Page 1

CURRICULUM GUIDE - 2012/2013 MIDDLE Sc- GRADES 4 TO 8 LAKESIDE CAMPUS


MISSIO N Engage. Enlighten. Empower. VISIO N The Canadian International School in Singapore is a dynamic, caring and safe learning environment. Our school community celebrates its internationalism. With our challenging, well-rounded curriculum and our dedicated teachers and staff, we strive to develop the whole child. Students enjoy learning by making meaningful connections between the classroom and the world at large. CIS prepares students to be successful, well-balanced and responsible global citizens.

CORE VALUE S R espect: We respect ourselves and respect others for their special talents, skills and contributions. Commitment: We keep our promises and will fulfil all our commitments. Integrity: We believe that integrity is the heart of all lasting relationships and endeavours, and will work with each other in good faith. Collaboration: We will cooperate with each other, learn and have fun together to achieve things which are of significance. R esponsibility: We take pride in all that we do and are accountable for our actions.

Canadian International School Pte. Ltd. CPE UEN: 199002243H Period of Registration: 8 June 2011 to 7 June 2015 Printed: August 2011 All information is correct at the time of printing but is subject to change.


TABLE OF CONTENTS

PART I

CIS Philosophy and Husky Paw Descriptors CIS Touchstones for Learning Expanding Horizons Years Special Features of the Expanding Horizons Years Brain Research and Learning Pastoral Care and Transition THE INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE PROGRAMME (IB) The IB Learner Profile The IB Primary Years Programme (PYP) and Middle Years Programme (MYP) Connections

3 3 3 3 4 5 6 6 7

PART II THE IB Primary Years Programme (PYP)

11

PYP TRANSDISCIPLINARY THEMES PYP/MYP Transition UNITS OF INQUIRY - GRADES FOUR TO SIX PYP TRANSDISCIPLINARY SKILLS CURRICULUM OVERVIEW - GRADES FOUR TO SIX

12 13 14 16 20

PART III THE IB Middle Years Programme (MYP)

37

MYP Subjects MYP Assessment MYP Areas of Interaction (AOIs) myp aPPROACHES TO LEARNING (ATLs) CURRICULUM OVERVIEW - GRADES SEVEN TO EIGHT

39 40 70 74 76

PART IV CURRICULUM SUPPORT

99

Communication to Parents Library Technology Guidelines Academic Resource Programme English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) Open Minds/EXCURSION WEEK W.A.E.L.P. Extra Curricular Activities (ECAs) Spirit Days and House Leagues Moving on to High School – Grades 9 – 12 THE INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE DIPLOMA PROGRAMME THE ONTARIO SECONDARY SCHOOL DIPLOMA

100 100 101 102 102 103 104 104 104 105 106 106


Welcome from the MIDDLE School Principal The transition phase from childhood towards life as a young adult demands a special programme. At CIS we have called this programme the

‘Expanding Horizons Years’ The CIS Grades 4 – 8 Middle School ‘Expanding Horizons Years’ programme aims to address each student’s varied levels of emotional, physical, and intellectual development. Our aim is to ensure authentic, varied and appropriate learning experiences that connect to prior learning whilst at the same time recognize the joy and growth that comes from new challenges. The learner is at the centre of all that we do. Our curriculum enables students to make meaningful links between the topics, themselves and the ‘real world’. As students at this stage of learning and growth often become deeply engaged with special interests and pursuits, our talented and professional team of teachers will create learning opportunities for students to explore, investigate, understand and share their growing skills and knowledge. Through the International Baccalaureate (IB) Primary Years Programme (PYP) interdisciplinary skills, and the Middle Years Programme (MYP) Areas of Interaction, concepts will be understood, subjects will be explored and integrated, and skills will be acquired and practiced to create meaningful learning experiences for students, while at the same time providing rigorous training for future success. The ‘Expanding Horizons Years’ structure provides opportunities for our students to move seamlessly from the IB PYP through to the IB MYP. Learners in the ‘Expanding Horizons Years’ are increasingly able to discuss, in an ongoing and reflective manner, their growing understanding of themselves as effective and quality focused learners. We support, encourage and expect from our students an ongoing daily commitment to understand what excellence means, and to apply the work and study habits to meet the demands of the criterion standards. Included in this developing understanding is the facility to experience and grow in leadership. Our holistic approach to education allows students to explore alternative paths to success as we believe that these are the skills and attitudes that demonstrate the true rigour of a learner and leader of today and for tomorrow. This is a time of self exploration, self discovery, and understanding of who I am and who I can be. Our key focus is to provide the very best in learning opportunities for our students. We will deliver an ‘Expanding Horizons Years’ curriculum that is innovative, engaging and rigorous, and in doing so, set a very high standard for Middle School education. Equally the special spirit of being caring and valued will continue to be a hallmark of the CIS Middle School learning community. Sincerely,

Keith Bland Principal Lakeside Grades 4- 8 Middle School

2 - 2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE


CANADIAN INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL PHILOSOPHY The Canadian International School in Singapore is a dynamic, caring and safe learning environment. Our school community celebrates its internationalism. With our challenging, well-rounded curriculum and our dedicated teachers and staff, we strive to develop the whole child. Students enjoy learning by making meaningful connections between the classroom and the world at large. CIS prepares students to be successful, well-balanced and responsible global citizens.

learning community is able to offer our students. We have identified four significant times of growth in their journey of learning: Preschool to Senior Kindergarten The Exploratory Years Grades One - Three The Independence and Challenge Years Grades Four – Eight The Expanding Horizons Years

Touchstones For Learning Our “touchstones” are the beliefs that guide teaching and learning at CIS. These are the understandings which we see as essential to genuine inquiry in classrooms. • Learners need to feel safe and valued in order to learn. • Learning is developmental. • We hold an image of learners as competent, creative, and full of ideas when they come to school. • Learners construct and co-construct knowledge. • Dialogue is a primary process through which we construct knowledge. • Environments must be thoughtfully created to support active learning. • Students’ progress can be seen as a learning continuum. • There are multiple forms of representation through which learners may develop and express their understanding. • Learners make the best progress toward their academic potential when they are challenged with high standards. At CIS we cherish, understand and support the development and changes that our students are experiencing physically, socially, emotionally and academically. The CIS curriculum aims to ensure that all students experience a seamless transition of successful learning connectedness from Preschool through to Grade 12. We believe that a student who is encouraged and motivated to view learning as a lifelong and exciting process, has attained a high level of academic skills and understandings, demonstrates positive social and cultural values will be equipped to meet the future education challenges that they will face. Aligned to the powerful foundation for learning provided by the three International Baccalaureate Programmes, we have identified special milestone grade groupings that will further strengthen and extend what the CIS

Grades Nine - Twelve The Defining Years The interdependence and connectedness of each of these stages has been represented by the footprint of the Canadian Husky, our school’s mascot. The Husky is synonymous with strength, power and endurance balanced with agility, alertness and boldness. It is also known as a gentle and affectionate animal that enjoys attention.

Special Features of the Expanding Horizons Years • •

• • •

• • • •

A family focused environment where children are encouraged to be children and young people are recognized and cherished. The development of the whole child will be a priority with advisor and homeroom based pastoral care and counseling continuing to be a special strength. A programme that recognizes connectedness of learning across the IB PYP and IB MYP. Academic rigour through the development, acquisition and use of transdisciplinary skills and approaches to learning. Focused learning achievement through: reading and writing continuums, mathematics benchmarks, learning exemplars, quality indicators, rubrics and IB MYP criteria. These ensure the recognition of learning needs, ongoing success and quality achievement. A five year additional language programme in preparation for higher level language acquisition and mastery. Expansion of the Open Minds programme to provide for self directed learning using artifacts and non-traditional learning environments. A commitment to higher level thinking and the application of ideas and understandings. Opportunities to work with specialists in music, dramatic arts, physical education, technology

2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE - 3


BRAIN RESEARCH AND LEARNING • • •

• • •

• •

• •

• • •

and languages. Inter-grade activities and grade level competitive and non-competitive activities through our House League programme. Use of specialist learning areas. The development of the skills and attitudes required to use the portfolio as evidence of a ‘Journey of Learning’ will be refined and supported. Ongoing guidance and support for developing and demonstrating increasingly effective self management skills. This will include management of homework agendas, personal belongings and lockers. The PYP Exhibition will be a wonderful celebration of the learning process and outcomes for our Grade 6 students. Extended opportunities in Grades 7 and 8 to explore specialty subjects with dedicated subject teachers and specialty classrooms. Involvement in field trips and Cultural, Academic, Sports and Action (C.A.S.A.) based experiences exploring the Asian region. These will provide students with a safe context in which to explore new challenges and to reflect on their growth. Skills for future learning success such as examinations are introduced in Grade 8. An Experiential Learning Programme (W.A.E.L.P.) providing students with the opportunity to explore and learn new physical, artistic and creative activities not intimately linked with the formal curriculum. A special focus on the design cycle in technology to further develop the ways in which we think, plan, create, and reflect. A competitive sports programme through our in-school House League programme and also with local and international schools in the region. Opportunities for engagement in school and community service through C.A.S.A. and special events. Opportunities to take part in international mathematics competitions in Grades 7 and 8. Community celebration evenings (Holiday Concert, Talent Show).

4 - 2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE

BRAIN RESEARCH AND LEARNING

As a school we are excited about the expanding knowledge that is now available through research related to how students learn and the conditions, factors and strategies that are conducive to effective learning. These are exciting developments that are strengthening our understanding of best practice in teaching and learning for both our teachers and students. This research is incorporated into our programme and includes: • • • • •

Teaching students strategies for framing their thinking. The practicing of the skills and processes required to prepare and present reports, essays and presentations. Understanding how the brain works and the conditions for enhancing the effectiveness of the brain. Supporting students with organizational planning. Developing the mindsets conducive to achievement and success from effective work habits and a commitment to ongoing improvement. Ongoing professional reading and professional development.


PASTORAL CARE AND TRANSITION PASTORAL CARE AND TRANSITION Pastoral care is highly valued at CIS and time is created for teachers and students to build relationships and for teachers to get to know each student from the ‘whole child’ point of view and in line with the attributes of the IB Learner Profile. Pastoral care provides an opportunity to support learning by teaching and reinforcing organizational skills and time management. Pastoral care is also an important time for incidental teaching of other issues that arise such as goal setting and organization, community service, special grade level or class initiatives, social dynamics, peer pressure and health issues etc. All Middle School students are organized into advisor (Grades 7 & 8) and homeroom classes (Grades 4 – 6). In Grades 4 – 6 the pastoral care programme is an integral part of the day and the homeroom teachers will incorporate it into the ongoing structure and framework for learning. When a need arises a special focus will be incorporated into the interaction and celebration weeks that occur as a part of the C.A.S.A. programme. In Grades 7 and 8 all students will have an advisor teacher and will be in a group of 7 to 11 students. They will meet daily with their advisor teacher, between 8.45 a.m. and 8.55 a.m. for announcements. They will also meet on a regular basis through the C.A.S.A. programme, regularly scheduled meetings and interviews, and as issues arise. In Grades 7 and 8 the advisor teacher will provide both support and guidance to the students regarding all facets of their learning and interactions in the school. This will include monitoring learning behaviour, providing guidance on meeting learning goals, organizational or behavioural requirements and expectations, guidance regarding the setting up and maintenance of the portfolio of learning and liaison with parents.

We support successful transition through: • • • •

Recognition and fostering of the IB Learner Profile. Consistency in the use of IB terminology. Specific Health programmes including a pubertal change and human development unit. Information sharing and dialogue between grade level teachers.

Specific Activities • Orientation Day (August). • Celebration Assemblies (Throughout the year). • Mixed grade level interactions (Throughout the year). • Information meetings on curriculum and special events (Throughout the year). • Grade Three Orientation and transition meetings for parents (February). • Grade Three Orientation and transition meetings for students (March or April). • Grade Eight Orientation and transition meetings for parents (March). • Information sharing on Excursion Week (December - February). • House League Council and PTA Events (Throughout the year). • Parent -Teacher meetings, Parent - Teacher Interviews (January),Three Way Conferences (September) and Student Led Conferences (March). • End of First (December) and Second (June) Semester Reports. • Excursion Week (March). • Grade Eight Orientation and transition meetings for students (April). • Grade 7 information session for Grade 6 students provided by Grade 7 students (May) • End of Year Celebration Assembly (June).

Middle School is a time of transition at many levels; transition from Elementary School through to Middle School, transition from a more homeroom based programme to the increased specialist teaching in Grades 7 and 8, transition from Middle School to High School and from childhood to early adolescence. For many of our students it is also a time of transition to a new country.

2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE - 5


IB INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE PROGRAMME AND THE IB LEARNER PROFILE INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE PROGRAMME

The IB Learner Profile

The Canadian International School believes in providing students with a nurturing, safe environment to develop their academic skills. CIS is proud to use our knowledge of effective teaching practice to provide the most valuable educational experiences for your child. Our inquiry based International Baccalaureate programmes combine with the best of the Canadian curriculum to provide students with an in-depth understanding of the world. We are a true International Baccalaureate World School and offer the International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme (DP) Grades 11 and 12, the Middle Years Programme (MYP) Grades 7 – 10, and the Primary Years Programme (PYP), ECE to Grade 6. We also offer an additional diploma option, Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) in Grades 11 and 12 from the Canadian province of Ontario.

The Learner Profile is a common and internationally recognized criteria for examining our success in achieving these traits.

Building from an IB philosophy, students are encouraged to question, discover and communicate through an interdisciplinary and integrated approach to learning. The combination of highly trained teachers, a challenging, yet flexible curriculum and an individual approach to learning, allows students to develop to their full potential. The end result is a quality education for the international student. Teachers are continually in-serviced throughout the school year by professional IB trainers to ensure teaching methodologies and assessment strategies are effectively carried out in each classroom.

For further information regarding the International Baccalaureate Programme visit: www.ibo.org. For further information regarding the Ontario Curriculum visit: www.edu.gov.on.ca.

Caring Care for others. Be sensitive to the needs of other people. Be a good friend to your classmates. Communicator Think and communicate effectively in many ways and in more than one language. Inquirer Be curious about the world. Conduct research independently. Develop a love for learning and discover new things. Knowledgeable Independently explore relevant and significant concepts. Remember what you have learned. Draw on this knowledge and apply it to new situations in your life. Open-Minded Listen to other points of view and consider many possibilities before making a decision. Celebrate the differences in the world. Principled Have a sense of fairness and be honest with yourself and with others. Know the rules at school and follow them. Complete your work independently to the best of your ability. Reflective Know your strengths and areas of improvement. Think about these things and make positive changes where you can. Reflect on situations that occur before taking action. Risk-Taker Dare to try new things. Solve problems in many ways. Be brave and tell people what you think is right. Thinker Solve problems and make good decisions. Think creatively and critically. Balanced Be healthy by eating properly and exercising. Understand that it is important to have a balance between the physical and mental aspects of your body.

6 - 2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE


IB PRIMARY YEARS PROGRAMME AND MIDDLE YEARS PROGRAMME CONNECTIONS THE IB PRIMARY YEARS PROGRAMME (PYP) AND MIDDLE YEARS (MYP) PROGRAMME CONNECTIONS Learner Profile • • • • • • • • • •

Inquirers Thinkers Communicators Risk-takers Knowledgeable Principled Caring Open-minded Well-balanced Reflective

Engagement in transdisciplinary learning PYP Concepts Powerful ideas that students must explore and re-explore in order to develop understanding: • Form • Function • Causation • Change • Connection • Perspective • Responsibility • Reflection

MYP Areas of Interaction Powerful ideas that students must explore and re-explore in order to develop understanding: • Health and Social Education • Human Ingenuity • Environments • Approaches to Learning • Community and Service

Engagement in interdisciplinary learning PYP Organizing Themes • Who we are • Where we are in place and time • How we express ourselves • How the world works • How we organize ourselves • Sharing the planet

MYP Fundamental Concepts • Holistic Learning • Intercultural Awareness • Communication

Adopted by both PYP and MYP teachers as a basis for describing the attributes and dispositions of an ‘international’ person. A common and internationally recognized criteria for examining our success in achieving these traits.

A rigorous, broad and balanced range of knowledge and skills. ‘What We Learn’ PYP Units of Inquiry • Social Studies • Language A English • Science & Technology • Arts Language – English • Reading, Writing, Listening and Speaking Foreign Language • French or Mandarin Mathematics Arts Science & Technology Physical Education

MYP Language A • English Language B • French or Mandarin Humanities Technology Mathematics Arts Sciences Physical Education

A Programme of Inquiry

Opportunities for individual and collaborative planning and research. PYP Units of Inquiry • Grade 6 Exhibition • Grade 6 is the PYP / MYP Transition Year

MYP Interdisciplinary Units • Personal Project Grade 10

2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE - 7


IB PRIMARY YEARS PROGRAMME AND MIDDLE YEARS PROGRAMME CONNECTIONS Developing understanding of the skills of learning Inquiry – Knowledge – Action – Reflection. ‘How We Learn’

PYP

MYP

Transdisciplinary Skills To assist students to increasingly understand the nature of learning, and to develop increasing sophistication in their approach to their own inquiry.

Approaches to Learning To assist students to increasingly understand the nature of learning, and to develop increasing sophistication in their approach to their own inquiry.

Development of positive attitudes towards people, towards the environment and towards learning. PYP Learner Profile. Transdisciplinary Skills. Attitudes as one of the Essential Elements. Action.

MYP

celebrating and reporting on student attainment and achievement PYP

MYP

Portfolio of Learning • Goal setting. • Range of samples of learning and achievement. • Reflection rubrics • Feedback and feed forward. • Basis for home school partnership. Alignment with a continuum of learning (Reading, Writing and Mathematics). Three Way Conferences (September).

Portfolio of Learning • Goal setting. • Range of samples learning and achievement. • Feedback and feed forward. • Reflection. • Rubrics. • MYP criteria goal setting. • Basis for home school partnership. Three Way Conferences – (September) End of Semester Reports – (MYP criteria) End of Semester One Interviews Student Led Conferences – (March) Grade 10 Personal Project

Learner Profile. Areas of Interaction. Approaches to Learning. Community and Service.

The adoption of ‘Essential Agreements’ as the special considerations or actions we have identified in our CIS learning communities, will enable all members to learn effectively and result in quality outcomes.

ACTION AND REFLECTION IN ORDER TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE TO AND WITHIN THE WORLD PYP

MYP

Support for UOI generated and school based opportunities for action and service.

Community and Service.

8 - 2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE

Middle School PYP and MYP Learners Are internationally minded young people who feel, demonstrate and value: •

Confidence

Empathy

Appreciation

Enthusiasm

Commitment

Independence

Cooperation

Integrity

Creativity

Respect

Curiosity

Tolerance


IB PRIMARY YEARS PROGRAMME AND MIDDLE YEARS PROGRAMME CONNECTIONS Middle School PYP and MYP Learners Use effective Transdisciplinary Skills/Approaches to Learning. We have identified important expectations under each of the following. Specific goals for each grade level are: • • • • •

Communication For Effective Learning. Self Management / Organization, Study Practices and Attitudes For Effective Learning. Thinking Skills / Metacognitive Skills and Problem Solving For Effective Learning. Research/Information Literacy Skills for Effective Learning. Social and Collaborative Skills and Attitudes for Effective Learning.

Learners at CIS use knowledge and skills to develop higher level and conceptual thinking By looking at eight key concepts and questions learners can gain important understandings about things. A CONCEPT is a BIG idea that is developed and applied through many learning experiences. By looking at eight key concepts and questions learners can gain important understandings about things:

REFLECTION: How do I know? We need to think about what we know and make sure we have used good reasoning and reliable information. RESPONSIBILITY: What is our responsibility? Based on understandings, people make choices and their actions based on these choices do make a difference.

BLOOM’S TAXONOMY Our Middle School curriculum is committed to developing higher level thinking and the PYP concepts combined with the research of Joseph Bloom, who in 1956 developed a taxonomy for cognition, are important components in supporting this goal. Evaluation synthesis analysis application comprehension knowledge (Bloom’s Taxonomy)

FORM: What is it? Everything has a form that we can observe, identify, describe and categorize. FUNCTION: How does it work? Everything has a purpose or way of behaving that we can investigate. CONNECTION: How is it connected to other things? We live in a world of connected systems where changing one thing makes another thing change too. CHANGE: How is it changing? Everything changes or moves in a different way from one state to another. CAUSATION: Why is it like it is? Things don’t just happen, something makes them happen. PERSPECTIVE: What are the points of view? People and groups view things from their own perspectives. We can think about the same idea differently in different subjects.

2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE - 9


NOTES

10 - 2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE


THE IB PRIMARY YEARS PROGRAMME GRADES 4 TO 6 THE EXPANDING HORIZONS YEARS


pyp: TRANSDISCIPLINARY THEMES THE INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE PRIMARY YEARS PROGRAMME (PYP) As an IB World School, the Primary Years Programme (PYP) is the organizational framework that drives the teaching and learning at CIS. The PYP is an international programme designed to foster the development of the whole child, not just in the classroom but also through other means of learning. The PYP focuses on the total growth of the developing child, touching hearts as well as minds and encompassing social, physical, emotional and cultural needs in addition to academic welfare. In the Primary Years Programme, students explore many different subject areas, often in ways that transcend conventional subject boundaries. Throughout the units, teachers and students generate questions with which to conduct inquiry into significant content. Through this inquiry process, students gain essential knowledge and skills and are encouraged to engage in responsible action. Students don’t just acquire knowledge, they examine larger concepts and begin to make meaningful connections in their world. They do all of this in a climate which fosters positive attitudes and develops a concept of international mindedness.

WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS OF THE IB PYP? •

• • •

The approach to teaching and learning in the PYP is good preparation for the IBO’s Middle Years Programme and the IBO’s Diploma Programme. Students in other schools implementing the PYP will have common learning experiences and as such the transfer between PYP schools is easier for students. The PYP defines a balanced programme of concepts, knowledge, skills, attitudes and action for students. The PYP promotes good teaching practice, both through sharing ideas and training sessions for teachers. The PYP incorporates a range of assessment, recording and reporting strategies, so that parents will receive clear information of their child’s progress. The PYP sets high standards for, and has, high expectations of the students.

12 - 2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE

Students Need To: 1. Be an Inquirer. 2. Take Action. 3. Explore the Concepts.

PYP Learners at CIS Learn Through Organized Inquiry Units of Inquiry are organized within SIX tRANSDISCIPLINARY THEMES: Who We Are • The things we believe and value. • The different ways we can be healthy. • Our relationships with others. • Our rights and responsibilities. • What it means to be human. Where We Are in Place and Time • • • • •

Our personal histories. History and geography of the world and where we live. Our homes and journeys. Discoveries, explorations (local and global) and migrations. Contributions of people and civilizations.

How We Express Ourselves • Our ideas. • Our feelings. • What we believe. • What we value. • Our creativity. • Our appreciation of the world around us. Sharing the Planet • Our rights and responsibilities when we are sharing resources that won’t last forever. • Communities. • The relationship between communities. • Peace and conflict resolution. • Access to equal opportunities.


pyp: TRANSDISCIPLINARY THEMES How the World Works • Things we can see and touch. • Nature and its laws. • Things made by humans. • The impact of science and technology. • The interaction between the natural world and human society. • Scientific processes. How We Organize Ourselves • Organizations. • How groups make decisions. • Human systems and communication. • The world of work.

GRADE 6 – PYP / MYP TRANSITION Grade 6 will be the culminating year of the PYP. The Exhibition is a key milestone year for our students in their understanding and application of the three interrelated components: ‘What do we want to learn?’, ‘How best we will learn?’ and ‘How will we know what we have learned?’ Units of Inquiry will form the structural basis for major studies. Equally though, we are very committed to ensuring that the transition from PYP through to the MYP is highly effective. Accordingly, during the Grade 6 year, particular emphasis will be placed on supporting students with their understanding and development related to the transdisciplinary skills, and when applicable, incorporating the MYP Approaches to Learning. In addition, when authentic opportunities arise for the inclusion of other dimensions of the MYP Areas of Interaction, teachers will be encouraged to develop them. We believe that this increased connectedness between the two programmes will provide for a seamless transition and reinforce a continuum of skills, understandings and attitudes that will ensure each student’s development as a successful and responsible international learner.

2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE - 13


pyp: units of inquiry - Grades 4 to 6 WHO WE ARE

LEVEL

An inquiry into the nature of the self; beliefs and values; personal, physical, mental, social and spiritual health; human relationships including families, friends, communities, and cultures; rights and responsibilities; what it means to be human.

CENTRAL IDEA: Rights and Responsibilities help to meet and protect human needs.

Grade 4 9 YEARS OLD

LINES OF INQUIRY: • Human rights. How humans rights are not • universally met. • How human rights are protected. • What responsibilities we have to attempt to meet and respect other peoples’ rights. KEY CONCEPTS: Responsibility, Perspective.

Grade 5 10 YEARS OLD

CENTRAL IDEA: Understanding how we think and learn can help us become better learners. LINES OF INQUIRY: • How the brain is connected to learning. • The elements of effective learning such as environments, learning styles (Multiple intelligences), healthy living, getting organized. • How reflection helps learning. KEY CONCEPTS: Reflection, Connection. CENTRAL IDEA: Beliefs and values underpin how we live our live. LINES OF INQUIRY: • Our thoughts and actions are influenced by a variety of factors. • Beliefs and values change over time. • People are influenced by others.

Grade 6 11 YEARS OLD

KEY CONCEPTS: Perspective.

14 - 2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE

WHERE WE ARE IN PLACE AND TIME An inquiry into orientation in place and time; personal histories; homes and journeys; the discoveries, explorations and migrations of humankind; the relationships between and the interconnectedness of individuals and civilizations, from local and global perspectives. CENTRAL IDEA: Exploration of the world changes our perspective and understanding. LINES OF INQUIRY: • The many forms of exploration. • Ways exploration impacts our understandings. Reasons for exploration. • • The way technology impacts exploration. KEY CONCEPTS: CHANGE, perspective.

CENTRAL IDEA: Present civilizations are built upon aspects from the past. LINES OF INQUIRY: • Characteristics of civilizations. How the past and present are • connected. • Past artifacts systems that are still used today. • The affect that artifacts and systems have on our lives today. KEY CONCEPTS: Form, Function, Connection.

CENTRAL IDEA: All countries have a location and history that connect them in different ways. LINES OF INQUIRY: The implications of a country’s • geographic location. • Factors that influence a country’s development. • Country’s modern day identity. KEY CONCEPTS: Connection, Causation.

HOW WE EXPRESS OURSELVES An inquiry into the ways in which we discover and express ideas, feelings, nature, culture, beliefs and values; the ways in which we reflect on, extend and enjoy our creativity; our appreciation of the aesthetic.

CENTRAL IDEA: Performing arts provides opportunity for expression. LINES OF INQUIRY: • The elements of dance, drama and rhythmic music (form and fuction). • Using performing arts to share ideas, dreams, moods and experiences. • The connection between the performer and the audience. KEY CONCEPTS: FORM, FUCTION, CAUSATION.

CENTRAL IDEA: The media is a powerful tool which can influence our choices and behaviour. LINES OF INQUIRY: • The purpose of advertisements. • Advertising techniques that are used to influence consumer behaviour. • How we can make informed choices as consumers. • Created needs. KEY CONCEPTS: Responsibility, Perspective. CENTRAL IDEA: Music evokes emotion. LINES OF INQUIRY: • Different types of emotions music can evoke. • Connection between music and personal experiences. • Connection between lyrics and poetry. KEY CONCEPTS: PERSPECTIVE, CONNECTION.


pyp: units of inquiry - grades 4 to 6 HOW THE WORLD WORKS

HOW WE ORGANIZE OURSELVES

SHARING THE PLANET

An inquiry into the natural world and its law; the interaction between the natural world (physical and biological) and human societies; how humans use their understanding of scientific principles; the impact of scientific and technological advances on society and on the environment.

An inquiry into the interconnectedness of the human-made systems and communities; the structure and function of organizations; societal decision-making; economic activities and their impact on humankind and the environment.

An inquiry into rights and responsibilities in the struggle to share finite resources with other people and with other living things; communities and the relationships within and between them; access to equal opportunities; peace and conflict resolution.

CENTRAL IDEA: Forces can be managed to make work easier for humans. LINES OF INQUIRY: • How humans manipulate force (machines, friction, etc.) • Uses of simple and compound machines in daily life. The role of the design cycle, fair testing, • and measurement and scientific process. • Understand the relationship between force, work and distance.

CENTRAL IDEA: Systems are created to maintain organization within communities. LINES OF INQUIRY: • The concept of organization (Impact). • How and why organizations work (Function). The impact of the organization within • their community. • Connections between people / roles in organizations (Impact & Connection).

CENTRAL IDEA: Living and non-living things in ecosystems are connected. LINES OF INQUIRY: • How living and non-living things are interdependent. • How life is sustained within ecosystems. Factors (climate, water, food sources, • soil type, human actions) that can affect living things in the ecosystem.

KEY CONCEPTS: Form, Function, CAUSATION.

CENTRAL IDEA: Planet earth is part of an immense and complex universe which inspires human curiosity. LINES OF INQUIRY: • Systems are made up of different parts. • The parts within a system influence one another. • Curiosity leads to new discoveries. KEY CONCEPTS: CAUSATION.

KEY CONCEPTS: CONNECTION, FUCTION.

CENTRAL IDEA: Leadership affects how a community functions. LINES OF INQUIRY: Characteristics of leadership. • • Influences of leadership. • Stories of leaders. KEY CONCEPTS: Reflection, Responsibility.

KEY CONCEPTS: Connection, CAUSATION.

CENTRAL IDEA: Water is an essential resource that is not equally available to everyone. LINES OF INQUIRY: • The sources of water on earth (sources, no water is “new”, water cycle). • Access to freshwater (physical, quality). • Use and impact of water in daily life. Demand and impact on water resources • (watering restrictions, food for the population, pollution). KEY CONCEPTS: Responsibility, FUNCTION.

CENTRAL IDEA: Scientific investigation explains how energy works. LINES OF INQUIRY: • Ways small electrical charges are produced. • Electrical pathways and currents. • The ways that electricity can be transformed into light, heat, sound, motion and magnetic effects. • Different sources of electrical energy. KEY CONCEPTS: Function, Form, Connection.

CENTRAL IDEA: The decision to restore lives, places or objects impacts communities. LINES OF INQUIRY: • A significant issue. • The decision and reason for taking restorative action. • The potential impact of restorative action. KEY CONCEPTS: PERSPECTIVE.

CENTRAL IDEA: Conflict can be solved in peaceful ways. THE EXHIBITION LINES OF INQUIRY: • Causes of conflict. • Strategies for dealing with conflict resolution. • The outcomes of conflict. KEY CONCEPTS: PERSPECTIVE, REFLECTION.

2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE - 15


PYP: Transdisciplinary Skills PYP TRANSDISCIPLINARY SKILLS: GRADES 4 TO 6

TRANSDISCIPLINARY SKILLS THAT WILL BE USED AND EXTENDED BY GRAde 4 students are: Communication for Effective Learning • • • • • • • • • •

Speaking clearly, coherently and concisely in group and class situations. Following oral and written instructions and responding constructively and creatively to the ideas of others. Demonstrating well thought out ideas and learning in group and class presentations. Questioning and seeking clarification when unsure. Extending and using an appropriate vocabulary over a range of learning contexts. Demonstrating increased independence and development of reading skills and reading comprehension. Writing effectively using an increasing range of genres and language skills. Actively using the skills of revising and editing in all written work. Increasing proficiency in learning French and Mandarin. With guidance, maintaining a PYP Portfolio of Learning.

Self Management/Organization, Study Practices and Attitudes for Effective Learning • • • • • • • • • •

Demonstrating a positive attitude and a thinking engagement for learning. Being punctual and using time effectively. Ensuring work is neatly presented and well organized. Having the necessary materials and resources to complete work to a high standard. Using the Homework Agenda on a daily basis to ensure that homework is completed and project deadlines are always met. With guidance, demonstrating increased independence in organizing and self managing resources. Asking for help and assistance as required. Setting, achieving and reporting on goals for improvement. Preparing for tests. Making safe decisions and healthy choices.

16 - 2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE

Thinking Skills, Metacognitive Skills and Problem Solving for Effective Learning • • • • • • • • • •

Demonstrating the Traits of the IB Learner Profile. Being able to discuss yourself as a successful learner and to adapt for different learning situations. Asking searching questions for research, inquiry or investigation. Independently and in groups completing research and investigations. Presenting new and creative ideas and thoughts. Using problem solving strategies and skills. Using and learning from written and oral feedback, tests, self assessment processes, rubrics and goal setting sheets. Demonstrating different levels of thinking through questioning and responses. Being a part of class or group initiatives for school and environmental action and service. Increasing understanding of the human body and improvement in P.E. and sporting skills.

Research / Information Literacy Skills for Effective Learning • • • • • • • • • •

Using the five senses to experience and explore learning in its widest realm. Expanding use of information and communication technology. With support demonstrating increased independent skill in identifying and locating alternative sources of information. Collecting, organizing and classifying information using concepts maps and graphic organizers. Increasingly confident in organizing thoughts and ideas for different purposes. Finding patterns and connections and using them to make deductions and conclusions. Using a bibliography and citation skills (Noodletools). Identifying PYP concepts and discussing initiating questions. Demonstrate increased understanding of the importance of evaluating information sources. Demonstrating an increasing knowledge, awareness and understanding of global people, environments and issues.


PYP: Transdisciplinary Skills Social and Collaborative Skills and Attitudes for Effective Learning • • • • • • • • •

Showing respect for other cultures and respect for your own culture. Respecting your classmates, their ideas, points of view and learning styles. Supporting successful and dynamic learning activities both within and out of the classroom. Being open minded and willing to try different ways to solve problems, achieve goals and complete assignments. Being cooperative and encourage the contributions from others. Using the strength of individual and group ideas and action in all programmes. Contributing to effective group planning, decision making and action. Knowing about and respecting the personal space of others. Demonstrating quality learning behaviour in different situations: formal presentations, class, group work and informal learning environments. Demonstrating class and group leadership.

TRANSDISCIPLINARY SKILLS THAT WILL BE USED AND EXTENDED BY GRAde 5 students are:

Self Management / Organization, Study Practices and Attitudes for Effective Learning • • • • • • • • • •

Thinking Skills, Metacognitive Skills and Problem Solving for Effective Learning • •

Communication for Effective Learning • • • • • • • • • •

Speaking clearly, coherently and concisely in group and class situations. Following oral and written instructions and responding constructively and creatively to the ideas of others. Demonstrating well thought out ideas and learning in group and class presentations. Questioning and seeking clarification when unsure. Extending and using an appropriate vocabulary over a range of learning contexts. Demonstrating proficiency in reading skills, comprehension and appreciation. Writing effectively using an increasing range of genres and language skills. Actively using the skills of revising and editing in all written work. Increasing proficiency in learning French and Mandarin. With limited support maintaining a PYP Portfolio of Learning.

Demonstrating a positive attitude and a thinking engagement for learning. Being punctual and using time effectively. Ensuring work is neatly presented and well organized. Having the necessary materials and resources to complete work to a high standard. Using the Homework Agenda on a daily basis to ensure that homework is completed and project deadlines are always met. Planning ahead to demonstrate increased independence in organizing and self managing resources. Asking for help and assistance as required. Setting, achieving and reporting on goals for improvement. Preparing for tests. Making safe decisions and applying increased understanding related to healthy choices.

• • • • • • • •

Demonstrating the traits of the IB Learner Profile. Being able to discuss yourself as a learner and to identify successful learning styles for different learning situations. Asking searching questions for research, inquiry or investigation. Independently and in groups completing research and investigations. Presenting new and creative ideas and thoughts. Using problem solving strategies and skills. Using and learning from written and oral feedback, tests, self assessment processes; rubrics, goal setting sheets. Demonstrating different levels of thinking through questioning and responses. Being a part of Grade level initiatives for school and environmental action and service. Increasing understanding of the human body and improvement in P.E. and sporting skills.

Research / Information Literacy Skills for Effective Learning • •

Using the five senses to experience and explore learning in its widest realm. Expanding use of information and communication technology. 2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE - 17


PYP: Transdisciplinary Skills • • • • • • • •

Skilled in identifying, locating and evaluating information. Collecting, organizing and classifying information using concepts maps, note taking, summaries and graphic organizers. Increasingly confident in organizing thoughts and ideas for different purposes. Finding patterns and connections and using them to make deductions and conclusions. Using a bibliography and citation skills (Noodletools). Identifying PYP concepts and discussing initiating questions. Developing skills in evaluating, and analysing valid information from an increasing range of sources. Demonstrating increasing knowledge, awareness and understanding of global people, environments and issues.

Social and Collaborative Skills and Attitudes for Effective Learning • • • • • • • • • •

Showing respect for other cultures and respect for your own culture. Respecting your classmates, their ideas, points of view and learning styles. Supporting successful and dynamic learning activities both within and out of the classroom. Being open-minded and willing to try different ways to solve problems, achieve goals and complete assignments. Being cooperative and encouraging the contributions from others. Using the strength of individual and group ideas and action in all programmes. Contributing to effective group planning, decision making and action. Knowing about and respecting the personal space of others. Demonstrating quality learning behaviour in different situations: formal presentations, group work and informal learning environments. Demonstrating class and grade level leadership.

TRANSDISCIPLINARY SKILLS THAT WILL BE USED AND EXTENDED BY GRAde 6 students are: Communication for Effective Learning • • • • • • • • • •

Self Management/Organization, Study Practices and Attitudes for Effective Learning • • • • •

• • • •

18 - 2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE

Speaking clearly, coherently and concisely in group and class situations. Listening to and responding constructively and creatively to the ideas of others in a range of learning environments. Demonstrating well thought out ideas when learning in groups, during class presentations, and the PYP Exhibition. Questioning and seeking clarification when unsure. Extending and using an appropriate vocabulary over a range of learning contexts. Demonstrating proficiency in reading skills, comprehension and appreciation. Writing effectively using an increasing range of genres and language skills. Actively using the skills of revising and editing in all written work. Increasing proficiency in learning at least one additional language. With limited guidance maintaining a PYP Portfolio of Learning.

Demonstrating a positive attitude and a thinking engagement for learning. Being punctual and organized in meeting the demands of an increased specialist schedule. Maintaining quality learning resources, exercise books and folders and ensuring files and notes are well-organized and presented. Having the necessary materials, equipment and resources to complete work to a high standard. Using the Homework Agenda, and other planning ahead organizers to ensure that homework is completed and project deadlines are always met. Asking for help, tutoring and assistance as required. Setting, achieving and reporting on goals for improvement. Preparing for tests. Reasoning and modelling safe decisions and healthy choices.


PYP: Transdisciplinary Skills Thinking Skills, Metacognitive Skills and Problem Solving for Effective Learning • • • • • • • • • •

Demonstrating the traits of the IB Learner Profile. Being able to discuss yourself as a learner and to identify successful learning styles for different learning situations. Asking searching questions for clarification, research or to propose an hypothesis that can be used as a basis for inquiry or investigation. Understanding the components of the scientific process as a formalized process of inquiry. Constructing and presenting new and creative ideas and thoughts. Demonstrating and using problem solving strategies and skills. Using and learning from written and oral feedback, tests, self assessment processes; rubrics, goal setting sheets. Demonstrating different levels of thinking through questioning and responses. Being a part of affirmative initiatives for community and environmental action and service. Increasing understanding of the human body and the refinement of fine and gross motor skills.

Research / Information Literacy Skills for Effective Learning • • • • • • • • •

Skilled in identifying, locating and incorporating information from a range of experiences and sources. Expanding use of information and communication technology. Collecting, organizing  and classifying information using concepts maps, note taking, and graphic organizers. Organizing thoughts and ideas for different purposes. Finding patterns and connections and using them to make deductions and conclusions Demonstrating increasing knowledge, awareness and understanding of global peoples, environments and issues. Identifying and responding to PYP concepts and discussing initiating questions and connections. Using a bibliography and citation skills (Noodletools). Using the scientific process including experimentation.

Developing skill in evaluating, and analyzing information in oral and written presentations.

Social and Collaborative Skills and Attitudes for Effective Learning • • • • • •

• •

Showing respect for other cultures and respect for your own culture. Respecting your classmates, their ideas, points of view and learning styles. Supporting successful and dynamic learning activities both within and out of the classroom. Being open-minded and willing to try different ways to solve problems, achieve goals and complete assignments. Being cooperative and encouraging the contributions from others. Using the strength of individual and collaborative ideas and action in all programmes, and especially through the PYP Exhibition process. In all learning, but especially through the PYP Exhibition process, contributing to effective group planning, decision making and action. Knowing about and respecting the personal space of others. Demonstrating quality learning behaviour in different situations: formal presentations, class, group work and informal learning environments. Demonstrating class and grade level leadership.

2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE - 19


PYP: Language A - English Curriculum Language A - English CURRICULUM: GRADES 4 TO 6 Language learning at CIS is based on the core belief that language is central to intellectual, social and emotional development, and fundamental to developing the traits of the International Baccalaureate Learner Profile. Individuals will achieve their potential when they can use languages effectively as a vehicle for inquiry, selfexpression and communication in a range of contexts and for a variety of purposes. The development of the attributes of the Learner Profile will involve the acquisition of language concepts, understandings, skills and attitudes that will empower all students to: • • • •

Frame and express their thinking and respond to the thinking of others. Communicate effectively. Understand, comprehend and appreciate. Acquire a sense of belonging to a wide range of groups and communities.

We aim to equip and support members of our learning community with the skills required to communicate comprehensively and meaningfully, and to be thoughtful and reflective communicators. The CIS community encourages open-minded interaction and aims to foster an appreciation of cultural richness and diversity. We recognize that all individuals are on a different journey of acquiring and applying increasingly complex language understandings, skills and attitudes and that the approach to learning and teaching must differentiate for these variable learning needs. The following is a general guide. Value must also be placed on the languages and cultures of all students. This year teachers will be using units of study from ‘The Complete 4 for Literacy’. This model is based upon 3 essential components: mini lesson with explicit instruction, independent practice, and group sharing. Through this model, teachers are able to teach specific skills and strategies to help students become better readers and writers. Perhaps the most significant aspect is the independent practice. Students are provided the time to practice and transfer the skills and strategies in their reading and writing time. Harvey Daniels and Marilyn Bizar explain the significance of the workshop model in their book ‘Teaching the Best Practice Way’ ‘The workshop model is simple and powerful. It derives from the insight that children learn by doing, and that in the past schools have simply failed to provide enough time for doing reading, writing…It recognizes that kids

20 - 2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE

need less telling and more showing, that they need more time to do learning, and less time hearing about what particular subjects might be like if they ever engaged in them.’

Grade 4 Portrait of a Grade 4 Reader BRIDGING TO FLUENT (AGES 8 - 10) This is a stage of consolidation when Preconventional students strengthen their skills by reading Emerging longer books with more complex plots, Developing characters and vocabulary. They often Beginning chose well known children’s books and Expanding also enjoy series books. They begin to Bridging read aloud with expression. With adult Fluent guidance, Bridging readers can use Proficient resources such as encyclopedias and Connecting internet web sites to find information. Independent They can respond to issues and ideas in books as well as facts and story events. Many students are able to make connections between their reading and other books and authors. Students at this stage should begin to support their opinions with reasons and examples during discussions.

Portrait of a Grade 4 Writer BRIDGING TO FLUENT (AGES 8 - 10) Bridging writers begin to develop and Preconventional organize their ideas into paragraphs. Emerging Students at this stage are able to write Developing about their feelings and opinions, as well Beginning as fiction, poetry and nonfiction. This Expanding is a time of practice and their writing is Bridging often uneven. Writers may focus on one Fluent aspect of a piece and pay less attention to Proficient others. Bridging writers are learning that Connecting meaning can be made more precise by Independent using description, details and interesting language. They also use dialogue in their writing and are able to edit for spelling, punctuation and grammar. They also experiment with different types of writing as they compose longer pieces in various genres. Based on the research of Bonnie Campbell Hill Please see page 20 for ways that parents can support reading and writing development at home for students in Grades 4 and 5.


PYP: Language A - English Curriculum ORAL COMMUNICATION:

WRITTEN COMMUNICATION:

WRITTEN COMMUNICATION:

Speaking & Listening

Reading & Viewing

Writing & Representing

Speaking: Interactions and Exchanges

Reflection, Metacognition and Strategies for Learning

Reflection and Metacognition

QI 1. Use speaking and listening to interact successfully with others in an extended range of settings. QI 2. Participate appropriately in discussions, conversations, class and/or group meetings.

The student will be able to: QI 9. Extend reading strategies and set specific personal goals for improvement QI 10. With guidance, critically evaluate their own choices in books and distinguish and appreciate commendable or notable literature QI 11. Read and identify a variety of genres

The student will be able to: QI 18. Self evaluate and set goals to improve writing. These need to be clearly stated and achievable goals that identify specific aspects of the writing process.

Strategies and Skills for Learning The student will be able to: QI 3. Prepare and deliver an individual presentation for a variety of purposes including to entertain, to inform, to persuade. QI 4. Argue persuasively and practise debating skills, presenting a point of view that is not necessarily their own QI 5. Use and understand an increasing vocabulary and complex sentence structures with a level of accuracy. QI 6. Give and respond appropriately to instructions, directions and messages.

Comprehension

The student will be able to: QI 7. Listen appropriately for a sustained period and for a variety of purposes (e.g. to seek information, to gain knowledge, for instructions, for enjoyment).

The student will be able to: QI 12. With increasing independence and within class discussions and guided literature circle activities identify and comprehend literary elements QI 13. With guidance, select the appropriate reading strategy for the purpose of the activity QI 14. Be familiar with the standard organization of informational non-fiction text (encyclopaedias including text based resources such as Wikipedia, search engines, web sites, atlas, graphs, charts, tables, articles) QI 15. With guidance, locate, organize, comprehend, and summarize information from a variety of sources

Reflection and Metacognition

Response

The student will be able to: QI 8. Self evaluate and set goals to improve oral skills and strategies. These need to be clearly stated and achievable goals that identify specific aspects of speaking or listening.

The student will be able to: QI 16. Generate responses to literature. QI 17. With limited guidance, recite, interpret and respond to a broadening range of poetry and poetic forms.

Listening Strategies and Skills for Learning

Strategies and Skills for Learning The student will be able to: QI 19. Have a fluent and legible style of handwriting and show increasing competency in word processing. QI 20. With guidance, use and follow an appropriate writing process. QI 21. Use the conventions of writing. Writing Modes The student will be able to: QI 22. Use a range of modes in writing: PERSONAL, INFORMATIONAL, CREATIVE

QI = Quality Indicator

2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE - 21


PYP: Language A - English Curriculum Grade 5 Portrait of a Grade 5 Reader FLUENT TO PROFICIENT (AGES 9-11) By the Fluent stage, students are well Preconventional launched as independent readers. They Emerging read challenging children’s literature in Developing various genres for longer periods of time Beginning (30-40 minutes). Many readers begin Expanding to enjoy mysteries, series and survival Bridging books. Other children prefer fantasy Fluent books. The books they can read contain Proficient fully developed characters and more Connecting challenging plots than in the previous Independent stage. They can use resources, such as a dictionary and thesaurus, to learn new words and can find information in encyclopedias and on the Internet. Many readers enjoy magazines. Students contribute thoughtful responses when they write or talk about books and begin to “read between the lines” to get at deeper levels of meaning. They are learning to evaluate their own reading strategies and set goals.

Portrait of a Grade 5 Writer

WAYS TO SUPPORT READING AND WRITING DEVELOPMENT AT HOME - APPLICABLE FOR STUDENTS IN GRADES 4 AND 5 • • •

• • • •

FLUENT TO PROFICIENT (AGES 9-11) This is a stage of increasing complexity. Preconventional Students begin to write organized Emerging fiction and nonfiction pieces for different Developing purposes and audiences. They write Beginning poetry, using carefully chosen language. Expanding Students write stories with problems and Bridging solutions, as well as multiple characters, Fluent with adult support. They experiment with Proficient leads, endings, and complex sentence Connecting structure. For example, they may start Independent a sentence with an adverb (“Nervously, the boy sat at his desk, waiting for his turn to speak.”). Students begin to revise for specific writing traits, such as ideas or word choice. Fluent writers are able to catch most spelling, punctuation, and grammatical errors independently as they edit their drafts. They begin to talk about qualities of good writing in different genres. Based on the research of Bonnie Campbell Hill

22 - 2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE

Ask them to read to you, or if you can read a piece of their work. Offer praise and suggestions for improvement or extension. Ask them to comment about what they are doing to revise and edit their work. During research ask them to tell you the sources that they have used and to show how they have written their own ideas and thoughts based on their research. Ask them to show you their bibliography. Read for leisure – model reading as a positive choice of activity on a plane, beach or after dinner. Read with your children – choose a book that you both can read. For older students, discuss what you are reading or have read. Ask your child to tell you in his/her own words what happened in a story or article. To check your child’s understanding of what he/she is reading, occasionally pause and ask your child questions about the characters and events in the story. Ask your child why he/she thinks a character acted in a certain way and ask your child to support his/her answer with information from the story. Comparing plot, characters or settings are all wonderful topics for discussion. Before getting to the end of a story, ask your child what he/she thinks will happen next and why.


PYP: Language A - English Curriculum ORAL COMMUNICATION:

WRITTEN COMMUNICATION:

WRITTEN COMMUNICATION:

Speaking & Listening

Reading & Viewing

Writing & Representing

Speaking: Interactions and Exchanges

Reflection and Strategies for Learning

Reflection and Metacognition

The student will be able to: QI 1. Use speaking and listening to interact successfully with others. QI 2. Participate appropriately in discussions, conversations, class and/or group meetings, and group presentations.

The student will be able to: QI 9. Extend reading strategies and set specific personal goals for improvement. QI 10. With guidance, critically evaluate their own choices in books and distinguish and appreciate commendable or notable literature. QI 11. Read and identify a variety of genres.

The student will be able to: QI 18. Self evaluate and set goals to improve writing. These need to be clearly stated and achievable goals that identify specific aspects of the writing process.

Strategies and Skills for Learning The student will be able to: QI 3. Prepare and deliver an individual presentation for a variety of purposes including to entertain, to inform, to persuade and to direct. QI 4. Argue persuasively and practise debating skills, presenting a point of view that is not necessarily their own. QI 5. Use and understand an increasing vocabulary and complex sentence structures with a high level of accuracy. QI 6. Confidently give instructions, directions and messages and respond appropriately to those of others. Listening Strategies and Skills for Learning

Comprehension The student will be able to: QI 12. Independently, within class discussions and guided literature circle activities, identify and comprehend literary elements. QI 13. With limited guidance, select the appropriate reading strategy for the purpose of the activity. QI 14. Be familiar with the standard organization of informational nonfiction text (encyclopedias including text based resources such as Wikipedia, search engines, web sites, atlas, graphs, charts, tables, articles). QI 15. With limited guidance, locate, organize, comprehend and summarize information from a variety of sources.

Strategies and Skills for Learning The student will be able to: QI 19. Have a fluent and legible style of handwriting and show increasing competency in word processing. QI 20. With limited guidance, use and follow an appropriate writing process. QI 21. Use the conventions of writing. Writing Modes The student will be able to: QI 22. Use a range of modes in writing: PERSONAL, INFORMATIONAL, CREATIVE

The student will be able to: QI 7. Listen appropriately for a sustained period and for a variety of purposes (e.g. to seek information, to gain knowledge, for instructions, for Response enjoyment). The student will be able to: Reflection and Metacognition QI 16. Generate responses to The student will be able to: literature. QI 8. Self evaluate and set goals to improve QI 17. With guidance, recite, interpret oral skills and strategies. These need to and respond to poetry. be clearly stated and achievable goals that identify specific aspects of speaking or QI = Quality Indicator listening.

2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE - 23


PYP: Language A - English Curriculum Grade 6

Portrait of a Grade 6 Reader

PROFICIENT – CONNECTING (AGES 10-13) Proficient readers seek out complex Preconventional children’s literature and can choose Emerging books to read independently. They read Developing a variety of genres, such as realistic Beginning fiction, historical fiction, biographies, Expanding nonfiction, and poetry. These books Bridging are sometimes set in other countries Fluent and time periods. Novels often deal Proficient with complex issues such as survival, Connecting or war. Students are able to talk about Independent the theme, author’s purpose, style, and author’s craft. Proficient readers begin to write and talk about literature at a deeper level and use reasons and examples to support their opinions. They delve into topics by reading both fiction and nonfiction materials and can locate information on a topic using several resources independently. Some students at the Proficient stage enjoy challenging magazines.

Portrait of a Grade 6 Writer PROFICIENT – CONNECTING (AGES 10-13) These are strong writers who can write Preconventional persuasively about their ideas, feelings, Emerging and opinions. Their fiction and nonfiction Developing writing is organized, and they can weave Beginning in information from several sources with Expanding some adult guidance. They use complex Bridging sentences, sophisticated language and Fluent imagery independently and their writing is Proficient descriptive. Proficient writers are learning Connecting how to create fiction with detailed settings Independent and well developed plots and characters. Students revise, edit, and publish some of their work independently. They are beginning to set their goals and identify ways in which to improve as writers. Based on the research of Bonnie Campbell Hill

WAYS TO SUPPORT READING AND WRITING DEVELOPMENT AT HOME •

Ask them to read to you, or if you can read a piece of their work. Offer praise and suggestions for improvement or extension.

24 - 2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE

• • • •

Ask them to comment about what they are doing to revise and edit their work. During research ask them to tell you the sources that they have used and to show how they have written their own ideas and thoughts based on their research. Ask them to show you their bibliography. Read for leisure – model reading as a positive choice of activity on a plane, beach or after dinner. Read with your children – choose a book that you both can read. For older students, discuss what you are reading or have read. Ask your child to tell you in his/her own words what happened in a story or article. To check your child’s understanding of what he/ she is reading, occasionally pause and ask your child questions about the characters and events in the story. Ask your child why he/she thinks a character acted in a certain way and ask your child to support his/her answer with information from the story. Comparing plot, characters or settings are all wonderful topics for discussion. Before getting to the end of a story, ask your child what he/she thinks will happen next and why.

READING MENU Traditionally, there is a noted drop in independent reading as students move into the middle and high school years. Homework increases, research and non-fiction reading take up much more of a student’s time. As a part of an initiative to increase circulation of independent reading books, a list of recommended reading was developed. Initially, it was a list of books sorted by genre. Students had a wide range to choose from, but were required to read a certain number of books and respond to those books with a variety of projects. The book list is regularly updated, as students move into higher grades, and new literature is released. In 20082009 year, the list was adjusted to reflect the IB Learner Profile. There is still a great deal of choice (10 different categories to choose from), and within each profile trait there are 8-10 titles. Students respond to the books in different ways, but now, there is the added tie to the Learner traits. This new list has enabled students to see the Learner Profile in a much more concrete manner. As part of their response, students discuss how their choice fits or does not fit with particular profiles – how does a character or plot illustrate or exemplify being a Risk-taker, for example, or being Principled.


PYP: Language A - English Curriculum ORAL COMMUNICATION:

WRITTEN COMMUNICATION:

WRITTEN COMMUNICATION:

Speaking & Listening

Reading & Viewing

Writing & Representing

Speaking: Interactions and Exchanges

Reflection, Metacognition and Strategies for Learning

Reflection and Metacognition

QI 1. Use speaking and listening to interact successfully with others in an extended range of settings. QI 2. Participate appropriately in discussions, conversations, class and/or group meetings.

The student will be able to: QI 9. Extend reading strategies and set specific personal goals for improvement. QI 10. With limited support, critically evaluate choices in books and distinguish and appreciate commendable or notable literature. Opportunities to link literature to the MYP Areas of Interaction are encouraged. QI 11. Read and identify a variety of genres.

The student will be able to: QI 18. Self evaluate and set goals to improve writing. These need to be clearly stated and achievable goals that identify specific aspects of the writing process.

Strategies and Skills for Learning The student will be able to: QI 3. Prepare and deliver a group and individual presentation. The major focus will be the PYP Exhibition that will require both an individualised and group dimension and engagement in the presentation. QI 4. Argue persuasively and practise debating skills, presenting a point of view that is not necessarily their own. QI 5. Use and understand an increasing vocabulary and complex sentence structures with a high level of accuracy. Particular emphasis will be placed on academic and subject specific vocabulary with particular emphasis on scientific vocabulary. QI 6. Give instructions, directions and messages and respond appropriately to those of others within a range of settings. Listening Strategies and Skills for Learning The student will be able to: QI 7. Listen appropriately for a sustained period and for a variety of purposes (e.g. to seek information, to gain knowledge, for instructions, for enjoyment). Reflection and Metacognition The student will be able to: QI 8. Self evaluate and set goals to improve oral skills and strategies. These need to be clearly stated and achievable goals that identify specific aspects of speaking or listening.

Comprehension The student will be able to: QI 12. Independently within class discussions and guided literature circle activities, identify and comprehend literary elements of young adult texts that contain increased complexity in themes, plots settings and relationships. Opportunities to link literature to the MYP Areas of Interaction are encouraged. QI 13. With limited guidance, select the appropriate reading strategy for the purpose of the activity. QI 14. Be familiar with the standard organization of informational non-fiction text (encyclopedias including text based resources such as Wikipedia, search engines, web sites, atlas, graphs, charts, tables, articles). QI 15. Independently, locate, organize, comprehend, summarize and synthesize information from a variety of sources.

Strategies and Skills for Learning The student will be able to: QI 19. Have a fluent and legible style of handwriting and show increasing competency and sophistication in word processing. Grade 6 students are expected to use a fluent, efficient and legible style. QI 20. With limited guidance, use and follow an appropriate writing process. QI 21. Use the conventions of writing. Writing Modes The student will be able to: QI 22. Use a range of modes in writing: PERSONAL, INFORMATIONAL, CREATIVE

Response The student will be able to: QI 16. Generate responses to literature. QI 17. With limited guidance, recite, interpret and respond to a broadening range of poetry and poetic forms.

QI = Quality Indicator

2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE - 25


PYP: Mathematics curriculum MATHEMATICS CURRICULUM: GRADES 4 TO 6 Learners will demonstrate their growth in mathematical understanding, knowledge, skills and attitudes by: •

• • • • • • •

• • • • •

Maintaining a journal of learning that provides evidence of thinking, responses to critical questions, connections in developing skills and knowledge and reflections on growth and achievements. Clarity in the learning intentions and direction through ‘We Are Learning To …’ WALT Statements. This will provide a detailed progression of clearly defined key skills and knowledge that underpin the development of the Mathematical Understandings. Making connections to Units of Inquiry and a range of authentic focus areas. Using teacher modelled examples of mathematical thinking and skills. Engaged and motivated involvement. Actively inquiring about their understanding and showing a resourcefulness in solving problems. Demonstrating developing accuracy, efficiency and confidence in calculating. Showing considered and responsive participation that demonstrates the ability to estimate and to make approximations. Moving with confidence between different forms of representation (e.g. number lines, tables, graphs, patterning, arrays, geometry, flow charts, formulae). Talking about, discussing and communicating their learning using mathematical language. Understanding and using a structure for organizing learning and investigative inquiry. Using resources for learning such as technology, collaborative activities and community resources. Successfully using social groupings appropriate to the task required. Discussing their learning goals and how they will recognise the achievement of the goals.

The Mathematics programme will enable the students to make sense of the world around them and will involve the development of strategies, a body of knowledge, skills and attitudes. It will involve active inquiry that will engage students and teachers in answering questions and solving real life problems.

26 - 2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE

Mathematical knowledge and skills will provide students with a body of understanding upon which to build and reflect and will include: • • • • •

Mathematical Processes. Number, Algebra, Pattern and Function. Measurement. Data Handling and Statistics. Shape and Space.

Grade 4 MATHEMATICS OVERVIEW MATHEMATICAL PROCESSES Understandings: • M.P. U1. The mathematical processes of: asking questions, problem solving, identifying and using a range of strategies, making connections, identifying relationships and communicating ideas underpins all mathematical inquiry. • M.P. U2. Mathematical processes connect the representations, relationships, interpretations and analysis of knowledge and skills. • M.P. U3. Mathematical literacy is an exciting and challenging language rich experience that involves the acquisition and application of knowledge and skills to an increasing range of complex real life problem solving contexts. • M.P. U4. Effective learning requires approximation, considered estimation and accuracy. • M.P. U5. Reviewing and practicing knowledge and skills are important parts of the learning process and support extended understanding. • M.P. U6. Technology can be used to support the application of strategies and express mathematical thinking. NUMBER AND NUMBER OPERATIONS, ALGEBRA – PATTERNS AND FUNCTIONS Understandings: • N.O. U1. The place value of number can be expressed in a range of ways and knowledge and skill in understanding and applying these multiple representations is important to mathematical competency. • N.O. U2. Mathematical equations and language can be expressed in a range of ways and knowledge and skill in understanding and applying these multiple representations is important to mathematical competency. • N.O. U3. Equivalency can be expressed in a range of ways and knowledge and skill in understanding and applying these multiple representations is important to mathematical competency. • N.O. U4. A range of strategies are available to


PYP: Mathematics curriculum •

• • • •

solve mathematical problems and these need to be applied in an accurate, efficient and effective way. N.O. U5. Solving addition and subtraction problems with fractional numbers can be modeled and requires the acquisition of new knowledge and skills related to equivalence. N.O. U6. Whole numbers and fractional numbers can be expressed and applied in a variety of forms. N.O. U7. Estimation and approximation are core skills in the problem solving process. A. U1. Number patterns and rules are created when the relationship between numbers and number operations are identified. A. U2. Rules, patterns, symbols and relationships can be used and recorded to solve problems involving one or more arithmetic problems.

SHAPE AND SPACE Understandings: • S.S. U1. The properties and characteristics of 2 dimensional and 3 dimensional geometric shapes enable them to be identified, classified, sorted, drawn, modeled and measured. • S.S. U2. Specialist language needs to be used to describe the properties and characteristics of 2 and 3 dimensional shapes. • S.S. U3. There are common and connected properties of 2 dimensional and 3 dimensional geometric shapes and these common properties are significant in classification. • S.S. U4. Angles can be classified: acute, right and obtuse. • S.S. U5. Specialist tools are required to draw and construct geometric shapes. • S.S. U6. Shapes have a special role in natural and manmade environments. MEASUREMENT Understandings: • M. U1. The Base Ten number system supports the developing measurement knowledge and skills and it is important to understand and apply these connections. • M. U2. Estimating, comparing and measuring require the selection and use of appropriate units . • M. U3. The accuracy of the measurement depends on the situation and the precision of the tool. • M. U4. There are connections between the various measures of area and perimeter and these connections and relationships are important in making calculations and solving problems. • M. U5. Measurement also involves the use and application of patterns, schedules and formulas.

STATISTICS, DATA HANDLING and PROBABILITY Understandings: • S.P. U1. Mathematical investigations involve the collection, interpretation, analysis and representation of data and information. • S.P. U2. The interpretation and analysis of data can be used to solve problems, ask and answer questions, make predictions and draw conclusions. • S.P. U3. Data can be represented using a range of mathematical forms and conventions. • S.P. U4. The likelihood or probability of events occurring can be evaluated and expressed using a range of scales. • S.P. U5. The occurrence of events can be predicted using models . • S.P. U6. The theoretical probability of an event might differ from experimental probability.

Grade 5 MATHEMATICS OVERVIEW MATHEMATICAL PROCESSES Understandings: • M.P. U1. The mathematical process of: asking questions, problem solving, identifying and using a range of strategies, making connections, identifying relationships and communicating ideas underpins all mathematical inquiry. • M.P. U2. Mathematical processes connect the strategic thinking, representations, relationships, interpretations and analysis of knowledge and skills. • M.P. U3. Mathematical literacy is an exciting and challenging language rich experience that involves the acquisition and application of knowledge and skills to an increasing range of complex real life problem solving contexts. • M.P. U4. The application of mathematical knowledge and skills includes the use of rules and formulas. • M.P. U5. Effective learning requires both approximation and accuracy. • M.P. U6. Reviewing and practicing knowledge and skills are important components of the learning process and support extended understanding. • M.P. U7. Technology is a useful tool in the application of strategies and in collecting, organizing, interpreting and presenting data and thinking. NUMBER AND NUMBER OPERATIONS, ALGEBRA – PATTERNS AND FUNCTIONS Understandings: • N.O. U1. The place value of number can be expressed in a range of ways and knowledge and

2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE - 27


PYP: Mathematics curriculum •

• • • •

• •

skill in understanding and applying these multiple representations is important to mathematical competency. N.O. U2. Mathematical equations and language can be expressed in a range of ways and knowledge and skill in understanding and applying these multiple representations is important to mathematical competency. N.O. U3. Equivalency can be expressed in a range of ways and knowledge and skill in understanding and applying these multiple representations is important to mathematical competency. N.O. U4. Exploring and modeling a range of representations assists in clarifying thinking when solving single and multiple operational written problems. N.O. U5. A range of strategies are available to solve mathematical computational problems and these need to be applied in an accurate, efficient and effective way. N.O. U6. Solving operational problems with fractional numbers requires the acquisition of new knowledge and skills. N.O. U7. Negative integers and percentages can be expressed in an variety of forms and applied to everyday contexts N.O. U8. Estimation and approximation are core skills in the problem solving process. N.O. U9. There are an increasing number of identified connections and relationships that exist between number patterns such as: prime factorization to identify groupings, multiplication and division in naming equivalency in fractions, Lowest Common Multiple (LCM) equivalency in fractions, Greatest Common Factor (GCF) simplest form in fractions, equivalency and conversion between fraction, decimal, whole number and percentage notation, square numbers/ area, cube numbers/volume. A. U1. Important relationships exist between addition subtraction, addition and multiplication, multiplication and division and division and subtraction, and these relationships are important in solving problems. A. U2. Number patterns and functions are created when the relationships between numbers and number operations are identified. A. U3. Rules, patterns and relationships can be used and recorded to solve problems involving one or more arithmetic problems.

28 - 2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE

SHAPE AND SPACE Understandings: • S.S. U1. The properties and characteristics of 2 dimensional and 3 dimensional geometric shapes enable them to be identified, classified, sorted, drawn, modeled and measured. • S.S. U2. Specialist language needs to be used to describe the properties and characteristics of 2 and 3 dimensional shapes. • S.S. U3. There are common and connected properties of 2 dimensional and 3 dimensional geometric shapes and these common properties are significant in classification. • S.S. U4. Specialist tools are required to draw and construct some geometric shapes. MEASUREMENT Understandings: • M. U1. Estimating, comparing and measuring require the selection and use of appropriate units of measurement. • M. U2. The accuracy of the measurement depends on the situation and the precision of the tool. • M. U3. There are connections in the measure of diameter and radius and these connections and relationships are important in making calculations of area and circumference. • M. U4. There are connections between the measures of area, perimeter and volume and these connections and relationships are important in making calculations. • M. U5. Measurement involves the use and application of patterns, schedules and formulas. • M. U6. There are number patterns related to the measurement of regions and shapes. STATISTICS, DATA HANDLING and PROBABILITY Understandings: • S.P. U1. The interpretation and analysis of data can be used to solve problems, ask and answer questions, make predictions and draw conclusions. • S.P. U2. Data can be represented using a range of mathematical forms and conventions. • S.P. U3. The likelihood or probability of events occurring can be evaluated and expressed using a range of scales. • S.P. U4. The occurrence of events can be predicted using models. • S.P. U5. The theoretical probability of an event might differ from experimental probability.


PYP: Mathematics curriculum Grade 6 MATHEMATICS OVERVIEW MATHEMATICAL PROCESSES Understandings: • M.P. U1. The mathematical process of: asking questions, problem solving, identifying and using a range of strategies, making connections, identifying relationships and communicating ideas underpins all mathematical inquiry. • M.P. U2. Mathematical processes connect the strategic thinking, representations, relationships, interpretations and analysis of knowledge and skills. • M.P. U3. Mathematical literacy is an exciting and challenging language rich experience that involves the acquisition and application of knowledge and skills to an increasing range of complex real life problem solving contexts. • M.P. U4. Effective learning requires both approximation and accuracy. • M.P. U5. Recognizing and applying an increasing level of abstractness is required when applying mathematical rules and formulas. • M.P. U6. Reviewing and practicing knowledge and skills are important parts of the learning process and support extended understanding. • M.P. U7. Technology is a useful tool in the application of strategies and in collecting, sorting, interpreting and presenting mathematical data and thinking. NUMBER AND NUMBER OPERATIONS, ALGEBRA – PATTERNS AND FUNCTIONS Understandings: • N.O. U1. The expression of mathematical thinking relies on language and symbols. • N.O. U2. Different civilizations, including Egyptian, Roman and Hindu developed symbols to express amounts and these have impacted on our present number system. • N.O. U3. Place value can be expressed in a range of ways and knowledge and skill in understanding and applying these multiple representations is important to mathematical competency. • N.O. U4. Equivalency can be expressed in a range of ways and knowledge and skill in understanding and applying these multiple representations is important to mathematical competency. • N.O. U5. Mathematical equations can be expressed in a range of ways and knowledge and skill in understanding and applying these multiple representations is important to mathematical competency.

• • •

• • •

• •

N.O. U6. Grouping symbols including parentheses, brackets and braces and the order of operations are used for mathematical sequences. N.O. U7. A range of strategies are available to solve mathematical problems and these need to be applied in an accurate, efficient and effective way. N.O. U8. Solving increasingly complex problems with fractional numbers, percentages and ratios requires the acquisition of new knowledge and skills. N.O. U9. Negative integers, rational and irrational numbers can be expressed and applied in an variety of forms. N.O. U10. Estimation and approximation are a core skill in the problem solving process. N.O. U11. There are an increasing number of identified connections and relationships that exist between number patterns such as: prime factorization to identify groupings, multiplication and division in naming equivalency in fractions, Lowest Common Multiple (LCM) for equivalency in fractions, Greatest Common Factor (GCF) for simplest form in fractions, equivalency and conversion between fraction, decimal, whole number and percentage notation, square numbers connection to solving area problems and cube numbers connections for solving volume problems. A. U1. Important relationships exist between addition subtraction, addition and multiplication, multiplication and division and division and subtraction, and these relationships are important in solving problems. A. U2. Number patterns and functions are created when the relationships between numbers and number operations are identified. A. U3. Rules, patterns, symbols and relationships can be used and recorded to solve problems involving one or more arithmetic problems.

SHAPE AND SPACE Understandings: • S.S. U1. The properties and characteristics of 2 dimensional and 3 dimensional geometric shapes enable them to be identified, classified, sorted, drawn , modeled and measured. • S.S. U2. Specialist language needs to be used to describe the properties and characteristics of 2 and 3 dimensional shapes. • S.S. U3. There are common and connected properties of 2 dimensional and 3 dimensional geometric shapes and these common properties are significant in classification. • S.S. U4. Specialist tools are required to draw and construct some geometric shapes.

2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE - 29


PYP: Mathematics curriculum MEASUREMENT Understandings: • M. U1. Estimating, comparing and measuring require the selection and use of appropriate units of measurement. • M. U2. The accuracy of the measurement depends on the situation and the precision of the tool. • M. U3. There are connections in the measure of diameter and radius and these connections and relationships are important in making calculations of area and circumference. • M. U4. There are connections between the measures of area, perimeter and volume and these connections and relationships are important in making calculations. • M. U5. Measurement involves the use and application of patterns, schedules and formulas. • M. U6. There are number patterns related to the measurement of regions and shapes. STATISTICS, DATA HANDLING and PROBABILITY Understandings: • S.P. U1. The interpretation and analysis of data can be used to solve problems, ask and answer questions, make predictions and draw conclusions. • S.P. U2. Data can be represented using a range of mathematical forms and conventions. • S.P. U3. The likelihood or probability of events occurring can be evaluated and expressed using a range of scales. • S.P. U4. The occurrence of events can be predicted using models and predictions. • S.P. U5. The theoretical probability of an event might differ from experimental probability. • S.P. U6. Awareness of spreadsheets and data base applications.

30 - 2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE


PYP: Technology TECHNOLOGY: GRADES 4 TO 6

Grade 6 technology program

Information Communication Technology (ICT) is an integrated part of the curriculum. The ICT teacher works closely with the homeroom teachers to ensure lessons are connected to the Units of Inquiry. The computer is used as a tool to support learning and the exploration of knowledge. In addition, Information Technology is woven through the curriculum to ensure computer skills are a relevant and meaningful part of the student’s education. Research and computer activities at each grade level are connected to the Units of Inquiry.

The Grade 6 Technology program expands on the Grade 5 program and continues to enhance the basic skills learned in Grade 5. The Grade 6 programme has five major focus areas:

Grade 4 technology program The Grade 4 Technology program is designed to give students the skill sets to enable them to effectively use a variety of Information Communication Technology (ICT) tools in both technology and across other areas of the school curriculum. Students will be introduced to a number of different programs that will enable them to safely use the internet for research, create audiovisual presentations, word process, create and manipulate graphic images, produce digital images using webcams, video cameras, and digital cameras. Grade 4 students will also be introduced to the basics of design technology and be developing the practical construction skills required as they progress through into MYP Design technology. Grade 4 technology is also integrated with the classroom PYP units of inquiry and student projects will be a reflection of work they are studying in class.

Responsible Technology Behaviour • Using technology appropriately at school. • Participating effectively as an online citizen. Communicating Online • Using blogs as a communication and collaborative tool. Research Skills • Locating and evaluating information on the Internet. • Acknowledging sources of information using Noodletools. Desktop Publishing • Producing banners, posters & other graphics using Publisher. • Producing a self-running slideshow using PowerPoint. Digital Photography • Using images to communicate ideas and concepts.

Grade 5 technology program The Grade 5 Technology program expands on the Grade 4 program and continues to enhance the basic skills learned in Grade 4. Students will be exposed to an increasing variety of programs that allow them to creatively write ‘blogs’ (web based journals) and podcasts. Internet and cyber safety is also an important feature of the program and will show students how to be safe in an increasingly digitally accessible world. The Grade 5 program is also integrated with the classroom units of inquiry and technology projects will often be reflective of this.

2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE - 31


pyp: Language B - French or Mandarin Language B - French or Mandarin - GRADES 4 TO 6 An important and highly valued goal of our CIS curriculum is to enable our students to achieve a high level of proficiency in at least two languages, English and either French or Chinese (Mandarin), by the end of the International Baccalaureate Middle Years Programme (MYP) in Grade 10. Language B is an additional or a foreign language the students study. The students are grouped according to their language need and attend Language B classes for 5 periods per week. Particular emphasis is placed on using contexts that are motivating and familiar to the students to introduce and practice the structures of the language studied. Some students presently take part in Academic Resource (AR) or English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) programmes during this time.

LANGUAGE B - FRENCH - GRADES 4 TO 6 Students in Grades 4 to 6 will continue to follow the Accelerated Integrative Method (A.I.M.). This method uses a kinesthetic approach of gestures along with songs, games, and use of literature to enhance and accelerate acquisition of the language. Each unit of study consists of a play and related exercises which encourage language development. Overall expectations and specific expectations for oral communication, reading and writing, (including grammar, language conventions and vocabulary), identified for each grade level describe the skills and knowledge students are expected to develop during the academic year. The achievement levels describe four degrees of achievement of the student’s knowledge and skills and focus on the following: communication, comprehension, organization of ideas, and application of language knowledge. Teachers will choose the plays that best fit a particular class and its students. Generally, and depending on the students’ language skills, the following plays will be studied at each grade level. Adaptations may be made to suit individual students, and additional materials will be used (e.g. Galaxies readers) to reinforce language skills. PYP elements will be integrated into the units.

Grade 4 LANGUAGE B - FRENCH PROGRAMME Comment y aller?

32 - 2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE

Themes: friendship, perseverance, surprise ending Cultural notes: French in Quebec, Canada and Paris, France. L’arbre ungali - an African cultural tale Themes: perseverance and careful attention wins the race. Cultural notes: French in Africa. Other possibilities/Adaptations: Le chat et la lune or Boucles violettes and one of the above.

Grade 5 LANGUAGE B - FRENCH PROGRAMME L’arbre ungali - an African cultural tale Themes: perseverance and careful attention wins the race, francophones in Africa. Cultural notes: French in Africa. Louis la grenouille Themes: friendship, interpersonal relationships, common interests, emotions, humour. Cultural notes: Famous French “Louis” - e.g. Louis XIV, Louis Pasteur, etc. Other possibilities/Adaptations: Boucles violettes and L’arbre ungali or Louis la grenouille and related readings and studies.

Grade 6 LANGUAGE B - FRENCH PROGRAMME Louis la grenouille and related readings and studies Themes: friendship, interpersonal relationships, common interests, emotions, humour. Cultural notes: Famous French “Louis” - e.g. Louis XIV, Louis Pasteur, etc. or Le chat angora and related readings and studies Themes: humour, using one’s wits, intrapersonal, detective’s work. Cultural notes: Charles Perrault – Author Study. Beginner Salut mon ami! Themes: friendship, sports, perseverance, keeping a positive attitude. Veux-tu danser? Themes: friendship, middle school contexts.


PYP: Language B - French or Mandarin GRADE 4 LANGUAGE B - MANDARIN PROGRAMME:

Contexts for Study:

• •

• • • • • •

You and Me. Introducing the Mid-Autumn Festival. My family (family members, pets, house). Chinese New Year celebration. Jobs and hobbies. Food.

Skills Oral:

• • • •

Follow basic classroom instructions. Ask and answer simple questions. Carry out a simple conversation. Use the vocabulary and structures introduced in class.

Reading: • Begin to show fluency in oral reading. • Locate main ideas of simple passages with familiar vocabulary and supporting visual cues. Writing: • Learn to use the correct strokes to write characters. • Use correct punctuation in short paragraphs and begin to use relevant vocabulary. • Compose short simple patterned sentences based on learned phrases and classroom discussions.

Reading: • Identify main ideas of simple passages with familiar vocabulary and context. • Read aloud familiar material, using correct pronunciation and intonation. • Use reading strategies to assist in determining meaning (e.g. prior knowledge of the text, vocabulary and visual cues from the structure of characters). Writing: • Begin to organize and sequence ideas. • Start to use correct strokes and sequence to write characters. • Use correct punctuation and some relevant vocabulary. • Write a short paragraph of about 3-4 sentences on a familiar topic.

GRADE 6 LANGUAGE B - MANDARIN PROGRAMME Contexts for Study: • • • • • • • •

GRADE 5 LANGUAGE B - MANDARIN PROGRAMME Contexts for Study: • • • • • • • •

Nationalities and languages (names). Food and dining. Introducing the Mid-Autumn Festival. My friends. Chinese New Year celebration. Living things. Activities for leisure-sports/daily routine. Time.

Getting to know a new friend. Nationalities and languages. Introducing the Mid-Autumn Festival. Dates and time. My Extended Family (parties and celebrations). Chinese New Year celebration/ legends. Transportation and moving around. The role of different occupations.

Skills Oral:

• • • •

Skills

Oral:

• • •

and sentences. Use the vocabulary and structures introduced in class. Carry out simple conversation. Express personal opinions and needs.

Follow classroom instructions. Talk about familiar topics using short phrases and sentences. Use the vocabulary, structures and grammar conventions introduced in class. Understand questions or comments and give appropriate responses. Maintain the flow of conversation for 1-2 minutes and show spontaneous engagement. Give an oral presentation of 5-8 sentences.

Follow basic classroom instructions. Talk about familiar topics using short phrases

2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE - 33


pyp: Language B - French or Mandarin Reading: • Identify main ideas and key information in text. • Read aloud familiar material, using correct pronunciation and intonation. • Use reading strategies to assist in determining meaning (e.g. prior knowledge, vocabulary, visual cues from the structure of characters). • Understand short appropriately written material. • Guideline minimum: 300 - 600 characters. Written: • Communicate ideas with some details • Use correct strokes and sequence to write characters. • Use correct punctuation and relevant vocabulary appropriate for this level. • Write a short paragraph of about 5 - 8 sentences on a familiar topic. • Guideline minimum 120 - 180 characters.

34 - 2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE


PYP: THE ARTS - Visual Arts, Drama, music and Physical Education THE ARTS - VISUAL ART AND DRAMA: GRADES 4 TO 6 Art and drama are taught by a specialist teacher for blocks of time and are integrated into Units of Inquiry. Specific artistic skills are taught, including the elements of design, art interpretation and the creation of artwork that communicate a range of ideas and feelings. In drama, students interpret play and stories using dramatic techniques and communicate using role-play and movement. The Visual Arts PYP strands for students in Grades 4 to 6 are: • • • •

Creative processes. Elements and principles of art and design. Reflection and appreciation. Visual art in society.

The Drama PYP strands for students in Grades 4 to 6 are: • • • • • •

Creative exploration and expression. Technical incorporation. Performance. Personal and social development. Reflect, evaluation and appreciation. Drama in society.

THE ARTS - MUSIC: GRADES 4 TO 6 All students in Grades 4 to 6 receive Music instruction each week with a specialist teacher. During these classes, students learn the basic elements of music through listening to, performing and creating music. The Music PYP strands for students in Grades 4 to 6 are creating and responding. This will be met through the following: • • • • •

Performing – singing and playing instruments Creating and composing Notation Listening and appreciation Music in society

Grade 4 In Grades 4 and 5, the Music programme will focus on the beginning stages of music understanding combined with the use of the voice as the instrument for application and performance. Links are also made to the cultural, historical and ethnic dimensions of music through Units of Inquiry.

Grade 5 In Grade 5, the music programme will focus on the beginning stages of music theory combined with the use of instruments for application and performance. Links are also made to the cultural, historical and ethnic dimensions of music through Units of Inquiry. Grade 6 During the second semester of Grade 5 students will go through the process of choosing an instrument. The musical instrument chosen will ideally be used throughout Grade 6, 7 and 8 as part of the music programme. Once students have chosen their instrument more information will be provided to assist parents in deciding which option (purchase or rental) is best for each child.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION: GRADES 4 TO 6 The Physical Education department provides a high quality physical and education programme in a safe, fun, and challenging environment. The physical education staff exercise excellent communication and teaching skills and aim to nurture each student’s growth and development in the physical, cognitive, and social domains through the scope and sequence of the Primary Years Programme. The goal is for students to learn the value of intrinsic motivation to pursue a healthy and active lifestyle in an increasingly changing society. The Physical Education PYP strands for Grade 4 students are: • • • • • •

Health related activities. Body control and spatial awareness. Athletic activities. Games. Movement to music. Adventure challenge.

The Physical Education PYP strands for Grades 5 and 6 students are: • Health related activities including human growth and development. • Body control and spatial awareness. • Athletic activities. • Games. • Movement to music. • Adventure challenge. 2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE - 35


Homework: grades 4 to 6 Homework aims to reinforce or extend learning; learning generated at school, but equally important, learning that reflects the natural curiosity and inquiry that all students engage in as they explore, investigate and make sense of the world around them. School generated homework assignments may vary from day to day and will include a range of activities such as: independent study and research projects, preparation for tests and quizzes, reports and assignments that extend or reinforce daily class work, skill reinforcement and practice. For long term assignments every effort will be made to coordinate due dates and the time each student is required to spend in preparation for completion.

All students are required to write their homework assignments, project due dates and test dates in their Agenda. In Grades 4—6 we encourage parents to check and sign these books each day. The books should also be used for communication with the classroom teacher. PARENTS CAN HELP WITH HOMEWORK We ask that parents give support and encouragement for their child in developing good work and study habits by: • •

When homework is not assigned, do encourage your child to use the established study time as a time for inquiry and investigation and to maintain the recreational reading period. Independent inquiries can be related to personal interests, current events, related areas to a topic under study, completing online skill builders etc.

Homework assignments are used to reinforce new concepts, understanding and skills and to help build desirable work and study habits. The amount of time that a student spends doing homework will vary somewhat from day to day, with the ability and diligence of the individual learner and a student’s programme and grade level. The amount and type of homework will also depend upon the subject area and the grade level of the student.

Asking your child about what he or she is learning. Establishing a specific nightly homework time. Providing a quiet place to study although we recommend the computer based homework or research is completed in a space where parents are able to easily monitor. Being available to answer questions or discuss related aspects of an inquiry. You are a key learning resource for your child. Reviewing completed work and offering praise or constructive feedback for improvement. Informing the teacher when problems arise.

SOME TIPS

Make sure your child has a quiet, well-lit place to do homework. Avoid having your It is important to recognize that the pattern child do homework with the television on or in of homework will be variable and the time places with other distractions, such as people required may be less or greater than the times coming and going. Computers should be in indicated in the guidelines below. Homework an area that can be easily monitored and we will be purposeful and assigned when required suggest they should not be in bedrooms. to support learning. Make sure the materials your child needs, such as technology hardware, books, The following is a guide: paper, pencils and a dictionary, etc are available. Ask your child if special materials Grade 4 40 to 50 minutes per day will be needed for some projects and get them including at least 25 minutes of in advance. Increasingly this may mean a recreational reading computer, printer and a thumb drive. Grade 5 60 to 75 minutes per day Help your child with time management. including at least 30 minutes of Establish a set time each day for doing recreational reading homework. Do not let your child leave homework Grade 6 60 to 90 minutes per day until just before bedtime. Think about using a including at least 30 minutes of weekend morning or afternoon for working on recreational reading long term assignments, especially if the project involves getting together with classmates.

36 - 2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE

Be positive about homework. Tell your child how important school is. The attitude you express about homework will be the attitude your child acquires. Show your child that the skills they are learning are related to things you do as an adult. Show them how you solve problems, write a report or prepare for a presentation. Support the partnership and show your child that the school and home are a team. When your child asks for help, provide guidance, not answers. Please also consider that at times too much parent involvement may work against the development of the attitudes and habits of independent, lifelong learning skills. Stay informed. Talk with your child’s homeroom teacher or advisor. Regular practice, review and completion of assignments at home are necessary and an integral part of the learning process. Non-completion of homework will require students to complete it during allocated times during the day or after school. Parents will be informed when students fail to complete homework to the standard required. Help your child work out what is hard homework and what is easy homework. Have your child do the hard work first. This will mean he/she will be most alert when facing the biggest challenges. Easy material will seem to go fast when fatigue begins to set in. Watch your child for signs of frustration. Let your child take a short break if he/she is having trouble keeping his/her mind on an assignment. Reward progress in homework. When your child has been successful in homework completion and is working hard, celebrate that success with praise and acknowledgement such as a special event (e.g., pizza, a walk, a trip to the park) to reinforce the positive effort.


THE IB MIDDLE YEARS PROGRAMME GRADEs 7 TO 8 the expanding horizons years 2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE - 35


The Middle Years Programme (MYP) THE MIDDLE YEARS PROGRAMME (MYP) ‘The Middle Years Programme (MYP) emphasizes a broad and balanced education which focuses on values as well as intellect. It addresses the students’ physical, affective, social and intellectual development. In helping students to understand the connectedness and application of knowledge, it serves their search for relevance and meaning, and helps them come to a deeper understanding. At the same time, the MYP allows the nature of each subject to emerge with integrity and rigour as the students prepare for the Diploma Programme or other upper secondary studies.’ (The Middle Years Programme – A Basis for Practice IBO) The MYP is guided by three fundamental concepts: Holistic learning – representing the notion that all knowledge is interrelated and that the curriculum should cater for the development of the whole person, attributes of which are described by the IB learner profile. Particular emphasis is placed on: • • •

The understanding of concepts. The mastery of skills. The development of attitudes that can lead to considered and appropriate action.

Intercultural awareness – the encouragement and promotion of international-mindedness as reflected in the attributes of the IB learner profile. Communication – the development and encouragement of open and effective communication which are important skills that contribute to international understanding as exemplified by the attributes of the IB learner profile. The Canadian International School is very proud to offer the International Baccalaureate Middle Years Programme (MYP). We firmly believe that the adoption of the IB Programme will positively enhance our already strong teaching philosophy and practices. The focus on holistic learning will challenge all students at all levels, equipping them with the intellectual, emotional, and physical tools to excel with their future educational plans.

38 - 2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE

THE CIS MIDDLE YEARS PROGRAMME AIMS TO: • • • • • • • • • •

Develop individual talents of young people. Relate classroom experience to real world. Achieve high academic standards. Promote international understanding. Develop responsible citizens. Develop critical and compassionate thinkers. Develop lifelong learners. Develop participators in local and world affairs. Promote awareness of all humanity. Foster respect for other cultures and attitudes and value one’s own culture and heritage.

MYP SUBJECTS All the MYP students study the eight curriculum areas listed below, as well as the Personal Project in Year 5 (Grade 10). Language A

English

Language B

French or Mandarin English support for Speakers of Other Languages

Technology

Computer/Design Technology/ Media Technology

Humanities

History/Geography

Physical Education Theory/Practical Science

Physics/Biology/Chemistry

Mathematics

Number, Algebra, Geometry and Trigonometry, Statistics and Probability, Discrete Mathematics

The Arts

Music, Drama, Art and Design

MIDDLE YEARS PROGRAMME OBJECTIVES To enable students to reach the final objectives in Grade 10 the IB has published Grade 8 interim objectives and we have used these as a basis for developing our Grade 7 objectives. The objectives are the starting point for all planning and teachers choose appropriate content that will enable the students to reach the objectives for that particular grade level. The objectives for each subject are included in each grade level information section.


GRADES 7 AND 8 SUBJECT ASSESSMENT CRITERIA MIDDLE YEARS PROGRAMME SUBJECT ASSESSMENT CRITERIA The MYP provides assessment criteria and accompanying descriptors that have been devised to reflect the different objectives for each subject area. The number of objectives and corresponding assessment criteria varies from one subject group to another due to the differing nature of the subjects and, to some extent, the methodologies found within the subjects. For Grades 7 and 8 we have modified the Grade 10 subject assessment criteria in order to make them more appropriate to the learning stage of our students. We have also developed a student friendly ‘I Can…’ assessment criterion that will provide the students with an increasing understanding of the criteria and performance standards. The end of semester report assesses a student’s performance throughout the semester against these assessment criteria in each subject area.

MIDDLE YEARS PROGRAMME ASSESSMENT The MYP values the use of a variety of assessment strategies and students will be required to demonstrate their achievement in a range of ways and continuously throughout the year. Assessments incorporated into the programme of study may include: Observations, use of exemplars, selected responses such as tests, quizzes and examinations, open-ended tasks such as written responses, essays, presentations, diagrams, investigations or solutions to problems and performance based assessment that will involve the performance of a task or demonstration of their interpretation of an idea. Self assessment is also integral to the assessment process. Assessment is an ongoing process and students need to ensure they understand the assessment process and prescribed criteria for measuring their performance. Each subject is assessed in applicable areas reflective of the subject studied. The criteria areas the students are assessed in are: Language A - English • Content (Receptive and Productive). • Organization. • Style and Language Mechanics.

Mathematics • Knowledge and Understanding. • Investigating Patterns. • Communication in Mathematics. • Reflection in Mathematics. Humanities • Knowledge. • Concepts. • Skills. • Organization and Presentation. Science • One World. • Communication in Science. • Knowledge and Understanding of Science. • Scientific Inquiry. • Processing Data. • Attitudes in Science. The Arts - Visual Art, Drama or Music • Knowledge and Understanding. • Application. • Reflection and Evaluation. • Personal Engagement. Physical Education • Use of Knowledge. • Movement / Composition. • Performance. • Social Skills and Personal Engagement. Technology • Investigate. • Design. • Plan. • Create. • Evaluate. • Attitudes in Technology. Language B - French or Mandarin • Speaking and Listening - Message and Interaction. • Oral Communication - Language. • Writing - Message and Organization. • Writing - Language. • Reading Comprehension.

2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE - 39


myp: interim Assessment Criteria - language a - ENGLISH Language A - English

Criterion A Content (receptive and productive)

How well can the student: • Understand and analyze language, content, structure, meaning and significance of both familiar and previously unseen oral, written and visual texts? • Compare and contrast works, and connect themes across and within genres? • Analyze the effects of the author’s choices on an audience? • Express an informed and independent response to literary and non-literary texts? • Compose pieces that apply appropriate literary and/or non-literary features to serve the context and intention? • Apply language A terminology in context. Achievement Level

Descriptor

0

The student does not reach a standard described by any of the descriptors below or no assessable work has been submitted.

1-2

The student demonstrates a very limited understanding of the text and topic and a little or no awareness of the author’s choices. There is little or no detail, development or support of ideas. In creative work, pieces show very limited imagination and sensitivity; the student rarely uses literary and/or non-literary tools that do help promote understanding and meaning. Terminology is rarely used accurately and appropriately.

3-4

The student demonstrates a limited understanding of the text and topic and an occasional awareness of the author’s choices, using insufficient detail, development and support. In creative work, pieces show limited imagination and sensitivity; the student attempts to use literary and/or nonliterary tools that sometimes help promote understanding and meaning. Terminology is sometimes used accurately and appropriately.

5-6

The student demonstrates an adequate understanding of the text and topic and a developing awareness of the author’s choices, using some detail, development and support. In creative work, pieces show acceptable imagination and sensitivity; the student sometimes uses literary and/or non-literary tools that help promote understanding and meaning. Terminology is occasionally used accurately and appropriately.

7-8

The student demonstrates a sufficient understanding of the text and topic and an awareness of the author’s choices, using adequate detail, development and support. In creative work, pieces show some imagination and sensitivity; the student generally uses literary and/or nonliterary tools that help promote understanding and meaning. Terminology is usually used accurately and appropriately.

9 - 10

The student demonstrates a good understanding of the text, topic and the author’s choices, using substantial detail, development and support. In creative work, pieces show imagination and sensitivity; the student uses literary and/or non-literary tools that help promote understanding and meaning. Relevant terminology is used accurately and appropriately.

40 - 2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE


myp: interim Assessment Criteria - language a - ENGLISH Criterion B Organization How well can the student: • Create work that employs organizational structures and language-specific conventions throughout a variety of text types? • Organize ideas and arguments in a sustained, coherent and logical manner? • Employ appropriate critical apparatus. Achievement Level

Descriptor

0

The student does not reach a standard described by any of the descriptors below or no assessable work has been submitted.

1-2

The student rarely makes use of organizational structures and language-specific conventions that do not help to develop meaning and understanding for the reader/listener. The work is generally disorganized, unclear and incoherent. The student employs critical apparatus inappropriately or not at all.

3-4

The student occasionally makes use of organizational structures and language-specific conventions that help to develop meaning and understanding for the reader/listener. The work shows the beginnings of organization but is difficult to understand. The student employs critical apparatus with limited success.

5 -6

The student sometimes makes use of organizational structures and language-specific conventions that help to develop meaning and understanding for the reader/listener. The work is adequately organized and generally coherent. The student generally employs critical apparatus correctly.

7 -8

The student usually employs organizational structures and language-specific conventions that help to develop meaning and understanding for the reader/listener. The work is generally well-organized, clear and coherent. The student generally employs critical apparatus correctly.

9 - 10

The student consistently makes use of organizational structures and language-specific conventions that help to develop meaning and understanding for the reader/listener. The work is usually well-organized, clear and coherent and the ideas being expressed build on each other. The student employs critical apparatus correctly.

Organizational structures and language conventions - refers to techniques such as clear paragraphs, transitions and topic sentences. Critical apparatus - refers to things such as referencing, footnotes, tables of contents, pagination, etc.

2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE - 41


myp: interim Assessment Criteria - language a - ENGLISH Criterion C Style and Language Mechanics How well can the student: • Use appropriate and varied register, vocabulary and idiom? • Use correct grammar and syntax? • Use appropriate and varied sentence structure? • Use correct spelling/writing? • Use language to narrate, describe, analyze, explain, argue, persuade, inform, entertain and express feelings? • Use language accurately? Achievement Level

Descriptor

0

The student does not reach a standard described by any of the descriptors below or no assessable work has been submitted.

1-2

The student employs a very limited range of vocabulary, idiom and sentence structure. There are very frequent errors in grammar and syntax which persistently hinder communication. There is little or no evidence of a register and style that serve the meaning and purpose. There are very frequent errors in punctuation and spelling/writing, which persistently hinder communication. In oral/presentation work there is little or no competence in formal speaking skills.

3-4

The student employs a limited range of vocabulary, idiom and sentence structure. Grammar and syntax are inconsistent; frequent errors often hinder communication. There is little evidence of a register and style that serve the meaning and purpose. There are frequent errors in punctuation and spelling/writing, which hinder communication. In oral/ presentation work there is limited competence in formal speaking skills.

5-6

The student employs a sufficient range of vocabulary, idiom and sentence structure. Grammar and syntax are inconsistent; frequent errors sometimes hinder communication. There is some evidence of a register and style that serve the meaning and purpose. There are frequent errors in punctuation and spelling/writing, which hinder communication. In oral/ presentation work there is some competence in formal speaking skills.

7-8

The student generally employs a range of appropriate vocabulary, idiom and sentence structure. Grammar and syntax are generally accurate; occasional errors sometimes hinder communication. The student often uses a register and style that serve the meaning and purpose. Punctuation and spelling/writing are generally accurate; occasional errors rarely hinder communication. In oral/presentation work there is an adequate level of competence in formal speaking skills.

9 - 10

The student employs a range of appropriate vocabulary, idiom and sentence structure. Grammar and syntax are accurate; occasional errors rarely hinder communication. The student consistently uses a register and style that serve the meaning and purpose. Punctuation and spelling/writing are accurate; occasional errors rarely hinder communication. In oral/ presentation work there is a good level of competence in formal speaking skills.

Notes • • • • • •

“Spelling” applies to alphabetic languages, whereas “writing” applies to character languages. This criterion deals with issues of accuracy of spelling/writing and not the aesthetics of handwriting. Spelling/writing: students should consistently use a standard form of the language being studied, appropriate to the task. The same recurring error should be treated as a single error. “Oratory technique” refers to a combination of pronunciation, intonation, tone, pitch, inflection, pace, pausing, voice control, volume, projection, body language, gesture, eye contact, as applicable to the language being studied. Pronunciation: clarity must be considered here, rather than issues of accent. This criterion can be applied to oral, written and visual work. Please note that the punctuation and spelling aspect will not apply to oral work, and the oratory technique aspect will not apply to written work. For visual work, these aspects will depend on the task and the teacher must clarify for students how they apply.

42 - 2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE


myp: interim Assessment Criteria - humanities Humanities

Criterion A Knowledge Knowledge is fundamental to studying humanities, and forms the base from which to explore concepts and develop skills. Knowledge and understanding can be assessed through a wide variety of tasks that involve factual recall or description, and explanation. Tasks may include tests, examinations, written assignments, oral interviews and presentations, extended writing, projects and exhibits. Achievement Level

Descriptor

0

The student does not reach a standard described by any of the descriptors below or no assessable work has been submitted.

1-2

The use of age appropriate terminology is inconsistent and frequent errors remain. The student demonstrates difficulty using facts and examples to show understanding. Descriptions are inaccurate and lack detail. Explanations are absent or superficial.

3-4

The student shows a beginning understanding of a basic range of age appropriate terminology and uses them with some errors. The student can generally use facts and examples to show understanding. Descriptions are basic and require more detail. Explanations are usually adequate but are superficial.

5-6

The student shows a developing understanding of a basic range of age appropriate terminology, and uses it accurately. The student can use facts and examples to show understanding. Descriptions are accurate but explanations are not well developed.

7-8

The student shows an acceptable understanding of a range of age appropriate terminology, and uses it with confidence. The student can use facts and examples to show understanding. Descriptions are accurate and explanations are developed.

9-10

The student shows a strong command of a range of age appropriate terminology, and uses it convincingly. The student can effectively use facts and examples to show understanding. Descriptions are accurate and detailed and explanations are well developed.

Criterion B Concepts Concepts are powerful ideas that have relevance within and across the MYP, and students must explore and re-explore these in order to develop understanding. Students develop their understanding of a concept to increasing levels of sophistication by applying acquired knowledge and skills. Achievement Level

Descriptor

0

The student does not reach a standard described by any of the descriptors below or no assessable work has been submitted.

1-2

Application of concepts is inappropriate. The student demonstrates conceptual awareness and understanding by recognizing basic connections to the subject matter.

3-4

Application of concepts is not always appropriate. The student demonstrates conceptual awareness and understanding by describing basic connections to the subject matter.

5-6

Application of concepts is appropriate but superficial. The student demonstrates conceptual awareness and understanding by describing some connections to the subject matter. The student occasionally attempts to apply concepts to other situations.

7-8

Application of concepts is appropriate. The student demonstrates conceptual awareness and understanding by describing connections to the subject matter. The student is beginning to apply concepts to other situations but is not always successful.

9 - 10

Application of concepts is appropriate and shows some depth. The student demonstrates conceptual awareness and understanding by describing and attempting to explain connections to the subject matter. The student is beginning to apply concepts to other situations with some success.

2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE - 43


myp: interim Assessment Criteria - humanities Criterion C Skills The development of skills in humanities is critical in enabling the student to undertake research and demonstrate an understanding of knowledge and concepts. Developments in the student’s technical, analytical, decision-making and investigative skills will be invaluable in transferring these skills to other subject groups in the MYP, and for lifelong learning. Achievement Level

Descriptor

0

The student does not reach a standard described by any of the descriptors below or no assessable work has been submitted.

1-2

The student selects and uses some relevant information. Work shows minimal analytical skills. The student develops arguments or decisions that are not always relevant or may be absent altogether The student demonstrates limited investigative skills.

3-4

The student selects and uses some relevant information. Work shows a lack of deep analysis. The student can develop occasionally relevant arguments or decisions but they are rarely supported with evidence. The student demonstrates limited investigative skills.

5-6

The student selects and uses mostly relevant information. Work shows emerging analytical skills. The student can develop relevant arguments or decisions but they are not well supported with evidence. The student demonstrates basic investigative skills.

7-8

The student selects and uses relevant information. Work shows developing analytical skills. Arguments, decisions and judgments are supported and balanced though superficial. The student demonstrates adequate investigative skills.

9 - 10

The student selects and uses a range of relevant information. Work shows good analysis. Arguments, decisions and judgments are supported and balanced. The student demonstrates effective investigative skills.

Criterion D Organization and Presentation Students need to develop the ability to organize and present information and ideas in order to be able to demonstrate their grasp of humanities knowledge, concepts and skills. Achievement Level

Descriptor

0

The student does not reach a standard described by any of the descriptors below or no assessable work has been submitted.

1-2

The student communicates information that is often irrelevant. The student attempts to use some structure but the work is often incoherent and does not follow the required format. Presentation and expression are unclear; the student shows limited awareness of the audience and purpose in terms of appropriate language, style and visual representation. There is little or no attempt to document sources.

3-4

The student communicates information that may not always be relevant. The student attempts to use some structure but the work is not always coherent. Presentation and expression are often unclear. The student rarely shows awareness of the audience and purpose in terms of appropriate language, style and visual representation. A limited number of sources of information are documented in MLA format, though details may be omitted.

5-6

The student communicates information that is mostly relevant. The student attempts to use a structure and to present ideas logically. Presentation and expression are sometimes unclear; The student shows some awareness of the audience and purpose in terms of appropriate language, style and visual representation. Sources of information are documented in MLA format, with occasional errors or omissions.

7-8

The student communicates information that is relevant. The student uses a structure appropriate to the task and presents ideas logically. Presentation and expression are clear. The student shows full awareness of the audience and purpose in terms of appropriate language, style and visual representation. Sources of information are documented in an MLA works cited list.

44 - 2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE


myp: interim Assessment Criteria - mathematics Mathematics

Criterion A Knowledge and Understanding This criterion examines to what extent the student is able to: • Know and demonstrate understanding of the concepts from the five branches of mathematics (number, algebra, geometry and trigonometry, statistics and probability, and discrete mathematics). • Use appropriate mathematical concepts and skills to solve problems in both familiar and unfamiliar situations, including those in real life contexts. • Select and apply general rules correctly to solve problems, including those in real life contexts. Assessment tasks for this criterion are likely to be class tests, examinations, real life problems and investigations that may have a variety of solutions. Achievement Level

Descriptor

0

The student does not reach a standard described by any of the descriptors below or no assessable work has been submitted.

1-2

The student attempts to make deductions when attempting simple problems in familiar contexts.

3-4

The student sometimes makes appropriate deductions when attempting simple and increasingly complex problems in familiar contexts.

5-6

The student usually makes appropriate deductions when attempting challenging problems in familiar contexts.

7-8

The student consistently makes appropriate deductions when attempting challenging problems in a variety of familiar contexts.

Notes: Deduction: reasoning from the general to the particular/specific.

2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE - 45


myp: interim Assessment Criteria - mathematics Criterion B Investigating Patterns This criterion examines to what extent the student is able to: • Select and apply appropriate inquiry and mathematical problem solving techniques. • Recognize patterns. • Describe patterns as relationships or general rules. • Draw conclusions consistent with findings. • Justify or prove mathematical relationships and general rules. Assessment tasks for this criterion should be mathematical investigations of some complexity, as appropriate to the level of MYP mathematics. Tasks should allow students to choose their own mathematical techniques to investigate problems, and to reason from the specific to the general. Assessment tasks could have a variety of solutions and may be set in real life contexts. Teachers should clearly state whether the student has to provide a justification or proof. Teachers should include a good balance between tasks done under test conditions and tasks done at home in order to ensure the development of independent mathematical thinking. Achievement Level

Descriptor

0

The student does not reach a standard described by any of the descriptors below or no assessable work has been submitted.

1-2

The student applies, with some guidance, mathematical problem-solving techniques to recognize simple patterns.

3-4

The student selects and applies mathematical problem-solving techniques to recognize patterns, and suggests relationships or general rules.

5-6

The student selects and applies mathematical problem-solving techniques to recognize patterns, describes them as relationships or general rules, and draws conclusions consistent with findings.

7-8

The student selects and applies mathematical problem-solving techniques to recognize patterns, describes them as relationships or general rules, draws conclusions consistent with findings, and attempts to provide justifications or proofs.

Notes 1. Pattern: the underlining order, regularity or predictability between the elements of a mathematical system. To identify pattern is to begin to understand how mathematics applies to the world in which we live. The repetitive features of patterns can be identified and described as relationships or generalized rules. 2. Justification: a clear and logical mathematical explanation of why the rule works. 3. Proof: a mathematical demonstration of the truth of a given proposition.

46 - 2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE


myp: interim Assessment Criteria - mathematics Criterion C Communication in Mathematics This criterion examines to what extent the student is able to: • Use appropriate mathematical language (notation, symbols, terminology) in both oral and written explanations. • Use different forms of mathematical representation (formulae, diagrams, tables, charts, graphs and models). • Communicate a complete and coherent mathematical line of reasoning using different forms of representation when investigating complex problems. Students are encouraged to choose and use appropriate ICT tools such as graphic display calculators, screenshots, graphing, spreadsheets, databases, drawing and word-processing software, as appropriate, to enhance communication. Assessment tasks for this criterion are likely to be real-life problems, tests, examinations and investigations. Tests and examinations that are to be assessed against criterion C must be designed to allow students to show complete lines of reasoning using mathematical language. Achievement Level

Descriptor

0

The student does not reach a standard described by any of the descriptors below or no assessable work has been submitted.

1-2

The student shows basic use of mathematical language and/or forms of mathematical representation. The lines of reasoning are difficult to follow.

3-4

The student shows sufficient use of mathematical language and/or forms of mathematical representation. The lines of reasoning are clear, and occasionally logical and complete. The student moves between different forms of representation with some success.

5-6

The student shows appropriate use of mathematical language and/or forms of mathematical representation. The lines of reasoning are clear, and sometimes logical and complete. The student moves adequately between different forms of representation.

Notes 1. Mathematical language: the use of notation, symbols, terminology and verbal explanations. 2. Forms of mathematical representation: refers to formulae, diagrams, tables, charts, graphs and models, used to represent mathematical information.

2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE - 47


myp: interim Assessment Criteria - mathematics Criterion D Reflection in Mathematics This criterion examines to what extent the student is able to: • Explain whether his or her results make sense in the context of the problem. • Explain the importance of his or her findings in connection to real life. • Justify the degree of accuracy of his or her results where appropriate. • Suggest improvements to the method when necessary. Assessment tasks are most likely to be investigations and real-life problems. Generally these types of tasks will provide students with opportunities to use mathematical concepts and skills to solve problems in real-life contexts. Achievement Level

Descriptor

0

The student does not reach a standard described by any of the descriptors below or no assessable work has been submitted.

1-2

The student attempts to explain whether his or her results make sense in the context of the problem and attempts to explain the importance of his or her findings in connection to real life.

3-4

The student briefly explains whether his or her results make sense in the context of the problem and provides a description of the importance of his or her findings in connection to real life. The student attempts to justify the degree of accuracy of his or her results where appropriate.

5-6

The student explains whether his or her results make sense in the context of the problem and provides a sufficient explanation of the importance of his or her findings in connection to real life. The student attempts to justify the degree of accuracy of his or her results where appropriate.

Notes 1. Describe: present an account without providing reasons or explanations. 2. Explain: give a detailed account including reasons, causes or justifications. Explanations should answer the questions “why” and “how”.

48 - 2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE


myp: interim Assessment Criteria THE arts - Visual art, Drama or music The Arts - Visual Art, Drama or Music Criterion A Knowledge and understanding

Students should be able to: • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the art form studied in relation to societal, cultural, historical and personal contexts. • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the elements of the art form studied, including specialized language, concepts and processes. • Communicate a critical understanding of the art form studied in the context of their own artwork. Achievement Level

Descriptor

0

The student does not reach a standard described by any of the descriptors below or no assessable work has been submitted.

1-2

The student shows limited age appropriate knowledge and understanding of the art form studied in relation to societal or cultural or historical or personal contexts. The student is able to demonstrate limited knowledge and understanding of the elements of the art form studied. The student is able to communicate a limited understanding of the art form studied, in the context of his or her own work.

3-4

The student is able to demonstrate satisfactory age appropriate knowledge and understanding of the art form studied in relation to societal or cultural or historical or personal contexts. The student is able to demonstrate satisfactory knowledge and understanding of most of the elements of the art form studied. The student is able to communicate satisfactory understanding of the art form studied, in the context of his or her own work although some opportunities are not pursued.

5-6

The student is able to demonstrate good age appropriate knowledge and understanding of the art form studied in relation to societal or cultural or historical or personal contexts. The student is able to demonstrate good knowledge and understanding of most of the elements of the art form studied. The student is able to communicate a good level of understanding of the art form studied, in the context of his or her own work.

7-8

The student is able to demonstrate excellent age appropriate knowledge and understanding of the art form studied in relation to societal or cultural or historical or personal contexts. The student is able to demonstrate excellent knowledge and understanding of most of the elements of the art form studied. The student is able to communicate a well developed understanding of the art form studied, in the context of his or her own work.

This assessment criterion needs to be clarified for students according to the outcomes for the unit of work or task, providing them with details of what they need to show or attain at different levels for tasks assessed using criterion A.

2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE - 49


myp: interim Assessment Criteria THE arts - Visual art, Drama or music Criterion B Application Students should be able to: • Develop an idea, a theme or a personal interpretation to a point of realization, expressing and communicating their artistic intentions. • Apply skills, techniques and processes to create, perform and/or present art. • Achievement Level

Descriptor

0

The student does not reach a standard described by any of the descriptors below or no assessable work has been submitted.

1-2

There is very limited expression and communication of artistic intentions in the student’s work, which may not have reached a point of realization. Skills and techniques are applied at a very limited level of age appropriate proficiency. The student attempts to apply the artistic processes.

3-4

There is limited expression and communication of artistic intentions in the student’s work, which has reached a point or partial point of realization. Skills and techniques are applied at a limited level of age appropriate proficiency. The student attempts to apply the artistic processes.

5-6

The student is able to elaborate an idea, a theme or a personal interpretation to a point of realization. There is satisfactory expression and communication of artistic intentions. Skills and techniques are applied at a satisfactory level of age appropriate proficiency. The student shows a satisfactory ability to apply the artistic processes involved in creating art.

7-8

The student is able to elaborate an idea, a theme or a personal interpretation to a point of realization. There is increasing evidence of good expression and communication of artistic intentions. Skills and techniques are applied at a good level of age appropriate proficiency. The student shows a good ability to apply the artistic processes involved in creating art.

9 - 10

The student is able to elaborate an idea, a theme or a personal interpretation to a point of realization. There is increasing evidence of purposeful expression and effective communication of artistic intentions. Skills and techniques are applied at a high level of age appropriate proficiency. The student shows an excellent ability to apply the artistic processes involved in creating art.

This assessment criterion needs to be clarified for students according to the outcomes for the unit of work or task, providing them with details of what they need to show or attain at different levels for tasks assessed using criterion A.

50 - 2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE


myp: interim Assessment Criteria THE arts - Visual art, Drama or music Criterion C Reflection and evaluation Students should be able to: • Reflect critically on their own artistic development and processes at different stages of their work. • Evaluate their work. • Use feedback to inform their own artistic development and processes. Achievement Level

Descriptor

0

The student does not reach a standard described by any of the descriptors below or no assessable work has been submitted.

1-2

The student records his or her artistic development and processes with little reflection. The student carries out a limited evaluation of his or her work, with guidance.

3-4

The student reflects on his or her artistic development and processes. The student carries out a satisfactory evaluation of his or her work. Some aspects of the evaluation may be unrealistic or incomplete. The student attempts to use feedback in his or her artistic development and processes, with guidance.

5-6

The student reflects appropriately on his or her artistic development and processes at different stages of his or her work. The student carries out a good evaluation of his or her work. The evaluation includes an appraisal of the quality of work produced and an identification of some areas of improvement. The student uses feedback in his or her artistic development with little guidance, which informs his or her own artistic development and processes

7-8

The student reflects critically on his or her artistic development and processes at different stages of his or her work. The student carries out an appropriate and effective evaluation of his or her work. This shows a balanced appraisal of the quality of work produced and details of improvements that could be made. The student clearly uses feedback in his or her artistic development, which shows an appropriate consideration of his or her artistic processes.

The purpose of this criterion is to focus students’ attention on their own creative work and their development in the art form. Students need to be guided in their evaluation of their strengths and weaknesses and their development in the subject. This includes their analysis of the process of working, discussion of themes and issues raised by the work, and responses to feedback from the teacher and from other students. Reflection and evaluation should be an ongoing process in MYP arts, so feedback and responses to it, as well as self appraisal, need to be recorded in the developmental workbook. When compiling samples for moderation or monitoring of assessment, teachers are asked to include examples of both ongoing and retrospective reflection and evaluation for criterion C. Reflections on, appraisals and critiques of the work of other artists should be assessed using criterion A.

2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE - 51


myp: interim Assessment Criteria THE arts - Visual art, Drama or music Criterion D Personal engagement Students should be able to: • Show commitment in using their own artistic processes. • Demonstrate curiosity, self motivation, initiative and a willingness to take informed risks. • Support, encourage and work with their peers in a positive way. • Be receptive to art practices and artworks from various cultures, including their own. Achievement Level

Descriptor

0

The student does not reach a standard described by any of the descriptors below or no assessable work has been submitted.

1-2

The student shows limited commitment in using his or her own artistic processes. The student demonstrates limited curiosity, self motivation, initiative and a willingness to take informed risks. The student works with his or her peers in a positive way, with encouragement. The student is rarely receptive to art practices and artworks from various cultures, including his or her own.

3-4

The student shows satisfactory commitment in using his or her own artistic processes. The student demonstrates satisfactory curiosity, self motivation, initiative and a willingness to take informed risks. The student supports, encourages and works with his or her peers in a positive way, with encouragement. The student is occasionally receptive to art practices and artworks from various cultures, including his or her own.

5-6

The student shows good commitment in using his or her own artistic processes. The student generally demonstrates curiosity, self motivation, initiative and a willingness to take informed risks. The student supports, encourages and works with his or her peers in a positive way, with little encouragement. The student is generally receptive to art practices and artworks from various cultures, including his or her own.

7-8

The student shows excellent commitment in using his or her own artistic processes. The student actively demonstrates curiosity, self motivation, initiative and a willingness to take informed risks. The student actively supports, encourages and works with his or her peers in a positive way. The student is actively receptive to art practices and artworks from various cultures, including his or her own.

52 - 2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE


myp: interim Assessment Criteria - physical education Physical Education

Criterion A Use of knowledge Achievement Level

Descriptor

0

The student does not reach a standard described by any of the descriptors below or no assessable work has been submitted.

1-2

Use of terminology is inconsistent, inappropriate or incorrect. Demonstrates limited knowledge of principles, concepts, strategies, techniques and rules related to the physical education topic or activity. Sometimes uses this knowledge to analyze and solve problems in familiar situations.

3-4

Uses basic terminology that is sometimes accurate or appropriate. Demonstrates basic knowledge of principles, concepts, strategies, techniques and rules related to the physical education topic or activity. Sometimes uses this knowledge to analyze and solve problems in familiar situations.

5-6

Uses sufficient terminology that is usually accurate or appropriate. Demonstrates acceptable knowledge of principles, concepts, strategies, techniques and rules related to the physical education topic or activity. Uses this knowledge to analyze and solve problems in familiar situations.

7-8

Uses a good range of terminology accurately and appropriately in many familiar situations. Demonstrates a good knowledge of principles, concepts, strategies, techniques and rules related to the physical education topic or activity. Uses this knowledge to analyze and solve problems in familiar and some unfamiliar situations.

Notes 1. Range: it will depend on the sport/topic as to what constitutes a “range� of terminology. 2. Unfamiliar: describes a situation that the student has not encountered before, but relates to work already studied. By giving students the opportunity to respond to unfamiliar situations, students can use their knowledge to analyze and solve problems. For example, after studying principles of fitness, a student may be asked to apply their knowledge to a sport or situation that they have not been in contact with before, or students could be given a game scenario and devise tactics or strategies to defeat their opponent. Tasks that only require students to recall or demonstrate knowledge prevent students from meeting the higher levels in this criterion.

Criterion B Movement Composition Achievement Level

Descriptor

0

The student does not reach a standard described by any of the descriptors below or no assessable work has been submitted.

1-2

The student selects some aesthetic moves that are appropriate to the requirements of the task. The sequence shows a simple use of space, time, level, force and flow. The composition is unclear with many pauses and shows limited creativity.

3-4

The student selects a range of aesthetic moves that are usually appropriate to the requirements of the task. The sequence shows a competent use of space, time, level, force and flow. The composition is generally clear and shows some aspects of imagination, creativity and style.

5-6

The student selects a range of aesthetic moves that are appropriate to the requirements of the task. The student is beginning to adapt and create moves for the task. The sequence shows an appropriate use of space, time, level, force and flow. The composition is clear and shows aspects of imagination, creativity and style.

2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE - 53


myp: interim Assessment Criteria - physical education Criterion C Performance Achievement Level

Descriptor

0

The student does not reach a standard described by any of the descriptors below or no assessable work has been submitted.

1-2

The student demonstrates limited competence in basic moves, skills and techniques in the performance or playing situation. The student shows awareness of movement concepts, tactics, strategies. The student performs with little precision, synchronization or energy.

3-4

The student demonstrates developing competence in some basic moves, skills and techniques in the performance or playing situation. The student shows awareness of movement concepts, tactics, strategies but has difficulty applying them. The student performs with limited precision, synchronization and/or energy.

5-6

The student demonstrates competence in most basic moves, skills and techniques in the performance or playing situation. The student shows awareness of movement concepts, tactics, strategies and rules and attempts to apply them. The student performs with some precision, synchronization and/or energy.

7-8

The student demonstrates general competence in most basic and occasional complex moves, skills and techniques in the performance or playing situation. The student applies some movement concepts, tactics, strategies and rules. The student performs with an acceptable degree of precision, synchronization and energy most of the time.

9 - 10

The student demonstrates competence in most basic and some complex moves, skills and techniques in the performance or playing situation. The student applies movement concepts, tactics, strategies and rules appropriately. The student performs with a high degree of precision, synchronization and energy most of the time.

Notes • • •

Competence: this could include characteristics such as accuracy, efficiency, control, coordination, timing, fluency, speed and power. Depending on the nature of the activity, these sorts of characteristics should be considered when determining competency. Precision: this could include balance, stability, amplitude, exactness, extension and body form. Synchronization: this indicates synchronization with the music, a partner or partners, or both.

54 - 2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE


MYP: interim Assessment Criteria - physical education Criterion D Social Skills and Personal Engagement Achievement Level

Descriptor

0

The student does not reach a standard described by any of the descriptors below or no assessable work has been submitted.

1-2

The student demonstrates attitudes and strategies that maintain their communication and relationships with others. The student shows respect and sensitivity to themselves, others and the physical environment some of them time. The student takes limited responsibility for their own learning some of the time and shows little enthusiasm and commitment to physical education. The student rarely reflects on their own achievements, sets goals and takes limited action towards achieving them.

3-4

The student demonstrates attitudes and strategies that maintain their communication and relationships with others. The student shows respect and sensitivity to themselves, others and the physical environment most of them time. The student takes responsibility for their own learning most of the time and shows some enthusiasm and commitment to physical education. The student occasionally reflects on their own achievements, sets goals and takes limited action towards achieving them.

5-6

The student demonstrates attitudes and strategies that begin to improve their communication and relationships with others. The student generally attempts to show respect and sensitivity to themselves, others and the physical environment. The student generally takes responsibility for their own learning and usually shows enthusiasm and commitment to physical education. The student reflects on their own achievements, sets adequate goals and takes some action towards achieving them.

7-8

The student demonstrates attitudes and strategies that improve their communication and relationships with others. The student consistently attempts to show respect and sensitivity to themselves, others and the physical environment. The student takes responsibility for their own learning and usually shows enthusiasm and commitment to physical education. The student reflects consistently on their own achievements, sets appropriate goals and takes some action towards achieving them.

2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE - 55


myp: interim Assessment Criteria LANGUAGE B - FRENCH OR MANDARIN Language B (Standard) - French or Mandarin Criterion A Oral Communication - Message and Interaction

To what extent does the student show the ability to communicate ideas, interact and maintain the flow of the conversation? To what extent can the student: • Communicate information, ideas and opinions. • Respond and react to questions and ideas (familiar and spontaneous situations). • Contribute to the conversation and engage actively. • Maintain a flow of ideas and a logical continuity in the conversation?

Achievement Level

Descriptor

0

The student does not reach a standard described by any of the descriptors below or no assessable work has been submitted.

1-2

The student’s communication of information is incoherent; ideas are generally irrelevant and/or repetitive; opinions are unsupported. The student has difficulty in responding, even in familiar situations. The student often needs prompting to encourage a response; conversation/dialogue does not flow.

3-4

The student has some difficulty in communicating information; ideas are sometimes irrelevant and/or repetitive; some opinions are supported. The student shows understanding by responding correctly in familiar situations. The student needs occasional prompting to encourage a response, and this contributes to some lapses in the natural flow of conversation.

5-6

The student communicates information clearly, though there is some difficulty with more complex ideas. The student’s ideas are relevant but not always developed; opinions are usually supported. The student shows understanding by responding correctly in familiar and some new situations. The student can maintain the natural flow of conversation, and may show some independent engagement. The student needs occasional prompting but this does not disturb the flow of conversation.

7-8

The student communicates information clearly and effectively; both simple and complex ideas are meaningful and developed; opinions are fully supported. The student shows understanding by responding in the target language correctly in familiar and unfamiliar situations. The student actively contributes to the natural flow of conversation; and is independently engaged . Any prompting is natural and does not disturb the flow.

Notes • • •

Reading from prepared texts or the use of memorized speeches does not constitute real interaction according to language B objectives. Teachers should bear in mind the different cultural norms and acceptable practices of the target language when engaged in conversation. Spontaneous engagement in the conversation needs to be appropriate to the conversation and to the cultural context.

56 - 2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE


myp: interim Assessment Criteria LANGUAGE B - FRENCH OR MANDARIN Criterion B Oral Communication - Language To what extent does the student show the ability to use the language effectively and accurately? To what extent can the student: • Use clear pronunciation and/or intonation. • Correctly use a range of vocabulary. • Correctly use a range of grammatical structures? Achievement Level

Descriptor

0

The student does not reach a standard described by any of the descriptors below or no assessable work has been submitted.

1-2

The student’s pronunciation and/or intonation are inaccurate and consistently interfere with their ability to be understood. The student’s range of vocabulary and structures is limited and/or is used inappropriately or incorrectly. Errors interfere frequently.

3-4

The student’s pronunciation and/or intonation have mistakes that sometimes interfere with their ability to be understood. The student uses a basic range of vocabulary and structures, with occasional mistakes. Errors sometimes interfere.

5-6

The student’s pronunciation and/or intonation have occasional mistakes but these rarely interfere with their ability to be understood. The student uses a range of vocabulary and structures appropriately; and attempts to use idiom and register appropriate to the context. Errors rarely interfere.

7-8

The student’s pronunciation and/or intonation have occasional mistakes, but these do not interfere with their ability to be understood. The student uses a wide range of vocabulary and varied structures appropriately, including idiom and register appropriate to context. Errors do not interfere.

Notes • •

Pronunciation/intonation: clarity must be considered here, rather than issues of accent. Register: this refers to tone, vocabulary, grammar and sentence structure, and their appropriateness for the situation.

2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE - 57


myp: interim Assessment Criteria LANGUAGE B - FRENCH OR MANDARIN Criterion C - Writing - message and organization To what extent does the student show the ability to communicate, organize and support relevant ideas? To what extent can the student: • Provide information and ideas. • Develop ideas. • Use a format and structure appropriate to the task to organize the work? Achievement Level

Descriptor

0

The student does not reach a standard described by any of the descriptors below or no assessable work has been submitted.

1-2

The student’s communication of information is mostly incoherent; ideas are generally irrelevant and/or repetitive; opinions are unsupported. The lack of structure contributes to the poor clarity of the message.

3-4

The student has some difficulty in communicating information; ideas are sometimes irrelevant and/or repetitive; opinions are often unsupported. The student makes an attempt at structuring the work, and uses some basic cohesive devices.

5-6

The student communicates information clearly, though there is some difficulty with more complex ideas. The student’s ideas are relevant but not always supported; opinions are sometimes justified. The student structures the work appropriately, which adds to the clarity of the message; there is an appropriate use of cohesive devices.

7-8

The student communicates information clearly and effectively; both simple and complex ideas are relevant and supported; opinions are justified. The student structures the work clearly and effectively, which adds to the clarity and coherence of the message; there is effective use of cohesive devices.

Notes • • •

Structure: this refers to the format or pattern of the piece of writing. For example, this may involve an introduction, development and conclusion as in some types of formal essay. Cohesive devices: this refers to the grammatical and/or lexical items that link the different elements of a text. Teachers should make sure that students are aware of the different writing norms and practices of the target language when setting writing tasks.

58 - 2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE


myp: interim Assessment Criteria LANGUAGE B - FRENCH OR MANDARIN Criterion D Writing - Language To what extent does the student show the ability to use the language effectively and accurately? To what extent can the student: • Correctly use a range of vocabulary. • Correctly use a range of grammatical structures. • Show accuracy in spelling or writing of characters. • Write with a particular audience in mind? Achievement Level

Descriptor

0

The student does not reach a standard described by any of the descriptors below or no assessable work has been submitted.

1-2

The student uses a limited range of vocabulary and structures; these may be used inappropriately or incorrectly. Errors interfere frequently. Spelling/writing are inaccurate and interfere with communication. The writing does not reflect a sense of audience.

3-4

The student uses a basic range of vocabulary and structures, with occasional mistakes. Errors sometimes interfere. There are occasional mistakes in spelling/writing that sometimes interfere with communication. There is an attempt to use appropriate register, which shows some evidence of a sense of audience.

5-6

The student uses a range of vocabulary and structures appropriately; and attempts to use idiom appropriate to the context. Errors rarely interfere. There are occasional mistakes in spelling/writing but these do not interfere with communication. The student shows a sense of audience, though there may be some lapses in using the appropriate register.

7-8

The student uses a wide range of vocabulary and varied structures appropriately and uses idiom appropriate to the context. Errors do not interfere. The student shows a good command of spelling/writing. The student shows a clear sense of audience by consistently using an appropriate register.

Notes • •

The importance attached to the assessment of spelling and/or writing will vary from language to language. For example, the techniques of writing will be particularly important in languages such as Chinese or Japanese, whereas spelling will take on greater importance in English or Russian. “Sense of audience” is linked to “register”: this refers to tone, vocabulary, grammar and sentence structure, and their appropriateness for the situation.

2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE - 59


myp: interim Assessment Criteria LANGUAGE B - FRENCH OR MANDARIN Criterion E - Reading Comprehension To what extent does the student show the ability to comprehend a piece of writing in the target language? To what extent can the student: • Identify both stated and implied information. • Identify main ideas and supporting details. • Draw conclusions and recognize implied opinions and attitudes. • Identify aspects of format and style? Achievement Level

Descriptor

0

The student does not reach a standard described by any of the descriptors below or no assessable work has been submitted.

1-2

The student identifies basic information stated in texts with familiar language. The student shows a limited understanding of the text(s) overall.

3-4

The student identifies stated information, main ideas and some supporting details in texts with familiar language. The student shows an understanding of some parts of the text(s).

5-6

The student identifies stated and implied information, main ideas and supporting details in texts with familiar and unfamiliar language and/or complex ideas. The student draws conclusions. The student shows an understanding of most parts of the text(s).

7-8

The student identifies stated and implied information, main ideas and supporting details in texts with familiar and unfamiliar language and/or complex ideas. The student draws conclusions and recognizes opinions and attitudes implied within the text. The student identifies some aspects of format and style where appropriate. The student shows a good understanding of the text(s) overall.

Notes • • • •

Please note that the final level for criterion E should be multiplied by two in order to give equal weighting to comprehension and expressive skills overall. However, this should only be done when determining the final grade (see the “Determining the final grade” section for further information). Teachers must choose texts and set tasks that will allow the students to reach the highest levels for the criterion: questions must pertain to the descriptors. Although multiple-choice questions may be appropriate in addressing the lower levels of criterion E, they are not recommended for addressing the higher levels: open-ended questions are more effective in allowing students to demonstrate all the skills listed in the higher levels. When students respond in the target language, they should not be penalized for language errors.

60 - 2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE


MYP interim Assessment Criteria - SCIENCES Sciences

Criterion A One World One world enables students to gain a better understanding of the role of science in society and allows them to explore how scientific developments and applications are applied and used to address specific problems or issues in local and global contexts. Students should be able to: • Explain the ways in which science is applied and used to address a specific problem or issue. • Discuss the effectiveness of science and its application in solving the problem or issue. • Discuss and evaluate the moral, ethical, social, economic, political, cultural and environmental implications of the use of science and its application in solving specific problems or issues. Assessment tasks should give students the opportunity to explore how science is used to address a specific problem or issue. Students are required to critically discuss and evaluate the implications associated with the use and application of science by considering moral, ethical, social, economic, political, cultural and environmental factors. Suitable assessment tasks for criterion A include written pieces of work, essays, case studies and research projects, as well as debates, oral and multimedia presentations. Achievement Level

Descriptor

0

The student does not reach a standard described by any of the descriptors below or no assessable work has been submitted.

1-2

The student can state how science is applied in a local or global context. The student can state the effectiveness of science and its application in solving the problem or issue.

3-4

The student appropriately describes how science is applied in a local or global context. The student describes the effectiveness of science and its application in solving the problem or issue. The student begins to discuss and evaluate the implications of the use and application of science interacting with any of the following factors: moral, ethical, social, economic, political, cultural and environmental.

5-6

The student appropriately explains how science is applied in a local or global context. The student discusses the effectiveness of science and its application in solving the problem or issue. The student begins to describes the implications of the use and application of science interacting with any of the following factors: moral, ethical, social, economic, political, cultural and environmental.

Describe: to give a detailed account. Discuss: to give an account including, where possible, a range of arguments for and against the relative importance of various factors and comparisons of alternative hypotheses. Explain : to give a clear account, including causes and reasons or mechanisms. State: to give a specific name, value or other brief answer without explanation or calculation.

2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE - 61


MYP interim Assessment Criteria - SCIENCES Criterion B Communication in Science Communication in science enables students to develop the communication skills to become competent and confident when communicating information in science. Students should be able to use different communication modes, including verbal (oral, written) and visual (graphic, symbolic), as well as appropriate communication formats (laboratory reports, essays, and multimedia presentations) to effectively communicate scientific ideas, theories, findings and arguments in science. Students should be able to: • Use scientific language correctly. • Use appropriate communication modes and formats. • Acknowledge the work of others and the sources of information used by appropriately documenting them using a recognized referencing system. Achievement Level

Descriptor

0

The student does not reach a standard described by any of the descriptors below or no assessable work has been submitted.

1-2

The student uses a limited amount of age appropriate scientific language correctly. The student communicates scientific information with difficulty or limited effectiveness. There is little attempt to document sources using MLA conventions.

3-4

The student uses a some age appropriate scientific language correctly. The student communicates scientific information with developing effectiveness. When appropriate to the task, the student uses MLA conventions to partially document sources of information with some errors and omissions.

5-6

The student uses a sufficient amount of age appropriate scientific language correctly. The student communicates scientific information effectively most of the time. When appropriate to the task, the student uses MLA conventions to effectively document sources of information with few errors.

Document: to credit fully all sources of information used by referencing (or citing), following one recognized referencing system. References should be included in the text and also at the end of the piece of work in a reference list or bibliography.

62 - 2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE


MYP interim Assessment Criteria - SCIENCES Criterion C Knowledge and understanding of Science Knowledge and understanding of science enables students to demonstrate their understanding of science by applying scientific knowledge to construct scientific explanations, solve problems and formulate scientifically supported arguments. Students should be able to: • Recall scientific knowledge and use scientific understanding to construct scientific explanations. • Apply scientific knowledge and understanding to solve problems set in familiar and unfamiliar situations. • Critically analyze and evaluate information to make judgments supported by scientific understanding. Achievement Level

Descriptor

0

The student does not reach a standard described by any of the descriptors below or no assessable work has been submitted.

1-2

The student can recall some scientific ideas, concepts and/or processes. With some support, the student applies scientific understanding to solve simple problems in familiar situations.

3-4

The student can describe scientific ideas, concepts and/or processes. With some support, the student applies scientific understanding to solve problems in familiar situations. The student analyzes scientific information by identifying parts, relationships or causes.

5-6

With some support, the student uses scientific ideas, concepts and/or processes correctly to construct scientific explanations. With some support, the student applies scientific understanding to solve increasingly complex problems including some in unfamiliar situations. The student analyzes and evaluates scientific information and makes judgments supported by appropriate scientific understanding.

Analyze: to identify parts and relationships and to interpret information to reach a conclusion. Complex problems: refers to problems that are set in a familiar or unfamiliar context and require analysis. These problems can often be broken down into sub-problems or stages, each of which requires the selection and application of the appropriate principle, rule, equation or method. Evaluate: to assess the implications and limitations; to make judgments about the value of ideas, works, solutions and methods in relation to selected criteria. Simple problems: refers to straightforward problems that are clearly stated and set in a familiar context, and require the student to apply the appropriate principle, rule, equation or method. Unfamiliar situation: refers to a problem or situation in which the context or the application is modified so that it is considered unfamiliar for the student.

2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE - 63


MYP interim Assessment Criteria - SCIENCES Criterion D Scientific Inquiry This criterion enables students to design and carry out scientific investigations independently. Students should be able to: • State a focused problem or research question to be tested by a scientific investigation. • Formulate a testable hypothesis and explain it using scientific reasoning. • Design and carry out scientific investigations that include variables and controls, material and/or equipment needed, a method to be followed, and the way in which the data is to be collected and processed. • Evaluate the validity and reliability of the method. • Judge the validity of the hypothesis based on the outcome of the investigation. • Suggest improvements to the method or further inquiry, when relevant. Achievement Level

Descriptor

0

The student does not reach a standard described by any of the descriptors below or no assessable work has been submitted.

1-2

The student attempts to state a focused problem or research question. The method suggested is incomplete. The student attempts to evaluate the method and respond to the focused problem or research question.

3-4

The student states a focused problem or research question and makes a hypothesis but does not explain it using scientific reasoning. The student selects appropriate materials and equipment and writes a mostly complete method, mentioning some of the variables involved and how to manipulate them. The student partially evaluates the method. The student comments on the validity of the hypothesis based on the outcome of the investigation. The student suggests some improvements to the method or makes suggestions for further inquiry when relevant.

5-6

The student states a clear focused problem or research question, formulates a testable hypothesis and adequately explains the hypothesis using scientific reasoning. The student selects appropriate materials and equipment and writes a clear, logical method, mentioning most of the relevant variables involved and how to control and manipulate them, and describing how the data will be collected and processed. The student evaluates the method, commenting on its reliability and validity. The student comments on the validity of the hypothesis based on the outcome of the investigation. The student suggests realistic improvements to the method and makes suggestions for further inquiry when relevant.

64 - 2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE


MYP interim Assessment Criteria - SCIENCES Criterion E Processing Data Processing data refers to enabling students to organize, process and interpret quantitative and qualitative data. Students should be able to: • Collect and record data using units of measurement as and when appropriate. • Organize, transform and present data using numerical and visual forms. • Analyze and interpret the data. • Draw conclusions consistent with the data and supported by scientific reasoning. Achievement Level

Descriptor

0

The student does not reach a standard described by any of the descriptors below or no assessable work has been submitted.

1-2

The student collects some data and attempts to record it in a suitable format. The student organizes and presents data using simple numerical or visual forms. The student attempts to identify a trend, pattern or relationship in the data. The student attempts to draw a conclusion but this is not consistent with the interpretation of the data.

3-4

The student collects sufficient data and attempts to record it in a suitable format. The student organizes, transforms or presents data in numerical and/or visual forms, with a few errors or omissions. The student states a trend, pattern or relationship shown in the data. The student draws a conclusion consistent with a reasonable interpretation of the data.

5-6

The student collects sufficient data and records it in a suitable format. The student organizes, transforms or presents data in numerical and/or visual forms logically. The student attempts to describe a trend, pattern or relationship in the data and comments on the reliability of the data. The student draws a conclusion based on a reasonable interpretation of the data and attempts to explain it using scientific reasoning.

Criterion F Attitudes in Science Attitudes in science encourages students to develop safe, responsible and collaborative working practices when carrying out experimental work in science. During the course students are expected to: • Work safely and use material and equipment competently. • Work responsibly with regards to the living and non-living environment. • Work effectively as individuals and as part of a group by collaborating with others. Achievement Level

Descriptor

0

The student does not reach a standard described by any of the descriptors below or no assessable work has been submitted.

1-2

The student requires some guidance to work safely and some assistance when using material and equipment. The student requires some guidance to work responsibly with regards to the living and non-living environment. When working as part of a group, the student needs frequent reminders to cooperate with others.

3-4

The student requires little guidance to work safely and little assistance when using material and equipment. The student usually works responsibly with regards to the living and non-living environment. When working as part of a group the student cooperates with others most of the time.

5-6

The student requires almost no guidance to work safely and uses materials and equipment responsibly and effectively. The student works responsibly with regards to the living and non-living environment. When working as part of a group, the student cooperates with others.

2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE - 65


MYP interim Assessment Criteria - TECHNOLOGY Technology

Criterion A Investigate Investigation is an essential stage in the design cycle. Students are expected to identify the problem, develop a design brief and formulate a design specification. Students are expected to acknowledge the sources of information and document these appropriately. Achievement Level

Descriptor

0

The student does not reach a standard described by any of the descriptors below or no assessable work has been submitted.

1-2

The student states the problem. The student investigates the problem, collecting information from sources. The student lists some specifications.

3-4

The student describes the problem, mentioning its relevance. The student investigates the problem, selecting, and attempting to analyze, information from some acknowledged sources. The student describes a test to evaluate the product/solution against the design specification.

5-6

The student explains the problem and attempts to discuss its relevance The student investigates the problem, evaluating information from a range of appropriate, acknowledged sources. The student describes methods for appropriate testing to evaluate the product/solution against the design specification.

Criterion B Design Students are expected to generate several feasible designs that meet the design specification and to evaluate these against the design specification. Students are then expected to select one design, justify their choice and evaluate this in detail against the design specification. Achievement Level

Descriptor

0

The student does not reach a standard described by any of the descriptors below or no assessable work has been submitted

1-2

The student generates one design, and makes some attempt to justify this against the design specification.

3-4

The student generates a few designs, justifying the choice of one appropriate design and fully evaluating this against the design specification.

5-6

With guidance, the student generates a range of feasible designs, each evaluated against the design specification. The student justifies the chosen design and evaluates it fully against the design specification.

Notes • •

Design brief: The student’s response to the challenge, showing how they intend to solve the problem they have been presented with. This will guide their investigation as they work to develop a more detailed design specification. Design specification: A detailed description of the conditions, requirements and restrictions with which a design must comply. This is a precise and accurate list of facts such as conditions, dimensions, materials, process and methods that are important for the designer and for the user. All appropriate solutions will need to comply with the design specification.

66 - 2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE


MYP interim Assessment Criteria - TECHNOLOGY Criterion C Plan Students are expected to construct a plan to create their chosen product/solution that has a series of logical steps, and that makes effective use of resources and time. Students are expected to evaluate the plan and justify any modifications to the design.

Achievement Level

Descriptor

0

The student does not reach a standard described by any of the descriptors below or no assessable work has been submitted.

1-2

With guidance, the student produces a plan that contains some details of the steps and/or the resources required.

3-4

With guidance, the student produces a plan that contains a number of logical steps that include resources and time. The student makes some attempt to evaluate the plan.

5-6

With guidance, the student produces a plan that contains a number of detailed, logical steps that describe the use of resources and time. The student evaluates the plan and justifies any modifications to the design.

Criterion D Create Students are expected to document, with a series of photographs or a video and a dated record, the process of making their product/solution, including when and how they use tools, materials and techniques. Students are expected to follow their plan, to evaluate the plan and to justify any changes they make to the plan while they are creating the product/solution. Students will sometimes embark upon a very ambitious project, or they may encounter unforeseen circumstances. In some circumstances a product/solution that is incomplete or does not function fully can still achieve one of the levels awarded for this criterion. Achievement Level

Descriptor

0

The student does not reach a standard described by any of the descriptors below or no assessable work has been submitted.

1-2

The student considers the plan and creates at least part of a product/solution.

3-4

With guidance, the student uses appropriate techniques and equipment with some competence. The student follows the plan and mentions any modifications made, resulting in a product/solution of good quality.

5-6

The student uses appropriate techniques and equipment with increasing competence. The student follows the plan and adequately justifies any modifications made, resulting in a product/solution of age appropriate quality using the resources available.

2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE - 67


MYP interim Assessment Criteria - TECHNOLOGY Criterion E Evaluate Students are expected to evaluate the product/solution against the design specification in an objective manner based on testing, and to evaluate its impact on life, society and/or the environment. They are expected to explain how the product/solution could be improved as a result of these evaluations. Students are expected to evaluate their own performance at each stage of the design cycle and to suggest ways in which their performance could be improved. Achievement Level

Descriptor

0

The student does not reach a standard described by any of the descriptors below or no assessable work has been submitted

1-2

The student evaluates the product/solution or his or her own performance. The student makes some attempt to test the product/solution.

3-4

With guidance, the student evaluates the product/solution and his or her own performance and suggests ways in which these could be improved. The student tests the product/solution to evaluate it against the design specification.

5-6

The student attempts to independently evaluate the success of the product/solution in an objective manner based on the results of testing, and the views of the intended users. The student provides an evaluation of his or her own performance at each stage of the design cycle and suggests improvements. The student provides an appropriate description of the impact of the product/solution on life, society and/or the environment.

Notes •

Product testing: A stage in the design process where versions of products (for example, prototypes) are tested against the need, applied to the context and presented to the end user or target audience.

68 - 2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE


MYP interim Assessment Criteria - TECHNOLOGY Criterion F Attitudes in technology This criterion refers to students’ attitudes when working in technology. It focuses on an overall assessment of two aspects: • •

Personal engagement (motivation, independence, general positive attitude). Attitudes towards safety, cooperation and respect for others.

By their very nature these qualities are difficult to quantify and assess, and assessment should therefore take into account the context in which the unit of work was undertaken. Achievement Level

Descriptor

0

The student does not reach a standard described by any of the descriptors below or no assessable work has been submitted

1-2

The student occasionally displays a satisfactory standard in personal engagement or attitudes toward safety, cooperation and respect for others.

3-4

The student frequently displays a satisfactory standard in both personal engagement and attitudes toward safety, cooperation and respect for others.

5-6

The student consistently displays a satisfactory standard in both personal engagement and attitudes toward safety, cooperation and respect for others.

2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE - 69


GradeS 7 and 8 MYP Areas of Interaction (AOIs) The Areas of Interaction (AOIs) provide the MYP with its unique core and they are common to the programme in all schools. The areas of interaction provide common organizing strategies and also allow for the diversity of student needs, interests and motivations. They provide the opportunities to engage the students with environmental, health and community issues for sustainability that affect the students of today, and how humans can solve problems for the future. The areas of interaction: •

Give meaning to what is learned through the exploration of real-world issues.

• • • • • •

Encourage higher order thinking skills. Provide a framework for student inquiry. Can help students develop positive attitudes and a sense of personal and social responsibility. Engage students in reflection. Can lead students from academic knowledge to thoughtful action. Contribute to the interdisciplinary approach to learning.

The CIS Grade 7 and 8 student Areas of Interaction learning outcomes, expectations and key questions are:

ENVIRONMENTS Student Learning Outcome Areas

Student Expectations

Awareness and understanding of:

A Variety of Environments

Grades 7 and 8 Understanding what environments are, and how we are both a part of and dependent on them. Students will demonstrate this by: • Classifying environments as natural, built or virtual. • Defining which environments we are a part of. • Outlining specific examples of how environments contribute to their lives and well being.

How our actions can benefit, harm or change environments. Students will demonstrate this by: • Indicating specific examples of the negative • impact they have on their environments. • Indicating specific examples of the positive • impact they have on their environments.

How do I affect my environments? How do I interact with my environments? What environments are part of my immediate world?

How can we make informed and responsible choices? What are the lifestyle implications of making environmental choices?

Grades 7 and 8

Action on:

Issues

• • •

Grades 7 and 8

Reflection on:

Responsibilities

Key Question

Take individual action on issues in your immediate environments; school and home. Students will demonstrate this by: • Outlining individual ways they can help contribute to solving an environmental problem. • Actively promoting change in their immediate environments.

70 - 2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE

What difference can I make as an individual?


GradeS 7 and 8: MYP Areas of Interaction (AOIs) COMMUNITY AND SERVICE Student Learning Outcome Areas Awareness and understanding of:

Community

Reflection on:

Attitudes

Responsibilities

Action:

Involvement through service

Student Expectations

Key Question Grades 7 and 8

Understanding what a community is. Awareness of the roles they play in their community. Understanding the importance of the different roles and relationships in a community. Students will demonstrate this by: • Describing their community and elements of it that make it unique. • Recognizing their current role in their community and how they contribute. • Explaining various ways that members of their community can both change and contribute to the community.

• • •

How does the material we are studying help me to identify my community? How does this unit help me understand my place in my community? How does the topic we are discussing both affect and alter my community and its members?

Grades 7 and 8 Discovering the causes and patterns of different social perspectives and reflecting on the impact they have on the community and on social harmony. Students will demonstrate this by: • Explaining the community wide implications of their actions. • Describing the need for a variety of perspectives in a community. Discovering the foundations of meaningful community service through uncovering the ethical implications of activity or inactivity. Students will demonstrate this by: • Describing the different ways that we can help. • Outlining their duties and responsibilities as an active contributor to their community.

• •

• •

How do my choices affect my community? What benefits are there to understanding other points of view?

How have we responded to areas of need? What should I do?

Grades 7 and 8 Recognizing the various types, levels and areas of community involvement available to them. Students will demonstrate this by: • Participating in a variety of guided service • endeavours. • • Differentiating between, fundraising, active service and community involvement.

What needs to be done? What can I do?

2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE - 71


GradeS 7 and 8: MYP Areas of Interaction (AOIs) HUMAN INGENUITY Student Learning Outcome Areas

Student Expectations

Awareness and understanding of:

Innovation and Change

Grades 7 and 8 Understand the meaning of ingenious, the ways humans have created and why humans want and need to create. Students will demonstrate this by: • Defining Human Ingenuity. • • Recognizing milestones in human innovation. • • Identifying historical reasons for different creations. Analyze the factors that have led to different innovations over time and the various effects that these innovations have had. Students will demonstrate this by: • Identifying the cause relationships of various • innovations. • • Recognizing of examples of perpetual • innovation.

What future developments can I foresee? How does innovation inspire innovation? What impact have creations had on individuals, society and the world?

Grades 7 and 8

Action on:

Creating Solution

Why do humans create, develop or change products or solutions? How do products, ideas or solutions change over time?

Grades 7 and 8

Reflection on:

Ingenuity

Key Question

Use creative approaches to develop ideas about and solutions for individual problems. Students will demonstrate this by: • Outlining steps to solving a problem. • Analyzing the effectiveness of the approaches they have used.

72 - 2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE

• • •

What are my challenges and what solutions can I come up with? What steps do I take to solve a problem? How do I tell if my chosen solution was the most effective?


Grades 7 and 8: MYP Areas of Interaction (AOIs) HEALTH AND SOCIAL EDUCATION Student Learning Outcome Areas Awareness and understanding of :

Ourselves and Society

Reflection on:

Our Responsibilities

Action on:

Our Choices

Student Expectations

Key Question Grades 7 and 8

A developing awareness of our human needs and systems including personal well being, relationships, lifestyles and group dynamics. Students will demonstrate this by: • Recognizing and identifying current global • health issues, global social concerns, and personal development matters. • • Identifying ways that current global health and social issues impact their individual lives.

How do global health and social issues impact my life? What are some developmental matters I have to consider as I get older?

Grades 7 and 8 Analyzing the ways in which our health and social choices impact us and others. Students will demonstrate this by: • Distinguishing between beneficial and harmful choices. • Outlining positive and negative impacts of their social choices.

What social and developmental responsibilities do I have?

Grades 7 and 8 Analyzing of how we make choices regarding behaviour, ethics, values, wants and needs, and healthy living. Students will demonstrate this by: • Identifying the causes that led to different choices they have made. • Predicting the long term implications that could result from their various choices.

• • •

What social and developmental choices have I already made? How do I know my choices are good ones? Where can my choices take me?

2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE - 73


GradeS 7 and 8: MYP approaches to learning (Atls) Skill Area

How do I demonstrate skills in this area?

Organization

Task management • Being able to independently analyze and prioritize the steps necessary to most efficiently complete a task. Self management • Effectively prioritizing and balancing their personal interests and their school commitments. • Understanding and reflecting on the correlation between their organizational skills and their success. Time management • Scheduling their time efficiently.

Collaboration

Working in groups • Be able to break down a project into roles, assigning appropriate roles to others and accepting the roles assigned to them. • Acting as a responsible member of a team. Accepting others • Being open to feedback and providing constructive feedback to others. Personal challenges • Negotiating goals with peers and teachers. • Understanding their limitations.

Communication

Literacy • Develop and use effective reading and writing skills to meet the needs of all subject areas. • Student uses and shows excellent understanding of a wide range of subject specific terminology. Presentation Skills • Student uses new and dynamic ways to present information in an engaging manner. Interpersonal Skills • Student is an effective, responsible communicator who is aware of the various differences in the ways they communicate with others. For example, using visual aids to accompany a speech in order to reinforce their message.

Information Literacy

Accessing Information • Student uses a variety of academic resources to support their ideas. Selecting and Organizing Information • Student demonstrates an awareness of the use of impacts of bias and an understanding the foundations of bias. • Student recognizes the impact of media in their life and is aware of how it influences their choices. Referencing • Student uses inline referencing for all quotations, paraphrasing and summarizations. • Student completes MLA formatted bibliographies to record all of their sources.

74 - 2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE


GradeS 7 and 8: MYP approaches to learning (Atls) Skill Area

How do I demonstrate skills in this area?

Reflection

Self-awareness • Student is able to identify their personal strengths and weaknesses. • Student demonstrates a desire to overcome their personal limitations and to reach new levels of achievement by outlining the steps they will take to do so. Self-evaluation • Student reflects upon, analyze and record their achievements and progress.

Thinking

Investigating and Planning • Student creates and follows a plan for gathering information and finding solutions. • Student challenges information and existing perspectives on issues by using the inquiry cycle. Application • Student is able to identify patterns in information. • Student can critically select the most relevant information to create insightful and persuasive arguments on an issue. • Student considers multiple perspectives on an issue, analyze the effectiveness of solutions and identify the most favourable and beneficial outcomes.

Transfer

Making Connections • Student can identify how to use common skills in different subject areas and on different tasks. • Student is able to draw upon the different skills they have learned to handle new and unfamiliar situations. • Student is aware of what skills to use to solve problems and complete tasks. Real World Application • Student uses their knowledge and skills to make positive changes and create effective solutions to better their life and the lives of others.

WHAT WILL YOUR CHILD BE LEARNING? YOUR CHILD WILL: • • • • •

Develop an understanding of important concepts. Conduct research that has local and global significance. Acquire and practice a range of essential skills. Be encouraged to develop positive attitudes towards learning, the environment and other people. Have the opportunity for involvement in responsible action.

HOW CAN YOU SUPPORT YOUR CHILD’S LEARNING? You can help your child by: • • • • • • •

Maintaining regular contact with the school and your child’s teachers. Read with your child. Encourage your child to ask questions and help him/her find the answers. Support your child’s first language. Assist your child with research projects. Encourage your child to take positive action. Attend curriculum information sessions at school and student conferences.

2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE - 75


MYP: Language A language a: grades 7 and 8

B: Organization At the end of Grade 7, students should be able to:

The Curriculum Topic Overview For GradE 7 Language A Includes:

Semester ONE:

• • •

The Writing Process. Understanding of the knowledge and skills required to be an effective writer. Forms of Writing - The Short Story. What makes a story (great)? What are the features of the short story genre? Getting to Know You: Bloomability - Sharon Creech. How can literature help me better understand my life? Reading Menu.

Semester TWO: • • • •

Social Issues: Literature Circle Unit. Why should I care? How can social issues be addressed through literature? Mystery Unit: And Then There Were None Agatha Christie. How do mysteries make us better thinkers? Poetry: What is poetry? What do poets and poetry add to our culture? Reading Menu.

GRADE 7 CURRICULUM OBJECTIVES A: Content (Receptive and Productive) At the end of Grade 7, students should be able to: •

• • • • •

Appreciate and comment on the language, content, structure, meaning and significance of both familiar and selected unseen pieces of age-appropriate oral, written and visual texts. Demonstrate a developing understanding and increasingly apply Language A terminology in context. Understand many of the effects of the author’s choices on an audience. Compose pieces that apply age-appropriate literary and / or non-literary features to serve that context and intention. Compare and contrast age-appropriate text and connect themes across and within genres. Express a relevant and independent personal response to literary and non-literary texts.

76 - 2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE

Create work that employs organization structures and language / specific conventions throughout a variety of text types. Organize ideas and arguments in a sustained, coherent and logical manner. Employ appropriate critical apparatus.

C: Style and Language Mechanics At the end of Grade 7, students should be able to: • • • • • •

Use language to narrate, describe, argue, persuade, inform, entertain, express feelings and begin to analyze. Use language accurately. Use appropriate and varied register, vocabulary and idiom. Use correct grammar and syntax. Use appropriate and varied sentence structure. Use correct spelling and writing.

READING AND WRITING CONTINUUM We recognize that all individuals are on a different journey of acquiring and applying increasingly complex language understandings, skills and attitudes and that the approach to learning and teaching must differentiate for these variable learning needs. The following is a general guide. Value must also be placed on all student’s languages and cultures.

Portrait of a Grade 7 Reader CONNECTING (AGES 11-14) At the Connecting stage, students read Preconventional both complex children’s literature and Emerging young adult literature. These books Developing include fully developed plots that often Beginning focus on complex issues, such as Expanding freedom, truth, good and evil, and human Bridging rights. Characters in these novels are Fluent often approaching adolescence. Students Proficient at this stage read a variety of genres Connecting independently and are able to integrate Independent information from fiction and nonfiction to develop a deeper understanding of a topic. They can contribute to and sustain discussions about what they read and start developing criteria for evaluating literature. They seek recommendations and opinions about books from others. Connecting readers are able to set reading goals and challenges for themselves independently.


MYP: Language A INDEPENDENT

INDEPENDENT

Students at this stage read both young Preconventional adult and adult literature. These books Emerging often focus on issues of growing up and Developing entering adulthood. They include multiple Beginning characters who encounter complex issues Expanding and challenging obstacles. These students Bridging read a range of sophisticated materials for Fluent pleasure, to learn information, and to solve Proficient problems. For instance, they may read Connecting newspapers and magazines, download Independent information off the Internet, or read longer biographies. When they respond to literature during discussions or in writing, students add insightful comments as they make connections between other books and authors, their background knowledge, and their own lives. They stick with complex reading challenges and are able to evaluate and analyze what they read. Independent readers are interested in hearing other perspectives and sharing their opinions about what they have read.

Writers at the Independent stage create Preconventional cohesive, in-depth fiction with carefully Emerging chosen language and strong characters, Developing setting, plot, and mood. They use dialogue Beginning and literary devices such as metaphors Expanding and imagery effectively. They can also Bridging write accurate and fluent nonfiction on Fluent a variety of topics. Writing has become Proficient natural, and they have internalized the Connecting writing process. Independent writers Independent seek feedback from others and work on multiple drafts. They begin to develop a personal voice and style of writing. In final drafts, there are very few spelling, punctuation, or grammatical errors. Students at this stage can analyze their own writing and set goals independently. They write with confidence and competence and persevere through complex writing projects.

Portrait of a Grade 7 Writer

Traditionally, there is a noted drop in independent reading as students move into the middle and high school years. Homework increases, research and non-fiction reading take up much more of a student’s time. As a part of an initiative to increase circulation of independent reading books, a list of recommended reading was developed. Initially, it was a list of books sorted by genre. Students had a wide range to choose from, but were required to read a certain number of books and respond to those books with a variety of projects.

CONNECTING (AGES 11-14) At the Connecting stage, students write in Preconventional a variety of genres and forms for different Emerging purposes and audiences. Students use a Developing variety of prewriting strategies to organize Beginning and strengthen their writing. They compose Expanding cohesive paragraphs, using reasons Bridging and examples for support. Connecting Fluent writers can integrate information from a Proficient variety of sources and can create graphs Connecting and charts to convey information. They Independent write organized, fluent, and detailed nonfiction with bibliographies using correct format. In their fiction, students can create plots with a climax and believable characters. At this stage, writers use descriptive language, details, and imagery independently and may use dialogue to enhance character development. Connecting writers can revise for specific writing traits (such as organization or sentence fluency) independently. As they revise, students work through several drafts independently and may rewrite or delete sections. They ask for feedback and incorporate others people’s suggestions into their writing. Based on the research of Bonnie Campbell Hill

Reading Menu

The book list is regularly updated, as students move to higher grades and new literature is released. In 20082009 year, the list was adjusted to reflect the IB Learner Profile. There is still a great deal of choice (10 different categories to choose from), and within each profile trait there are 8-10 titles. Students respond to the books in different ways, but now, there is the added tie to the Learner traits. This new list has enabled students to see the Learner Profile in a much more concrete manner. As part of their response, students discuss how their choice fits or does not fit with particular profiles – how does a character or plot illustrate or exemplify being a risk-taker, for example, or being principled. This initiative has been very successful in guiding students to make good choices in their independent reading, to choose books they may not have been exposed to and to have students look at the IB Learner Profile as a path to understanding a character or a novel. At this time, the reading list is not tied to the curriculum, but rather a list of suggested titles. 2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE - 77


MYP: Language A The Curriculum Topic Overview For GradE 8 Language A Includes:

Semester ONE:

C: Style and Language Mechanics At the end of Grade 8, students should be able to:

• •

The Writing Process (review): Understanding and applying the knowledge and skills required to be an effective writer. Supporting Opinions: The Outsiders - SE Hinton. How do writers effectively communicate their ideas? Freedom and Struggle: An active viewing unit. What can one person do to change the world?

Semester TWO: • • • •

Sources of Inspiration: The Giver - Lois Lowry. How does who we are inspire what we create? The Power of Figurative Language: Night - Elie Wiesel. How can an author use language to develop an understanding of an historical event? Introduction to Shakespearean Drama - Why should I read a play? Reading Menu. An ongoing programme from a menu of books. Students are required to complete written responses.

• • • • • •

variety of text types. Organize ideas and arguments in a sustained, coherent and logical manner. Employ appropriate critical apparatus.

Use language to narrate, describe, argue, persuade, inform, entertain express feelings and begin to analyze. Use language accurately. Use appropriate and varied register, vocabulary and idiom. Use correct grammar and syntax. Use appropriate and varied sentence structure. Use correct spelling and writing.

READING AND WRITING CONTINUUM We recognise that all individuals are on a different journey of acquiring and applying increasingly complex language understandings, skills and attitudes and that the approach to learning and teaching must differentiate for these variable learning needs. The following is a general guide. Value must also be placed on all student’s languages and cultures.

GRADE 8 CURRICULUM OBJECTIVES

Portrait of a Grade 8 Reader

A: Content (Receptive and Productive) At the end of Grade 8, students should be able to:

CONNECTING (AGES 11-14)

• • • • •

Appreciate and comment on the language, content, structure, meaning and significance of both familiar and previously unseen pieces of age-appropriate oral, written and visual texts. Understand and apply Language A terminology in context. Understand many of the effects of the author’s choices on an audience. Compose pieces that apply age-appropriate literary and / or non-literary features to serve that context and intention. Compare and contrast age-appropriate text and connect themes across and within genres. Begin to express an informed and independent response to literary and non-literary texts.

B: Organization At the end of Grade 8, students should be able to: •

Create work that employs organizational structures and language / specific conventions throughout a

78 - 2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE

At the Connecting stage, students read both complex children’s literature and young adult literature. These books include fully developed plots that often focus on complex issues, such as freedom, truth, good and evil, and human rights. Preconventional Characters in these novels are often Emerging approaching adolescence. Students Developing at this stage read a variety of genres Beginning independently and are able to integrate Expanding information from fiction and nonfiction Bridging to develop a deeper understanding of a Fluent topic. They can contribute to and sustain Proficient discussions about what they read and Connecting start developing a criteria for evaluating Independent literature. They seek recommendations and opinions about books from others. Connecting readers are able to set reading goals and challenges for themselves independently.


MYP: LANGUAGE A INDEPENDENT

INDEPENDENT

Students at this stage read both young Preconventional adult and adult literature. These books Emerging often focus on issues of growing up Developing and entering adulthood. They include Beginning multiple characters who encounter Expanding complex issues and challenging Bridging obstacles. These students read a range Fluent of sophisticated materials for pleasure, to Proficient learn information, and to solve problems. Connecting For instance, they may read newspapers Independent and magazines, download information off the Internet, or read longer biographies. When they respond to literature during discussions or in writing, students add insightful comments as they make connections between other books and authors, their background knowledge, and their own lives. They stick with complex reading challenges and are able to evaluate and analyze what they read. Independent readers are interested in hearing other perspectives and sharing their opinions about what they have read.

Writers at the Independent stage create Preconventional cohesive, in-depth fiction with carefully Emerging chosen language and strong characters, Developing setting, plot, and mood. They use dialogue Beginning and literary devices (such ad metaphors Expanding and imagery) effectively. They can also Bridging write accurate and fluent nonfiction on Fluent a variety of topics. Writing has become Proficient natural, and they have internalized the Connecting writing process. Independent writers Independent seek feedback from others and work on multiple drafts. They begin to develop a personal voice and style of writing. In final drafts, there are very few spelling, punctuation, or grammatical errors. Students at this stage can analyze their own writing and set goals independently. They write with confidence and competence and persevere through complex writing projects.

Portrait of a Grade 8 Writer

Traditionally, there is a noted drop in independent reading as students move into the middle and high school years. Homework increases, research and non-fiction reading takes up much more of a student’s time. As a part of an initiative to increase circulation of independent reading books, a list of recommended reading was developed. Initially, it was a list of books sorted by genre. Students had a wide range to choose from, but were required to read a certain number of books and respond to those books with a variety of projects.

CONNECTING (AGES 11-14) At the Connecting stage, students write in Preconventional a variety of genres and forms for different Emerging purposes and audiences. Students Developing use a variety of prewriting strategies to Beginning organize and strengthen their writing. Expanding They compose cohesive paragraphs, Bridging using reasons and examples for support. Fluent Connecting writers can integrate Proficient information from a variety of sources and Connecting can create graphs and charts to convey Independent information. They write organized, fluent, and detailed nonfiction with bibliographies using correct format. In their fiction, students can create plots with a climax and believable characters. At this stage, writers use descriptive language details and imagery independently and may use dialogue to enhance character development. Connecting writers can revise for specific writing traits (such as organization or sentence fluency) independently. As they revise, students work through several drafts independently and may rewrite or delete sections. They ask for feedback and incorporate others people’s suggestion into their writing.

Based on the research of Bonnie Campbell Hill

Reading Menu

The book list is regularly updated as new literature is released. In 2008-2009 year, the list was adjusted to reflect the IB Learner Profile. There is still a great deal of choice (10 different categories to choose from), and within each profile trait there are 8-10 titles. Students respond to the books in different ways, but now, there is the added tie to the Learner traits. This new list has enabled students to see the Learner Profile in a much more concrete manner. As part of their response, students discuss how their choice fits or does not fit with particular profiles – how does a character or plot illustrate or exemplify being a risk-taker, for example, or being principled. This initiative has been very successful in guiding students to make good choices in their independent reading, to choose books they may not have been exposed to and to have students look at the IB Learner Profile as a path to understanding a character or a novel. At this time, the reading list is not tied to the curriculum, but rather a list of suggested titles.

2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE - 79


MYP: MATHEMATICS MATHEMATICS: GRADES 7 AND 8 THE CURRICULUM TOPIC OVERVIEW FOR GRADE 7 MATHEMATICS INCLUDES: Semester One: • • • • • •

Review of Grade 6 mathematical concepts and skills with emphasis on whole numbers, decimals and fractions. Problem solving strategies. Percentages: Commission, Simple Interest. Ratios, Rates and Scale Drawing. Patterns and Algebra: Fractions and Binominals. Solving Equations and Graphing Inequalities.

Semester Two: • •

Graphing: Information gathering and representing. Geometry: How should I design my playground?

• • • •

C. COMMUNICATIONS IN MATHEMATICS: At the end of Grade 7, when investigating problems, in both theoretical and real-life contexts, students should be able to: • •

MATHEMATICS: GRADE 7 A. Knowledge and understanding: At the end of Grade 7, students should be able to demonstrate some knowledge and understanding of the following five branches of mathematics: • Number • Algebra • Geometry and Trigonometry • Statistics and Probability • Discrete Mathematics By being able to: • Know and demonstrate understanding of some of the concepts of number, algebra, geometry and trigonometry, statistics and probability, and discrete mathematics. • Use appropriate mathematical concepts and skills to solve simple problems in both familiar and unfamiliar situations including those in real-life contexts. • Select with guidance, and apply basic rules correctly to solve problems including those in reallife contexts. B. Investigating patterns: At the end of Grade 7, when investigating problems, in both theoretical and real-life contexts, students should be able to: •

With guidance, select and apply basic inquiry and mathematical problem-solving techniques by identifying variables, posing relevant questions,

80 - 2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE

organizing data and using an appropriate model. Recognize simple patterns similar to previously seen examples, and with guidance, in different situations. Describe simple patterns as relationships or general rules. Arrive at a result or set of results and make predictions based on extending the pattern(s) or consistent with findings. Describe and offer, using increasingly logical arguments, explanations for simple mathematical relationships and general rules.

Use appropriate mathematical language (notation, symbols, terminology) in both oral and written explanations in familiar situations. Use different and an increasing range of forms of mathematical representation (simple formulae, diagrams, tables, charts, graphs and models). Identify and communicate the steps in solving simple problems using different forms of representation.

D. REFLECTION IN MATHEMATICS: At the end of Grade 7, when investigating problems, in both theoretical and real-life contexts, students should be able to: • • • •

Consider the reasonableness of their results in the context of the problem and to offer simple explanations on whether they make sense. Consider the importance of their findings. Consider the degree of accuracy of their results where appropriate and estimate. Consider alternatives to the method when appropriate, with limited guidance.


MYP: MATHEMATICS THE CURRICULUM TOPIC OVERVIEW FOR GRADE 8 MATHEMATICS INCLUDES: Semester One: • • • • • • •

Review of basic skills related to number, decimals, fractions and ratios. Problem solving with rates and percentage. Measurement of shapes. Venn diagrams. Ratio and proportion. Algebraic expressions with all operations. Grouping and substitutions. Trigonometry. Pythagoras. Study of indices. Equations and inequations.

Semester Two: • • • •

Graphing: Gradient. Angles of geometric construction: Why are angle sums important? Measurement: How do I know my measurements make sense? Statistics and Probability: How do I use statistics in my everyday life?

B. Investigating patterns: At the end of Grade 8, when investigating problems, in both theoretical and real-life contexts, students should be able to: • • • • •

C. COMMUNICATIONS IN MATHEMATICS: At the end of Grade 8, when investigating problems, in both theoretical and real-life contexts, students should be able to: • • •

MATHEMATICS: GRADE 8 A. Knowledge and understanding: At the end of Grade 8, students should be able to demonstrate some knowledge and understanding of the following five branches of mathematics: • • • • •

Number Algebra Geometry and Trigonometry Statistics and Probability Discrete Mathematics

By being able to: •

Know and demonstrate understanding of some of the concepts of number, algebra, geometry and trigonometry, statistics and probability, and discrete mathematics. Use appropriate mathematical concepts and skills to solve simple problems in both familiar and unfamiliar situations including those in reallife contexts. Select and apply basic rules correctly to solve problems including those in real-life contexts.

Select and apply basic inquiry and mathematical problem-solving techniques to problems by asking searching questions. Recognize simple patterns in different situations. Describe simple patterns as relationships or general rules. Arrive at a single result or set of results and make predictions consistent with findings. Explain simple mathematical relationships and general rules using logical arguments.

Use appropriate mathematical language (notation, symbols, terminology) in both oral and written explanations in familiar situations. Use different forms of mathematical representation (simple formulae, diagrams, tables, charts, graphs and models). Communicate a mathematical line of reasoning in solving simple problems using different forms of representation.

D. REFLECTION IN MATHEMATICS: At the end of Grade 8, when investigating problems, in both theoretical and real-life contexts, students should be able to: • • • •

Consider the reasonableness of their results in the context of the problem and attempt to explain whether they make sense. Consider the importance of their findings. Consider the degree of accuracy of their results where appropriate and estimate errors in simple measurements. Consider alternatives to the method when appropriate.

2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE - 81


MYP: Humanities HUMANITIES: GRADES 7 AND 8

THE CURRICULUM TOPIC OVERVIEW FOR GRADE 7 HUMANITIES (GEOGRAPHY AND HISTORY) INCLUDES:

• •

Semester ONE: •

Geographical focus with an emphasis on interpretation, e.g. Map reading, types of maps, symbols, scales, grid reference, direction, latitudes, longitudes, application of mapping skills. Culture, Beliefs and Values and Identity. What is identity? How are some of the features in our individual culture unique? What shapes a culture?

Place and space: At the end of Grade 7, students should be able to: • • •

Semester TWO: •

Industrialization: Industrialization in Great Britain during the 18th century. Agriculture advances, urbanization, cottage industry and factory systems, child labour, environment impacts. How does industrialization affect people? What are the benefits & consequences? An investigation into economics: macro and micro economics, allocation of resources, economic systems, supply & demand, banking system and economic cycle. How do different economic systems and economic cycle affect the lives of its citizens? What is economics and how does scarcity of resources affect our decision making?

HUMANITIES: GRADE 7 KNOWLEDGE

Know and use humanities terminology in context. Demonstrate subject content knowledge and understanding through the use of guided descriptions and explanations, supported by some relevant facts and examples.

CONCEPTS Time: At the end of Grade 7 students should be able to: • •

Understand their role as part of a group in a context of time and place. Know that time can be measured and demonstrate some understanding of different perceptions of time.

82 - 2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE

Recognize and describe patterns and relationships in space, including natural and human environments. Describe and offer simple explanations for some similarities and differences between places. Identify, and with guidance, describe in simple terms the constraints and opportunities afforded by location. Identify and describe basic issues related to place/ space on a local, national and global scale.

Change: At the end of Grade 7 students should be able to: • • • • • •

At the end of Grade 7, students should be able to: • •

Show an understanding of some aspects of people in past societies. Demonstrate some awareness of the links between people, places and events through time. Recognize and provide a simple explanation of the similarities and differences that exist between people, places and events through time.

Identify and provide some simple explanations for short-term and long-term causes of change. Identify and with guidance describe links between causes, processes and consequences. Recognize and describe simple examples that illustrate continuity and change. Recognize and describe examples of change and that rates of change vary. Understand that as people interact with their environment, changes occur. Describe simple examples of how environmental, political, economic and social interactions can change levels of sustainability.

Systems: At the end of Grade 7, students should be able to: • • • • • •

Identify, understand and compare how basic systems, models and institutions operate. Understand, identify and make basic comparisons between social structures and controls. Understand, identify and compare the dynamic nature of basic systems. Identify, understand and compare different types of equilibrium within systems. Identify and compare increasingly complex systems in local, national and global societies. Understand, and with guidance, compare rights and responsibilities within systems.


MYP: Humanities •

Identify and compare cooperation with in and between systems.

Global awareness: At the end of Grade 7, students should be able to: • • • • • • •

Identify and with guidance, describe different perceptions of places, societies and environments. Recognize and compare how their own culture and perception can affect their sense of internationalism. Identify, and with guidance, describe examples of the interdependence of societies. Demonstrate international and intercultural awareness and some understanding. Explore issues facing the international community. Recognize and explore with guidance issues of equality, justice and responsibility. Recognize and show increasing understanding of when and how to take responsible action.

SKILLS Technical skills: At the end of Grade 7, students should be able to: • • • •

Observe, select and record relevant information from a variety of sources. Use different media and technologies to research, select, interpret and communicate increasingly complex data. Use core sources such as maps, graphs, tables, atlases, photographs and statistics skillfully. Represent information using maps, models and diagrams.

Investigative skills: At the end of Grade 7, students should be able to: • • •

• • • •

Semester ONE:

Decision-making skills: At the end of Grade 7, students should be able to: • •

Use a range of strategies to address issues. Formulate clear arguments, make considered judgments on events and draw basic conclusions, including some broad based or readily identified

Communicate information that is relevant to the topic. Organize information in a logically sequenced manner, appropriate to the format used. Present and express information and ideas in a clear and concise manner, using appropriate language and visual representation. Use referencing and a bibliography to clearly document sources of information, using appropriate conventions.

THE CURRICULUM TOPIC OVERVIEW FOR GRADE 8 HUMANITIES (GEOGRAPHY AND HISTORY) INCLUDES:

• •

Test basic hypotheses and ideas and offer simple modifications. Plan, carry out and present individual and group investigations. Engage in fieldwork in order to complement an investigation.

ORGANIZATON AND PRESENTATION At the end of Grade 7, students should be able to:

Analytical skills: At the end of Grade 7, students should be able to: Analyze and interpret information from guided and independently selected sources. Identify questions, problems and issues. Describe, with guidance, the values and limitations of sources. Compare and contrast events, issues, ideas, models and arguments in limited contexts.

implications. Make considered and increasingly complex decisions and relate them to real-world contexts.

A review of research skills through Approaches to Learning. What are the components of Humanities? Cultural Tension. Present day and historical perspectives. Explore reasons for cultural tension: ignorance, racism, discrimination, prejudice, stereo-typing/labeling human rights. Who are some people fighting for human rights? Religious Ideologies: What similarities are there amongst the major religions? What spatial patterns are found throughout major religions?

Semester TWO: •

Political Ideologies: Why do nations need to establish government? Why are some political systems more prone to collapse? What are some examples and different forms of government that have thrived throughout history? What are different

2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE - 83


MYP: Humanities •

forms of government? What are the different political ideologies? Where do I fit in the political spectrum? Migration: What is the impact on communities? Why do people move? What are some barriers to migration? What are the effects of migration on culture? What are some circumstances in history that have prompted mass migration?

HUMANITIES: GRADE 8 KNOWLEDGE At the end of Grade 8, students should be able to: • •

Know and use humanities terminology in context. Demonstrate subject content knowledge and understanding through the use of descriptions and explanations, supported by relevant facts and examples.

CONCEPTS Time: At the end of Grade 8 students should be able to: • • • • •

Understand their role as part of a group in a context of time and place. Demonstrate some understanding of different perceptions of time. Show an understanding of some aspects of people in past societies. Demonstrate some awareness of chronology that links people, places and events through time. Recognize and describe the similarities and differences that exist between people, places and events through time.

Place and space: At the end of Grade 8, students should be able to: • • • •

Recognize and describe patterns and relationships in space, including natural and human environments. Recognize and explain some similarities and differences between places. Identify and describe constraints and opportunities afforded by location. Identify and describe issues related to place/space on a local, national and global scale.

Change: At the end of Grade 8 students should be able to: •

Identify and provide some explanations for shortterm and long-term causes of change.

84 - 2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE

• • • • •

Identify and provide some explanations for links between causes, processes and consequences. Recognize and describe examples that illustrate continuity and change. Recognize that change is inevitable and that rates of change vary. Understand that as people interact with their environment, changes occur. Identify and describe how environmental, political, economic and social interactions can change levels of sustainability.

Systems: At the end of Grade 8, students should be able to: • • • • • • •

Identify, understand and compare how increasingly complex systems, models and institutions operate. Understand, identify and compare social structures and controls. Understand, identify and compare the dynamic nature of systems. Identify, understand and compare different types of equilibrium within increasingly complex systems. Understand, identify and compare increasingly complex systems in local, national and global societies. Understand, identify and compare rights and responsibilities within systems. Understand, identify and compare cooperation with in and between systems.

Global awareness: At the end of Grade 8, students should be able to: • • • • • • •

Identify and describe different perceptions of places, societies and environments. Recognize that culture and perception can affect a sense of internationalism. Identify and describe examples of the interdependence of societies. Demonstrate international and intercultural awareness and some understanding. Explore issues facing the international community. Recognize issues of equality, justice and responsibility. Know when and how to take responsible action.

SKILLS Technical skills: At the end of Grade 8, students should be able to: • •

Observe, select and record relevant information from a variety of sources. Use different media and technologies to research,


MYP: Humanities • •

select, interpret and communicate data. Use sources such as maps, graphs, tables, atlases, photographs and statistics, in a thoughtful manner. Represent information using maps, models and diagrams, including use of scale, graphs and tables.

Analytical skills: At the end of Grade 8, students should be able to: • • • •

Analyze and interpret information from a range of sources. Identify relevant questions, problems and issues. Evaluate the values and limitations of sources. Compare and contrast events, issues, ideas, models and arguments in different contexts.

Decision-making skills: At the end of Grade 8, students should be able to: • • •

Use appropriate strategies to address issues. Formulate clear and sound arguments, make balanced judgments on events and draw conclusions, including some implications. Make substantiated decisions and relate them to real-world contexts.

Investigative skills: At the end of Grade 8, students should be able to: • • •

Test hypotheses and ideas and modify them where necessary. Plan, carry out and present individual and group investigations. Engage in fieldwork in order to complement a more detailed investigation.

ORGANIZATON AND PRESENTATION At the end of Grade 8, students should be able to: • • • •

Communicate information that is relevant to the topic. Organize information in a logically sequenced manner, appropriate to the format used. Present and express information and ideas in a clear and concise manner, using appropriate language and visual representation. Use referencing notation and a bibliography to clearly document sources of information, using appropriate conventions.

2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE - 85


MYP: Sciences SCIENCES: GRADES 7 TO 8

THE CURRICULUM TOPIC OVERVIEW FOR GRADE 7 SCIENCE (BIOLOGY, MATTER, ENERGY, EARTH SCIENCES) INCLUDES:

Semester ONE: • • •

The Scientific Method as a process of inquiry. How do scientists investigate and communicate? An inquiry into pure substances and mixtures. Investigation of and interaction with a range of ecosystems.

Semester TWO: • •

Investigation of and interaction with a range of ecosystems. Heat & Temperature: How does temperature affect how substances react?

SCIENCE: GRADE 7 A: One World At the end of Grade 7, students should be able to: • •

Describe and explain simple ways in which science is applied and used to solve local and global problems. Give examples of science and scientific applications and offer simple explanations and ideas related to the positive and/or negative effects on people, societies and the environment. Identify and describe with simple examples how science and technology depend on each other for the development of knowledge and technological applications. Understand that science is part of the world they live in by describing how science and its applications are affected and/or influenced by some of the following factors: social, economic, political, environmental, cultural and ethical.

B: Communication in Science At the end of Grade 7, students should be able to: •

Understand and use scientific language relevant to the units of work covered including appropriate scientific terminology, units of measurement and symbolic representation. With guidance, provide scientific information using appropriate modes of communication: oral, written, visual representation (formulae, graphs, tables, diagrams).

86 - 2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE

Present scientific information in formats (such as laboratory reports, experimental accounts, explanations, essays, expositions, audio-visual presentations) appropriate to the work covered, and acknowledge sources. Demonstrate honesty when collecting and processing data, information, and acknowledging sources. Use, with limited guidance, appropriate information and communication technology applications (World Wide Web, data loggers, databases, spreadsheets and/or software for plotting graphs) to access, process and communicate scientific information.

C: Knowledge and understanding of Science At the end of Grade 7, students should be able to: • • • •

Recognize and recall scientific information relevant to the units of work covered. Explain and apply simple scientific information to solve problems in familiar and, with guidance, in unfamiliar situations. Discuss with guidance, simple scientific information by identifying basic components, relationships and patterns. Identify and discuss simple examples of scientific information from different sources (Internet, newspaper articles, television, scientific texts and publications) and offer an opinion justified by their knowledge and understanding of sciences.

D: Scientific inquiry At the end of Grade 7, students should be able to: • •

• •

Recognize, and with limited guidance attempt to articulate the problem or research question to be tested by a scientific investigation. Use a range of questions (“What would happen if…, Why does this happen when…?) to formulate a simple hypothesis and explain it using reasoning and their knowledge of sciences (“If I do this, then that will happen because…”). Design scientific investigations that include variables and controls (dependent variables, independent variables and control variables); identify materials/equipment needed; describe a method to be followed; suggest the data to be collected. Comment on the method, accuracy and the quality of the results. Suggest improvements to the method.


MYP: Sciences E: Processing data At the end of Grade 7, students should be able to: • •

• •

Collect and record data using appropriate units of measurement. Organize and transform data into numerical and diagrammatic forms, including mathematical calculations and visual representation (tables, graphs and charts). Present data in a variety of ways using appropriate communication modes (oral, written and visual representation, and use of technologies) and conventions (units of measurement). Analyze and interpret data by identifying trends, patterns and relationships. Draw conclusions supported by simple explanations that are consistent with the analysis of the data.

F: Attitudes in Science During the course, students should: • • •

Carry out scientific investigations using materials and techniques safely and skillfully. Work effectively as a members of a team, collaborating, acknowledging and supporting others as well as ensuring a safe working environment. Show respect for themselves and others, and deal responsibly with the living and non-living environment.

THE CURRICULUM TOPIC OVERVIEW FOR GRADE 8 SCIENCE (BIOLOGY, MATTER, ENERGY, EARTH SCIENCES) INCLUDES: Semester ONE: • • •

The scientific method. A review of the process of inquiry and related communication skills. Human Body: An investigation into systems of the body. Cells and cell systems – What are the building blocks of life? An inquiry into light and optics.

SCIENCE: GRADE 8 A: One World At the end of Grade 8, students should be able to: • •

• •

Describe and explain ways in which science is applied and used to solve local and global problems. Give examples of science and scientific applications and discuss some of their positive and/or negative effects on people, societies and the environment. Describe and explain how science and technology depend on each other for the development of knowledge and technological applications. Understand that science is part of the world they live in by describing how science and its applications are affected and/or influenced by some of the following factors: social, economic, political, environmental, cultural, and ethical.

B: Communication in Science At the end of Grade 8, students should be able to: • •

• •

Understand and use scientific language relevant to the units of work covered. Provide scientific information using appropriate modes of communication: oral, written, visual representation (formulae, graphs, tables, diagrams) consistent with the level of complexity of the units of work covered. Present scientific information in formats (such as laboratory reports, experimental accounts, explanations, essays, expositions, audio-visual presentations) appropriate to the work covered, and acknowledge source. Demonstrate honesty when handling data and information, and acknowledging sources. Use where appropriate information and communication technology applications (World Wide Web, data loggers, databases, spreadsheets and/or software for plotting graphs) to access, process and communicate scientific information.

Semester TWO:

C: Knowledge and understanding of Science At the end of Grade 8, students should be able to:

• •

Fluids. Mechanical forces and machines.

• •

Recognize and recall scientific information relevant to the units of work covered. Explain and apply scientific information to solve problems in familiar and, with guidance, in unfamiliar situations. Analyze simple scientific information by identifying

2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE - 87


MYP: Sciences AND TECHNOLOGY •

basic components, relationships and patterns, both in experimental data and ideas. Discuss scientific information from different sources (Internet, newspaper articles, television, scientific texts and publications) and comment on its credibility.

TECHNOLOGY: GRADES 7 AND 8 THE CURRICULUM TOPIC OVERVIEW FOR GRADE 7 TECHNOLOGY INCLUDES: Semester ONE:

D: Scientific inquiry At the end of Grade 8, students should be able to:

• •

• •

Recognize and attempt to articulate the problem or research question to be tested by a scientific investigation. Formulate a simple hypothesis and explain it using a logical reasoning and their knowledge of sciences (“If I do this, then that will happen because…”). Design scientific investigations that include variables and controls that are identified; identify materials/equipment needed; describe a method to be followed; suggest the data to be collected. Comment on the method and the accuracy and/or precision of the results. Suggest improvements to the method.

E: Processing data At the end of Grade 8, students should be able to: • •

• •

Collect and record data using appropriate units of measurement. Organize and transform data into numerical and diagrammatic forms, including mathematical calculations and visual representation (tables, graphs and charts). Present data in a variety of ways using appropriate communication modes (oral, written and visual representation, and use of technologies) and conventions (units of measurement). Analyze and interpret data by identifying trends, patterns and relationships. Draw conclusions supported by explanations that are consistent with the analysis of the data.

F: Attitudes in Science During the course, students should: • •

Carry out scientific investigations using materials and techniques safely and skillfully. Work effectively as members of a team, collaborating, acknowledging and supporting others as well as ensuring a safe working environment. Show respect for themselves and others, and deal responsibly with the living and non-living environment.

88 - 2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE

Introduction unit to thinking skills and the design cycle. Egg Drop challenge. Design and create a balloon powered vehicle. Children’s digital story book. Application of multimedia to design and create a children’s book to share with elementary students.

Semester TWO: • •

The Design cycle. The design of a game and the use of a simple electronic circuit. Application of the design cycle. Digital Yearbook: Capturing our memories.

TECHNOLOGY: GRADE 7 A: Investigate At the end of Grade 7, students should be able to: Identify the problem to be solved. • Consider the importance of problem within increasingly wider contexts which may include life, society and/or the environment. • Understand the concept of a design brief, adapt a given design brief and begin to outline a simple design brief. Develop the design brief. • Ask useful questions at the different stages of the investigation. • With guidance identify appropriate sources of information and acknowledge these using a recognized convention. • Collect and select information, organize it logically and, with guidance, begin to analyze it. • Consider, with some guidance, the value of sources of information. Formulate a design specification. • List, with some guidance, the specific requirements that must be met by the product/solution. • Design, with some guidance, tests to evaluate the product/solution against the design specification.


MYP: Technology B: Plan At the end of Grade 7, students should be able to: Design the product/solution. • Begin to generate a range of designs that attempt to meet the design specification. • Compare the designs against the design specifications and show increasing skill in evaluating. • Select one design and explain its choice over the others. Plan the product/solution. • Devise, with guidance, a series of logical steps to create the product/solution. • Construct a simple plan to create the product/ solution that makes effective use of resources and time. • Consider the effectiveness of the plan and make any suitable modifications to the design. C: Create At the end of Grade 7, students should be able to: Use appropriate techniques and equipment. • Use an increasing range of techniques and equipment competently. • Ensure a safe working environment for themselves and others. Follow the plan. • Follow, with guidance, the plan to produce the product/solution. • Understand the importance of monitoring and revisiting the plan, and with limited guidance, make and explain any changes to the plan. Create the product/solution. • Create a product/solution of appropriate quality. D: Evaluate At the end of Grade 7, students should be able to: Evaluate the product/solution. • Follow and carry out simple tests to compare the product/solution against the design specification. • Consider the success (and/or/failure) of the product/solution in an objective manner based on testing, their own views and the views of the intended user. • Consider, with limited guidance, the impact of the product/solution on individuals and/or on society. • Explain, with limited guidance, how the product/ solution could be improved.

Evaluate their use of the design cycle. • Reflect on their performance at each stage of the design cycle. • Identify the parts they found easy and the parts that proved difficult and with guidance through questioning, suggest ways in which their performance could be improved. E: Attitudes in technology Throughout the course, students should: • Carry out units of work in technology using materials and techniques safely and responsibly. • Work effectively as members of a team, collaborating, acknowledging and supporting the views of others. • Provide evidence of personal engagement with the subject (motivation, independence, general positive attitude) when working in technology.

THE CURRICULUM TOPIC OVERVIEW FOR GRADE 8 TECHNOLOGY INCLUDES: Semester One: • •

Digital Citizenship. Review of the design cycle. Autobiographies. How do I conduct myself appropriately online? Desktop Publishing. Digital Art.

Semester Two: • •

Design Task 3: Movie Making. Design Project: Film Editing Radio News Broadcast Design Project. How has communication tools changed our time? Podcasting.

TECHNOLOGY: GRADE 8 A: Investigate At the end of Grade 8, students should be able to: Identify the problem to be solved. • Consider the importance of problem for life, society and/or the environment. • Outline a simple design brief. Develop the design brief. • Ask relevant questions at the different stages of the investigation. • Identify appropriate sources of information and acknowledge these using a recognized convention. • Collect and select information, organize it logically and, with guidance, begin to analyze it. • Consider, with guidance, the value of sources of information. 2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE - 89


MYP: Technology Students formulate a design specification. • List, with limited guidance, the specific requirements that must be met by the product/solution. • Design, with limited guidance, tests to evaluate the product/solution against the design specification.

Evaluate their use of the design cycle. • Reflect on their performance at each stage of the design cycle. • Identify the parts they found difficult and suggest ways in which their performance could be improved.

B: Plan At the end of Grade 8, students should be able to:

E: Attitudes in technology Throughout the course, students should: • Carry out units of work in technology using materials and techniques safely and responsibly. • Work effectively as members of a team, collaborating, acknowledging and supporting the views of others. • Provide evidence of personal engagement with the subject (motivation, independence, general positive attitude) when working in technology.

Design the product/solution. • Generate a range of designs that attempt to meet the design specification. • Compare the designs against the design specifications and identify the pros and cons of each design. • Select one design and explain its choice. Plan the product/solution. • Devise, with guidance, a series of logical steps to create the product/solution. • Construct a plan to create the product/solution that makes effective use of resources and time. • Analyze the plan and explain the need for any modifications to the design. C: Create At the end of Grade 8, students should be able to: Use appropriate techniques and equipment. • Use appropriate techniques and equipment competently. • Ensure a safe working environment for themselves and others. Follow the plan. • Follow the plan to produce the product/solution with minimal guidance. • Review the plan and explain any changes to the plan (when necessary). Create the product/solution. • Create a product/solution of appropriate quality. D: Evaluate At the end of Grade 8, students should be able to: Evaluate the product/solution. • Carry out tests to compare the product/solution against the design specification. • Consider the success (and/or/failure) of the product/ solution in an objective manner based on testing, their own views and the views of the intended user. • Consider the impact of the product/solution on individuals and/or on society. • Explain how the product/solution could be improved.

90 - 2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE


MYP: PHYSICAL EDUCATION PHYSICAL EDUCATION: GRADES 7 AND 8 THE CURRICULUM TOPIC OVERVIEW FOR GRADE 7 PHYSICAL EDUCATION INCLUDES:

• •

Semester One: • • • • • •

Co-operative games. Fitness and personal goal setting. Healthy eating. Athletics. Fitness and personal goal setting. Movement/Dance.

Semester Two: • • • • • • • • • •

Co-op games. Outdoor invasion games (lacrosse, soccer, galic, ultimate). Dance. Net games (badminton, volleyball, takraw). Health C.A.S.A. Week. Indoor invasion (baskets, hockey). Target games (archery, Frisbee, golf, BoG). Bating games (table-tennis). Games of low organization.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION: GRADE 7 A. USE OF KNOWLEDGE At the end of Grade 7, students should be able to: • •

Demonstrate and use some physical education terminology in context. Demonstrate an understanding of basic concepts, strategies, techniques and rules related to a variety of physical activities, and apply them in an increasing range of contexts. Explain and increasingly demonstrate an understanding of the basic principles that contribute to fitness, and their importance in various contexts. Use their knowledge to identify and analyze factors that influence situations, and solve problems in familiar and simple unfamiliar situations.

aesthetic activity with limited guidance from the teacher. Compose basic aesthetic movements. Link movements in order to compose simple aesthetic sequences, taking into account the concepts of space, time, level, force and flow, with guidance from the teacher.

C. PERFORMANCE At the end of Grade 7, students should be able to: •

Demonstrate the basic skills and techniques necessary for active participation in modified and some more complex performance situations in a variety of physical activities. Apply basic tactics, strategies and rules in modified and some more complex performance environments in both individual and group situations. Perform movement concepts and simple sequences of movement in a variety of physical contexts.

D. SOCIAL SKILLS AND PERSONAL ENGAGEMENT At the end of Grade 7, students should be able to: • • • •

• •

Communicate effectively, including basic verbal and non-verbal forms of communication. Demonstrate attitudes and strategies that support and encourage others. Show respect and sensitivity to their own and different cultures. Demonstrate enthusiasm and commitment when taking part in the activity and with guidance, take an active role in understanding their own learning process. Reflect upon their own achievements in terms of strengths and weaknesses and make an informed reflection. Set simple goals to enhance learning and take action towards achieving them.

B. MOVEMENT COMPOSITION At the end of Grade 7, students should be able to: •

Explore movement possibilities and variations in accordance with the basic principles of a particular

2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE - 91


MYP: PHYSICAL EDUCATION THE CURRICULUM TOPIC OVERVIEW FOR GRADE 8 PHYSICAL EDUCATION INCLUDES: Semester One: • • • • • • • •

Cooperative games. Fitness and personal goal setting. Athletics. Games of low organization. Students will be involved in high activity games that can be played in variety ways. Healthy eating: Students can discuss the elements that they know contribute to a healthy lifestyle and share it with the class. Movement/Dance. Fitness and review goals.

B. MOVEMENT COMPOSITION At the end of Grade 7, students should be able to: • • •

C. PERFORMANCE At the end of Grade 8, students should be able to: •

Semester Two: • • • • • • • • •

Invasion games: Basketball, touch football, lacrosse. Target games: Archery, bocce ball, ring toss, golf. Net/Wall games: Volleyball, badminton, wall ball. Human growth and development. Students will be discussing issues that relate to human growth and puberty. C.A.S.A. Week. Striking/Fielding games: A contest between the fielding and batting teams. Track and Field: Students will be learning and practicing various track and field events. Adventure challenge: Students will be engaging in various outdoor challenges that will involve teamwork and pushing their boundaries. Final fitness testing.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION: GRADE 8 A. USE OF KNOWLEDGE At the end of Grade 8, students should be able to: • • • •

Use some physical education terminology in context. Demonstrate an understanding of basic concepts, strategies, techniques and rules related to a variety of physical activities, and apply them in context. Demonstrate an understanding of the basic principles that contribute to fitness, and their importance in various contexts. Use their knowledge to identify and analyze factors that influence situations, and solve problems in familiar and simple unfamiliar situations.

92 - 2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE

Explore movement possibilities and variations in accordance with the basic principles of a particular aesthetic activity. Compose aesthetic movements. Link movements in order to compose simple aesthetic sequences, taking into account the concepts of space, time, level, force and flow, with limited guidance from the teacher.

• •

Demonstrate the skills and techniques necessary for active participation in some more complex performance situations in a variety of physical activities. Apply tactics, strategies and rules in some more complex performance environments in both individual and group situations. Perform movement concepts and sequences of movement in a variety of physical contexts.

D. SOCIAL SKILLS AND PERSONAL ENGAGEMENT At the end of Grade 8, students should be able to: • • • • • •

Communicate effectively, including basic verbal and non-verbal forms of communication. Demonstrate attitudes and strategies that support and encourage others. Show respect and sensitivity to their own and different cultures. Take an active role in their own learning process and demonstrate enthusiasm and commitment when taking apart in the activity. Make an informed reflection upon their own achievements. Set simple goals to enhance learning and take action towards achieving them.


MYP: Language B LANGUAGE B: GRADES 7 AND 8

THE CURRICULUM UNIT OVERVIEW FOR GRADES 7 AND 8 LANGUAGE B (EITHER FRENCH OF MANDARIN) INCLUDES:

• •

level one foundation (french and mandarin): • • • • • •

Bridging Unit – The Language We Study Unit 1 – Myself Unit 2 – My Family Unit 3 – Housing Unit 4 – School Unit 5 – My Hobbies and Leisure Activities

At the end of Grade 8, students should be able to: • •

LEVEL TWO FOUNDATION (FRENCH AND MANDARIN):

• • • • • •

Bridging Unit - Review Unit 1 – Clothing and Fashion Unit 2 – Food Unit 3 – Holidays and Celebrations Unit 4 – Friendships Unit 5 - Transportation

LEVEL THREE STANDARD (FRENCH AND MANDARIN): • • • • •

Bridging Unit - Review Unit 1 – Physical and Personality Descriptions Unit 2 – Health and Healthy Lifestyle Unit 3 – The World of Work and Occupations Unit 4 – My Community

Request and provide information in simple, familiar situations in both spoken and written contexts. Engage in oral production in familiar situations using comprehensible pronunciation and intonation most of the time. Take part in formal and/or informal exchanges related to the areas of interaction and cultural and international issues with age and topic-specific guidance.

• • •

Communicate information, ideas and opinions. Demonstrate comprehension of specific factual information and attitudes, expressed in spoken and written contexts. Identify main ideas and supporting details and draw conclusions from spoken and written texts. Understand and appropriately use structures and vocabulary. Request and provide information in both spoken and written contexts. Engage actively in oral production using comprehensible pronunciation and intonation. Take part in formal and informal exchanges related to the areas of interaction and to cultural and international issues.

LEVEL FOUR STANDARD (FRENCH AND MANDARIN): • • • • •

Bridging Unit - Review Unit 1 – The Environment Unit 2 – Media Unit 3 – World Affairs Unit 4 – History and Geography

At the end of Grade 7, students should be able to: • •

Communicate information, ideas and opinions. Demonstrate comprehension of specific factual information and attitudes, expressed in simple spoken and written contexts where the language is familiar. Identify main ideas and supporting details with familiar language and draw conclusions from spoken and written texts where the language is familiar. Understand and appropriately use basic structures and vocabulary.

2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE - 93


MYP: The arts THE ARTS: GRADES 7 AND 8

ensemble: Elements application and rehearsal techniques. How do we polish our performance? Unit: Small ensemble Ongoing growth, development and proficiency with a selected instrument.

THE CURRICULUM TOPIC OVERVIEW FOR GRADE 7 ARTS SUBJECTS (VISUAL ARTS, DRAMA AND MUSIC) INCLUDES:

Semester ONE - Visual Arts:

the arts: grade 7

A. Knowledge and understanding At the end of grade 7, students should be able to: • Demonstrate awareness and knowledge of the art form studied in a relation to the influence to some aspects of societal, cultural, or historical contexts. • Demonstrate a simple knowledge and understanding of some elements of the art form studied, including some specialized language, concepts and processes. • Express, with guidance, an informed opinion of the art form studied in the context of their own artwork.

• • •

Introduction to the visual art media and ideas: Where do I get my ideas? Linear Perspective. Frottage: How is surface quality of an object shown? Paper Mache: Where do artists/designers get their ideas for fantastic imaginative creatures?

Semester ONE - Drama: • •

Collaboration. Drama-Connections and relationships: How can we use our bodies and therefore ourselves creatively? How are we affected by our environment.

Semester ONE - Music: • • • • •

Exploration of musical elements: Italian terms. Approaches to learning through multiple intelligence. Applications of musical terms. E.g. rhythm, volume, dynamics, tempo and mood. Large ensemble applying Italian terms and rehearsal techniques. History unit: Classic Romantic. How are the musical elements used to create mood in Romantic music. Inquiry into composers. Ongoing growth, development and proficiency with a selected instrument.

Semester TWO - Visual Arts: • • •

Paper Mache. Observational drawing nature. What is a calligraphic print?

Semester TWO - Drama: • •

Musical Theatre. Me and the World: How can we use literature to explore universal themes?

Semester TWO - Music: • Score study: Elements applications. How do we create mood in music as a performer? Unit: Large 94 - 2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE

B. Application At the end of grade 7, students should be able to: •

Use an increasing understanding of artistic ideas and conventions to create, perform and/or present art.

C. Reflection and evaluation At the end of grade 7, students should be able to: • • •

Describe the progress they have made and identify possible strategies to develop and improve their artistic processes. Evaluate their work. Consider feedback when identifying strategies to develop and improve.

D. Personal engagement At the end of grade 7, students should be able to: • • • •

Show commitment in using and developing their own artistic processes. Demonstrate curiosity, self-motivation, initiative and a willingness to take informed risks. Support, courage and work with their peers in a positive way. Identify and discuss the various ways in which art practices and artworks present themselves from culture to culture.


MYP: The arts THE CURRICULUM TOPIC OVERVIEW FOR GRADE 8 ARTS SUBJECTS (VISUAL ARTS, DRAMA AND MUSIC) INCLUDES: Semester ONE - Visual Arts: • Introduction to design. • Mandala - A cultural art investigation. • Anamorphic Pictures: Art Movements: Surrealism. How do we create a surrealist artwork?

the arts: grade 8 A. Knowledge and understanding At the end of grade 8, students should be able to: • •

Semester TWO - Visual Arts: • • • •

What is 3D art? Collaborative free standing sculpture. Pop Art : Painting on Canvas. How do other cultures view the same object? Context - Fish. Lino cuts. What is a print?

Semester ONE - Drama: • • •

Collaboration. Storytelling: How are stories of our world told to others? Masks.

Semester TWO - Drama: • •

Drama: Who can I be? What universal pattern and themes are evident in various cultures’ stories and experiences. Children’s theatre: What are the elements of children’s entertainment?

Semester ONE - Music: • • •

Music: How do I use what I know to set new goals in collaboration with others? Review in small ensemble. Music: How does popular music affect me? Links to visual arts. Ongoing growth, development and proficiency with a selected instrument.

Semester TWO - Music: • • • • •

Large ensemble. Small ensemble. Solo Performance. How do we pick, prepare & polish? Ongoing growth, development and proficiency with a selected instrument.

Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the art form studied in a relation to some aspects of societal, cultural, historical or personal contexts. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of some elements of the art form studied, including some specialized language, concepts and processes. Demonstrate an informed opinion of the art form studied in the context of their own artwork.

B. Application At the end of grade 8, students should be able to: • •

Articulate an idea, theme or personal interpretation to a point of realization. Develop skills and apply the techniques and processes involved in creating, performing and/or presenting art.

C. Reflection and evaluation At the end of grade 8, students should be able to: • • •

Give an informed description of the progress they have made so far and identify strategies to develop and improve their artistic processes. Evaluate their work. Consider feedback when identifying strategies to develop and improve.

D. Personal engagement At the end of grade 8, students should be able to: • • • •

Show commitment in developing their own artistic processes. Demonstrate curiosity, self-motivation, initiative and a willingness to take informed risks. Support, encourage and work with their peers in a positive way. Be receptive to the various ways in which art practices and artworks present themselves from culture.

MUSIC PROGRAM - NEW STUDENTS Grades 6 to 8: Instrumental Programme Students new to Grades 6 to 8 need to rent or purchase their own instrument from an independant supplier. At the end of the 2010/2011 school year, all students went through the process of selecting an instrument. This

2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE - 95


MYP: THE ARTS AND GRADE 8 EXAMINATIONS musical instrument will ideally be used throughout the Grades 6 to 8 programme. Full details regarding the instrumental programme can be obtained from the Middle School Office.

GRADE 8 EXAMINATIONS Our goal is that examinations must be viewed as an important skill of learning and that the students need to be successful in this skill as a part of their learning journey; in our case Grade 8. We strongly believe that we as the school have the responsibility to engage students in this learning skill in a positive, constructive and reflective way. We acknowledge it is a more pressured learning situation, and that is a reality for meeting future challenges, but once again we must assist our students in understanding and managing examinations. This is the aspect that we as a school can control and do well; timing, providing study guides, balancing expectations in terms of the work due, providing direct instructional time on how to prepare, and reinforcing with the students at all times that this is a part of an ongoing assessment process from day one to day finish. Being successful in examination type assessment processes is another way that enables our students to show quality in their learning and success as a learner. Examinations are scheduled in early December and April.

96 - 2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE


Homework: GRADES 7 AND 8 Homework aims to reinforce or extend learning; learning generated at school, but equally important, learning that reflects the natural curiosity and inquiry that all students engage in as they explore, investigate and make sense of the world around them. School generated homework assignments may vary from day to day and will include a range of activities such as : independent study and research projects, preparation for tests and quizzes, reports and assignments that extend or reinforce daily class work, skill reinforcement and practice. For long term assignments every effort will be made to coordinate due dates and the time each student is required to spend in preparation for completion.

All students are required to write their homework assignments, project due dates and test dates in their Agenda. In Grades 4—6 we encourage parents to check and sign these books each day. The books should also be used for communication with the classroom teacher. PARENTS CAN HELP WITH HOMEWORK We ask that parents give support and encouragement for their child in developing good work and study habits by: • •

When homework is not assigned, do encourage your child to use the established study time as a time for inquiry and investigation and to maintain the recreational reading period. Independent inquiries can be related to personal interests, current events, related areas to a topic under study, completing online skill builders etc.

Homework assignments are used to reinforce new concepts, understanding and skills and to help build desirable work and study habits. The amount of time that a student spends doing homework will vary somewhat from day to day, with the ability and diligence of the individual learner and a student’s programme and grade level. The amount and type of homework will also depend upon the subject area and the grade level of the student.

Asking your child about what he or she is learning. Establishing a specific nightly homework time. Providing a quiet place to study although we recommend the computer based homework or research is completed in a space where parents are able to easily monitor. Being available to answer questions or discuss related aspects of an inquiry. You are a key learning resource for your child. Reviewing completed work and offering praise or constructive feedback for improvement. Informing the teacher when problems arise.

SOME TIPS

Make sure your child has a quiet, well-lit place to do homework. Avoid having your It is important to recognize that the pattern child do homework with the television on or in of homework will be variable and the time places with other distractions, such as people required may be less or greater than the times coming and going. Computers should be in indicated in the guidelines below. Homework an area that can be easily monitored and we will be purposeful and assigned when required suggest they should not be in bedrooms. to support learning. Make sure the materials your child needs, The following is a guide: such as technology hardware, books, paper, pencils and a dictionary, etc are Grade 7 70 to 100 minutes per day available. Ask your child if special materials including at least 30 minutes of will be needed for some projects and get them recreational reading in advance. Increasingly this may mean a computer, printer and a thumb drive. Grade 8 Up to 120 minutes per day including at least 30 minutes of Help your child with time management. recreational reading Establish a set time each day for doing homework. Do not let your child leave homework until just before bedtime. Think about using a weekend morning or afternoon for working on long term assignments, especially if the project involves getting together with classmates.

Be positive about homework. Tell your child how important school is. The attitude you express about homework will be the attitude your child acquires. Show your child that the skills they are learning are related to things you do as an adult. Show them how you solve problems, write a report or prepare for a presentation. Support the partnership and show your child that the school and home are a team. When your child asks for help, provide guidance, not answers. Please also consider that at times too much parent involvement may work against the development of the attitudes and habits of independent, lifelong learning skills. Stay informed. Talk with your child’s homeroom teacher or advisor. Regular practice, review and completion of assignments at home are necessary and an integral part of the learning process. Non-completion of homework will require students to complete it during allocated times during the day or after school. Parents will be informed when students fail to complete homework to the standard required. Help your child work out what is hard homework and what is easy homework. Have your child do the hard work first. This will mean he/she will be most alert when facing the biggest challenges. Easy material will seem to go fast when fatigue begins to set in. Watch your child for signs of frustration. Let your child take a short break if he/she is having trouble keeping his/her mind on an assignment. Reward progress in homework. When your child has been successful in homework completion and is working hard, celebrate that success with praise and acknowledgement such as a special event (e.g., pizza, a walk, a trip to the park) to reinforce the positive effort.

2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE - 97


NOTES

98 - 2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE


CURRICULUM SUPPORT


Curriculum Support CURRICULUM COMMUNICATION TO PARENTS

student as a lifelong reader.

At the end of each week all teachers send home a summary of the learning that the students will be involved in during the week. These emails contain information on specific topics as well as details regarding assignments, assessments and events. In Grades 4 to 6 the homeroom teacher sends out the email and in Grades 7 and 8 the email is forwarded by the advisor teacher.

The Library staff aim to provide a warm and inviting learning environment for all students and their families to enjoy. Students are welcome to use the Library as a place to read and relax, complete homework, and search for books before and after school, at recess and at lunch time.

PARENT ORIENTATION Information ‘Coffee Mornings’ will be scheduled as required to support parents who arrive during the school year. The purpose is to provide an opportunity to answer queries and to share information concerning: the school curriculum, classroom procedures, placement procedures, homework policy, discipline policy, and opportunities for parent involvement.

REPORTING TO PARENTS August/September - Meet the Teacher - An informal opportunity to meet the teachers. September - Three Way Conferences - A student, teacher and parent goal setting conference. January - End of Semester Written Report and Interview.

The Library is open each school day from 8:00 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. Students are able to borrow books during their weekly class book exchange period and may also drop in to exchange or renew books at any time. Students may borrow up to three (3) independent reading books. Books for Literature Circles or Novel Studies are in addition to their independent reading books. All students are also permitted to borrow one additional book, in their mother-tongue, from our World Languages Collection. Additional resources available to our students (links are available from our school website): • http://cislearningcentre.folletdestiny.com The library database is your centralized information link. Through that one site, you have links to all of the following databases, as well as all of the resources that we house within the library.

June - End of Semester Written report.

http://search.ebscohost.com/ Username = cis password = Singapore EBSCO is our online information warehouse, providing access to over 80.000 magazines, newspapers and professional journals from around the world.

Scheduled throughout the year - Curriculum Evenings.

April - Student Led Conferences - A student led report on progress and achievement.

We welcome and encourage parents and teachers to communicate at anytime if questions or concerns arise.

LIBRARY The Library of the Canadian International School focuses on providing supportive services and program collaboration. Global information literacy and literature that reflect our multicultural school community are integral to active, authentic life-long learning and inquiry. The Library is a changing and dynamic place and is an integral part of the busy daily life of the CIS community. The Library staff strive to meet the educational needs of students and staff and to support our IB (International Baccalaureate) curriculum. Our goal is to develop every

100 - 2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE

http://infoweb.newsbank.com Username = candnis Password = candnis Newsbank is our online source for newspapers from around the world. Easy to browse, as well as conduct specific searches targeting particular continents, regions of the world or even worldwide searches. •

http://www.teenhealthandwellness.com/static/ web_ads Username = cis Password = health Teen Health and Wellness is a terrific resource not only for Health classes, but also for science classes and just general information about physical wellbeing. • http://www.noodletools.com Noodletools is our online research organizational site. Students can keep track of the materials that they use for their research projects, take notes and organize


Curriculum Support them, and share this information electronically with their teachers. Most recently, Noodletools has linked to Google Docs, so students can now write their papers at Noodletools.com. Our Policy for Lost Library Books Books can become lost despite students’ and families’ best efforts to care for them. However, part of being a responsible student is taking care of school property. If a book is lost, the person who signed out the book is responsible for paying the replacement charge. If the book is found and returned to the Learning Centre no later than September 1 of the following school year, a refund will be issued. Contact for the Jurong East Learning Centre: Mrs. Lisa Patton: lisa.patton@cis.edu.sg

TECHNOLOGY GUIDELINES A CIS ‘Expanding Horizons Years’ Middle School Information Technology Student is … A Balanced CIS ‘Expanding Horizons Years’ Middle School Information Technology Student is on task in the classroom and avoids entertainment sites or noneducational sites and focuses on appropriate learning activities. He/she is able to use resources that are not electronic in nature and can make presentations with a variety of tools. A Reflective CIS ‘Expanding Horizons Years’ Middle School Information Technology Student considers how he/she has used technology in the past and learns from successes and failures to develop their skills as lifelong learners. A Communicating CIS ‘Expanding Horizons Years’ Middle School Information Technology Student communicates effectively with teachers and peers through email, uses available technology appropriately to be fully engaged in the school environment, and ensures that he/she can effectively communicate the results of their learning

the appropriateness and validity of information on websites, critically analyzes the information gathered and considers the consequences of using it improperly, and is aware of the value of IT equipment and acts responsibly when using the equipment. An Open-Minded CIS ‘Expanding Horizons Years’ Middle School Information Technology Student uses technology as a vehicle for discovering multicultural information, while not excluding more traditional methods; information gathered would include a variety of technological tools from a variety of worldwide sources. A Caring CIS ‘Expanding Horizons Years’ Middle School Information Technology Student considers the consequences before taking part in any action which may be disrespectful or infringe on the privacy of fellow students, teachers, personnel, administrators or staff of CIS. A Principled CIS ‘Expanding Horizons Years’ Middle School Information Technology Student uses technology in a way that meets legal, academic and moral expectations—this includes, but is not limited to, refraining from illegal file sharing and other forms of piracy, bullying or abusing others online, stealing passwords and using technology to plagiarize the work of others. A Knowledgeable CIS ‘Expanding Horizons Years’ Middle School Information Technology Student knows how to access appropriate resources and a variety of programs; knows which resources are available and understands how to use the Microsoft Office Suite of Applications; knows the security risks involved in computer usage; and is able to utilize computer technology to maximize their potential. A Risk-Taking CIS ‘Expanding Horizons Years’ Middle School Information Technology Student uses technology to its full potential to discover new, exciting and engaging resources—software, search engines, computer programs, and ways to complete assignments and create presentations.

An Inquiring CIS ‘Expanding Horizons Years’ Middle School Information Technology Student persistently looks for new software programs, communication technologies, techniques, and learning tools to incorporate into his/her learning. A Thinking CIS ‘Expanding Horizons Years’ Middle School Information Technology Student thinks about

2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE - 101


Curriculum Support ACADEMIC RESOURCE PROGRAMME The Academic Resource Programme provides academic support for those students with learning exceptionalities. It is a broad-based programme, offering support to students, regular classroom teachers, and parents. All students are registered in regular classes and must function with a minimum of special assistance. CIS may not be able to facilitate all students with academic, emotional or physical exceptionalities. If your child is receiving special services, such as learning resource instruction, remedial teaching, speech or language therapy or seeing an educational specialist outside the regular classroom, please contact the Vice Principal and discuss your child’s situation before making a decision to come to CIS. Parents of prospective students are advised that the school is able to serve only those students with learning or behaviour exceptionalities, who are able to function in the regular programme with minimal support. The Canadian International School reserves the right to refuse admission to any student for whom an appropriate educational programme or support service is not currently available.

at her/his grade level and is able to talk and write in correct sophisticated language, like a native speaker. Some people learn faster; some learn more slowly. 2. How long does it take to learn to speak English? Learners may be able to speak conversationally in fairly simple English in one to two years. It takes longer to learn more words (there are about 500,000 words in English) and more difficult grammar. At this time students are not able to do school work at grade level. 3. My child can speak English. Why can’t she or he write English well? For many people it is easier to learn to speak than to learn to write or even to read. Learning how to write with correct grammar takes time. 4. My child was doing well, making good progress, but now she/he seems not to be learning anything new. Why is this happening? It is common for language students to reach a “plateau” of learning, where it appears they are not learning anything more. Sometimes students may appear to fall back, and do worse. This is very frustrating for the students, but it is temporary and normal. They will begin to learn again if they keep working.

ENGLISH FOR SPEAKERS OF OTHER LANGUAGES (ESOL) English language standards are high at CIS and students follow a well-developed curriculum with highly qualified teachers in the classrooms. Teachers are native speakers of English whose in-depth knowledge of curriculum practices helps prepare students for living and learning in English-speaking environments. Students are provided with opportunities throughout their programme to apply their learning to real-life situations. Students of varying ability levels can enter the ESOL programme at any time during the school year. They can also study without interruption or loss of continuity, if they wish, by enrolling in popular Summer School programmes. All CIS teachers work together to support ESOL students and to help them integrate successfully into the academic and social life of the school.

5. When can my child pass to the next course? The student can move to the next level when he/ she has passed speaking, writing and reading assessments. 6. Should I hire a tutor? It is always useful for a student to work privately with a tutor. Speaking should be part of the tutoring session, where the tutor can help the student learn the correct grammar and correct pronunciation. The tutor should ask the child’s teacher about any weaknesses the student has, and work on those weaknesses.

Information for Parents and Students about Language Learning: 1. How long does it take to become fluent in English? It usually takes between 5 and 7 years, sometimes longer. A person who is fluent understands textbooks

102 - 2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE

What Parents can do to help their children succeed in English: •

Ensure they study new words they have learned in class and on their own, every day. The same


Curriculum Support • • • •

• • • •

words should be reviewed within 24 hours after learning them, and again within 2-3 days. Repetition is good. This is daily homework. Ensure they read at home in English every day, up to one hour. They can read novels, magazines, or newspapers. This is daily homework. Encourage them to watch appropriate TV programmes in English. Buy educational software they can use on their own computers at home. There are many kinds of software designed to teach people English. Hire a tutor to work with your child, especially on speaking and correct pronunciation. A tutor can also help the students develop a larger writing and reading vocabulary, and work on correct grammar. Purchase or borrow books that are on tape, so the students can read along while they hear the text. This is especially useful for beginning students. If you are able, speak some English at home with your children. Ensure they get enough sleep, so they are able to learn better. Encourage your children to do their best in a gentle way. Putting pressure on them to learn English fast creates stress for them and prevents them from learning effectively.

STUDENT AGENDA All students are issued with an Agenda when they commence the year. Students should use the Agenda to record and plan homework plus maintain and update other important organizational information. Students may use electronic agendas.

THE OPEN MINDS PROGRAMME AND EXCURSION WEEK CIS provides two significant off-site programmes: Open Minds and Excursion Week. These programmes provide opportunities for students to use inquiry in furthering their understanding of people, community and global issues, places, artifacts and objects outside the boundaries of traditional learning environments. In these programmes we will assist students in developing new skills and insights that will enhance their ability to discuss and analyze their learning which is so important in becoming a life-long learner. The Open Minds and Excursion Week experiences will provide unique opportunities to extend social, aesthetic, cultural and physical insights. These experiences will challenge the learner to push his/her personal

boundaries and, as a result, provide for significant intellectual growth. The purpose of these two programmes is to increase each student’s curiosity, awareness, understanding and sensitivity to the world both within and beyond the school community, and in doing so support them as intelligent, successful, caring, and responsible global citizens. These off-site explorations assist us to focus on the transdisciplinary IB based curriculum, which enables students to make meaningful links by building relationships between the curriculum, their studies, themselves, and the ‘real world’. Open Minds learning experiences occur throughout the year and the current focus areas for the grades are: Grade 4

Ecosystems and Conservation of Living Things

Grade 5

Ancient Civilizations

Grade 6

Singapore’s connection to the world

Grade 7

Investigations in Unique Environments

Grade 8

The Fall of Singapore during World War II

Excursion Week usually occurs in mid April with the focus on: Grade 4

Sembawang Singapore - Personal Growth, Independence and Challenge

Grade 5

D’Coconut Island, Malaysia - Physical Challenge, Environmental Study and Personal Growth

Grade 6

Taman Negara, Malaysia – Rain Forest Community, Environment and Peoples

Grade 7

Telunas, Indonesia – Outdoor Education and Aquatic Ecology

Grade 8

Chiang Mai, Thailand – Intercultural Understanding and Personal Growth

As Excursion Week is a part of our curriculum, it is expected that all students will participate. Parents will be advised of the approximate cost of this programme early in the year.

2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE - 103


Curriculum Support W.A.E.L.P. The Wednesday Afternoon Experiential Learning Programme (W.A.E.L.P.) provides an opportunity for students to sample a variety of non-traditional learning experiences to enrich their lives and foster life-long learning in a holistic environment. Over the course of the year, students are involved in three different learning activities, with the emphasis being placed on encountering activities outside one’s own experience and meeting new challenges. Each block of activities runs for 4 weeks.

EXTRA CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES (ECAs) The school offers a wide range of sporting, recreational and artistic activities, ensuring students can discover their potential, explore their interests and develop their sportsmanship, teamwork and fair play. The programme is comprehensive, caters for all interests and abilities, and ensures that all students have the opportunity to participate and develop fully. Activities occur after school. Registration for ECAs is done online. Please read the weekly “Week at a Glance” for full details on signing up.

HOUSE LEAGUES, HOUSE COUNCIL AND SPIRIT DAYS

LEAGUE

These are a very special part of our school. All our students are assigned into ‘House Colours’ and these multi-grade ‘Houses’ come together during the year for special activities that include both sports and cultural events. Spirit Days are fun lunch time activities held throughout the year and are an integral part of building our very special Middle School spirit. The Houses are: Green Red Yellow Blue

Represented by the Cougar Represented by the Eagle Represented by the Otter Represented by the Wolf

At the start of each semester students are involved in the nomination and election of our Middle House League Council. In addition to providing a student voice, the House League Council encourages and provides student driven activities and ideas including dances, bake sales, candy grams, special dress days and assemblies. A number of their activities actively support the school’s community service initiatives such as Tabitha House Building in Cambodia.

104 - 2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE


MOVING ONTO HIGH SCHOOL: GRADES 9 TO 12 Moving on to High School - Grades 9 to 12 The Defining Years This final stage in our programme prepares our students for success in post secondary education and life as an adult. The emphasis for learning and discovery is placed on self-exploration and emphasizes personal responsibility, organization, and time management. These students are the leaders and role models within our school’s student body. With teacher support, they organize large-scale events for other students and the wider community.

to provide the knowledge, skills, and attitudes. required for academic and learning success. School excursions aimed at expanding students’ understanding of the world and providing opportunities for practicing language skills and challenging established beliefs.

The high school programme aims at developing healthy, well balanced, and principled young adults. The rigorous curriculum offers opportunities to explore subjects in depth in preparation for success in universities and colleges. A strong emphasis is placed on critical thinking and the ability to appropriately and expertly question established norms and values while developing and questioning our own positions as well. Students are leaders in their own learning, exploring knowledge and reflecting on their context within a specific situation and within the world as a whole. This is a time of independence, leadership and service. Special features in the ‘Defining Years’ • • • • • • •

• •

Student service assistance in university applications and career planning. Extended service opportunities to remote regional countries for service projects and discovery. A rigorous and internationally recognized high school diploma. Sophisticated specialty rooms including science labs, drama rooms, and IT support centres. Opportunities for student leadership through the Students’ Council, Athletic Council, and a variety of Community Service committees. Local community service opportunities with local schools and organizations. Real life work experience through our Co-operative Education programme placing students into the workforce for a term in a structured programme. offering opportunities for experience and reflection. Competitive sports competitions with a variety of local and international schools in the region. Supportive and highly skilled teachers who utilize a variety of inquiry based learning strategies

2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE - 105


THE IB DP PROGRAMME AND THE OSSD PROGRAMME - GRADES 11 AND 12 INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE DIPLOMA PROGRAMME (DP) GRADES 11 AND 12

ONTARIO SECONDARY SCHOOL DIPLOMA PROGRAMME (OSSD) GRADES 11 AND 12

The International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme was born, in the 1960s, in an effort to establish a common curriculum and university entry credential for students moving from one country to another. International educators were motivated by practical considerations but also by an idealistic vision that students should share an academic experience that would emphasize critical thinking, intercultural understanding and exposure to a variety of viewpoints.

In March of 1999, after ten years of study, planning and development, the Ontario Ministry of Education, Canada officially released its new Ontario Curriculum. The new system unveiled a seamless curriculum from Kindergarten through to Grade 12, a curriculum which was benchmarked against the best in the world and designed to provide students with the skills they needed to compete and succeed in the 21st century. Today, this curriculum is implemented in Ontario, Canada and in the Canadian International School (Singapore) at the senior level of Grades 11 and 12. High standards are expected of graduating students. All graduates must successfully sit the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test (OSSLT) as a requirement to earn an Ontario Secondary School Diploma and complete 40 hours of Community Service. In addition, the secondary curriculum requires students to develop higher order thinking and learning skills. The Ontario system expects that students will be well schooled in the skills necessary for them to take their place as individuals in the global community. The programme prepares them to make a living and a life for themselves and to make a difference to others.

The IB Diploma Programme is a demanding preuniversity course of study that leads to examinations. It is designed for highly motivated secondary school students aged 16 to 19 years. To be awarded the IB Diploma, a student must demonstrate a strong commitment to learning, in terms of mastery of subject content and in the development of skills and attitudes necessary for success at the tertiary level. The IB Diploma is held in high esteem throughout the world and the student who is awarded the IB Diploma gains access to the world’s leading universities. The IB Diploma Programme is a comprehensive two-year international curriculum that generally allows students to fulfill the requirements of their national or state education systems. The Diploma Programme incorporates the best elements of national systems. For further information regarding the International Baccalaureate – Diploma Programme, visit: www.ibo. org/diploma IB-DP Coordinator: Metty Antony: mantony@cis.edu.sg

106 - 2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE

For further information regarding the Ontario Curriculum visit: www.edu.gov.on.ca OSSD Coordinator: Rick Butler: rbutler@cis.edu.sg Important Note: The OSSD programme is being phased out at CIS. The 2011/2012 Grade 11 cohort will be the final group of students to graduate with the OSSD at CIS.


NOTES

2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE - 107


NOTES

108 - 2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE


Canadian International School

T anjong Katong Campus E arly Childhood E ducation to Grade 10 371 Tanjong Katong Road Singapore 437128 T: +65 6345 1573 F: +65 6345 4057 E: admissionstk@cis.edu.sg L akeside Campus E arly Childhood E ducation to Grade 12 7 Jurong West Street 41 Singapore 649414 T: +65 6467 1732 F: +65 6467 1729 E: admissions@cis.edu.sg URL : www.cis.edu.sg


OR

LD S C

W

www.cis.edu.sg

HO OL

Middle School Curriculum Guide  

Middle School Curriculum Guide - Lakeside Campus