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that were far beyond the subject matter of the class. His questions usually had no particular relevance to the basics that were being taught, but were probably for the purpose of showing off how much he already knew. Much of the time, the teachers could not adequately answer his questions, which, I am sure, added to his enormous ego. Try to limit your questions to things that have been mentioned in class or that you feel will help yourself and others to understand the important concepts. The point is not to make the teacher feel stupid because he or she can’t answer questions, but rather to clarify and support the ideas on which the teacher is focusing. It is also a good idea to add your own opinions and insights at appropriate times during lectures. If you notice something new or have a comment that will help everyone understand, don’t be afraid to raise your hand and share this information. The teacher will see that you are thinking about what is being said. Nothing pleases a teacher more than to have inspired a student. If you make this inspiration known, your teacher will begin to think very highly of you and will know that you are putting forth your best effort. Unfortunately, some classes are so large that this kind of participation is not possible. I had at least three college classes in which there were over five hundred students enrolled. The chance that your teacher will see you and remember you, let alone take a personal interest in your well being, is very slim.

In these

circumstances, the best way to let the teacher know that you are

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Learning to Succeed and Succeeding to Learn: The Smart Way to Earn Better Grades in School  

A light-hearted and informative guide to help dedicated students learn the keys to success in school and in life.

Learning to Succeed and Succeeding to Learn: The Smart Way to Earn Better Grades in School  

A light-hearted and informative guide to help dedicated students learn the keys to success in school and in life.

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