is defined to the angel of the slats joining point, designed to keep the construction in tension and position. The joint ties to the wooden slats with a metal ring pulled over. To build the demonstrator the detailing of the ash slats and laser cut steel joints are developed directly from the relational model. Strategies for direct specification and digital fabrication are incorporated in the digital model, informing the production of the cutting sheets to define the geometry of laser cut steel joints and the lengths of manually cut slats.

Developing the skin The digital relational model developed for the Woven Wood is as described above fundamentally different to architectural representations. Architectural drawings will have the ambition to represent the geometry of the structure thereby creating exact measured form. In Woven Wood the model is relational. We are able to calculate the lengths of the material parts, but their actual geometrical shape is unsure.

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2/1/2012 6:56:09 PM

Book: Textile Logic for a soft space  

The book "Textile Logic for a soft space", by Mette Ramsgaard Thomse (CITA) and Karin Bech (CITA).

Book: Textile Logic for a soft space  

The book "Textile Logic for a soft space", by Mette Ramsgaard Thomse (CITA) and Karin Bech (CITA).

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