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CIRCA

JULY

AUGUST

SEPTEMBER 2021

s w e e t s l i c e s o f s u m m e r • P RO P E R P RU N I N G • T H E F O C U S O N C O N TAC T S • C R A F T I N G . . . FA R M H O U S E S T Y L E • S T O R M R E A DY T H E P U L L O F P U L L E N PA R K • T H E S U M M E R O F S ' M O R E S • S AY G O O D B Y E T O S U M M E R S TA I N S • I T ' S K I D N E Y S T O N E S E A S O N C O O L S U M M E R S L AW S • S L E E P . . . W H E R E H AV E YO U G O N E ? • TA K E M E T O YO U R S E LT Z E R • s a f e s u m m e r g r i l l i n g • A N D M O R E

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A WORD FROM THE PUBLISHER

Welcome summer! If you’re like me, you’re super excited about its arrival … the weather is warm, the days are longer, and after a crazy time like no other, life feels like it’s getting back to normal. A far cry from this time last year. But I’m not going to dwell on how crazy it’s been – nope, I’m going to focus on all the summer bliss that lies ahead! While every season here in North Carolina is pretty darn wonderful, our summers are particularly awesome – full of sunshine, beautiful blue skies, fun and adventure, sprinkled with a bit of relaxation and rejuvenation. And our summer issue is full of ways for you to enjoy the perfect summer – whether with food and family or simply celebrating the season. Let me start with food – after all, it’s featured right on the front cover. Fresh pineapple just screams summer, and you can find several refreshing recipes for it in “Sweet Slices Of Summer.” It also pops up as possible ingredients elsewhere in this issue, so be on the lookout – perhaps in the “Cooked in (Non) Tradition” feature that shares tasty twists to the traditional summer staple, the s’more. And maybe the delectable pineapple is mentioned in “Cool Summer Slaws” as a unique addition to the popular cookout side. Is grilled pineapple on your summer menu tonight? If so, be sure to check out “Safe Summer Grilling” to ensure you enjoy the sizzle, not a hazardous fizzle. When it comes to enjoying time with loved ones, there is no better time than summer. If you’re looking for something fun to do while the kids are out of school, check out this issue’s “Hidden Gem” to learn more about what awaits at the local treasure that is Pullen Park. Want a quick escape but don’t want to go too far away? The nearby Sandhills, showcased in the “Driveable Destination” feature, illustrates that this region of our state has fun for all – not just the golf lover in your life. And be sure to read all about the many exciting activities the Town of Wake Forest has planned now that state restrictions have been lifted – go ahead and get that calendar back out … there’s so much to add that is sure to make this summer one to remember! Check out these awesome articles, and the many more shared by our wonderful writers. We’ve got health and wellness pieces, such as “The Focus On Contacts,” “Too Much Elbow Grease?” and “It’s Kidney Stone Season,” to name a few. Tips for properly pruning your plants, trees, and shrubs, as well as how to make your own mosquito repellent can be found. You will discover design tips, tricks, and helpful hints if you’re looking to make a decorating change. “Storm Ready” will help you prepare for summer storms and possible power outages. All this, and much more awaits in this issue of CIRCA. Once again, I’m going to close with a great big “thank you” to the many businesses, writers, distribution locations, and readers who are part of the CIRCA Magazine family. I couldn’t do this without them. And while you’re enjoying a super summer of fun, be sure to also support our many loyal advertisers, and please tell them you saw their ads in this edition of CIRCA. ’Til next time!


J U LY • A U G U S T • S E P T E M B E R 2 0 2 1 6

Hey Wake Forest – We’re B-A-A-A-C-K!

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Pesty Plants – Do Mosquito Repellent Plants Really Repel?

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Cool Summer Slaws

14 It’s Hot Out There – Think The Housing Market Is Going To Cool? Think Again ... 16 It’s Kidney Stone Season – Prevention, Treatment, And Relief 18

Say Goodbye To Summer Stains

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Crafting ... Farmhouse Style

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Take Me To Your Seltzer

24 Driveable Destination – The Sandhills ... Not Just A Golfer’s Paradise 26

Cooked In (Non) Tradition – The Summer Of S’Mores

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Outdoor Living – Create The Perfect Outside Area To Eat, Work, And Play

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Proper Pruning

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Sleep ... Where Have You Gone?

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Good Reads

38 Storm Ready – Getting Ready For Summer Storms And Possible Power Outages 40

Decor Dilemma? Design Tips, Tricks, And Helpful Hints

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Hidden Gem – The Pull Of Pullen Park

44 The Menopause Transition – Yes, You Can Enjoy The Journey

PUBLISHER & EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Kent Lower CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Allison Caudle Abbott Dr. Thomas Pendergrast Nick Pione Robyn Goss Bennai Rhonda Benvie Plummer Buck Buchanan Dolores Riggins Margarita Cohen Dr. Edmond Suh Sommer Donahoe Jimmy Tompkins Grace Lower Thomas Walters Suzanne Lucey Samantha McPherson Town of Wake Forest Wake Electric Stacey Moritz WakeMed Ed Morris Dr. Hajira Yasmin Todd Nelson Joe O’Keefe

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You Are What You Eat – The Truth About Vanilla

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Feeling A Tad Sensitive? What Causes Sensitive Teeth And How To Treat It

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Safe Summer Grilling – Enjoy The Sizzle, Not The Hazardous Fizzle ... Grilling Safety Tips Are The Key For Enjoying Summertime Cookouts

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The Focus On Contacts

MANAGERS Kent Lower & Mitch Lower

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Too Much Elbow Grease? The Causes, Treatments, And Role Of MRI For Elbow Pain

Printed by Walton Press Inc.

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Our Heritage – May 21, 1956: The Day The College Moved

CONTACT INFORMATION BallPointe Publishing & Design, LLC P.O. Box 1182 Wake Forest, NC 27588 919.453.2555 • info@circamagazine.com circamagazine.com ADVERTISING SALES 919.453.2555 • info@circamagazine.com

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CIRCA Magazine is published quarterly by BallPointe Publishing & Design, LLC. All rights reserved. No part of this magazine may be reproduced or transmitted without the written permission of the publisher. Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained within; however, BallPointe Publishing & Design assumes no liability for accuracy or omissions.


HEY WAKE FOREST WE'RE B-A-A-A-C-K!

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BY TOWN OF WAKE FOREST

ow that North Carolina has lifted all indoor and outdoor capacity requirements and masks and social distancing are no longer required, the Town of Wake Forest is pleased to announce the return of several popular in-person events.

“From the outset of the pandemic, we said that once state restrictions were lifted, we’d resume hosting in-person events,” said Mayor Vivian Jones. “We’re beyond thrilled that we can resume gathering in-person with our family and friends for so many of our favorite community events.” Just in time for summer, here’s a listing of upcoming events so you can mark your calendar and make plans to attend!

FAMILY MOVIE NIGHTS AT JOYNER PARK Enjoy a movie – or two – under the stars. The Wake Forest Parks, Recreation & Cultural Resources Department is pleased to offer two free movie nights this summer. Join us on Saturday, July 24, for Aladdin (2019) and Saturday, August 7, for Black Panther. Free and open to the public, the movie screenings begin at dusk, around 8:30 PM. Bring chairs or a blanket and arrive early to give you and your family time to find a spot before the movie begins. You may also want to bring bug spray, a flashlight, and an umbrella – just in case. Food trucks will not be on-site this summer, but families are welcome to bring their own food and non-alcoholic beverages.

SIX SUNDAYS IN FALL We missed Six Sundays in Spring this year, so we’re making up for it by offering Six Sundays in Fall on six consecutive Sunday afternoons from September 5 through October 10. Bring the kids, friends, a picnic, and a blanket and settle in for some foot-tapping, finger-snapping good times. Sponsored by ARTS Wake Forest in partnership with Wake Forest Parks, Recreation & Cultural Resources, these free concerts take place from 5:00 PM – 7:00 PM at the E. Carroll Joyner Park Amphitheater. Families are encouraged 6

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to bring their own food or snacks as there will be no food trucks or refreshments on-site. The September 5 concert will be held in conjunction with Wake Forest Unplugged, which will feature a variety of organized games and activities. These concerts typically take place rain or shine, so make plans now to join your friends and neighbors at Joyner Park and make this year’s Six Sundays in Fall your best Sundays of the year.

FRIDAY NIGHT ON WHITE Friday Night on White returns to Downtown Wake Forest on Friday, September 10. Crush, one of our area’s most popular party bands, will perform along South White Street from 6:00 PM – 9:00 PM. While you’re downtown, check out the sponsor expo, visit the variety of outstanding dining establishments, or enjoy delicious food from several food trucks that will be on-site. Beer and wine will also be available for purchase, but age identification is required. So grab your lawn chair and come enjoy the music while experiencing the undeniable charm of Downtown Wake Forest. See you there!

LEGACY MOTOWN REVUE The July 24 Malpass Brothers concert is already sold out, but plenty of tickets are available for our Rockin’ the Forest concert featuring Legacy Motown Revue on Friday, September 24. The Legacy Motown Revue pays tribute to the legendary icons of Motown. Backed by an amazing six-piece horn section, the four talented performers dance, sing, and transport you back to one of the most influential periods in musical history. The bar will be open for wine, beer, and other refreshment purchases. Tickets go on sale July 30, and can be bought online or at the Renaissance Centre Box Office. Reserved seats are $25 and general admission is $15. In case you’re interested, the Renaissance Centre also offers an interesting variety of camps and workshops, including Musical Theatre Studio and the Golden Age of Gaming for Lego-Loving Adults. To view the full list of camps and workshops, or to purchase tickets to an upcoming performance, visit wakeforestrencen.org.

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But wait, there’s more! Save the dates for these upcoming events later this year.

surroundings could make an elegant backdrop for the drop-dead gorgeous as well as those who simply drop dead! So, grab your camera and your autograph book and get ready for a taste of show business as you’ve never sampled before. Guests are encouraged to dress in their best red-carpet attire, or come as you are. Tickets are $45, which includes a three-course dinner catered by Crumbstruction. For tickets, visit wakeforestrencen.org.

SPIRITS OF WAKE FOREST If you’re looking for a “hauntingly” good time this fall season, then don’t miss the “Spirits of Wake Forest” ghost walk returning to Downtown Wake Forest. Presented by Wake Forest Downtown, Inc., these tours will be offered Thursdays, Fridays, and Saturdays in October. Ticket information coming soon!

WAKE FOREST CARES HOLIDAY KICK-OFF

HALLOWEEN BOO BASH A free, family-oriented festival for children ages 12 and younger, the Halloween Boo Bash is scheduled for Thursday, October 21, at Joyner Park Community Center. Get your costumes and candy bags ready.

Our Wake Forest Cares Holiday Kick-Off is coming to Downtown Wake Forest on Saturday, November 13. Join us as we welcome the holiday season with an array of family-friendly activities, plus a late afternoon concert featuring the ACE Party Band playing hits from Top 40, Rock, R&B, Beach, and Motown.

MURDER MYSTERY DINNER THEATRE – LIGHTS! CAMERA! MURDER!

ROCKIN’ THE FOREST

The Wake Forest Renaissance Centre’s next Murder Mystery Dinner Theatre – “Lights! Camera! Murder!” – is set for Saturday, October 30. Welcome to the “Gimme Awards,” North Carolina’s answer to the Academy Awards. Each year, prizes go to the best in the growing film industry that makes our state a leader in film and television production. This year’s awards are being held at the Renaissance Centre. The posh

CIRCA Magazine

Everybody’s favorite beach music band, The Band of Oz, is coming to the Wake Forest Renaissance Centre on Saturday, November 20. Once the cool temperatures arrive this fall and you find yourself longing for summer and the sweet sounds of beach music, meet your friends for some summertime fun featuring the live music of this dynamic eight-member group. The

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bar will be open for wine, beer, and other refreshment purchases. VIP seats are $40, reserved seats are $25, and general admission tickets are $15. For more information, visit wakeforestrencen.org.

LIGHTING OF WAKE FOREST Experience the wonder and magic of the holiday season in Town Hall’s Centennial Plaza on Friday, December 3. The evening’s festivities will get underway with the lighting of the Town’s 30-feet-tall Christmas tree, followed by Santa Claus’ exciting arrival aboard a Wake Forest fire truck. This is a night you won’t want to miss!

DOWNTOWN HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE Join us in historic Downtown Wake Forest on Saturday, December 4 for a hearty dose of holiday cheer. The Town of Wake Forest is hard at work planning a full array of activities to round out 2021. As of press time, all information is current. Additional details about Town happenings will be provided in the coming weeks. In the meantime, area residents are urged to sign up for special events reminders via E-Notifier at www.wakeforestnc.gov/ communications/e-notifier. You may also visit our website at wakeforestnc.gov and search “meetings and events.” 

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READY TO BUY OR SELL? CONTAC

WITH OVER A DECADE OF EXPERI THE LOCAL MARKET, WE PROV PROFESSIONAL AND PERSONAL SERVICES FOR BOTH BUYERS AND


CT ALLISON!

ENCE IN VIDE LIZED SELLERS


THE SCIENCE BEHIND THE PLANT There has been a substantial amount of scientific research applied to the theory that plants have the ability to repel mosquitoes. All of the research I read showed there is no significant difference in the number of mosquitoes landing on a human subject when plants are present versus not. This applies to all the plants just mentioned, including citronella. While on the surface, I’m sure this sounds surprising – but it can be better understood when you dig deeper. While a lavender plant smells delightful when you bend over to smell it, it does not fill the air around you with fragrance. Rather, plants release a significant amount of their fragrant oils only when crushed. It is this extract that contains the repellent properties, and only when the active ingredients within it are applied to the skin.

HOMEMADE MOSQUITO REPELLENT

PESTY

BY MARGARITA COHEN

So, if mosquito repellent plants do not really exist, at least in their plant form, what about the option of homemade mosquito repellents? There are certainly plenty of recipes out there. Before we get to those, here a few important reminders: – The effectiveness of homemade repellent wears off relatively quickly compared to DEET, so be prepared to reapply every few hours. – For some, essential oils can trigger skin reactions, so always do a patch check on yourself, as well as kids, who can be more sensitive. – Essential oils have a limited life, so it is best to store your homemade repellent in a dark-colored bottle and a dark, cool place.

PLANTS DO MOSQUITO REPELLENT PLANTS REALLY REPEL?

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or gardeners, nothing is more delightful than time spent caring for and cultivating plants. But what can ruin this pastime more than a mosquito? Over the years, numerous articles have been written detailing various mosquito repellent plants that allow gardeners to get back to enjoying their yards again. Almost all of these plants, including citronella, mints, lemon balm, lavender, marigolds, petunias, basil, and lemongrass, are fragrant. Since mosquitoes locate us by smell, it seems logical that a fragrant plant would impede their ability to find us, right? They can sniff out our carbon dioxide fumes from over 150 feet away, so perhaps this is why the concept of their repelling mosquitoes gained traction. 10

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Essential oils from lavender, rosemary, eucalyptus, lemongrass, and other “mosquito repellent plants” (AKA plant oils) can be combined with a carrier oil (olive, almond, and grapeseed are great ones) and witch hazel, along with ½ teaspoon of vodka, which acts as a preservative. It takes quite a bit to repel the mosquitoes, so be prepared to add about 100 drops of your plant oil to two tablespoons of your carrier oil. Herbal repellents work the same way, using essential oils from basil or rosemary to get the job done. It is a good idea to visit the EPA website (EPA.gov) for more guidance on skin repellents. There you will find an excellent search tool for discovering the one that is right for you. And for you DIY folks, try using the ingredients and recipes found within these articles: Healthline.Com’s “10 Natural Ingredients that Repel Mosquitoes” and HomemadeHints.Com’s “Natural Homemade Mosquito Repellent as Effective as DEET.” Basically, there is truly no such thing as a mosquito repellent plant (but of course, you can still enjoy the beauty these plants provide to your garden – just don’t count on them to rid your yard of pesky pests). Instead, enjoy their fragrance via essential oils and make your own short-term mosquito repellent. In previous articles, I discussed that we are actively participating in the EPA’s Pesticide Partnership Environmental Stewardship Program. As part of our local efforts, we have introduced new products that rely on similar ingredients derived from natural sources to rid yards of those darned mosquitoes. Leveraging only botanicals and essential oils, these products are proving to be extremely effective, and like synthetics, resilient to our North Carolina weather.

A FINAL TIP Let me close with one quick and easy tip that you can do in your yard to reduce the mosquito population – eliminate stagnant water! It is important to remember that the number one source for mosquitoes is water. If you do not treat and manage the water in your yard, you will never garden alone. Just one teaspoon is enough water for mosquitoes to lay 200 to 300 eggs. It takes three to five days for mosquito eggs to hatch. Just walking your yard and getting rid of any standing water within a day or two after it rains can go a long way in reducing the mosquito population in it. I realize that around here in the summertime, this can turn out to be a daily activity … but I think you’ll find the 15 minutes it might take well worth it!  Margarita Cohen is the owner of Mosquito Joe of Raleigh – Durham – Chapel Hill, making “Outside Fun Again” with mosquito, tick, and flea control treatments for residential and commercial customers. For more information, or to schedule a treatment, call 919-926-8851 or visit Raleigh-Durham-Chapelhill.MosquitoJoe.com.

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delicious ingredients provide the inspiration for creating healthy new slaws that can stand up to any dish. Kale, Swiss chard, and bok choy are among my favorites, but I also love incorporating unique additions like snap peas, fennel, apples, and broccoli – and even mango or grilled pineapple from time to time. When making your own slaw, go ahead and experiment with textures and flavors. Maybe toss in some nuts for a heart-healty, Omega-3 boost, or add some beans or chickpeas for a protein-packed dish. No matter which route you go, it’s sure to complement any of your summer grilling mainstays.

BY STACEY MORITZ

COOL SUMMER

SLAWS

While most people tend to go with a mayonnaise-based dressing, keep in mind there are many delectable vinegar-based dressings that will please even the most die-hard slaw lover. One of my favorites for summer slaw has a more sweet-and-sour base – simply take a bit of oil (canola, vegetable, or avocado are great options for this), whisk it with an apple cider vinegar, and add a little sugar, agave, or honey. The perfect topping for your pulled pork sammie! If you really want to kick things up for your summer cookout, consider experimenting with rice wine vinegar, or even a little citrus juice in place of vinegar. Doing so will for sure add some tasty zing and completely change your slaw’s flavor profile, allowing you to create the perfect accompaniment to your meal.

Summer is in full swing, and we are finally able to gather

again with family and friends. What better way to celebrate together than gathering around the grill in the backyard and enjoying some of summer’s best eating? While burgers, fish, or steaks might be the stars of your cookout, you can’t have the perfect meal without your best supporting sides! Potato salads and pastas are always a hit, but in my book, slaw – the crunchy, sometimes savory, sometimes sweet, good-for-you slaw – is the queen of the South.

B

onus – many of us don’t consume the daily recommended dose of vegetables … cole slaws are a delicious and easy way to get some of those veggies and their nutritional benefits, all in one dish.

Everyone has their favorite slaw staple from childhood, and chances are most are made from green cabbage and carrots – and quite possibly a little too much mayonnaise. Sure, cabbage is the main ingredient in any slaw recipe, but trust me – there are many awesome ways to elevate cole slaw that will add taste, texture, and tang to summer’s favorite side … so much so that it will deserve prime time billing. As a restaurant owner, I am blessed to partner with several local farmers who provide amazing organic greens and veggies. These 12

CIRCA Magazine

If you still prefer a creamier cole slaw but don’t want the calories that come with mayo, consider using Greek yogurt in its place. This allows for a flavorful slaw option, and a healthier one as well. My slaw passion of late leans toward southwest and Asian flavors. Starting with a base of green or napa cabbage, I love to toss in red cabbage and hearty greens like Swiss chard and kale. This beautiful base of contrasting color and texture provides the perfect canvas to add veggies, herbs, or fruit. Add some kick to your favorite grilled meat or fish by topping with a slaw that contains a little spice and citrus vinaigrette, or cool things down with a little sweetness from grilled pineapple or your favorite stone fruits – the ideal accompaniment for a spicy dish like chipotle chicken or fish tacos. Mixing in a handful of fresh herbs like cilantro or chopped jalapeños or tossing with grated ginger along with a squeeze of your favorite citrus fruit will also allow all the fabulous flavors to come together. Now that summer is heating up, I highly encourage you to ramp up your slaw game. Not only will you have some healthy, culinary fun, you might also become the queen or king of the neighborhood cookout!  Stacey Moritz is the owner of The Lemon Tree Cafe, located at 113 S. White Street in Downtown Wake Forest (919-521-5806), offering freshly prepared salads, pastas, soups, and take-away fare. The Lemon Tree Cafe serves breakfast and lunch Monday - Friday, 7:30 AM - 5:00 PM and Saturdays 7:30 AM - 3:00 PM.

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We’ve got your back. WakeMed Women’s From pregnancy and childbirth to mammograms, menopause and more, the care is compassionate, comprehensive and here for you at every life stage. Inpatient and outpatient surgery. Specialty and subspecialty services. Urgent care and emergency care. Diagnostics and imaging. Rehabilitation and more. How much more? Let’s just say, at WakeMed Women’s, we’ve got a lot more than your back. wakemed.org/womens-services


A BY ALLISON CAUDLE ABBOTT

pple planting roots in the Triangle says a lot about North Carolina, and the region itself. Our area is already home to many high-profile companies, including the Amazon distribution center in Garner, IBM in Durham, Lenovo in Morrisville, and many more. Not only will the addition of Apple create numerous jobs and attract many other companies to the area, it also further legitimizes and establishes the Triangle as a place where high-profile companies can succeed and thrive.      This news comes at a time when housing inventory here is already at an all-time low. As of the writing of this article, there were 1,700 active properties listed in the Triangle Multiple Listing Service, with only 74 of those being in Wake Forest – and of those 74, only 63 were detached properties (otherwise known as single family homes.)   Although home prices have skyrocketed over the past 12 months, this increase will likely continue for some time, simply due to supply versus demand. For new construction homes, not only will supply and demand have an impact on sale price, but also the increased cost of lumber and other building supplies. For sellers, they are finding themselves turning a lucrative profit on their homes, on average. Many are seeing multiple offers come flooding in after their house is on the market for less than 24 hours.

IT'S HOT OUT THERE THINK THE HOUSING MARKET IS GOING TO COOL? THINK AGAIN ... On April 26, 2021, Apple made an announcement that they will be settling down in the Triangle, a move that will create thousands of high-paying jobs over the next five years. The landing of Apple in the area is huge and will likely attract

Special event spaces & catering Summer concerts & outdoor events Epic beer and fantastic food

many other people and companies around the country to the Wake Forest/Raleigh/Durham area. Their one-million square foot building will contain over 3,000 jobs, ranging from artificial intelligence, software engineering, and more. The company will also be investing $100 million dollars into schools throughout the Triangle area. 14

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For buyers, this means the need to move quickly when a house comes on the market that fits the wants and needs of what that buyer is looking for. For many potential homebuyers, gone are the days of planning out a weekend ahead of time for touring houses. In this market, they are experiencing a high sense of urgency, sight unseen offers, a race against time to get offers in before deadlines, understanding multiple offer situations, and high due diligence deposits. With a hot, fast, and ever-changing market, regardless if you are a buyer or seller, it’s imperative to have an experienced agent to hold your hand and walk you through these scenarios to minimize any surprises and stress.   As it always has been, buying and selling a home can be a very exciting, yet stressful time. With this current housing market, that stress level can seem even more overwhelming at times if you’re not prepared. Communication, experience, and trust is key for a successful transaction as you embark on a journey towards home ownership – whether that be a first home, downsizing, growing into a new home, or a new opportunity.  Allison Caudle Abbott is the owner and broker-in-charge of Southern Lux Living, serving buyers and sellers throughout the Triangle. She may be reached at 919-395-6186 or visit www.southernluxliving.com.

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IT'S KIDNEY

STONE

SEASON 5 PREVENTION, TREATMENT, AND RELIEF

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idney stones are comprised of tiny crystals that form inside the kidney. These solid masses may form one at a time or several may form all at once. Did you know that North Carolina is home to the highest rate of kidney stones in the country? And with the number one cause of kidney stones being dehydration, summer in N.C. is considered primetime kidney stone season. We reached out to Dr. Carmin Kalorin and Dr. Matthew Lyons from WakeMed Urology – which handles more kidney stones than nearly any urology group in the state – to talk all things kidney stones.

WHAT’S IN A STONE? Kidney stones are clusters of crystals that develop when the levels of calcium, oxalate, and phosphorus in the urine get too high. Each of these minerals is normally found in urine and doesn’t cause problems at normal levels; stones can form if your urine contains more of these crystal-forming minerals than the fluid in it can dilute.

WHAT ARE THE SYMPTOMS? The most common sign of a kidney stone is severe, sudden, sharp pain under the rib cage on the right or left side of the body (where your kidneys are located). Other possible symptoms include nausea, fever, and/or urinary symptoms such as blood in the urine or the urge to go more often. The pain can come on suddenly and potentially disappear just as quickly. This is because the pain occurs only when the stone(s) block the flow of urine to the bladder, and because stones are often small enough to move around, it can come and go.

TIPS FOR AVOIDING KIDNEY STONES “Once you’ve had a kidney stone, you have a 50% chance of making another stone if you change nothing in your diet or lifestyle,” Dr. Kalorin explains. BECOME A WATER BOTTLE PERSON. “We see a consistent increase in the number of kidney stone cases every summer, especially 16

CIRCA Magazine

once people start spending more time in the heat and aren’t staying as hydrated as they need to,” adds Dr. Lyons. To stay hydrated enough to prevent kidney stones, you need to drink 80 to 100 ounces of water a day – which isn’t easy to do if you aren’t paying attention and/or don’t have water on hand at all times. That’s why Dr. Lyons also recommends investing in a nice water bottle and carrying it everywhere you go. DRINK FRESH-SQUEEZED JUICE. Adding fresh-squeezed lemon or lime juice to your water every day can increase urinary citrate levels, which can help prevent kidney stones. While it doesn’t work quite as well as the prescribed potassium citrate given to patients with recurring stones, it’s a great natural option for those who prefer to avoid medications or have never had a kidney stone. FOCUS ON DIET. Dr. Lyons jokes that you should avoid everything that tastes good to prevent kidney stones. In truth, foods that are high in salt and animal protein (i.e. meat, poultry, eggs) can increase your risk of kidney stones. Other foods and drinks to avoid in excess include nuts, chocolate, spinach, rhubarb, carbonated drinks, and tea. If you experience the symptoms of kidney stones, it is recommended that you contact a medical professional. Evaluation and diagnosis may include a combination of imaging studies and a physical exam. If kidney stones are found, he or she can help you determine which treatment option is best for you.  The WakeMed Kidney Stone Center is a dedicated, 24-hour hotline for patients dealing with emergent, acute, or chronic kidney stones. With one call to the “Stone Phone” at 919-350-ROCK (7625), patients can get relief, advice, and access to an expert team and the latest minimally-invasive treatment options. By providing immediate access to care, the Kidney Stone Center means patients don’t have to wait in pain for extended amounts of time. Depending on a patient’s history of kidney stones and symptoms, the Kidney Stone Center can call in prescriptions, arrange same-day appointments with board-certified urologists with WakeMed Urology (five locations), and admit patients to the hospital directly for treatment. To learn more, visit wakemed.org/kidney-stone-center.

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SUMMER

SAY GOODBYE TO

STAINS Summer is a season for swimming pools, running through sprinklers, water balloon fights, tree climbing, gardening, grilling out, and al fresco dining. Sadly, that also makes it prime season for hard-to-treat clothing stains — such as ground-in dirt; grass; popsicles; ice cream; brightly-colored drinks; ketchup, mustard, and other condiments; and blood from the occasional scrape or cut.

S

o to help you enjoy some big summer fun without any stress, keep this simple summer-stain removal guide on hand. Here’s to a season of stain-free clothes, no matter how messy your adventures get!

First, a few universal rules for treating stains: – Test the solution somewhere inconspicuous, such as inside and near a seam, to ensure it will not damage or discolor the fabric. – Do the least possible needed to remove a stain. In fact, repeat gentler steps several times before moving to harsher methods that could discolor or damage fabrics. – Air dry between treatments, as some stains reappear only after a fabric dries completely. – Never mix stain-fighting solutions, especially chlorine bleach with ammonia, as this can generate poisonous fumes. – Do not heat/tumble dry a garment until you are sure a stain is gone completely, as this could “set” the stain forever. In rare cases, it can also cause oil-based stains to ignite. – When in doubt (or unsuccessful at removing a stain), check with a cleaning professional. Stain chemistry will dictate which basic removal solution to use, but the same four-step treatment method generally applies. 1. Promptly blot away as much of the stain as you can using paper towels or a clean white cloth. For dried stains, use a plastic tool or the back of a butter knife to scrape away as much as possible, starting at the edges and working inward; then, re-wet the stain with cold water. 18

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BY TODD NELSON

2. Spritz, sponge, or dab your chosen solution onto the stain and blot away gently with a paper towel or clean white cloth. Continue this step, rotating your cloth, until no more of the stain is transferring. 3. Allow the stained area to dry completely, then repeat steps 1 and 2 several times before moving on to harsher or storebought stain-removal solutions, which carry higher risks of damaging fabrics (including causing summer whites to yellow irrevocably). 4. Once you are satisfied that the stain has been completely removed, either launder the garment as you normally would, or be sure to rinse away solution residues thoroughly and blot or allow to air dry.

The stage is set for unlimited possibilities! At Kiddie Academy® of Wake Forest, we encourage your child to step out, be bold and act on their natural curiosity. We believe that sense of discovery helps nurture a love for learning that reaches beyond our walls and lasts a lifetime. Schedule your visit to find out more.

Now pre-enrolling at Kiddie Academy of Wake Forest 945 Gateway Commons Circle Wake Forest, NC 27587 kiddieacademy.com/wake-forest (984) 251-1550

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Following are suggested cleaning solutions, depending on the summer-stain type. – Salad dressing/mayonnaise: Speed is of the essence with oilbased stains, as allowing them to dry can cause permanent setting (also creating a small, but noteworthy future ignition risk when heat drying). It’s also important to pretreat oil-based stains with chemical agents, such as regular laundry detergent or greasefighting dishwashing liquid, which are both designed to bind with and lift away oily molecules. Allow your stain remover of choice to work chemically for at least 15-20 minutes before blotting and rinsing with the hottest possible water that is safe for the fabric you are treating. Be especially patient with repeating steps 1 and 2 before laundering and heat drying. – Mud/ground-in dirt: If it’s fresh mud you are dealing with – hopefully from puddle stomping or dancing in the rain – it is best to allow the stain to dry, then scrape or brush away as much dirt as possible before pretreating. Rubbing or blotting can cause a mud/dirt stain to spread and become even more entrenched in fabric fibers. That said, dirt is a combination stain with oily elements, so you need a chemical solution – regular laundry or dishwashing detergent – to bond with and lift away particles. – Grass: Using a 1:1 solution of white vinegar and cold water, soak the stain for 15 to 30 minutes, then scrub gently with a small, nylon-bristled brush (such as a toothbrush). – Sunscreen: Most sunscreens contain the ingredient avobenzone, which, when combined with water, causes rusty fabric stains. Avoid using any forms of bleach (chlorine or oxygen-based), opting instead for a solution specifically formulated to remove chemical rust. – Antiperspirant/deodorant: Commercial anti-perspirants and deodorants have potential to cause two kinds of stains – first, those unsightly white stains from careless applications, and second (and more difficult to treat), yellowing stains, especially in white fabrics, which are caused by the aluminum in these products. For the former, think weak acid-based solutions like lemon juice or hydrogen peroxide; white vinegar works too, but can also cause yellowing in white fabrics. For the latter, start with a baking soda paste before moving to a commercial whitening solution.  Todd Nelson is the owner of MaidPro of Raleigh and Wake Forest. Visit maidpro.com/ raleigh-north or call 919-871-9996.

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décor in any room in your house, and look simply stunning when hanging on the front door. Enough chatter – let’s get started! The first step is, of course, to gather your supplies. For this project, you will need 2-inch split wood balls, which can easily be found at craft stores and online, as well as a 12-inch bamboo wreath form (a large wood embroidery hoop can also be used). Pick up some greenery, artificial flowers, and wired ribbon of your choice as well. Grab the hot glue gun, glue sticks, and floral wire cutters, and you’re all set. Now the farmhouse crafting fun can begin. Glue the split wood beads onto the bamboo wreath frame by placing three dots of hot glue directly onto the form and attaching the balls, going all the way around. When you get back to the starting point, there will likely be a space not large enough to accommodate another bead. No worries! You can easily complete the circle with the previously mentioned flowers, greenery, and bow in this area. The simplest step is finished, but don’t fret – the remaining steps are almost as easy. BY DOLORES RIGGINS

CRAFTING ...

FARMHOUSE

When adding the embellishments, hot glue the greenery first. When I crafted my first beaded wreath, I glued two pieces of lamb’s ear, two to three inches in length, onto the frame, facing each other. Be careful not to glue the entire piece of greenery

STYLE

F

armhouse style – when I hear those two words, my mind immediately goes to beautiful shiplap walls, the perfect holiday mantel, the cool white porch … and dollar signs! I love the farmhouse style and try to tastefully incorporate bits and pieces of it into my décor when I can. However, sometimes when I see the price, I head on over to Pinterest to find directions for making the object of my farmhouse decorating desire myself. I love – and when I say love, I mean I LOVE – wreaths. Wreaths of all kinds – grapevine, deco mesh, rag, greenery – you name it, and I’ll try to make it. So, you can imagine my joy when I recently discovered my newest obsession … the adorable farmhouse beaded wreaths. These circular shaped objects of joy are so pretty in their simplicity, and are equally stunning when adorned with embellishments such as flowers, leaves, and ribbons. They can be made in different sizes, hung in a group or alone, and fit with just about any 20

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onto the wreath, as you’ll want to leave some loose to give your project some dimension. If you desire a fuller look, feel free to add more greenery. At this point it’s time to add some color by gluing the flowers onto the greenery. I recommend starting with three flowers of the same kind, such as peonies or sunflowers, with one being larger one and the other two smaller in size. Attach the larger of the three to the greenery, then glue the two smaller ones on either side, leaving a tad bit of space between them. For a bigger pop of color, adhere additional smaller blooms or groupings of berries in between the flowers and on the greenery. Allot space in the center of this area for the bow if you are choosing to add one. These wreaths are so versatile that you may decide you don’t need or want a bow this go round. But if you do opt for one, adding it will be your final step. For ease and to ensure it holds up well, be sure to use a wired ribbon. All you need to do is hot glue the tied bow to the allotted space. For a bit of decorating whimsy, why not feature the bow on the wreath’s side (as pictured), rather than the traditional top or bottom location? See how easy it was to create a beautifully beaded farmhouse wreath? But now, the question is, how do you hang your gorgeous creation? There are several easy options. First, simply place the wreath on the

wreath hook you may already have on your door. Or if you aren’t crazy about this method, cut a piece of thin, unwired ribbon or jute, loop it around the top of the wreath in between two split beads, and simply tie a knot or a bow at the top. These hang very nicely from a nail or screw in the wall. I have a good feeling that after you craft your first farmhouse beaded wreath, you won’t want to stop. Check out all the various bead and wreath frame sizes available. Make one that just has a bow or only one large flower. Perhaps add a galvanized metal word like “Hello” or “Welcome” for the perfect front door feature. Or go a little crafty crazy with smaller versions that make the cutest Christmas ornaments (it’s never too early to start thinking about Christmas, is it?). Why not paint the beads to match the colors of the nursery of the little one in your life for adorable wall decor? A farmhouse beaded wreath can be the perfect holiday addition to your decorating scheme. For Valentine’s Day, for instance, maybe opt for a heart-shaped wreath ring rather than the traditional circle, boasting roses rather than leaves. Think holly berries and leaves plus a “Merry and Bright” sign for Christmas. Use your imagination – the design option is entirely up to you. Enjoy crafting – farmhouse style!  Dolores Riggins is the co-owner of Southern Suds & Gifts, featuring over 35 craftsmen and artists, located at 213 S. White St. in Downtown Wake Forest (www.facebook.com/SouthernSudsAndGifts).

BUILDING A BRIGHTER ENERGY FUTURE We’re here to help you achieve your energy goals. With our regular residential and electric vehicle time-of-day rates, you can save money and go green by shifting your energy use to different times of the day!

Contact Wake Electric at 919.863.6300 to see how you can start saving money today. CIRCA Magazine

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currently offers a number of hard seltzers under the label Isla.

HERE TO STAY The pandemic has challenged all of our senses, and we all called into question our drinking and eating habits while we navigated the new normal, and now the newer normal. Seltzers, being lower in alcohol and calories, have allowed many folks to enjoy, while testing out different diets and different foods, a nice option for multiple drinks at a much lower ABV then wine. The ABV of the average wine is 11.5% to 16.5%. Two or three glasses at that level are quite a few calories. For beer lovers, a hard seltzer just feels less filling – because it is. BY JOE O’KEEFE

TAKE ME TO YOUR

SELTZER When I was in college, I had a professor who taught all

about paradigms and paradigm shifts. He thought he was training me to be a teacher (he was). But he probably did

The Carolina weather, with its proclivity for successive hot days in spring, summer, and fall make this market ripe for the hard seltzer option. Especially when you consider what I call the “N.C. late afternoon heat phenomenon” – it’s hotter at 5:00 PM than it is at 2:00 PM. Again, trying to maintain focus and waistline and still be refreshed with an alcoholic option make the hard seltzer a great elixir when hanging out or going out, during the summer months and pretty much all year long. So pick your flavor, pop a can, and you will have room for another. Cheers!  Joe O’Keefe is the founder of Wine & Beer 101, located at 1228 Heritage Links Dr., #104 in Wake Forest. They are offering deliveries throughout Wake Forest, virtual tastings, and live music. Stop by anytime for a drink or to chat.

more to prepare me for business than he could have ever imagined. Case in point (not pint), I give you the “seltzer craze.” This obsession is raging, and ladies and gentlemen, this shift is stuck in one direction at the moment – growth.

NOT A WINE COOLER Those of us who went to college in the ’80s have been mortified thinking this was a rebirth of the wine cooler phenomenon. Good news – seltzers are NOT wine coolers. They are crisp, refreshing alcoholic beverages … and at only 5% average alcohol content, a little friendlier to the waist. More on that later. This paradigm-shift actually began in Australia in 1993 with the development of a brand called Two Dogs, which was the first brewed alcoholic lemonade. This was followed up by the development of Mike’s Hard Lemonade. The rapidly growing popularity of non-alcoholic seltzers like LaCroix, Bubly, and others has led to the hard seltzer explosion over the past five years. The creation of a hard seltzer starts with the fermenting of sugar cane and then fruit flavors and carbonation added. As of 2019, the number one seltzer in the U.S. is White Claw. Sales of seltzer in America are currently 2.5 billion dollars. Budweiser, as well as many small breweries around the country, have followed suit and develop their own sub brands within their brewery offerings. In Raleigh, for instance, R&D Brewing Company 22

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DRIVEABLE

DESTINATION THE SANDHILLS ...

NOT JUST A GOLFER'S PARADISE If you live in North Carolina, you’ve surely heard of Pinehurst, known for its world-renowned golf facilities that have hosted numerous prestigious golf tournaments. The Pinehurst Resort is a stunning retreat, founded in 1895 by James Tufts, and was central in the development of the area. Amenities include a staggering nine golf courses, a spa, delicious dining, and various fitness activities. However, Pinehurst and its neighbor, Southern Pines, boast an array of other attractions, lending the area known as the Sandhills to be this edition’s “Driveable Destination.” Ranging from relaxing resorts to historic houses, small-business shopping to radiant restau-

BY GRACE LOWER

and kids alike can appreciate the beauty of the Weymouth Woods Sandhills Nature Preserve, which is home to short and easy ranger-led hikes, hundreds-of-years-old pine trees, unique ecology, and fun seasonal events (check out ncparks.gov for more information). Interested in the history of Pinehurst? Visit the Tufts Archives, located in the Pinehurst Resort. James Tufts founded Pinehurst in 1895, and also patented the first soda fountain in 1883, calling his invention the Arctic Soda Apparatus. The resort shares that the archives display “original maps of Donald Ross’s [golf] courses, photos of The Village since 1895 and various artifacts from the founders of the Village. Visitors will also find James W. Tufts’ original marble and silver 19th century Soda Fountain machine and more than 125,000 historic images.” Another interesting glimpse into the area’s history is the Campbell House. The Arts Council of Moore County explains that the house was initially part of the Boyd Mansion, owned by James Boyd, Sr., a railroad and steel tycoon from Pennsylvania. In the 1920s, the Campbell House was salvaged and relocated across the street after the older mansion caught fire. Boyd’s grandson, Jackson Boyd, lived in the home, which was later bought and thoroughly renovated by Major W.D. Campbell in 1946. In 1966, the Campbell family donated the historic home to Southern Pines for community use. Since then, the Campbell House has maintained a position as a town staple, showcasing art galleries, weddings, events, and more.

rants, and awe-inspiring archives to notable nature preserves,

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Pinehurst, Southern Pines, and the Sandhills have it all. ocated in Moore County, North Carolina, Pinehurst and Southern Pines are next-door neighbors, and are an easy drive from Wake Forest at less than two hours. This makes the area the perfect destination for a quick day or weekend trip. Or, if you’re looking for a longer stay, you can also take advantage of the various nearby excursions the Sandhills region has to offer. As I mentioned, Southern Pines and Pinehurst have a long list of attractions that ensures enjoyment for the whole family. Parents 24

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To continue, the Southern Pines Business Association shares that “Southern Pines is known for its vibrant downtown area with many shops, restaurants, and entertainment. The main streets are the two sides of Broad Street, divided by railroad tracks offering many unique businesses, beautiful parks, and the idyllic downtown scene.” Additionally, Pinehurst Business Partners highlights area businesses and events that make the Village of Pinehurst special, including the Holly Arts & Crafts Marketplace and the Pinehurst Harness Track, a horse racing center founded by Leonard Tufts (son of James Tufts) in 1915. Beyond Pinehurst and Southern Pines, the Sandhills region possesses a plethora of enticing elements that are easily accessible from either of these two towns. Visit the famed Seagrove Pottery and antique shops in the Cameron Historic District. Seagrove Potters, established in 1781, is the largest concentration of working potters in the United States, according to their website (discoverseagrove.com). With a rich history and beautiful creations, you’ll love every minute of your visit to Seagrove. You can also take a trip to the Temple Theatre, located in Sanford, NC. Built in 1925, the historic theater was initially a Vaudeville house, but changed occupations several times to accommodate for the needs of the community. However, with help from the son of the theater’s original owner, Temple was named a National Historic Site, and was renovated and reopened in 1984. Catch a show while you’re there (templeshows.com). Lastly, take a trip to the U.S. Army Airborne & Special Operations Museum in Fayetteville. According to the website (asomf.org), the museum was established in August 2000, and “celebrates over 80 years of Army Airborne and Special Operations history and honors our nation’s Soldiers – past, present, and future.” Rich history coupled with modern-day accommodations makes the Sandhills a lovely “Driveable Destination.” Whether you choose to take advantage of the amenities at the acclaimed Pinehurst Resort, or you travel to the region’s towns for their other exciting attractions and unique historical appreciation, you are guaranteed to have a wonderful vacation. So, without further ado, I wish you a splendid stay in the Sandhills!  Grace Lower is a recent graduate of Heritage High School, and will be attending UNC-Chapel Hill in the fall. Grace enjoys dance, theater, science, and all things outdoors.

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COOKED IN (NON) TRADITION THE SUMMER OF S'MORES

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BY GRACE LOWER

arshmallows. Chocolate. Graham crackers. The well-regarded s’more is a staple summer treat that we all know and love. As I sat down to write this edition of “Cooked In Tradition,” I wondered, “How can we push the boundaries of the scrumptious s’more?” And after some research and creative thinking, I present to you “Cooked In (Non) Tradition – The Summer of S’mores!” Nationaltoday.com shares that August 10th is annually celebrated as National S’mores Day, and to honor the tradition that accompanies a good ol’ fashioned s’more – sitting ’round a campfire, stargazing on a warm, summer night, enjoying the outdoors with loved ones – I want to provide you with some history of this classically tasty treat. First mentioned as a “Graham Cracker Sandwich” in an early 1920s Campfire Marshmallows recipe book, it is thought to have been originally popularized by Boy and Girl Scouts. Then, in 1927, the Girl Scouts published a similar creation, naming the delicacy a “some more,” paving the way for what we now call a “s’more.” With a delightful history and a delectable taste, the s’more is a timehonored tradition that makes for the perfect summer campfire. However, as I previously mentioned, I want to share with you a few ways to spice up your s’more through substitutions, add-ins, tips and tricks, and more. I hope these non-traditional takes on this classic treat help make summer 2021 the “summer of s’mores!” These are just a few suggestions – go crazy and use your imagination ... but no matter what, have fun!

TASTY TWISTS

GRAHAM CRACKER: Sugar, snickerdoodle, chocolate chip, or Oreo cookies; flavored graham cracker (cinnamon sugar, chocolate). CHOCOLATE: Reese’s Cup, Kit Kat, dark chocolate, Nutella spread, or chocolate-covered pretzels. MARSHMALLOW: Spreadable marshmallow fluff or colorful marshmallows (for fun!). ADD-INS: Fruit (strawberry, pineapple, banana, raspberry, etc.), peanut butter, frosting, or cinnamon. 26

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OVEN-BAKED S’MORES Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. Lay graham crackers on a cookie sheet. Top each graham cracker with a chocolate square. Cut marshmallows in half horizontally, then lay atop each square. Bake 3-5 minutes, or until marshmallows are golden brown. Press another graham cracker on top of each marshmallow to form sandwiches.

SKILLET S’MORES DIP Preheat broiler (high); preheat a cast-iron skillet (over medium heat). Melt 3 tablespoons unsalted butter in the skillet. Remove the skillet from heat; add a 12-ounce bag of chocolate chips. Top the chips with an even layer of mini marshmallows. Broil until marshmallows are golden brown. Eat with graham crackers as dippers. OPTIONAL: Mix chocolate with nuts for extra crunch.

TIPS – Place your chocolate bar on the graham cracker and set on the rim of your firepit while roasting your marshmallow for deliciously gooey chocolate. – Use a metal skewer. While wooden skewers or sticks hold the essence of tradition, metal skewers are safer and will provide a more well-cooked marshmallow. – Preheat the tip of your metal marshmallow skewer by placing it in the coals/flames (just don’t touch the hot tip!). – Want even gooier chocolate? Stuff a chocolate square inside your marshmallow before roasting over the fire. – Don’t rush it! Roast your marshmallow slowly to ensure even heating throughout. Tried any of these tips and tricks and have a favorite? Or have another unique way to “s’more?” We want to hear! Email your creations to info@circamagazine.com for a chance to be featured! And as always, we want to know about your favorite family foods and unique delicacies, so send your recipes to info@circamagazine.com for a chance to be featured in a future “Cooked In Tradition.”  Grace Lower is a recent graduate of Heritage High School, and will be attending UNC-Chapel Hill in the fall. Grace enjoys dance, theater, science, and all things outdoors.

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#wherequaintmeetscool CIRCA Magazine

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OUTDOOR

LIVING

BY SOMMER DONAHOE

CREATE THE PERFECT OUTSIDE AREA TO EAT, WORK, AND PLAY Outdoor spaces have become an extension of our homes, especially over this past year. Homeowners have found creative, functional ways to utilize space and bring conve-

PRIVACY AND PROTECTIVE STRUCTURES: As more time is spent outside, the desire to add privacy and protection to outdoor living areas has increased too. Natural borders such as bushes, trees, and other greenery can be added to create a more private area, or coverings, curtains, or makeshift walls can also help protect your outdoor oasis from the elements. Even adding a simple tilted umbrella is a great way to acquire some protection and privacy, while serving double duty and providing some much needed shade on a hot summer day.

niences such as smart technology and indoor “activities” to the outside. As we approach the second half of 2021 and embrace our time outside, consider these outdoor trends that have gained popularity and changed the way we think about being outside our homes. OUTDOOR TECHNOLOGY: Whether streaming movies or incorporating televisions, music, and lighting, more and more households are bringing interior technology to the exterior. Outdoor movie nights, offices, and wi-fi accessibility have all been on the rise thanks to technology and connectivity devices. MULTIPURPOSE FURNITURE: Furniture has evolved to accommodate everyday living and offers versatility for hosting a social gathering. Therefore, it is common nowadays to see furniture with hidden features such as beverage compartments and convertible capabilities such as movable or stackable tables. OUTDOOR KITCHENS: Since more meals have been prepared at home over the past year, the kitchen “duties” are being taken outside now more than ever. Outdoor kitchens can include cooking vessels such as grills or pizza ovens and appliances such as refrigerators, prep spaces, and sinks. Regardless of the complexity, available seating should always be available nearby. 28

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PRODUCTS TO EXTEND OUTDOOR LIVING USAGE: With our pleasant climate here in North Carolina, we are fortunate to be able to enjoy our outdoor living spaces not just in summer, but throughout the year, while still remaining comfortable. Fire pits, fans, and outdoor heaters can be great additions and allow extended use of these areas. Other products such as rugs, blankets, and lighting can also contribute to the comfort and adaptability of a space as temperatures change. EDIBLE GARDENS: Whether it has become a hobby due to the recent time spent at home or you have been avidly gardening for years, edible gardens offer homeowners a great opportunity to be outside, grow nutritious food, and contribute to their overall health. These gardens can have a focus such as herbs or ingredients for favorite recipes you can prepare at home too. SOCIAL FRONT YARDS: While the backyard has traditionally been the outdoor hangout space at home, front yards have also taken on that role, as homeowners recently had the desire to socialize from a distance with neighbors and friends. What was once a space to just offer curb appeal has now evolved into an informal place to enjoy spending outdoor time with others. Front yard furniture tends to be more simplistic such as a bench, a swing, or a few chairs. TRANSITIONAL SPACE: As family dynamics change and children outgrow outdoor play structures and toys, outdoor spaces can be “repurposed” and transitioned into something new. There may suddenly be a great spot for a raised vegetable garden or maybe a fire pit – the outside options are endless!  Sommer Donahoe is a realtor with Southern Lux Living, serving buyers and sellers throughout the Triangle. She may be reached at 919-426-1762 or visit southernluxliving.com.

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DOW N TOWN

WAKE FOREST LIVE IT UP IN DOWNTOWN!

T

his summer, head on down to Downtown Wake Forest and discover all that awaits ... whether you’re looking to grab a bite to eat or a cup of coffee, do some shopping, listen to some music, and more, you’re sure to find it here. It’s “Where Quaint Meets Cool” _ so come explore this unique variety of businesses, restaurants, shops, and more for yourself ... you’ll be glad you did!

www.wakeforestdowntown.com


̶ Janice Originals Jewelry

̶ Backporch Pottery

̶ Expression Artworks

̶ Pretty Practical

̶ Keepsakes By Kim

̶ Time Step Boutique

̶ Jennifer Niesel Designs

̶ Wiener Dog Pottery

̶ MD Furniture Rehab & Sales ̶ Positively Lettering ̶ Jeanne Steck - Gems By Jeanne Marie

̶ Dick Larsen Pet Portraits ̶ Closet Sikeology ̶ Reflect Gifts & Decor

̶ Wine and Rita’s

̶ Carolina Clover

̶ Storybook Cottage

̶ Saving Grace

̶ The Budding Artist

̶ Urban Mercanitile

̶ And many more!

̶ Lola + Jane

̶ The Artists’ Loft

̶ BJS Design Studio

#WHEREQUAINTMEETSCOOL

COME DISCOVER IT FOR YOURSELF!


BY JIMMY TOMPKINS

PROPER PRUNING

P

runing, while not necessarily the most enjoyable of the landscaping tasks, is important not only for the beauty of trees, shrubs, and plantings, but also for their health, and the safety of others. It is the practice of removing their roots, buds, or branches that are dead or dying due to pests, disease, and lack of sunlight, or trimming them for aesthetic purposes and to encourage healthy plant development. A regular pruning schedule protects your plants, people, and property from injury, bugs, and damage.

PRUNING BENEFITS

– MAINTAIN SAFETY: Remove low-growing branches if they impede passing vehicles or obscure oncoming traffic from view. You may also need to take out split or broken branches before they have the chance to come crashing down on a person, car, or building. It’s wise, too, to prune out low-hanging, whip-like branches (especially those with thorns) that may strike passersby. – ALTER OR REJUVENATE GROWTH: Neglected, overgrown shrubs can sometimes be turned into small, multi-trunked trees if you remove their lower limbs. This may be a better approach than digging out the shrub and planting another in its place. 32

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– DIRECT GROWTH: Pruning influences the direction in which a plant grows. Each time you make a cut, you stop growth in one direction and encourage it in another. This principle is important to keep in mind when you train young trees to develop a strong branching structure. – REMOVE UNDESIRABLE GROWTH: Prune out unwanted growth periodically. Cut out wayward branches, take out thin growth, and remove suckers (stems growing up from the roots) and water sprouts (upright shoots growing from the trunk and branches). – PROMOTE PLANT HEALTH: Trees and shrubs stay healthier if branches that are diseased, dead, pest-ridden, or rubbing together are removed. – CREATE PARTICULAR SHAPES: You can prune a line of closely planted trees or shrubs as a unit to create a hedge. – PRODUCE MORE FLOWERS OR FRUITS: Flowering plants and some fruit trees are pruned to increase the yield of blossoms and fruit to improve their quality. You’ll need, for example, to remove spent flowers from roses throughout their bloom time. For some fruit trees, you’ll make small, precise cuts each dormant season. Although this sort of pruning sometimes ranks as a tedious chore, remember that your efforts will pay off in lavish blooms and generous crops of fruit at harvest time.

WHEN TO PRUNE Pruning at the wrong time won’t damage plants, but it can sacrifice that year’s flowers or fruits. As rules of thumb: – Prune spring-flowering shrubs and trees immediately after the flowers fade. – Prune summer-blooming trees and shrubs in winter or early spring, before new growth emerges. – Late summer pruning encourages new growth that might not harden before the cold winter temperatures settle in.

SUMMER PRUNING Summer is a good time to prune those plants that blossomed early in the spring. For instance, you may want to prune your azaleas or forsythia plants. Summer pruning of spring blooming plants allows you to manage their size and/or improve their structure, while still allowing plenty of time for the plant to develop flower buds that will bloom when spring arrives again next year. If you aren’t a fan of frequent hedge pruning, then trimming shrubs during the summer season is a good idea. Typically, they grow back less vigorously after being pruned this time of year than when pruned during the spring months, with their cooler temperatures. This potentially allows more time between hedge pruning sessions. Additionally, you should go ahead and cut out the watersprouts on your trees while you have the pruning shears out. Like hedges, watersprouts grow back less robustly when they are pruned in summer.

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Rather than full pruning, some gardeners like to thin plants in summer because one, it’s easier to see how much thinning is needed when branches are still thickly foliaged, and two, growth is slower this time of year, so it is less likely to stimulate new growth – an advantage when thinning.

HOW TO PRUNE There are four basic pruning cuts, each aimed at producing a different effect. For cuts that involve cutting above a growth bud, angle your cut at about 45 degrees, with the lowest point of the cut opposite the bud and even with it and the highest point about 1/4-inch above the bud. Each of the following steps can be applied to your specific pruning needs. – CUT 1: Pinching is one of the “easiest” cuts to make, without actually cutting. Simply pinch off a terminal bud with your thumb and forefinger. This stops the stem and encourages bushy growth. It is typically done on annual and perennial flowers, and on some vegetables. Also use it to direct growth of small-leaved shrubs and give the plant an even shape. – CUT 2: Heading means cutting farther back on the shoot than you would for pinching. In most cases, the lateral bud has already grown a leaf, and you cut right above it. Usually done with hand-held pruners, heading stimulates the buds just below the cut, encouraging dense growth. – CUT 3: Shearing, customarily used to create a hedge or bush with spherical or square form, is a form of heading that makes no attempt to cut back to a bud. However, because plants chosen for this treatment typically have many lateral buds close together, you’ll usually end up cutting near one. Shearing stimulates many buds to produce new growth, so you’ll be repeating the job regularly after you start. Because this method cuts right through leaves, it’s best done on small-leaved plants, where damage is less noticeable. Use handheld or electric hedge shears for this.

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– CUT 4: Thinning reduces the bulk of a plant with minimal regrowth. Each cut removes an entire stem or branch, either back to its point of origin on the main stem or to the point where it joins another branch. Because you remove a number of lateral buds along with the stem or branch, you’re less likely to wind up with clusters of unwanted shoots than when you are making heading cuts. (A common mistake of inexperienced gardeners is to make a heading cut when a thinning cut is needed.) Use handheld pruners, loppers, or a pruning saw to make thinning cuts, depending on the thickness of the branch being cut.

PRUNING TOOLS

– HAND SHEARS: Use hand shears for branches up to 1/4-inch in diameter. Scissor-type shears make tight, close cuts on plants. Hold shears to make sure they fit your hand and feel comfortable. – LOPPING SHEARS: For branches up to 11/2 inches in diameter, reach for lopping shears. Buy shears with lightweight handles for easy use. Extendable handles let you reach higher branches. – PRUNING SAWS: For branches more than 11/2 inches in diameter, use pruning saws. Coarse teeth cut on the pull stroke for easy and safe pruning. – POLE PRUNERS: You’ll need pole pruners for branches more than 1-inch thick and beyond arm’s reach. Pole pruners feature a pruning shear head or saw that works via rope action. Look for pruners with a handle that disassembles for easy storage. – HEDGE SHEARS: Use hedge shears for shaping and snipping new growth on shrubs.  Jimmy Tompkins is the owner of JT’s Landscaping and Lawncare. If you are in need of pruning or any other landscaping and lawncare service, contact the experts at JT’s. They have decades of experience serving homeowners throughout Raleigh and the Triangle area. Jimmy may be reached at 919-453-2716, or visit jts-landscaping.com for more information.

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SLEEP...

WHERE HAVE YOU GONE? SECRETS OF THE ELUSIVE SLUMBER BY NICK PIONE

As described by the Mayo Clinic, sleep provides the founda-

WHAT CAN WE DO?

tion for all of your daily habits and decisions. Sleep depriva-

So what can we do to sleep more and improve the quality of our sleep? Try one or all of the following tips.

tion can negatively affect your mood and temperament, as well as your ability to focus on daily tasks. Furthermore, it plays a critical role in immune function, metabolism, memory, learning, and other vital functions. But for many, getting a good night of sleep isn’t a simple task. Does this seem like a dream for you? I get it – I was that guy in my 20s who bragged about how I could drink a double espresso and then go right to sleep. Now that I’m not in my 20s, when I have a

D

couple glasses of wine, I toss and turn all night. oes this sound like you? If so, you are not alone. In fact, only a quarter of Americans get the recommended seven hours of sleep per night. Compare that to the 1940s, when Americans averaged 7.9 hours per night.

SO WHY ARE WE ALL SLEEPING LESS?

To no surprise, we live in a 24/7 world that makes shutting our minds down difficult. Life was simpler when the television networks would go off the air at midnight with the playing of the National Anthem. After that, you could either listen to music, read, or stare at the ceiling until you feel asleep. Today, we have 500+ channels on TV, movies on demand, and an endless supply of content to search on social media or the Internet. (Who doesn’t want to learn more about how to raise llamas?) There are also other contributing factors that can make sleep more elusive: – Chronic pain from arthritis, headaches, or fibromyalgia; – Sleep apnea, asthma, or COPD; – Depression and anxiety; – Bedroom environment (i.e. a partner who snores or a room that is too hot). 34

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TIP 1: Establish a sleep schedule. The nightly news may come on at 11:00 PM; however, the perfect bedtime is 10:00 PM. Our bodies release growth hormones between 11:00 PM – 2:00 AM, and these hormones play a significant role in rejuvenating our immune systems and repairing our skin. TIP 2: Limit caffeine after 4:00 PM. We often consume caffeine and sugar to stay awake during the day. However, these are stimulants and can interrupt our ability to fall asleep later in the evening. TIP 3: Put down the devices. Our brains naturally produce melatonin in response to darkness, which helps control our sleep/wake rhythms and induces drowsiness when we turn off the lights. However, the light from our phone screens affect melatonin production, so try putting yours down at least 30 minutes before bed. TIP 4: Take a little nap. Taking a short nap (20-30 minutes) during the day can makes you feel refreshed, but napping too long or late in the day can elicit sleep deprivation at night. TIP 5: Turn to nature. CBD helps calm the mind before bed, and when taken during the day, can help alleviate stress and anxiety. There is a reason why 89% of CBD users report a better night’s sleep when taking it. Sleep is our time to recover, and it is recommended that we all get a minimum of seven hours per night. This may not be possible for you, and that is ok – keep in mind that even one extra hour can make a big difference.  Nick Pione is a local business owner, blog writer, and natural wellness expert. He co-founded Trek CBD and contributes to medium.com and trekcdb.com. If you would like to learn more about how CBD can help you stress less during the day, or help you fall asleep and stay asleep, please call Trek CBD at 919-761-5020, email Nick at nickpione@trekvitality.com, visit trekcbd.com, or stop by at 1968 South Main Street in Wake Forest.

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GOOD

W

BY SUE LUCEY

hile the COVID-19 pandemic is something none of us ever wants to live through again, one silver lining from it is that the book world is booming, as many authors were able to take advantage of the extra time at home and write, write, write. This summer, whether you are looking for a fast-paced thriller, folklore and fantasy, or a deep dive into a good history novel, there is surely something for everyone stocking the shelves of your favorite bookstore. Here are a few suggestions ...

CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOKS A Life Electric: The Story of Nikola Tesla by Azadeh Westergaard I love when young readers are inspired by stories of ordinary kids who may have been considered “eccentric” and grew up to be extraordinary. This story of Nikola Tesla, who was born during a lightning storm at the stroke of midnight, is described by Booklist as “an elegant and enlightening look at a man who brightened the whole world.” But before he grew up to become one of the most important electrical inventors in the world, Tesla was simply a child who loved playing with animals on this family’s farm in Serbia. A Life Electric is a fascinating and beautiful glimpse into the legacy of the brilliant inventor.

READS

YOUNG READERS

Spy School At Sea by Stuart Gibbs (Available August) Set sail for adventure in the ninth installment of the Spy School series, where we find Ben aboard a luxury cruise posing with friends as his family, trying once again to beat his nemesis Murry. But according to the author’s website (stuartgibbs.com), “At first, it sounds exciting to have a mission on the most glamorous ocean liner on earth, but as usual, nothing goes according to plan. There is action, danger, and plenty of surprises as Ben and his team quickly find themselves in hot water.” Full of humor, this fastpaced adventure makes Gibbs’ latest work, and the entire series, a great read for any kid.

The Leaf Thief by Alice Hemming (Available August) Where did the leaf go? Who stole it? Squirrel loves counting the leaves on this tree – but discovers one of them is missing! He and his good buddy Bird are on the case to find out who among their forest friends could be the leaf thief. Silly and fun, The Leaf Thief makes sense of the seasons and teaches about adapting to change. Hold That Thought by Bree Galbraith (Available August) Finn awakes to a cool idea spinning around in his head. With help from his friends, he builds on that idea until a school bully tries to stop him. Finn imagines his idea working, and with renewed confidence, follows through with it. Hold That Thought encourages self-esteem, inclusion, perseverance, collaboration, and creativity. 36

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Vampires Don’t Wear Polka Dots: A Graphix Chapters Book (The Adventures Of The Bailey School Kids) by Marcia Thornton Jones The third graders at Bailey School are so mischievous that they have made every teacher quit – but then Mrs. Jeepers moves to town from Transylvanian Alps. Her powers help her deal with the rascals – but while her methods may be a little unusual, perhaps they are just what the kids need. This graphic novel adaptation of the classic chapter book series helps young readers with reading comprehension and will hopefully turn them into lifelong bookworms.

a group of Jews fleeing the Nazi terror. Stunned to learn what’s happening in the outside world, she vows to teach the group all she can about surviving in the forest – and in turn, they teach her some surprising lessons about opening her heart after years of isolation. But when she is betrayed and escapes into a German-occupied village, her past and present come together in a shocking collision that could change everything.” The Book of Accidents: A Novel by Chuck Wendig A family returns to their hometown in rural Pennsylvania, where long ago something terrible happened. Where something evil walked in its tunnels and its mountains and its coal mines. Not only do they return to their hometown, but also to the dark past that haunts them still. The Book of Accidents is literary horror at its finest.

YOUNG ADULTS Six Crimson Cranes by Elizabeth Lim Elizabeth Lim’s latest work has it all – fairytale, folklore, mystery, and discovery. As described by #1 New York Times bestselling author Kerri Maniscalco, “A princess with a secret, forbidden magic, betrothals gone awry – Six Crimson Cranes is an unputdownable, sweeping fairytale that thrills as much as it delights.”

The Madness of Crowds by Louise Penny (Available August) Louise Penny is back with the latest in her Inspector Gamache series, the spellbinding page turner The Madness of Crowds. This time, Gamache is on holiday with his family when he gets a small request to help with security for a visiting professor. Sounds easy and innocent enough, right?

Any Way The Wind Blows by Rainbow Rowell As quoted on the author’s website (rainbowrowell.com), the first of her Simon Snow Trilogy, Carry On, “was conceived as a book about Chosen One stories; (its final book) Any Way The Wind Blows is an ending about endings. About catharsis and closure, and how we choose to move on from the traumas and triumphs that try to define us.”

We Keep The Dead Close: A Murder at Harvard And a Half Century of Silence by Becky Cooper We Keep The Dead Close – history, true crime, and mystery, all wrapped into one mind-blowing book. Publisher Grand Central Publishing depicts it as “a memoir of mirrors, misogyny, and murder. It is at once a rumination on the violence and oppression that rules our revered institutions, a ghost story reflecting one young woman’s past onto another’s present, and a love story for a girl who was lost to history.” This ghost story, investigated by Cooper for 10 years, was designated NPR’s best book of 2020. 

ADULT The Forest Of Vanishing Stars by Kristin Harmel Following her breakout novel The Book of Lost Names comes another historical fiction winner based on true stories. As summarized by publisher Simon & Schsuter: “After being stolen from her wealthy German parents and raised in the unforgiving wilderness of eastern Europe, a young woman finds herself alone in 1941 after her kidnapper dies. Her solitary existence is interrupted, however, when she happens upon

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Suzanne Lucey and her husband Dave own Page 158 Books, located at 415 S. Brooks St. in Wake Forest. She may be reached at 919435-1843 or visit www.page158books.com.

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only hook up power to your house – they cannot repair your fuse or breaker box or make repairs on or inside your house.

DURING THE STORM – Don’t open freezers and refrigerators any more than absolutely necessary. – Listen to local radio stations for news about outages. – Turn off your heating and air conditioning systems. Unplug sensitive electronic appliances such as TVs, microwave ovens, and computers. This will protect your appliances against power fluctuations that can occur when power is restored. Be sure to wait five to 10 minutes before turning on appliances and heating systems after power is restored. Turn off your electric range during a power outage. This may prevent possible damage if you’re away when the power is restored.

STORM READY GETTING READY FOR SUMMER STORMS AND POSSIBLE POWER OUTAGES

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esearchers at NC State have predicted the 2021 Atlantic hurricane season will see 15 – 18 named storms forming in the Atlantic basin. Of those, seven to nine may grow strong enough to become hurricanes, with the possibility of two to three becoming major hurricanes (news.ncsu.edu). Top that with the many summer thunderstorms we regularly have here in North Carolina, and there’s a chance that you might lose power at your home. Knowing that Mother Nature can strike at any time this summer, it’s recommended that you prepare now should an outage occur.

BEFORE THE STORM – Make sure flashlights, battery powered lanterns, and/or other sources of light are readily available. – Make sure flashlight and radio batteries are fresh. – Homeowners with wells should draw an emergency water supply in case power to their electric water pumps is interrupted. – If you evacuate, shut off your electricity at the breaker box. When you return, check for electrical damage, such as frayed wires, downed power lines, sparks, or the smell of hot or burned insulation. If you find such damage, don’t turn your power on until service crews have made repairs. An electrician must repair damage inside your house. Your electric cooperative or company can 38

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AFTER THE STORM – If power lines and poles are down in your yard or in the street, always treat them as if they are energized and dangerous. Never touch them! Stay away. Call your electric cooperative or company to report the location so repairs can be made as soon as possible. – Post-storm debris can hide power lines that have fallen. Fallen trees that contain energized power lines can energize any item they come in contact with, such as a metal fence, a pond, or standing water. Even the ground can be energized near fallen power lines. The real danger of fallen power lines is often hidden. – If your electric service is out, check with your neighbors to see if they have power. If they do, you may have only a blown fuse or a tripped breaker. Never replace a fuse or reset a circuit breaker with wet hands or while standing on a wet (or even damp) surface. – If you’re without electricity and want to use a portable generator, make sure you use it in a well-ventilated area. Don’t connect the generator to your home’s electrical panel or fuse boxes. It may cause electricity to feed back into the power lines, which can endanger linemen and damage electric service facilities. Helping line crews is appreciated, but working with power lines and electricity requires a high degree of training. In order to restore power with the highest degree of safety, restoration must be accomplished in a certain order and following certain procedures. Above all, the hard-working men and women restoring your power appreciate your patience and understanding that they are doing everything they can to restore it as quickly and safely as possible.  Wake Electric Membership Corporation is an electric distribution cooperative operated and controlled by their consumer-members. It a not-for-profit electric utility with a customer service center located in Downtown Wake Forest at 100 S. Franklin Street. Wake Electric provides electric service to approximately 44,500 members in Durham, Franklin, Granville, Johnston, Nash, Vance, and Wake Counties. For more information about WEMC, and for further information about power outages, storm safety, and more, visit wemc.com.

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DECOR

DILEMMA? BY RHONDA BENVIE PLUMMER

Summer is the season of home projects. Maybe you want to freshen up your space a bit, or you’re ready to tackle a complete overhaul. Perhaps in this hot real estate market, you are itching to sell your current home and move into another. Whatever is going on with your summertime home decorating/renovation/selling plan, I am sure you have questions when it comes to anything that has to do with it. We have received several questions from CIRCA readers about topics relevant to their current situations – if you’re in the same boat, hopefully my advice can help you too! Q: As an aging couple, my husband and I are going to take advantage of the real estate market and sell our large home, and downsize into something smaller. How do you suggest we navigate this transition – specifically, what furniture, art, and accessories should we move and what should we not move? A: As soon as you find your new home, the first thing I recommend is to measure each room. Be sure to consider window placement and doors. The next thing to do is measure the existing furniture you want to keep. Ask yourself where it will fit in the new space. Keep in mind that just because it was in a particular room in your current home does not mean that it needs to go in the same room of the new house. For example, maybe that beautiful sideboard that is currently a showpiece in your dining room will look equally lovely and fit perfectly in your new foyer. When I work with clients who are downsizing, I help them determine placement of all the things they need to keep. I also emphasize that everything in a 5,000 square foot home will not fit in a 2,500 square foot home, so it’s imperative that they prioritize. If you love it, then let’s find a home for it. If you like it, then maybe we can find a place for it. If it is a piece that is just okay, then we get rid of it. It may take a while to keep purging, but it’s better to do so before the move so you don’t pay movers to transport things you may eventually discard. A few hours with an 40

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interior designer can go a long way in helping you determine the best layout of furniture, art, and accessories in your new home. Q: It is finally time to paint the outside of my house. I have never liked the exterior of it because I think there are too many colors and textures going on. Is there a rule of thumb for picking outside paint colors? A: Picking the correct paint colors for the exterior of your home is very important – it is the first impression of your home and what you must look at every day. Plus, exterior painting can be expensive, so you want to be sure you get it right the first time. Personally, I like the rule of threes when it comes to outside colors/textures. For example, my home is painted white brick, has black window trim, and boasts wood beams on the porch, as well as wood shutters in the same stain. The roof is black, as are the gutters. So, I have three colors – white, black, and stained wood – all of different textures, but very cohesive and not too busy. Maybe you have a house with siding, stone, brick, and white windows. This is okay if the colors of the stone, brick, and siding are complementary. If the stone and brick are in the brown family, for example, then the siding paint color should be a shade that is pulled from the stone and brick for a compatible look, with the trim white. If the brick and stone are not in the same color family, then you may want to paint the brick for a better overall look. If they are different in hue, the house may look “choppy.” When it comes to picking exterior paint colors, remember that there is no perfect rule of thumb, because every house is so different. I recommend contacting a professional for help with picking the right colors for your home if you’re uneasy about selection decisions. Q: We just moved into a house, and we absolutely love everything about it … except for the kitchen countertops. They just aren’t our style. We want to change them out for new ones, but are confused about all the options out there. Which do you think is better – quartz or granite? A: I understand why you may be feeling a bit confused – there are certainly more options these days for countertops than there used to be. As for quartz, the biggest misconception about it is

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that some people think it is like quartz stone; however, quartz in the countertop world is a manmade product that is very durable and non-porous. It does not have the natural movement of granite, so it appeals to the consumer who likes a more subtle look versus a busy pattern. Quartz is very popular for the mimicking of marble, which is not the best countertop option for a kitchen due to how soft and porous it is. As for granite, it is a very hard, porous, natural substance. If you go this route, know that the key to how well it stands the test of time is the sealer that is used. Most fabricators use a high-quality sealer, but I recommend double-checking with the company from which you purchase your granite that this is what they will be using.

great qualities to consider for such a prominent part of the kitchen. They are made of the same porcelain used for tile, and we all know how durable that is. Another new material is Dekton. Dekton counters are very resistant to stains, scratches, and heat – again, important for a kitchen. If you love the popular concrete and industrial look, this may be the perfect choice for you. Any great fabricator can educate you on the pros and cons of all these materials. If they only push you toward one kind of countertop, then move on to another fabricator, as they are not all created equal.  Rhonda Benvie Plummer is the owner of Help Me Rhonda Interiors and Open Door Furniture & Accents, a furniture and accessories store located at 11605 Durant Road in Raleigh. Visit helpmerhondainteriors.com or opendoorfurnitureandaccents.com or call 919-263-9054. Rhonda is also a regular guest on WPTF’s “Making Your Home Great” radio show, the second Saturday of every month, when you can call in with any design questions you may have.

I know you didn’t inquire about other materials, but you might want to consider the new-to-this-market porcelain countertop option. Porcelain countertops are both beautiful and durable –

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P

ullen Park was founded in 1887 and became the first, and now oldest, public park in all of North Carolina; the 5th oldest operating amusement park in the U.S.; and 16th oldest in the world. The park is named after Richard Stanhope Pullen who donated farmland to the City of Raleigh to be used as an area for recreational fun for North Carolinians and visitors from all over the nation. Here’s a wild fact: There was a time during the early 1900s in which the park had a small zoo on-site with racoons, bears, alligators, and monkeys! The entrance into Pullen Park is as special as the park itself. You must go through an active railroad crossing to enter, and if the railroad crossing gate is closed, you will have to wait for the train to pass. Once you enter the park, you will find a Welcome Center to your left where you can get information, buy tickets, or browse the souvenirs. Once you leave the Welcome Center, you can choose your own adventure.

BY ROBYN GOSS BENNAI

HIDDEN

GEM THE PULL OF PULLEN PARK

Here are some of the places to explore. – PLAY AREAS: Near the entrance, there is a large public playground area with swings, slides, play structures, sand play, and a preschool playground. This play area is unique in its accessibility for kids of all ages. Adjacent to the playground is a real delight for future conductors – a Norfolk Southern Railway red caboose with a Southern Railway paint scheme for visitors to enter and explore. – TRAIN RIDE*: On the other side of the playground is a C.P. Huntington miniature train. Coming in at about one-third of the size, this near-replica of the famous locomotive of the same name will take you on a ride around the park with the purchase of a ticket.  – BOATS*: When you get tired of being on land, worry not. Pullen Park offers both kiddie boats for riders between 30” and 54” and pedal boats with room for up to four people per boat. Access to the pedal boats is at the docks on Lake Howell.  – CAROUSEL*: The large indoor carousel is largely considered Pullen Park’s most popular attraction. With both animal figures to ride and seated options, the carousel is a great area to cool

If you have lived in the area for a while, you may have already experienced this not-so-hidden gem. And if you haven’t yet discovered it, it’s a gem like no other around

and one you’re surely going to want to check out. Located on 66.4 acres, Pullen Park is situated in the heart of Raleigh. On the outskirts of the NC State University campus and minutes from downtown, Pullen Park draws individuals and families from all over. With countless attractions for kids and many benches for tired parents, Pullen Park has something for everyone. 42

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down on a hot summer day and take a break from the outdoor activities at Pullen. The carousel has a rich history dating back to 1912 when it was made by Salvatore Cernigliaro of the Dentzel Carousel Company. Originally, the carousel was located in Bloomsbury Park until it was bought and relocated by the Raleigh City Council in 1921 to replace Pullen’s former steam-powered merry-go-round (yes, this landmark just celebrated its 100th anniversary!). The Pullen Park Carousel was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1976. It’s also a designated Raleigh Historic Landmark! – WALKING TRAILS: Pullen Park is home to multiple walking trails. One trail has bridges to and from the Island Gazebo. The park is well maintained and you won’t be hard-pressed to find beautiful flora and local suburban wildlife along the trails. The walking trails hold some of the best picture spots in all of Pullen!

may be rented through the website (raleighnc.gov/places/pullenpark); Pullen Cafe, which provides sandwiches, pizza, snacks, drinks, and more for purchase; a premier competitive aquatic center; six tennis courts; a softball field as well as a youth baseball field; and public restrooms. Additionally, in the northern end of the scenic park awaits The Theatre In The Park (originally known as The Children’s Theatre of Raleigh, Inc.), nationally acclaimed for its outstanding theatrical achievements. This local and national gem is a treat yearround for parents and kids alike. With so many things to do, visit the treasure that is Pullen Park today to enjoy some of the best family fun Raleigh has to offer.  *Tickets for these rides are currently $1.50 per ticket. Tickets may be purchased on-site or online at raleighnc.gov/places/pullen-park. Robyn Goss Bennai is a local artist and instructor at Pint + Paint at Norse Brewing Co. in Downtown Wake Forest.

Pullen Park also offers six shelters which

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THE MENOPAUSE

TRANSITION YES, YOU CAN ENJOY THE JOURNEY

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BY DR. HAJIRA YASMIN

eing in the space of reproductive healthcare for more than two decades, year upon year I have gained knowledge and understanding of women’s bodies and their functioning that gradually changes with every milestone of their lives.

The biological changes a woman’s body endures after puberty, during pregnancy, following childbirth in the postnatal phase, while breastfeeding, and during her late thirties/forties when she is thrown into the phase of fluctuating hormones and its symptoms are profoundly magical and phenomenal. The phase of midlife, perimenopause, can arrive seven to 10 years before menopause, causing bothersome symptoms and affecting quality of daily life, many of which will continue on during menopause. Most women are not truly prepared for this big change for a variety of reasons. Though many of us are aware of the basic biology of menopause (the time that marks the end of our menstrual cycles), we would actually like to know more about the changes that our bodies face, so we can be well-prepared for what is happening, and what is to come. But often, due to our cultural and societal constructs, as well as time-restrictive doctor visits, we end up not focusing on education and prevention strategies for the vast range of bothersome symptoms we are experiencing. Some of these can be mild, while others may be more moderate, and even severe. Some are temporary, and some are long lasting. These symptoms can cause an increase in medical hazards like osteoporosis, cardiovascular risks, vulvovaginal conditions, bladder health, mental health risks, and more. So while you may be feeling a sense of shame or fear about the changes your body is undergoing or you find yourself feeling disempowered, uninformed, and unsure about what to expect as normal and when you should seek help and self-advocate, please know that understanding what is happening to your body as you approach this stage of life is vital. Sleep is one particularly challenging experience for many women during perimenopause/menopause, usually due to unexplained anxiety, hot flashes, drenching night sweats, or headaches. In fact, the prevalence of sleep disturbances can vary from 35%-60% across this stage of life. This has a downstream effect for women, affecting moods, daily function, midlife weight gain, lack of selfesteem and confidence, and more, often leaving them confused 44

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and frustrated on this journey. In addition, perimenopausal women may encounter irregular, heavy menstrual cycles, while they and menopausal woman may experience low moods, weight gain, lack of intimacy from frequent bladder infections, and dryness in intimacy. Sometimes this phase is severe and can last for a very long time.   While this phase of life is natural and there is no way to avoid it, you can feel better, sleep better, and live better. There are medical options available to help women deal with these symptoms. For instance, evidence-based, FDA-approved hormonal therapies can safely be used to help treat them. These therapies may be bioidentical products which can be systemic (oral and transdermal), as well as localized options. If you are interested in learning more about these, talk with your medical provider, and together decide if they are right for you. Each hormonal therapy option has to be individualized to your body symptoms, risk factors, and current health conditions – there is no cookie cutter formula. In addition, aggressive changes in lifestyle support and non-hormonal options, like plant-based products and mind-body practices, can be discussed. Talk with your doctor about these options – you can enjoy better transitions to the phases of post-childbirth, perimenopause, and menopause. With knowledge, education, and empowerment, you can understand your body’s changes – but first, you need to start the discussion. Menopausal care is constantly evolving. Staying updated and abreast of these new scientifically accurate changes and offering these to women who are in the post-reproduction time of their lives is a game changer for doctors, and ultimately, their patients. Conversations about aging need to be normalized, and women should feel emboldened to self-advocate. They deserve to experience these life shifts with facts and accurate information that is free from shame, fear, guilt, and secrecy. And above all, women deserve to enjoy all parts of their life’s journey, including a wonderful second half.  Hajira Yasmin, MD, FACOG, NCMP, AASECT-CSC, IF, is the founding physician of Alray Direct Gynecology & Intimate Health Center, located at 10940 Raven Ridge Road, Suite 110 in Raleigh, and is a NAMS Certified Menopause Practitioner and an ISSWSH Certified Sexual Medicine Fellow. For information, visit alraymd.com.

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As you wander through the grocery store looking at the many vanilla extract options, you may find yourself shocked at their price tags. And you may find yourself wondering why something so simply created is so costly. The answer? Vanilla beans are hard to grow. Naturally, vanilla is only pollinated by the vanilla bee, which has had a hard time surviving. Deforestation and encroachment on their habitat have reduced the vanilla bee population. As a result, vanilla farmers have begun hand pollinating. This, along with additional issues such as weather and cartels, has resulted in the price of vanilla skyrocketing. When I first started making my own vanilla, beans were sold for $45 a pound. Today, they range from $280 up to $500 a pound, depending on their country of origin and their quality. People with good intentions and a “value” mindset have been making “non-bean,” if you will, flavors for years. Some are natural, some are not.

BY BUCK BUCHANAN

YOU ARE WHAT

YOU EAT

There are three types of artificial vanilla. One is made from petrochemicals (yes, you read that right) – chemicals (something called “guaiacol”) made from petroleum! I don’t need to go any further other than to say this version is probably not ideal for consumption. The second type is made by extracting “vanilla crystals” from plant-based sources, with yeast and wood pulp being the top culprits in this process. When it comes to discussing both the petrochemical and “crystal” processes, I am not very

THE TRUTH ABOUT VANILLA

V

anilla is a very popular flavoring, commonly used in both food and drink. It can be found in a variety of sweet treats, including yogurt, coffee, and smoothies, as well as some savory dishes, such as pasta sauces, vinaigrettes, and certain soups and stews. And of course, vanilla is found in the ever-popular summer staple – ice cream. In fact, vanilla is in every flavor that we ice cream makers make. What exactly is vanilla, you ask? Encyclopedia Britannica defines vanilla as “any member of a group of tropical climbing orchids and the flavoring extracted from their pods.” Originally found in the eastern jungles of Mexico, vanilla has been used for centuries. The original chocolate drink known as Xocoatl was flavored with vanilla well before the Spaniards drank it in Montezuma’s court. Now, we use vanilla (or eat it) on a daily basis. The most common form found in grocery stores is vanilla extract arisen from a simple process. Vanilla beans, or pods, are suspended in an alcohol at the rate of one pound of beans per one gallon of alcohol. Three months later … bing bang boom, you have vanilla extract. 46

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well-versed (but while I may not be a chemist, I do know enough to be certain that neither of these products are exactly good for human wellbeing). The third type of artificial vanilla brings me to the funny – and perhaps a little bit gross – part of my story … It begins with one of the world’s greatest engineers that also happens to be one of the world’s cutest inhabitants, as well as a North American resident that is both a prized resource and a pesky nuisance. I’m talking about the beaver. Located between the pelvis and the base of a beaver’s tail are organs called castor sacs. The “goo” that comes from said castor sacs is known as castoreum – what the beaver uses to “mark its territory.” Somehow, because of the beaver’s diet of leaves and trees, castoreum smells and apparently tastes like vanilla. I personally would like to know who the first person was to lift a beaver’s tail, take a big sniff, and decide it would taste great in his pancakes! Although it is approved by the FDA, castoreum is often a combination of castoreum and urine (due to the location of the sacs and the method used to extract it). Here’s one of my favorite jokes, “You can have real vanilla or beaver’s butts – you pick ...” In all reality, it’s not funny. After reading the aforementioned methods of how artificial vanilla is made, I hope you remember how important it is to think about what you eat, what you buy to eat, and where you go to eat. With the season’s temperatures blazing, you are likely finding yourself craving the sweet refreshing coolness of a delicious scoop of ice cream right about now. If you are looking for a fun summertime activity to enjoy with the kids that will let you beat the heat at the same time, why not make some homemade ice cream? Just remember that when it comes buying vanilla extract for it, ask questions and read labels first. One of the misleading terms is “natural” flavorings – for this sweet treat ingredient, that could be yeast, wood pulp, petrochemicals, or beaver butt goo.  Buck Buchanan is the owner of Lumpy’s Ice Cream, located at 306 Wait Avenue in Downtown Wake Forest.

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If you can’t find, or trust that what you do find, is true vanilla extract, stop by Lumpy’s, where they make their own vanilla extract using a blend of Mexican and Madagascar vanilla beans. You can also enjoy their fresh vanilla ice cream, as well as their many other unique, fresh, allnatural flavors. In addition, you can find Lumpy’s online at lumpysicecream.com, on Facebook (LumpysIceCream), and on Instagram (thelumpysicecream).

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Get ready for the dog days of summer!

919-453-0765 | dirtydogsspa.com 929 Heritage Lake Rd, Ste 500 Wake Forest, NC 27587

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FEELING A TAD

SENSTIVE? WHAT CAUSES SENSITIVE TEETH, AND HOW TO TREAT IT

BY DR. EDMOND SUH

T

here isn’t a pain much more annoying and distracting than the kind that comes with a sensitive tooth. Whether your teeth are chronically sensitive or you have an occasional twang of sharp pain, this discomfort can put a damper on your day. Sensitive teeth make it difficult to perform certain necessary activities, like eating and drinking or brushing your teeth. The worst part is that you can’t always predict when doing one of these things is going to kick the nerves into hyperspace and cause you to hurt. The sharp pain may only be temporary, but it’s not fun while it lasts. Knowing what causes sensitive teeth can help you prevent some of the pain, but until you get to the “root” of the problem, it’ll keep happening. Most sensitive teeth causes can be narrowed down to dental issues like dentin hypersensitivity, worn enamel, or an exposed root in your tooth. In some cases, it might be more complex. Cavities, chipped and cracked teeth, gum disease, and old fillings are other common reasons for sensitive teeth.

FIXING SENSITIVE TEETH At your dental appointment, you’ll learn the actual cause of your sensitivity. Your dentist will work with you to come up with a treatment plan. Depending on the reason for your sensitive teeth, you may have one or more of these treatments suggested to you: – A different toothpaste. Your dentist may recommend a desensitizing toothpaste, which is designed to gradually block the pain that comes with sensitive teeth. – Fluoride treatments. Professional fluoride products can be applied to the sensitive parts of the teeth to strengthen their enamel and reduce pain at the same time. You might even be prescribed fluoride treatments to use at home. – Bonding procedures. If the cause is an exposed root surface, you’ll need more than a toothpaste or fluoride treatment to fix it.

PREVENTING SENSITIVE TEETH PAIN Of course, you want to get to the bottom of the issue and put a stop to whatever is causing it. But right now, you probably just want to know if there’s a sensitive teeth remedy. The best advice you can follow is to visit your dentist, who can quickly figure out why your teeth are causing you pain. In the meantime, these tips can help you prevent the pain from messing with your day: – Brush your teeth at least twice a day using a soft-bristled toothbrush, and use gentle, circular motions instead of harsh scrubbing. – Use a fluoride toothpaste designed for sensitive teeth. – Floss everyday to prevent buildup of bacteria and plaque.  – Use a mouthguard if you are prone to teeth grinding. This behavior erodes away the enamel and can even fracture a tooth. – Sensitive teeth are irritated by food and drink. Avoid acidic beverages or foods if your teeth have been acting up. – Teeth are sensitive to sugar, no matter how healthy they are. Limit your sugar intake in beverages and food. Brush well or rinse your mouth with water to get rid of the sugar after you eat. – Cold items are common culprits of pain, so take care if you plan on enjoying these. If you drink anything that is a known irritant, use a straw to avoid as much contact with your teeth as possible. 48

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Your dentist might recommend bonding or desensitizing, a simple procedure that uses a local anesthetic to numb the area, followed by a bonded resin applied to the exposed root to take away the sensitivity. – A gum graft. This is a more intensive procedure for complicated issues. When a tooth root loses gum tissue, a minor surgical graft can be performed. The gum tissue is removed from a healthy area of the mouth and is attached to the problem site. You still have enough gum in the healthy area to keep your teeth there safe, but now the exposed roots from the missing tissue are covered up and won’t cause you pain. – A root canal. In a root canal, an anesthetic is given and your dentist will surgically remove the infected pulp inside your tooth, with the goal to save it. A root canal is one of the most commonly performed surgical procedures in dentistry, with excellent results. If you’re concerned about the pain, today’s anesthetics make this a relatively easy procedure. Compared with living with your infected

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or damaged tooth, the quick recovery of a root canal is much preferred.

SEE YOUR DENTIST Teeth pain is rarely a situation where the “If I ignore it, it will go away” way of thinking works. There’s likely an underlying problem and ignoring it means it is going to get worse, not better. The sooner you get treated, the better your chances of having a quick and relatively painless treatment. So before a simple problem turns into one that requires a complicated and painful fix, schedule an appointment with your dentist. He or she will get to the “root” of your sensitive teeth situation and help you find a solution to get rid of the pain fast.  Dr. Edmond Suh, DDS is with Supremia Dentistry, located at 1704 S. Main Street in Wake Forest. He is an international lecturer on contemporary dental techniques. At Supremia Dentistry, expect something different as they welcome you to their patient family. Call 919-556-6200 to learn more or schedule an appointment. You can also visit supremiadentistry.com.

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GRILLING FIRE FACTS According to the National Fire Protection Association: – July is the peak month for grill fires, followed by June, May, and August; – 10,600 home fires are started by grills each year, on average; – Roughly half of the injuries involving grills are thermal burns.

GENERAL GRILLING SAFETY

BY THOMAS WALTERS

To avoid grilling disasters and promote safe outdoor cooking all summer long, always keep in mind the following safety tips.  – Grills should only be used outside, and placed on a level surface, far away from structures such as your house, deck railing, or overhead tree limbs. Kids, pets, and recreational activities should be kept away from the grill too. – Check to see that your grill’s legs are sturdy and avoid grilling on a combustible surface such as a wooden deck.  – Position your grill so sparks and smoke won’t fly towards people, furniture, or buildings.  – Avoid grilling in a confined space and don’t grill on balconies and decks of apartments and condominiums.  – Protect your hands and body by using potholder-type gloves and a heavy apron when cooking over the grill.  – Keep lighted cigarettes, matches, and open flames away.  – Be sure to keep the grill clean by removing grease or built-up fat from the cooking grate and the drip trays under it.

SAFE SUMMER

GRILLING ENJOY THE SIZZLE, NOT HAZARDOUS FIZZLE ... GRILLING SAFETY STEPS ARE KEY FOR ENJOYING SUMMERTIME COOKOUTS Firing up your backyard grill this weekend to cook dinner for friends and family, or are you planning on going camping for a fun summer getaway? Whether you’re grilling burgers or brats, steaks or seafood, make sure you’ve run through your grilling safety checklist before you ignite the

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charcoal briquettes or crank open the gas valve on the propane tank. Even the slightest oversight can spark danger, potentially leading to extensive property damage and severe burn injuries. Basic safety tips can keep your cookout from going up in flames. 50

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CHARCOAL GRILL SAFETY TIPS – Never allow burned coals to smolder in any container on a wooden deck and be sure to douse coals with water before they are disposed.  – Do not discard used briquettes in a cardboard carton or any other combustible container.  – Avoid using gasoline, kerosene, alcohol, or a cigarette lighter to ignite a fire.  – Do not add more starter fluid to an existing fire.  – Only use enough charcoal for the amount of time it’s needed.  – Make sure the ash catcher is properly attached when using a kettle grill.  – In the event of bad weather, do not move a grill indoors; hot charcoal can build up lethal levels of carbon monoxide. 

GAS GRILL SAFETY TIPS – Always store gas tanks in an upright position outside and away from your home or garage and out of reach of children and pets. – Make sure tank valves are turned off when not in use.  – To see if there may be a leak in a tube or connection, pour soapy water over it with the valve turned open. Bubbles will appear if there is a leak. Should there be a leak, shut off the gas immediately and do not use the grill until it is repaired.  – Be sure to open the cover before lighting. Although gas fuels the fire, you shouldn’t smell gas while cooking; if you do, the grill may have a leak. Turn off the burners and propane tank – if you continue to smell gas after the grill is turned off, move away from it and call the fire department. If you do not smell gas once the grill is turned off, you should have the grill professionally serviced before using it again. Regardless of what kind of grill you have, it’s important to take safety precautions. Then, you can enjoy your cookouts knowing that you’ve taken steps to help keep your home and loved ones safe in the process.   And for all types of grilling, never leave your grill unattended when in use. Taking time to check for safety will have everyone remembering your outdoor party for the right reasons.  Thomas Walters is the owner of Walters Insurance Agency (with offices located in both Wake Forest and Raleigh). Call 919-554-0267 or 919-848-8015 or email ThomasWalters@allstate.com for help with all of your insurance needs.

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THE FOCUS

ON CONTACTS BY DR. SAMANTHA McPHERSON

Contact lenses have a fascinating history. Leonardo da Vinci had the rudimentary idea of a contact lens way back in the 1500s. He recognized that his vision changed when looking through water, and thus he created a glass lens with a funnel so that water could be poured into it … but this bulky option never caught on. It wasn’t until the early 1880s that a

T

contact lens could actually be worn on the surface of the eye. he original contact lens was made of glass and covered the entire eye surface. Very heavy, it was not practical for long-term wear. Most importantly, the eye receives its oxygen supply from the air, so by covering the whole surface, the original essentially suffocated the eyes and caused extreme discomfort after a short period of wear. Advancements in the manufacturing of plastic materials in the 1930s enabled production of lightweight and unbreakable contact lenses. Glass versions quickly fell out of favor and plastic ones became the norm. Mass-produced soft contact lenses as we know them weren’t developed until the 1960s. The popularity of contact lenses took off in 1987 when the first disposable version was introduced. It is estimated that 45 million people in the U.S. currently wear contact lenses – and it is easy to see why. With just a little practice, it takes minimal time to feel confident about putting them on your eyes and removing them. They feel comfortable from the moment they touch your eyes, and improved vision is immediately noticeable. The ease of wearing them now makes the original contact lenses seem prehistoric. The ultimate in convenience is provided by daily disposable contact lenses, which were introduced in 1996 and are now the fastest growing segment of the market. After wearing your lenses for the day, you simply remove and toss them into the trash. No special storage cases needed, no dealing with cumbersome cleaning and disinfecting routines, and the comfort of a brand-new pair of contacts can be appreciated every day. If you currently wear glasses for vision correction, take a minute or two to imagine a day without them. Sure glasses provide depend52

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able, clear vision and can even be fun fashion statements. But do they hinder your ability to move the way you want when you are participating in sports or exercise? Do you wish your glasses had windshield wipers to deal with the constant fogging that has become a way of life with recent mask-wearing? Do you sometimes feel your glasses make you appear older than you are? Have you ever taken your glasses off to not only leave them somewhere like a restaurant, store, or airplane? Have your glasses unexpectedly broken, leaving you stranded with poor vision? If you answered “yes” to any of these questions, you may want to consider contact lenses. Contact lenses’ quality of vision is typically superior as compared to glasses. If your prescription is high, your vision can appear distorted when wearing glasses due to aberrations in the thicker part of the lenses. If you are very nearsighted, you can experience “barrel distortion,” which causes the edges of objects to appear curved outwards. Objects can also appear smaller than their true size when viewing them through lenses that correct nearsightedness. If you are very farsighted, you may experience “pincushion distortion,” which causes objects to appear pinched inward toward the center. Objects can also appear magnified than their true size when viewing them through lenses that correct farsightedness. You have undoubtedly seen how giant a person’s eye looks behind a magnifying lens! When wearing glasses, your peripheral vision can be restricted due to the frame, size, and type of lenses, or the nature of your refractive error. Contact lenses have no visible border, and because they move with your eye, your peripheral vision remains intact, regardless of where you are looking. Scratches and smudges on glasses lenses also cause blurred vision and increased glare and haloes at night. These issues disappear when you wear contact lenses. Popularity and interest in contact lenses have skyrocketed among children. Their ease and proven safety record has convinced an increasing number of parents that contact lenses are the right choice for their children. In a clinical study, 80% of parents agree that contact lenses made their children feel more confident. For kids not excited about wearing glasses, contact lenses can help improve self-esteem. For athletes, they can help improve performance by enhancing peripheral vision and eliminating the worry of glasses falling off, breaking, or bouncing around. Parents are also often surprised at how affordable contact lenses can be. If your child is

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demonstrating responsibility at school and at home, and is eager to try contact lenses, the time just might be right!

Find an eye doctor who has experience and enjoys fitting these types of lenses and you may be very pleasantly surprised that you too can be free from your glasses.

Nearsightedness, or myopia, is a global epidemic with significant visual, social, and economic implications. It is not your imagination if you feel that more children are wearing glasses than 20 years ago. Several companies are racing to develop innovative products that treat or prevent myopia. One such new product is a contact lens called MiSight 1 Day. Unlike any other contact lens, it not only corrects vision, but it can also slow down the progression of nearsightedness. In the clinical study, the children who wore the MiSight lens had, on average, only about half of the increase in nearsightedness seen in those who wore conventional soft contact lenses over a three-year period. This is an extraordinary finding that will change the way contact lenses are prescribed for children and will certainly bring about the development of more exciting lenses in the future. The MiSight lens is a convenient daily disposable contact lens and is indicated for children aged 8-12 years of age at the initiation of treatment. It is currently the only contact lens with FDA approval to slow myopia progression. If you believe that this lens may be appropriate for your child, seek out an eye doctor who has received the certification and training required to fit this unique lens.

I believe that the most amazing type of contact lenses are niche ones that correct vision in those who cannot successfully wear glasses as a result of significantly high prescriptions or corneal irregularity secondary to trauma, disease, or surgery. People suffering from advanced dry eye know that their vision is often terrible due to the visual fluctuation and chronic blur that cannot be corrected with glasses. 90% of contact lens wearers use soft contact lenses. However, special contact lenses, known as scleral lenses, can be absolutely life-changing for those who are afflicted by corneal disease, such as dry eye or keratoconus. These lenses are made of a rigid plastic, and when fit properly, can be worn comfortably all day, every day. They are filled with saline prior to insertion, so they essentially bathe the cornea in moisture

while on the eye. Not only does the saline provide much needed moisture for a very dry eye, but the lenses also improve vision by masking the irregularities of a cornea that has developed an irregular shape due to disease or surgery. Not all eye doctors fit these types of lenses, so do your research if you think that you or a loved one could benefit from a scleral lens. Vision correction is the most common reason why people choose to wear contact lenses, but they offer so much more than that. They are truly extraordinary small pieces of plastic that offer emotional and health benefits and can now even slow down the progression of myopia. Don’t hesitate to ask your eye doctor if you think that you would like to give contact lenses a try.  Samantha McPherson, OD, FAAO, is with McPherson Family Eye Care, located at 3150 Rogers Road, Suite 110 in Wake Forest. For more information, call 919-2639163 or visit mcphersonfamilyeyecare.com.

Contact lenses are not just for kids or young adults. If you are in your 40s and beyond and are looking for an alternative to your bifocal or progressive glasses, you also have options. Many who find themselves in need of reading glasses are unaware that they may be great candidates for contact lenses. As a matter of fact, multifocal and monovision contact lenses are allowing many people to say goodbye to their readers, bifocals, or progressive glasses, and this population segment is fueling the market for contact lens growth. Multifocal and monovision contact lenses are available in daily, monthly, and bi-weekly wearing modalities.

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TOO MUCH

ELBOW GREASE?

THE CAUSES, TREATMENT, AND ROLE OF MRI FOR ELBOW PAIN

J

ust give it a little more elbow grease!” We’ve all heard this expression before as a playful way to refer to hard work. But as we get older, many of us realize just how much sense it actually makes. We use our elbows for all sorts of activities, both work-related and recreational. Therefore, it’s no surprise that elbow pain is a common condition found in adults who are 30- to 40-plus years of age, due to repetitive overuse. Activities like golf, tennis, and other racquet sports, and occupations such as painting, carpentry, and plumbing are usually the culprits.

ELBOW PAIN AND EPICONDYLITIS

A good first step is to visit your primary care physician or orthopaedist, where your condition can be evaluated based upon a physical exam and an understanding of your activities and history. Dr. Pendergrast explains that if the symptoms and exam fit epicondylitis, your doctor will likely first recommend three to six months of conservative measures for the cessation of pain. Conservative measures include anti-inflammatory medications; icing after activity; corticosteroid injections in the elbow, given by an orthopaedist; activity modification; and physical therapy exercises, which can be done at home.

The common cause of elbow pain is medically referred to as epicondylitis, and there are two types that occur. – Medial epicondylitis (or golfer’s elbow): Occurs on the inside of the elbow and affects the common flexor tendon and muscles in the forearm that contribute to moving the wrist and fingers. – Lateral epicondylitis (or tennis elbow): Occurs in the outer elbow, where the common extensor tendon attaches the forearm muscle to the elbow bone. Both types of epicondylitis develop gradually and create a dull and achy type of pain or soreness in the elbow. Dr. Thomas Pendergrast, a musculoskeletal radiologist with Raleigh Radiology, is wellacquainted with elbow pain, both as doctor and patient. “I have golfer’s elbow myself … from playing tennis,” he shared. “Back in the 1800s (when they coined the phrase), different equipment was used for tennis which affected the lateral tendons and muscles. In today’s game, tennis is more stressful on the medial elbow.”

CONSERVATIVE MEASURES COME FIRST IN TREATING ELBOW PAIN Whether you are a tennis player suffering from golfer’s elbow, or a golfer suffering from tennis elbow, medical intervention is probably needed to relieve the pain, especially if your elbow is feeling tender to the touch. 54

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USING MRI TO EVALUATE PERSISTENT ELBOW PAIN

dons, typically due to overuse. This can increase the risk of a higher-grade tear, but can also be managed with conservative measures such as activity modification, wearing a brace, consistent and correct exercises, strength training, nutrition, and even massage.

If conservative treatment measures are not successful and the symptoms of elbow pain continue, an MRI is likely the next step. The elbow MRI is relatively simple and is a highly effective method for diagnosing elbow pain. The scan takes approximately 20 minutes and can be done without contrast fluid. After interpreting the images, a radiologist will report back to the patient’s referring physician.

However, high-grade tendon tears may require surgery, especially if there is associated ligamentous injury, which can also be seen on MRI. For this reason, it is important to see your doctor if you are experiencing elbow pain that is affecting

“The sensitivity of MRI for detection of epicondylitis is nearly 100 percent,” explains Dr. Pendergrast. “With elbow pain, MRI findings and clinical findings tend to correlate nicely, making this condition readily identifiable – which is very helpful when it comes to determining the best treatment plan. I find it very satisfying to be able to use MRI to give patients a clear answer about their pain.”

daily activities. Proper treatment is needed to help resolve the pain and prevent further deterioration.  Dr. Thomas Pendergrast is a musculoskeletal radiologist with Raleigh Radiology. He earned his medical degree and completed his residency and fellowship from Wake Forest School of Medicine. He joined Raleigh Radiology in 2020. Raleigh Radiology offers top-of-the-line medical imaging services throughout Wake and Johnson Counties. To learn more about Raleigh Radiology, visit raleighrad.com.

MRI can determine the severity of epicondylitis – for example, whether the tendon is thickening or inflamed, or if there is a tear in the tendon. Tears can even be quantified using MRI to determine if surgical repair is needed. MRI can also identify other abnormalities associated with elbow pain, such as nerve entrapment syndrome (when the nerves around the elbow are being compressed or squeezed) and osteoarthritis. To an orthopaedic surgeon, a patient’s MRI results are often critical for surgical planning.

DOES AN MRI ALWAYS MEAN SURGERY? Receiving an MRI for elbow pain does not always mean surgery is necessary. As Dr. Pendergrast also explains, “The severity of a tendon tear can be present on a spectrum, from low-grade to more severe. For example, I have tendinosis, a lower grade condition, and can keep it under control myself with the correct exercises.” Tendinosis is a chronic, degenerative condition that can occur in the elbow ten-

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PIÑA COLADA PIE IN A JAR – 3 cups finely crushed graham crackers – 12 tablespoons butter, melted – 2 15-ounce cans crushed pineapple – 2 cups heavy cream – 8 ounces cream cheese, softened – 1 tablespoon sugar – ½ cup unsweetened coconut flakes, toasted To make crust: In a large bowl, combine graham cracker crumbs with butter and stir until combined. To make pineapple layer: In a medium saucepan over mediumlow heat, heat crushed pineapple until thick and jammy, about 15 minutes. Meanwhile, to make cream layer: In a stand mixer with a paddle attachment, beat heavy cream until stiff peaks form. Fold in cream cheese and sugar. (For best results, transfer mixture to a piping bag.) In the jars: Among four mason jars, layer graham cracker crust, pineapple (using a spoon), and cream, alternating until you reach the top of the jar.

SWEET

Garnish with toasted coconut and serve.

SLICES OF

SUMMER What better way to cool down this summer than with one

of our favorite summertime fruits? Pineapples are delicious, low in calories, and loaded with nutrients and antioxidants. This super versatile fruit has been linked to notable health benefits, including: improved digestion, better immunity, a lower risk of cancer, relief of arthritis symptoms, and improved post-surgery recovery. So this summer, if you’re looking to improve your health while also enjoying the fruits of Mother Nature, give these delectable, healthy, and super easy-to-make pineapple recipes a try! 56

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PINEAPPLE COCONUT OVERNIGHT OATS – 1½ cup rolled oats – 5-8 ounces pineapple Greek yogurt (can sub vanilla Greek yogurt) – 1 (8-ounce) can crushed or diced pineapple with the juice – ⅓ cup shredded unsweetened coconut – ½ cup unsweetened coconut milk – ¼ heaping teaspoon ground cinnamon – For topping: Fresh pineapple and additional coconut In a medium size bowl, mix all ingredients together (rolled oats through cinnamon) and chill overnight. You may also divide mixture into individual serving bowls before refrigerating. Top with fresh pineapple and additional shredded coconut.

HAWAIIAN CHICKEN KABOBS – 3 tablespoons soy sauce – 3 tablespoons brown sugar – 2 tablespoons sherry – 1 tablespoon sesame oil – ¼ teaspoon ground ginger – ¼ teaspoon garlic powder – 8 skinless, boneless chicken breast halves, cut into 2 inch pieces – 1 (20 ounce) can pineapple chunks, drained; or fresh pineapple, chunked In a shallow glass dish, mix the soy sauce, brown sugar, sherry, sesame oil, ginger, and garlic powder. Stir the chicken pieces and pineapple into the marinade until well coated. Cover, and marinate in the refrigerator at least 2 hours. Preheat grill to medium-high heat. Lightly oil the grill grate. Thread chicken and pineapple alternately onto skewers. Grill 15 to 20 minutes, turning occasionally, or until chicken juices run clear.  For more delicious and healthy recipes, visit the WakeMed Voices blog (where you can also subscribe) at wakemedvoices.com. The WakeMed Voices blog provides an outlet for their many experts to share information on topics important to the health of patients and the community.

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OUR HERITAGE MAY 21, 1956: THE DAY THE COLLEGE MOVED

O

BY AMY PIERCE BY ED MORRIS

n February 3, 1834, on an unusually warm winter morning, Samuel Wait sat down with 16 students in the former home of Dr. Calvin Jones. On that morning, what is now Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, North Carolina was born. For the next 122 years, Wake Forest College would be the sun that the surrounding community we know as Wake Forest would revolve around. That all came to an almost complete stop on Monday, May 21, 1956. Graduation exercises were taking place in what is now known as Binkley Chapel on the campus of Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary (SEBTS). As Dr. Hubert McNeill Poteat gave the final commencement address inside the chapel, outside on the campus grounds rolled up a fleet of moving vans. They had been summoned from nearly every part of North Carolina, and some from other states as well. When the newly-graduated Wake Forest College alumni processed from the chapel with degree under arm, they came face-to-face with the trucks and movers who had arrived to pack up Wake Forest College and move it 100 miles west to Winston-Salem. It would be a sparkling new, much-larger campus built on a large portion of the estate of the late tobacco magnate Richard Joshua Reynolds. The estate was called Reynolda, and the family of R.J. Reynolds likely thought when their generous gift of a perpetual endowment was offered to Wake Forest College nearly a decade earlier that the college’s name would be changed to Reynolda as well. The trustees of Wake Forest College had accepted the Reynolds’ money, but they explicitly spelled out in their acceptance letter that the name Wake Forest would never change. The emotions of those final graduates from the 122-year-old college ran high. Many tears were shed by both those graduating and the folks who called Wake Forest home. As Margaret Johnston Wineinger stated “They just sat on the ground and bawled.” The acceptance of the Reynolds’ endowment and the move made a lot of sense for Wake Forest College. For the first time in its long history, the college would have a real, stable endowment. It would also be in an area of the state where it did not have to compete with North Carolina State University, UNC, and Duke for students and funding. In those days, nearly all the students in those four schools were from North Carolina. Wake Forest College would be in one of the state’s largest cities, rather 58 58

than a very small town. It would be in the western Piedmont where it would stand nearly alone among major North Carolina institutions of higher education. For the first time in 15 years, it would be in the same city with its medical school that had moved to Winston-Salem in 1941 to be aligned with the North Carolina Baptist Hospital. The loss of the College was compared to dropping an atomic bomb. Every part of life for nearly everyone in town was touched in one way or another. For Wake Forest Baptist Church, which sat on the campus for nearly as long as the college had existed, it was a major blow. At once, the church lost its pastor, organist, choir director, most of its Sunday school teachers, and many of its deacons. Within a month, nearly 100 families that were members of the church had left to follow the College to Winston-Salem. The loss of the College hit Downtown perhaps the hardest of all – soda shops, pool rooms, two movie theaters, department stores, men’s clothing stores, and all but a couple of restaurants were forced to close. Among those that survived was Shorty’s – famous for its hot dogs and pool room and as a hangout for such notables as Arnold Palmer and Carroll O’Connor, aka Archie Bunker. Shorty’s is rumored to have “diversified” its menu to survive – but only if they knew you and only in the back room where you may have been able to purchase some local spirits. Both movie theaters which once had the top new releases every week could not make it and had to close their doors. Nearly every business was in some way adversely affected. Wake Forest was said to be like a ghost town, with empty boarding houses and closed store fronts – but not for long. Town Commissioners and the Chamber of Commerce soon went to work. A committee was formed to recruit business and industry. Shortly, Athey came to town and became one of the largest producers of street sweepers in the country. Schrader, a manufacturer of valves for industrial use in products produced worldwide, also arrived. Weavex and Burlington built textile plants, and the town slowly began to recover from the loss of it namesake College. It still took over 40 years before the town’s population would exceed what it had been when the college was here. But today it continues to survive and thrive. We know Wake Forest today as a prosperous and growing community that still cherishes its ties to an institution 100 miles west with the same name.  Ed Morris is executive director of the Wake Forest Historical Museum & Wake Forest College Birthplace. For more information, visit wakeforestmuseum.org.

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