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VPH-DARE@IT - This project has received funding from the European Union’s Seventh Framework Programme for research, technological development and demonstration under grant agreement no FP7-ICT-2011-9-601055.

IN THIS ISSUE Editorial Project Focus • VPH-DARE@IT Year 2 Review

Partner Profiles • (HIRS) Klinik Hirslanden • (PMS/PRH) Philips Medical Systems / Philips Research

Action Line Focus • Jyrki Lotjonen - VTT

People

• Maria Pikkarainen - UEF

Research Highlights • Citizen Platform – 1st Prototype

Events

Project coordinator: The University of Sheffield Contact person: Professor Alejandro Frangi Tel: +44 114 222 6071 Email: contact@vph-dare.eu

www. v p h - da re . eu

Newsletter Issue IV SEPTEMBER 2015


Newsletter Issue IV

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VPH-DARE@ IT

Editorial By Juan Arenas Welcome to the four issue to the VPHDARE@IT newsletter! There has been a lot of activity during the past six months including our second yearly review, where we were rated as a GOOD project as a result of the contribution of all partners, well Done!!. We also received clear recommendations from the reviewers about how they expect the project to evolve in the coming months what should help us to deliver an EXCELLENT third review, with everyone commitment. Thank you, to all of you that have contributed to this issue of the newsletter! It is great to hear about the research being undertaken at our partners institutions and in parallel initiatives. Alongside also hearing about the different events being held to raise awareness and disseminate information about Dementia research in Europe, helping us to engage the public and show the wider community what we have achieved. In this issue of the newsletter, we hear

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from our partners Klinik Hirslanden (HIRS) and Philips Medical Systems. Action line 1 leader gives us a look at the progress that has been made so far. We are introduced to Maria Pikkarainen UEF / University of Eastern Finland and how she feels working on VPH-DARE@IT. In research highlights we explore the Citizen Platform – 1st Prototype , and the impact that this will have. Included is a look at the parallel initiative The European Federation of Neurological Associations [EFNA], and we explore what they hope to achieve. The newsletter also includes the list of publications, milestones and deliverables that have been completed over the last 6 months followed by what interesting events are coming up soon. We end it with a few highlights that will be included in issue 5. Thank you to all who helped get this newsletter out and hope you enjoy reading it.

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VPH-DARE@IT Year 2 Review By Juan Arenas T VPH-DARE@ The IT project met its second major milestone at the end of May 2015, the periodic review by the European Commission. This annual review is the main means that the European Commission uses to assess progress in the project. A group of twenty five members of the project team travelled to Brussels for the review on May 26th and 27th. The team assembled at the Hotel Gresham Belson in Brussels on May 25th to finalise the account of the second year of the project to be presented to the European Commission. This preparation followed a number of previous project board

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teleconferences, so was mainly focused on polishing the narrative of the journey that the project has taken in its second year. The review team, consisting of the work package leadership team and most Year 2 deliverable authors and a great representation of our industrial partners. Around 300 slides were prepared, charting the progress of the project along the second year and including a number of demonstration and industrial partners presentations as well as and outlining the plans for the coming year. The review itself, which was held at the premises of DG Connect, which allowed the project to present its progress before a panel consisting of our project officer, Dr. AmalinaIrina Vlad, and four external experts appointed by the European Commission. The external

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VPH-DARE@ IT reviewers brought a range of expertise to the process: Dr. Rolf P. Würtz, RuhrUniversity of BochumDr. Aleksandra Suvalska of Poznan University of Medical Sciences; and Prof. Dr.-Ing. Galina Ivanova of Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, we had also the benefit of having Dr. Elena Tsiporkova of The Collective Center for the Belgian technological industry and Dr Chris Barnett from Euram Limited, Nottingham whom are now part of the review team. They listened diligently to the presentations made to them, having previously reviewed the periodic report and the project’s Year 2 deliverables, and asked a number of challenging questions. A great deal of discussion was devoted to the project’s activities to assess the relevance of lifestyle and environmental factors in the project, the level of personalization as well as the level of integration of the different components into the platform. After a day and a half of presentations, demonstrations and discussions, the VPH-DARE was finally sent out of the room to allow the reviewers to reach their conclusions. After what seemed like an eternity, the team was called back in and received the welcome news that VPH-DARE@IT had been rated a GOOD project, one that had achieved

most of its objectives and technical goals for the period with relatively minor deviations. The project’s objectives were found to remain relevant and the quality of the work done was much appreciated, however the reviewers made also clear the statement that we are on a transition point where we need to shift from research and discovery to more of emphasis on integration and product development. The project board analysed the outcome of the review during its teleconference on August 11th and has decided, as a result and taking on board reviewer’s recommendations and introduce a number of changes including a new structure of the next year review, that will be highlight on the progress accomplished by both platforms where evidence of the integration accomplished (modelling, personalization, live style factors) will be presented through different Patient Scenarios in the Clinical platform and Clinical Studies in the research platform. With the aim of pushing the GOOD up to a EXCELLENT.

Juan Arenas Marquez

Portfolio Manager Centre for Computational Imaging & Simulation Technologies in Biomedicine (CISTIB) Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering The University of Sheffield Mappin Street Sheffield, S1 3JD T: +44 114 222 0166 E: j.arenas@sheff.ac.uk

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Klinik Hirslanden (HIRS) By Verena R Reichl

HIRSLANDEN is the largest Private Hospital Group in Switzerland and is part of the MEDI-CLINIC C network. Many MD’s are partner with HIRSLANDEN aand access the state of the art technical platform and d hospital services to treat their patients. HIRSLANDE EN draws HIRSLANDEN national and international patients and one of th he focuses the of HIRSLANDEN includes evaluation, couns seling and counseling treatment of patients with neurovascular dise eases. diseases. Further, HIRSLANDEN is not yet partne er of an partner University, is motivated to build translation nal clinical translational researchh capabilities biliti and d ffor thi this purpose o offers ff the th Clinical Trial Unit (CTU) support for research h oriented and interested clinical partners. HIRSLAN DEN has HIRSLANDEN established in 2010 the CTU HIRSLANDEN N headed by Reto Stocker, and since 2015 joint with A nne Zuse, Anne pharmacist and certified in clinical trail man nagement. management. know wn to the The very helpful CTU study nurse known VPHDARE community is Verena Reichl. HIRSLLANDEN Within the SwissNeuroInstitute (SNI), HIRSLANDEN diagnostic clinical partners with dedication to further d erventions imaging and image based endovascular inte interventions 08: Isabel for neurovascular diseases have jjoined in 200 2008: el Rüfenacht. Isabel Wanke continues Wanke and Dani Daniel eurointerventional activitie to chair the ne neurointerventional activitiess at the University Clinic iinn Essen (UKE) and is at the ssame time S ept em ber 2015

fu ull member of the center of Neuroradiology - SNI full Clinic Hirslanden, co-chaired by both, her and Daniel C Rü üfenacht, who was formerly working at the University Rüfenacht, Hospital in Geneva. They had both been involved in H “V VPH” FP6 and FP7 projects, mainly around intracranial “VPH” an neurysm disease,, aneurysm st tarting 2006 starting “offers the Clinical Trial with ANEURIST w T Unit (CTU) support (Coordinator for research oriented Pr rof. Alex Frangi).. Prof. and interested clinical Inn extension off partners. ” th his project, theyy this es stablished the established AneurysmDataBase A se at the SwissNeuroFoundation SwissNeuroFoundation, a Sw wiss Foundation with the mission to further clinical Swiss ne eurosciences. This database will offer hopefully neurosciences. su ustainable database services that can collect websustainable ba ased image and text information and to be stored based an nd made available for further research purposes in and de epersonalized format. This information will be stored depersonalized aft fter data quality checks and categorizing the cases after ba ased on shape analysis of the aneurysm disease in based ea ach individual case in regard to the diseased organ each in volved, the cerebrovascular segment adjacent to the involved, an neurysm.The ambition here is to evaluate and use aneurysm. su uch categorization in view of developing such

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a n image biomarker of the disease. Current neurovascular disease has evolved and the shape of an aneurysm is today supposed to mirror the result of wall instabilities that have led to areas of wall inflammation and thus to weakening related to defective endothelium damaged by pathological shear and possibly associated overlaying thrombus. This, very similar to other degenerative arterial wall changes such as are today well understood in atherosclerosis.Analysis of the shape of the disease (aneurysm) in connection to the concerned organ (vascular segment) therefore appears prime candidate capable of summarizing a disease status – to be the image biomarker reflecting the biological history in a given case and hereby contributing significantly to the assessment of disease stability. Instable disease being at a higher risk of leading to rupture prone rupture conditions, assessment of shape irregularity nowadays is helping to identify candidates for treatment in cases of incidental aneurysm findings. Very similar to this aneurysm neurovascular disease concept,our group believes and investigates other neurovascular diseases, such as arteriovenous malformations (AVM), developmental venous anomalies (DVA) and vascular dementia (VasD) – all complex cerebrovascular diseases but with high potential impact on the cerebral homeostasis and all at risk to undergo accelerated neurovascular degenerative changes of the arterial or venous vascular pathological wall condition as seen with aneurysms. Therefore, with VPHDARE, our group sees a chance for continuing and expanding VPH methodologies such as developed in ANEURIST. The vessels concerned with VasD are in our current understanding rather the veins of the deep white matter, the vascular structure that dominates mainly the periventricular area but likely the whole white matter. In the same brain area, according to current understanding, occurs also the vast majority of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) reabsorption entering the brain along perivascular CSF spaces reaching from the brain surface deep into the brain. Disturbed capabilities to reabsorb CSF could well be linked

PI Isabel Wanke and Daniel Rüfenacht

ctures and he ere to diseased micro-vascular structures here en shown to be mainly involving veins as has been ous collageno osis the case with periventricular venous collagenosis e. patients w ith in patients with leucoaraiosis, i.e. with ase often fou und periventricular white matter disease found inimal cognit tive in patients presenting with minimal cognitive ced impairment at risk of developing more advanc advanced ave states ofVasD. In a pilot study, suchVasD cases ha have ymptoms und der been shown to improve clinical symptoms under ting involveme ent hyperbaric oxygen therapy, indicating involvement of energetic aspects of the homeostasis. As hat localized disease model may servee brain areas th that age are dependent of a pathological venous draina drainage ten observed to in DVAs. These brain areas are often .g. white-matt ter exhibit tissue changes, such as e.g. white-matter hy, calcifications, catio ons, hyper-intensities (WMH), atrophy, ith and bleeding such as can be observed w with D. degenerative brain changes in VasD. becam me WhenVPHDARE built the differenttWP’s,it became vestigate furth her clear that our perspectives to investigate further hat in the direction of VasD could be in sink and th that nvestigate no ovel VPHDARE efforts to build and investigate novel asis of the br rain MR methods to study homeostasis brain d morphologi ical circulation and possible associated morphological ular changes of the white-matter micro-vascu micro-vascular structure. We are today very positive, that efforts with MRE (MR elastography) – Ralph Sinkus (KCL, London) and Sebastian Kozerke (ETHZ, Zurich) and their teams are worth translational clinical efforts and after testing on volunteers, appropriate conditions have been built to allow for patient investigation. This will happen first at ETHZ with patients from HIRSLANDEN and will involve MCI patients after further understanding of MRE in DVA patients, that will serve best for initial tuning purposes, because in DVA patients there are similar WM changes secondary to venous wall disease and localized degenerative changes of the homeostasis very much alike VasD, however, only on one side of the brain hemisphere, what will

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Cross-sectional MRI of a patient (female, 24 yo), presenting with epilepsy. She was found to have a developmental venous anomaly (DVA), i.e. an area of the brain exhibiting an abnormal venous drainage variant.Associated, in the territory of the abnormal venous drainage, there are signal hyper-intensities of the concerned brain white matter (WMH), and some brain atrophy. Not as a regional lesion but with a more or less symmetrical distribution pattern in both cerebral hemispheres, similar WMH changes can be often found in normal aging, presenting clinically with or without mild cognitive impairment (MCI). In such cases, the brain is exhibiting to a variable degree proportional gray and white matter volume loss (minor degree of brain atrophy) with some patchy areas of periventricular WMH (“Leucoaraiosis”) and possibly a few cerebral micro-bleeds (CMB). All quite frequent findings in elderly people over 60 years. Such changes can often be found in “normal aging” patients and whether they are clinically relevant seems to be a matter of where exactly the brain degeneration has led to damage and dysfunction.

allow w for intrinsic control by looking at the co contralateral ontralateral brain brai in half. Accordingly, protocols have beenn submitted to tthe he responsible ethical committee and d the Swiss regulatory experimental regu ulatory body responsible for use of ex xperimental devices. dev vices.The measurements obtained should d well serve the poroelastic brain model development eefforts as is Yiannis Ventikos llead d bby the h group offYi iV ik at UCLL iin LLondon. d We further hope, that morphological lesion assessment ofVasD in regard to the brain volume could well prepare for novel image biomarkers allowing for comparing clinical presentation and image information and for future categorization of VasD in databases, similar to what we have now experience with in aneurysm cases. We have therefore encouraged in our presentations to the VPHDARE General Assembly the interest

of developing “pattern analysis” of VasD suspected lesions in regard to the brain. This would in our view be including WMH and cerebral micro-bleeds (CMB), both lesions today considered to be hallmarks related to pathological micro-vascular structures. Overall, we think that the image based assessment efforts described in VPH-DARE DOW may develop useful instruments for better understanding vascular aspect of dementia in a large group of patients and the HIRSLANDEN neuroradiology team (Isabel Wanke, Kiriaki Kollia, Cornelius Deuschler, Diego San Millan, Daniel Rüfenacht) will support all who further develop and support the hypothesis of VasD and associated potential changes in homeostasis of the brain, specifically of the white matter.

Ms.Verena Reichl

Study Coordinator Klinik Hirslanden (HIRS) Hirslanden Witellikerstrasse 40 Zürich, Switzerland E: verena.reichl@hirslanden.ch

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VPH-DARE@ IT Philips Medical Systems / Philips Research Marcel Breeuwer / Fabian Wenzel zel

What is Philips Royal Philips is a diversified health and well-being company, focused on improving people’s lives through meaningful innovation in the areas of Healthcare, Consumer Lifestyle and, today, Lighting. Headquartered in the Netherlands, Philips posted 2014 sales of EUR 21.4 billion and employs approximately 108,000 employees worldwide, with sales and services in more than 100 countries. Two entities of Philips are part of the VPHDARE@IT consortium: Philips Healthcare: As a global leader in healthcare, we are guided by the understanding that there is a patient at the center of everything we do. By pioneering

“By pioneering new solutions that improve and expand care around the world, we are dedicated to creating the ideal experience for all patients, young and old.”

new solutions that improve and expand care around the world, we are dedicated to creating the ideal experience for all patients, young and old. The company is a leader in several fields, like cardiac care, acute care and home healthcare. Philips Research: Philips Research is a global organization that helps Philips introduce meaningful innovations that improve people’s lives. We provide technology options for innovations in the area of health and well-being, targeted at both developed and emerging markets. Positioned at the front-end of the innovation process, we work on everything from spotting trends and ideation to proof of concept and – where needed – first-of-a-kind product development.

“ Introduce meaningful innovations that improve people’s lives..”

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Who are the key people involved in the VPH-DARE@IT and what do they do? A number of researchers in the Philips Research Laboratories in Hamburg participate in VPH-DARE@IT, with varying parts of their time. Jakob Meineke and Ulrich Katscher are working on quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) MRI, a new technique to measure the magnetic susceptibility of brain tissue. Thomas Stehle, Martin Bergtholdt and Fabian Wenzel are active in developing techniques for automatic delineation and volumetry of anatomical structures in brain MRI. In Philips Healthcare, Clinical Scientists Liesbeth Geerts and Kim van de Ven and Principal Scientist Marcel Breeuwer are participating. Their focus is the translation of the innovative imaging and image analysis methodologies developed in VPH-DARE@IT to exploitable new medical devices, in close cooperation with Philips Research, which amongst others involves verification and validation of these methodologies.

How and when did you become involved in VPH-DARE@IT? Philips Research and Philips Healthcare were involved from the planning phase of VPH-DARE@IT, in which

we had the chance to connect different partners of the current consortium and to help build a strong proposition.

What is the main contribution of Philips to the VPH-DARE@IT project? Philips Research is contributing in two areas to VPHDARE@IT, mostly in work packages 2 and 3. Firstly, we are working on fully automatic delineation techniques for anatomical brain scans, utilizing our framework for model-based segmentation, which has already been successfully implemented in a few healthcare applications related to cardiac analysis. We are utilizing this technology also for multi-sequence and multi-modal analysis. Secondly, we are working on an emerging contrast in MRI called QSM (quantitative susceptibility mapping), enabling iron quantification in brain scans on standard 3T scanners, and exploring the potential as a biomarker for dementia. Philips Healthcare focuses on the translation of these methodologies to clinical practice.

How do they contribute to the project? Our work packages require different technical areas of expertise, ranging from the design of an MRI acqui-

Fabian Wenzel Philips Research Hamburg, Germany

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VPH-DARE@IT IT news VPH-DARE@

sition sequence to the development of numerical, scientific image analysis software. Each team indivimember contributes according to his/her indivi dual areas of expertise.

What do you find most interesting about VPH-DARE@IT? Scientifically, we find it most interesting thatVPHDARE@IT aims at combining physiological with phenomenological modeling and environmental factors.We have a great mix of competencies in our consortium. Clinically, we are eager to learn if and how the innovative approaches developed in VPH@DARE-IT could be applied to improve the care of dementia patients.

“ We have a great mix of competencies in our consortium”

Liesbethh Geerts Geert G eert rts an aand ndd Marcel Marrc Marc rcel e B Breeuwer reeeuwe werr Philips Healthcare The H al He a thcaare MR, MR, Best, Bes est,t,T Thee Netherlands Net ethe h rlandss

How do you find working as a part of a large collaborative project? We enjoy the way of working in VPH-DARE@ IT very much. We can focus on our individual tasks, while, at the same time, we can witness the progress of our partners in other related areas, like the prospective clinical studies or the two software platforms that are being implemented, where the developed methods will eventually be integrated. This joint activity is really motivating.

What hat do you find most challenging about ut working in VPH-DARE@IT? The uniqueness of VPH-DARE@IT’s pro propooponking sitionn is also the most challenging one: Lin Linking fferent modeling activities, ideally with the of different ation of environmental factors. This is sovalidation hing which can only be tackled in a team mething with other consortium members, and we feel ng a luckyy that we have already started plannin planning joint activity on the validation of VPH-DARE@ IT techniques including environmental factors. We are really looking forward to the results of these validation studies.

Fabian Wenzel

Marcel Breeuwer

Philips GmbH Innovative Technologies Röntgenstraße 24-26 22335 Hamburg Germany T: +494050782177 E: fabian.wenzel@philips.com

Philips Medical Systems (PMS) Veenpluis 4-6 Best Eindhoven 5684 PC Netherlands T: +31402799732 E: marcel.breeuwer@philips.com

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ICT 2015 Conference As part of the Dissemination of VPH-DA VPH-DARE@IT A ARE@IT we applied to attend ICT 20 015 and we aare very 2015 hap ppy to announce we were aaccepted and d we will happy be running a stall at the exhibit tion. ICT is be eeing held exhibition. being in Lisbon Lisbon Portugal on the 20thh – 22nd of October O by the European Commission n. This event includes i Commission. bot th a conference and an exhi bition whichh is based both exhibition aro ound the three main theme es Connect, In nnovate around themes Innovate and d Transform. It is being held w with the aim m tto bring tog gether all the key areas and d individuals iinvolved nvolved together in ICT innovation and researc h. research. Thee conference will be focused o on presentingg the new com mmission policies and initiative es focused on IC CT.With commission initiatives ICT. a ra ange of sessions ranging from m informatio n session range information abo boutt Horizon H i 2020 2020W Workk Progr P ram tto th theme ed d parallel ll l about Program themed sess sions which will allow spe ecialist and in n nterested sessions specialist interested indi ividuals to explore the varyingg technology aand ideas individuals at IICT CT 2015. The exhibition w ill following along aallong the will sam me lines with stalls that show tthe advanced d research same and d activities that have a high potential im mpact on m impact the European Industry and the life and well l--being of well-being Eur ropean citizens. Alongside wit th the compa an nies that European with companies hav ve grown from funding provide ed by the EC, aas well as have provided exp ploring the interaction of art aand nd technology y. exploring technology. Thr ree partners will be taking takking part ppresenting resenting the work of VPH-DARE@IT. Tomorrow Options Three (Kinematics), Teknologian Tut tkimuskeskuuss VTT Oy and tthe University of Sheffield. We will be exhibiting Tutkimuskeskus a demonstration of each of the platforms that have been developed. The citizen platform, The Clinical Platform and the Research Platform; alongside this we will also be demonstrating the insole system that has been developed by Kinematics to aid in recording lifestyle factors supported by videos and printed media that will allow idivduals to see how the platform form a cohesive whole. We will also be tweeting live from the event so keep your eyes open on VPH-DARE social media to get real time update and news from the event. Check the next newsletter to catch up on how the event went and the highlights from the exhibit.

ICT 2015 Conference 20 - 22 October More Information:

http://ec.europa.eu/digital-agenda/en/ict2015-innovateconnect-transform-lisbon-20-22-october-2015

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VPH-DARE@ IT By - Jyrki Lotjonen 1. Collaboration activities within the action line The Action Line 1, consisting of WP1-3, is titled “Hypothesis, Biomarkers & Personalisation�. WP1 is responsible for data provision both retrospective and prospective. The prospective study of the project is ongoing both in Kuopio and Sheffield. WP2 has been developing MRI sequences, being used in the prospective study, as well as novel tools for analysing different data, mostly targeting on image analysis methods. WP3 is responsible for storing retrospective and prospective data from WP1 and for implementing corelab pipelines for high-throughput image analysis.

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2. Collaboration with other action lines

All action lines are linked to clinical scenarios coming from WP1, and draw on the imaging tools being developed and implemented in WP2 and WP3. Collaboration with Action Line 2 (modelling) has progressed significantly in this period, with first efforts at defining image-based model personalisation workflows kicking off, leading to a refocus in WP2, in particular, on identification and development of the requisite tools for extracting relevant subject data from images. The latter is of key significance for the biophysical models formulated in WP5. New image processing tools, such as model-based segmentation, are now being trialled within WP6. Collaboration with Action Line 3 (platforms) is ongoing actively: 1) pipelines from WP3 are being implemented in WP7; 2) methods from WP2 (model-based segmentation, image-based vascular dementia biomarkers, disease progression modelling, biophysical model personalisation) are being deployed either in WP7 (research platform) or WP8 (clinical platform).

3. Action Line Achievements since January 2014 The key achievements include the ongoing prospective study (WP1) as well as development and first integrations of the tools/pipelines

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developed in WP2 and WP3 to research and clinical platforms (WP7 and WP8). Data collection of a prospective cohort of different dementia diseases, mild cognitive impairment and controls has proceeded at UEF and USFD. So far 130 cases have been included. Multimodal data, including clinical, neuropsychological, molecular and imaging data as well as lifestyle factors and risk factor related physiological measurements are emphasized. In WP2, model-based segmentation tools have been integrated into the research platform, and are currently being tested on retrospective data in WP6 and incorporated into model personalisation workflows in collaboration with WP5. Novel tools for image alignment and quantitative susceptibility mapping have been further refined.A new approach to computational modelling of diffusion MR signals based on arbitrary microstructure was recently published. First validation (using the LADIS cohort) of new vascular dementia imaging biomarkers was achieved.A new approach to disease progression modelling was also published.

4. Activities planned for the next 6 months The key objectives for the next 6 months are 1) closer integration of the technologies from WP2 and WP3 to research and clinical platforms and 2) keep the recruitments in the prospective studies ongoing. Using the research platform, novel imaging biomarkers developed in WP2 in the first two years will be finalised and tested on prospective cohort data, as it becomes available. The most promising of these will be further translated to the clinical platform for evaluation alongside existing markers. Development of biophysical model personalisation methods will be accelerated ahead of the Y3 review, at which first results of these tools will be demonstrated. A series of deliverables (D1.4, D1.5, D2.5, D2.6, D2.7, D2.8, D2.9, D2.10, D2.11) will also be completed.

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http://citizen.vph-dare.eu Last May we launched our Citizens' website as means for people to find out more about the aims and potential impact of this major European research project, and enable the public to take part in advancing the understanding and technology which will help us understand Dementia.

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Maria Pikkarainen UEF / University of Eastern Finland

Background and Research

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I am Senior Researcher at the University of Eastern Finland (UEF) with a special interest and a strong background in neurodegenerative diseases. After graduating with MSc in Biochemistry (University of Kuopio, Finland) I developed a growing interest in neuroscience and in particular in neuroanatomy. I stayed on in Kuopio to complete a PhD on Neuroanatomy. As a part of my postgraduate studies I assessed the interconnections of the hippocampus, entorhinal cortex and the amygdala in the rat. It was very attractive to see how these brain regions that are known to be vulnerable in many neurodegenerative diseases including the Alzheimer’s disease were so specifically interconnected. I got PhD degree in 2005, and subsequently worked as a post-doc at the Neuropathology laboratory at UEF to improve my skills in neuropathology and to investigate how human brains are affected in neurodegenerative diseases. This was a very instructive and rewarding job that opened my eyes to see how the particular inclusions such as the plaques and tangles in Alzheimer’s disease are distributed in the brain. Moreover my post-doc period gave me my first opportunity to be involved in a large multicentre FP6 EU project called BrainNetEurope.The focus of our work in this project was on the standardisation of neuropathological criteria and diagnostics. Since 2010 I have worked as a part of the team of Clinical Alzheimer Research Program led by Professor Hilkka Soininen at the Institute of Clinical Medicine – Neurology at UEF. Today we know that in Alzheimer’s disease, the pathologi-

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cal changes in the brain start up to 20 years before the occurrence of any clinical symptoms.Thus the focus of research has shifted towards early diagnosis and even more importantly towards early and accurate prediction of developing AD in individual patients. Identifying people at risk for developing dementia and selecting them for enrolment into clinical trials and interventions may help us identify ways to struggle against the Alzheimer’s disease and other diseases that affect memory. The Institute of Clinical Medicine at UEF is a partner in many ongoing EU projects including BIOMARKAPD, EMIF-AD and VPH-DARE@IT that all aim to promote these objectives. I have been happy to be involved in these collaborative EU projects. Working in these projects has given me extensive experience in neurology research and improved my organisation and management skills.

What is your specific role in VPHDARE@IT? From June 2015 I started working as a research scientist and a local project coordinator on the VPH-DARE@IT project in the group of Professor Hilkka Soininen at UEF. Our group is responsible for the conduct of WP1 that focuses to design appropriate study protocols, to acquire prospective data and to evaluate the clinical usefulness of the developed research and clinical tools. At the moment I am coordinating research activities related to collection of prospective data. Later on my work will also include data analysis, and dis-

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semination of new results. The WP1 also ensures that ethical and legal issues pertinent to the involvement of patients and their data are taken into account. In this regard, I have been working in VPH-DARE@IT before since I have taken part in the applying of ethical approvals for retrospective and prospective data collection at UEF and in conduction of ethical guidelines of VPHDARE@IT.

What do you find most interesting about the VPH-DARE@IT project? Technological innovations as a part of modern healthcare, software engineering and mathematical modelling are far away from my own expertise area. It will be very interesting and instructive to work with people with such diverse professional expertise.

What do you as a researcher find most challenging about working in VPH-DARE@IT? “This kind of collaborations will stimulate creative strategies to address challenges in dementia research.” I just started by work in this project that was lounged about two years ago.At the moment the most challenging thing for me is to get the big picture of this whole project.

How do you find working as a part of a large collaborative project? It is challenging to work in a large collaborative project. There are a lot of tasks and deliverables that you have

to accomplish on time so that the other participants are able to continue their part of the work. Collaboration across diverse professional backgrounds as well as public-private partnerships is demanded while applying for research funding today.VPH-DARE@IT offers a multidisciplinary approach focusing on dementia research. This is a great chance to establish new innovative research collaborations.

Have you attended any of the VPHDARE@IT project meetings and if so, what benefits did you get from attending these events? I haven’t been able to join project meetings yet, but I am looking forward to attending my first VPHDARE@IT General Assembly meeting. I think it is very important to attend such meetings since they will give you a good overview of the project and its progress. In these meetings you will meet faceto-face people behind many emails and teleconferences. These meetings will also allow you to make new contacts. Later on it will be easier to collaborate with familiar people.

How has working on VPH-DARE helped to develop your career? I believe that working on VPH-DARE@IT project will improve my ability to work with others with multidiscipline background and at international level. I’m convinced that this will increase my scientific and academic competence and help to strengthen my position as researcher in future collaborative research projects.

“Working as a part of this large collaborative project will give a magnificent opportunity to become engaged in widespread networks of partnerships across universities, clinical institutes and companies in many countries. ”

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VPH-DARE@ IT

Citizen Platform Citizen Platform – 1st Prototype

Newsletter Issue IV

In the context of VPH-DARE@IT and the work in WP 8, what is the Citizen platform? The pathology of Alzheimer’s disease is known to progress even decades before any visible symptoms appear. When a person with early signs of memory problems visits a doctor the first time, the disease is already at a quite advanced phase and the most fertile time for treating the disease may have been lost.

“...focusing on early inventions, preferably started already at the presymptomatic phase.”

To d a y th there is no efficient tr treatment av a i l a b l e for dementing diseases but a lot of efforts are being invested on this area. Very recently, a couple of very positive preliminary signals have been received from pharmaceutical industry as well as from life-style-based interventions. The development of treatments, both pharmaceutical and life-style-based, is focusing on early interventions, preferably started already at the presymptomatic phase. One challenge in the development is the detection of correct patients to these clinical trials and later to treatment of patients when efficient interventions become available. In other words, the challenge is cost-efficient early diagnosis. The best available biomarkers at this moment, such as amyloid-imaging using positron emission tomography or cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers, are

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not suitable for large-scale screening of populations. Therefore, biomarker discovery from blood samples is of great interest to the scientific community due to its availability. In addition to blood, the use of other low-cost biomarkers, such as early changes in the cognition and gait, is studied as well.

What is the purpose of the Citizen platform? The Citizen portal being developed in VPH-DARE@IT and PredictND (www. predictnd.eu) projects aims to develop a platform for acquiring and combining various low-cost biomarkers for detecting patients at high risk for dementing diseases earlier than currently. The platform is a web-portal containing at this moment a web-based cognitive test and a few games. However, the idea is to create an open system to which data from different validated tools and biomarker sources can be connected and data integrated with other available biomarkers. It is possible that no single highly accurate costefficient biomarker will be found but we must rely onn n combination “The idea is to create m of data from an open system.” multiple lesss accurate biomarkers.. In addition to finding finding good low-cost biomarkers, one of our key objectives is to develop the concept of Citizen platform forward in overall. In other words, we are studying how such platform should be implemented to be interesting for citizens

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and to be an efficient and seamlessly integrated part of early clinical diagnosis.

Who will use this tool? The ultimate goal is that anybody interested in their brain health should have access to the tool. Because the prevalence of Alzheimer’s disease starts increasing rapidly after the age of 60 years, the most interesting target population for such screening tool could be people which are 50-55 years old or older. We are still studying the role of healthcare experts in using the tool and supporting the interpretation of the results. There are multiple user scenarios from the primary care settings to totally independent use of the tool by the citizens themselves.

partners of the project provide feedback on the platform. In the PredictND project, its clinical partners and the patient organisation Alzheimer Europe are also active in developing the citizen platform concept further.

What is the current status of this work?

The platform is in use in four studies consisting of altogether about 4000 users: VPH-DARE@IT (N=120), PredictND (N=320), FINGER (N=130) and a study with the Finnish Institute of Occupational Health (N=3000). These studies provide feedback of the performance of the platform in detecting early signs of dementing diseases as well as of the usability. Regarding the performance, the proofp study focuses on cases having very of-concept How has this been minor cognitive impairments. We developed? “The ultimate goal is that are assessing how well the low-cost anybody interested in their biomarkers of the platform compare The very first version of the brain health should have with standard clinical measures, tool was developed already access to the tool.” such as neuropsychological test prior the VPH-DARE@ results, magnetic resonance imaging IT project together with bi k biomarkers and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers. t Fi l d (UEF) VTT and University of Eastern Finland (UEF). If the correspondence can be shown, as our very Neuropsychologists from UEF designed the preliminary results are indicating, the next step cognitive test and VTT implemented it. The first would be to extend the study to earlier cases even study where it was used is the Finnish Geriatric without any symptoms.The challenge of such studies Intervention Study to Prevent Cognitive Impairment is that the number of cases becomes easily very and Disability (FINGER). high as the annual conversion rate to Alzheimer’s disease is only 0.4-2 % in the healthy population. Which VPH-DARE@IT partners are

involved in the work?

In addition to the original developers, the clinical

The data from the studies mentioned above has a central role in the defining the next steps.

Dr. Jyrki Lötjönen

Principal Investigator Teknologian Tutkimuskeskus VTT TT Technical Research Centre of Finland P.O. Box 1000 FI-02044 Finland T: +358 20 722 3378 E: jyrki.lotjonen@vtt.fi

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VPH-DARE@ IT

EFNA

European Federation of Neurological Association Associationss By Donna Walsh What W hat is EFNA? Thee European Federation of Neurological Association ns [EFNA] is an umbrella group representing pantions Eur ropean neurology patient groups. Our slogan ‘EmEuropean pow wering Patient Neurology Groups’ encapsulates our powering goa als as an Association. We strive to add capacity to goals ourr members – allowing them to be the most effective advocates possible in their own disease specific areas. EFNA embraces the concept of Partnership for Progress – working at a high level with relevant stakeholders from the fields of policy, medical, scientific/research, industry, patient partners and other key opinion leaders.

What do you do? EFNA’s overall aim is to improve the quality of life of people with neurological disorders, their families and carers by working in four strategic areas: Awareness – Advocacy – Empowerment – Engagement.This is the central focus of our Strategic Plan 2015 – 2020 which we have entitled ‘Stronger Connected’.

b bsite. In some cases we have international or nnational m members, where a European umbrella group do does not c currently exist.We also re+ach out to National N Neurolo ogical Alliances in an informal manner. logical

C you tell us about some of you Can your currrent initiatives? One off our cuO “Awareness – Advocacy rrent central – Empowerment – activities is ourr Engagement. ” Member of the European Parliaroup on Brain n Mind and Pain – throu ugh ment Interest Group Brain, through which we plan to centralise and cement much of the advocacy work we have been doing via the European Institutions over the past number of years.

Can you tell us about some of EFNA’s members and what kind of patients they represent?

Across Europe, 1 in 3 Europeans are affected by a brain disorder and 1 in 5 by chronic pain. However, two thirds of people with brain disorders receive no treatment and 40% of people with chronic pain report that it is not adequately controlled. So, we have teamed up with our colleagues at Pain Alliance Europe to attempt to push neurological and chronic pain conditions higher up the European agenda.

As I mentioned, our members are pan-European disease specific neurology groups and so our membership is composed of organisations rather than individual patients. Some examples of our members are the European Multiple Sclerosis Platform, the Stroke Alliance for Europe, etc. – the full list is available on our we-

These long-term conditions severely impact quality of life, often leading to considerable disability and sometimes to reduced life expectancy. EFNA and, our partners at Pain Alliance Europe, felt more attention was long overdue. A new Parliament with many fresh faces was the ideal opportunity to launch the new group.

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September - 2015

The aim is to encourage research into and access to innovative treatments, promote prevention and selfmanagement approaches, decrease stigma and work together to improve quality of life for people living with these disabling conditions. The new group is co-chaired by MEPs Marian Harkin, Jeroen Lenaers and Daciana Sârbu, with more than 40 additional MEPs already signing a Register of Supporters. For more information you can access the Interest Group website at: www.brainmindpain.eu.

Does EFNA have any involvement or interaction with any dementia research projects? As EFNA is an umbrella organisation for neurological disorders, we are not directly involved in any diseasespecific research projects – which we would signpost to our members/partners. However, there are many exciting research projects in the field of dementia which we feel could be replicated and extended to encompass other neurological disorders, if successful. For example, the European Prevention of Alzheimer’s Dementia Consortium (EPAD) project will result in a disease registry drawing on cohorts from across Europe involving more than 200,000 people. The aim of the project, to develop a sustainable pan-European platform for running adaptive trials in secondary prevention of Alzheimer’s dementia, is an approach that could certainly be promoted as a replicable best practice exemplar in other neurological disorders.

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“Including patients in top level priority setting in order to close the gap between what researchers want to research, and what patients want researching, is likely to be beneficial for all. .”

What kind of role should patients have in major research projects? It is right that patients should be involved in helping to shape priorities for research that is publicly funded and ultimately carried out for their benefit, and a growing body of evidence suggests that involving patients in research improves the relevance, quality and/or speed of that research. However, it is important to consider what the appropriate form is for patient and public involvement (PPI) for different types of activities (e.g. basic science vs. clinical research) and for different groups (e.g. young adults with MS vs. people with dementia). In translational neuroscience there are clear benefits: research protocols which are planned with inputs from patients with the condition are more likely to work. And, for clinical trials in neurological conditions, patient participation is [particularly valuable in influencing the choice of outcome measured and establishing realworld targets against which drugs can be assessed.This helps companies and payers to understand the real value of a treatment. So patients should not only be involved as clinical trial participants but also in designing research topics, goals,

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protocols and beyond – in terms of dissemination and advocacy.

approach in tackling the challenges faced by those affected other neurological disorders.

How serious is the rising prevalence of dementia in Europe and what does this mean for patient groups like EFNA?

What do think of the project’s patient outreach so far?What else do you think could be done to improve it?

As the population ages, EFNA is concerned by the It is encouraging that the project has reached beyond rising prevalence of many neuro-degenerative diseathe patient community to the citizen and society. ses – including dementia. We are Clearly, we need to do more to alert aware that we need to raise public the general public to the high, and inawareness – not just to make life creasing, prevalence of brain disorders better for those living with these diacross Europe and to inform them sorders – but also to prevent them. about what can be done to prevent For example, we know that around these – as I mentioned already – but half of a person’s risk for developing also to self-manage when prevention is Alzheimer’s disease can be explainot possible. ned by seven lifestyle related facThe citizens portal could perhaps be tors: hypertension, obesity, diabetes, further developed to link to national smoking, depression, cognitive actidementia patient organisations, or sivity/education and physical activity. milar, to ensure that those interested However, the wider public, policyare diverted to resources that can furmakers and – even – many health ther educate and empower. professionals do not recognise this preventability. EFNA is using the foThe initial social media strategy should rum of our MEP Interest Group to Donna Walsh also be pursued to ensure ongoing enExecutive Director focus more attention on the fact that gagement and visibility healthy lifestyle choices from early in Do you see for any opportunities for life can the potential to greatly reduce both the economic and personal burden of these disorders. EFNA and VPH-DARE@IT to collabo-

rate?

What kind of impact do you think the VPH-DARE@IT project could have?

EFNA would be very much open to including VPHDARE@IT on the agenda for forthcoming meetings of our MEP Interest Group. In fact, in mid-2016 the topic for consideration with be ‘Patient Involvement in Research and Beyond’ where we clearly share a mutual interest.

Despite the increasing prevalence of neurological disorders, overall we are seeing that the pharmaceutical industry is considerably reducing its investment in this area – due to the reduced success rates and longer development cycles, as compared to other disease areas. To fill this void, we need more publicly funded research and more innovative approaches. Should VPH-DARE@IT be successful, this could encourage the European Institution to continue to provide support research in this sector and to take a similar

EFNA also has a number of communication channels through which we could promote messages/publish update on your upcoming work – especially if this can be shown as a replicable model of good practice for the other disease areas we cover.

Michael Crean

Project Manager Neutorgasse 9 1010 Vienna, Austria T: +43-1-533-4064321 E: mcrean@eibir.org

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Publication Highlights 2014-2015 Journals

Burgos N, Cardoso M,Thielemans K, Modat M, Pedemonte S, Dickson J, Barnes A,Ahmed R, Mahoney C, Schott J et al: Attenuation Correction Synthesis for Hybrid PET-MR Scanners:Application to Brain Studies. Ieee Transactions on Medical Imaging 2014, 33(12):2332-2341. Cash DM, Rohrer JD, Ryan NS, Ourselin S, Fox NC: Imaging endpoints for clinical trials in Alzheimer’s disease. Alzheimer’s Research & Therapy 2014, 6(9):87. Daga P, Pendse T, Modat M, White M, Mancini L, Winston G, McEvoy A, Thornton J,Yousry T, Drobnjak I: Susceptibility artefact correction using dynamic graph cuts:Application to neurosurgery. Medical Image Analysis 2014, 18(7):1132-1142. de Groot M, Ikram MA,Akoudad S, Krestin GP, Hofman A, van der Lugt A, NiessenWJ,Vernooij MW: Tract-specific white matter degeneration in aging:The Rotterdam Study. Alzheimers Dement 2015, 11(3):321-330. De Marco M, Clough PJ, Dyer CE,Vince RV,Waby JS, Midgley AW, A V: Apolipoprotein E Ɛ4 allele modulates the immediate impact of acute exercise on prefrontal funcƟon. Behavior Genetics 2015, 45:106-116. Di Marco L, Marzo A, Munoz-Ruiz M, Ikram M, Kivipelto M, Ruefenacht D,Venneri A, Soininen H,Wanke I,Ventikos Y et al: Modifiable Lifestyle Factors in Dementia: A Systematic Review of Longitudinal Observational Cohort Studies. Journal of Alzheimers Disease 2014, 42(1):119-135. Di Marco LY,Venneri A, Farkas E, Evans PC, Marzo A,AF F: Vascular dysfunction in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease – A review of endothelium-mediated mechanisms and ensuing vicious circles. Neurobiology of Disease 2015. Di Marco LY, Farkas E, Martin C,Venneri A, Frangi AF: Is Vasomotion in Cerebral Arteries Impaired in Alzheimer’s Disease? J Alzheimers Dis 2015. Gundersen G,Vindedal G, Skare O, Nagelhus E: Evidence that pericytes regulate aquaporin-4 polarization in mouse cortical astrocytes. Brain Structure & Function 2014, 219(6):2181-2186. Hadjistassou C, Bejan A,VentikosY: Cerebral oxygenation and optimal vascular brain organization. J R Soc Interface 2015, 12: 20150245. Jansen W, Ossenkoppele R, Knol D,Tijms B, Scheltens P,Verhey F,Visser P, Group ABS: Prevalence of Cerebral Amyloid Pathology in Persons Without Dementia.A Meta-analysis. JAMA Journal of the American Medical Association 2015:1939. Leung K, van der Lijn F,Vrooman H, Sturkenboom M, NiessenW: IT Infrastructure to Support the Secondary Use of Routinely Acquired Clinical Imaging Data for Research. Neuroinformatics 2015, 13(1):65-81. Mahoney C, Simpson I, Nicholas J, Fletcher P, Downey L, Golden H, Clark C, Schmitz N, Ourselin S, Rohrer J et al: Longitudinal DiffusionTensor Imaging in Frontotemporal Dementia. Annals of Neurology 2015, 77(1):33-46. Martiskainen H, Viswanathan J, Nykänen NP, Kurki M, Helisalmi S, Natunen T, Sarajärvi T, Kurkinen KM, Pursiheimo JP, Rauramaa T et al: Transcriptomics and mechanistic elucidation of Alzheimer’s disease risk genes in the brain and in vitro models. Neurobiol Aging 2015, 36(2):1221.e1215-1228. Marttinen M, Kurkinen KM, Soininen H, Haapasalo A, Hiltunen M: Synaptic dysfunction and septin protein family members in neurodegenerative diseases. Mol Neurodegener 2015, 10(1):16. Parker C, Deligianni F, Cardoso M, Daga P, Modat M, Dayan M, Clark C, Ourselin S, Clayden J: Consensus between Pipelines in Structural Brain Networks. Jama Neurology 2014, 9(10). Rohrer J, Nicholas J, Cash D, van Swieten J, Dopper E, Jiskoot L, van Minkelen R, Rombouts S, Cardoso M, Clegg S et al: Presymptomatic cognitive and neuroanatomical changes in genetic frontotemporal dementia in the Genetic Frontotemporal dementia Initiative (GENFI) study: a cross-sectional analysis. Lancet Neurology 2015, 14(3):253-262. Solomon A, Soininen H: Dementia: Risk prediction models in dementia prevention. Nat Rev Neurol 2015. Steinberg S, Stefansson H, Jonsson T, Johannsdottir H, Ingason A, Helgason H, Sulem P, Magnusson OT, Gudjonsson SA, Unnsteinsdottir U et al: Loss-of-function variants in ABCA7 confer risk of Alzheimer’s disease. Nat Genet 2015, 47(5):445-447. Takalo M, Haapasalo A, Martiskainen H, Kurkinen K, Koivisto H, Miettinen P, Khandelwal V, Kemppainen S, Kaminska D, Makinen P et al: High-fat diet increases tau expression in the brain ofT2DM and AD mice independently of peripheral metabolic status. Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry 2014, 25(6):634-641. Thomas JB, Brier MR, Bateman RJ, Snyder AZ, BenzingerTL, Xiong C, Raichle M, Holtzman DM, Sperling RA, Mayeux R et al: Functional connectivity in autosomal dominant and late-onset Alzheimer disease. JAMA Neurol 2014, 71(9):1111-1122. Young A, Oxtoby N, Daga P, Cash D, Fox N, Ourselin S, Schott J, Alexander D: A data-driven model of biomarker changes in sporadic Alzheimer’s disease. Brain 2014, 137:2564-2577.

Conferences Beltrachini L, De Marco M, Frangi A,Taylor Z,Venneri A: Integration of cognitive tests and Resting State fMRI indices for the identification of amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment. . In: Alzheimer’s Association International Conference: 12-17 July 2014; Copenhagen; 2014. Beltrachini L,Taylor Z, Frangi A: A parametrical finite element formulation of the Bloch Torrey equation for NMR applications. In: 20th Annual Scientific Meeting of the British (ISMRM): 4th – 5th September 2014 2014; Edinburgh; 2014: , p.132. Cremers L, De Groot M, Hofman A, Krestin G,Van der Lugt A, Niessen W, Ikram M,Vernooij M: White matter degeneration in aging; a longitudinal diffusion MRI analysis. In: Alzheimer’s Association International Conference: 13-17 July 2014; Copenhagen; 2014. De Marco M,Meneghello F,VenneriA:‘O’ blood type as protection factor against cognitive decline:aVoxel-Based Morphometry exploratory study. . In: Societa’ Italiana Neurologia delle Demenze Annual Conference: 26-28 March 2015; Genoa (Italy) 2015.

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VPH-DARE@ IT De Marco M, Meneghello F,Vallelunga A, Duzzi D, Pilosio C, Rigon J,Venneri A: Patterns of Hippocampus Functional Connectivity in APOE ε4 Carriers with Mild Cognitive Impairment. In: Alzheimer’s Association International Conference: 12-17 July 2014; Copenhagen (Denmark); 2014. De Marco M, Meneghello F,Vallelunga A, Duzzi D, Pilosio C, Rigon J,Venneri A: Patterns of Hippocampus Functional Connectivity in APOE ε4 Carriers with Mild Cognitive Impairment. . In: Alzheimer’s Research UK Yorkshire Branch: 24 Oct 2014; Sheffield, UK; 2014. De Marco M, Rigon J, Pilosio C, Meneghello F, Venneri A: Cognitive Stimulation Regulates Functional Connectivity in Mild Cognitive Impairment. In: Organization for Human Brain Mapping International Conference: 8-12 June 2014; Hamburg (Germany); 2014. De Marco M,Vallelunga A, Duzzi D, Meneghello F,Venneri A: Functional connectivity of the claustrum in mild cognitive impairment and the impact of the ApoE ε4 allele. . In: American Academy of Neurology Annual Meeting: 18-25 April 2015;Washington (USA); 2015. De Marco M,Vallelunga A, Meneghello F, Mitolo M,Venneri A: Apolipoprotein ɛ4 Allele Modulates Functional Connectivity in Mild Cognitive Impairment. In: Societa’ Italiana Neurologia delle Demenze Junior Annual Conference: 21-23 Jan 2015; Brixen, Italy; 2015. Huizinga W, Metz CT, Poot DHJ, de Groot M, Leemans A, Niessen WJ, Klein S: Groupwise registration for correcting subject motion and eddy current distortions in diffusion MRI using a PCA based dissimilarity metric. In: Workshop on Computational Diffusion MRI and Brain Connectivity, MICCAI,: September 22 - 26 2013; Nagiya, Japan; 2013. Huizinga W, Poot DHJ, Guyader J, Smit H, van Kranenburg M, van Geuns RJM, Uitterdijk, van Beusekom HMM, Coolen BF, Leemans A et al: Non-rigid groupwise image registration for motion compensation in quantitative MRI. In: 6th InternationalWorkshop,WBIR: July 7-8 2014; London, UK; 2014. Huizinga W, Poot DHJ, Klein S: Fast Multidimensional B-spline Interpolation using Template Metaprogramming. In: 6th International Workshop,WBIR 2014: July 7-8 2014; London, UK; 2014. Lötjönen J, Ledig C, Koikkalainen J,Wolz R,Thurfjell L, Soininen H, Ourselin S, Rueckert D: Extended Boundary Shift Integral. In: IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging: April 29-May 2 2014; Beijing, China; 2014. McGrath DM, Frangi A,Wilkinson ID,Taylor ZA: Modelling skull dynamics during brain magnetic resonance elastography to evaluate wave delivery strategies. In. McGrath DM, Ravikumar N, Frangi A, Wilkinson ID, Taylor ZA: Magnetic resonance elastography in the brain: an in silico study on the influence of cranial anatomy. In. MendelsonAF,Zuluaga MA,Thurfjell L,Hutton BF,Ourselin S:The EmpiricalVariance Estimator for ComputerAided Diagnosis:Lessons forAlgorithm Validation. In: Medical Image Computing and Computer Assisted Intervention (MICCAI),: September 14-18 2014; Boston, USA; 2014. Modat M, Cash D, Daga P,Winston G, Duncan J, Ourselin S: A symmetric block-matching framework for global registration. In: SPIE Medical Imaging: 15-20 February 2014; San Diego, California, USA; 2014. Modat M, Simpson I, Cardoso J, Cash D, Toussaint N, Fox N, Ourselin S: Simulating neurodegeneration through longitudinal population analysis of structural and diffusion weighted MRI data. In: Medical Image Computing and Computer Assisted Intervention (MICCAI): September 14-18 2014; Boston, USA; 2014. Ravikumar N, Castro I, Frangi A, Taylor Z: 3D active shape models of human brain structures: application to patient-specific mesh generation. In: SPIE Medical Imaging: 21-26 Feb 2015; Orlando, Florida; 2015. Schmidt-Richberg, Ricardo Guerrero, Christian Ledig, Helena Molina-Abril, Frangi AF, Rueckert D: Multi-stage biomarker models for progression estimation in Alzheimer’s disease. Information Processing in Medical Imaging (IPMI) 2015. Sudre C, Cardoso MJ, Bouvy W, Biessels GJ, Barnes J, Ourselin S: Bayesian model selection for pathological data. In: Medical Image Computing and Computer Assisted Intervention (MICCAI): September 14-18 2014; Boston, USA; 2014. Vardakis J, Chou D, Guo L, B,Tully B,VentikosY: Investigating Cerebral Oedema using Poroelasticity. In: 3rd International CSF Dynamics Symposium: July 9 - 10 2015; Amiens, France; 2015. Vardakis J, Chou D, Guo L,Ventikos Y: Multicompartmental Poroelasticity for the Integrative modelling of periventricular lucency. In: 4th International Conference on Computational and Mathematical Biomedical Engineering: 29 June - 1 July 2015; Paris, France; 2015. Vardakis J, Chou D, Tully B,Ventikos Y: A CFD and FEM Approach to a Multicompartmental Poroelastic Model for CSF Production and Circulation with Applications in Hydrocephalus Treatment and Cerebral Oedema. In: 4th Micro and Nano Flows Conference: 7-10 September 2014; University College London, UK.; 2014. Vardakis J, Chou D,Tully B,Ventikos Y: Multicompartmental Poroelasticity for the Integrative Modelling of Fluid Transport in the Brain. In: 9th European Solid Mechanics Conference: July 6-10 2015; Leganés-Madrid, Spain; 2015. Vardakis JC, Chou D, Tully BJ, Ventikos Y: Exploring a Multicompartmental Poroelastic Model for the Integrative Modelling of Fluid Transport. In: 7th World Congress of Biomechanics Boston: 6th to 11th of July 2014; Massachusetts, USA; 2014. Vardakis JC, Chou D,VentikosY: Understanding Hydrocephalus using a Multicompartmental Poroelasticity Model. In: The 18th International Conference on Finite Elements in Flow Problems: 16-18 March 2015;Taipei,Taiwan; 2015. Venneri A: Reinterpreting the role of neuropsychology in neurodegeneration and dementia: a personal perspective. In: Societa’ Italiana Neurologia delle Demenze Annual Conference: 26-28 March 2015; Genoa (Italy) 2015. Zagorchev L, StehleT, Meyer C,Wenzel F, PopovV, Hakky M, Flacke S: Shape-constrained Deformable Segmentation for Alzheimer’s Disease. In: OHBM 2014 Annual Meeting: June 8-12 2014; Hamburg, Germany; 2014.

Deliverables and Milestones completed D 3.3

Detailed workflow specification and component roadmap for high-throug put image analysis of large-scale studies w

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Events

Upcoming events

• 18th international conference on medical imaging computing and computer assisted interventions - Munich, Germany 5 - 9 October 2015

• Molecular neurodegradation workshop - Cambridge, UK, 29 November - 4 December 2015 • 4th Biomarkers In Diagnostics - Berlin, Germany, 7 - 8 October 2015 • 8th Clinical Trials on Alzheimer’s Disease (CTAD) - Barcelona, Spain, 5 - 7 November 2015 • 9th International Congress of Vascular Dementia - Ljublijuna, Slovenia, 16 - 18 October 2015 • 12th World Congress of Neurology - Santiago, Chile, 31 October - 5 November 2015

In the next issue... • Partner Profiles: o Tomorrow Options (Kinematix) o

ETHZ

• Event Report ICT 2015 To ensure that we capture all the important issues from across the research arena, we invite you to send us your ideas, comments and suggestions for future editions to contact@vph-dare.eu. Non-VPH-DARE@IT participants interested in receiving this newsletter can subscribe via the VPH-DARE@IT website at www.vph-dare.eu

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VPH-DARE@IT Partners USFD The University of Sheffield VTT VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland ESI ESI Group S.A ASD Advanced Simulation & Design GmbH EMP Empirica Gesellschaft für Kommunikations– und Technologieforschung mbH UIO Universitetet i Oslo EMC Erasmus Universitair Medisch Centrum Rotterdam HIRS Hirslanden Klinik PMS Philips Medical Systems Nederland BV ETHZ Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule Zürich KCL King’s College, London PRH Philips Technologie GmbH STH Sheffield Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust UCL University College London UEF Itä-Suomen yliopisto UMA University of Maastricht TO Kinematix ICL Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine EIBIR EIBIR Gemeinnützige Gmbh zur Förderung der Erforschung der Biomedizinischen Bildgebung UOXF The Chancellor, Master and Scholars of the University of Oxford

This project has received funding from the European Union’s Seventh Framework Programme for research, technological development and demonstration under grant agreement no FP7-ICT-2011-9-601055 VPH-DARE@IT Virtual Physiological Human: DementiA Research Enabled by IT Project coordinator: Alejandro Frangi - The University of Sheffield Timetable: April 2013 to March 2017 VPH-DARE@IT Project University of Sheffield Sir Frederick Mappin Bldg, Mappin Street S1 3JD Sheffield, UK + 44 114 222 6071 contact@vph-dare.eu www.vph-dare.eu

VPH-DARE@IT Newsletter Issue 4  
VPH-DARE@IT Newsletter Issue 4  

VPH-DARE@IT Newsletter Issue 4

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