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Curriculum Guide - 2012/2013 high School - GradeS 9 to 12 LAKESIDE Campus


Canadian International School Pte. Ltd. CPE Reg. No: 199002243H Period of Registration: 8 June 2011 to 7 June 2015 Printed: August 2011 All information is correct at the time of printing but is subject to change.


TABLE OF CONTENTS

Welcome from the High School Principal 2 CIS Mission Statement 3 The Husky Paw 3 The Defining Years 3 High School Programme Overview 4 The IB Learner Profile 4 Student Services 5 International Baccalaureate Middle Years Programme (MYP) 7 International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme (DP) 23 Ontario Secondary School Diploma Programme (OSSD) 47 Laptop Learning Programme 63 Teacher Advisor Programme 65 The Library 66 Academic Resource Programme 67 Student Success Programme 67 Homework 68 Excursion Week 68 Community Outreach 68


Welcome from the High School Principal Welcome to the 2011/2012 school year at the Canadian International School of Singapore. At CIS, there is a proud tradition of excellence, caring, respect, and responsibility as we commit to challenging and supporting all students. We are an International Baccalaureate World School, offering the Middle Years Programme (MYP) to our Grade 9 and 10 students and the International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme (DP) at Grades 11 and 12, both of which have a proven track record of successful college and university acceptance and success throughout the world. This school year marks the end of an era for the High School community as our final cohort of Grade 11 students embark on their journey to obtain the Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD). The OSSD is also rigorous and recognized at universities around the world. The OSSD will continue until the end of the 2012/2013 school year, after which all students will undertake the IB DP in order to graduate. In these Defining Years, we strive to develop our young people into successful, well-balanced and responsible global citizens. We do this through modelling the IB Learner Profile, which encourages students and teachers to be Inquirers, Knowledgeable, Thinkers, Communicators, Principled, Open-Minded, Caring, Risk-Takers, Balanced and Reflective. With the guidance and expertise of a strong base of well-trained, enthusiastic and caring educators, we challenge and support students to excellence through a strong, vibrant and engaging curriculum. As we are committed to the development of the whole child, students will have ample opportunities to participate in the arts, athletics, community service and academic-based clubs and teams. As well, our Grade 10s and Grade 12s will experience Excursion Week and travel to countries such as Vietnam, India, Malaysia or Cambodia to learn about their cultures first hand. In addition, the Advisor Programme assigns a teacher who advocates, supports and sees the big picture for parents and students. This essential connection will serve as a resource for parents and students throughout their academic and personal progress. We hope students take full advantage of the events that have been coordinated for and by the students, and experience a rich and rewarding high school experience Please take some time to browse through our website and feel free to contact me at the school with any questions. I recognise and highly value the partnership that can be cultivated with parents and I encourage you to be an integral part of your child’s high school experience through our PTA. I look forward to getting to know the students and parents of our high school community. Sincerely,

Dr. David Ansbacher High School Principal

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THE CIS HUSKY PAW CIS MISSION STATEMENT Engage. Enlighten. Empower.

CIS VISION STATEMENT The Canadian International School in Singapore is a dynamic, caring and safe learning environment. Our school community celebrates its internationalism. With our challenging, well-rounded curriculum and our dedicated teachers and staff, we strive to develop the whole child. Students enjoy learning by making meaningful connections between the classroom and the world at large. CIS prepares students to be successful, well-balanced and responsible global citizens.

CORE VALUES Respect: We respect ourselves and respect others for their special talents, skills and contributions. Commitment: We keep our promises and will fulfil all our commitments. Integrity: We believe that integrity is the heart of all lasting relationships and endeavours, and will work with each other in good faith Collaboration: We will cooperate with each other, learn and have fun together to achieve things which are of significance. Responsibility: We take pride in all that we do and are accountable for our actions.

A footprint that will make an impression and leave a mark!

The CIS curriculum aims to ensure that all students

experience a seamless transition of successful learning connectedness from Preschool through to Grade 12. An important component in achieving this aim is the recognition of significant milestones of development and changes that our students are experiencing physically, socially and academically. We believe that a student who is encouraged and motivated to view learning as a lifelong and exciting process, has attained a high level of academic skills and understandings, demonstrates positive social and cultural values will be equipped to meet the future education challenges that they will face. Within the powerful foundation for learning provided by the three International Baccalaureate Programmes we have identified special milestone year groupings that will further strengthen and extend what the CIS learning community is able to offer its students. We have identified four significant milestone stages: Preschool The Exploratory Years Grades One - Three The Independence and Challenge Years Grades Four - Eight The Expanding Horizons Years Grades Nine - Twelve The Defining Years The interdependence and connectedness of each of these stages has been represented by the footprint of the Canadian Husky, our school’s mascot. The Husky is synonymous with strength, power and endurance balanced with agility, alertness and boldness. It is also known as a gentle and affectionate animal that enjoys attention. The Defining Years (Grades 9 – 12) This final stage in our programme prepares our students for success in post secondary education and life as an adult. The emphasis for learning and discovery is placed on self exploration and emphasizes personal responsibility, organization, and time management. These students are the leaders and role models within our school’s student body. With teacher support they organize large scale events for other students and the wider community. Our programme aims at developing healthy, wellbalanced, and principled young adults. The rigorous curriculum offers opportunities to explore subjects in depth in preparation for success in universities and colleges. A strong emphasis is placed on critical thinking which develops the ability to appropriately and expertly question established norms and values while developing and questioning our own positions as well.

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HIGH SCHOOL PROGRAMME OVERVIEW Students are leaders in their own learning, exploring knowledge and reflecting on their context within a specific situation and within the world as a whole. This is a time of independence, leadership and service. Special features in the ‘Defining Years’: • • • • • • •

• •

Assistance in university applications and career planning. Extended service opportunities to remote regional countries for service projects and discovery. A rigorous and internationally recognized high school diploma. Sophisticated specialty rooms including science labs, drama rooms, and IT support centres. Opportunities for student leadership through the Student Council, Athletic Council, and a variety of Community Service committees. Local community service opportunities with local schools and organizations. Real life work experience through our Co-operative Education programme where students are placed into the workforce for a term in a structured programme offering opportunities for experience and reflection. Competitive sports competitions with a variety of local and international schools in the region. Supportive and highly skilled teachers who utilize a variety of inquiry based learning strategies to provide the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required for academic and learning success. School excursions aimed at expanding students’ understanding of the world and providing opportunities for practicing language skills and challenging established beliefs.

High School Programme Overview The Canadian International School believes in providing students with a nurturing, safe environment to develop their academic skills. CIS is proud to use our knowledge of effective teaching practice to provide the most valuable educational experiences for your child. We are an International Baccalaureate World School and offer the Middle Years Programme (MYP) to all students in Grades nine and ten. The Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) programme is being phased out over the next two years. With effect from 2012/2013, all students entering Grade eleven will need to complete the International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme (IB DP) in order to graduate. Over the course of the next two years, the

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OSSD programme will be fully supported until our final student cohort graduates (June 2013). Canadian International School teachers are continually in-serviced throughout the school year by professional IB trainers to ensure teaching methodologies and assessment strategies are effectively carried out in each classroom. Building from an IB philosophy, students are encouraged to question, discover and communicate through a thematic, integrated approach to learning. The combination of highly trained teachers, a challenging, yet flexible curriculum and an individual approach to learning, allows students to develop to their full potential. The MYP, DP and OSSD encourage positive student attitudes and a global perspective to learning. The end result is a quality education for the international student.

The IB Learner Profile The aim of all IB programmes is to develop internationally minded people who, recognizing their common humanity and shared guardianship of the planet, help to create a better and more peaceful world. IB learners strive to be: Inquirers - They develop their natural curiosity. They acquire the skills necessary to conduct inquiry and research and show independence in learning. They actively enjoy learning and this love of learning will be sustained throughout their lives. Knowledgeable - They explore concepts, ideas and issues that have local and global significance. In so doing, they acquire in-depth knowledge and develop understanding across a broad and balanced range of disciplines. Thinkers - They exercise initiative in applying thinking skills critically and creatively to recognize and approach complex problems, and make reasoned, ethical decisions. Communicators - They understand and express ideas and information confidently and creatively in more than one language and in a variety of modes of communication. They work effectively and willingly in collaboration with others. Principled - They act with integrity and honesty, with a strong sense of fairness, justice and respect for the dignity of the individual, groups and communities. They take responsibility for their own actions and the


STUDENT SERVICES consequences that accompany them.

Open-minded - They understand and appreciate their own cultures and personal histories, and are open to the perspectives, values and traditions of other individuals and communities. They are accustomed to seeking and evaluating a range of points of view, and are willing to grow from the experience.

Caring - They show empathy, compassion and respect towards the needs and feelings of others. They have a personal commitment to service, and act to make a positive difference to the lives of others and to the environment.

• • • •

Programme planning assistance to select appropriate High School courses. Assisting students to gain entry to college, university and other post-secondary institutions. Individual counselling regarding academic, career and/or personal concerns. Print, video and CD-ROM information on postsecondary institutions world-wide. Information and promotion of International Career Fairs. Campus visits by many college and university representatives from Canada, U.S., Australia and Europe.

Risk-takers - They approach unfamiliar situations and uncertainty with courage and forethought, and have the independence of spirit to explore new roles, ideas and strategies. They are brave and articulate in defending their beliefs. Balanced - They understand the importance of intellectual, physical and emotional balance to achieve personal well-being for themselves and others. Reflective - They give thoughtful consideration to their own learning and experience. They are able to assess and understand their strengths and limitations in order to support their learning and personal development.

Student Services Student Services offer activities and services that facilitate the personal, social, educational and career development of students at all grade levels. The school Counsellor provides individual counselling, group instruction, consultation and referrals to assist students and their families in making informed decisions and responsible plans. The department has a wide variety of resource information pertaining to colleges, universities, and other post-secondary institutions around the world. In addition, information is available on social issues, study tips, careers, job search skills, summer jobs, and travel/ study/ work programs. Resource material may be borrowed from the Student Services Department. Resources and services offered to students by the Student Services Department include: • • •

Grade 8 orientation. Prospectus of colleges and universities from around the world. Internet and email access to post-secondary institutions.

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NOTES

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THE MIDDLE YEARS PROGRAMME (myp) GRADE 9 AND 10


INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE MIDDLE YEARS PROGRAMME (MYP) The International Baccalaureate Middle Years Programme (MYP) is concerned with providing more for students. Students are expected to be well versed in the traditional subject areas of our current curriculum, and more - they are also encouraged to see the relationships between them. They are expected to develop a genuine understanding of their own history and culture, and more - they are also encouraged to appreciate the traditions of other people and other places. Students are expected to have a firm command of language as a means of communication, and more - they are encouraged to develop a respect for the elegance and richness of other languages and forms of communication. Above all, we expect our students to acquire a genuine love of learning and the skills and discipline to support their education through the rest of their lives. The Middle Years Programme (MYP) embraces and transcends the goals of traditional educational models. Students are encouraged to holistically explore various disciplines and their interrelatedness and interdependence. This interdisciplinary perspective asks students to consider issues in their widest scope and realize that solutions may be acquired from many different sources. A growing intercultural awareness moves beyond a simple tolerance of other people towards developing a genuine empathy and readiness to act cooperatively in shared efforts. Communication is the fundamental ingredient in the service of these ambitious aims. Good communication skills go far beyond the ability to relate your message. Students actively practice and develop their listening skills as well as being attuned to the intentions, variations, and nuances of others. All students are enrolled in all eight subject areas in the MYP Programme, Language A, Mathematics, Science, Humanities, Language B (either French or Mandarin), Technology, Arts (students select either Music, Drama, Visual Arts), Physical Education. English Language Learners may be placed in Language B English for one or two courses depending on their English level. All MYP students will complete a personal project in Grade 10. The personal project is a significant body of work produced over an extended period. It is a product of the student’s own initiative and should reflect his/her experience of the MYP. The personal project holds a very important place in the programme. It provides an excellent opportunity for students to produce a truly

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creative piece of work of their choice and to demonstrate the skills they have developed in approaches to learning. For further information regarding the International Baccalaureate – Middle Years Programme, visit: www.ibo.org/myp IB-MYP Coordinator: Mark Patton (mark.patton@cis.edu.sg)

Reporting Dates • • • •

Mid-Year Report : End January. Parent Teacher Conferences – February 1 to 3, 2012. Student Led Conferences – May 3 to 4, 2012. Final Report : Mid June.


AREAS OF INTERACTION SCOPE AND SEQUENCE FOR GRADES 9 AND 10 Approaches to Learning ATL skill area

Student Learning Expectation Demonstrated by:

Key questions for use with MYP units of work

Grades 9 and 10 (Mastery) Organization

Collaboration

Communication

Task management • Independently analysing and prioritizing the steps necessary to most efficiently complete a task. Self-management • Effectively prioritizing and balancing personal interests and school commitments. • Reflecting on the correlation between organizational skills and success. Time management • Scheduling time efficiently and developing methods to meet all commitments. Working in groups • Assigning roles and accepting assigned roles. • Acting as a responsible member of a team. Accepting others • Being open to and providing constructive feedback. Personal challenges • negotiating goals and limitations with peers and teachers. Literacy • Developing and using effective reading and writing skills in order to meet the requirements of all subject areas. • Mastering a wide range of subject specific terminology. Presentation Skills • Using new and dynamic ways to present information in an engaging manner. Interpersonal Skills • Being an effective, responsible communicator who is aware of the various differences in the ways we communicate.

• • •

• •

• •

How can I best organize myself? What aspects of my organization do I need to develop? How do I best organize tasks?

How can I be a responsible group member? How can I improve the dynamics of a group?

How do I effectively help others understand? How do the ways in which I communicate with others reflect on me?

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AREAS OF INTERACTION SCOPE AND SEQUENCE FOR GRADES 9 AND 10 Information Literacy

Reflection

Thinking

Transfer

Accessing Information • Using sources to support original ideas. • Using a variety of academic resources. Selecting and Organizing Information • • Understanding the foundations of bias. • Recognizing the pervasive impact media • can have in their lives. Referencing • Using inline referencing for all quotations, paraphrases and summaries.

How can information help me enhance my ideas? Why are we biased?

Self-awareness • Identifying personal strengths and weaknesses. • Overcoming limitations and maximizing potential. Self-evaluation • Analysing and recording achievements and progress.

• •

What do I do with my reflections? How do I continue to improve?

Investigating and Planning • Creating a plan for gathering information and finding solutions. • Challenging information and existing perspectives using the inquiry cycle. Application • Identifying patterns in information. • Critically selecting the most relevant information to create insightful and persuasive arguments. • Considering multiple perspectives on an issue, analysing the effectiveness of solutions and identifying the most favourable and beneficial outcomes.

• •

How do I find the best outcomes? How can I develop an effective plan?

How can I use my knowledge, understanding and skills across subjects? How does my learning improve my life?

Making Connections • Identifying common skills. • Consolidating skills to handle unfamiliar situations. Real World Application • Using their knowledge and skills to make positive changes and create effective solutions to better their lives.

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COMMUNITY AND SERVICE Student Learning Outcome Areas Awareness and understanding of: Community

Student Expectations

Key Questions

Grades 9 and 10 Understand the dynamics of the various communities within a larger community and which different communities they are members of. Understanding of how the various communities have an impact on their lives. Students will demonstrate this by: • Listing and defining several unique community groups in which they are involved. • Identifying and understanding the ways in which various community groups. both identify themselves and integrate themselves within larger communities. • Recognizing the effects of other community groups on their lives.

Reflection on Attitudes

• •

How does the material we are covering illustrate the existence of community groups? How might different community groups have an impact on, be affected by and relate to the material we are studying? How does this unit we are studying help me better understand my community as a whole?

Grades 9 and 10 Realization of the various factors and attitudes that contribute jointly to social discord and that only through understanding and cooperation can solutions be found. Students will demonstrate this by: • Illustrating why communities need help from others. • Explaining the benefits that can be obtained through community action.

Responsibilities

Realizing, through meaningful reflection on social situations and areas of need, opportunities to be an active contributor and areas where empathy needs to be further developed.

• •

How can I be a responsible group member? How can I improve the dynamics of a group?

How can I be of service?

Students will demonstrate this by: • Using their understanding of social need to create and develop solutions. • Showing mature understanding of and compassion for global concerns.

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COMMUNITY AND SERVICE Grades 9 and 10

Action: Involvement through service

Continuously striving to be an active and contributing member of the community through willingness to become independently engaged in helping others and bettering their communities.

• • •

Students will demonstrate this by: • Actively seeking out and participating • in varied community service endeavors independently. • Being a role model for community service and involvement.

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What will I do? How do I encourage others to help? What difference do my contributions make? How is my involvement contributing to my personal growth?


ENVIRONMENTS Student Learning Outcome Areas Awareness and understanding of: A Variety of Environments

Student Expectations

Key Questions

Grades 9 and 10 (Mastery) Understand that environments are affected by people, organizations and other environments.

• Students will demonstrate this by: • Describing the impacts, both positive • and negative, of organizations on environments. • • Giving examples of how one environment can benefit or harm another. • Showing awareness of people’s ability to both create and destroy environments. • Identifying organizations that have an impact on various environments. Reflection on: Responsibilities

Grades 9 and 10 Understand how collective action can benefit, harm or change environments. Students will demonstrate this by: • Identifying established organizations that promote change within environments. • Illustrating, with specific examples, ways that organizations have harmed or helped environments.

Action on: Issues

How do various environments affect people? What are ways organizations affect environments? How do various different environments interact?

• •

What affiliations do I have with organizations that promote change within environments? What are the differences between collective and individual action?

Grades 9 and 10 Create, join or support organizations or endeavors that are working towards positive changes in larger scale environments.

How can I be involved on larger scale?

Students will demonstrate this by: • Contributing to organized efforts to improve environments. • Evaluating the validity and effectiveness of a variety of different endeavors in which they participated.

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HEALTH AND SOCIAL EDUCATION Student Learning Outcome Areas

Student Expectations

Awareness and understanding of: Ourselves and Society

Key Questions

Grades 9 and 10 (Mastery) An insightful understanding of our human needs and systems including personal well being, relationships, lifestyles and group dynamics. Students will demonstrate this by: • Recognizing the causes and possible long term implications of current global health issues, global social concerns, and personal development matters. • Identifying measures being taken to alleviate global health and social problems throughout the world. • Identifying steps individuals can take in their own lives to address developmental matters.

Analyzing personal health and social responsibilities and how they can influence systems and groups. Students will demonstrate this by: • Identifying ways they can influence the choices of others. • Outlining their duties in society as a responsible citizen.

What skills do I need to be a responsible citizen?

Grades 9 and 10

Actions: Our Choices

What are some of the factors that create global health and social issues? What can I do as I grow?

Grades 9 and 10

Reflection on: Our Responsibilities

Analyzing daily health, lifestyle and social choices; how they affect personal development and how they have an impact on the world around us. Students will demonstrate this by: • Giving examples of the ways their choices are interconnected with the choices of others. • Identifying how their lifestyles and the lives of others have been influenced by their choices.

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• •

Where can my choices take others? How do I promote change?


HUMAN INGENUITY Student Learning Outcome Areas Awareness and understanding of: Innovation and Change

Student Expectations

Key Questions

Grades 9 and 10 (Mastery) Understanding of the systems, solutions and products created by humans and the processes related to the development of these.

• Students will demonstrate this by: • • Identifying various systems and processes, not simply products, as examples of human creation. • Recognizing the different values mankind places on various forms of creation. Reflection on: Ingenuity

Grades 9 and 10 Demonstrate considered insight into how humans approach problem solving from a variety of schools of thought and using different sets of skills. Reflect on the various implications of human ingenuity.

• Students will demonstrate this by: • Outlining various religious, cultural, • social, political, and environmental effects related to a human innovation. • Relating a variety ways in which a problem can be approached or solved.

Actions: Creating Solutions

How do we place value on creation? What are the various examples of human ingenuity in our lives?

What are the consequences of human innovations? How does using perspectives make my problem solving more effective?

Grades 9 and 10 Using creative approaches to develop ideas about and solutions for group and community problems. Students will demonstrate this by: • Demonstrating willingness to take action towards solving the problems of others as well as personal problems. • Developing and applying innovative techniques for making changes and creating solutions. • Collaborating in groups to develop effective solutions.

• • •

How can I use my thinking in one subject to help me in another? How can we benefit by sharing and comparing ideas about a problem? Why should I care?

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MYP: COURSE OFFERINGS HUMANITIES The aim of humanities in the MYP is to encourage students to gain and develop knowledge, conceptual understanding, research skills, analytical and interpretive skills, and communication skills, contributing to the development of the student as a whole. The Humanities courses aim to encourage students to respect and understand the world around them, and to provide a skills base to facilitate further study. This is achieved through the study of individuals, societies and environments in a wide context: historical, contemporary, geographical, political, social, economic, religious, technological and cultural. Year 4 (Grade 9) Responsibility, Globalization and Identity Foundations of Globalization Economic Globalization and Sustainability Human Rights and the Global Citizen Year 5 (Grade 10) Sharing our Humanity Ultranationalism Foundations of Nationalism Canadian Identity

through quality literature. The study of language and literature enables students to become highly proficient in their understanding and use of their language A. Students need to develop an appreciation of language and literature, of the nature of language and literature, of the many influences on language and literature, and of the power and beauty of language and literature. They will be encouraged to recognize that proficiency in language is a valuable life skill, a powerful tool both in societal communication and as a means of personal reflection. Learning that language and literature are creative processes encourages the development of imagination and creativity through self-expression. Year 4 (Grade 9) Responsibility - The Short Story Discrimination - To Kill A Mockingbird Literary Movements Dramatic Voice - Romeo and Juliet Memoir - This Boy’s Life Year 5 (Grade 10) Sharing Our Humanity - Humanity and Power - Lord of the Flies/Julius Caesar Mythology Humanity and Isolation - The Road Poetry

Assessment in Humanities Criterion A

Knowledge

Maximum 10

Criterion B

Concepts

Maximum 10

Criterion C Criterion D

Skills

Maximum 10

Organization and Presentation

Maximum 8 Total 38

Assessment in Language A Criterion A

Content (Receptive and Productive)

Maximum 10

Criterion B

Organization

Maximum 10

Criterion C

Style and Language Mechanics

Maximum 10 Total 30

Boundaries

Final Grade

0-7

1

Boundaries

Final Grade

8-12

2

0-4

1

13-18

3

5-9

2

19-23

4

10-14

3

24-28

5

15-19

4

29-33

6

20-23

5

34-38

7

24-27

6

28-30

7

LANGUAGE A Language is fundamental to learning, thinking and communicating, therefore it permeates the whole curriculum. The power of language is best experienced 16 - 2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE


MYP: COURSE OFFERINGS LANGUAGE B The primary aim of Language B in the MYP is to encourage students to gain competence in a modern language other than their mother tongue, with the long‑term goal of balanced bilingualism. The International Baccalaureate (IB) acknowledges that learning additional languages greatly contributes to the holistic development of students. Proficiency in a second language gives students access to a broader range of input, experiences and perspectives, and is believed to raise achievement in other subject areas, as well as giving the student the enjoyment of being able to communicate in a language other than his or her mother tongue. The study of MYP Language B aims to encourage in the student a respect for and understanding of other languages and cultures, and to provide a skills base to facilitate further language learning. Language B is grouped into three levels of ability: Foundation, Standard and Advanced. Language B English LITERACY DEVELOPMENT Year 4 (Grade 9) All About School All About Me Heroes The Medium of Media Expression Novel Study Language B English Standard Year 4 (Grade 9) Responsibility Mythology Travel Around the World People and Personalities Environment Novel Study Year 5 (Grade 10) Genre Short Stories Book or Film Novel Study Practical Writing Language B English Advanced

Year 5 (Grade 10) Duality in Humanity Humanity and Tradition Humanity and Isolation Humanity and Power Language B French and Mandarin Foundation (no prior experience) Year 4 (Grade 9) Core Knowledge Myself and Family Housing and My Community My School Healthy Living Food Festivals and Traditions Year 5 (Grade 10) Holidays Transportation Services and Shopping Health Physical and Personality Descriptions The World of Work Le Petit Nicolas Stories (French) Language B French and Mandarin Standard (some prior experience) Year 4 (Grade 9) Youth Problems Physical and Personality Description Health Food World of Work Francophonie (French) “Le Fantome de l’Opera” Gaston Leroux (French) Year 5 (Grade 10) Environmental Issues The Media World Affairs History “ Le Petit Prince” - St.Exupery (French)

Year 4 (Grade 9) Advertising Comparing Short Stories Culture Adversity Writer’s Portfolio and Language Autobiography

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MYP: COURSE OFFERINGS Language B French and Mandarin Advanced (considerable experience for near-native speakers) Year 4 (Grade 9) and Year 5 (Grade 10) The core topics are the same as Language B Standard There would also be additional grammar topics Literature (French) “La Fugue de Bach” “Sac de Billes” Joseph Joffo “Mon bel Oranger” José Mauro de Vasconcelos Assessment in Language B (Foundation level) Criterion A

Speaking and Listening – Message and Interaction

Maximum 8

Criterion B

Speaking - Language

Maximum 8

Criterion C

Writing – Message and Organization

Maximum 8

Criterion D

Writing - Language

Maximum 8

Criterion E

Reading Comprehension

Maximum 16 Total 48

Boundaries

Final Grade

0-8

1

9-16

2

17-23

3

24-30

4

31-36

5

37-42

6

43-48

7

Assessment in Language B (Standard level) Criterion A

Oral Communication – Message and Interaction

Maximum 8

Criterion B

Oral Communication - Maximum 8 Language

Criterion C

Writing – Message and Organization

Maximum 8

Criterion D

Writing - Language

Maximum 8

Criterion E

Reading Comprehension

Maximum 16 Total 48

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Boundaries

Final Grade

0-8

1

9-16

2

17-23

3

24-30

4

31-36

5

37-42

6

43-48

7

Assessment in Language B (Advanced level) Criterion A

Oral Communication – message and interaction

Maximum 8

Criterion B

Oral Communication Maximum 8 – Style and Language Use

Criterion C

Writing – Message and Organization

Maximum 8

Criterion D

Writing – Style and Language Use

Maximum 8

Criterion E

Text Interpretation

Maximum 16 Total 48

Boundaries

Final Grade

0-8

1

9-16

2

17-23

3

24-30

4

31-36

5

37-42

6

43-48

7


MYP: COURSE OFFERINGS MATHEMATICS The interconnected objectives of the Mathematics Department for the Middle Years Programme at the Canadian International School in Singapore are to provide high quality, forward-looking instruction in mathematics for all students, at all levels, to promote excellence in the teaching and learning of mathematics, and encourage inquiry, application and a lifetime appreciation of the beauty and usefulness of mathematics. Year 4 (Grade 9) Basic Number Skills Proportion Algebraic Expressions and Factorizing Indices and Surds (Exponent laws) Equations, Inequations and Formulae Linear Systems (Simultaneous Equations) Coordinate Geometry Graphs of Physical Phenomena Deductive Geometry Year 4 (Grade 9) Extended Mathematics Logarithms Angles, Triangles, and Polygons Properties of Circles

Assessment in Mathematics Criterion A

Knowledge and Understanding

Maximum 8

Criterion B

Investigating Patterns Maximum 8

Criterion C

Communication in Mathematics

Maximum 6

Criterion D

Reflection in Mathematics

Maximum 6 Total 28

Boundaries

Final Grade

0-4

1

5-8

2

9-12

3

13-17

4

18-21

5

22-25

6

26-28

7

Year 5 (Grade 10) Measurement Congruence and Similarity Pythagoras’ Theorem and Trigonometry Polynomials, Identities, and Binomial Expansion Quadratic Equations and Inequalities and Curve Sketching Functions, Inverse Functions, and Logarithmic Functions Statistics Probability Set Language and Set Notation Year 5 (Grade 10) Extended Mathematics Transformations Matrices Arithmetic/Geometric Sequences and Series Vectors in Two Dimensions

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MYP: COURSE OFFERINGS PHYSICAL EDUCATION Physical Education has a unique and significant contribution to make to education. It also plays a very important role within the MYP as it contributes to the total development of the individual. Physical Education in the MYP is concerned with more than sports and games. Its clear goal is to contribute to the development of a student’s physical, intellectual, emotional and social maturity. Physical Education in the MYP aims to cultivate a healthy lifestyle for students and therefore advocates activities that are enjoyable and that also contribute to healthy living. Year 4 (Grade 9) Personal Fitness Soccer Dance Basketball Floor Hockey Ultimate Frisbee Badminton Healthy Relationships Year 5 (Grade 10) Personal Fitness Nutrition Basic Anatomy Soccer Dance Basketball Floor Hockey Ultimate Frisbee Body Image

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Assessment in Physical Education Criterion A

Use of Knowledge

Maximum 8

Criterion B

Movement Composition

Maximum 6

Criterion C

Performance

Maximum 10

Criterion D

Social Skills/ Personal Engagement

Maximum 8

Total 32 Boundaries

Final Grade

0-5

1

6-10

2

11-15

3

16-20

4

21-24

5

25-28

6

29-32

7


MYP: COURSE OFFERINGS SCIENCES

TECHNOLOGY

The MYP Science course must provide students with opportunities to explore the role of science in historical and contemporary contexts. MYP Science aims to help students appreciate the links between science and everyday life as well as the dynamic interactions between science and society.

Technology brings change to every aspect of our lives. Responsible global citizens must have technological skills and an understanding of how technology and society interact. To do this, an appreciation of the historical and contemporary development of technology is required. Our students are encouraged to use technology creatively in their problem-solving when facing challenges in their lives. Students will have many opportunities to apply the problem-solving model (MYP Design Cycle) to a variety of challenges.

MYP Science, in conjunction with the other subject groups and the areas of interaction, contributes to helping students broaden their understanding of themselves as individuals and as collective members of society and the natural environment. Year 4 (Grade 9) Ecosystems and Environment The Periodic Table Electricity and Magnetism Year 5 (Grade 10) The Biology of a Sustainable Environment (Ecology) Optics Foundations of Chemistry

Year 4 (Grade 9) Technology and Society – Does society drive technology or does technology drive society? Technology and Safety – How can I use technology to make my community safer? Technology and Communication – How can I use technology to improve communication? Technological Process – What makes a good baby toy?

Criterion A

One World

Maximum 6

Criterion B

Communication in Science

Maximum 6

Year 5 (Grade 10) Technology and History – How is my world different from my father’s, my grandfather’s? Technology and Manufacturing – How do I make a robot? Technology and Programming – What is code and how can I use it to solve a problem? Technology and the Environment – How can I improve my environment using technology?

Criterion C

Knowledge and Understanding of Science

Maximum 6

Assessment in Technology

Criterion D

Scientific Inquiry

Maximum 6

Criterion E

Processing Data

Maximum 6

Criterion F

Attitudes in Science

Maximum 6

Assessment in Sciences

Total 36

Criterion A

Investigate

Maximum 6

Criterion B

Design

Maximum 6

Criterion C

Plan

Maximum 6

Criterion D

Create

Maximum 6

Criterion E

Evaluate

Maximum 6

Criterion F

Attitudes in Technology

Maximum 6

Boundaries

Final Grade

0-5

1

6-11

2

12-18

3

Boundaries

Final Grade

19-24

4

0-5

1

25-28

5

6-9

2

29-32

6

10-15

3

33-36

7

16-21

4

22-26

5

27-31

6

32-36

7

Total 36

2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE - 21


MYP: COURSE OFFERINGS THE ARTS

Drama

The arts are a universal form of human expression and a unique way of knowing how to engage us in affective, imaginative and productive activity. Learning through the arts helps us to explore, shape and communicate our sense of identity and understanding of the world, while providing opportunities to develop self confidence, resilience and adaptability.

Year 4 (Grade 9) Storytelling Theatre History Pantomime Improvisation Monologues

In the MYP, the arts should challenge students to consider authentic issues and develop their skills beyond superficiality and imitation. Students are provided with opportunities to function as artists, as well as learners of the arts. To be an artist one has to be curious, and by developing curiosity about themselves, others and the world, students become effective learners, inquirers and creative problem solvers. In the MYP, students are guided to create, perform and present art in ways that engage and convey their own feelings, experiences and ideas.

Year 5 (Grade 10) Group Dynamics and Fluid Tableaux Movement and Dance Theatre History and Clowning Improvisation for Creation Script Work Assessment in Arts Criterion A

Knowledge and Understanding

Maximum 8

Criterion B

Application

Maximum10

Visual Art

Criterion C

Reflection and Evaluation

Maximum 8

Year 4 (Grade 9) The Basics / Canadian Art Composition & Watercolour Mythology & Sculpture Relief Printmaking

Criterion D

Personal Engagement

Maximum 8 Total 34

Boundaries

Final Grade

0-3

1

4-8

2

Year 5 (Grade 10) The Basics / Linear Perspective Multi-colour Relief Printmaking Renaissance Portraiture Environmental Art

9-13

3

14-20

4

Music

21-25

5

26-30

6

31-34

7

Year 4 (Grade 9) Performance Theory and Composition Music Technology Listening and Analysis Perspectives in Music Year 5 (Grade 10) Performance Theory and Composition Music Technology Listening and Analysis Perspectives in Music

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INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE DIPLOMA PROGRAMME (ib dp) GRADE 11 AND 12


INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE DIPLOMA PROGRAMME (IB DP) The International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme was born, in the 1960’s, of efforts to establish a common curriculum and university entry credential for students moving from one country to another. International educators were motivated by practical considerations but also by an idealistic vision that students should share an academic experience that would emphasize critical thinking, intercultural understanding and exposure to a variety of points of view. The IB Diploma Programme is a demanding pre-university course of study that leads to examinations. It is designed for highly motivated secondary school students aged 16 to 19 years. To be awarded the IB Diploma, a student must demonstrate a strong commitment to learning, in terms of mastery of subject content and in the development of skills and attitudes necessary for success at the tertiary level. The IB Diploma is held in high esteem throughout the world and the student who is awarded the IB Diploma gains access to the world’s leading universities. The IB Diploma Programme is a comprehensive two-year international curriculum that generally allows students to fulfill the requirements of their national or state education systems. The Diploma Programme incorporates the best elements of national systems, without being based on any one.

External Assessment (50-80%) •

Some assessments are conducted and overseen by teachers without the restrictions of examination conditions, but are then marked externally by examiners. Examples include world literature assignments for Language A1, written tasks for language A2, essays for theory of knowledge and extended essays. Because of the greater degree of objectivity and reliability provided by the standard examination environment, externally marked examinations form the greatest share of the assessment for each subject.

Reporting Dates • • • •

Progress Report Year 1 and 2: October. Final Predicted Grades Year 2 : Early April. Final Report Year 1: Mid June. 3-Way Conferences: September 28-30, 2011 and Feb 1-3, 2012.

IB DP Core Elements: EXTENDED ESSAY

Throughout the two-year programme, students are assessed both internally and externally in ways that measure individual performance against stated objectives for each subject.

The extended essay is an in-depth study of a focused topic chosen from the list of approved Diploma Programme subjects—normally one of the student’s six chosen subjects for the IB diploma. It is intended to promote highlevel research and writing skills, intellectual discovery and creativity. It provides students with an opportunity to engage in personal research in a topic of their own choice, under the guidance of a supervisor (a teacher in the school). This leads to a major piece of formally presented, structured writing, in which ideas and findings are communicated in a reasoned and coherent manner, appropriate to the subject chosen. It is recommended that completion of the written essay is followed by a short, concluding interview, or viva voce, with the supervisor.

Internal Assessment (20-50%)

Content

In the Diploma Programme, the extended essay is the prime example of a piece of work where the student has the opportunity to show knowledge, understanding and enthusiasm about a subject area topic of his or her choice.

For further information regarding the International Baccalaureate – Diploma Programme, visit: www.ibo.org/diploma IB-DP Coordinator: Metty Antony (metty.antony@cis.edu.sg)

Assessment

In nearly all subjects at least some of the assessment is carried out internally by teachers, who mark individual pieces of work produced as part of a course of study. Examples include oral exercises in language subjects, projects, student portfolios, class presentations, practical laboratory work and mathematical investigations.

Skills • •

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Plan and pursue a research project with intellectual initiative and insight. Research skills.


INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE DIPLOMA PROGRAMME (IB DP) • •

Writing skills. Analytical and evaluative skills appropriate to the subject.

Assessment The method of assessment used by the IB is criterionrelated. That is to say, the method of assessment judges each student in relation to identified assessment criteria and not in relation to the work of other students. All extended essays are externally assessed by examiners appointed by the IB, and are marked on a scale from 0 to 36.

THEORY OF KNOWLEDGE (TOK)

there is no end to the valid questions that may arise in a TOK course. The Theory of Knowledge course will: • • • • • •

Build on students’ own experience and involve them actively in the classroom. Ensure that students understand the purpose of TOK and its central role in the Diploma Programme. Allow the teacher to model the values of curiosity, thoughtful inquiry and critical thought. Have a structure that is clear to the students. Meet the objectives of TOK. Ensure that students understand and are prepared for the assessment tasks.

The TOK course encourages critical thinking about knowledge itself, to try to help young people make sense of what they encounter. Its core content is questions like these: What counts as knowledge? How does it grow? What are its limits? Who owns knowledge? What is the value of knowledge? What are the implications of having, or not having, knowledge?

Assessment

What makes TOK unique, and distinctively different from standard academic disciplines, is its process. At the centre of the course is the student as knower. Students entering the Diploma Programme typically have 16 years of life experience and more than 10 years of formal education behind them. They have accumulated a vast amount of knowledge, beliefs and opinions from academic disciplines and their lives outside the classroom. In TOK they have the opportunity to step back from this relentless acquisition of new knowledge, in order to consider knowledge issues. These include the questions already mentioned, viewed from the perspective of the student, but often begin from more basic ones, like: What do I claim to know [about X]? Am I justified in doing so [how?]? Such questions may initially seem abstract or theoretical, but your teacher will try to bring them into closer focus by taking into account students’ interests, circumstances and outlooks.

External assessment (40 points)

TOK activities and discussions aim to help students discover and express their views on knowledge issues. The course encourages students to share ideas with others and to listen to and learn from what others think. In this process students’ thinking and their understanding of knowledge as a human construction are shaped, enriched and deepened. Connections may be made between knowledge encountered in different Diploma Programme subjects, in CAS experience or in extended essay research; distinctions between different kinds of knowledge may be clarified. Because the subject matter of the course is defined in terms of knowledge issues,

Assessment outline • The assessment model in theory of knowledge (TOK) comprises two components, both of which should be completed within the 100 hours designated for the course.

Essay on a prescribed title (1,200–1,600 words) • One essay on a title chosen from a list of ten titles prescribed by the IBO for each examination session. Internal assessment (20 points) The presentation (approximately 10 minutes per student) One presentation to the class. One written presentation planning document and presentation marking form, using the relevant form including: • The knowledge issue that is the focus of the presentation. • A summary in note form of the knowledge issues to be treated during the presentation . • Achievement levels for each of the four assessment criteria, briefly justified, from both student and teacher. The presentation is an integral part of the TOK course.

CREATIVITY, ACTION AND SERVICE (CAS) Creativity, Action, Service (CAS) is at the heart of the Diploma Programme. It is one of the three essential elements in every student’s Diploma Programme

2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE - 25


INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE DIPLOMA PROGRAMME (IB DP) experience. It involves students in a range of activities alongside their academic studies throughout the Diploma Programme. Content Creativity: Arts, and other experiences that involve creative thinking. Action: Physical exertion contributing to a healthy lifestyle, complementing academic work elsewhere in the Diploma Programme. Service: An unpaid and voluntary exchange that has a learning benefit for the student. The rights, dignity and autonomy of all those involved are respected. Skills The CAS Programme aims to develop students who are: • • • • •

Reflective thinkers—they understand their own strengths and limitations, identify goals and devise strategies for personal growth. Willing to accept new challenges and new roles. Aware of themselves as members of communities with responsibilities towards each other and the environment. Active participants in sustained, collaborative projects. Balanced—they enjoy and find significance in a range of activities involving intellectual, physical, creative and emotional experiences.

Evaluation The most important aspect of evaluation is selfevaluation by the student. The school will provide students with formative feedback on progress and offer guidance on future activities. The school also makes the final decision on completion, which is reported to the IB regional office. There is no other assessment of student performance in CAS.

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IB DP COURSE OFFERINGS COURSE OFFERINGS

of the English language.

Students will select one subject from each Group. The six selections must contain three Higher Level (HL) courses and three Standard Level (SL) Courses.

Topics will include:

Online Courses – IB DP In addition to the courses outlined in this section, CIS offers additional courses online through Pamoja Education (www.pamojaeducation.com). Online courses that are on offer to students in the 2011/2012 school year are as follows: • • • •

Spanish AB Initio. Philosophy. Psychology. Mathematics HL.

Information regarding these courses can be viewed on the Pamoja Education website. For further details regarding online IB DP courses, please contact the IB DP Coordinator: Metty Antony (metty.antony@cis.edu.sg).

Expansion of IB DP Course Offerings in 2012/2013 In 2012/2013, all students entering Grade 11 will participate in the IB DP. With the phase out of the OSSD programme, the school will be equipped to offer a wider selection of IB DP course offerings beginning in the 2012/2013 school year. Parents will be provided with further details regarding course offerings, and any changes to the High School programme, throughout the course of this school year.

GROUP 1 – STUDIES IN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE English A1 LITERATURE HL The IB Language A1 programme is designed to permit students to explore and interact with literature that covers a time period from early Greece to the 20th century, with an emphasis on 19th century works. This course emphasizes the development of literacy, critical thinking, and communication skills. Students will analyze challenging texts from various periods; conduct research and analyze the information gathered; write persuasive and literary essays; and analyze the relationship among media forms, audiences, and media industry practices. An important focus will be on understanding the development

Topic 1: Works in Translation - Antigone: Sophocles, Crime and Punishment: Fyodor Dostoyevski, The Stranger: Albert Camus, So Long a Letter: Mariama. Topic 2: Detailed Study - Macbeth: William Shakespeare, Hamlet: William Shakespeare, Songs of Innocence and Experience: William Blake, A Lady’s Life in the Rocky Mountains: Isabella Bird, Essays: Jonathan Swift, et. al. Topic 3: Literary Genres – Drama, Oedipus Rex: Sophocles, Death of a Salesman: Arthur Miller, Waiting for Godot: Samuel Beckett, King Lear: William Shakespeare; Prose, The Awakening: Kate Chopin, The Scarlet Letter: Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Bride Price: Buchi Emecheta, Love Medicine: Louise Erdrich. Topic 4: Options - The Constant Gardener: John Le Carre, The Catcher in the Rye: J. D. Salinger, Poetry of Keats, Blake, Coleridge and Shelley, Metamorphosis: Franz Kafka, Pretty-shield: Frank Linderman, Short Stories: William Somerset Maugham, Poetry: Wilfred Owen. External Examination/Assessment descriptions: Paper 1 - Commentary 2 Hours 25% Written commentary based on poetry or another text to which the techniques of literary criticism can be applied. Two unseen texts for commentary; no guiding questions. One commentary to be written on one of the texts. Paper 2 - Essay 2 Hours 25% Two essay questions on each genre available for Part III for study, Groups of Works, and four essay questions of a general nature. Only one question to be answered based on the Part III works studied and, if relevant, a Part 2 work of the same genre. World Literature Assignment 1: Two assignments written during the course and externally assessed, each 1000-1500 words. • •

Assignment 1: Comparative essay of at least two Part I works. Assignment 2: Based on work not used in

2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE - 27


IB DP COURSE OFFERINGS • • •

Assignment 1. Assignment 2 (a): Comparative Study 1 WL work and 1 Language A1 work. Assignment 2 (b): Imaginative or Creative Assignment (1 WL work, or 1 WL work and 1 Language A1 work). Assignment 2 (c): Detailed Study (1 WL work only).

Internal Assessment: Oral Component: •

Two compulsory oral activities to be internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IBO.

Individual Oral Commentary 15 minutes 15% •

Commentary on an extract, chosen by the teacher, from one of the Part 2 works studied. Extract accompanied by guiding questions.

Arthur Miller. External Examination/Assessment Descriptions: Paper 1 - Commentary 1 ½ hours 25% • • •

Written commentary based on poetry or another text to which the techniques of literary criticism can be applied. Two unseen texts for commentary; no guiding questions. One commentary to be written on one of the texts.

Paper 2 - Essay 1 ½ hours 25% • •

Two essay questions on each genre available for Part III for study, Groups of Works, and four essay questions of a general nature. Only one question to be answered based on the Part III works studied and, if relevant, a Part 2 work of the same genre.

Individual Oral Presentation 10-15 minutes 15%

World Literature Assignment 1:

English A1 LITERATURE SL

The IB Language A1 programme is designed to permit students to explore and interact with literature that covers a time period from early Greece to the 20th century, with an emphasis on 19th century works. This course emphasizes the development of literacy, critical thinking, and communication skills. Students will analyze challenging texts from various periods; conduct research and analyze the information gathered; write persuasive and literary essays; and analyze the relationship among media forms, audiences, and media industry practices. An important focus will be on understanding the development of the English language.

Topics will include: Topic 1: World Literature - Antigone: Sophocles, Crime and Punishment: Fyodor Dostoyevski, The Stranger: Albert Camus. Topic 2: Detailed Study - Macbeth: William Shakespeare, Songs of Innocence and Experience: William Blake. Topic 3: Groups of Works: Drama - Oedipus Rex: Sophocles, Death of a Salesman: Arthur Miller, King Lear: William Shakespeare. Topic 4: Free Choice - The Constant Gardener: John Le Carre, Metamorphosis: Franz Kafka, The Crucible:

28 - 2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE

One assignments written during the course and externally assessed, 1000-1500 words. Comparative essay of at least two Part I works.

Internal Assessment: Oral Component: •

Two compulsory oral activities to be internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IBO.

Individual Oral Commentary 15 minutes 15% •

Commentary on an extract, chosen by the teacher, from one of the Part 2 works studied. Extract accompanied by guiding questions.

Individual Oral Presentation 10-15 minutes 15% By the end of Language A1, students will be able to: 1. Knowledge and understanding • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of a range of texts. • Demonstrate an understanding of the use of language, structure, technique and style. • Demonstrate a critical understanding of the various ways in which the reader constructs meaning and of how context influences this constructed meaning.


IB DP COURSE OFFERINGS •

Demonstrate an understanding of how different perspectives influence the reading of a text.

2. Application and analysis • Demonstrate an ability to use terminology relevant to the various text types studied. • Demonstrate an ability to analyse the effects of language, structure, technique and style on the reader. • Demonstrate an awareness of the ways in which the production and reception of texts contribute to their meanings. • Demonstrate an ability to substantiate and justify ideas with relevant examples. 3. Synthesis and evaluation • Demonstrate an ability to compare and contrast the formal elements, content and context of texts. • Discuss the different ways in which language and image may be used in a range of texts. • Demonstrate an ability to evaluate conflicting viewpoints within and about a text. • At HL only: Produce a critical response evaluating some aspects of text, context and meaning. 4. Selection and use of appropriate presentation and language skills • Demonstrate an ability to express ideas clearly and with fluency in both written and oral communication. • Demonstrate an ability to use the oral and written forms of the language, in a range of styles, registers and situations. • Demonstrate an ability to discuss and analyse texts in a focused and logical manner. • At HL only: Demonstrate an ability to write a balanced, comparative analysis. SELF-TAUGHT LANGUAGE A1 SL This is a course studied in the first language of the student or that which he or she is most competent. It offers students whose best or first language is not English an opportunity to study literature in another language, guided by a teacher who will prepare them for literary analysis through the study of short stories and poetry in English. Students are expected to be competent readers and writers in their chosen language of study. This course is offered as the standard level only.

Content Part 1: World Literature (World Literature Comparative Essay) • • •

Three works read in translation (not originally written in the language of study). All works linked by one or more aspect in common Each work written by a different author.

Part 2: Detailed Study (Individual Oral Commentary) Two works studied in detail • •

Each work of a different author and genre. Both works originally written in the language of study.

Part 3: Groups of Works (Written Commentary and Comparative Essay) • • • •

Two Language A1 works and one World Literature work studied as a group. All three works chosen from the same genre category. Each work written by a different author. Works linked by at least genre for study.

Part 4: School’s Free Choice (General Questions) • • •

Two Language A1 works and one World Literature work studied. Each work chosen from either the Prescribed Book List for the language studied or Prescribed World Literature. Works linked by one or more aspects in common.

Skills • • • •

Literary analysis. Commentary writing. Comparative essay writing. Character profile development.

Assessment (all externally assessed) Paper 1 - 1.5 hours - Commentary - 25%. Paper 2 - 1.5 hours - Essay - 25%. World Literature Assignment - 20%. Individual Oral Commentary - 15%. General Questions - 15%.

2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE - 29


IB DP COURSE OFFERINGS GROUP 2 - LANGUAGE ACQUISITION

Paper 2: Written Production 1½ hours 30%.

Mandarin B SL

Internal Assessment: Oral Component 30% Individual Oral 15%. Interactive Oral Activity 15%.

This course is for a language learner who may not intend continuing study of the language beyond the Diploma Programme and who: • • • •

Has 2 to 5 years experience of the target language. Is not taught other subjects in the target language. Is normally taught outside a country where the language is spoken. Is a beginner or near-beginner who lives in a country where the language is spoken.

This course aims to enable students to understand and use the language they have studied in a range of contexts and for a variety of purposes and enable students to use the language appropriately, to encourage, through the study of texts and through social interaction, an awareness and appreciation of the different perspectives of people from other cultures. Content Topic 1: Individual Topic 2: Festivals and culture Topic 3: Media Topic 4: Environment Topic 5: Religions Topic 6: Emergency Skills At the end of the Language B course standard level candidates are expected to demonstrate an ability to: • Communicate clearly and effectively in a range of situations. • Understand and use accurately oral and written forms of the language that are commonly encountered in a range of situations. • Understand and use a range of vocabulary in common usage. • Select a register that is generally appropriate to the situation. • Express ideas with general clarity and some fluency • Structure arguments in a generally clear, coherent and convincing way. Assessment External Assessment: Written Component 70% Paper 1: Text Handling 1½ hours 40% Reading 30% Written response 10% 30 - 2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE

Mandarin B HL This course is for a language learner who intends to study the language at this level for a future career, or to meet a Diploma Programme requirement, and who: • Has 4 to 5 years experience of the target language. • Is not taught other subjects in the target language. • Is normally taught outside a country where the language is spoken. This course aims to develop students’ awareness of the role of language in relation to other areas of knowledge, to provide the opportunity for enjoyment, creativity and intellectual stimulation through knowledge of a language, to provide students with a basis for further study, work and leisure through language and develop students’ awareness of the relationship between the languages and cultures with which they are familiar. Content Topic 1: Individual Topic 2: Festivals and cultures Topic 3: Media Topic 4: Environment and community Topic 5: Religions Topic 6: Literacy Skills At the end of the language B course higher level candidates are expected to demonstrate an ability to: • Communicate clearly and effectively in a wide range of situations. • Understand and use accurately oral and written forms of the language that are essential for effective communication in a range of styles and situations. • Understand and use a wide range of vocabulary. • Select a register and style that are appropriate to the situation. • Express ideas with general clarity and fluency. • Structure arguments in a clear, coherent and convincing way. Assessment External Assessment: Written Component 70% Paper 1: Text Handling 1½ hours 40%.


IB DP COURSE OFFERINGS

Reading 27% (Questions based on a number of written texts). Written response 13% (A short writing exercise in response to a written text).

Paper 2: Written Production 1½ hours 30%. One writing task from a choice of six. Internal Assessment: Oral Component 30%. Individual Oral 15%. Interactive Oral Activity 15%.

• •

Reading. Writing.

In the context of Language B the successful use of a language consists of demonstrating competence in three distinct but interrelated areas: • • •

Language: handling the language system accurately (grammar, syntax, etc). Cultural interaction: selecting language appropriate to a particular cultural and social context. Message: understanding ideas and how they are organized in order to communicate them appropriately.

IBO has revised the curriculum for examinations in May 2013.

Assessment

French B SL

External assessment - 70%

This course is designed for students who have 2 to 5 years of previous experience of learning the target language. The main focus of the course is on language acquisition and development in the four primary language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. These language skills should be developed through the study and use of a range of written and spoken material. Such material will extend from everyday oral exchanges to literary texts.

Paper 1: Text Handling 1.5 hours – 40%. Reading (Questions based on a number of written texts) - 30%. Written Response - A short writing exercise in response to a written text - 10% .

At the standard level, a successful Language B student should not only learn and assimilate basic language structures but should also be able to use the language in a range of situations and purposes for which and in which the language is used. These situations extend to the domains of work, social relationships and, at higher level, may include the discussion of abstract ideas.

Internal assessment - 30%

Content Possible topics to be explored: • • • • • •

Social groupings (such as the family or minorities). Political institutions, philosophies and programmes. International issues (such as globalization) and their relationship to the culture(s) studied. Perspectives provided by the media. Traditions and conventions in the arts. Typical or distinctive leisure activities.

Skills The four primary language skills to be developed in an integrated way are: • •

Listening. Speaking.

Paper 2: Written production 1.5 hours – 30%. One writing task from a choice of four.

Two oral activities to be internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IBO. • Individual Oral – 15%. Based on a stimulus chosen by the candidate. • Interactive oral – 15%. The mark of one interactive oral activity. French B HL This course is designed for students who have 4 to 5 years experience of the target language and for learners who intend to study the language for a future career or to meet a Diploma Programme requirement. The main focus of the course is on language acquisition and development in the four primary language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. These language skills should be developed through the study and use of a range of written and spoken material. Such material will extend from everyday oral exchanges to literary texts. At both higher level and standard level, a successful Language B student should not only learn and assimilate basic language structures but should also be able to use the language in a range of situations and purposes for which and in which the language is used. These situations

2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE - 31


IB DP COURSE OFFERINGS extend to the domains of work, social relationships and, at higher level, may include the discussion of abstract ideas.

Content

French B SL/HL (Exams 2013)

Possible topics to be explored: • social groupings (such as the family or minorities). • political institutions, philosophies and programmes. • international issues (such as globalization) and their relationship to the culture(s) studied. • perspectives provided by the media. • traditions and conventions in the arts. • typical or distinctive leisure activities.

This course is designed for students who have 2 to 5 years of previous experience of learning the target language. The main focus of the course is on language acquisition and development in the four primary language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. These language skills should be developed through the study and use of a range of written and spoken material. Such material will extend from everyday oral exchanges to literary texts.

Skills

At the standard level, a successful Language B student should not only learn and assimilate basic language structures but should also be able to use the language in a range of situations and purposes for which and in which the language is used. These situations extend to the domains of work, social relationships and, at higher level, may include the discussion of abstract ideas.

The four primary language skills to be developed in an integrated way are: • listening. • speaking. • reading. • writing. In the context of Language B the successful use of a language consists of demonstrating competence in three distinct but interrelated areas: • Language: handling the language system accurately (grammar, syntax, etc). • Cultural interaction: selecting language appropriate to a particular cultural and social context. • Message: understanding ideas and how they are organized in order to communicate them appropriately. Assessment External assessment - 70% Paper 1: Text Handling 1.5 hours – 40%. Reading - (Questions based on a number of written texts) - 30%. Written Response - A short writing exercise in response to a written text - 10%. Paper 2: Written production 1.5 hours – 30%. One writing task from a choice of four.

Interactive oral – 15% The mark of one interactive oral activity.

Content SL and HL are differentiated by the recommended number of teaching hours, the depth of syllabus coverage, the study of literature at HL, and the level of difficulty and demands of assessment and assessment criteria. The core with topics common to both levels is divided into three areas and is a required area of study. • • •

Communication and media. Global issues. Social relationships.

In addition, at both SL and HL, teachers select two from the following five options. • • • • •

Cultural diversity. Customs and traditions. Health. Leisure. Science and technology.

Also, at HL, students read two works of literature.

Internal assessment - 30%

Skills

Two oral activities to be internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IBO • Individual Oral – 15% Based on a stimulus chosen by the candidate.

Receptive activities include silent reading and following the media.

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Productive activities have an important function in many


IB DP COURSE OFFERINGS academic and professional fields (oral presentations, written studies and reports) and particular social value is attached to them (judgments made of what has been submitted in writing or of fluency in speaking and delivering oral presentations).

Section B: Response of 150–250 words to a stimulus text, based on the core - 25%

In interaction at least two individuals participate in an oral and/or written exchange in which production and reception alternate and may in fact overlap in oral communication.

Creative writing of 500–600 words plus a 150-word rationale, based on one of the literary texts read - 20%

Assessment SL External assessment - 70% Paper 1: Receptive skills (1 hour 30 minutes) Text-handling exercises on four written texts, based on the core - 25%. Paper 2: Written productive skills (1 hour 30 minutes) One writing exercise of 250–400 words from a choice of five, based on the options - 25%. Written assignment: Receptive and written productive skills. Intertextual reading followed by a written exercise of 300–400 words plus a 100-word rationale, based on the core – 20%. Internal assessment - 30%

Written assignment: Receptive and written productive skills

Internal assessment - 30% Internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IB. Individual oral (8–10 minutes). Based on the options: 15 minutes’ preparation time and a 10-minute (maximum) presentation and discussion with the teacher - 20%. Interactive oral activity -10%. Based on the core: Three classroom activities assessed by the teacher.

GROUP 3 – INDIVIDUALS AND SOCIETIES History SL History is more than the study of the past. It is the process of recording, reconstructing and interpreting the past through the investigation of a variety of sources. It is a discipline that gives people an understanding of themselves and others in relation to the world, both past and present.

Internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IB. Individual oral (8–10 minutes) - 20%. Based on the options: 15 minutes’ preparation time and a 10-minute (maximum) presentation and discussion with the teacher . Students of history should learn how the discipline works. It is an exploratory subject that poses questions without Interactive oral activity. providing definitive answers. In order to understand the Based on the core: Three classroom activities assessed past, students must engage with it both through exposure by the teacher - 10%. to primary historical sources and through the work of Assessment HL External assessment - 70% Paper 1:Receptive skills (1 hour 30 minutes) Text-handling exercises on five written texts, based on the core - 25%.

historians. Historical study involves both selection and interpretation of data and critical evaluation of it. Students of history should appreciate the relative nature of historical knowledge and understanding, as each generation reflects its own world and preoccupations and as more evidence emerges. A study of history both requires and develops an individual’s understanding of, and empathy for, people living in other periods and contexts.

Paper 2: Written productive skills (1 hour 30 minutes): Two compulsory writing exercises.

Content

Section A: One task of 250–400 words, based on the options, to be selected from a choice of five.

Route 2 • Prescribed Subject 1: Peacemaking, peacekeeping— international relations 1918–36.

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IB DP COURSE OFFERINGS Route 2 Topics (2): • Origins and development of authoritarian and single-party states. • The Cold War. Learning Skills • • • • •

Developing research skills of locating and selecting relevant and appropriate evidence, from books, articles, websites and audio-visual resources. Recognizing the value and uses of sources, and reasons to use them cautiously. Recognizing and appreciating why and how opinions and interpretations differ. Recognizing, explaining and analysing causes and consequences. Handling and synthesizing several sources for one inquiry.

Assessment External Assessment: 75%

providing definitive answers. In order to understand the past, students must engage with it both through exposure to primary historical sources and through the work of historians. Historical study involves both selection and interpretation of data and critical evaluation of it. Students of history should appreciate the relative nature of historical knowledge and understanding, as each generation reflects its own world and preoccupations and as more evidence emerges. A study of history both requires and develops an individual’s understanding of, and empathy for, people living in other periods and contexts. Content Route 2 Prescribed Subject 1: Peacemaking, peacekeeping— international relations 1918–36. Route 2 Topics (2): Origins and development of authoritarian and single-party states. The Cold War

Paper 1: 1 hour (30%). Paper 2: 1 hour, 30 minutes (45%).

Route 2 Options: Europe: France: 1776-1830, Germany: 1848-1914, Russia: 1848-1914.

Internal Assessment: 25%

Learning Skills

The historical investigation is a problem-solving activity that enables students to demonstrate the application of their skills and knowledge to a historical topic that interests them and that need not be related to the syllabus. The internal assessment allows for flexibility and should encourage students to use their own initiative. The emphasis must be on a specific historical inquiry that enables the student to develop and apply the skills of a historian by selecting and analysing a good range of source material and managing diverse interpretations. The activity demands that students search for, select, evaluate and use evidence to reach a relevant conclusion.

History HL

External Assessment: 80%

History is more than the study of the past. It is the process of recording, reconstructing and interpreting the past through the investigation of a variety of sources. It is a discipline that gives people an understanding of themselves and others in relation to the world, both past and present. Students of history should learn how the discipline works. It is an exploratory subject that poses questions without

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• • • •

Developing research skills of locating and selecting relevant and appropriate evidence, from books, articles, websites and audio-visual resources. Recognizing the value and uses of sources, and reasons to use them cautiously. Recognizing and appreciating why and how opinions and interpretations differ. Recognizing, explaining and analysing causes and consequences. Handling and synthesizing several sources for one inquiry.

Assessment

Paper 1: 1 hour. Paper 2: 1 hour, 30 minutes. Paper 3: 2 hours, 30 minutes. Internal Assessment: 20% Business and Management HL The Business and Management course is designed to develop an understanding of business theory, as well


IB DP COURSE OFFERINGS as an ability to apply business principles, practices and skills. The application of tools and techniques of analysis facilitates an appreciation of complex business activities. The course considers the diverse range of business organizations and activities and the cultural and economic context in which business operates. Emphasis is placed on strategic decision-making and the day-to-day business functions of marketing, production, human resource management and finance. Links between the topics are central to the course, and this integration promotes a holistic overview of business activity. The business and management course aims to help students understand the implications of business activity in a global market. It is designed to give students an international perspective of business and to promote their appreciation of cultural diversity through the study of topics like international marketing, human resource management, growth and business strategy. Content Topic 1: Business organization and environment Topic 2: Human resources Topic 3: Accounts and finance Topic 4: Marketing Topic 5: Operations management Topic 6: Business strategy Skills

Paper 1: 2 and ¼ hours – based on a case study issued in advance. Paper 2: 2 and ¼ hours. Internal assessment – 25% The student is required to design and undertake research that either addresses an issue facing an organization or range of organizations or analyses a decision to be made by an organization or range of organizations and produce report that does not exceed 2,000 words. The portfolio is internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IBO. Business and Management SL The Business and Management course is designed to develop an understanding of business theory, as well as an ability to apply business principles, practices and skills. The application of tools and techniques of analysis facilitates an appreciation of complex business activities. The course considers the diverse range of business organizations and activities and the cultural and economic context in which business operates. Emphasis is placed on strategic decision-making and the day-to-day business functions of marketing, production, human resource management and finance. Links between the topics are central to the course, and this integration promotes a holistic overview of business activity.

1. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of business terminology, concepts, principles and theories. 2. Make business decisions by identifying the issue(s), selecting and interpreting data, applying appropriate tools and techniques, and recommending suitable solutions. 3. Analyse and evaluate business decisions using a variety of sources. 4. Evaluate business strategies and/or practices showing evidence of critical thinking. 5. Apply skills and knowledge learned in the subject to hypothetical and real business situations. 6. Communicate business ideas and information effectively and accurately using appropriate formats and tools. 7. Synthesize knowledge in order to develop a framework for business decision-making.

The business and management course aims to help students understand the implications of business activity in a global market. It is designed to give students an international perspective of business and to promote their appreciation of cultural diversity through the study of topics like international marketing, human resource management, growth and business strategy.

Assessment

1. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of business terminology, concepts, principles and theories.

External assessment – 75%

Content Topic 1: Business organization and environment Topic 2: Human resources Topic 3: Accounts and finance Topic 4: Marketing Topic 5: Operations management Skills

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IB DP COURSE OFFERINGS 2. Make business decisions by identifying the issue(s), selecting and interpreting data, applying appropriate tools and techniques, and recommending suitable solutions. 3. Analyse and evaluate business decisions using a variety of sources. 4. Evaluate business strategies and/or practices showing evidence of critical thinking. 5. Apply skills and knowledge learned in the subject to hypothetical and real business situations. 6. Communicate business ideas and information effectively and accurately using appropriate formats and tools. 7. Synthesize knowledge in order to develop a framework for business decision-making. Assessment External assessment – 75% Paper 1: 1 and ¼ hours – based on a case study issued in advance. Paper 2: 1 and ¾ hours. Internal assessment – 25% The SL internal assessment is a written commentary. Students need to demonstrate the application of business and management tools, techniques and theories to a real business issue or problem. Students must select a real issue or problem, not a fictional one, and must produce a commentary with a title presented as a question. The commentary must refer directly to a single business organization, but may consider industry-wide issues that impact on that organization. The portfolio is internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IBO. Economics SL Economics is a dynamic social science, forming part of group 3—individuals and societies. The study of economics is essentially about dealing with scarcity, resource allocation and the methods and processes by which choices are made in the satisfaction of human wants. As a social science, economics uses scientific methodologies that include quantitative and qualitative elements. The economics course encourages students to develop international perspectives, fosters a concern for global

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issues, and raises students’ awareness of their own responsibilities at a local, national and international level. The course also seeks to develop values and attitudes that will enable students to achieve a degree of personal commitment in trying to resolve these issues, appreciating our shared responsibility as citizens of an increasingly interdependent world. Content Section 1: Microeconomics Section 2: Macroeconomics Section 3: International Economics Section 4: Development Economics Skills • • • •

Graphing skills to develop models to explain changes in the firm and economy. Analytical skills to explain impacts of economic happenings in the world. Research skills. Evaluative skills to understand impact of events on individuals and societies.

Assessment External assessment 80% Paper 1: 1.5 hours. Paper 2: 1.5 hours. Internal assessment 20% This component is internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IB at the end of the course. Students produce a portfolio of three commentaries, based on different sections of the syllabus and on published extracts from the news media. Economics HL Economics is a dynamic social science, forming part of group 3—individuals and societies. The study of economics is essentially about dealing with scarcity, resource allocation and the methods and processes by which choices are made in the satisfaction of human wants. As a social science, economics uses scientific methodologies that include quantitative and qualitative elements.


IB DP COURSE OFFERINGS The economics course encourages students to develop international perspectives, fosters a concern for global issues, and raises students’ awareness of their own responsibilities at a local, national and international level. The course also seeks to develop values and attitudes that will enable students to achieve a degree of personal commitment in trying to resolve these issues, appreciating our shared responsibility as citizens of an increasingly interdependent world. Content Section 1: Microeconomics Section 2: Macro economics Section 3: International Economics Section 4: Development Economics Skills • • • •

Graphing skills to develop models to explain changes in the firm and economy. Analytical skills to explain impacts of economic happenings in the world. Research skills. Evaluative skills to understand impact of events on individuals and societies.

Assessment External assessment 80% Paper 1: 1.5 hours. Paper 2: 1.5 hours. Paper 3: 1 hour. Internal assessment 20% This component is internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IB at the end of the course. Students produce a portfolio of three commentaries, based on different sections of the syllabus and on published extracts from the news media.

GROUP 4 – EXPERIMENTAL SCIENCES

and biology is expected although extensive knowledge of each as a separate science is not necessary. Some mathematical skills (specifically graphing, using simple formulas, standard deviation and t-tests) will be utilized as part of the course. Students will be required to recall, describe, explain, compare and evaluate biological concepts. In addition to this, students will apply the biological knowledge they have acquired to solve realistic problems set in an appropriate context. The syllabus consists of the following topics, but is covered in much less depth, detail and complexity than in HL biology: Content Topic 1: Statistical analysis Topic 2: Cells Topic 3: Chemistry of Life Topic 4: Genetics Topic 5: Ecology, Evolution & Classification Topic 6: Human Health & Physiology Option D: Evolution Option G: Ecology & Conservation Skills 1. Demonstrate an understanding of: a. Scientific facts and concepts. b. Scientific methods and techniques. c. Scientific terminology. d. Methods of presenting scientific information. 2. Apply and use: a. Scientific facts and concepts. b. Scientific methods and techniques. c. Scientific terminology to communicate effectively. d. Appropriate methods to present scientific information. 3. Construct, analyse and evaluate: a. Hypotheses, research questions and predictions b. Scientific methods and techniques c. Scientific explanations.

Biology SL

4. Demonstrate the personal skills of cooperation, perseverance and responsibility appropriate for effective scientific investigation and problem solving.

This course caters to students who already possess knowledge of basic scientific concepts and methodology. Some knowledge of chemistry, specifically particle theory,

5. Demonstrate the manipulative skills necessary to carry out scientific investigations with precision and safety.

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IB DP COURSE OFFERINGS Assessment

Skills

External assessment - 76%

1. Demonstrate an understanding of: a. Scientific facts and concepts. b. Scientific methods and techniques. c. Scientific terminology. d. Methods of presenting scientific information.

Paper 1: 1.5 hours - calculators not permitted. Paper 2: 1.5 hours - graphic display calculator required. Internal assessment - 24% The student portfolio is a collection of written pieces of work assigned by the teacher and completed by the student during the course. The pieces of work must be based on different areas of the syllabus and address criteria specified by the Biology DP Course. The portfolio is internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IBO. Biology HL

2. Apply and use: a. Scientific facts and concepts. b. Scientific methods and techniques. c. Scientific terminology to communicate effectively. d. Appropriate methods to present scientific information. 3. Construct, analyse and evaluate: a. Hypotheses, research questions and predictions. b. Scientific methods and techniques. c. Scientific explanations.

This course caters to students who already possess knowledge of basic scientific concepts and methodology, particularly in Biology. Some knowledge of Chemistry, specifically particle theory, is expected. Some mathematical skills (specifically graphing, using simple formulas, standard deviation and t-tests) will be utilized as part of the course.

4. Demonstrate the personal skills of cooperation, perseverance and responsibility appropriate for effective scientific investigation and problem solving.

Students will be required to recall, describe, explain, compare and evaluate biological concepts. In addition to this, students will apply the biological knowledge they have acquired to solve realistic problems set in an appropriate context. The syllabus consists of the following topics, some of which is also covered in Biology SL

Assessment

Content Topic 1: Statistical analysis Topic 2: Cells Topic 3: Chemistry of Life Topic 4: Genetics (HL) Topic 5: Ecology, Evolution & Classification Topic 6: Human Health & Physiology Topic 7: Nucleic Acids and Proteins Topic 8: Cell Respiration and Photosynthesis Topic 9: Plant Science Topic 10: Genetics Topic 11: Human Health and Physiology (HL) Option D: Evolution Option G: Ecology & Conservation

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5. Demonstrate the manipulative skills necessary to carry out scientific investigations with precision and safety.

External assessment - 76% Paper 1: 1.5 hours - calculators not permitted. Paper 2: 1.5 hours - graphic display calculator required. Internal assessment - 24% The student portfolio is a collection of written pieces of work assigned by the teacher and completed by the student during the course. The pieces of work must be based on different areas of the syllabus and address criteria specified by the Biology DP Course. The portfolio is internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IBO. Chemistry SL This course caters to students who already possess knowledge of basic chemistry concepts, and who are equipped with the investigative skills needed to apply to chemistry experiments. This course gives students a strong foundation in the fundamentals of both organic


IB DP COURSE OFFERINGS and inorganic chemistry and prepares them for future course work in chemistry and science. All students will be required to complete a number of lab hours and their practical reports will be 24% of their IB Chemistry Grade. These lab reports are assessed by the subject teacher but are moderated by an external examiner. SL students will need to complete 40 hours of practical work. The goal of IB chemistry is to instil in the student a curiosity about matter and its interactions, to initiate a lifetime of using an organized based approach to solving problems. The course will also foster communication and cooperation amongst students in their scientific quests to better prepare them to be future members of the greater international scientific community. The syllabus consists of the following topics, but is covered in much less depth, detail and complexity than in HL Chemistry. Content Topic 1: Quantitative Chemistry Topic 2: Atomic Structure Topic 3: Periodicity Topic 4: Bonding Topic 5: Energetics Topic 6: Kinetics Topic 7: Equilibrium Topic 8: Acids and Bases Topic 9: Oxidation and Reduction Topic 10: Organic Chemistry Topic 11: Measurement and Data Processing Option Topics (the teacher will choose 2 out of 7) Topic A: Modern analytical Chemistry Topic B: Human Biochemistry Topic C: Chemistry in Industry and Technology Topic D: Medicines and Drugs Topic E: Environmental Chemistry Topic F: Food Chemistry Topic G: Further Organic Chemistry Lab Skills developed in Chemistry • • • • • • • •

Measurement; equipment handling. Volumetric techniques, weighing techniques. Observational skills (quantitative and qualitative). Data collecting/organization. Data interpretation. Utilizing technology. Collaboration skills. Communication.

Assessment External assessment – 76% Paper 1: 45 minutes. Paper 2: 1 hour 15 minutes. Paper 3: 1 hour – based solely on the two option units. Internal assessment - 24% The internal assessment consists of the following five criteria that are used to assess the work of SL students. • Design—D. • Data collection and processing—DCP. • Conclusion and evaluation—CE. • Manipulative skills—MS. • Personal skills—PS. The first three criteria—design (D), data collection and processing (DCP) and conclusion and evaluation (CE)—are each assessed twice. Manipulative skills (MS) are assessed summatively over the whole course. Personal skills (PS) are assessed once only during the group 4 project. Chemistry HL This course caters to students who already possess knowledge of basic chemistry concepts, and who are equipped with the investigative skills needed to apply to chemistry experiments. This course is designed to meet the needs of those who want to study science at the University. IB Chemistry will give the students a broad and comprehensive experience in the experimental subject of Chemistry, a science based on the use of the scientific method to answer questions about the composition, structure and properties of all the things around us. All students will be required to complete a number of lab hours and their practical reports will be 24% of their IB Chemistry Grade. These lab reports are assessed by the subject teacher but are moderated by an external examiner. HL students will need to complete 60 hours of practical work. The goal of IB chemistry is to instil in the student a curiosity about matter and its interactions, to initiate a lifetime of using an organized based approach to solving problems. The course will also foster communication and cooperation amongst students in their scientific quests to better prepare them to be future members of the greater international scientific community. The syllabus consists of the following topics, and is covered in much more depth, detail and complexity than in SL Chemistry. 2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE - 39


IB DP COURSE OFFERINGS Content Topic 1: Quantitative Chemistry Topic 2: Atomic Structure Topic 3: Periodicity Topic 4: Bonding Topic 5: Energetics Topic 6: Kinetics Topic 7: Equilibrium Topic 8: Acids and Bases Topic 9: Oxidation and reduction Topic 10: Organic Chemistry Topic 11: Measurement and data processing Option Topics (the teacher will choose 2 out of 7) Topic A: Modern analytical chemistry Topic B: Human biochemistry Topic C: Chemistry in industry and technology Topic D: Medicines and drugs Topic E: Environmental chemistry Topic F: Food chemistry Topic G: Further organic chemistry Lab Skills developed in Chemistry • • • • • • • •

Measurement; equipment handling. Volumetric techniques, weighing techniques. Observational skills (quantitative and qualitative). Data collecting/organization. Data interpretation. Utilizing technology. Collaboration skills. Communication.

Assessment External assessment - 76% Paper 1: 1 hour. Paper 2: 2 hours 15 minutes. Paper 3: 1 hour 15 minutes – based solely on the two option units. Internal assessment - 24% The internal assessment consists of the following five criteria that are used to assess the work of HL students. • • • • •

Design—D. Data collection and processing—DCP. Conclusion and evaluation—CE. Manipulative skills—MS. Personal skills—PS.

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The first three criteria—design (D), data collection and processing (DCP) and conclusion and evaluation (CE)—are each assessed twice. Manipulative skills (MS) are assessed summatively over the whole course. Personal skills (PS) are assessed once only during the group 4 project. Physics SL Physics is the most fundamental of the experimental sciences, as it seeks to explain the universe itself, from the very smallest particles, quarks (perhaps 10–17 m in size), which may be truly fundamental to the vast distances between galaxies (1024 m). Despite the exciting and extraordinary development of ideas throughout the history of physics, certain things have remained unchanged. Observations remain essential at the very core of physics, and this sometimes requires a leap of imagination to decide what to look for. Models are developed to try to understand the observations, and these themselves can become theories that attempt to explain the observations. Theories are not directly derived from the observations but need to be created. These acts of creation can sometimes compare to those in great art, literature and music, but differ in one aspect that is unique to science: the predictions of these theories or ideas must be tested by careful experimentation. Content The syllabus is divided into two parts: the core material and the options. This content is tested with three external examinations. Paper 1 is Multiple Choice Questions on the core, Paper 2 is written responses on the core, while Paper 3 is written responses to the Options. Each student studies two options. 76% of the overall grade is assessed using the examinations. The remaining 24% of the overall grade is internally assessed. In Physics, this is achieved through evaluation of laboratory reports which are written after the student has performed a practical investigation. The following topics are examined: Core Topic 1: Physics and Physical Measurement Topic 2: Mechanics Topic 3: Thermal Physics Topic 4: Oscillations and Waves


IB DP COURSE OFFERINGS Topic 5: Electric Currents Topic 6: Fields and Forces Topic 7: Atomic and Nuclear Physics Topic 8: Energy, Power and Climate Change

the predictions of these theories or ideas must be tested by careful experimentation.

Options (that we study at CIS)

The syllabus is divided into three parts: the core, the Additional Higher Level (AHL) material and the options. This content is tested with three external examinations. Paper 1 is Multiple Choice Questions on the core and AHL, Paper 2 is written responses on the core and AHL, while Paper 3 is written responses to the Options.

Option A: Sight and Wave Phenomena Option G: Electromagnetic Waves Skills • • • • •

An ability to analyse, evaluate and synthesize scientific information. The ability to apply and use a body of knowledge, methods and techniques that characterize physics. Develop experimental and investigative scientific skills. Develop and apply information and communication technology skills relevant to physics. Develop an appreciation of the possibilities and limitations associated with physics and physicists.

Assessment Internal Assessment - 24% External Assessment - 76% Paper 1 : 20% Paper 2 : 32% Paper 3: 24% Physics HL Physics is the most fundamental of the experimental sciences, as it seeks to explain the universe itself, from the very smallest particles, quarks (perhaps 10–17 m in size), which may be truly fundamental to the vast distances between galaxies (1024 m). Despite the exciting and extraordinary development of ideas throughout the history of physics, certain things have remained unchanged. Observations remain essential at the very core of physics, and this sometimes requires a leap of imagination to decide what to look for. Models are developed to try to understand the observations, and these themselves can become theories that attempt to explain the observations. Theories are not directly derived from the observations but need to be created. These acts of creation can sometimes compare to those in great art, literature and music, but differ in one aspect that is unique to science:

Content

Each student studies two options. 76% of the overall grade is assessed using the examinations. The remaining 24% of the overall grade is internally assessed. In Physics this is achieved through evaluation of laboratory reports which are written after the student has performed a practical investigation. The following topics are examined: Core Topic 1: Topic 2: Topic 3: Topic 4: Topic 5: Topic 6: Topic 7: Topic 8:

Physics and physical measurement Mechanics Thermal physics Oscillations and waves Electric currents Fields and forces Atomic and nuclear physics Energy, power and climate change

AHL Topic 9: Motion in fields Topic 10: Thermal physics Topic 11: Wave phenomena Topic 12: Electromagnetic induction Topic 13: Quantum physics and nuclear physics Topic 14: Digital technology Options (that we study at CIS) Option G: Electromagnetic Waves Option H: Relativity Skills • • • •

An ability to analyse, evaluate and synthesize scientific information. The ability to apply and use a body of knowledge, methods and techniques that characterize physics. Develop experimental and investigative scientific skills. Develop and apply information and communication

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IB DP COURSE OFFERINGS •

technology skills relevant to physics. Develop an appreciation of the possibilities and limitations associated with physics and physicists.

Assessment External - 76%

Topic 8: Financial Mathematics Skills • •

Paper 1 : 20% Paper 2 : 32% Paper 3 : 24%

Internal - 24%

GROUP 5 – MATHEMATICS Mathematical Studies SL This course caters to students with varied backgrounds and abilities. More specifically, it is designed to build confidence and encourage an appreciation of mathematics in students who do not anticipate a need for mathematics in their future studies. Students taking this course need to be already equipped with fundamental skills and a rudimentary knowledge of basic processes. The students most likely to select this course are those whose main interests lie outside the field of mathematics The course concentrates on mathematics that can be applied to contexts related as far as possible to other subjects being studied, to common real-world occurrences and to topics that relate to home, work and leisure situations. The course includes project work, a feature unique within this group of courses. Students must produce a project, a piece of written work based on personal research, guided and supervised by the teacher. The project provides an opportunity for students to carry out a mathematical investigation in the context of another course being studied, or a hobby or interest of their choice using skills learned before and during the course. This process allows students to ask their own questions about mathematics and to take responsibility for a part of their own course of studies in mathematics. Content Topic 1: Introduction to the Graphic Display Calculator Topic 2: Number and Algebra Topic 3: Sets, Logic and Probability Topic 4: Functions Topic 5: Geometry and Trigonometry Topic 6: Statistics Topic 7: Introductory Differential Calculus

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Students will learn to read, interpret and solve a given problem using appropriate mathematical terms. Students will recognize and demonstrate an understanding of the practical applications of mathematics. Students will learn to select and use appropriate mathematical techniques. Students will learn to transfer skills to alternative situations and to future developments.

Assessment External assessment - 80% Paper 1: 1.5 hours – 15 compulsory short response questions based on the whole syllabus. Paper 2: 1.5 hours – 5 compulsory extended response questions based on the whole syllabus. Internal assessment - 20% - Project The project is an individual piece of work involving the collection of information or the generation of measurements, and the analysis and evaluation of the information or measurements. The project is internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IBO. Mathematics SL This course caters to students who already possess knowledge of basic mathematical concepts, and who are equipped with the skills needed to apply simple mathematical techniques correctly. The majority of these students will expect to need a sound mathematical background as they prepare for future studies in subjects such as chemistry, economics, psychology and business administration. The course focuses on introducing important mathematical concepts through the development of mathematical techniques. The intention is to introduce students to these concepts in a comprehensible and coherent way, rather than insisting on mathematical rigour. Students will apply the mathematical knowledge they have acquired to solve realistic problems set in an appropriate context. The syllabus consists of the


IB DP COURSE OFFERINGS following topics, but is covered in much less depth, detail and complexity than in HL Mathematics: Content Topic 1: Algebra Topic 2: Functions and Equations Topic 3: Circular Functions and Trigonometry Topic 4: Matrices Topic 5: Vectors Topic 6: Statistics and Probability Topic 7: Calculus Skills • • • •

Students will develop logical, critical and creative thinking. Students will develop patience and persistence in problem solving. Students will learn to select and use appropriate mathematical techniques. Students will learn to recognize patterns and structures in a variety of situations, and make generalizations.

Assessment External assessment - 80% Paper 1: 1.5 hours - calculators not permitted. Paper 2: 1.5 hours - graphic display calculator required. Internal assessment - 20% The student portfolio is a collection of two pieces of work assigned by the teacher and completed by the student during the course. The pieces of work must be based on different areas of the syllabus and represent the two types of tasks: • Mathematical investigation. • Mathematical modelling. The portfolio is internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IBO. Mathematics HL This course caters for students with a good background in mathematics who are competent in a range of analytical and technical skills. The majority of these students will be expecting to include mathematics as a major component of their university studies, either as a subject in its own right or within courses such

as physics, engineering and technology. Others may take this subject because they have a strong interest in mathematics and enjoy meeting its challenges and engaging with its problems. The internally assessed component, the portfolio, offers students a framework for developing independence in their mathematical learning through engaging in mathematical investigation and mathematical modelling. Students will be provided with opportunities to take a considered approach to these activities, and to explore different ways of approaching a problem. The portfolio also allows students to work without the time constraints of a written examination and to develop skills in communicating mathematical ideas. Content 20% of the assessment is completed through the development of a student portfolio. This is a collection of two pieces of work assigned by the teacher and completed by the student during the course. The pieces of work must be based on different areas of the syllabus and represent the two types of tasks: • •

Mathematical investigation. Mathematical modelling.

80% of the assessment is done externally through three examinations. Paper 1 is completed without a calculator while access to a graphics display calculator is permitted in Papers 2 and 3. The following topics are examined in Papers 1 and 2. Topic 1: Algebra Topic 2: Functions and Equations Topic 3: Circular Functions and Trigonometry Topic 4: Matrices Topic 5: Vectors Topic 6: Statistics and Probability Topic 7: Calculus Paper 3 examines an option studied by the students. We will be studying the following: Topic 10: Series and Differential Equations Skills • •

Develop logical, critical and creative thinking skills. Develop an understanding of the principles and

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IB DP COURSE OFFERINGS • • • •

nature of the subject. Employ and refine the powers of abstraction and generalization. Develop patience and persistence in problem solving. Use of appropriate technology to solve problems. Clear and confident communication in a variety of contexts.

GROUP 6 – ARTS AND OPTIONAL SUBJECTS For Group 6, students may choose an additional subject from Group 2, 3 or 4 instead of a Group 6 subject. Visual Arts SL and HL The impulse to make art is common to all people. From earliest times, human beings have displayed a fundamental need to create and communicate personal and cultural meaning through art. The process involved in the study and production of visual arts is central to developing capable, inquiring and knowledgeable young people, and encourages students to locate their ideas within international contexts. Supporting the principles of the IBO mission statement (that is, to foster students’ appreciation of diverse world cultures and traditions), the course encourages an active exploration of visual arts within the students’ own and other cultural contexts. The study of visual arts and the journey within it encourages respect for cultural and aesthetic differences and promotes creative thinking and problem solving. The Diploma Programme visual arts course enables students to engage in both practical exploration and artistic production, and in independent contextual, visual and critical investigation, with option A students focusing more on the former and option B students on the latter. The course is designed to enable students to study visual arts in higher education and also welcomes those students who seek life enrichment through visual arts. The course content for HL and SL may be the same. However, due to the different amount of time available for each, students at HL have the opportunity to develop ideas and skills, to produce a larger body of work and work of greater depth. In order to reflect this, the assessment criteria are differentiated according to option and level.

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Content The Diploma Programme visual arts syllabus provides a framework that allows teachers to choose content and activities appropriate to both their students’ interests and experience and their own. When constructing a course of study, the teacher must bear in mind the visual arts assessment criteria and the specific requirements for the assessment tasks explained in this guide. An integrated relationship between studio work and investigation work is essential throughout the course. Option A (HL and SL) Option A is designed for students who wish to concentrate on studio practice in visual arts. Students will produce investigation workbooks to support, inform, develop and refine studio work through sustained contextual, visual and critical investigation. At both HL and SL, the investigation workbooks are integral to studio practice and should reflect the student’s critical visual and written investigation. Option B (HL and SL) Option B is designed for students who wish to concentrate on contextual, visual and critical investigation in visual arts. In their investigation workbooks students will explore fully an integrated range of ideas within a contextual, visual and critical framework and produce studio work based on their visual and written investigation. At both HL and SL, students should demonstrate connections between academic investigation and studio work. Skills • • • • •

Investigate past, present and emerging forms of visual arts and engage in producing, appreciating and evaluating these. Develop an understanding of visual arts from a local, national and international perspective. Build confidence in responding visually and creatively to personal and cultural experiences. Develop skills in, and sensitivity to, the creation of works that reflect active and individual involvement. Take responsibility for the direction of their learning through the acquisition of effective working practices.


IB DP COURSE OFFERINGS Assessment SL and HL Option A Studio 60% External assessment The student prepares a selection of his or her studio work in the form of an exhibition. This is externally assessed by a visiting examiner following an interview with the student about the work. Investigation 40% Internal assessment The student presents selected pages of his or her investigation workbooks that have been produced during the course. This selection is internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IBO at the end of the course. Option B Investigation 60% External assessment The student presents selected pages of his or her investigation workbooks that have been produced during the course. This selection is externally assessed by a visiting examiner following an interview with the student. Studio 40% Internal assessment The student presents a selection of his or her studio work. This selection is internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IBO at the end of the course. MUSIC SL and HL Music functions as a means of personal and communal identity and expression, and embodies the social and cultural values of individuals and communities. This scenario invites exciting exploration and sensitive study. Music, and all of its associations, may vary considerably from one musical culture to another: yet music may share similarities. Such richness offers a variety of ways to encounter and engage with a constantly changing world. The Diploma Programme music course provides an

appropriate foundation for further study in music at university level or in music career pathways. It also provides an enriching and valuable course of study for students who may pursue other careers. This course also provides all students with the opportunity to engage in the world of music as lifelong participants. Distinction between SL and HL Both standard level (SL) and higher level (HL) music students are required to study musical perception. All students therefore submit a musical links investigation and also respond to a listening examination paper. In the latter, HL students are required to answer a further two questions. The first of these two questions allows them to demonstrate a wider understanding of music in relation to time, place and cultures. The second requires them to carry out a comparative analysis of music in response to pieces not previously studied. SL students in music are required to choose one of three options: • • •

SL creating (SLC). SL solo performing (SLS). SL group performing (SLG).

HL students are required to present both creating and solo performing. Content • • •

Musical perception—SL and HL. Creating—SLC, HL. Performing.

Skills 1. Enjoy lifelong engagement with the arts 2. Become informed, reflective and critical practitioners in the arts 3. Understand the dynamic and changing nature of the arts. 4. Explore and value the diversity of the arts across time, place and cultures 5. Express ideas with confidence and competence 6. Develop perceptual and analytical skills. 7. Develop their knowledge and potential as musicians, both personally and collaboratively.

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THE ONTARIO SECONDARY SCHOOL DIPLOMA (OSSD) GRADE 11 AND 12


THE ONTARIO SECONDARY SCHOOL DIPLOMA (OSSD) In March of 1999, after ten years of study, planning and development, the Ontario Ministry of Education officially released its New Ontario Curriculum. The new system unveiled a seamless curriculum from Kindergarten through to Grade 12, a curriculum which was benchmarked against the best in the world and designed to provide students with the skills they needed to compete and succeed in the 21st century. Today, that curriculum is implemented in Ontario, Canada and in the Canadian International School (Singapore) at the senior level of Grades 11 and 12. The Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) programme is being phased out over the next two years. With effect from 2012/2013, all students entering Grade eleven will need to complete the International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme (IB DP) in order to graduate. Over the course of the next two years, the OSSD programme will be fully supported until our final student cohort graduates (June 2013). High standards are expected of graduating students. All graduates must successfully sit the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test (OSSLT) as a requirement to earn an Ontario Secondary School Diploma and complete 40 hours of Community Service. In addition, the secondary curriculum requires students to develop higher order thinking and learning skills. The Ontario system expects that students will be well schooled in the skills necessary for them to take their place as individuals in the global community. The programme prepares them to make a living and a life for themselves and to make a difference to others. For further information regarding the Ontario Curriculum visit: www.edu.gov.on.ca.

• • • • • • • •

• •

Ontario Secondary School Diploma The OSSD will be granted by the Ministry of Education and Training, on the recommendation of the Principal, to a student who has accumulated a minimum of 30 credits (including at least 18 Compulsory Credits), completed 40 hours of Community Service and has passed the Ontario Secondary School Literary Test. Students must successfully complete the following requirements in Grades 11 and 12 in order to obtain an Ontario Secondary School Diploma:

OSSD Coordinator: Rick Butler (richard.butler@cis.edu.sg)

• • • •

The Credit System

The OSSD programme is based on a credit system. Students must earn a minimum of 30 credits to obtain an Ontario Secondary School Diploma. Of these credits, 18 are compulsory and the remainder of the credits is optional. Students will be granted the following 16 credits upon successful completion of grades 9 and 10 towards the requirements for an OSSD. • • •

2 Credits in English. 1 Credit in a Second Language. 2 Credits in Mathematics.

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2 Credits in Science. 1 Credit in Canadian History. 1 Credit in Canadian Geography. 1 Credit in Arts. 1 Credit in Health and Physical Education. 0.5 Credit in Civics. 0.5 Credit in Career Studies. 1 Additional Credit in English, or French as a second language, or a or a Native language, or a classical or an international language, or Social Sciences and the Humanities, or Canadian and World Studies, or Guidance and Career Education, or Cooperative Education. 1 Additional Credit in Health and Physical Education, or The Arts, or Business Studies, or French as a second language, or Cooperative Education. 1 Additional Credit in Science (Grade 11 or 12) or technological education (Grades 9-12), or French as a second language or Computer Studies, or Cooperative Education. 1 Elective Credit.

2 Credits in English (1 credit per grade). 1 Credit in Mathematics. 11 Elective Credits. Community Service - Completion of 40 hours of community service across grades 9-12. Successful completion of the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test (OSSLT).

Credit Definition: A credit is defined as “successful completion of a course for which a minimum of 110 hours of instruction has been scheduled”. If the student successfully completes a subject, the equivalent of one period per day, per semester, one credit will be granted. Credits are assigned based upon attaining at least a pass mark of 50% or better in each subject.


THE ONTARIO SECONDARY SCHOOL DIPLOMA (OSSD) Literacy Test Students will take the Secondary School Literacy Test in Grade 10. Successful Completion of the Grade 10 OSSLT is a Diploma requirement. The test result is recorded as a pass/fail on the OST. The literacy test evaluates reading and writing skills based on curriculum expectations in language and communications up to and including Grade 9. CIS has developed teaching strategies in all courses to help our students be successful in this test. Students who might benefit from a deferral of test may include students who are registered in English as a second language / English literacy development (ESL / ELD) courses, who have not yet acquired the level of proficiency in English required to successfully complete the test. The principal will determine whether or not a deferral should be granted. Procedures For Taking the OSSLC: (Ontario Secondary School Literacy Course) To ensure that they have the essential competencies in reading and writing that they will need to succeed at school, at work, and in daily life, students at CIS must demonstrate those skills as a requirement for graduation. The standard method for assessing the literacy skills of students at CIS in the OSSD program for purposes of meeting the literacy requirement for graduation is the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test (OSSLT), implemented in the 2011-2012 school year. The Ontario Secondary School Literacy Course has been developed to provide students who have been unsuccessful on the test with intensive support in achieving the required reading and writing competencies, and with an alternative means of demonstrating their literacy skills. Students who have been eligible to write the OSSLT at least twice and who have been unsuccessful at least once are eligible to take the course. Community Involvement Students are required to complete 40 hours of community involvement in order to receive a diploma. The purpose of this requirement is to encourage students to develop an understanding of the various roles they can play in their community and to help them develop a greater sense of belonging within the community. Students may not be paid for performing any community involvement activity. The ePortfolio, completed by the student, and verified by the student’s Teacher Advisor is used to record community service involvement. Student will submit their hours to the Teacher Advisor at the end of each semester.

Student Evaluation Students will be notified, in writing, during the first week of every course, of the method to be used to determine both mid-term and final marks. Term work will make up 70% of the student’s mark. This may include tests, projects, activities, presentations, assignments, etc. Assessment • • •

Assessments throughout the term account for 70% of the final grade in all OSSD courses. A summative assessment(s) approved by the Principal will be administered in each subject at the end of the semester. This summative assessment(s) will account for 30% of the final grade and will cover the semester’s work.

Reporting Dates • • •

3-Way Conferences: September 28-30, 2011 and May 3-4, 2012. Mid-Term Report : End October + Mid April. Final Report : End January + Mid June.

School Records An Ontario Student Record (OSR) file is maintained in the Student Services Department for every student. It contains a record of student academic achievement and an Ontario School Transcript for all schools attended in Ontario. This file is available for inspection by parents, legal guardians, or the student upon request at the Students Services Office. Ontario Student Record (OSR) The Ontario Student Record (OSR) is the record of a student’s educational progress through the Ontario school system. An OSR is established for all students who enroll in the Ontario school system. The OSR is an official school record of biological data, Ontario schools attended, retirement data, names of parents or guardians, special health information, photographs and information on school activities. The OSR houses all report cards and a current Ontario Student Transcript (OST). Access to the OSR Every student has the right to have access to his/her OSR. The parents of a student have the right to have access to the student’s OSR, until the student becomes age eighteen, at which time a student must grant permission

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THE ONTARIO SECONDARY SCHOOL DIPLOMA (OSSD) for a parent to view the records. The Principal and teachers of the school have access to the OSR for the purpose of improving the instruction of the student. The Education Act states that the OSR will NOT be produced in the course of any legal proceeding. Ontario Student Transcript (OST) The Ontario Student Transcript (OST) is the formal record of student progress in the Ontario system. All Grade 9/10 MYP courses successfully completed, will receive equivalent credits are recorded on the OST. All Grade 11/12 courses completed or attempted, with percentage grades and credits earned are recorded on the OST. Full Disclosure If a student withdraws from a Grade 11 or 12 course within five days following the issue of the mid-term report card, the withdrawal is not recorded on the OST. If a student withdraws from a course later than five days following the issue of the mid-term report card, a ‘W’ records it on the OST and the student’s grade is recorded. Where there are extraordinary circumstances relating to a student’s withdrawal, the special indicator ‘S’ may be entered in the Note column. Students may earn only one credit per course. Students who repeat a Grade 11 or 12 course, which they have previously completed successfully, will have both marks recorded on the OST. Each attempt and the grade earned is recorded on the OST and an ‘R’ is entered in the Credit column beside the second attempt. Course Changes Students are permitted to change courses within the first 5 school days of each semester. Course changes are subject to availability, teacher recommendations, parental consultation and with the approval and permission of the guidance counselor. Equivalent Credits Students who transfer to CIS from a school outside the Ontario system are granted equivalent credits based on: 1. The Principal’s evaluation of previous academic reports. 2. Placement tests. 3. Age. Transfer credits are recorded on the OST as ‘Equivalent

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Credits’ for the course title and ‘EQV’ as the percentage earned. Independent Study Courses Independent Study Courses are available to students who may require a specific course to meet their graduation requirements. Only courses found in the course description booklet can be done by independent study. These courses are subject to approval by the Principal. Online Courses Online Courses are available to students to broaden the course selections to meet graduation requirements. Course descriptions found in this booklet are supported through weekly in-class sessions and are granted through Virtual High School (www.virtualhighschool.com). Other online options are available and are subject to approval by the Principal. Substitutions for Compulsory Courses In order to allow flexibility in designing a student’s programme and to allow for diversity in courses studied outside the Ontario system; and to ensure that all students can qualify for the Ontario Secondary School Diploma, substitutions may be made for a limited number of compulsory credit courses. Substitutions of compulsory courses are made using courses from the remaining courses offered by the school that meet the requirements for compulsory credits. To meet individual students’ needs, the Principal may replace up to three of these courses (or the equivalent in half courses) with courses from the remainder of those that meet the compulsory credit requirements. Substitutions should be made to promote and enhance student learning or to meet special needs and interests. Course Outlines Course Outlines are available upon request from subject teachers or the Student Services Office or the OSSD Curriculum Co-ordinator. Explanation of Course Codes The Ministry of Education and Training has established a Common Course Coding System. All courses are identified in two (2) ways:


THE ONTARIO SECONDARY SCHOOL DIPLOMA (OSSD) i. by TITLE = the name of the course ENGLISH ii. by CODE = the 5 digit Ministry designation ENG3U

students with a broad educational base and to equip them for active and rewarding participation in society.

ENG

Prerequisite Courses: A course that is deemed absolutely essential for the successful understanding of a subsequent course. Prerequisite courses are established only by Ministry curriculum policy documents. It is advisable that parents and students familiarize themselves with the system of prerequisites as indicated for most of the courses offered.

3 Letters = Subject Name

3

1 Digit = Year 3 = Year 3 = Grade 11 4 = Year 4 = Grade 12

U

1 Letter = Type of Course C = College U = University M = College/University O = Open

Types of Courses The courses offered by CIS have been developed according to the requirements of the Ontario Ministry of Education and Training of Ontario.

Online Courses: CIS facilitates some OSSD courses online through Virtual High School to offer a broader range of courses to students. Grade 11 and 12 students will choose courses based on their post secondary destination. Students may choose courses from one or more of four types: University, University/College, College, and Open.

The types of courses available in the secondary school programme are: College Courses: College preparation courses emphasize concrete applications of the theoretical material covered in the course, and will also emphasize the development of critical-thinking and problem-solving skills. All college preparation courses will be based on rigorous provincial curriculum expectations and will emphasize the development of both independent research skills and independent learning skills. University Courses: University preparation courses emphasize the theoretical aspect of the course content but will also include concrete applications. All university preparation courses will be based on rigorous provincial curriculum expectations and will emphasize the development of both independent research skills and independent learning skills. University/College Courses: University/college preparation courses emphasize both theoretical aspects and related concrete applications of the course content. All university/ college preparation courses will be based on rigorous provincial curriculum expectations and will emphasize the development of both independent research skills and independent learning skills. Open Courses: Open courses in Grade 11 and 12 are appropriate for all students regardless of post-secondary destination. These courses are designed to provide

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OSSD COURSE OFFERINGS THE ARTS ADA3M - Dramatic Arts, Grade 11, University/College Preparation This course requires students to create and to perform dramatic presentations. Students will analyze, interpret, and perform works of drama from various cultures, including Western plays from around 1900. Students will also do research on different acting styles and conventions for their presentations, create original works, and analyze the functions of playwright, director, actor, producer, designer, technician, and audience.

AMU4M - Music, Grade 12, University/College Preparation This course emphasizes the appreciation, analysis, and performance of music from the romantic period and the twentieth century, including art music, jazz, popular music, and Canadian and non-Western music. Students will concentrate on developing interpretive skills and the ability to work independently. They will also complete complex creative projects. Prerequisite: AMU3M - Music, Grade 11, University/ College Preparation.

AMU3M - Music, Grade 11, University/College Preparation

AVI4M - Visual Arts, Grade 12, University/College Preparation

This course emphasizes the appreciation, analysis, and performance of various kinds of music, including baroque and classical music, popular music, and Canadian and non-Western music. Students will perform technical exercises and appropriate repertoire, complete detailed creative activities, and analyze and evaluate live and recorded performances. They will continue to increase their understanding of the elements of music while developing their technical and imaginative abilities.

This course focuses on the refinement of students’ skills and knowledge in visual arts. Students will analyze art forms; use theories of art in analyzing and producing art; and increase their understanding of stylistic changes in modern and contemporary Western art, Canadian (including Native Canadian) art, and art forms from various parts of the world. Students will produce a body of work demonstrating a personal approach.

AVI3M - Visual Arts, Grade 11, University/College Preparation This course provides students with opportunities to further develop their skills and knowledge in visual arts. Students will explore a range of subject matter through studio activities, and will consolidate their practical skills. Students will also analyze art works and study aspects of Western art history, as well as art forms from Canada and other parts of the world. ADA4M - Dramatic Arts, Grade 12, University/College Preparation This course requires students to experiment with forms and conventions in dramatic literature, and to create/ adapt and present dramatic works. Students will do research on dramatic forms, conventions, themes, and theories of acting and directing from different historical periods, and apply their knowledge of these in analyzing and interpreting dramatic literature, including Canadian works and works from various cultures in the late twentieth century. Students will also examine the significance of dramatic arts in various cultures. Prerequisite: ADA3M - Dramatic Arts, Grade 11, University/College Preparation or Open.

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Prerequisite: AVI3M - Visual Arts, Grade 11, University/ College Preparation or Open.


OSSD COURSE OFFERINGS BUSINESS STUDIES

Prerequisite: None.

BAF3M - Financial Accounting Principles, Grade 11, University/College Preparation (THIS COURSE MAY BE OFFERED ONLINE)

BOH4M - Business Leadership: Management Fundamentals, Grade 12, University/College Preparation

This course introduces students to the fundamental principles and procedures of accounting. Students will develop financial analysis and decision skills that will assist them in future studies and/or career opportunities in business. Student will acquire an understanding of accounting for a service and a merchandising business, computerized accounting, financial analysis, and ethics and current issues in accounting.

This course focuses on the development of leadership skills used in managing a successful business. Students will analyze the role of a leader in business, with a focus on decision making, management of group dynamics, workplace stress and conflict, motivation of employees, and planning. Effective business communication skills, ethics, and social responsibility are also emphasized.

BDI3C - Entrepreneurship: The Venture, Grade 11, College Preparation

Prerequisite: None.

This course focuses on ways in which entrepreneurs recognize opportunities, generate ideas, and organize resources to plan successful ventures that enable them to achieve their goals. Students will create a venture plan for a school-based or student-run business. Through hands-on experiences, students will have opportunities to develop the values, traits, and skills most often associated with successful entrepreneurs. BMI3C - Marketing: Goods, Services, Events, Grade 11, College Preparation This course introduces the fundamental concepts of product marketing, which includes the marketing of goods, services, and events. Students will examine how trends, issues, global economic changes, and information technology influence consumer buying habits. Students will engage in marketing research, develop marketing strategies, and produce a marketing plan for a product of their choice. BBB4M - International Business Fundamentals, Grade 12, University/College Preparation This course provides an overview of the importance of international business and trade in the global economy and explores the factors that influence success in international markets. Students will learn about the techniques and strategies associated with marketing, distribution, and managing international business effectively. This course prepares students for postsecondary programs in business, including international business, marketing, and management.

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OSSD COURSE OFFERINGS CANADIAN AND WORLD STUDIES Economics CIE3M - The Individual and the Economy Grade 11, University / College Preparation This course examines the changing Canadian economy and helps students develop an understanding of their own role as economic agents. Students will apply economic models and concepts to assess the roles of the various stakeholders in the Canadian economy and analyze the interactions among them. Students will consider the economic behaviour of the individual as consumer, contributor, and citizen in a mixed economy and will apply economic inquiry, critical-thinking, and communication skills to make and defend informed economic decisions. CIA4U - Analyzing Current Economic Issues, Grade 12, University Preparation (THIS Course may be offered online)

CGW4U - Canadian and World Issues: A Geographic Analysis, Grade 12, University Preparation This course examines the global challenges of creating a sustainable and equitable future, focusing on current issues that illustrate these challenges. Students will investigate a range of topics, including cultural, economic, and geopolitical relationships, regional disparities in the ability to meet basic human needs, and protection of the natural environment. Students will use geotechnologies and skills of geographic inquiry and analysis to develop and communicate balanced opinions about the complex issues facing Canada and a world that is interdependent and constantly changing. Prerequisite: Any University or University/College Preparation course in Canadian and World Studies, English, or Social Sciences and Humanities.

History CHA3U – American History, Grade 11, University Preparation (THIS COURSE MAY BE OFFERED ONLINE)

This course investigates the nature of the competitive global economy and explores how individuals and societies can gain the information they need to make appropriate economic decisions. Students will learn about the principles of microeconomics and macroeconomics, apply economic models and concepts to interpret economic information, assess the validity of statistics, and investigate marketplace dynamics. Students will use economic inquiry and communication skills to analyze current economic issues, make informed judgements, and present their findings.

This course traces the social, economic, and political development of the United States from colonial times to the present. Students will examine issues of diversity, identity, and culture that have influenced the country’s social and political formation and will consider the implications of its expansion into a global superpower. Students will use critical-thinking and communication skills to determine causal relationships, evaluate multiple perspectives, and present their own points of view.

Prerequisite: Any 3U or 3M level Canadian and World Studies, English or Social Studies and Humanities course.

CHW3M – World History to the 16th Century, Grade 11, University/College Preparation (Course may be offered online)

Geography

This course investigates the history of humanity from earliest times to the sixteenth century. Students will analyze diverse societies from around the world, with an emphasis on the political, cultural, and economic structures and historical forces that have shaped the modern world. They will apply historical inquiry, critical-thinking, and communication skills to evaluate the influence of selected individuals, groups, and innovations and to present their own conclusions.

CGG3O – Travel and Tourism: A Regional Geographic Grade 11, Open This course focuses on travel and tourism as the vehicle for studying selected world regions. Using a variety of geotechnologies and inquiry and communication methods, students will conduct and present case studies that develop their understanding of the unique characteristics of selected world regions; the environmental, cultural, economic, and political factors that influence travel and tourism; and the impact of the travel industry on communities and environments around the world.

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OSSD COURSE OFFERINGS CHY4U - World History: The West and the World, Grade 12, University Preparation This course investigates the major trends in Western civilization and world history from the sixteenth century to the present. Students will learn about the interaction between the emerging West and other regions of the world and about the development of modern social, political, and economic systems. They will use critical-thinking and communication skills to investigate the historical roots of contemporary issues and present their conclusions. Prerequisite: Any University or University/College Preparation course in Canadian and World Studies, English, or Social Sciences and Humanities. CHI4U - Canada: History, Identity, and Culture, Grade 12, University Preparation (Course is only offered online) This course explores the challenges associated with the formation of a Canadian national identity. Students will examine the social, political, and economic forces that have shaped Canada from the pre-contact period to the present and will investigate the historical roots of contemporary issues from a variety of perspectives. Students will use critical-thinking and communication skills to consider events and ideas in historical context, debate issues of culture and identity, and present their own views. Prerequisite: Any 3U or 3M level Canadian and World Studies, English or Social Studies and Humanities course.

COMPUTER STUDIES ICS3U - Introduction to Computer Programming, Grade 11, University Preparation (Course is only offered online) This course introduces students to computer science. Students will design software independently and as part of a team, using industry-standard programming tools and applying the software development life-cycle model. They will also write and use subprograms within computer programs. Students will develop creative solutions for various types of problems as their understanding of the computing environment grows. They will also explore environmental and ergonomic issues, emerging research in computer science, and global career trends in computerrelated fields. ICS4U - Computer Science, Grade 12, University Preparation (Course is only offered online) This course enables students to further develop knowledge and skills in computer science. Students will use modular design principles to create complex and fully documented programs, according to industry standards. Student teams will manage a large software development project, from planning through to project review. Students will also analyze algorithms for effectiveness. They will investigate ethical issues in computing and further explore environmental issues, emerging technologies, areas of research in computer science, and careers in the field. Prerequisite: ICS3U - Introduction to Computer Programming, Grade 11, University Preparation.

Politics CPW4U - Canadian and World Politics, Grade 12, University Preparation (Course is only offered online) This course examines national and international political issues from a variety of perspectives. Students will learn about the rights and responsibilities of individuals, groups, and states within the international community; analyze the different ways in which Canada tries to settle its conflicts with other nations; and evaluate the role of nationalist and internationalist ideologies in shaping relations among states. Prerequisite: Any University or University/College Preparation course in Canadian and World Studies, English or Social Sciences and Humanities.

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OSSD COURSE OFFERINGS ENGLISH

ENG4C - English, Grade 12, College Preparation

ENG3C - English, Grade 11, College Preparation

This course emphasizes the consolidation of literacy, communication, and critical and creative thinking skills necessary for success in academic and daily life. Students will analyze a variety of informational and graphic texts, as well as literary texts from various countries and cultures, and create oral, written, and media texts in a variety of forms for practical and academic purposes. An important focus will be on using language with precision and clarity and developing greater control in writing. The course is intended to prepare students for college or the workplace.

This course emphasizes the development of literacy, communication, and critical and creative thinking skills necessary for success in academic and daily life. Students will study the content, form, and style of a variety of informational and graphic texts, as well as literary texts from Canada and other countries, and create oral, written, and media texts in a variety of forms for practical and academic purposes. An important focus will be on using language with precision and clarity. The course is intended to prepare students for the compulsory Grade 12 college preparation course.

Prerequisite: ENG3C - English, Grade 11, College Preparation.

ENG3U - English, Grade 11, University Preparation

ENG4U - English, Grade 12, University Preparation

This course emphasizes the development of literacy, communication, and critical and creative thinking skills necessary for success in academic and daily life. Students will analyze challenging literary texts from various periods, countries, and cultures, as well as a range of informational and graphic texts, and create oral, written, and media texts in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on using language with precision and clarity and incorporating stylistic devices appropriately and effectively. The course is intended to prepare students for the compulsory Grade 12 university or college preparation course.

This course emphasizes the consolidation of the literacy, communication, and critical and creative thinking skills necessary for success in academic and daily life. Students will analyze a range of challenging literary texts from various periods, countries, and cultures; interpret and evaluate informational and graphic texts; and create oral, written, and media texts in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on using academic language coherently and confidently, selecting the reading strategies best suited to particular texts and particular purposes for reading, and developing greater control in writing. The course is intended to prepare students for university, college, or the workplace.

ETC3M - Canadian Literature, Grade 11, University / College Preparation (Course is only offered online) This course emphasizes the study and analysis of literary texts by Canadian authors for students with a special interest in Canadian literature. Students will study the themes, forms, and stylistic elements of a variety of literary texts representative of various time periods and of the diverse cultures and regions of Canada, and will respond personally, critically, and creatively to them. EMS3O – Media Studies, Grade 11, Open (Course is only offered online) This course emphasizes knowledge and skills that will enable students to understand media communications in the twenty-first century and to use media effectively and responsibly. Through analyzing the forms and messages of a variety of media works and audience responses to them, and through creating their own media works, students will develop critical thinking skills, aesthetic and ethical judgment, and skills in viewing, representing, listening, speaking, reading, and writing.

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Prerequisite: ENG3U - English, Grade 11, University Preparation. ETS4U - Studies in Literature, Grade 12, University Preparation (Course is only offered online) This course is for students with a special interest in literature and literary criticism. The course may focus on themes, genres, time periods, or countries. Students will analyze a range of forms and stylistic elements of literary texts and respond personally, critically, and creatively to them. They will also assess critical interpretations, write analytical essays, and complete an independent study project. Prerequisite: ENG3U - English, Grade 11, University Preparation. EWC4U - The Writer’s Craft, Grade 12, University Preparation (Course is only offered online) This course emphasizes knowledge and skills related


OSSD COURSE OFFERINGS to the craft of writing. Students will analyze models of effective writing; use a workshop approach to produce a range of works; identify and use techniques required for specialized forms of writing; and identify effective ways to improve the quality of their writing. They will also complete a major paper as part of a creative or analytical independent study project and investigate opportunities for publication and for writing careers. Prerequisite: ENG3U - English, Grade 11, University Preparation. OLC4O - ontario secondary school literacy course, Grade 12, college preparation This course is designed to help students acquire and demonstrate the cross-curricular literacy skills that are evaluated by the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test (OSSLT). Students who complete the course successfully will meet the provincial literacy requirement for graduation. Students will read a variety of informational, narrative, and graphic texts and will produce a variety of forms of writing, including summaries, information paragraphs, opinion pieces, and news reports. Students will also maintain and manage a portfolio containing a record of their reading experiences and samples of their writing. Pre-requisite/Eligibility requirement: Students who have been eligible to write the OSSLT at least twice and who have been unsuccessful at least once are eligible to take the course. (Students who have already met the literacy requirement for graduation may be eligible to take the course under special circumstances, at the discretion of the principal).

ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE ESLEO – English as a Second Language, ESL Level 5, Open This course provides students with the skills and strategies they need to make the transition to college and university preparation courses in English and other secondary school disciplines. Students will be encouraged to develop independence in a range of academic tasks. They will participate in debates and lead classroom workshops; read and interpret literary works and academic texts; write essays, narratives, and reports; and apply a range of learning strategies and research skills effectively. Students will further develop their ability to respond critically to print and media texts.

GUIDANCE AND CAREER STUDIES GWL3O - Designing Your Future, Grade 11, Open (Course is only offered online) This course prepares students to make successful transitions to post secondary destinations as they investigate specific postsecondary options based on their skills, interests, and personal characteristics. Students will explore the realities and opportunities of the workplace and examine factors that affect success, while refining their job-search and employability skills. Students will develop their portfolios with a focus on their targeted destination and develop an action plan for future success.

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION PPL3O - Healthy Active Living Education, Grade 11, Open This course focuses on the development of a healthy lifestyle and participation in a variety of enjoyable physical activities that have the potential to engage students’ interest throughout their lives. Students will be encouraged to develop personal competence in a variety of movement skills and will be given opportunities to practise goalsetting, decision-making, social, and interpersonal skills. Students will also study the components of healthy relationships, reproductive health, mental health, and personal safety. PPZ3O - Health for Life, Grade 11, Open (Course is only offered online) This course helps students develop a personalized approach to healthy living. Students will examine the factors that affect their own health and the health of individuals as members of the community. They will learn about the components of the Vitality approach to healthy living - an initiative that promotes healthy eating, an active lifestyle, and a positive self-image. Throughout this course, students will develop the skills necessary to take charge of and improve their own health, as well as to encourage others to lead healthy lives.

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OSSD COURSE OFFERINGS MATHEMATICS MCR3U - Functions, Grade 11, University Preparation This course introduces the mathematical concept of the function by extending students’ experiences with linear and quadratic relations. Students will investigate properties of discrete and continuous functions, including trigonometric and exponential functions; represent functions numerically, algebraically, and graphically; solve problems involving applications of functions; investigate inverse functions; and develop facility in determining equivalent algebraic expressions. Students will reason mathematically and communicate their thinking as they solve multi-step problems. MBF3C - Foundations for College Mathematics, Grade 11, College Preparation This course enables students to broaden their understanding of mathematics as a problem solving tool in the real world. Students will extend their understanding of quadratic relations; investigate situations involving exponential growth; solve problems involving compound interest; solve financial problems connected with vehicle ownership; develop their ability to reason by collecting, analyzing, and evaluating data involving one variable; connect probability and statistics; and solve problems in geometry and trigonometry. Students will consolidate their mathematical skills as they solve problems and communicate their thinking. MCF3M - Functions and Applications, Grade 11, University / College Preparation (Course is only offered online) This course introduces basic features of the function by extending students’ experiences with quadratic relations. It focuses on quadratic, trigonometric, and exponential functions and their use in modeling real-world situations. Students will represent functions numerically, graphically, and algebraically; simplify expressions; solve equations; and solve problems relating to applications. Students will reason mathematically and communicate their thinking as they solve multi-step problems. MHF4U - Advanced Functions, Grade 12, University Preparation This course extends students’ experience with functions. Students will investigate the properties of polynomial, rational, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions; develop techniques for combining functions; broaden their understanding of rates of change; and develop

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facility in applying these concepts and skills. Students will also refine their use of the mathematical processes necessary for success in senior mathematics. This course is intended both for students taking the Calculus and Vectors course as a prerequisite for a university program and for those wishing to consolidate their understanding of mathematics before proceeding to any one of a variety of university programs. Prerequisite: MCR3U - Functions, Grade 11, University Preparation. MDM4U - Mathematics of Data Management, Grade 12, University Preparation This course broadens students’ understanding of mathematics as it relates to managing data. Students will apply methods for organizing and analyzing large amounts of information; solve problems involving probability and statistics; and carry out a culminating investigation that integrates statistical concepts and skills. Students will also refine their use of the mathematical processes necessary for success in senior mathematics. Students planning to enter university programs in business, the social sciences, and the humanities will find this course of particular interest. Prerequisite: MCR3U - Functions, Grade 11, University Preparation, or MCF3M - Functions and Applications, Grade 11, University/College Preparation. MCV4U – Calculus and Vectors, Grade 12, University Preparation This course builds on students’ previous experience with functions and their developing understanding of rates of change. Students will solve problems involving geometric and algebraic representations of vectors and representations of lines and planes in three dimensional space; broaden their understanding of rates of change to include the derivatives of polynomial, sinusoidal, exponential, rational, and radical functions; and apply these concepts and skills to the modeling of real-world relationships. Students will also refine their use of the mathematical processes necessary for success in senior mathematics. This course is intended for students who choose to pursue careers in fields such as science, engineering, economics, and some areas of business, including those students who will be required to take a university-level calculus, linear algebra, or physics course. Prerequisite: MHF4U - Advanced Functions, Grade 12, University Preparation (MHF4U may be taken concurrently).


OSSD COURSE OFFERINGS SCIENCE

SCH4U - Chemistry, Grade 12, University Preparation

SBI3U - Biology, Grade 11, University Preparation

This course enables students to deepen their understanding of chemistry through the study of organic chemistry, the structure and properties of matter, energy changes and rates of reaction, equilibrium in chemical systems, and electrochemistry. Students will further develop their problem-solving and investigation skills as they investigate chemical processes, and will refine their ability to communicate scientific information. Emphasis will be placed on the importance of chemistry in everyday life and on evaluating the impact of chemical technology on the environment.

This course furthers students’ understanding of the processes that occur in biological systems. Students will study theory and conduct investigations in the areas of biodiversity; evolution; genetic processes; the structure and function of animals; and the anatomy, growth, and function of plants. The course focuses on the theoretical aspects of the topics under study, and helps students refine skills related to scientific investigation. SCH3U - Chemistry, Grade 11, University Preparation This course enables students to deepen their understanding of chemistry through the study of the properties of chemicals and chemical bonds; chemical reactions and quantitative relationships in those reactions; solutions and solubility; and atmospheric chemistry and the behaviour of gases. Students will further develop their analytical skills and investigate the qualitative and quantitative properties of matter, as well as the impact of some common chemical reactions on society and the environment. SPH3U - Physics, Grade 11, University Preparation This course develops students’ understanding of the basic concepts of physics. Students will explore kinematics, with an emphasis on linear motion; different kinds of forces; energy transformations; the properties of mechanical waves and sound; and electricity and magnetism. They will enhance their scientific investigation skills as they test laws of physics. In addition, they will analyze the interrelationships between physics and technology, and consider the impact of technological applications of physics on society and the environment SBI4U - Biology, Grade 12, University Preparation This course provides students with the opportunity for in-depth study of the concepts and processes that occur in biological systems. Students will study theory and conduct investigations in the areas of biochemistry, metabolic processes, molecular genetics, homeostasis, and population dynamics. Emphasis will be placed on the achievement of detailed knowledge and the refinement of skills needed for further study in various branches of the life sciences and related fields. Prerequisite: SBI3U - Biology, Grade 11, University Preparation.

Prerequisite: SCH3U - Chemistry, Grade 11, University Preparation. SPH4C – Physics, Grade 12, College Preparation (Course is only offered online) This course develops students’ understanding of the basic concepts of physics. Students will explore these concepts as they relate to mechanical, electrical, fluid (hydraulic and pneumatic), and communications systems, as well as to the operation of commonly used tools and equipment. They will develop scientific-inquiry skills as they verify accepted laws of physics and solve both assigned problems and those emerging from their investigations. Students will also consider the impact of technological applications of physics on society and the environment. Prerequisite: None. SPH4U - Physics, Grade 12, University Preparation This course enables students to deepen their understanding of physics concepts and theories. Students will continue their exploration of energy transformations and the forces that affect motion, and will investigate electrical, gravitational, and magnetic fields and electromagnetic radiation. Students will also explore the wave nature of light, quantum mechanics, and special relativity. They will further develop their scientific investigation skills, learning, for example, how to analyze, qualitatively and quantitatively, data related to a variety of physics concepts and principles. Students will also consider the impact of technological applications of physics on society and the environment. Prerequisite: SPH3U - Physics, Grade 11, University Preparation.

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OSSD COURSE OFFERINGS SOCIAL SCIENCES AND HUMANITIES HRT3M - World Religions: Beliefs, Issues, and Religious Traditions, Grade 11, University / College Preparation (Course is only offered online) This course enables students to discover what others believe and how they live, and to appreciate their own unique heritage. Students will learn about the teachings and traditions of a variety of religions, the connections between religion and the development of civilizations, the place and function of religion in human experience, and the influence of a broad range of religions on contemporary society. This course also introduces students to skills used in researching and investigating world religions. HSP3M – Introduction to Psychology, Anthropology and Sociology, Grade 11, University/College Preparation This course introduces the theories, questions, and issues that are the major concerns of anthropology, psychology, and sociology. Students will develop an understanding of the way social scientists approach the topics they study and the research methods they employ. Students will be given opportunities to explore theories from a variety of perspectives and to become familiar with current thinking on a range of issues that have captured the interest of classical and contemporary social scientists in the three disciplines. HZB3O - Philosophy: The Big Questions, Grade 11, Open (Course is only offered online) This course addresses three (or more) of the following questions: What is a person? What is a meaningful life? What are good and evil? What is a just society? What is human knowledge? How do we know what is beautiful in art, music, and literature? Students will learn critical thinking skills in evaluating philosophical arguments related to these questions, as well as skills used in researching and investigating various topics in philosophy. HHS4M - Individuals and Families in a Diverse Society, Grade 12, University / College Preparation (Course is only offered online) This course applies current theories and research from the disciplines of anthropology, psychology, and sociology to the study of individual development, family behaviour, intimate and parent-child relationships, and the ways in which families interact within the diverse Canadian

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society. Students will learn the interpersonal skills required to contribute to the well-being of families, and the investigative skills required to conduct and evaluate research about individuals and families. Prerequisite: Any University, University/College, or College Preparation course in Social Sciences and Humanities, English, or Canadian and World Studies. HSB4M - Challenge and Change in Society, Grade 12, University / College Preparation (Course is only offered online) This course examines the theories and methodologies used in anthropology, psychology, and sociology to investigate and explain shifts in knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and behaviour and their impact on society. Students will analyze cultural, social, and biological patterns in human societies, looking at the ways in which those patterns change over time. Students will also explore the ideas of classical and contemporary social theorists, and will apply those ideas to the analysis of contemporary trends. Prerequisite: Any University, University/College, or College Preparation course in Social Sciences and Humanities, English, or Canadian and World Studies.

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION The Cooperative Education Programme comprises a cooperative education course and a related curriculum course on which the cooperative education course must be based. The cooperative education course is completed concurrently with the related course or after successful completion of that course. The cooperative education course consists of a classroom component and a placement component. Through these two components, the cooperative education course prepares the student for successful participation in a work placement; provides sufficient time and various opportunities at the placement to enable the student to apply and further develop the knowledge and skills acquired in the related course; and provides opportunities for the student to integrate the learning acquired in school and at the placement. Cooperative education courses may be planned as singleor multiple-credit courses, but the latter are encouraged in order to ensure sufficient time at the placement for the student to fully achieve the required knowledge and skills.


additional academic information


HIGH SCHOOL PROMOTION GUIDELINES “THE DEFINING YEARS” Successful completion of Grade 9 requires a student to score: • 4 or higher in all 8 MYP subject areas OR • 4 or higher in 6 or 7 MYP subject areas and future participation in the Student Success Programme at the Principal’s discretion If a student does not meet these requirements, they will remain in Grade 9 at CIS at the Principal’s discretion.

Successful completion of Grade 10 requires a student to score: • 4 or higher in all 9 MYP subject areas (including the Personal Project) OR • 4 or higher in 7 or 8 MYP subject areas (including the Personal Project) and future participation in the Student Success Programme at the Principal’s discretion If a student does not meet these requirements, they will remain in Grade 10 at CIS at the Principal’s discretion.

Recommended prerequisites for International Baccalaureate – Diploma Programme courses: In Grade 10 courses students should score: • 5 or higher in all subjects they are choosing at Standard Level • 6 or higher in all subjects they are choosing at Higher Level

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TECHNOLOGY AND THE LAPTOP LEARNING PROGRAMME LAPTOP LEARNING PROGRAMME (GRADES 9 TO 12) The benefits of integrating technology with education are clear: utilizing technology in the classroom provides Students with richer learning experiences and teaches Students transferable skills that society has deemed necessary to be successful and competitive in postsecondary education and in the work force. The Canadian International School, acknowledging the need and benefits of providing Students with opportunities to use current technologies, implements an innovative approach to teaching and learning with the use of laptop computers. At CIS, our goals for the Laptop Learning Programme are to: • • • • •

Enhance classroom activities and the curriculum by integrating technology to provide rich and meaningful learning experiences. Teach and refine technology skills that will provide greater success in their future endeavours. Use technology to become more efficient and productive workers. Provide an environment in which technology is ubiquitous and the use of computers routine. Promote the healthy, safe and ethical use of technology.

In the context of the IB Learner Profile: A Balanced CIS High School Information Technology Student: Is on task in the classroom and avoids entertainment sites or non-educational sites and focuses on appropriate learning activities. They are able to use resources that are not electronic in nature and can make presentations with a variety of tools. A Reflective CIS High School Information Technology Student: Considers how they have used technology in the past and learns from successes and failures to develop their skills as lifelong learners. A Communicating Technology Student:

CIS

High

School

Information

Communicates effectively with teachers and peers through email or Moodle, uses available technology appropriately

to be fully engaged in their school environment, and ensures that they can effectively communicate the results of their learning. An Inquiring CIS High School Information Technology Student: Persistently looks for new software programs, communication technologies, techniques, and learning tools to incorporate into their learning. A Thinking CIS High School Information Technology Student: Thinks about the appropriateness and validity of information they find on websites, critically analyzes the information gathered and considers the consequences of using it improperly, and is aware of the value of IT equipment and acts responsibly when using the equipment. An Open-Minded CIS Technology Student:

High

School

Information

Uses technology as a vehicle for discovering multicultural information, while not excluding more traditional methods; information gathered would include a variety of technological tools from a variety of worldwide sources. A Caring CIS High School Information Technology Student: Considers the consequences before taking part in any action which may be disrespectful or infringe on the privacy of fellow students, teachers, personnel, administrators or staff of CIS. A Principled CIS High School Information Technology Student: Uses technology in a way that meets legal, academic and moral expectations—this includes, but is not limited to, refraining from illegal file sharing and other forms of piracy, bullying or abusing others online, and using technology to plagiarize the work of others. A Knowledgeable Technology Student:

CIS

High

School

Information

Knows how to access appropriate resources and a variety of programs; knows which resources are available and understands how to use the Microsoft Office Suite of Applications; knows the security risks involved in computer

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THE LAPTOP LEARNING PROGRAMME usage; and is able to utilize computer technology to maximize their potential. A Risk-Taking CIS High School Information Technology Student: Uses technology to its full potential to discover new, exciting and engaging resources—software, search engines, computer programs, and ways to complete assignments and create presentations.

LAPTOP MINIMUM SPECIFICATIONS REQUIRED With technology forming an ever-increasing part of the global economy, technology skills are a prerequisite for future success. Integrated curriculum is at the heart of the CIS programme. By teaching concepts across subject areas, Students gain increased understanding of the subject matter and develop a sense of the relationships between various disciplines. All CIS Students in Grade 9 to 12 must have their own laptop computer at school every day. We strongly recommend that you purchase a MacBook given that the school will be transitioning to a Mac Platform over the next few years. If you have any further questions, please contact Martin Laidlaw, Head of Technology at CIS at martin.laidlaw@cis.edu.sg. REQUIRED MINIMUM SPECIFICATIONS: 2GHz+ CPU 80GB HD 2 GB RAM DVD COMBO DRIVE WIRELESS NETWORK A/G/N 64MB VIDEO RAM MIN 10” LCD ENGLISH Operating System Self-Updating Anti-Virus Software English System Restore DVD/CDs Removable/External Storage Device for Backup Singapore Warranty Coverage

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RECOMMENDED SPECIFICATIONS: Dual Core 2GHz+ CPU 160+GB HD 128+MB VIDEO RAM FIREWIRE MULTI CARD READER DVD SUPER MULTI BUILT-IN WEB CAM/MICROPHONE 3 Year Next Business Day International Warranty COMPLETE COVERAGE Warranty Windows OS Extra Battery


THE TEACHER ADVISOR PROGRAMME The Teacher Advisor Programme The Teacher Advisor Programme at the Canadian International School is designed to provide students with opportunities to maximize their potential as outlined in the Mission and Vision statements of the school. The Teacher Advisor Programme is an integral part of students’ success at CIS.

• • •

Goals • • • •

To provide the home and school with a primary contact for each student. To ensure that each student in the high school will have at least one teacher who oversees “the big picture” for that student. To help each student adapt to and succeed at CIS, by ensuring that each student understands the values, culture and character of this unique school. To assist each student with their educational, personal and social growth.

• • •

Roles and Responsibilities of the Teacher Advisor It is expected that the Teacher Advisor will provide for the individual needs of each Advisee with the areas of advocacy, monitoring, parent liaison and transition. The Advisor is to be aware that they are expected to deal with issues until they feel they are beyond their range of expertise, at which point the Advisor is to refer to a Grade Learning Lead or the Principal. Advocacy In this area, the Teacher Advisor will: • • • • •

Act as an advocate of the Advisee with teachers, counselors, parents and the administrative team. As part of their teaching assignment, be available daily in their assigned meeting place for the scheduled Advisory time. Encourage the participation, involvement and support of their Advisees in the extensive cocurricular opportunities and programs at CIS. Inform Advisees daily about important and relevant events at CIS. Be knowledgeable of the academic progress of each Advisee and identify “at risk” students early in the year to Student Services or the Principal.

Monitoring

include: course selection materials, individual student profiles, copies of correspondence home, and a record of conversations with parents. Monitor Advisee attendance daily, including a uniform check at the beginning of each day. Ensure that each Advisee has and maintains a Personal Planning System, or electronic equivalent. Assist Student Services in determining the need for discussing the Advisee at a Grade Meeting, as per the protocol established by Student Services. Advise and consult with Student Services and Administration about Advisees with any issues, and implement actions deemed appropriate. Assist Advisees in tracking and recording Community Service and CAS hours. Know their Advisees. Celebrate the unique contributions of each Advisee to the school and community. On a day-to-day basis, discuss their co-curricular school and extra-curricular community activities. Encourage each Advisee to be involved in one school activity per term while maintaining a reasonable balance with academic expectations.

Parent Liaison In this area, the Teacher Advisor will: • • • •

Initiate and maintain contact with the home about the Advisee’s progress and achievement through phone calls, e-mail or letters. Involve parents in the planning of their child’s programme at CIS. Invite parents to events at the school like “Meet the Teacher” evening, information evenings, etc. Distribute the weekly curriculum updates to parents.

Transition In this area, the Teacher Advisor will: • • • •

Help students understand the unique learning environment at CIS, by clarifying the expectations and opportunities at each grade level. Be familiar with the curricular and co-curricular offerings of the school, to most wisely guide the Advisee in his/her programme. Help students new to CIS to quickly understand the culture of international schools, and CIS in particular. Consistently implement the Teacher Advisor programme as it evolves to best advance the Mission and Vision of the School.

In this area, the Teacher Advisor will: •

Maintain an individual student record file that will

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THE LIBRARY The Library of the Canadian International School focuses on providing supportive services and programme collaboration. Global information literacy and literature that reflect our multicultural school community are integral to active, authentic life-long learning and inquiry. The Library is a changing and dynamic place and is an integral part of the busy daily life of the CIS community. The Library staff strive to meet the educational needs of students and staff and to support our IB (International Baccalaureate) curriculum. Our goal is to develop every student as a lifelong reader. The Library staff aim to provide a warm and inviting learning environment for all students and their families to enjoy. Students are welcome to use the Library as a place to read and relax, complete homework, and search for books before and after school, at recess and at lunchtime. The Library is open each school day from 8:00 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. Students are able to borrow books during their weekly class book exchange period and may also drop in to exchange or renew books at any time. Students may borrow up to three (3) independent reading books. Books for Literature Circles or Novel Studies are in addition to their independent reading books. All students are also permitted to borrow one additional book, in their mother-tongue, from our World Languages Collection. Additional resources available to our students (links are available from our school website): •

http://cislearningcentre.follettdestiny.com

The Library database is your centralized information link. Through that one site, you have links to all of the following databases, as well as all of the resources that we house within the library. •

http://search.ebscohost.com/ Username = cis Password = singapore

EBSCO is our online information warehouse, providing access to over 80,000 magazines, newspapers and professional journals from around the world. •

http://infoweb.newsbank.com

Username = candnis Password = candnis

Newsbank is our online source for newspapers from

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around the world. Easy to browse, as well as conduct specific searches targeting particular continents, regions of the world or even worldwide searches. •

http://www.noodletools.com/

Noodletools is our online research organizational site. Students can keep track of the materials that they use for their research projects, take notes and organize them, and share this information electronically with their teachers. Most recently, Noodletools has linked to Google Docs, so students can now write their papers at Noodletools.com. •

http://www.teenhealthandwellness.com/static/web_ads Username = cis Password = health

Teen Health and Wellness is a terrific resource not only for Health classes, but also for science classes and just general information about physical wellbeing. Our Policy for Lost Library Books Books can become lost despite students’ and families’ best efforts to care for them. However, part of being a responsible student is taking care of school property. If a book is lost, the person who signed out the book is responsible for paying the replacement charge. If the book is found and returned to the Library no later than September 1 of the following school year, a refund will be issued. Contact for the Jurong East Library: Mrs. Lisa Patton: lisa.patton@cis.edu.sg


ACADEMIC RESOURCE AND STUDENT SUCCESS PROGRAMME Academic Resource Programme The Academic Resource Programme provides academic support for those students with learning exceptionalities. It is a broad-based programme, offering support to students, regular classroom teachers, and parents. All students are registered in regular classes and must function with a minimum of special assistance. CIS may not be able to facilitate all students with academic, emotional or physical exceptionalities. If your child is receiving special services, such as learning resource instruction, remedial teaching, speech or language therapy or seeing an educational specialist outside the regular classroom, please contact the academic resource teacher to discuss your child’s situation before making a decision to come to CIS. Parents of prospective students are advised that the school is able to serve only those students with learning or behaviour exceptionalities, who are able to function in the regular programme with minimal support. The Canadian International School reserves the right to refuse admission to any student for whom an appropriate educational programme or support service is not currently available. Teacher: Mrs. Melissa Ansbacher (melissa.ansbacher@cis.edu.sg)

Student Success Programme Who is involved? •

• • •

Students who have not achieved academic success due to a number of reasons. (subject difficulty, language, learning style, effort, organization, attendance/lates). Student Success Coordinators will meet with and outline steps for the students to take in order to improve. Teaching staff: Departments will be involved in scheduled, subject specific tutorials. Parents/Guardians: Encourage and support their child/charge.

• •

Teaching staff will begin scheduled tuition sessions. Attendance. There is a compulsory attendance component for their sessions.

ProgramMEs: We recognize the individual needs and styles of each student so there will be various programmes for each one. However, many common elements will be present that they must follow. • •

• •

Attend regularly scheduled meeting with their designated mentor. Attendance at their designated tuition sessions. These will involve some or all of the following: lunch sessions, 3:30 p.m. to 4:10 p.m. sessions, and possibly in class assistance. Assignment and homework tracking. Parents/guardians will be notified of the specific programme the student must follow.

Consequences: We would like to have the full support of the student in this programme as it is for their benefit. Our goal is to assist and guide them to improve. Should they not make the necessary efforts in the programme the following steps will take place. • • • • •

Discussion with designated mentor to review the reasons that they are in the programme and the importance of maintaining their plan. Letter home indicating lack of commitment to their success at CIS. Increase the after school sessions. Meeting with administration, to reinforce the severity of their actions. Possibly asked to resign from CIS.

How does it work? •

Students are identified during promotion committee meetings at report times. Letters are included with reports so that parents/ guardians and students are aware of the situation. Mentors will contact students at the earliest convenience and outline the steps they will need to follow. 2011/2012 CURRICULUM GUIDE - 67


HOMEWORK, EXCURSION WEEK AND COMMUNITY OUTREACH Homework Homework assignments are used to reinforce new concepts and skills and to help build desirable work and study habits. The amount of time that students spend doing homework will vary somewhat from day to day, with the ability and diligence of the individual learner and a student’s programme and grade level. We ask that parents give support and encouragement for their child in developing good work and study habits by: • • • • • •

Talking with your child about what he or she is learning. Establishing a specific nightly homework period. Providing a quiet place to study. Being available to answer questions. Reviewing completed work. Informing the teacher when problems arise.

Excursion Week Excursion Week provides an opportunity for students to experience meaningful learning that helps them on their journey to becoming informed, purposeful, and active global citizens. A series of trips will be offered that will challenge our students from a variety of angles, helping them to better experience and enjoy the Defining Years. All Grade 10 and 12 students are expected to participate in Excursion Week. Grade 10 students will be traveling to Vietnam and Grade 12 students will have a selection of trips that historically have visited Cambodia, India, Malaysia, Thailand, Indonesia and New Zealand.

Community Outreach Students in High School undertake numerous Community outreach projects at CIS. We work in partnership with development projects in Cambodia, India and Indonesia, and with charities here in Singapore. These charities are supported through our IB DP CAS and OSSD Community Service requirements as well as our Excursion Week opportunities. For over fifteen years, students and teachers have been raising funds for Tabitha, a development programme founded by Canadian, Janne Ritskes. Each year a group of committed high school students travel to Cambodia to build houses and to undertake various service projects. CIS supports the Maryknoll AIDS Hospice in Phnom Penh, the NHCC (New Hope for Cambodia Childrens’ Orphanage), and the People’s Improvement Organization, who sponsors 3 schools at the city dump. In Ladakh, India students have been supporting the dental and reforestation programmes initiated by Bill Kite at the Lamdon School. For the third year CIS students have

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demonstrated how to brush teeth, donated toothbrushes and toothpaste, and planted trees for the community of Lamdon School. Last year, a group of students visited a village on Bintan, Indonesia and worked with orphans to improve their facilities. Locally, students and teachers are proud to participate in a yearly worldwide cancer fundraiser, the Run for Hope in memory of Canadian hero, Terry Fox. We also join forces with the Canadian Association in December each year to collect teddy bears, educational toys, and raise funds for children with Cerebral Palsy. Other charities and causes are addressed throughout the year as needs arise.



High School Curriculum Guide