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(1935 - 2008)

Kenneth M. Freeman

artist at work


The Kenneth M Freeman Legacy Collection is a rich and full body of work created by Kenneth Miles Freeman during his successful career as a working artist. Kenneth Freeman was an extraordinary classical portrait painter, best known for his beautiful, spirited paintings of the American West. During his life, he often was called by the media, the Rembrandt of the Rodeo. I am proud to present: Kenneth M Freeman – Artist at Work museum traveling exhibition. This cross-section of Ken’s lifetime of work is a collection of paintings, bronzes, illustrations and artifacts that represent his working style, his passions and the breathtaking results of his dreams and commitment to fine art. The exhibition has had a wonderful reception at the Booth Western Art Museum in Cartersville, GA (Jan 16, 2009- May2, 2010). It is now returning to the home of the Kenneth M Freeman Collection to be tagged and documented with the Fine Art Registry, in preparation for the continuation of its tour around the United States. Booking dates are available beginning in 2011 and running through 2015. As a member emeritus of the Western Artists of America, some of Ken’s work will be showcased at the Pearce Museum in Corsicana, TX, in January 2011 at the Annual WAA Art Show. The Kenneth M Freeman – “Artist at Work” exhibition will follow the WAA Show at the Pearce Museum into early 2011. I am sure you will find the Kenneth M Freeman – Artist at Work exhibition to be an exciting addition to your program with lots of educational and historical elements as well as a body of compelling artworks by this master twentieth century artist. Unlike many travelling exhibitions, the Kenneth M Freeman Legacy has its own nationally recognized marketing and public relations team who will work with your museum experts and community to build a strong presence for us all, locally and nationally. You can learn more about them at www.DMProductionsLLC.com. Kenneth M Freeman - Portraits of the West is a second traveling exhibition featuring another body of Ken’s work that will premiere at the Phippen Western Art Museum in Prescott, AZ from June 26 - Oct 24, 2010. This show is equally exciting with a great cross-section of portraits from Ken’s lifetime career of painting the people of the American West. This exhibition is available for booking through 2015. For more details please consult the Museum Kit for Kenneth M Freeman - Portraits of the West. To help you book your preferred time for Artist at Work or Portraits of the West, please reserve your spot as early as possible. Sincerely, Bonnie Adams-Freeman CuratorKenneth M Freeman Legacy Collection

www.KennethMFreeman.com


The Kenneth M. Freeman Legacy: Artist at Work

The exhibition consists of fifty (50) oil paintings and sculptures that feature working cowboys and cowgirls, rodeo heroes, Native American elders & children, mountain men, Western landscapes, and Buffalo Soldiers.

The Kenneth Freeman Legacy Exhibition represents a true working artist. The exhibition shows the artist at work … as an illustrator, sculptor and painter.

Seth Hopkins Executive Director Booth Western Art Museum

This exhibition is a traveling retrospective of the late Kenneth M. Freeman (1935 - 2008) who had a prolific career as both an illustrator and fine artist, primarily portraying the American West. Artist at Work presents a cross-section of Freeman’s lifetime body of work and range of mediums.

Museum Exhibition

A re-creation of Freeman’s studio is the centerpiece of this exhibition, defining the artist’s creative process. Earning scholarships to study at the American Academy of Art, Freeman studied techniques of the European old masters. “Ken’s old masters’ technique was very time consuming but the outcome is extraordinary. It is the only way to achieve the depth of colors and warm layers of content that will pass the test of time. ” said Edward Holmes, president of Western Artists of America. The exhibition also highlights a number of educational exhibits that include a re-creation of Ken Freeman’s studio complete with easel and artifacts; a section on Ken Freeman - the illustrator showcasing a display of book covers and posters including ‘Fallon’ by Louis L’Amour; and a special section on the Buffalo Soldiers. The exhibition premiered January 2010 at the Booth Museum, a Smithsonian Affiliate, and will be on exhibit until May 22, 2010. Dates are currently being booked for Kenneth M. Freeman Legacy: Artist at Work from 2010 through 2015.

KENNETH M. FREEMAN Lifetime Achievement Award (Hereafter: The Freeman Award) Western Artists of America Cowboy Spirit Award National Festival of the West Western Heritage Award Parada del Sol Rodeo IMAGES: clockwise from top left:

Cookie Lady Power of the Basket Tough Draw Buffalo Soldier Booth Museum Exhibition

Collections: - The Library of Congress The American Legacy Collection -The Smithsonian Museum - The Booth Museum

| Website: www.KennethMFreeman.com | Email: doug@dmproductionsllc.com | 623.825.9122 | HD Video available online at our pressroom link |


The Kenneth M. Freeman Legacy: Portraits of the West

The exhibition consists of seventy (70) oil paintings and sculptures that feature working cowboys and cowgirls, rodeo heroes, Native American elders & children, mountain men, and Buffalo Soldiers.

Ken appreciated the art and heritage of the American West. We are pleased to host the second world premiere of the Kenneth M. Freeman Legacy entitled Portraits of the West.

This exhibition is the second traveling retrospective of the late Kenneth M. Freeman (1935 - 2008) who had a prolific career as both an illustrator and fine artist, primarily portraying the American West.

Deb Bentlage Curator The Phippen Art Museum

Portraits of the West presents a cross-section of Freeman’s lifetime body of work and range of mediums including plates from the Hamilton series Proud Indian Families.

Museum Exhibition

A re-creation of Freeman’s studio is the centerpiece of this exhibition, defining the artist’s creative process with his unfinished portrait Impending Decision IV. A graduate of the American Academy of Art, Freeman studied techniques of the old masters. “Ken’s old masters’ technique was very time consuming but the outcome is extraordinary. It is the only way to achieve the depth of colors and warm layers of content that will pass the test of time. ” said Edward Holmes, president of Western Artists of America. The exhibition also highlights a number of educational exhibits that include a re-creation of Ken Freeman’s studio complete with easel and artifacts; a section on Ken Freeman - the illustrator showcasing a display of book covers and posters including ‘Smoky the Cowhorse’ by Will James and the Centennial Prescott Rodeo poster. The exhibition will premiere June 2010 at the Phippen Art Museum, and will be on exhibit until October 24, 2010. Dates are currently being booked for the exhibition Kenneth M. Freeman Legacy: Portraits of the West from 2011 through 2015.

KENNETH M. FREEMAN Lifetime Achievement Award (Hereafter: The Freeman Award) Western Artists of America Cowboy Spirit Award National Festival of the West IMAGES: clockwise from top left:

Bronc Buster Traditions Navajo Wool Spinner John Wayne End of the Trail Horsehair Coat Illustration: Coca Cola

Western Heritage Award Parada del Sol Rodeo Collections: - The Library of Congress The American Legacy Collection -The Smithsonian Museum - The Booth Museum

| Website: www.KennethMFreeman.com | Email: doug@dmproductionsllc.com | 623.825.9122 | HD Video available online at our pressroom link |


a jewish artist from chicago, born with a cowboy spirit.

Kenneth M. Freeman

8 The Kenneth M. Freeman Legacy Exhibition

He was also famous for painting original art for the Hashknife pony express ride three years running from which posters have been made and sold in U.S. Post Offices. Senator Jon Kyl of Arizona chose two of these posters for display in the Library of Congress and are included in the American Legacy Project.

He graduated from art college just one year after completing high school and then launched a 20-year successful career as an illustrator.

That painting was used as the inside cover of Arizona Highways.

Other accolades include: winning the Salmagundi Show in New York City, the Union League Club of Chicago, being chosen five times as artist for the Parada del Sol Rodeo in Scottsdale, Arizona and having a painting selected for the 1988 Prescott Centennial Rodeo.

While an illustrator, Freeman’s interest in portraits and subjects of the West intensified. John Singer Sargent had always been his idol as a portrait artist, and Ken maintained a portrait style in all his art forms including oil, bronze, and most recently in etched glass. His models were unanimously impressed by his ability to capture on canvas the essence of humanity. Freeman won first prize for a portrait of his daughter Dori at the Illinois State Fair.

Kenneth M. Freeman won every year among students from 10 states and chose to study at the American Academy of Art under the tutelage of Bill Mosby while in high school. He studied privately with Joseph DeSalvi and ultimately apprenticed with Haddon Sundblom.

Each year Stanford University granted one full scholarship to the art school of choice for the winner in each of five regions nationally.

Ken commandeered the TV table for his palette and continued to use this same palette throughout his career. He announced that he would someday be a famous artist and that he would apprentice with Haddon Sundblom.

When Kenneth Miles Freeman was a mere six-year-old growing up in Chicago, his mother had already recognized his enthusiasm for and talent in art. One Saturday she took her wide eyed boy to the Art Institute of Chicago. Shortly thereafter he began art lessons. When he was eight he told his mother, “clear out the living room so I can have my studio.”


In addition to creating book covers for Louis L’Amour and other Western authors, Freeman produced original art for Hamilton Collectibles, a ten plate series called “Proud Indian Families.”

First Lady Barbara Bush was sufficiently impressed with Ken’s southwestern art, that she invited him to show at the Smithsonian Institute in conjunction with the planned Native American Museum extravaganza.

Ken Freeman was known affectionately as “Rembrandt of the Rodeo” by members of the press. Television and radio frequently interviewed Freeman and showed his colorful and masterful works to the public.

Freeman earned the honor of creating the art for the 50th anniversary of the Orange Blossom Festival Rodeo in Davey, Florida. Ken’s painting entitled “Heluva Good Morning” won Pick of the Show in “The Cowboy” competition at the San Diego Museum of Fine Art.

Southwest Art Magazine has also written feature articles about him and displayed many of his rodeo and native American pieces which are well recognized and respected.

He always spoke of his mother’s encouragement reverently.

Thankful for his success, he proudly donated to charities, particularly those that benefit abused women and the elderly in hospice care. Ken Freeman enjoyed creating art every day of his life.

Kenneth M. Freeman was featured in a one man show in Milan, Italy in 2007 complete with a catalogue of his work. He did several custom portraits for the Festival of the West including John Wayne, John Smith, Robert Fuller and Waylon Jennings.

The American Medical Association annually commissioned Freeman as their official portrait artist for a decade.

His notable clients for portraits included the late President Herbert Hoover, elder Okland of the Mormon Church and founder of Okland Corporation, the New Mexican ranching Bogle family, professional accordionist Sherwin Wasserman, country western recording artist Ray Herndon, Senator Lister Hill, the Chicago restaurateur Mr. Biocetti, Chairman of the Duro Corporation, and many famous actors.

The Kenneth M. Freeman Legacy Exhibition 9


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collections

Kenneth M. Freeman

The Kenneth M. Freeman Legacy Exhibition

Membership is limited to 24 members.

Western Artists of America Membership is open to both men and women and is based solely on artistic ability and talent.

He was a proud member.

Look for the Western Artists of America symbol on many of Ken’s paintings.

Kenneth M. Freeman

- Fondazione Metropolitan, Milan, Italy

- North Trust Bank of Scottsdale

- The Illinois State Fair

- Chicago’s Union League Club

- The Hubbard Museum of Western Art

- The San Diego Museum of Art

- The Phippen Museum

Kenneth M. Freeman

Noteworthy Art Shows

- The American Art Academy

- The Booth Western Art Museum

- The Smithsonian Museum

- The Library of Congress

Kenneth M. Freeman

Prominent Collections


This was Ken Freeman and I knew from that first meeting I would never forget him. He asked “You still have my painting?” It was then I realized the man who created that beautiful painting I so loved was standing right in front of me, 50 years after he painted it.

He was like a kid ... and I mean that in the best way possible.

The Academy is like a home to its former students. Hardly a week goes by where I don’t meet or hear from an alumnus. Some of them reach back into the 1940’s, still holding close those fond memories. One day a man arrived and introduced his wife and himself to me. He gave me some of his history. He was a western painter, worked with Haddon Sundblom, is building a new studio ... I wondered how someone who seemed to be so young had worked with Sundblom. His energy and enthusiasm were incredible.

I would take it down from the storage rack and admire it often. A nude figure study, nothing exceptional there, but this one had something the others did not. All I could make out about the painting was a faded signature ... Freeman, 1955.

In the archives of the American Academy of Art there are many original works of art. They span the entire history of the school from 1923 to the present ... early work by Haddon Sundblom, Gil Elvgren, J. Allen St. John, Richard Schmid, Thomas Blackshear, Alex Ross and many others. However, there was one painting among them that always got my attention.

Aron Gagliardo American Academy of Art Chicago 2009

But there was only one Kenneth Freeman.

I don’t think anyone who met Ken believed he would ever leave us. And really he hasn’t. His spirit will be with us forever, ageless and eternal. This is why Ken and his art were so unique. ike that painting from 50 years ago. Even then he was able to capture his wonderful light and transfer it to a canvas. No easy task for any artist.

And then one day Ken was gone.

Some time later I got another call and he informed me it was done, in writing. We discussed his wishes as to what the school could do with this gracious gift.

After Ken’s visit we would keep in touch. One day he called to inform me that he will be leaving the school an endowment. I thanked him and we moved on to other topics his, new studio and upcoming trip to Italy.

Freeman would study illustration, life drawing, fundamentals and painting primarily during the summer break from John Marshall high school. His last class ended on April 22nd of 1955.

Kenneth Freeman began taking classes at the American Academy of Art in the summer of 1950 at the ripe old age of 15. He had won a scholarship to the school sponsored by the Latham Foundation. And, as noted on his record by Academy founder, Frank H. Young, “saw excellent samples.”

Nude (Untitled) Oil on Canvas - 1955

Kenneth M. Freeman

permanent collection

american academy of art

The Kenneth M. Freeman Legacy Exhibition 7


WESTERN ARTISTS OF AMERICA DEDICATED TO AMERICA’S WESTERN HERITAGE 

WESTERN ARTISTS OF AMERICA APresentationof TheLifetimeAchievementAwardto KennethM.Freeman (1935–2008)  ItisthroughtheeffortsofKen’swife,BonnieAdamsFreeman,thatweareproudtopresentthisaward toKennethM.FreemanattheWorldPremiereoftheKennethM.FreemanLegacyExhibitionatthe BoothWesternArtMuseuminCartersville,Georgia. ItwasanhonortocountKenFreemanamongthemembersofWesternArtistsofAmerica.Unlikemany ofus,Kenwasblessedatanearlyagetorecognizehisartistictalent.Hismothersawhistalentwhen Kenwasjustsixyearsold.BythetimeKenwaseightyearsold,heannouncedhewasgoingtobecomea cowboyandgreatwesternartist. KenwasacommercialillustratorintheChicagoareafortwentyyears.HeworkedwithHaddon Sundblomonmanyadvertisingcampaignsofthetime. ButwithKen’smovefromChicagotoScottsdale,hisdreambecamereality.Helivedthelifeofacowboy ridinghorses,goingoncattledrives,becomingaBuffaloSoldierandattendingtheceremoniesofNative Americans.Hedidachievehisgoalofbecomingagreatwesternartist.Kenpaintedworkingcowboys andcowgirls,rodeoheroes,NativeAmericanelders&children,mountainmen,Westernlandscapes,and BuffaloSoldiers.aswellasdepictingtheAmericancowboyandhissurroundings,especiallytherodeo. CapturingtherichheritageofthemanyvariedpeoplesheencounteredintheAmericanWest,Ken Freemanbroughtthepersonalitiesofthesemodelstolife. Ken’soldmasters’techniquewasverytimeconsumingbuttheoutcomeisextraordinary.Itistheonly waytoachievethedepthofcolorsandwarmlayersofcontentthatwillpassthetestoftime.Hewould slowlybuildthegoodfoundationofapaintingthroughcharcoalpencilsketches,thenunderpainting withburntumber,andfinallyaddthethincolorglazestoachievethefinalresult.Thispainting techniquewilllastforhundredsofyears  16745 E. Saguaro Blvd., #114 Fountain Hills, AZ 85268

 Telephone: 480-816-9230 www.westernartistsofamerica.com


WESTERN ARTISTS OF AMERICA DEDICATED TO AMERICA’S WESTERN HERITAGE    Ken’slistofcollectorsofhiswesternartworkwasnumeroustosaytheleast…andnotabletosaythe best.Theyincludedapresident,HerbertHoover,prominentchurchleaders,headsofmajor corporation,actorslikeJohnWayneandRobertFuller,andcountrywesternsingerssuchasWaylon JenningsandRayHerndon. WorksofKennethM.FreemanareinthepermanentcollectionoftheSmithsonianMuseum,Libraryof Congress,AmericanArtAcademy,andBoothMuseumaswellasdistinguishedprivatecollections. AccoladesincludewinningcompetitionsattheSanDiegoMuseumofArt,theHubbardMuseumofArt, theIllinoisStateFair,theSalmagundiShowinNewYorkCity,theUnionLeagueClubofChicago,being chosenfivetimesasartistfortheParadaDelSolRodeoinScottsdale,AZandhavingapaintingselected forthe1988PrescottCentennialRodeo. HewasanillustratorforauthorslikeLouisL’AmourandWillJames. OneoftheendearingtraitsofKennethM.Freeman,andperhapsthenoblestofall,washisundaunting loveandspirittopaintregardlessofhishealthissues.ItwasalwaysapleasuretovisitKeninhisstudio. Justseeinghimgoaboutcreatinganothermasterpiece…oblivioustoanydiscomforthemightbe experiencing…thegleaminhiseyeandtheexcitementinhisvoiceashespokeabouthiscurrent projectorthenextonehehadinmindwasexemplary.Suchisthewayofagreattalent. WhileKennethM.Freemanisnolongerwithus,hislegacyofthegreatAmericanWestlivesonforallto enjoyandinspire. Thankyou,Ken.  EdHolmes,Founder&PresidentofWesternArtistsofAmerica EdCopley,FounderofWesternArtistsofAmerica

16745 E. Saguaro Blvd., #114 Fountain Hills, AZ 85268

Telephone: 480-816-9230 www.westernartistsofamerica.com


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: Dianemarie (DM) Collins 623.825.9122 Email: DM@DMProductionsLLC.com

Ken Freeman, Scottsdale’s Adopted Son, Receives Cowboy Spirit Award Joins Past Winners Including John Wayne, Roy Rogers, Gene Autry, Bruce Dern, Robert Fuller, Dale Evans & Ernest Borgnine in this Exclusive Club “Kenneth M. Freeman, a nationally recognized artist, receives the Cowboy Spirit Award along with actor James Drury (The Virginian) during the Festival of the West on Saturday, March 20, 2010. For artist Kenneth M. Freeman, the cowboy hat and boots was not a gimmick or shtick. Neither was his Arizona attitude. Ken Freeman may have grown up in a traditional Jewish home in Chicago, Illinois but make no mistake … he was a cowboy. Keywords: art, festival of the west, museum, western art, cowboy, rodeo, fine art, Booth Museum, Smithsonian, Artist at Work, museum book, Scottsdale, Chicago, American Academy of Art

Recent Kenneth M. Freeman Awards of Excellence has received in 2010: -

The first Lifetime Achievement Award from Western Artists of America (hereafter known as the Freeman Lifetime Achievement Award) Western Heritage Award from Parada del Sol (the February 26, 2010 Rodeo Performance was also dedicated to Ken Freeman) Cowboy Spirit Award from the National Festival of the West Special Award from the World’s Oldest Rodeo – Prescott, AZ

(Scottsdale, AZ) – What do John Wayne, Dale Evans, Gene Autry, Jane Russell, Roy Rogers and Ken Freeman have in common? They are all individuals who have been recognized by the National Festival of the West as men and women who have set the example of Western heroes with the integrity, strength of spirit. and moral character depicted by the American Cowboy. On Saturday, March 20, 2010, artist Kenneth M. Freeman, a Jewish Cowboy as he liked to refer to himself, will receive the Cowboy Spirit Award at the final National Festival of the West (presented to his curator, Bonnie Adams of the Kenneth M. Freeman Legacy). Each year, the National Festival of the West presents the prestigious award to men and women who have contributed to the continuance of the western life-style and who have demonstrated the characteristics so admired in the American cowboy. Freeman is the only fulltime artist ever chosen to receive the Cowboy Spirit Award. Ken Freeman, who passed away May 2008, painted portraits of three other Cowboy Spirit Award recipients: John Smith and Robert Fuller (both known for Laramie) and John Wayne. Ken is honored posthumously on Saturday, March 20, 2010 at 2 p.m. at the festival. The artwork he created specifically for the Festival of the West is now part of Kenneth M. Freeman Legacy – ‘Artist at Work’ museum book for the exhibition at the Booth Western Art Museum located in Cartersville, Georgia. The Booth Western Art Museum, an Affiliate of the Smithsonian Institution, houses the largest exhibit space for Western Art in the country and the upcoming Kenneth M. Freeman – ‘Portrait of the West’ exhibition opening in June 2010 continuing through October 2010 at the Phippen Art Museum in Prescott, AZ.


Mary Brown, founder of Festival of the West, considered Kenneth M. Freeman a close friend. “We met the second year I began the festival and I connected with him almost instantly. Then when saw his paintings and realized how good he was, I was truly grateful he wanted to be a part of the festival,” Brown remembered. “He was a fellow cowboy at heart, and his enthusiasm for the life was overwhelming in a very positive way. Without a doubt, he was a real sweetheart.” Bonnie Adams, curator of the Legacy collection will accept the award for Freeman. “Leaving his home in Chicago and moving to Scottsdale, Arizona was a turning point in Ken’s career,” Adams said recently. “The lure of the cowboy life captured his imagination as a young child. Once here he embraced the lifestyle of the West wholeheartedly and lived that dream – riding horseback, participating in cattle drives, becoming a Buffalo Soldier and attending Native American ceremonies. Ken would be so happy knowing he’s being remembered as a cowboy as well as an artist.” Adams adds, “As he immersed himself in this rich cultural heritage, he documented the daily lives of the people, capturing faces and activities with his camera that would later be the models for his stunning paintings that embody the soul and spirit of the American West – cowboys and cowgirls, rodeo riders, Native American elders and children, grizzled mountain men and breathtaking Western landscapes. So completely did he identify with his new life, he even called himself a ‘Jewish Cowboy’.” A Kiowa poet once remarked that the American West is a place that has to be seen to be believed, and it may have to be believed in order to be seen. Kenneth M. Freeman had the talent to draw, paint and sculpt the West as he had seen and experienced it. His unique combination of light and depth of color, together with rich cultural heritage, has left us with a body of work that connect with the soul and spirit of the American West. About Kenneth M. Freeman Works of Kenneth M. Freeman are in the permanent collection of the Smithsonian Museum, Library of Congress, American Art Academy, and Booth Museum as well as distinguished private collections. Accolades include winning competitions at the San Diego Museum of Art, the Hubbard Museum of Art, the Illinois State Fair, the Salmagundi Show in New York City, the Union League Club of Chicago, being chosen five times as artist for the Parada Del Sol Rodeo in Scottsdale, AZ and having a painting selected for the 1988 Prescott Centennial Rodeo. He was an illustrator for authors like Louis L’Amour. Ken was known affectionately as “Rembrandt of the Rodeo” by members of the press. First Lady Barbara Bush, impressed with Ken Freeman’s southwestern art, invited him to show at the Smithsonian Institute in conjunction with the Native American Museum Extravaganza. Ken also had a one man show in 2007 in Milan, Italy at Fondazione Metropolitan. www.KennethMFreeman.com


5/21/2010

Kenneth M. Freeman Exhibition: Artist At Work

Kenneth M. Freeman (1935 – 2008)

ARTIST AT WORK

www.KennethMFreeman.com www.shop.KennethMFreeman.com

The World Premiere at The Booth Museum: 1.2010 – 5.2010 www.KennethMFreeman.com

DM Productions LLC is the agency of record for the Kenneth M. Freeman Legacy and will provide international, national, regional and local media campaigns to promote the Artist at Work Exhibition at your museum.

Kenneth M. Freeman Exhibition: Artist At Work

For the Booth Museum, over 60 publications carried feature stories on Ken and the museum exhibition … from Atlanta to Chicago … from Berlin to Tel Aviv … media coverage was excellent including many streaming video interviews. Access our video archives at www.KennethMFreeman.com/press.htm.

The centerpiece of the exhibition is a re-creation of Kenneth M. Freeman’s artist studio.

www.KennethMFreeman.com

“The museum book is a piece of artwork in itself,” said Bonnie Adams, curator of the Kenneth M. Freeman Legacy. “The cover design in cobalt blue features Ken’s brush strokes from the master work ‘Impending Decision’ and the metallic copper paint brings Arizona into the book design. The images have a depth of color and richness of content that will quickly make it your favorite art book.”

www.KennethMFreeman.com

A Kiowa poet once remarked that the American West is a place that has to be seen to be believed, and it may have to be believed in order to be seen. Kenneth M. Freeman had the talent to draw, paint and sculpt the West as he had seen and experienced it. His unique combination of light and depth of color, together with rich cultural heritage, has left us with a body of work that connect with the soul and spirit of the American West.

After the Ride The Kenneth M. Freeman Legacy has generously donated a portion of the proceeds of this limited edition print to the Desert Foothills Land Trust. The goal is to provide a $100,000 donation. Artist at Work is a beautiful museum catalogue which contains many of the works of the museum exhibition as well as other masterworks of the artist Kenneth M. Freeman. Available as a fundraiser element for your museum.

www.KennethMFreeman.com

The Desert Foothills Land Trust preserves and protects the beautiful Sonoran Desert of Arizona. Ken always gave back to his community. More information: http://www.shop.KennethMFreeman.com

www.KennethMFreeman.com

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5/21/2010

Kenneth M. Freeman

Kenneth M. Freeman

Exhibition: Artist At Work

Educational Exhibition: Artist At Work Artifacts include: Photographs of models Denim shirt Boots & Cowboy Hat Native American artifacts Mountain Man costume and artifacts The Kenneth M. Freeman Technique - Photograph - Drawing - Burnt Umber Underpainting - Finished Painting

* The Booth Museum provided the easel, paints, palette and other artifacts to build out Ken’s re-created studio.

The Booth Museum is a Smithsonian Affiliate Museum and has over 120,000 sq. ft. of exhibition space. As they say, ‘Explore the West without leaving the South!’

www.KennethMFreeman.com

www.KennethMFreeman.com

Kenneth M. Freeman A Jewish Artist From Chicago ... Born With A Cowboy Spirit ...

Kenneth M. Freeman

• Lifetime Achievement Award (2010) from Western Artists of America

Exhibition: The Artist At Work

• Cowboy Spirit Award (2010) from the National Festival of the West • Western Heritage Award (2010) from Parada del Sol Rodeo When Kenneth Miles Freeman was a mere six-year-old growing up in Chicago, his mother had already recognized his enthusiasm for and talent in art. One Saturday she took her wide eyed boy to the Art Institute of Chicago. Shortly thereafter he began art lessons. When he was eight he told his mother, "clear out the living room so I can have my studio." Ken commandeered the TV table for his palette and continued to use this same palette throughout his career. He announced that he would someday be a famous artist and that he would apprentice with Haddon Sundblom. Each year Stanford University granted one full scholarship to the art school of choice for the winner in each of five regions nationally. Kenneth M. Freeman won every year among students from 10 states and chose to study at the American Academy of Art under the tutelage of Bill Mosby while in high school. He studied privately with Joseph DeSalvi and ultimately apprenticed with Haddon Sundblom. He graduated art college just one year after completing high school, then launched a 20-year successful career as an illustrator. While an illustrator, Freeman's interest in portraits and subjects of the West intensified. John Singer Sargent had always been his idol as a portrait artist, and Ken maintained a portrait style in all his art forms including oil, bronze, and most recently in etched glass. His models were unanimously impressed by his ability to capture on canvas that essence of humanity. Freeman won first prize for a portrait of his daughter at the Illinois State Fair.

S Above: Parada de Sol Rodeo Poster

W Left: Prescott Centennial Rodeo Poster

www.KennethMFreeman.com

Other accolades include winning the Salmagundi Show in New York City, the Union League Club of Chicago, being chosen five times as artist for the Parada del Sol Rodeo in Scottsdale, Arizona and having a painting selected for the 1988 Prescott Centennial Rodeo. That painting was used as the inside cover of Arizona Highways. He was also famous for painting original art for the Hashknife pony express ride three years running from which posters have been made and sold in the post offices. Senator Jon Kyl of Arizona chose two of these posters for display in the Library of Congress and are included in the American Legacy Project.

www.KennethMFreeman.com

Southwest Art has also written feature articles about him and displayed many of his rodeo and native American pieces which are well recognized and respected. Freeman earned the honor of creating the art for the 50th anniversary of the Orange Blossom Festival Rodeo in Davey, Florida. Ken's painting entitled "Heluva Good Morning" won Pick of the Show in "The Cowboy" at San Diego Museum of Fine Art. He was known affectionately as "Rembrandt of the Rodeo" by members of the press. Television and radio frequently interviewed Freeman and showed his colorful and masterful works to the public. First Lady Barbara Bush was sufficiently impressed with K.M. Freeman's southwestern art, that she invited him to show at the Smithsonian Institute in conjunction with the planned Native American Museum extravaganza.

Kenneth M. Freeman Emeritus Member In Memoriam

In addition to creating book covers for Louis L'Amour and other Western authors Freeman produced original art for Hamilton Collectibles authors, Collectibles, a ten plate series called "Proud Indian Families" His notable clients for portraits included the late President Herbert Hoover, elder Okland of the Mormon Church and founder of Okland Corporation, the New Mexican ranching Bogle family, professional accordionist Sherwin Wasserman, country western recording artist Ray Herndon, Senator Lister Hill, the Chicago restaurateur Mr. Biocetti, Chairman of the Duro Corporation, many famous actors, and for ten years The American Medical Association annually commissioned Freeman as their official portrait artist. Kenneth M. Freeman was featured in a one man show in Milan, Italy in 2007 complete with a catalogue of his work. He did several custom portraits for the Festival of the West including John Wayne, John Smith, Robert Fuller & Waylon Jennings. Thankful for his success, he proudly donated to charities, particularly those that benefit abused women and the elderly in hospice care. Freeman enjoyed creating art every day of his life. He spoke of his mother's encouragement reverently, and as a man, he was a delight to know!

www.KennethMFreeman.com

Western Artist of America’s President Ed Holmes presents Bonnie Adams with the Lifetime Achievement Award … now called the Freeman Lifetime Achievement Award

www.KennethMFreeman.com

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5/21/2010

Educational Element: Kenneth M. Freeman’s Technique: Burnt Umber Underpainting Kenneth M. Freeman joins the elite … John Wayne, Gene Autry, Roy Rogers, Rex Allen, James Drury, Robert Fuller and Dale Evans as a winner of The Cowboy Spirit Award.

Ken sketched on the canvas or board with pencil, then did a full value burnt umber painting where he worked out all the values and made any changes he wanted to make in the picture. He used burnt umber straight from the paint tube, mixed with turpenoid. When this was dry, he laid down the color.

www.KennethMFreeman.com

www.KennethMFreeman.com

Exhibition:

Sergeant Major William McCurtis

Buffalo Soldiers During the late 1800s and early 1900s, the Buffalo Soldiers were assigned to the harshest and most desolate posts. Specific duties included subduing Mexican revolutionaries, outlaws, commancheros, rustlers and hostile Native Americans. Additional administrative duties included exploring and mapping the Southwest, and establishing frontier outposts for future towns. The Buffalo Soldiers fought in the Indians Wars of the American West, Spanish American War of 1898, WWI and WWII.

"Bill" McCurtis is fast becoming one of the most sought after speakers today. He speaks about the True History of the first REGULAR ARMY BLACK TROOPERS known as the "Buffalo Soldiers".

Motto: "WE CAN: WE WILL" Their adversary, whether Indians, outlaws, Mexican revolutionaries, or gun smugglers, found that the Buffalo Soldiers, like their namesake, could not easily be diverted from their trail. Whatever the reason for the name, the Buffalo Soldier has come down in American military history as one of the proudest individuals of all.

February EDUCATIONAL FOCUS Artifacts include: Buffalo soldier uniform Hat Gloves Sword, Gun & Holster Boots Drawings Photographs Three Masterwork Paintings Burnt Umber Underpainting Portrait Regiment Flag

National African American History Month in February celebrates the contributions that African Americans have made to American history in their struggles for freedom and equality and deepens our understanding of our Nation's history.

Guest Lecturer: Sergeant Major Bill McCurtis* 9th Calvary Buffalo Soldiers Historian

Sergeant Major Bill [ 2005 ]

21.5 in. X 25.25 in.

*Additional Appearance Fee

Sergeant Major Bill Bronze [ 2005 ]

22 in. X 25 in. X 27 in.

www.KennethMFreeman.com

Special Exhibition: Buffalo Soldiers by Kenneth M. Freeman

www.KennethMFreeman.com

Exhibition: Kenneth M. Freeman, Illustrator

Educational Exhibition: Kenneth M. Freeman, Illustrator

Kenneth M. Freeman worked his entire life as an artist and being a illustrator is an important part of his professional career. In the legacy exhibition there is a special display of book covers by Louis L’Amour such as 1963’s Fallon and other western authors along with drawings, newspaper articles and other artifacts.

Kenneth M. Freeman worked his entire life as an artist and being a illustrator is an important part of his professional career. Will James’ Smoky the Cowhorse and other posters, book covers along with drawings, newspaper articles and other artifacts are part of the Legacy Exhibition.

Louis L’Amour’s Fallon [ 1963 ]

15.0 in. X 20.0 in.

www.KennethMFreeman.com

Louis L’Amour’s Fallon [ 1963 ]

15.0 in. X 20.0 in.

www.KennethMFreeman.com

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Tough Draw [ 2005 ] is the Exhibition Official Image 33.5 in. X 39.5 in.

www.KennethMFreeman.com

After the Ride [ c.1986 ] 29.5 in. X 23.5 in.

www.KennethMFreeman.com

Blue Snow [ c.2000 ] 22.0 in. X 18.0 in.

www.KennethMFreeman.com

Child’s Play [ 1999 ] 40.0 in. X 34.0 in.

www.KennethMFreeman.com

Drummer of Taos [ c.1990 ] 16.0 in. X 12.0 X 11.0 in. [#7 of 25]

www.KennethMFreeman.com

Early Morning Ride [ 1999 ] 46.5 in. X 34.5 in.

www.KennethMFreeman.com

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El Gato [ 2000 ] 34.0 in. X 30.0 in.

www.KennethMFreeman.com

Flint [2003 ] 39.0 in. X 27.0 in.

www.KennethMFreeman.com

French Connection [ c.2005 ] 19.0 in. X 17.5 in.

www.KennethMFreeman.com

Hard Days Night [ 1981 ] 25.5 in. X 29.5 in.

www.KennethMFreeman.com

Jimmy [ 2004 ] 16.5 in. X 19.5 in.

www.KennethMFreeman.com

Keeping the Tradition [ 1994 ] 34.5 in. X 40.0 in.

www.KennethMFreeman.com

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Kenneth M. Freeman Self Portrait [ 1954 ] 24.5 in. X 21.0 in.

www.KennethMFreeman.com

Mohawk Warrior [ 1994 ] 40.5 in. X 35.0 in.

www.KennethMFreeman.com

Mountain Man in Fox Hat [ c.2002 ] 22.0 in. X 19.0 in.

www.KennethMFreeman.com

My Baby [ 2004 ] 20.0 in. X 17.5 in.

www.KennethMFreeman.com

No Easy Way [ 1988 ] 30.0 in. X 34.0 in.

www.KennethMFreeman.com

Pickin’ Up Strays [ 2001 ] 32.0 in. X 44.0 in.

www.KennethMFreeman.com

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Power of the Basket [ 1999 ] 33.5 in. X 39.5 in.

www.KennethMFreeman.com

Rocky Road [ 2003 ] 25.5 in. X 21.5 in.

www.KennethMFreeman.com

Ruins of the Past [ 2001 ] 33.5 in. X 45.0 in.

www.KennethMFreeman.com

Bronze: Sergeant Major Bill [ 2005 ] 22.0 in. X 25.0 in. X 27.0 in. [ #2 of 25 ]

www.KennethMFreeman.com

Serenity [ c.1998 ] 39.5 in. X 49.5 in.

www.KennethMFreeman.com

She’s Bringin’ Them In [ 2004 ] 39.5 in. X 33.5 in.

www.KennethMFreeman.com

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Soldier [ c.1975 ] 17.0 in. X 14.0 in.

www.KennethMFreeman.com

Taos Shaman [ 2000 ] 25.5 in. X 21.5 in.

www.KennethMFreeman.com

The Jewelry Maker [ c.1992 ] 30.0 in. X 34.0 in.

www.KennethMFreeman.com

Them Beans [ c.1990 ] 33.5 in. X 29.5 in.

www.KennethMFreeman.com

Un Momento Sereno [ 2003 ] 24.0 in. X 21.5 in.

www.KennethMFreeman.com

Bronze: Un Momento Sereno [ c.1990 ] 16.0 X 9.0 in. X 10.0 in. [#20 of 25]

www.KennethMFreeman.com

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Waitin’ for the Fargo [ c.1999 ] 39.0 in. X 33.0 in.

www.KennethMFreeman.com

Welcome Home [ 2001 ] 33.5 in. X 40.0 in.

www.KennethMFreeman.com

White Kitchen Chair [ 1987 ] 41.0 in. X 35.0 in.

www.KennethMFreeman.com

Winning Combination [ 1986 ] 33.5 in. X 39.5 in.

www.KennethMFreeman.com

Ace’s Up [ c.1986 ] 13.0 X 8.5 X 7.0 in. [ #8 of 25 ].

www.KennethMFreeman.com

The Hand Off [ 2003 ] 25.5 in. X 29.5 in.

www.KennethMFreeman.com

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Cookie Lady [ 2004 ]

31.0 in. X 23.0 in.

Young Pow Wow Dancer [ 2005 ]

21.0 in. X 8.0 in.

www.KennethMFreeman.com

Sergeant Major Bill [ 1980’s ]

www.KennethMFreeman.com

Buffalo Soldier [ 1988 ]

21.5 in. X 25.25 in.

21.5 in. X 18.5 in.

www.KennethMFreeman.com

www.KennethMFreeman.com

Exhibition:

Educational Impact Lecture on Kenneth M. Freeman & Western Art by Curator Bonnie Adams Freeman Buffalo Soldier Exhibition Opportunity for Guest Speaker Sergeant Major Bill McCurtis Kenneth M. Freeman – his technique - Burnt Umber Underpainting Easels & Artifacts – Native American, Mountain Men, Buffalo Soldiers and Cowboy The Kenneth M. Freeman Legacy Catalogue Educational materials: Text panels and/or foam-core mounted images for docent use Narrative identification labels Multimedia Exhibition via DVD – museum supplies player/screen

Little Princess [ 2005 ]

16.5 in. X 19.5 in.

www.KennethMFreeman.com

Educational Elements of the Legacy Exhibition

www.KennethMFreeman.com

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Exhibition:

Multimedia Professionally produced video elements of Kenneth M. Freeman told both in his own words through video archives and by his friends … including: • Actor Robert Fuller • Country Music Singer/Songwriter Ray Herndon • Western Entertainer Rex Allen Jr. • Buffalo Soldier Sergeant Major Bill McCurtis • Native American Flint Carney • Festival of the West Founder Mary Brown • Mountain Man J.R. Robertson

Bonnie Adams Freeman With Rex Allen Jr. X

W Bonnie Adams Freeman With Flint Carney

Rental Fee: $20,000 for ten week display [ Sponsorship subsidies may be available. Contact: Doug@DMProductionsLLC.com ] | Museum is responsible for INBOUND freight & insurance. | Exhibition content: 50 works (masterworks, additional paintings, bronze sculptures, Buffalo Soldier exhibition with bronze sculpture, three masterwork paintings, uniform and other artifacts, Freeman artifacts of his painting environment, Louis L’Amour and other illustrations by Kenneth Freeman, plus drawings and Burnt Umber Underpainting to demonstrate his painting technique, and other western artifacts as detailed in the registrar’s packet. Curator: Bonnie Adams Organized by: Kenneth M. Freeman Legacy LLC Security: High - Full insurance is required for the Kenneth M. Freeman Legacy Exhibition Shipping: Fine Art Running feet: 225-275 Minimum square feet: 2500 - 4000 Fee includes: Catalogue Educational materials: Text panel digital files and docent training Narrative identification labels (on request) Multimedia Exhibition via DVD – museum supplies player/screen Publicity packet and Media Kit through our designated agency: DM Productions LLC Press releases through our designated agency: DM Productions LLC Registrar's packet Installation instructions Custom designed and built crates

Streaming Videos: http://www.kennethmfreeman.com/video.htm

Multimedia Elements of the Legacy Exhibition

www.KennethMFreeman.com

www.KennethMFreeman.com

KENNETH M. FREEMAN (1935 – 2008) Ken was an artist born in Chicago … With a Cowboy Spirit … His artwork will forever hang in museums, galleries & private collections around the world.

He lived the dream.

For more on the Kenneth M. Freeman Legacy:

www.KennethMFreeman.com 775.825.1727DouglasCollins www.KennethMFreeman.com

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Docent Support Material: Artist at Work – Kenneth M Freeman Tough Draw: oil on canvas The subject of this work demonstrates Freeman’s ability to convey the emotional experience of the rodeo. He was invited to create the poster for the Parada del Sol (“Parade of the Sun”) Rodeo in Arizona five times, more than any other artist. Tough Draw is the title featured master work of “Artist at Work” - The Kenneth M. Freeman Legacy Museum Exhibition. The painting has also been featured in the Kenneth M. Freeman show at the Fondazione Metropolitan Museum in Milan, Italy March/April 2007. It is prominently featured in the museum books: Kenneth M Freeman, "Artist at Work" and the Milan Exhibition book: “Kenneth M. Freeman.” The painting has also been featured in Western Art Collector Magazine. A rodeo cowboy contemplates his next ride. Bronc Riding is the only sport he can imagine in which participants get hurt each and every time they do it: sometimes a little, sometimes a lot. And his luck just got tougher with the draw he made in today’s lottery and the bronc he will ride. He thinks that for once the horse has the advantage. In a sport where more violence equals more money, the broncs are bigger stars than many of the riders. He is saddled with a tough draw. Sergeant Major Bill bronze/Sergeant Major Bill:

oil on canvas

Sergeant Major Bill is the most important of the Buffalo Soldiers painted and sculpted by Ken Freeman. This painting has been featured in the Kenneth M. Freeman show at the Fondazione Metropolitan Museum in Milan, Italy March/April 2007, Buffalo Soldiers, Vaqueros and Friends at the Phippen Museum and, along with the bust sculpture, is a featured element of the Artist at Work - The Kenneth M. Freeman Legacy at the Booth Museum in Cartersville, GA. It is prominently featured in 2 museum books: "Artist at Work", and the Milan Exhibition book: “Kenneth M. Freeman” which both represent cross sections of Kenneth Freeman's artwork. The painting has also been featured in Western Art Collector Magazine. “Ken had the true spirit of the Buffalo Soldier in him. He was one of the rare people that realized that, although in the document authorizing the forming of the all-black regiments, in 1866, stating that the Officers must be white, the all-white officers were just as much Buffalo Soldiers as the troops they commanded. When Ken painted, he brought this spirit out in his subjects. My friend has moved on. I know he wanted to stay but I think God had something more important for him to do. So ... Captain Kenneth M. Freeman ... my dear, dear friend ... Keep your cinch tight, ride easy and keep your eyes on the horizon. I will see you at our next Post.”

www.KennethMFreeman.com


Docent Support Material: Artist at Work – Kenneth M Freeman There is a story to how Bill McCurtis and Ken Freeman met. When Bill would stop at Truck Stops across the West, he saw prints of an image called “Impending Decision”. It was a strong image, that sang to Bill’s soul; a masterfully executed painting. There was an artist , “dressed in a fancy western jacket and hat”, at the National Festival of the West in Scottsdale Arizona, who caught Bill’s eye. In the artist’s booth was painting of that very image Bill had come to love in the truck stops…. Impending Decision. Bill went over to this “fancy cowboy” to give him a piece of his mind for stealing that image! It was a huge surprise for Bill to discover that he was meeting the actual Artist of Impending Decision. This was the beginning of a wonderful friendship and a partnership in telling the story of the Buffalo Soldiers. Bill is the historian for the 9th Calvary AZ Memorial Buffalo Soldiers and Ken became a Captain in the 9th, painted the Buffalo Soldiers with dedicated accuracy, and helped to tell the story and raise funds for the organization. Buffalo Soldier: Oil on Canvas During the late 1800’s and early 1900’s the Buffalo Soldiers were assigned to the harshest and most desolate posts. Specific duties included subduing Mexican revolutionaries, outlaws, rustlers and hostile Native Americans, as well as mapping the Southwest and establishing outposts. Freeman was honored with the title of Captain of the 9th Memorial Calvary Buffalo Soldiers. Soldier: Oil on Board The artist’s subjects were not always limited to Western themes, as evidenced by this portrait of a World War II, young Combat Soldier, filled with a passion to serve his country. Ken lived his own passions through his art. Pride and Honor were two passions he shared with this young soldier. Jimmy: Oil on Canvas Private Collection (on loan to the exhibition) It is prominently featured in the museum books "Artist at Work”. During the late 1800s and early 1900s, the Buffalo Soldiers were assigned to the harshest and most desolate posts. Specific duties included subduing Mexican revolutionaries, outlaws, commancheros, rustlers and hostile Native Americans. Additional administrative duties included exploring and mapping the Southwest, and establishing frontier outposts for future towns. The Buffalo Soldiers fought in the Indians Wars of the American West, Spanish American War of 1898, WWI and WWII. The Buffalo Soldier Motto: “WE CAN: WE WILL” Their adversary, whether Indians, outlaws, Mexican revolutionaries, or gun smugglers, found that the Buffalo Soldiers, like their namesake, could not easily be diverted from their trail. Whatever the reason for the name, the Buffalo Soldier has come down in American military history as one of the proudest individuals of all.

www.KennethMFreeman.com


Docent Support Material: Artist at Work – Kenneth M Freeman French Connection: Oil on Board The painting has been featured in the Kenneth M. Freeman show at the Fondazione Metropolitan Museum in Milan, Italy March/April 2007. It is prominently featured in the museum books "Artist at Work" which represents Freeman's museum exhibition and also the Milan Exhibition book: Kenneth M. Freeman. The painting has also been featured in several art publications. Welcome Home: Oil on Canvas A man and his dog. Many months may pass before a mountain man and his companion would have contact with another human being. A warm welcome and confirmation that all is well. Mountain Man in Fox Hat: Oil on Canvas Freeman often visited Western-themed events, such as the National Festival of The West, where he photographed models for this painting, French Connection a And many others. He would spend his time among re-enactors who spent the week Living like mountain men. Henry Nash Smith's Virgin Land outlines the myth of the mountain man and the larger-than-life image poplar back in the east. While the mountain men have always been an important symbol of America's wild frontier, their role in westward expansion was also very concrete. Most mountain men were both adventurous and practical; they came to the wilderness to turn a profit. This desire to make a living and their amazing ability to survive in the wilderness made them ideal trappers during the fur heyday and kept them in the mountains long after the beaver were gone. They became explorers, guides and even government officials. The mountain men did not just wander around the Great Plains and Rocky Mountains creating material for adventure stories and tall tales, they were instrumental in exploring and settling the land west of the Mississippi. Those Beans: Oil on Canvas The transient nature of the fur trade called for foodstuffs that could be kept for Long periods of time. The pinto bean provided the perfect solution for trappers as a source of carbohydrates and protein. Them Beans has been featured in the Kenneth M. Freeman show at the Fondazione Metropolitan Museum in Milan, Italy March/April 2007. It is prominently featured in the museum books "Artist at Work" which represents Freeman's museum book and also the Milan Exhibition book: Kenneth M. Freeman. The painting has also been featured in Western Art Collector Magazine. There were beans and onions cooking with herbs the mountain man traded for ‌ cooking in that Dutch oven in the fire. The fire burned bright, and he watched the red and yellow flames turn the bottom of the Dutch oven to a glowing orange color.

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Docent Support Material: Artist at Work – Kenneth M Freeman It’s something every camp has, at least one set of cast iron pots and pans. They may be heavy but a good set of cast iron cookware will last a lifetime. The wonderful smell of beans filled the air tonight as his cooking was almost done. Flint: Oil on Canvas The Native American model for Flint and Blue Snow is Ken’s good friend Flint Carney. Flint introduced Ken to many of the Indian subjects in his paintings. Flint was a popular jeep tour guide, actor and model among the Scottsdale western crowd as well as among his Native People. Flint was often recognized by strangers everywhere, due to the nationwide distribution and familiarity of Freeman’s images. Blue Snow: Oil on Canvas Flint is the model for this image also. Flint made all of his own clothing and jewelry. He was well recognized for his stunning appearance. Fallon Book Cover Sketch #3: Pencil on paper Fallon Book Cover Sketch #2: Pencil on paper Fallon Book Cover Sketch #1: Pencil on paper Fallon Book Cover: Ink on paper Fallon, by Louis L’Amour, is the fictional account of Malcolm Fallon, a gambler and Founder of a mining town who must fight for what he calls home. Freeman made the adjacent series of preliminary sketches to submit to Bantom Books, for them to choose which composition would be most effective for the final cover illustration. Little Princess: Oil on Canvas In this work, “Little Princess” refers to a description of this little girl. It is a title bestowed on this young pow-wow dancer of the Zuni Pueblo. Many of Freeman’s subjects were children, representing his desire to portray the roles that many generations play in the cultures of the American West. Little Princess was featured in Artist at Work: The Kenneth M. Freeman Legacy exhibition at the Booth Museum in Cartersville, GA. The painting has also been featured in the Kenneth M. Freeman show at the Fondazione Metropolitan Museum in Milan, Italy March/April 2007. It is prominently featured in the museum books "Artist at Work" which represents Freeman's museum book and also the Milan Exhibition book: Kenneth M. Freeman. The painting has also been featured in Western Art Collector Magazine and Southwest Art Magazine.

www.KennethMFreeman.com


Docent Support Material: Artist at Work – Kenneth M Freeman Mohawk Warrior: Oil on Canvas Modern pow-wows often blend Native American traditions from a range of tribal back grounds. In this image, a Mohawk native to the Northeast wears Plains Indian regalia at a pow-wow in the Southwest. Young Pow-Wow Dancer: Oil on Canvas The very young learn the ceremonial and competitive dances of their ancestors. He already participates in the pride and energy of his culture in his dancing. Ruins of the Past: Oil on Canvas Although Freeman is known for his portraiture, he was often inspired to articulate the surroundings of the people he portrayed. In this painting, Freeman highlights deserted, Pueblo Indian ruins, suggesting the close relationship of their former inhabitants to this landscape in present day Southwest Colorado. Looking closely at the painting and you will find “faces”…many faces. Power of the Basket: oil on canvas Power of the Basket was featured in Artist at Work: The Kenneth M. Freeman Legacy museum exhibition at the Booth Museum in Cartersville, GA. It has also been featured in the Kenneth M. Freeman show at the Fondazione Metropolitan Museum in Milan, Italy March/April 2007. It is prominently featured in the museum books "Artist at Work" which represents Freeman's museum book and also the Milan Exhibition book: Kenneth M. Freeman. The painting has also been featured in Western Art Collector Magazine. This painting was also used in the Proud Indian Family Series of Collectible Plates by Hamilton Collectibles. A basket has great symbolic significance because it represents the well-being of an individual, particularly the mind. Navajo legend teaches that Holy People – First Man and First Woman – made baskets when they lived in the underworld for ceremonial purposes. Each part of a Navajo basket has a special significance. - The core of the basket represents the emergence of the Holy People into the present world - the Fourth or Glittering World. - The area surrounding the core represents the earth. - Traditional Navajo baskets have a first layer of black triangular design, representing the four sacred mountains. That area immediately adjacent to the black represents the sky; the red design represents the clouds and darkness. - The black triangular designs on the outside of the basket represent the Holy People, including Yellow Corn and Dawn. Finally, the outer edge of the basket represents the association with others.

www.KennethMFreeman.com


Docent Support Material: Artist at Work – Kenneth M Freeman

Keeping the Tradition: oil on canvas Ken shared the appreciation of family values, tradition and culture with the Native American People. Ken was raised in pride for his own Jewish heritage. He appreciated the value of the teachings of elders and scholars in preserving and nurturing heritage. The Jewelry Maker: oil on canvas The Jewelry Maker, The Power of the Basket, and Keeping the Tradition, are part of series of ten paintings titled “Proud Indian Families” which illustrate the craft traditions that are still an important part of the Navajo culture. Freeman painted these figures from photographs of models he took in his own backyard. Serenity: oil on canvas Freeman painted most of his scenes with figures in the image. Serenity is one of the two landscapes in the Kenneth M. Freeman Legacy Collection. Child’s Play: oil on canvas Freeman was a portrait painter who mastered all ages and cultures. This scene was one of Ken’s favorites. He was impressed with the Navajo Children making pets of their livestock. El Gato: oil on canvas El Gato, Spanish for “cat” refers not to a house pet, but the ceramic cat figure Being displayed for sale by the young subject in this work. The model for the Ceramic figure can be identified among the reference artifacts in Freeman’s Studio. El Gato has been featured in the Artist at Work: The Kenneth M. Freeman Legacy at the Booth Museum and also in the Kenneth M. Freeman show at the Fondazione Metropolitan Museum in Milan, Italy March/April 2007. It is prominently featured in the museum books "Artist at Work" which represents Freeman's museum book and also the Milan Exhibition book: Kenneth M. Freeman. The painting has also been featured in Western Art Collector Magazine. “Can I paint your portrait?” asked Ken Freeman to this Navajo child. She wanted some compensation in return. “Only if you will buy one of my pieces,” said the child. Her expression shows she is pleased with the negotiation. The ceramic cat, El Gato, is featured in both the painting and also as an artifact in the re-creation of Ken’s studio. White Kitchen Chair: oil on canvas White Kitchen Chair, Cookie Lady and Shaman of Taos and Un Momento Sereno are portraits of some of the residents of the Pueblo. The Taos are a proud and fiercely independent people.

www.KennethMFreeman.com


Docent Support Material: Artist at Work – Kenneth M Freeman They have for centuries enforced a strict policy that forbids marriage outside of the Pueblo. This has served to maintain the blood line of these people. Their strong sense of community has also helped to maintain their sense of tribal identity. The people have a tradition of secrecy which has kept many of their sacred beliefs and customs from the outside world. Ken always painted his Native American subjects with reverence and respect, capturing their pride and beauty. He never painted images of conflict between the Indian and the White Man. Cookie Lady: oil on canvas She made the best cookies in Taos Shaman of Taos: oil on canvas Un Momento Sereno: oil on canvas No Easy Way: oil on canvas Spinning wool by hand, a tedious early step in Navajo weaving, is demonstrated by this skilled model of Monument Valley, Arizona. When Freeman spent time with Navajo families, he recognized how traditional crafts such as weaving and metallurgy is still passed down from generation to generation. Ken adopted the name of this painting to relate to people his philosophy of working in art… “There is no easy way”… to a fine painting Pickin’ Up Strays: oil on canvas The story behind this painting is that the horse without a rider is actually Ken’s horse. He got off the horse and walked ahead of the group to capture this scene in his camera so he could paint it and forever immortalize the magic of this experience of riding horseback through the open range. Rocky Road: oil on canvas Rocky Road and Pickin’ Up Strays are set in the ranching country near Wickenburg, Arizona. Freeman went out with ranchers at round-up time and worked with them all day, as long as they provided a “real bed” for him at night. The cowboys would bring Ken back to the chuck wagon by early morning for breakfast. She’s Bringin’ Them In: oil on canvas A simple process, but hard work, a cattle drive in Arizona might involve taking the cattle up to the mountains during the summer and bringing them down again for the winter. Freeman not only photographed the scenes, but lived the life of a cowboy. This first-hand experience enabled him to capture the spirit of the working rancher.

www.KennethMFreeman.com


Docent Support Material: Artist at Work – Kenneth M Freeman After the Ride: oil on canvas Freeman had access behind-the-scenes of many rodeos. He was able to depict the gamut of the rodeo experience in his paintings, from the hardships of defeat to the glory of victory. The model for this painting and for Early Morning Ride grew up on ranches of Gilbert AZ and divided his time between the rodeo circuit and ranch work. Early Morning Ride: oil on canvas Jim Lyles is the model for this painting. Jim has dedicated much of his life to promoting the safety of the Rodeo Cowboys and Rodeo Animals. Winning Combination: oil on canvas The Rider and his Horse together win. It takes a team to pull it off. It also takes a great sponsor, “Coors,” to make the Rodeo a winning event. Waitin’For the Fargo: oil on canvas In 1866, Wells Fargo & Company expanded to become the West’s all-purpose business, commercial and transportation company when they took over the Overland Mail Company. The Company then controlled the entire overland courier route from the Missouri River to the Pacific Ocean. In his repertoire of painting the American West, Ken made several images portraying the pioneering communications of the United States Postal Service. The Hand Off: oil on canvas This painting is one of three Ken Freeman was created for the annual re-enactment of the Hashknife Gang Pony Express, which ran south from Holbrook to Scottsdale, Arizona. Posters featuring this image (such as the one at the left-rear in the Studio exhibit) have been displayed in post offices, as well as the Library of Congress Legacy Collection. The Hand Off is one of the most important master works of Kenneth M. Freeman. - The Hand Off was the lead painting featured in the Kenneth M. Freeman show at the Fondazione Metropolitan Museum in Milan, Italy March/April 2007 and was used as the image for the banner announcing the show. - The Hand Off was used as the cover of the museum art book. - A copy of this painting hangs in the American Legacy Collection of the Library of Congress and was placed in this collection by Senator Jon Kyl. - The Hand Off was originally designed for the Hashknife Pony Express in conjunction with the Parada de Sol Rodeo in Scottsdale, AZ. Copies of the official Hashknife poster featuring The Hand Off were sold at US Post Offices throughout the country.

www.KennethMFreeman.com


Docent Support Material: Artist at Work – Kenneth M Freeman - The Hand Off is a featured master work in Artist at Work: The Kenneth M. Freeman Legacy Museum Exhibition and the “Artist at Work” Museum Catalogue. Aces Up: bronze At first glance, Aces Up, a simple solitaire card game, might seem inappropriate as a title for a portrait bust of a professional gambler. However, when considering how important self-reliance was for a gambler’s survival, the relationship between the card game and the figure becomes more apparent. Un Momento Sereno: bronze Freeman often represented the same subject of a two-dimensional painting in a three dimensional sculpture with the same title. When visiting Taos Pueblo, he likely took multiple photographs of this model in “a serene moment” from different angle. The photos provided the artist with enough reference information to later soft-carve the figure and cast it in bronze. Drummer of Taos: bronze The figure depicted in the work was an elderly resident of Taos Pueblo who played and sang for the artist on one of his trips to Northern New Mexico. He was delighted that Freeman would paint his portrait and cast his likeness in bronze, to convey the pride and beauty of his people. Kenneth Freeman’s Studio This re-creation of the artist’s home studio in Arizona demonstrates his creative process and techniques that were at the heart of his work. It also displays objects that Freeman used as reference material for his paintings. Against the wall, at left, are posters featuring images that helped establish an early portrait of the artist. Freeman accumulated the artifacts hanging in the rear corner from mountainman reenactments and pow-wows. These items, as well as those on the table, were used for rendering subjects ranging from Pueblo Indians to Rodeo Cowboys. Also included is the artist’s trademark hat. In the foreground, the regimental flag of the 9th Cavalry is flanked by an authentic saddle and belt. The complete Buffalo Soldier outfit, detailed photographs, and easel painting indicate one of his almost recently completed projects. The photograph, sketch and underpainting, on the table at right, display the initial stages of another portrait in progress. The artist’s painting glasses and denim jacket are also visible.

www.KennethMFreeman.com


Docent Support Material: Portraits of the West – Kenneth M Freeman

Aces Up: bronze At first glance, Aces Up, a simple solitaire card game, might seem inappropriate as a title for a portrait bust of a professional gambler. However, when considering how important Self-reliance was for a gambler’s survival, the relationship between the card game and The figure becomes more apparent. All Cowgirls Are Beautiful: Oil on Canvas Ranching is a business for both men and women. Through all the dust and wind and long hours on horseback, a cowgirl’s beauty is never lost. Ken noticed this young lady as she dismounted her horse, to take a stretch and captured the moment with his camera, later painting this image. Beautiful Creations: Oil on Canvas A mother teaches her child the craft of her ancestors. Ken shared the appreciation of family values, tradition and culture with the Native American People. Ken was raised in pride for his own Jewish heritage. He appreciated the value of the teachings of elders and scholars in preserving and nurturing heritage. Beth: Oil on Canvas Beth and Mary are two portraits in the Americana series of paintings that Ken created during the 1990’s. Photographs were taken of models at the Pioneer Arizona History Museum, using period clothing and architecture. Big Valley: Oil on Canvas Ken loved the ranch life and excitement of the cattle drives, rounding up the cattle over in the big open spaces of Arizona’s wilderness. Ken worked the cattle, but he also photographed the cowboys and animals so he could go home and bring them to life again on his canvas. Ken never really left the Cowboys… he brought them home to his studio. This is the largest painting in the Kenneth M Freeman Legacy Collection. Bitin’ Leather: Oil on Canvas Behind the scenes at the Rodeos, Cowboy prepare for their rides. This man is tightening his leather straps. There is a lot of preparation and psyching up that goes on behind the scenes before the Rodeo Cowboy breaks out of the gates to perform in front of the audience.

www.KennethMFreeman.com


Docent Support Material: Portraits of the West – Kenneth M Freeman

Bright New Morning: Oil on Canvas This is one of the paintings in the American series that Ken painted from his visits to the Pioneer Arizona History Museum. A young girl prepares to meet the day with anticipation of the freshness of a brand new day. Bronc Buster: Oil on Canvas This is the lead image of this exhibition, Portraits of the West. It is a very suitable portrait to represent the spirit of the west. The model is Jim Lyles, a bronc riding rodeo cowboy from Gilbert, Arizona. Bronc Buster was chosen for the 1984 Parada del Sol Rodeo Art Poster. Ken had the honor of painting the Art for the prestigious Parada del Sol Rodeo in Scottsdale, AZ five times. No other artist has received this honor so many times. Bronc Buster was exhibited in the Milan, Italy Exhibition of Kenneth M Freeman in 2007 and has been featured in many magazines and news articles. Child of Mother Earth: Oil on Canvas Cowgirl (Portrait): Oil on Board Young cowgirl ready to ride and rope Dirty Al: bronze A tough and dusty old gunslinger. The Wild West with its tales of men and women who pioneered the land and the law…. And the lawless. Don’t Let Your Sons Grow Up To Be Cowboys: Oil on board. Many a Rodeo cowboy cut their teeth at the Rodeos, behind the scenes watching and imitating their brave Daddy as he prepares for the ride. This youngster already has his heart dedicated to the Rodeo. Dori: Portrait of a Child: Oil on Canvas Ken’s oldest daughter, Dori, age three, is the model for this magnificent painting which took first prize in portraits at the Illinois State Fair in August 1961. Dori: bronze This bronze bust is of Ken’s oldest Daughter , Dori Drummer of Taos: bronze The figure depicted in the work was an elderly resident of Taos Pueblo who played and sang for the artist on one of his trips to Northern New Mexico. He was delighted that Freeman would paint his portrait and cast his likeness in bronze, to convey the pride and beauty of his people.

www.KennethMFreeman.com


Docent Support Material: Portraits of the West – Kenneth M Freeman

End of the Trail: Oil on Canvas The Cowboy refreshes his horse after a long day’s ride and working the herd. A cowboy and his horse are partners in everything they do on the ranch. They take care of each other. Man Who Walks with Wolves: Oil on Canvas The model in this painting, nick named Grizzly, created all his leather clothing. He was well known for his fine custom hide clothing as well as his Natural Preserve for Wolves. Preparing the Berries: Oil on Canvas This painting is part of the Proud Indian Family Series paintings. There were 10 paintings from which Hamilton Collectables produced collectable plates in the late 1990’s and early 2000’s. The matching plate is in the artifact collection of this exhibition. Herford Time: Oil on Canvas Ken spent many hours riding horses and working the herd. He rounded up the cattle, drove them to the high ground for the summer months and back down for the winters. All the while he would photograph and learn and live the working cowboy life, so when it came time for him to put these heroes on canvas, he knew what he was doing. Each portrait of the people and the animals is accurate. Horse Hair Coat: Oil on Canvas AKA Mountain Man. Featured in the Artist at Work Museum Catalogue. John Wayne: Oil on Canvas In 2007, The National Festival of the West made a special Tribute to John Wayne. Ken painted this portrait of John Wayne for the Tribute. He worked closely with the Wayne family to bring the finishing touches to their expectations. Ethan Wayne, John’s son commented that this was the best painting anyone had done of his father. In the last year and half of Ken’s life he received personal letters and phone calls of comfort and encouragement from the Wayne Family and their Cancer Foundation. Self Portrait of Ken and Wife Bonnie: Pencil on Canvas Ken sketched this image on the canvas, intending to paint it later. However he took the sketch much farther then he normally would have. His three step technique involves a pencil sketch to start, but all the shading, all the values were usually applied with burnt umber mixed with terpenoid, rather than with pencil. There are only 2 self portrait of Ken in the Kenneth M Freeman Legacy Collection. This one is Ken at age 72 with his wife Bonnie Adams. The second self portrait is in the Artist at Work exhibition and is a color pastel portrait of himself at age 25.

www.KennethMFreeman.com


Docent Support Material: Portraits of the West – Kenneth M Freeman

Listen to the Stillness: Oil on Canvas Freeman often vistited Western-themed events, such as the National Festival of The West, and Mountain Men Rendezvous, where he photographed models for his paintings. He would spend his time among reenactors who spent the week Living like mountain men. Henry Nash Smith's Virgin Land outlines the myth of the mountain man and the larger-than-life image poplar back in the east. While the mountain men have always been an important symbol of America's wild frontier, their role in westward expansion was also very concrete. Most mountain men were both adventurous and practical; they came to the wilderness to turn a profit. This desire to make a living and their amazing ability to survive in the wilderness made them ideal trappers during the fur heyday and kept them in the mountains long after the beaver were gone. They became explorers, guides and even government officials. The mountain men did not just wander around the Great Plains and Rocky Mountains creating material for adventure stories and tall tales, they were instrumental in exploring and settling the land west of the Mississippi. Man of Acoma: bronze Little Pow Wow Dancer: Oil on Canvas This little pow-wow dancer of the Zuni Pueblo was the featured subject of 3 of Ken’s paintings. This was one of last two complete paintings Ken made before he passed away. He was experimenting with his technique. After he sketched the image on the canvas, he did not apply the full value under painting in burnt umber, but went directly into the color. Look Into the Past: Oil on Canvas This proud warrior has been featured in the Kenneth M. Freeman show at the Fondazione Metropolitan Museum in Milan, Italy March/April 2007. It is prominently featured in the museum books "Artist at Work" which represents Freeman's museum book and also the Milan Exhibition book: Kenneth M. Freeman. Man of Taos: Oil on Canvas The Taos are a proud and fiercely independent people. They have for centuries enforced a strict policy that forbids marriage outside of the Pueblo. This has served to maintain the blood line of these people. Their strong sense of community has also helped to maintain their sense of tribal identity. The people have a tradition of secrecy which has kept many of their sacred beliefs and customs from the outside world. Ken always painted and sculpted his Native American subjects with reverence and respect, capturing their pride and beauty. He never made images of conflict between the Indian and the White Man.

www.KennethMFreeman.com


Docent Support Material: Portraits of the West – Kenneth M Freeman

Mary: Oil on Canvas Mary and Beth are two sisters, whom Ken painted for his American series. The setting for the photo shoot was at the Arizona Living History Museum. Maverick: Oil on Canvas This full portrait speaks of a popular figure in the history of the old west: a rugged gunslinger, perhaps for hire. Mixed Breed: Oil on Canvas The ranch hands bring the cattle down from the hills to spend the cooler months in the the valley. Ken road with these cowboys, driving the herds on horseback and photographing scenes like this one so he could paint the experience and passion of the cowboy when he returned to Scottsdale. Morning Prayer: Oil on Canvas Morning Prayer is an incredible portrait of a Rabbi doing tflin, with a depth of color and richness of content consistent with Ken's old masters' technique learned at the American Art Academy of Chicago. It is prominently featured in the museum book "Artist at Work" which represents Freeman's museum book and also other publications. Mountain Man in Glasses: Oil on Board Ken found his models at Mountain Man Rondevues and Western Festivals like National Festival of the West. This reinactor wears a white fox hat, period glasses and hand made skin garments and jewelry. Move Over: Oil on Canvas These young steers wait in a corral, for their turn to perform in the rodeo arena. If you look carefully you will see one of the steers that inspired Ken to name this painting “Move Over”. My New Blue Scarf: A young Pow Wow dancer is proudly wearing his new dance regalia. Even the very young Indian children know and perform with pride the traditions of their culture. Playing With Tradition: Oil on Canvas Two young girls play with Kat china dolls. Psychin’ Up: Oil on Canvas The rodeo is an exciting place with a rich culture. However the sports of the rodeo are dangerous and there is a lot of “Psychin’ Up” required to mentally be prepared for one’s ride. This Rodeo Cowboy is getting ready to ride his bronc.

www.KennethMFreeman.com


Docent Support Material: Portraits of the West – Kenneth M Freeman

Smoky the Cowhorse: Oil on Canvas In 1993 Ken Freeman painted this image for the book cover of Will James’ reedition of the award winning novel Smoky the Cowhorse. Someone’s Coming: Oil on Board The Story Teller: Oil on Canvas To teach the young the traditions, values, and history of their culture, elders told stories. Every story was a lesson, which would be handed down through the generations. This image is one of the collectable plate series called Proud Indian Families, produced by Hamilton Collectables in the late 80’s to 90’s. Takin’ Care of Business: Oil on Canvas As the name implies, this scene is a part of the day to day business of running a ranch. Cattle are branded under the careful handling of three cowboys. Talking to the Wind: Oil on Canvas Inside the tent the elder speaks to the spirits and teaches his son and grandson the ways of their people. This image is part of the Proud Indian Families series of collectable plates. Taos Matron: Oil on Canvas Team Work: Oil on Canvas There is a close bond between a Cowboy and his Horse. The Outfit: Oil on Canvas JPS Brown, author of “The Outfit”, chose the artwork for this book. He appreciated Ken’s ability to really paint the working Cowboy. Tracy Lynn: bronze A portrait of Ken’s youngest daughter in Bronze. Tracy (full portrait): Oil on Canvas Tracy is Ken’s youngest daughter. Tradition: Oil on Canvas Ken always called himself the “Jewish Cowboy from Chicago”. Ken grew up in a poor Jewish neighborhood in Chicago, where he dreamed of becoming a great artist and a cowboy. Just as he never lost site of his heritage, Ken had a great respect for the heritage and traditions of his subjects, whether they were reverent Rabbis, Rodeo Cowboys or Indian Warriors.

www.KennethMFreeman.com


Docent Support Material: Portraits of the West – Kenneth M Freeman

Verner Ranch: Oil on Canvas The Verner Ranch held many wonderful memories for Ken as he visited his fellow artist friend on her ranch and shared the Cowboy life with the ranch hands. Many of Ken’s aintings originated from photographs taken on the ranch in Oklahoma. The Wedding Ceremony: Oil on Canvas Part of the Proud Indian Families series of paintings and collectable plates, this image depicts the ceremony of marriage. Ken’s models were husband and wife and the blanket used for this image was gifted to Ken, from Flint Carney (in the image). Winning Pow Wow Dancer: Oil on Canvas The painting of this young boy was one of last two complete paintings Ken made before he passed away. He was experimenting with his technique. After he sketched the image on the canvas, he did not apply the full value under painting in burnt umber, but went directly into the color. Un Momento Sereno: bronze Freeman often represented the same subject of a two-dimensional painting in a three dimensional sculpture with the same title. When visiting Taos Pueblo, he likely took multiple photographs of this model in “a serene moment” from different angles. The photos provided the artist with enough reference information to later soft-carve the figure and cast it in bronze.

www.KennethMFreeman.com


Docent Support Material: Portraits of the West – Kenneth M Freeman

ARTIFACTS: Ken’s Studio Items in the studio are the authentic pieces from Ken’s studio in Scottsdale, Az. The painting on the easel “Impending Decision IV” was the last painting he was working on when he passed away. This is a very important part of the Kenneth M Freeman Legacy Collection as it tells the entire story of Ken’s technique. When you look closely you will see the pencil sketch on the canvas. Then the burnt umber undertone painting (a full value painting ), and the color over the burnt umber. During the under painting process , Ken worked out all the details, any changes were made there instead of on the color layer. This keeps the image clean, the colors clean, not muddy. When the under painting was dry he started to put down the color. Note he painted the background first , then started in on the figure, usually leaving the face until the end. The last of the detail s to go on the canvas would be the highlights Easel, paints, brushes … Some of these items are over 50 years old . Other There are other items that were in Ken’s studio that he used for copy (baskets, pottery ) etc… and inspirational memoires , gifts from his family. ILLUSTRATIONS Ken made his living as a commercial illustrator until he was 43 years old. He also painted throughout that career, selling as he painted (he used to say they were flying off the wall “wet”) and he could hardly keep up with getting photos of them before they were taken away by the clients. The woman holding the Coke a Cola bottle is a fine example of the illustration work he was doing in the 1950’s. Ken apprenticed with the Father Of Illustration, Hadden Sunbloom and finished off many of the Santa Claus drinking Coke a Cola images for Haddon. Also included in the illustrations of this exhibit is the 1984 Parada Del Sol Rodeo poster featuring the painting called “Bronc Buster” and the Prescott Centennial Poster 1988, featuring the painting called “All American Cowboy”.

www.KennethMFreeman.com


The Legacy of

Kenneth M. Freeman

Rembrandt of the Rodeo Fine Art Registry® is proud to feature one of our latest registered artists – the legendary Western painter Kenneth M. Freeman. Ken was truly ¹TIZOMZ\PIVTQNMºIVL_M_QTTJMXZWÅTQVOPQUQVI series of articles. Here, we begin with an overview of Ken’s legacy, his tremendous output and a groundbreaking new exhibition celebrating his phenomenal accomplishments.

BORN TO BE AN ARTIST

From an early age, Kenneth M. Freeman had a dream and a vision. He knew that he would be a great artist – and that vision never wavered his entire life.

Recognizing his talent and determination, his mother supported his intentions by ensuring he began art lessons before he was eight years old. And he never looked back. Childish things didn’t hold his attention – he even converted the family television into a table for his paint palette!


Impending Decision

D

riven and dedicated, as his training progressed, he won scholarship after scholarship and, at 15, began studying at the American Academy of Art, graduating from that esteemed institution just a year after receiving his high school diploma. Although he would have been accepted at any art school in the country, he chose the American Academy because he wanted to learn the classical techniques of the master XIQV\MZ[QVXIZ\QK]TIZ\PW[M_PWQVÆ]MVKMLPQUUW[\ – Rembrandt, Rubens and John Singer Sargent. Following graduation, a successful 20-year career as an illustrator provided Ken with invaluable experience, including an apprenticeship with Haddon Sundblom

and the opportunity to create book cover paintings for well-known authors such as Louis L’Amour. It was during this time that his interest in portraiture increased and the icons of the old West became a major inspiration for his work.

THE CALL OF THE WEST

Leaving his home in Chicago and moving to Scottsdale, Arizona was a turning point in Ken’s career. There, the lure of the cowboy life captured his imagination. He embraced the lifestyle of the


Tough Draw

West wholeheartedly and lived that dream – riding horseback, participating in cattle drives, becoming a Buffalo Soldier and attending Native American ceremonies. As he immersed himself in this rich cultural heritage, he documented the daily lives of the people, capturing faces and activities with his camera that would later be the models for his stunning paintings that embody the soul and spirit of the American West – cowboys and cowgirls, rodeo riders, Native American elders and children, grizzled mountain men and breathtaking Western landscapes. So completely did he identify with his new life, he even called himself a “Jewish Cowboy.”

THE TECHNIQUE OF THE MASTERS ¹<PMZMIZMVW[PWZ\K]\[\WIÅVMXIQV\QVOº – Kenneth M. Freeman The luminous faces in his portraits and the vivid, exquisite vistas of his landscapes were painted in a centuries-old manner. Each painting was done essentially three times: the foundation was slowly built


Young Pow-Wow Dancer

up through charcoal pencil sketches, then a burnt umber underpainting was done to work out all the values, and when the burnt umber was dry, the careful process of laying down layer after layer of thin color glazes was carried out. “This is the style of the old masters and for his use of the technique and his subjects, several members of the press dubbed Ken The Rembrandt of the Rodeo,” explains Bonnie Adams-Freeman, curator of the

Kenneth M. Freeman Legacy exhibit. “Ken’s old masters’ technique was very time consuming but the outcome is extraordinary. It is the only way to achieve the depth of colors and warm layers of content that will pass the test of time. This painting technique will last for hundreds of years,” said Edward Holmes, president of the Western Artists of America.


Ken (left) was a true cowboy, in dress and spirit. Bonnie Adams-Freeman, the curator of the Kenneth M. Freeman Legacy, accepts Ken’s Lifetime Achievement Award from Western Artists of America President Ed Holmes (below left). A recreation of Ken Freeman’s studio is the centerpiece of the Booth Museum Exhibition (below).

WORLD PREMIERE OF THE KENNETH M. FREEMAN LEGACY EXHIBITION <PM*WW\P?M[\MZV)Z\5][M]UIV)NÅTQI\MWN  \PM;UQ\P[WVQIV1V[\Q\]\QWVQV+IZ\MZ[^QTTM/MWZOQI _I[\PMPW[\NWZ\PM_WZTLXZMUQMZMWN \PM3MVVM\P 5.ZMMUIV4MOIKa-`PQJQ\QWV)VM_TaZMVW^I\ML IVLM`XIV[Q^MU][M]U\PM*WW\PPW][M[\PMTIZOM[\ XMZUIVMV\M`PQJQ\QWV[XIKMNWZ?M[\MZVIZ\QV)UMZQKI <PM.ZMMUIV4MOIKa-`PQJQ\QWVKWV[Q[\[WN ÅN\aWQT XIQV\QVO[IVL[K]TX\]ZM[\PI\NMI\]ZM_WZSQVOKW_JWa[ IVLKW_OQZT[ZWLMWPMZWM[6I\Q^M)UMZQKIVMTLMZ[

IVLKPQTLZMVUW]V\IQVUMV?M[\MZVTIVL[KIXM[ IVL*]NNITW;WTLQMZ[)[_MTTQ\NMI\]ZM[ML]KI\QWVIT M`PQJQ\[QVKT]LQVOIZMKZMI\QWVWN 3MV.ZMMUIV¼[ [\]LQWKWUXTM\M_Q\PMI[MTIVLIZ\QNIK\[I[MK\QWVWV Ken Freeman, The IllustratorIVLILQ[XTIaWN JWWSKW^MZ[ IVLXW[\MZ[WN 3MV¼[_WZSQVKT]LQVOFallon Ja4W]Q[ 4¼)UW]Z 7V\PMWXMVQVOLIaWN \PMM`PQJQ\QWV3MV_I[ PWVWZMLXW[\P]UW][Ta_Q\P\PM4QNM\QUM)KPQM^MUMV\ )_IZLNZWU\PM?M[\MZV)Z\Q[\[WN )UMZQKIIKKMX\ML WVPQ[JMPITN JaPQ[_QNM*WVVQM)VLIN]Z\PMZPWVWZ _I[JM[\W_ML]XWVPQU·NZWU\PQ[\QUMNWZ_IZL \PMI_IZL_QTTJMSVW_VI[\PM.ZMMUIV4QNM\QUM )KPQM^MUMV\)_IZL


Little Princess

Exhibition Dates for the Kenneth M. Freeman Legacy Exhibition – ‘Artist at Work’: January 16, 2010 – May 2, 2010, at The Booth Western Art Museum, Cartersville, GA. www.boothmuseum.org

Fine Art Registry® system. Creating a database of the collection establishes authenticity and will encourage owners of Ken Freeman originals to register their own paintings.

A second traveling exhibition of Ken’s work will premiere on June 26, 2010 at the Phippen Museum, Prescott, AZ, running through October 24, 2010. www.PhippenArtMuseum.org

THE LEGACY

SECURING THE WORK FOR THE FUTURE Recognizing that it was vital to protect this exceptional body of work for future generations, especially with the pieces being moved for traveling exhibits, the Kenneth M. Freeman Legacy has begun tagging and registering each piece using the patented

Ken did achieve his dream of becoming a great Western artist. In addition to creating book covers for Louis L’Amour, Will James and other western authors, he created original work for Hamilton Collectibles, a beautiful ten plate series entitled Proud Indian Families. His notable portraits included President Herbert Hoover, John Wayne, Robert Fuller, Sherwin Wasserman, Senator Lister Hill, Ray Herndon, John Smith and Waylon Jennings.


JR

I

mpressed with his images of the Southwest, former First Lady Barbara Bush invited Ken to exhibit at the Smithsonian Institute in conjunction with the Native American Museum Extravaganza. And in 2007, Ken’s work was featured in a solo show in Milan, Italy. Although he passed away in May 2008, he left a rich body of work unrivaled by most artists. His evocative paintings hang in museums, galleries and private collections throughout the world including The Library of Congress American Legacy Collection, The Booth Western Art Museum and the family of President Herbert Hoover. “He was a man you could never forget. His enthusiasm for life and art was contagious. Of all the artists from the Academy I’ve met over the years, Ken really stood out as one of a kind,” said Aron

Gagliardo, historian and archivist of the American Academy of Art. Learn more about Kenneth M. Freeman by visiting his website at www.KennethMFreeman.com where aW]_QTTÅVLI_MIT\PWN NI[KQVI\QVOQVNWZUI\QWV articles, videos and more. And now, collectors can acquire a number of authorized limited edition giclees from Ken’s masterful series: Buffalo Soldiers, Cowboys, Heroes of the Old West, Landscapes of the American West, North American Children, Native American Elders and many more, in the online store at www.shop.KennethMFreeman.com. And be sure to visit Ken’s Fine Art Registry gallery here. Watch for Part II in this article series! 

FAR®, Fine Art Registry® and the Fine Art Registry Logo are registered trademarks of Global Fine Art Registry, LLC. ©2010 Global Fine Art Registry, LLC. All Rights Reserved.


World Premiere Museum Art Exhibition in Atlanta Area "You don't have to leave the Sou... Page 1 of 1

World Premiere Museum Art Exhibition in Atlanta Area "You don't have to leave the South to visit the West." Business Wire | 04 Jan 2010 | 09:00 AM ET

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz., Jan 04, 2010 (BUSINESS WIRE) -- --Artist Ken Freeman always called himself a "Jewish Cowboy." The world premiere of the Kenneth M. Freeman -- Artist at Work opens at the Booth Western Art Museum in January 2010. The exhibition consists of fifty (50) oil paintings and sculptures that feature working cowboys and cowgirls, rodeo heroes, Native American elders & children, mountain men, Western landscapes, and Buffalo Soldiers. For artist Kenneth M. Freeman, the cowboy hat and boots was not a gimmick or shtick. Neither was his Arizona attitude. Ken Freeman may have grown up in a traditional Jewish home in Chicago, Illinois but make no mistake ... he was a cowboy. The Booth Western Art Museum, an Affiliate of the Smithsonian Institution, hosts the world premiere of the Kenneth M. Freeman Legacy Exhibition -- Artist at Work opening on January 16, 2010 and continuing through May 2, 2010 in the newly created Special Exhibition Gallery. This collection is a traveling retrospective of the late Kenneth M. Freeman (1935 - 2008) who had a prolific career as both an illustrator and fine artist, primarily portraying the American West. Artist at Work presents a cross-section of Freeman's lifetime body of work and range of mediums. The Kenneth M. Freeman Legacy Exhibition -- Artist at Work scheduled opening on the Martin Luther King weekend holds special significance because of Freeman's paintings, sculpture and artifacts portraying Buffalo Soldiers. "During the late 1800's and early 1900s, the Buffalo Soldiers were assigned to the harshest and most desolate posts. The Buffalo Soldiers fought the Indian Wars of the American West and established frontier outposts which have since become towns," explains Bonnie Adams, curator of the Kenneth M. Freeman Legacy. "Ken Freeman was a Captain in the 9th Calvary Memorial Buffalo Soldiers." A re-creation of Freeman's studio is the centerpiece of this exhibition, defining the artist's creative process. Earning scholarships to study at the American Academy of Art, Freeman studied techniques of the European old masters. Capturing the rich heritage of the many varied peoples he encountered in photographs, Freeman brought the personalities of these models to life. "Ken's old masters' technique was very time consuming but the outcome is extraordinary. It is the only way to achieve the depth of colors and warm layers of content that will pass the test of time. This painting technique will last for hundreds of years," said Edward Holmes, president of Western Artists of America whose organization is presenting Adams with Freeman's Lifetime Achievement Award on January 16, at 7 p.m. Freeman was a graduate of the American Academy of Art in Chicago (www.aaart.edu). At the age of 15, he began taking classes at the Academy in the summer of 1950. He studied with renowned artist Haddon Sundblom. "He was a man you could never forget. His enthusiasm for life and art was contagious. Of all the artists from the Academy I've met over the years, Ken really stood out as one of a kind," said Aron Gagliardo, historian and archivist of the American Academy of Art. "The Kenneth M. Freeman Legacy Exhibition represents a true working artist," said Seth Hopkins, executive director of the Booth Western Art Museum. "The exhibition shows the artist at work ... as an illustrator, sculptor, and painter." "This will also be the first temporary exhibition at the Booth Museum since the opening of our new 40,000 square foot expansion, completed in October, 2009," added Hopkins. "We now house the largest permanent exhibition space for Western art in the country. We say: You don't have to leave the South to visit the West." As this exhibition travels around the country, Ken Freeman's legacy will be confirmed. Kenneth M. Freeman Works of Kenneth M. Freeman are in the permanent collection of the Smithsonian Museum, Library of Congress, American Art Academy, and Booth Museum as well as distinguished private collections. Accolades include winning competitions at the San Diego Museum of Art, the Hubbard Museum of Art, the Illinois State Fair, the Salmagundi Show in New York City, the Union League Club of Chicago, being chosen five times as artist for the Parada Del Sol Rodeo in Scottsdale, AZ and having a painting selected for the 1988 Prescott Centennial Rodeo. He was an illustrator for authors like Louis L'Amour. Ken was known affectionately as "Rembrandt of the Rodeo" by members of the press. First Lady Barbara Bush, impressed with Ken Freeman's southwestern art, invited him to show at the Smithsonian Institute in conjunction with the Native American Museum Extravaganza. Ken also had a one man show in 2007 in Milan, Italy at Fondazione Metropolitan. www.KennethMFreeman.com Booth Western Art Museum 501 Museum Drive -- Cartersville, GA The Booth Museum is where guests are invited to explore the American West through contemporary Western artwork. The Museum also houses a Presidential Gallery, Civil War art gallery, and Sagebrush Ranch children's gallery. www.boothmuseum.org HIGH RESOLUTION IMAGES: 1. Booth Museum Installation of Artist at Work (TIF 5.5MB) http://www.KennethMFreeman.com/press/boothinstallation.tif 2. Impending Decision -- Freeman's most famous painting (JPG 3.8 MB) http://www.KennethMFreeman.com/press/ImpendingDecision.jpg 3. Tough Draw -- the official image of the exhibition (JPG 2.7 MB) http://www.KennethMFreeman.com/press/ToughDraw.jpg Keywords: art, exhibition, museum, western+art, cowboy, rodeo, fine+art, Booth+Museum, Smithsonian SOURCE: Kenneth M. Freeman Legacy, LLC CONTACT: Dianemarie (DM) Collins, 775-825-1727 DM@DMProductionsLLC.com Copyright Business Wire 2010 -0- KEYWORD: United States North America Arizona Georgia INDUSTRY KEYWORD: Entertainment Arts/Museums SUBJECT CODE: Award Event

URL: http://www.cnbc.com/id/34686788/ . Š 2010 CNBC.com

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1/26/2010


'Jewish Cowboy' Paints Western Life - The Atlanta Jewish Times - Atlanta, Georgia

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'Jewish Cowboy' Paints Western Life

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Jason Butt Staff Writer In the center of a second-floor gallery in the Booth Western Art Museum in Cartersville sits a recreated studio, complete with a fallen pencil lying on the floor. The detail included in Kenneth M. Freeman’s posthumous exhibit coincides with the detail Freeman sought with his art.

Obituaries

His paintings surround the studio, creating an image of Freeman’s being still at work. “We really tried to give the impression that the artist just got up to go get a cup of coffee,” said Seth Hopkins, executive director of the Booth Museum.

In “Tough Draw,” Kenneth M. Freeman painted a rodeo bull rider, who was photographed moments after finding out he drew a bull notorious for his mean attitude.

Freeman’s exhibit is titled “An Artist at Work” and is on display at the Booth Museum until May 2. Hopkins explained the Booth, which is the first museum to show this body of work, wanted to capture the setting Freeman worked in as well as to present this collection. “Because there was so much artwork left in his studio and the studio was left intact, it provided the opportunity to do this kind of exhibition and physically recreate his studio, and to show such a wide range of one artist’s work,” Hopkins said. The recreated studio contains items Freeman, a self-proclaimed Jewish cowboy from Chicago, used in his paintings. One item is a ceramic cat bought from a Native American girl after she posed with it for one of his paintings. Freeman’s Western-style jean jacket, that he consistently wore, hangs from his desk chair. Freeman is known for his use of lighting and color, influenced by Rembrandt, Peter Paul Rubens and John Singer Sargent. His detailed strokes grab the viewer’s attention. He occasionally used one-haired paintbrushes to capture detail. Freeman, obsessed with cowboys and Western culture as a child, decided he wanted to venture into painting professionally at the age of 8 – a vision he never gave up. Freeman’s curator, Bonnie Adams, said after taking a painting lesson, he came home and declared his family’s living room as his studio, the coffee table his workspace. “He told me this story, he said, ‘I cleared off the table and this is my studio,’” Adams said. “Right then and there, he painted there until he left home.” Freeman, who passed away in June of 2008 with appendix cancer, painted professional bull riders, ranchers, mountain men and Native Americans. Freeman also lived the lifestyle he painted, often bartering with Natives, sometimes in exchange for his art. Adams said Freeman’s realism was uncharacteristic compared to other Jewish artists, who traditionally paint abstract and symbolic paintings. “That’s not what Jewish artists are usually known for,” Adams said. “Ken would always say, ‘Well, I’m a Jewish cowboy – from Chicago.’” Freeman has painted portraits for actor John Wayne and country musicians Waylon Jennings and Ray

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2/10/2010


'Jewish Cowboy' Paints Western Life - The Atlanta Jewish Times - Atlanta, Georgia

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Herndon. Wayne’s son Ethan said Freeman’s portrait was the best he’s ever seen of his father. After Freeman moved to Arizona from Chicago in 1978, Adams said his Western painting “became more developed.” “He really embraced the lifestyle,” Adams said. “He became a cowboy.” Each Freeman portrait depicts a meaning, detailing his subject’s traditions and customs he refused to omit. “If you look at how Ken started as a child, in a poor Jewish community that’s filled with heritage and culture,” Adams said. “That’s why he appreciated the culture and heritage of the mountain man, the cowboy, the Native American.” Freeman would wake up each day and paint from sunrise to sunset, said Adams, in natural light at the north window in his house, etching each fine feature in a three-step process involving pencil sketching, a layer of burnt umber under-painting and oil colors on top. Each Freeman painting depicts a level of truth. Freeman painted a rodeo cowboy looking somber after drawing a vicious bull to ride (Tough Draw). He also asked a Native American mother to pose with her two daughters as they wove baskets (Power of the Basket). “He painted their souls,” Adams said. “He painted their passion.”

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2/10/2010


ArtsScene | Encore Atlanta: Atlanta’s Performing Arts Publication

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Atlanta’s arts scene is vibrant and exciting, and Encore Atlanta is proud to be a part of it. Here you’ll find news bits about and ruminations on The Scene.

The Rembrandt of the Rodeo January 17, 2010 at 4:32 pm

From Jan. 16 through May 22, a very special exhibition will be on display at the Booth Western Art Museum in Cartersville, Ga. Featuring 50 oil paintings and sculptures of the West and its inhabitants, “Kenneth M. Freeman Legacy Exhibition-Artist at Work” gives patrons a very special glimpse of a lifetime of work by Kenneth M. Freeman (1935-2008), a man nicknamed the “Rembrandt of the Rodeo” by members of the Arizona media, who viewed him as a local treasure and source of pride. Central to the exhibit is a re-creation of the artist’s studio. “It’s a great way for people to understand how an artist makes a living,” says Bonnie Adams, curator of the Kenneth M. Freeman Legacy Collection. “It shows how he painted and what was in his environment. People can see the [Old Masters] technique he used. He painted a picture three times. First, he put a full drawing on canvas. Then, on the same canvas, he laid down the full value painting in one color: burnt umber. Then, he laid down the same painting in color. There are also lots of artifacts that Ken used in his paintings. Having [the studio] there, we hope you’ll feel Ken and his magic.” Because the exhibit opens on Martin Luther King weekend, Adams chose to include several of his Buffalo Soldiers paintings and sculptures. Freeman and many of his models were members of the re-enactment group, the Ninth Memorial Arizona Buffalo Soldiers calvary. “People think all the Buffalo Soldiers were black, but the officers were white,” Adams explains. “There are a lot of under-told and unappreciated stories about them. The Buffalo Soldiers were sent to the toughest and most remote areas of the West.” Although Freeman’s Western-themed paintings hang in the collections of the Smithsonian and the Library of Congress’ Legacy Collection from Arizona, he painted portraits of Western legends such as John Wayne and Waylon Jennings, and he illustrated many Louis L’Amour books, he was an unlikely cowboy painter. Raised in Chicago, Freeman was brought up in a traditional Jewish family and had a very successful 20-year career as an illustrator that began with an apprenticeship with Haddon Sundblum, best known as the creator of Coca-Cola’s iconic Santa Claus ads.

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1/26/2010


ArtsScene | Encore Atlanta: Atlanta’s Performing Arts Publication

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But his childhood dream was to be both an artist and a cowboy. “When he was 43 years old, he decided Chicago was too cold and it was time to pursue the other part of his dream. So he moved to Arizona and took his camera and went to powwows, rodeos and cattle drives. He’d be herding cattle and photographing all at the same time. Then he’d come home with those photographs and bring those models to life on his canvas.” While in town during the exhibit’s opening, Adams will also be accepting a posthumousa award for Freeman. “Western Artists of America is awarding him their lifetime achievement award for his body of art, and from here on in, it’s going to be called the Freeman Award,” she says. For more information, visit the Booth Museum Web site. Posted in ArtsScene | Permalink | Comment

A Cappella Competition – call for submissions January 9, 2010 at 9:14 pm

Have you and your group ever thought about performing on the Tony Award winning Alliance Theatre stage? What about the opportunity to record a professional demo? Here’s your chance! In honor of their latest show, the a cappella Doo Wop musical Avenue X, the Alliance Theatre is proud to present our “Sing Your Soul” A Cappella Competition, and they would love to see your entry! Visit http://alliancetheatre.org/contest for all the details! Record a video with at least three people singing an awesome a cappella song and upload it to YouTube. Fill out an application and email it to lindsey.hardegree@woodruffcenter.org. Then tell everyone you know to come and vote! Each week during Avenue X, they’ll be picking a semifinalist based on the highest rated YouTube video. Each weekly semifinalist will then open that Friday evening’s performance of Avenue X before a packed Alliance house. It gets better!!! The three semifinalists will be then be judged by 3 all-star judges: z Jody Feldman, Associate Producer and Casting Director for the Alliance

Theatre z Nick Spangler, Season 13 winner of “The Amazing Race” and cast

member of Avenue X z Christine Pullara, host of WXIA-TV’s “Atlanta & Company” (a live, studio-

based weekday show featuring Atlanta businesses, food, arts, events and more)

The ultimate winner will receive professional studio time to make a recording! So what are you waiting for? Grab your friends and a video camera and get to singing! Posted in Arts Bits | Permalink | Comment

Get away to the islands this weekend December 3, 2009 at 11:33 am

Looking for a way to escape this holiday season? Saturday, Dec. 5, and Sunday, Dec. 6, the U.S. Virgin Islands will be hosting an island party weekend at Lenox Square Mall. Amenities will include complimentary

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1/26/2010


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Artist Ken Freeman... A Jewish Cowboy from Chicago

For artist Kenneth M. Freeman, the cowboy hat and boots were not a gimmick or shtick.

SCOTTSDALE, AZ.- Artist Ken Freeman always called himself a “Jewish Cowboy.” The world premiere of the Kenneth M. Freeman Legacy Exhibition opens at the Booth Western Art Museum in January 2010. The display consists of fifty (50) oil paintings and sculptures that feature working cowboys and cowgirls, rodeo heroes, Native American elders and children, mountain men, Western landscapes, and Buffalo Soldiers. For artist Kenneth M. Freeman, the cowboy hat and boots were not a gimmick or shtick. Neither was his Arizona attitude. Ken Freeman may have grown up in a traditional Jewish home in Chicago, Illinois but make no mistake … he was a cowboy. His early career as an artist included illustrations for books by Louis L’Amour and Will James and culminated with compelling portraits of cowboys, Native American elders and children, mountain men, Buffalo Soldiers, western landscapes and rodeo heroes. The Booth Western Art Museum, an Affiliate of the Smithsonian Institution, hosts the world premiere of the Kenneth M. Freeman Legacy Exhibition – Artist at Work opening on January 16, 2010. The exhibit continues through May 2, 2010 in the newly created Special Exhibition Gallery. Kenneth M. Freeman was a graduate of the American Academy of Art in Chicago. At the age of 15, he began taking classes at the Academy in the summer of 1950. He studied with renowned artist Haddon Sundblom. Freeman passed away in June of 2008 leaving a rich body of work unrivaled by many artists. His paintings hang today in museums, galleries and private collections around the world including The Library of Congress American Legacy Collection, The Booth Western Art Museum and the family of President Herbert Hoover. “He was a man you could never forget. His enthusiasm for life and art was contagious. Of all the artists from the Academy I've met over the years, Ken really stood out as one of a kind,” said Aron Gagliardo, historian and archivist of the American Academy of Art. According to Bonnie Adams, curator for the Kenneth M. Freeman Legacy exhibition, his subject matter was unique for a Jewish painter. “Most Jewish artists are not figurative in their subject matter,” Adams points out. “They paint abstracts and symbolism, but not usually realistic figures and portraits. Ken was a rare breed … a special man and a special artist. He had chutzpah and the courage to live his dream.” “The Kenneth Freeman Legacy Exhibition represents a true working artist,” said Seth Hopkins, executive director of the Booth Western Art Museum. “The exhibition shows the artist at work … as an illustrator, sculptor, and painter. The Booth Museum has two of Ken’s paintings in our permanent collection.” “This will also be the first temporary exhibition at the Booth Museum since the opening of our new 40,000 sq. ft. expansion completed in October, 2009,” added Hopkins. “We now house the largest permanent exhibition space for Western art in the country. We say: You don’t have to leave the South to visit the West.” Consisting of fifty (50) oil paintings and sculptures that feature working cowboys and cowgirls, rodeo heroes, Native American elders and children, mountain men, Western landscapes, and Buffalo Soldiers the exhibit also includes an area focusing on Ken’s artistic technique.

http://www.artdaily.com/index.asp?int_sec=2&int_new=34927

1/26/2010


Ken Freeman Exhibit - 11Alive.com | WXIA | Atlanta, GA

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Updated 1/13/2010 2:12:46 PM USA TODAY

The Booth Western Art Museum , an Affiliate of the Smithsonian Institution, hosts the world premiere of the Kenneth M. Freeman Legacy Exhibition Artist at Work opening on January 16, 2010 and continuing through May 2, 2010 in the newly created Special Exhibition Gallery. This collection is a traveling retrospective of the late Kenneth M. Freeman (1935 - 2008) who had a prolific career as both an illustrator and fine artist, primarily portraying the American West. Artist at Work presents a cross-section of Freeman's lifetime body of work and range of mediums. Works of Kenneth M. Freeman are in the permanent collection of the Smithsonian Museum, Library of Congress , American Art Academy, and Booth Museum as well as distinguished private collections. Ken was known affectionately as "Rembrandt of the Rodeo" by members of the press. The Kenneth M. Freeman Legacy Exhibition - Artist at Work scheduled opening on the Martin Luther King weekend holds special significance because of Freeman's paintings, sculpture and artifacts portraying Buffalo Soldiers. 770-387-1300 www.boothmuseum.org

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1/26/2010


The Kenneth M. Freeman Legacy

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Kenneth M. Freeman Museum Exhibition: Comprehensive Presentation