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CIRCA

JULY

AUGUST

SEPTEMBER 2018

G R I L L I N G U P A S U M M E R F E A S T • O U T D O O R R E T R E AT • S I M P L E S U M M E R S T Y L E • G E T T I N G I N T O H I G H G E A R • C A RO L I NA T I G E R R E S C U E A S U C C U L E N T S U M M E R • W E D D I N G DAY D I Y • M A K I N G T H E M O S T O F L A B O R DAY • O L D F U R N I T U R E . . . N E W T R E A S U R E S A N U N F O RG E T TA B L E S U M M E R I N T H E F O R E S T • h o t b o o ks f o r s u m m e r • t h e wa l l t h at h e a l s • S W I M S A F E LY • A N D M O R E

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A WORD FROM THE PUBLISHER

Summer has arrived! Although high temperatures, longer days, and fun activities have been here for a while already, summer has officially made its entrance, and I for one am very excited. Each season in North Carolina brings new treasures and unique opportunities, and summer is definitely no exception. NC summers are packed with sun, blue skies, adventures, and bliss, mixed with a hint of rejuvenation and relaxation. And this issue is packed with ways for you to enjoy all of these and more – whether it’s with food, friends, family, or simple summer celebrations, we’ve got you covered. Fabulous food is a summer staple around here – hence our front cover feature by Holly Hopkins of Chef Mario’s, Inc. If you’re finding your mouth watering and your tummy grumbling after seeing that deliciousness, go ahead and get that grill warming so you can “Grill Up A Summer Feast” and serve some seasonal yumminess, thanks to Holly’s recipes for a non-traditional take on the traditional backyard cookout. Enjoying time with friends and family during the spectacular summer months is another must, with time off from school, summer vacations, and the like. But if you find yourself running out of creative ways to entertain the kids now that the excitement of school’s end has worn off, then consider a visit to this issue’s “Driveable Destination,” where you can discover the quaint character of nearby Pittsboro. While there, make it a point to visit the one-of-a-kind Carolina Tiger Rescue, our summer “Hidden Gem.” And be sure to fill your summer calendar with all the exciting events detailed in “An Unforgettable Summer In the Forest.” With all this family-friendly fun, this will surely be a summer to remember. While celebrating summer, we need to remember how to do so safely. “Swim Safely” is here to remind you that while you and your child are leisurely relaxing by the pool, lake, or ocean, safety measures should always be top of mind. And the higher temperatures welcome the excitement of cruising the open road … so “Getting In High Gear” offers tips for both bikers and drivers to remember for a safe motorcycle season. Check out each of these wonderful articles, and many more – ranging from the hottest recommendations for beach reading; to transforming old, forgotten furniture into fresh, new treasures; to upgrading your outdoor living space for ultimate summer enjoyment; to making the most of your Labor Day weekend; and much more … this issue has it all. I hope you enjoy all this edition has to offer, and while you’re enjoying your summer of fun, be sure to also support our many loyal advertisers, and please tell them you saw their ads in this issue of CIRCA Magazine. Have a wonderful and safe summer, and I’ll see you again this fall!


J U LY • A U G U S T • S E P T E M B E R 2 0 1 8 6

An Unforgettable Summer In The Forest

8 Wedding Day DIY – Personalize Your Perfect Day

With Fun Do-It-Yourself Wedding Day Projects And Ideas

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Grilling Up A Summer Feast – Serve Up Some Seasonal Deliciousness With This Fabulous Fare

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A Succulent Summer

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Summer Break – How To Change Your Weekly Cleaning Game While School’s Out For Summer

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Swim Safely – Understand “Dry Drowning” And Know The Signs

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Outdoor Retreat – Take Your Backyard To The Next Level With These Outdoor Living Design Ideas

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Getting Into High Gear – Tips To Remember For A Safe Motorcycle Season

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Driveable Destinations – Discover The Character Of Pittsboro

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The Doctor Will See You Now

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Old Furniture ... New Treasures

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Hidden Gems – Carolina Tiger Rescue

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The Hidden Signs Of TMJ

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Good Reads – Hot Books For Summer

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Simple Summer Style – Freshen And Lighten Your Home For Summer With These Easy Breezy Decorating Ideas

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Making The Most Of Labor Day

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Ditch The Drops – What’s New In Dry Eye Diagnosis And Treatments

CONTACT INFORMATION BallPointe Publishing & Design, LLC P.O. Box 1182 Wake Forest, NC 27588 919.453.2555 • info@circamagazine.com www.circamagazine.com

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You Are Enough

ADVERTISING SALES 919.453.2555 • info@circamagazine.com

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Brace Yourself To Maintain Healthy Pearly Whites During Orthodontic Treatment

The Wall That Heals

48 Moments And Memories 50 Our Heritage Revisited – The Falls, Wake County’s Brigadoon: You Can’t Hardly Get There From Here

PUBLISHER & EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Kent Lower CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Todd Nelson Rhonda Benvie Amy Pierce Anna Bolton Joe Raboine Jill Bright Jennifer Smart Margarita Cohen Dr. Edmond Suh Patti Fralix Kelle Sullivan Dr. Jason Gladwell UNC Physicians Network Holly Hopkins WakeMed Shanna Labrador Thomas Walters Suzanne Lucey Kasey Wright Jessica McMican Dr. Samantha McPherson

MANAGERS Kent Lower & Mitch Lower Printed by Theo Davis Printing, Inc.

Nick Honeycutt 919.380.5949 • nhoneycutt@theodavis.com Publisher Photo by Christina Bowman Photography, LLC Front Cover Photo by Holly Hopkins Chef Mario’s, Inc. • www.chefmario.com LIKE US ON FACEBOOK FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @CIRCA_Magazine FOLLOW US ON INSTAGRAM circa_magazine AD SPACE RESERVATIONS Oct / Nov / Dec 2018: August 17, 2018 CIRCA Magazine is published quarterly by BallPointe Publishing & Design, LLC. All rights reserved. No part of this magazine may be reproduced or transmitted without the written permission of the publisher. Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained within; however, BallPointe Publishing & Design assumes no liability for accuracy or omissions.


AN UNFORGETTABLE

SUMMER

IN THE FOREST BY ANNA BOLTON

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ummer’s here and that means it’s time for some fun! But where should you go and what should you do? Look no further than right here, because Wake Forest has a second-to-none lineup of family-friendly events that includes outdoor music concerts, family movie nights, a home and garden show, and much more. So gather your family and join your neighbors for what promises to be an unforgettable summer in the Forest.

word artists. Come out and enjoy a truly unique and entertaining event and support your local artists. Wine, beer, and other refreshments will be available for purchase. Tickets are $5 plus tax and may be purchased online or at the box office. For more information, visit wakeforestnc.gov and search “Neck of the Woods.”  

FAMILY MOVIE NIGHTS AT JOYNER PARK

FRIDAY NIGHT ON WHITE 

The third season of Friday Night on White is in full swing. Recognized far and wide as Wake Forest’s most popular concert series, these free outdoor concerts continue on July 13, August 10, and September 14. Presented by White Street Brewing Co., the performances take place along South White Street from 6:00 PM – 9:00 PM. All concerts are free and feature a variety of premier local bands and food trucks. Grab your lawn chair and come enjoy the music while taking in the great atmosphere of Downtown Wake Forest. Thank you to these sponsors: White Street Brewing Co., Gladwell Orthodontics, McPherson Family Eye Care, Mitchell Heating & Cooling, iHeart Media, NuImage Surgical & Dental Implant Center, Capital Powersports, Wells Family Dental Group, Local Charm, Benchmark Community Bank, Orangetheory Fitness, The Wake Weekly, Pro Audio & Light, Dirty Dogs Spa, Sole Dimensions, Tuscan Ridge Animal Hospital, Stanley Martin Homes, Hasentree by Toll Brothers, B&W Hardware, Coastal Credit Union, Birkner Insurance, Rainbow Child Care Center, Orthopedic Physical Therapy, Avance Primary Care, Carillon Assisted Living, Chronic Tacos, Triangle Family Dentistry, Nutrishop, Chick-fil-A, CIRCA Magazine, 27587 Magazine, Fidelity Bank, The Dental Care Center, Lowes Foods, Massage Envy, Ads N Art, Wake Forest Federal, and For Your Occasion Party Rentals. For more information, visit wakeforestnc.gov and search “Friday Night on White.”  

NECK OF THE WOODS

Presented and sponsored by Wake Forest Arts, Neck of the Woods is a variety performance series featuring emerging local artists. The event will take place at the Wake Forest Renaissance Centre on Friday, July 20, at 7:30 PM. Each show is different and may include actors, dancers, musicians, comedians, writers, and spoken 6

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You’re invited to enjoy a movie under the stars at Wake Forest’s most popular park. Wake Forest Parks, Recreation & Cultural Resources is excited to host Family Movie Nights at E. Carroll Joyner Park, 701 Harris Road. Presented by McPherson Family Eye Care, Walters Insurance Agency, Edward Jones Investments, and Capital Powersports, the outdoor movie series continues on July 28 and August 11. Free and open to the public, the movies begin at 8:30 PM. New this year, Family Movie Nights will also feature movierelated pre-show activities for kids beginning at 7:15 PM. Assorted food vendors will also be onsite. Bring chairs or a blanket and arrive early in order to find a spot and settle in before the movie begins. Thank you to all the event sponsors: McPherson Family Eye Care, Walters Insurance Agency, Edward Jones Investments, Capital Powersports, Bumgarner & Martin Orthodontics, Mosquito Joe, Vision Martial Arts, Primrose School of Heritage Wake Forest, Wells Family Dental Group, British Swim School, Michelle Palatine & Co., Triangle Family Dentistry, The College at Southeastern, Avance Care, and Kerr Family YMCA. For more information, visit wakeforestnc.gov and search “Family Movie Nights.”

CONCERTS IN THE PARK  The Town of Wake Forest and PineCone will present two free concerts at E. Carroll Joyner Park on August 5 and September 2. Both of these Sunday performances are scheduled from 5:00 PM – 7:00 PM in the Amphitheater. Food and refreshments will be available for purchase or attendees may bring their own picnic. For more information, visit wakeforestnc.gov and search “Concerts in the Park.”

WAKE FOREST HOME & GARDEN SHOW Whether you are looking for a complete home remodel, a kitchen or bath makeover, a newly landscaped yard, or just like to shop for your home, you will find it all at the Wake Forest Home & Garden Show. Presented by Mitchell Heating & Cooling, the third annual

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Wake Forest Home & Garden Show will take place on Saturday and Sunday, August 11-12 at the Wake Forest Renaissance Centre. Showcasing the latest in-home improvement products, services, and features, the event is free and open to the public on Saturday from 9:00 AM – 4:00 PM and Sunday from noon – 4:00 PM. This year’s show will again feature a “shopping marketplace” sponsored by BOHO.boutique, where you can browse a variety of local vendors and purchase unique décor, artwork, and gifts. Thank you to the 2018 sponsors: Mitchell Heating & Cooling, BOHO.boutique, Champion Windows, Capital Powersports, Leaf Filter, Mosquito Joe, B&W Hardware, and Wake Forest Power. For more information, visit wakeforestnc.gov and search “Home & Garden Show.”  

WAKE FOREST UNPLUGGED

Longing for an entire afternoon free from electronic devices? If so, then save the date for Wake Forest Unplugged on Sunday, September 2. Sponsored by the Wake Forest Recreation Advisory Board, this one-of-a-kind community event encourages Wake Forest-area residents to “disconnect” from cell phones and computers, and “re-connect” with their community, friends, and family. Beginning at 4:00 PM, join other Wake Foresters for an afternoon of free games and activities at E. Carroll

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Joyner Park. The electronics-free afternoon will culminate with a concert in the Joyner Park Amphitheater from 5:00 PM – 7:00 PM. Even if you can’t make it out to Joyner Park, you and your family can still participate by simply “unplugging” from your televisions, personal computers, smart phones, and video games for the afternoon and instead engage in healthier, more active pursuits. For more information, visit wakeforestnc.gov and search “Wake Forest Unplugged.”

GOOD NEIGHBOR DAY The Wake Forest Human Relations Council will host the 13th Annual Good Neighbor Day on Saturday, September 15. This free, family-friendly event is scheduled from 1:00 PM – 4:00 PM at E. Carroll Joyner Park. Good Neighbor Day assembles people from all walks of life for a day of food, fun, and family entertainment. By bringing together a mix of cultures, music, ages, and ethnicities, the event celebrates diversity and promotes goodwill among all of Wake Forest’s citizens. Thank you to the event sponsors: Gladwell Orthodontics, The College at Southeastern, Passanante’s Home Food Services, Girl Scouts – North Carolina Coastal Pines, Wells Family Dental Group, Nest Egg Home Services, Wake Dental Wellness, Vision Marital Arts, and The Dental Care Center. For more infor-

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mation, visit wakeforestnc.gov and search “Good Neighbor Day.” 

WAKE FOREST DANCE FESTIVAL Presented by Wake Forest Arts in partnership with the Wake Forest Parks, Recreation & Cultural Resources, the Wake Forest Dance Festival will bring a day of dance to the Triangle in a spectacular outdoor setting. Free and open to the public, this familyfriendly event will take place Saturday, September 29, at E. Carroll Joyner Park. The event will feature national and regional professional dancers from the Wake Forest dance community and beyond, along with local rising advanced dance performers. For more information, visit wakeforestnc.gov and search “Dance Festival.”

STAY CONNECTED! Always be the first to know about Town of Wake Forest programs, services, and special events by signing up for E-Notifier at www.wakeforestnc.gov/enotifier.aspx, downloading the Town of Wake Forest app at www.wakeforestnc.gov/app.aspx, or visiting www.wakeforestnc.gov. 

Anna Bolton is the marketing and business relations specialist for the Town of Wake Forest. To learn more about promotional opportunities and event sponsorships, contact Anna at 919-610-4916 or abolton@wakeforestnc.gov.

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ather up the bridesmaids and host a DIY party to create fabulous personalized signs and pieces to use around the wedding and reception venues. You can create custom-made items to display that clever Instagram hashtag you’ve selected for the wedding; honor loved ones who have passed, but you still want to include in your day; or direct guests where to sit. Having each of your attendants create these specialized pieces with you offers not only a unique and bonding experience – and some pre-wedding fun during an oftentimes stressful process – but also lasting and valuable memories you will cherish long after the big day. If you want to include a little wit into the ceremony, maybe create a cheeky sign with a fun saying for the ring bearer to carry down the aisle – a surefire way to bring a smile to the face of every guest. No matter what, never be afraid to show your personality throughout the wedding ceremony and reception – after all, it’s your day!

BY KASEY WRIGHT

DIY

WEDDING DAY

Beautiful tablescapes are a key component of the reception that most brides have envisioned since the day their wedding planning started. These can range from simple to elaborate, as long as they reflect the style and personality of the couple. If rustic vibe is your thing, why not incorporate thin wood slices from a tree, painted with chalkboard paint for place markers? Simply handletter the names of each guest and their table numbers with chalk – a whimsical and personal take on the traditional seating card. Take this one step further by attaching some twine or ribbon to the tree slice for a keepsake ornament for those guests to take home as a memento of your day.

PERSONALIZE YOUR PERFECT DAY WITH THESE FUN DO-IT-YOURSELF WEDDING DAY PROJECTS AND IDEAS Summer is the season of love. From wedding showers to the actual wedding, summertime is prime time to celebrate the union of loved ones. While traditional wedding aspects are very meaningful, the big day, and the special events leading up to it, should reflect the personalities of the happy couple. With DIY being all the rage, there are so many ways to incorporate more personal touches into the event than ever before, making it as unique and memorable for the guests as it is for you and your significant other. Here are just a few examples ... 8

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Wedding guests traditionally sign a register to show who attended – why not shake things up a bit with a personalized sign featuring your names and the wedding date for everyone to sign? In addition to a “document” of who attended, you will have a special work of art you can display in your first home together as a great reminder of who celebrated your special day with you. Creating a custom card box for the gift table is a charming way to show guests where to place cards and gift envelopes.

By combining a little DIY action with some special weddingplanning fun with friends and family, you will be able to customize and create the day of your dreams – all while saving a little money, helping the overall budget (who doesn’t want that?). But more importantly, you will be able to reflect on the projects created, remembering those moments where you all worked together and cherishing the love that went into each and every one of them.  Kasey Wright is the owner of AR Workshop Raleigh, offering hands-on graphic design and DIY workshops in a studio boutique that is located at 14460 Falls of the Neuse, Suite 175 in Raleigh. For more information, please visit www.arworkshop.com/raleigh.

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live music

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food

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beer & wine

Second Fridays April-Sept 6-9 pm South White Street downtown wake forest

JULY 13 – SLEEPING BOOTY AUG 10 – BIG LOVE SEPT 14 – CRUSH wakeforestnc.gov

ProAudio

& Light Inc.

S P O N S O R S

TUSCAN RIDGE ANIMAL HOSPITAL

Ads N’ Art | For Your Occasion Party Rentals | Lowes Foods | Massage Envy | The Dental Care Center | Wake Forest Federal


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hichever summer gathering you’re hosting, there’s always that burning question at the top of your mind – what will you serve? Hot dogs? Frozen burger patties? Chips? Store-bought potato salad? No, no, no ... no need for the typical cookout fare – no, we have the perfect grilling menu you need right here. These easy dishes full of fun flavors will truly surprise your guests, leaving a lasting impression on them as they secretly hope you’ll be hosting the next backyard summer bash sooner rather than later.

BY HOLLY HOPKINS

GRILLING UP

A SUMMER

FEAST SERVE UP SOME SEASONAL DELICIOUSNESS WITH THIS FABULOUS FARE There it is! Did you catch that waft of smoky goodness? The smoky goodness that lets us know that summer is here, and it’s in full swing. Yes, summer is here, so let the lighting of the grills begin, or go ahead and break out the briquettes or wood for your grill. It’s time to throw that summer celebration for friends and family you’ve been planning for weeks, or that impromptu cul-de-sac cookout with the neighbors. 10

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To start, you need a burger centerpiece – and ours is a true winner. Forget Taco Tuesdays this summer – make it a Fiesta Burger Friday for your feast instead! Following is a recipe for a juicy and tender burger that combines ground beef with the creaminess of North Carolina sweet potatoes and the smoky seasonings found in your favorite Mexican foods – a truly delicious combination. Surprise: it is also good for you because sweet potatoes are loaded with fiber, vitamins, and minerals. The best part? The kids will happily scarf down these burgers and not even notice that they just ate their veggies. Yup, that’s right … Mom and Dad: 1 – picky kid: 0. Adults love them too, simply because they are delicious. While you’re at it, be sure to make extra for that last-minute summer get-together … simply mix up a big batch and put some in the freezer so you’ll be prepared for your next outdoor grilling feast. To top these scrumptious burgers, skip the typical ketchup, mustard, and dill pickles. Instead, try some of the following nontraditional topping ideas that are simple to make and will keep in the fridge for many other uses – you will want to keep these bad boys on hand for salads and sandwiches all summer long as well. For you pickle lovers out there, try our simple pickled onion recipe for a crunchy, tangy-sweet, and super colorful burger topping alternative (using red onions provides the perfect color pop). Or give one of my favorite new recipes – Roasted Tomato Relish – a whirl. This scratch-made condiment could easily replace your standard store-bought ketchup. Have you ever noticed that one of the primary ingredients in ketchup is high fructose syrup? You don’t really want to serve that, do you? Tap into the relish’s natural sweetness and depth of flavor by using simple canned tomatoes and roasting all the ingredients together in the oven, low and slow. If you don’t like the natural chunky texture, simply puree it in your blender – you’ll still achieve the delicious flavors ... either way, the roasted tomato relish is a sure-fire winner that will keep people coming back for more. And to go with this epic burger, I’m letting you in on one of my favorite pasta salad recipes – Mexican Street Corn Pasta Salad. It, too, is loaded with lots of summer veggie goodness and bright colors. Creamy and delicious with the perfect combination of

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mayonnaise and some full-bodied flavors from spices, as well as a little zip of lime, this cookout accompaniment is a summer must. Set out a bottle of your favorite hot sauce for folks to spice it up as hot as they like. Go ahead and invite your friends and neighbors over for a funfilled summer afternoon of conversation, corn hole, water balloons, and of course, food – and shake up your grilling plans a little by giving these great recipes a try. But if you notice your party goes completely silent once the food is served, don’t worry – that’s actually a great sign, as it means that everyone is too busy enjoying your delicious food to have time to talk. In this case, silence is truly golden.

SOUTHWEST SWEET POTATO BURGER – 1 tablespoon canola or olive oil – 2 cups finely diced onion – 2 teaspoons cumin – 2 tablespoons chili powder – 2 teaspoons dry oregano – ¼ cup water – 1 teaspoon Sriracha – 1 tablespoon mustard – 2 tablespoons soy sauce – 1 medium sweet potato, baked and mashed (approximately 1½ - 2 cups) – 2 pounds ground beef (or turkey) – Salt and pepper, to taste Preheat oven to 350 degrees or heat up your grill. Heat the oil over medium heat in a sauté pan and add the onion. Stir and cook for 2-3 minutes, or until translucent. Add cumin, chili powder, and oregano. Stir and let cook for 1 minute. Then, add the water and soy sauce. Stir and cook until most of the liquid has evaporated. Remove from heat and let cool. In a separate bowl, combine the mashed sweet potato, ground beef, and salt and pepper. Once sautéed ingredients have cooled, add them to the meat and potato mixture. Using your hands, mix all ingredients thoroughly so everything is combined well. Form into patties and set aside. If grilling later, store them in the refrigerator before cooking. To cook on the grill: cook on each side for 3-5 minutes, depending on the size of the burger. To bake in the oven: place on a foil-lined sheet pan and bake for 14-20 minutes, depending on the size of the burger. Enjoy as a “naked burger” or on your favorite bread. Top as desired, or not – these burgers are so flavorful and moist that they are great with little or no toppings. And instead of burgers, you can use this recipe to create a meatballs versions (simply add to your favorite sauce) for a dinnertime change of pace. continued on next page

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ROASTED TOMATO RELISH

Place onions in a heat-safe bowl. Mix vinegar, honey, and salt in a small sauce pan and bring to a boil. Pour the liquid over the onions and stir to coat. Let sit at room temperature for a minimum of an hour. Keep up to two weeks, covered in the refrigerator. Red onions are best because they turn a beautiful color, but any onion will work.

Makes approximately 3 cups – 32-ounce can diced tomatoes – ¼ cup brown sugar – 3 tablespoons cider vinegar – 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar – 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard – 1 teaspoon Sriracha – Salt and pepper, to taste

MEXICAN STREET CORN PASTA SALAD

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Place all ingredients in a deep roasting pan and stir to combine. Roast for one hour, uncovered, checking on it every 15 minutes. Stir each time you check. It will be done when most of the liquid has evaporated and the tomatoes are slightly charred on the edges. Remove from oven and stir. Let cool. Once completely cool, transfer to a mason jar, plastic container, or divide up into small freezer bags. Relish will keep in the refrigerator for up to two weeks, or freeze for up to three months (if frozen, remove from the freezer the night before serving).

PICKLED RED ONIONS – 2 large red onions, sliced thin – 1 cup apple cider vinegar – 2 tablespoons honey – 3 teaspoons salt

Makes approximately 2 quarts For the salad: – 2 cups dry pasta (I prefer bow tie) – 3-4 ears of corn (or 3 cups frozen corn) – 1 cup cherry tomatoes – 2 colored bell peppers – 3 green onions – 1 small bunch of cilantro – ½ cup queso fresco (or feta) For the dressing: – 1 cup regular mayonnaise – Zest and juice of 2 limes – ½ teaspoon ground cumin – 1 teaspoon paprika – 1 teaspoon chili powder – 1 teaspoon Sriracha – Salt and pepper, to taste Cook the pasta or until al dente. Drain pasta and let sit out to cool and dry in the colander. If using fresh corn, cook the corn on the cob (grill, boil, or bake) and cut the kernels off the cob. If using frozen corn, measure out 3 cups and thaw. Prep the rest of the veggies: cut the cherry tomatoes in half; seed the colored bell peppers and cut into thin strips; trim the green onions and cut into small pieces; and rough chop the cilantro (reserve some for garnish). To make the sauce, in a large bowl, whisk together all the ingredients until thoroughly combined. Taste and adjust seasonings as needed. Add the pasta to the bowl and stir to coat all the pasta. Add in all the vegetables and stir gently to combine. Taste and adjust salt and pepper to your taste. Top with crumbled cheese and reserve cilantro. You can also sprinkle a little paprika on top for added color.  Holly Hopkins has spent many years working in and with food, starting off at her Grandma’s elbow, making wedding cakes and cookies galore. Since then, she has been a manager and business owner and is thrilled to be combining her passions for high quality food and superior customer service at Chef Mario’s. For more information, visit www.chefmario.com.

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grown. When a succulent is dormant, it’s trying to survive and not grow. This means it prefers to be left alone and will not take in much water. Now if your succulents stay indoors year-round, they will not go into dormancy because the temperatures never fluctuate. Most succulents are very active in the spring, rest in the summer, become active again in fall, and rest again in winter. I don’t know if plants have a memory of their native seasons, but the best rule is to know your plants and learn their cycles. Sempervivums (hen and chicks) are the most popular succulents that love the freezing temperatures, but not high heat, whereas echeverias can’t handle freezing temperatures, but will really show off their beautiful colors because of the stress of heat. Your succulents will tell you what they need; you just need to know what to look for. Are the leaves completely dried out and dying? No need to worry – this is a normal part of the growing process. Your beauty is creating new leaves while the other ones die. Simply pull them off gently and your plant will remain nice and happy.

BY KELLE SULLIVAN

A SUCCULENT

SUMMER

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OVERWATERING: Are the leaves looking yellow? This is usually a sign of overwatering. You can also tell if your succulent is overwatered if its leaves fall off by just touching them. As soon as you notice these signs, take it out of the pot and let the soil dry out – or go ahead and change out the soil completely. If you see signs of root rot, you can usually cut the top of the plant and save it, or take

t’s finally summertime in North Carolina, y’all! The days are longer, the temps are rising, and so is the humidity. What does this mean for our succulents? So much! We need to talk about summer dormancy and what that means for watering and caring for your beloved plants.

HGTV’s Joanna Gaines has taught us that plants don’t need to stay on a shelf. Get those succulents outside and take advantage of your porches this summer. They thrive on the morning sun and most love the warm temperatures. Just be sure to put them in an area where you can shelter them from our frequent evening downpours. Succulents are known for their incredible ability to store water and survive in harsh climates due to their thick, fleshy leaves. You can’t go on a vacation and leave your flowers unwatered, but you can certainly neglect your succulents and come back to see them even more beautiful than when you left them. Perfect for summer travelers, succulents are very easy to maintain, as long as they are planted in porous cactus/succulent soil, given proper drainage, receive daily bright light, and are not overwatered. With this universal love of succulents comes lots of confusion about their active growing seasons. Most will go through phases where they grow less (dormancy) or grow more (actively growing), just like most plants. This is all based on the climate in which they are 14

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some of the leaves to propogate. This may not save overwatered succulents, but it’s worth a shot. UNDERWATERING: Do the leaves appear limp or wilty? If so, pay close attention to the soil. If the soil is wet, this could mean it has too much water, or not enough. Only water when the soil is completely dry. If succulents are underwatered, they’ll usually perk up pretty quickly when watered. If the leaves are completely shriveled up, they may be too far gone, unfortunately, and unable to recover.

It’s more than a college. It’s a calling.

PESTS: Check for bugs, as humidity creates a breeding ground for mealy bugs – little white web-looking bugs that hide in the nooks and crannies of your succulents and can spread from plant to plant in no time. If you work quickly, you can save them by spraying your plants with plant pesticides or by using 70% isopropyl alcohol and dabbing it on the affected area. Just be sure to remove them from direct sunlight while they’re being treated or they will burn.

Come visit us or learn more at collegeatsoutheastern.com.

The College at Southeastern combines the best of a liberal arts college education with substantial biblical and theological training.

Remember, it’s called plant therapy, so don’t stress about them too much; it’s all about learning the practice of patience. If you have specific questions or concerns, feel free to message me or stop by. I hope you have a succulent summer!  Kelle Sullivan is the owner of Sully’s Succulents, located in Rolesville, offering succulent sales, classes, parties, and special events. Check her out on Facebook (@SullysSucculents) or Instagram (@sullyssucculents).

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BY TODD NELSON

SUMMER

BREAK

HOW TO CHANGE YOUR WEEKLY CLEANING GAME WHILE SCHOOL'S OUT FOR SUMMER

Even if you’re an outdoor-living kind of family, summer

BEDROOMS. Dust mites – those tiny allergy-implicated creatures that live in virtually every bedroom – thrive in summer’s heat and humidity. You can make bedrooms less hospitable to the invisible pests by frequently laundering bed linens with hot water; removing unneeded textiles such as extra pillows, blankets, stuffed animals, and even window treatments; and leaving beds either unmade or at least neatly turned down during summer months.

brings new home-cleaning priorities – especially if you have kids home from school. Some spaces and regular tasks need more attention, others less. Here’s a quick rundown of how to shift your cleaning game for summer. BATHROOMS. Bathrooms get a double-whammy in summer. With kids home from school, toilet and sink usage goes way up. So too does tub and shower use with post-pool, beach, summer camp, and plain old sweaty-body bathing. Due to high humidity in many areas, bathrooms also become more susceptible to mold and mildew in summer. Tip: No need to change your weekly cleaning routine; just increase the frequency to every few days, and make a point of physically drying tile, grout, and shower walls after last use. KITCHEN. If your kids are old enough to help themselves to snacks and meals, certain areas of your kitchen need extra attention in summer. Think microwave and refrigerator (inspect frequently for spills), countertops (sanitize more often for food safety), and floors (sweep or vacuum daily to pick up crumbs that attract ants and other bugs). If you tend to grill outside and stick to lighter fare such as salads and sandwiches, your stovetop can probably do with less-often cleaning this season. And, unless you accidentally boil over a summer pie when baking, heavy oven cleaning can wait until the fall. HIGH-TOUCH SPOTS. All the usual home high-touch spots – door knobs, sink and toilet handles, TV remotes, phones, light switches – get more daily and weekly touches with kids home for summer. No matter how diligently you teach them, you can pretty much count on kids to be less concerned than you are about being sanitary, so be sure to keep up with at least weekly sanitizing or disinfecting of high-touch zones. 16

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DUST ZONES. If you enjoy open windows when the weather’s warm, your home’s quotient of outside dust may rise exponentially. Add ceiling and other fans to the mix, and the places where dust tends to blow and settle also shifts dramatically. Stay up-to-date with at least weekly dusting. UPHOLSTERY AND CARPETS. This one’s a toss-up. If you’re essentially an outdoor family – spending summers swimming, hiking, playing, and eating outside – you can probably get away with less frequent vacuuming of rugs and upholstery (outside of bedrooms). If, on the other hand, you tend to stay inside more since we live in an A/C-essential high-heat zone or you’ve got teens who love to hole up, munch chips, play video games, and binge-watch Netflix and Hulu, you’ll probably need to up your vacuuming game. FLOORS. Regular floor cleaning is a must in spring (mud season), winter (snow, slush, salt, grit season), and fall when family members are more likely to wear treaded shoes that pick up gravel and other tiny particles that slowly damage hardwood and tile floors. Summer’s smooth-soled sandals, flip flops, and bare feet mean you may be able to reduce frequency of floor cleaning or shift to spot versus thorough mopping.  Todd Nelson is the owner of MaidPro of Raleigh and Wake Forest. For cleaning tips, visit www.maidpro.com/raleigh-north or call 919-871-9996.

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applies to all drownings, including those called “dry” and “secondary” drownings. “Dry drowning” and “secondary drowning” are often used interchangeably, but these phrases actually refer to two different things. In dry drowning, breathing in water causes the vocal cords to spasm and close up, making it hard to breathe, but water never reaches the lungs. In secondary drowning, you also breathe water in and the vocal cords spasm, but some water does get into the lungs, irritating the lining of the lungs. This causes a condition called pulmonary edema, an accumulation of fluid in the lungs that can cause death because not enough oxygen passes from the lungs into the blood – this causes the heart to stop (cardiac arrest). “Dry drowning” and “secondary drowning” are both very rare. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), there were an average of 3,536 drownings in the U.S. each year from 2005 to 2014. The CDC does not break that down into how many were “dry drowning” or “secondary drowning.” However, experts estimate that combined, they represent no more than 1% or 2% of all drownings. Neither “dry drowning” nor “secondary drowning” are accepted medical terms. Years ago, medical professionals used the phrases “dry drowning” and “secondary drowning” more commonly than they do now. You could even find these terms in

SWIM

SAFELY UNDERSTAND “DRY DROWNING" AND KNOW THE SIGNS You may have heard terrifying stories of children dying long after being submerged in water. With summer here and many hours spent around water, here’s what you should know about “dry drowning” and a related phenomenon, “secondary drowning,” so your children can swim safely. Dry drowning and secondary drowning refer to breathing problems that happen after the victim is out of the water. The World Health Organization (WHO) defines drowning as “the process of experiencing respiratory impairment from submersion/ immersion in liquid.” This definition, which was adopted in 2002, 18

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medical dictionaries. But in 2002, the World Health Organization (WHO) concluded that these terms created a lot of confusion. They noted that research had raised questions about whether “dry” drowning actually happens at all, or whether its victims died of another cause. They also said that “secondary” drowning was a misleading term, because in most cases, the victim did not suffer a second submersion episode. In response, the WHO adopted its new, simpler definition of drowning. Ever since then, the WHO has said that the words “dry” and “secondary” should no longer be used to describe a drowning victim. Most medical professionals now follow the WHO’s guidance on this. However, these phrases continue to be used in news stories and by people who are not medical professionals, so it’s important to understand what they mean. It takes very little water or time for drowning to occur. Drowning can happen just about anywhere there’s water. This includes places in your home that you might not expect, like your bathtub or your kitchen sink. Children can drown in as little as an inch of water. Because of that, there are many items in and around the home that could pose a drowning threat to children. These include buckets and pails, ice chests with melted ice, toilets, hot tubs, spas and whirlpools, irrigation ditches, post holes and wells, fish ponds, and fountains. In addition, in most cases, the process of drowning – from submersion to cardiac arrest – takes places within just a few minutes; it can even happen in less than a minute. Drowning is preventable — there are measures you need to take. When your child is in the water, or near the water, you or another adult should always watch closely, and stay within arm’s reach of the child. Other recommended prevention measures include: – If you have a backyard pool, fence it off and lock the gate so that children can’t get into it when you aren’t with them. – Make sure your children always wear life jackets when they are in and around natural bodies of water. – Parents should learn CPR and keep a telephone and emergency equipment, such as life preservers, nearby. If a child stops breathing after being in the water, don’t delay – begin CPR right away. If someone else is present, ask them to call 911. Concentrate on giving CPR until his or her breathing has resumed or paramedics arrive. Afterward, the child should be given a complete medical examination, even if he or she seems all right. A child who has stopped breathing, inhaled water, or lost consciousness should remain under medical observation for at least 24 hours to be sure there is no damage to the respiratory or nervous system.  For more information, contact your pediatrician. If you don’t have a pediatrician, find one near you at uncpn.com.

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BY JOE RABOINE

OUTDOOR

RETREAT

method of cooking, consider a flexible outdoor design that lets you have it all – a grill, a Big Green Egg, brick-oven, sink, refrigerator, and more. Grill islands offer a smaller footprint if you don’t have the square footage for a full-on outdoor kitchen, creating an eye-catching setup even when space is at a premium. A classic Lshaped grilling station gives you everything that you need within arm’s reach, making cooking and cleanup a breeze. The possibili-

TAKE YOUR BACKYARD TO THE NEXT LEVEL WITH THESE OUTDOOR LIVING DESIGN IDEAS

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s homeowners here in our area want to enjoy the glorious North Carolina weather and thus, are considering outdoor living more literally, they are moving past traditional backyard setups like lawn chairs and decks. Instead, they desire backyards that bring the indoors outside and are created for year-round family enjoyment, especially during the summer months. One of the most popular and well-known ways to merge indoors and outdoors is, of course, an outdoor kitchen. It can be as simple as a built-in grill with some countertops, or it can contain a full array of deluxe appliances and finishes to rival those of any interior space. Natural stone textures are a staple in these outdoor spaces, but new trends gaining steam include double sinks, side burners, and bar stations (which can help unify the space by incorporating a seating area). Outdoor kitchens can offer advantages that indoor ones can’t. For example, if you are interested in a wood-burning oven (which can be difficult to install inside thanks to how hot it gets), the backyard can offer ideal placement. For all you grill masters out there who can’t settle for just one 20

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ties are endless for all different kinds of outdoor spaces and chefs. Interested in melding your kitchen or grill area with other parts of your yard? There are plenty of ways to go from garden to grill. Maintaining a garden allows you to grow your own foods; with farm-to-table trends on the rise, imagine cutting a few herbs from your garden and then seasoning your favorite dish with them just a few feet away. Or, you could harvest a few of your favorite fruits and veggies right from your backyard and toss them on the grill to add flair to essentials like steak, fish, and chicken. There are few limits to your imagination as you consider the design possibilities. Consider adding a TV or custom lighting to your outdoor kitchen. Don’t want to haul your guests’ used dishes back into your house? Add an outdoor dishwasher and get all the dirty work done outside. In some areas, homeowners are even adding such features as outdoor showers and hanging beds to take their outdoor living spaces to a whole new level. Looking for the perfect place to gather friends and family in your backyard? A nearby fire pit creates an ideal spot to come together to unwind, tell stories, and roast s’mores on summer nights. In fact, fire pits and fireplaces ranked as the most popular outdoor design elements in this year’s “Residential Landscape Architecture Trends Survey,” conducted by the American Society of Landscape

designdevelopment.com

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Architects (ASLA). This feature adds a fun and relaxing element to any outdoor space and will instantly make your backyard everyone’s favorite gathering spot. If you have an outdoor kitchen or grill, you may want to consider adding a fire pit either nearby or as a feature of that space. This gives family and guests an excellent place to hang around while the outdoor chef prepares dinner. To ensure seamless flow between these areas, consider using different paver designs and patterns that help define the transition from one outdoor “room” to the next. In addition, built-in seating – a leading trend in outdoor design – makes an excellent addition to a fire pit or outdoor fireplace, adding both form and function to your outdoor living room. The possibilities for your outdoor space are endless, and you can start planning for one at any time. If you’re constructing a new home or remodeling your current one, it’s the perfect moment to consider an outdoor kitchen that might fit onto your property or a fire pit to bring your family together on warm summer nights. But even if you don’t have other renovations on your radar, there’s still ample opportunity to tackle an outdoor project (or think about adding to an existing hardscape). Whether you want an extra place to prepare food or a total extension of your indoor living space, anything you want is within your reach.  Joe Raboine is a residential business manager with Belgard. For more information, visit www.belgard.com.

RALEIGH NC

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GETTING INTO

HIGH GEAR TIPS TO REMEMBER FOR A SAFE MOTORCYCLE SEASON BY THOMAS WALTERS

Drivers are conditioned to look for other large vehicles on the road, especially when changing lanes and making turns. But with so many motorcycles on the road, especially during the warmer summer months, drivers must pay extra attention to be aware of riders on two- and three-wheeled vehicles. Motorcycles are obviously smaller, faster, and offer the rider much less protection than a car, truck, or van.

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here are some common rules both riders and drivers can use to help improve the safety of our roads. So this summer, drive safely and keep an eye out for other drivers on the road, and always keep these common rules in mind.

For the motorist, here are some quick tips for safely interacting with motorcycles: – Look left, right – and left again – for motorcyclists when pulling into an intersection or onto the road. – Assume a motorcycle is closer than it looks. – Take an extra moment to check your blind spot. – Be cautious when going through intersections. – Assume a motorcyclist may slow down without a visual warning; bikers often use the lower gears to initially slow before applying the brakes (and therefore, activating their brake lights). – Make sure a rider’s turn signal has not been turned on, or left on, accidentally. – Don’t assume motorcyclists are speeding. – Don’t expect a motorcyclist to always be able to dodge out of the way or come to a controlled stop as quickly as an automobile. – Allow more following distance behind a motorcycle because it can’t always stop “on a dime.” – Avoid all forms of distracted or careless driving. – Always use your signals so the rider knows your intentions. – Road hazards that may cause little or no issue for a car, truck, or van can be disastrous for a motorcycle. Tossed trash can hit or harm a motorcycle rider or create a dangerous condition on the road – so keep it in the car (plus, you shouldn’t litter). 22

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Of course, motorcyclists have to be just as vigilant – and respectful. When a motorcyclist is out on the road, here are some things for riders to remember: – Use your signals and flash your brake lights when slowing down. Drivers can’t always detect when you are “gearing down” and may be closing too quickly to safely stop by the time you would otherwise apply your brakes. – Know your bike’s limits and stay within them. If you’re a new or inexperienced rider, consider taking a training course. – While it may be tempting to speed, always stick to the posted speed limits. – Don’t tailgate other vehicles, while riding or when stopped. – When buying a helmet, pick one that has the Department of Transportation (DOT) label, which shows that it meets federal safety standards. – Be respectful of other drivers. Don’t weave through traffic or drive on the shoulder of the road. – Be visible when you ride. Avoid blind spots, wear bright colors and protective clothing, and always use your headlights. – Brake smart. Use both brakes at the same time, slow and steady. – Know and obey the helmet laws in the state(s) in which you are riding (laws vary from state to state). Be safe and be smart. While many motorcyclists can and do ride year-round in mild North Carolina weather, the long days and warm nights of summer increases the number of riders, and often the risks, for those on two wheels. Vigilance and respect on the part of both drivers and riders can help ensure everyone stays safe. Remember, when a motorcycle is in motion, don’t think of it as a motorcycle – think of it as a person.  One important action that motorcyclists should take? Another look at their insurance coverage to make sure they’re informed on the extent of their protection. Thomas Walters is the owner of Walters Insurance Agency. If you’d like to talk more about motorcycle insurance coverage, stop by the agency at 3207 Rogers Road, Suite 100 in Wake Forest. He may also be reached at 919-554-0267 or ThomasWalters@allstate.com.

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BY JENNIFER SMART

DRIVEABLE

DESTINATIONS

DISCOVER THE CHARACTER OF PITTSBORO

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ittsboro is where the beautiful Chatham County Courthouse rises from a traffic circle so famous it earned the town the nickname “The Circle City.” This is a locale with a clear identity. In fact, it’s a good example of what makes North Carolina special. Unlike my home state of Florida – where the origin of almost every crossroad can be chalked up to orange groves, water, or tourism – most Tarheel towns have stories with roots that plunge deep into history.

while before buying a lampshade made entirely of bottle caps! After the spectacular bottle cap bargain (about $50), it was time to stroll past the rest of the storefronts to check out the shops. My daughter found some adorable bracelets at New Horizons Downtown, and the Blood Orange Italian Soda at Blue Dot Coffee was superb. We spent an inordinate amount of time at Screaming for Vintage, a combo thrift shop/antique store/time capsule. This is

In fact, Pittsboro is more than 200 years old. Named for British politician William Pitt the Younger, it was well established by the mid-19th century and escaped devastation during the Civil War thanks to a lucky environmental fluke – the Haw River flooded and United States troops could find no way across. The Pittsboro Railroad opened in 1886, and for decades the town’s business district was humming. Fast forward to the 21st century, and you find a Pittsboro that has evolved into a trendy rural community making great strides in the fields of art, food, and organic farming. Residents even cooperated to develop their own local currency – colorful paper bills called the “Plenty,” which stands for Piedmont Local Economy Tender. This is why, when you visit the town on a warm summer day, the air practically glistens with a patina of character and purpose that’s impossible to miss. So for our afternoon jaunt, we decided to start with the historic downtown. After pulling into a curbside parking space on Hillsborough Street, our first stop was a magnificent place called French Connections. Like many weekend travelers, we’d done our homework and knew what to expect – somewhat. But, truly, Google doesn’t do justice to French Connections. It’s a historic home with a broad front yard upon which rainbow-colored animal sculptures sprawl, crawl, and stretch. Planters and bird-feeders line the front porch while, inside the house, piles of imported fabrics, beads, and handcrafted décor fill the rooms. We lingered quite a 24

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where your old Brady Bunch lunchbox sits atop a retro, pastel-colored, fiberglass chair priced at a cool $1,000. It’s fascinating and fun, with plenty of nooks and crannies tailor-made for aesthetic posts on Instagram. Of course, the most aesthetic spot in all of Chatham County – possibly in all of central North Carolina – is Fearrington Village. About a 10-minute drive from downtown Pittsboro, and approximately an hour southwest of Wake Forest, the converted farm remains one of the region’s most elegant experiences in terms of quality, history, and ambience. The 640 acres of land were purchased by William Cole in 1786 and passed down through generations until they landed in the hands of great-greatgrandson John Bunyan Fearrington, who in the 1930s turned the property into a dairy farm. In 1974, R.B. and Jenny Fitch purchased the land and began carving it into a planned community complete with homes and yards, but also with shops, eateries, studios, and gardens. The Fitches had hoped to create a place reminiscent of a small village in the English countryside, and they succeeded most remarkably. Not only does the community possess a peaceful, bucolic character, but the new construction melts into the broader surroundings seamlessly. The cottages line the pastures like storybook pictures come to life. Those pastures, by the way, are filled with the farm’s beloved black and white Belted Galloway Cows. There’s also a friendly herd of black and white goats and a flock of rare black and white Columbian Wyandotte chickens. Apart from bringing a touch of silver plumage to the monochromatic livestock palette, the birds also provide fresh eggs for diners at the Fearrington House Restaurant. We were so enchanted by the surroundings that we decided to visit two weekends in a row. With extra time to explore, there was very little about Fearrington Village that escaped our notice. The collection of shops is charming, though pricey. It includes Nest, a

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lovely home design and accessories store; a chic apparel and gift shop called Dovecote Style; an independent bookseller known as McIntyre’s Books; the Spa Boutique; and the Belted Goat Wine Shop. That first weekend we dined on the outdoor patio of the Roost Beer Garden, an environmentallyfriendly venue featuring local craft beer, wood-fired artisan pizza, live music, and plates made out of recyclable cardboard. Of the pizzas we tried, one had Italian sausage, pancetta, salami, smoked mozzarella, and raisin gremolata. The other consisted of six cheeses, confit garlic, rosemary, and lemon salt. Both were amazing. Of course, we saved the best for last, returning the second weekend for a reserved family seating at the Fearrington House Restaurant. Adjacent to the Fearrington Inn, which has 32 exquisitely appointed guest rooms, the restaurant ranks as one of the top hotel food destinations in the world. It boasts AAA Five Diamond status, an executive chef who has received some of the world’s highest culinary honors, and a trademark hot chocolate soufflé that’s absolutely to die for. The menu choices are presented as meals of either three or four courses – take your pick – along with a surprisingly wide array of breads, wines, and amuse-bouches to introduce new flavors, make a statement between dishes, or cleanse your palate. Most of the plates are seasonal and locallysourced, and include such delicacies as Steelhead Trout with Smoked Butter, Salt Meadow Lamb with English Peas, or Diver Scallops with Curry Cream. The restaurant occupies the property’s 1927 farmhouse (a fire destroyed the original homestead), and the tables look out over the gardens, paths, and majestic shade trees. By the time our spoons scraped the last of the chocolate from our still-warm soufflé dishes, we already were planning when to come back.  Jennifer Smart is assistant director at the Wake Forest Historical Museum. Visit the website at www.wakeforestmuseum.org.

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“I feel like there are all of these things that women worry about, and sometimes they don’t know what advice they should take. With an early visit we are able to provide information and reassurance and talk about major concerns. We can address any potential issues and identify risk-factors early that can have an impact on the pregnancy. A healthy baby starts with a healthy pregnancy, and we want to support our expectant mothers every step of the way.” Patients receive a confirmation pregnancy test and can ask questions and discuss prenatal care, including nutrition, medications, and follow-up care. Once you are past the eight-week point, your physician will move you onto the new pregnancy visit where you will have a complete physical exam and schedule your ultrasound. Regular prenatal care is very important for both your health and your baby’s health. Along with a complete physical during a new pregnancy visit, you will meet with a provider to determine your estimated due date, ask questions, and discuss your care, including nutrition, medication safety, and labor and delivery options.  “See You Now” appointments can be made at a WakeMed Physician Practices – OB/GYN location near you with offices in Brier Creek, Cary, Holly Springs, Morrisville, Raleigh, and North Raleigh. Midwives are also available in North Raleigh and Cary. For more information about WakeMed Physician Practices – OB/GYN and “See You Now” appointments, visit www.wakemed.org/now.

THE DOCTOR

NOW WILL SEE YOU

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ou take a pregnancy test at home … and it’s positive. Now what? The questions start running through your head: What should you be eating or not eating? Can you continue your regular workouts? Are your prescription medications okay for the baby?

The first few weeks of pregnancy can be an exciting and emotional time. While most OB-GYNs schedule initial appointments eight to 12 weeks into a pregnancy, that can feel like an eternity for someone who has just gotten a positive pregnancy test result. If you find yourself feeling a little anxious and want answers to your questions sooner rather than later, you’re in luck … some obstetrics and gynecology practices now offer early pregnancy visits for women who are less than eight weeks pregnant, including WakeMed Physician Practices – OB/GYN, which now offers “See You Now” visits. Dr. Chantel S. Roedner, an OB/GYN with WakeMed Physician Practices – OB/GYN, says this early visit is important for new mothers, especially first-time moms, so they have an opportunity to establish a relationship with a provider early in the pregnancy and get answers to questions about which they are concerned. 26

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If you find yourself wanting to redecorate entire rooms in your home, or simply want to upgrade a space by transforming a few furniture pieces, what do you do? Before you hit the furniture stores out there or traverse the numerous online décor shopping sites, look around your space. What do you see? Chances are you already have some great pieces with sturdy bones that you may be tired of, but which still serve a purpose – pieces that have lost their luster, perhaps, or taken some abuse over the years from children, moving, or life in general. While they are still standing strong, all you can see is their ugly exterior. Your first thought may be to donate those pieces, or maybe put them in the garage so you can sell them at the upcoming neighborhood yard sale or online. Trust me, there are plenty of ambitious furniture flippers out there eager to get their hands on those items. Then you could go shopping online at the endless rows of furniture stores that are filled with very expensive and limited choices. Hmmmm ... What if you could get exactly the look you envision for your space, with no limitations on color or finish? What if I told you that refinishing your existing pieces would cost you a fraction of what you would spend to buy new? What if I told you that your pieces could even be altered structurally to fit a more modern style? Well, I’m here to tell you … they can! And chances are, your existing pieces will long outlive the ones you would have purchased. Not only is refinishing existing furniture a cost-effective redecorating option, it also gives you unlimited choices for color and finish. It’s environmentally-friendly; you can do it yourself; and you can avoid the dreaded boring, “cookie cutter” design – your space should be a personal reflection of you and the things you love most.

BY SHANNA LABRADOR

NEW TREASURES OLD FURNITURE ...

“Do what you can, with what you have, where you are.” These timeless words of Teddy Roosevelt could be the mantra for the modern decorator. It seems that the American dream has evolved in recent history, at least when it comes to home furnishings. Gone are the days of throwing out the old and buying new, thankfully. Because let’s face it ... they just don’t

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make things like they used to. ure, boxed furniture that has been mass produced overseas has its place. For college students, short-term renters, and the like, this is an inexpensive and convenient alternative to moving trucks full of hand-medown furniture. But for those in a more permanent situation, these furnishings often prove to be poorly made from cheap materials and do not withstand the test of time. Alternatively, buying well-made, sturdy furnishings that appeal to the modern taste could easily blow your budget. 28

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So where do you start? Take stock of the pieces you already have and pull some transformation inspiration from resources like decorating magazines and Pinterest. If you need to fill a particular space with a “new” item or want something different for a change, you can discover amazing pieces at thrift stores and yard sales to help you complete your design. Remember that size and style are most important (aside from quality construction) when looking for pieces to refinish, as you will be changing their “look.” The easiest way to upcycle a piece is to paint it. Choose colors that leave a neutral canvas for the rest of your décor, or create a statement with a bold color choice. There are numerous options out there for furniture paint – and I have tried most of them. After my disappointment with the durability of the “chalk style” paint that was all the rage in recent years, I found I was able to replicate the same look with durable latex. However, the required preparation needed for latex paint was also much more time-consuming and tedious, not to mention its long list of chemicals. Thankfully, this past year I discovered a small company based right here in America that seemingly experienced many of the same issues as I, and had set out to create something better. Wise Owl Chalk Synthesis

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Paints & Finishes provides a complete line of products to help you achieve a beautiful finish, regardless of your experience or ability. The paints are free of harsh chemicals, can be used indoors and on any surface, and are self-leveling for a velvety smooth finish with minimal brush lines. Choose from a variety of waxes, glazes, and varnishes to finish your look and seal your project for durability. Want to restore a wood surface rather than paint it? Wise Owl’s Furniture Salve is a great solution for restoring and protecting wood, leather, painted finishes, and more. It can even remove oxidation from metal and polish your stainless steel appliances. Made from all-natural ingredients such as hemp seed oil, cold pressed lavender oil, and plant-based waxes, you will love the scents of Lemon Verbena, Lavender, or White Tea. If you have never painted furniture before, I recommend practicing on a small piece before tackling a larger project, or signing up for a local class that offers instruction. Once you’ve learned how to refinish and completed your creations, you will love your “new” pieces and the way they bring your unique style into your space.  Shanna Labrador is the owner of BOHO.boutique, offering eclectic furnishings and home decor and official retailer of Wise Owl Chalk Synthesis Paints & Finishes. Find them at The Cotton Company and Furniture Leaf Co. in Downtown Wake Forest or shop online at www.BOHOboutique24.com.

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HIDDEN

GEMS

CAROLINA TIGER RESCUE

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ust a few pages prior, you were introduced to the “Driveable Destination” jewel that is Pittsboro. If you are now finding yourself longing to escape to this nearby town and enjoy all that it has to offer, be sure to allow a little extra time to discover this issue’s “Hidden Gem” – Carolina Tiger Rescue. Located at 1940 Hanks Chapel Road in Pittsboro, Carolina Tiger Rescue is the only federally-defined wild cat sanctuary in North Carolina, and the perfect place for you and your family to visit on a summer day. With 49 animals of 10 different species currently – tigers (22, to be exact), lions, leopards, cougars, caracals, servals, ocelots, bobcats, coatimundi, and kinkajous (one of which is the most recent rescue, Baxter, who was previously owned as a pet) – this hidden gem will provide not only a unique way to spend time with loved ones, but also a fun and educational break from summer’s monotony for the kids in your life. It’s so much fun, in fact, that they may not even realize they are learning!

lives. While traditional zoos generally don’t acquire their inhabitants from the public, the Rescue accepts wildcats who need a home. Meeting the highest standards, they don’t commercially trade wildlife or their parts, and they prohibit breeding and public contact with the animals. They go a step further as a no-touch facility, only putting hands on the animals if they are sedated for a veterinary procedure. The animals are benefited with a staff vet, a quarantine facility for new rescues, and the daily enrichments they

Carolina Tiger Rescue is a non-profit organization that was founded by UNC geneticist Dr. Michael Bleyman more than 40 years ago as the Carnivore Evolutionary Research Institute to ensure the survival of specific keystone species from threatened/endangered ecosystems. He started a breeding program for caracals, servals, ocelots, and binturongs, and eventually began rescuing large cats when the need for a sanctuary became apparent. Carolina Preservation, Inc. was incorporated in 1981, around the time they began rescuing wild cats as well. In the 1990s, they transitioned to a sanctuary, and the breeding program ended in 2002, with the focus turning to rescue and conservation education. In 2009, the name changed to what it is today, Carolina Tiger Rescue, reflecting their current mission and focus of saving and protecting wild cats in captivity and in the wild. Carolina Tiger Rescue is a refuge for these animals, providing them with a safe, comfortable home for the remainder of their 30

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require. Some of the animals are housed on the tour path, while others prefer a quiet life away from the day-to-day action. The animal care team members perform operant conditioning with some of the animals to curb behavior such as anxiety. If you’d like to visit these beautiful creatures – like Rajah the tiger, found 13 years ago when he was only six months old in the middle of a rural road near Charlotte with his sister Kaela (who unfortunately passed away in September of last year) – be sure to schedule a public, private, or twilight tour. Public tours, which last about an hour and a half, run year-round on a regular schedule of Fridays, Saturdays, and Sundays. Tickets must be purchased in advance, with a limited number per tour available. With this tour option, a trained volunteer guide will walk you through the sanctuary where you can learn about the different resident species, as well as the problems they face in the wild. You will also hear about the challenges they encounter while in captivity. You will have the opportunity to ask questions about and take photos of the animals, but you will not have any physical contact.

There are many other exciting and educational opportunities available at Carolina Tiger Rescue, including the “A Feeding With a Keeper” tour, where visitors will learn what the animals are fed, and how the keepers maintain the animals’ health; and the “Tiger Tales Tour,” the once-a-month experience where children will join a trained team member for a fun and engaging story before creating an animal-themed take-home craft. With “Kids Camp” (limited to 12 campers per week), campers will experience the incredible world of the sanctuary, visiting the animals daily, learning about the essential role carnivores play in their natural habitats, finding out what it takes to be a wildcat veterinarian, practicing biology skills, and helping some of the tigers express their creativity through painting. Got a high-schooler in the house? “High School Summer Camp” is a threeday project-based camp that incorporates education, hands-on activities, and fun projects for the animals, and provides the chance for campers to take care of the

Rescue’s residents while working on group enrichment projects for them. Want to go to camp yourself? “Kid For A Day” Adult Camp is a one-day opportunity for you to feel like a kid again – feed with the keepers, paint with the tigers, and learn more about these magnificent carnivores. Internship, field trip, volunteer (this is a very volunteerdriven organization, with more than 150 active volunteers, from animal care, tour guides, construction, gift shop assistance, and gardening), and membership and donation opportunities are also available. With so much to offer, the next time your kiddos say they are bored during this long, summer break, plan a fun-filled excursion to this hidden gem … they will surely be bored no more.  For more information about Carolina Tiger Rescue, how you can become involved with their mission, research tour options and details such as times and pricing, purchase tour tickets, and even adopt a cat, please visit www.carolinatigerrescue.org.

Private tours, which are based on availability, require at least two weeks’ notice. Very much like the public tour in duration, content, and the animals you will visit, the difference with the private tour is that it is exclusive to your group, offering a more personal experience (again, no physical contact with the animals is allowed). Running from April through October on Fridays, Saturdays, and Sundays, the very popular twilight tours are for adults only (guests 18 years of age and older). Tour tickets are limited and must be purchased in advance. While the twilight tours offer similar content as the public and private versions, they provide a more intimate experience, as the work day is done, and the guests have the sanctuary to themselves. Enjoy a quiet evening with the cats, and you just might be lucky enough to be serenaded by the lions!

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While most people think the first symptom is pain in the face, this is actually a rare way for TMJ symptoms to start out. How do you know if you are experiencing TMJ disorders? These are a number of common symptoms: pain or achiness in the jaw, neck, face, ears, and shoulders; painful chewing and problems when eating; headaches; dizziness; ringing in the ears; popping or clicking of the jaw; muscle spasms or swelling in the jaw and face; and locking of the jaw, making it difficult to shut your mouth. Many people think TMJ disorders are caused by some type of jaw trauma. More times than not, though, TMJ disorders – which are often difficult to determine – are caused by a combination of factors like genetics, arthritis, or clenching or grinding of teeth. Several risk factors that can increase the risk of developing TMJ disorders include: the diagnosis of various types of arthritis, including rheumatoid and osteoarthritis; injury to the jaw; chronic grinding or clenching of the teeth; and certain connective tissue disorders.

BY DR. EDMOND SUH, DDS

THE HIDDEN

SIGNS

Other causes of TMJ disorders include: – Erosion of the disks in the joint; – The jaw being out of alignment; – Damage to the cartilage in the jaw; –Arthritis; – Impact or blow to the jaw.

OF TMJ

A

re you one of the many who suffer from frequent headaches, migraines, vertigo, ear pain, or sinus pressure? Are you tired of taking pills that may have long-term effects on your organs or paying for expensive Botox injections that wear off in months because you need relief from this discomfort? Do you know why you’re experiencing these conditions? Perhaps it’s for a reason you never suspected – TMJ. Up to 12% of the U.S. population experiences some sort of TMJ (temporomandibular joint) disorder, with both children and adults at risk. The temporomandibular joint connects your jawbone to the skull on each side of your face and is capable of both rotational and translational movements. This complex joint works to allow movements from side to side and up and down, as well as grinding and hinging. These functions are key to everyday activities like chewing your food and speaking. So if you are experiencing persistent pain or tenderness in your jaw, or you struggle to open or close your jaw completely, you should seek treatment from your dentist or doctor. 32

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Inc .

Approximately 17.8 million workdays are lost due to the lack of sleep and pain caused by TMJ disorders because the limitations and changes in the jaw’s normal range of motion can cause pain and difficulty sleeping. Getting enough sleep is important for controlling inflammation, but with a TMJ disorder, that may be a challenge. Relaxation exercises may help in getting better sleep, but not treating TMJ disorders can impair someone’s quality of life. Stress also adds to the causes of TMJ disorders. For instance, stress can cause you to unconsciously clench your teeth and tighten your jaw muscles, creating added pressure and strain. Without treatment, this disorder can lead to long-term damage and orthodontic complications.

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Since the classic symptom of pain in the face usually doesn’t present itself until the later stages of TMJ, consider seeking a proper diagnosis from your dentist or doctor if you are experiencing any of these symptoms. Reversing the dysfunction can be harder than getting it controlled and treated earlier with a healthier, permanent solution. Prevent the long-term effects of TMJ disorder by getting it addressed now.  Dr. Edmond Suh, DDS is with Supremia Dentistry, located at 1711 S. Main Street in Wake Forest. He is an international lecturer on contemporary dental techniques. At Supremia Dentistry, expect something different as they welcome you to their patient family. Call 919-556-6200 to learn more or schedule an appointment. You can also visit www.supremiadentitsry.com.

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GOOD

READS HOT BOOKS FOR SUMMER

BY SUZANNE LUCEY

Y

our long-awaited trip to one of North Carolina’s magnificent beaches is finally here. You’ve almost finished packing and are going through the checklist one last time to make sure you haven’t forgotten anything. Swimsuits ... check. Sunscreen ... check. Sunglasses ... check. Summer reading material ... oops! If you haven’t yet stocked your beach bag with books to enjoy as you lounge and relax under your umbrella, no worries. Whether you’re looking for hot summer reads for the youngest reader in your family, the teen in your life, or for yourself, I’ve got you covered.

FOR CHILDREN Adrian Simcox Does Not Have a Horse by Marcy Campbell (ages birth to 100) This beautifully illustrated, heartwarming book will bowl you over with its ingenuity and cleverly knitted story. Expertly told through a “smarty pants’” eyes, you will want to reread this gem as soon as you finish, so you can once again witness the clever way it ends. Teaching young and old to always be kind, because you never know what someone else is going through, this classic-in-the-making is about empathy and imagination, and a must read for one and all.

34

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Brave Enough For Two by Johnathon D. Voss (Grades 1-3) Wake Forest’s own Jonathan D. Voss’s author-illustrator debut children’s book is garnering a lot of national attention and is bound to become a true classic, with its nostalgic and whimsical feel that instantly reminds you of a certain silly old bear. Little girl Olive and her stuffed animal owl Hoot are destined to win hearts among all kinds of readers, not just the young ones. When Hoot asks Olive to go on an adventure not inside a book, Olive wants to make sure the adventure is just right and not too much. As things progress, in the way that adventures often do, Olive realizes that there is never “too much” when it comes to helping a best friend. Lions and Liars by Kate Beasley (8-12 years old) This unique book, with protagonist Frederick Frederickson and his food-chain theory about life, is a coming-of-age story featuring a great bond between unlikely friends and shows how overcoming odds can bring people together, making it the perfect read for any child. The Lifters by Dave Eggers (Grades 4-6) This quirky fable by the brilliant, Pulitzer-nominated author of The Monk of Mokha and Her Right Foot, takes you on a journey

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underground where adventure awaits and heroes are made, all while promoting family, community, and most of all, teamwork. As stated by Booklist, The Lifters is “original … and always intriguing … Eggers’ story moves along briskly, thanks to mounting suspense and bite-size chapters,” letting this contemporary novel wrap up your young reader right from the start.

FOR TEENS Getting Things Done for Teens: Take Control of Your Life in a Distracting World by David Allen, Mike Williams, and Mark Wallace  The most interconnected generation in history is navigating unimaginable amounts of social pressure, both in personal and online interactions. Very little time, focus, or education is being spent teaching and coaching this generation how to navigate this unprecedented amount of “stuff ” entering their lives each day. However, this book – an adaptation of the business classic for a new generation – is here to help save the day. An essential how-to manual for stress-free productivity, Getting Things Done For Teens provides helpful tools for today’s modern kids to gain momentum and confidently face whatever comes their way.

murder, this novel reads so much like nonfiction that I checked the front cover more than once to verify that the story wasn’t true. Unexpected death, an unsolved mystery, and a trail of bloody clues are all found within this page-turner that takes you on a thrilling ride right from the start. Everything Happens For a Reason: And Other Lies I’ve Loved by Kate Bowler Duke Divinity School Professor Kate Bowler’s personal story of a terminal cancer diagnosis and the road she’s traveled amongst good intentions while fighting for her life and her faith, Everything Happens For A Reason: And Other Lies I’ve Loved is a beautiful, raw, inspiring, and convicting memoir, sometimes frank, sometimes funny, sometimes dark, and sometimes wise. The Line That Held Us by David Joy (Available August 14, 2018) Producing some of the finest writing the South has to offer, David Joy’s non-fiction works are thoughtful, yet have a visceral

quality that is unmatched. His latest fiction work, The Line That Held Us, is no exception. This novel about the coverup of an accidental death, and the dark consequences affecting the lives of four people who will never be the same again, will grip you and not let go, just like a Dwayne Brewer bear hug, from the first page to the last. Three Days Missing by Kimberly Belle When a child goes missing, two mothers’ lives collide in a shocking way in Three Days Missing, a gripping and compelling thriller about mistaken identity, divorce, and the struggles both parents go through when the divorce gets nasty. This story of child abduction and what parents experience when their child simply vanishes is a summer must-read that will keep you turning page after page with breathless suspense.  Suzanne Lucey and her husband Dave own Page 158 Books, located at 415 S. Brooks St. in Wake Forest. She may be reached at 919435-1843 or visit www.page158books.com.

Anger Is a Gift by Mark Oshiro Moss and his fellow classmates are treated like prisoners in their own school in Anger Is A Gift, one of the hottest books for teens right now. When the students organize against the new restrictions, the police strike back harder, forcing those students to choose between fight over flight – and love over hate. Mark Oshiro joins the powerhouse ranks of Jason Reynolds and Angie Thomas in this much-needed and beautifully-crafted examination of police brutality in the lives of high school students. You will fall in love, you will grieve, and you will learn – yes, anger is a gift.

FOR ADULTS The Word Is Murder by Anthony Horowitz The Word Is Murder is a mystery featuring a fictional version of Horowitz himself as the main character. Starting off with a

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THE WALL THAT

HEALS

OCTOBER 18-21 • WAKE FOREST BY JILL BRIGHT

The Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C. is a

items left at TWTH in Washington, and much more will be open to the public, free of charge, 24 hours a day, from 8:00 AM Thursday, October 18 until 2:00 PM Sunday, October 21. New LED lighting on The Wall will provide visibility at night, and for the first time, visitors will be able to make name rubbings of individual names on it (pencils and paper will be provided).

symbol of America’s honor, recognizing the more than 3 million Americans who served in the U.S. Armed Forces during the Vietnam War. This monument bears the names of the 58,318 service men and women who lost their lives

Thursday evening’s opening ceremonies will include local tributes, patriotic music, wreath ceremonies, and more. Taps will be played each day at dusk. A closing service on Sunday morning will precede the disassembling of The Wall by local veterans, and we will bid it farewell as it begins its travels to the next stop in Kentucky.

during or are unaccounted for from this war in Vietnam

I

and Southeast Asia. n 1996, a small replica of this memorial was designed to travel throughout the United States, allowing those who were unable to go to Washington the opportunity to see the Wall; teach younger generations the history of the Vietnam War; and give veterans a chance to remember, honor, and pay respect to their fallen comrades. In 2018, a new three-quarter size scale mobile replica and education center, called “The Wall That Heals” (TWTH), was dedicated and put into service. Thanks to the hard work and efforts of our Wake Forest Purple Heart Foundation, Wake Forest is honored to be the only town in North Carolina this year to host The Wall That Heals on October 18-21 at E. Carroll Joyner Park, located at 701 Harris Road. The community will welcome TWTH into Wake Forest midday on Tuesday, October 16 (time and route to be announced later), escorted by police, fire trucks, and up to 100 Patriot Guard Riders on motorcycles. I encourage local veterans, organizations, businesses, students, and citizens to gather along these highways and streets, wave flags, salute The Wall, and make signs, thanking veterans for their service. After assembly of the 375-feet-long, 71/2 feet high, chevron-shaped memorial, and its education center, this exhibit will bring to life the stories and sacrifices of our hometown heroes. Displays with photos of local service members on The Wall, maps of Vietnam, 36

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This significant and exciting event will only be possible and successful with business and individual sponsorships, the support of many volunteers, and the hard work of a local volunteer committee. If you are interested in being a part of this important occasion, please visit The Wall That Heals – Wake Forest Facebook page (www.facebook.com/twthwakeforestnc), The Wall That Heals – Town of Wake Forest website (www.wakeforestnc.gov/the-wall-thatheals.aspx), or The Wake Forest Purple Heart Foundation website (www.wakeforestpurpleheartfoundation.org) for more information, volunteer sign-up, donation opportunities, finalized routes, times, and ceremony schedules. I hope you take advantage of this unique and memorable experience that we are fortunate to be able to host right here in Wake Forest, and visit The Wall That Heals. May we never forget the many sacrifices of our military and first responders who protect our families, our nation, and our flag, and ultimately make our freedom possible.  Jill Bright is with Bright Funeral Home, located at 405 S. Main Street in Wake Forest. Bright Funeral Home, which serves the Wake Forest, Rolesville, Youngsville, Franklinton, Falls, Bay Leaf, Loiusburg, Raleigh, and surrounding areas, is honored to be a sponsor of The Wall That Heals, and Jill and Randy Bright are proud to serve on this committee. For more information about Bright Funeral Home, call 919-556-5811 or visit www.brightfunerals.com.

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SIMPLE

SUMMER

STYLE

FRESHEN AND LIGHTEN YOUR HOME FOR SUMMER WITH THESE EASY BREEZY DECORATING IDEAS BY RHONDA BENVIE

The birds are singing and the flowers are blooming. Yes,

THE FAMILY ROOM

summer is here. This time of year allows us to enjoy the

Another popular spot in the home is of course the family room – another space that should always be warm and welcoming. Update the sofa pillows for an instant and inexpensive facelift. Maybe the art in the room doesn’t speak to you anymore, or isn’t providing the fresh, summery vibe you’re envisioning for the season. Replacing existing art with something new can definitely bring a whole

outdoors and the wonder of nature, with its glorious smells and colors that instantly brighten our moods. But what about the inside of our homes? Do you smile when

I

you walk into your house? f not, you may be itching to give it a bit of a freshening facelift. But does the task of updating your space overwhelm you and inflict anxiety? There’s no need for that! Here are some quick and easy fixes for each room that will bring the joy of summer indoors, and have you smiling each time you enter.

THE KITCHEN

Most of you probably agree that the kitchen is the heart of the home. Therefore, this popular gathering spot for family and friends should be cheery and inviting. To help achieve this goal, purge items you don’t use on a frequent basis, and make room in the cabinets for the items that are cluttering your countertops. Bring in live plants and flowers from your summer garden for a splash of color (not to mention some wonderfully fresh scents to permeate throughout the space). Summer is also the season for fresh fruit, so why not incorporate this natural element by investing in a beautiful bowl and filling it with fresh fruit? In addition to providing an instant and vibrant decorative pop, it also readily offers a fabulous and refreshing seasonal snack. Throw in some new linens with a style that speaks to you, whether it’s as big as new window treatments, or as small as trendy dish towels. If color is what you crave, introduce a coordinating hue. If you want texture, bring in jute placemats. Mix the two for a cool and funky vibe. 38

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new look to the space. Don’t forget about personal family pictures. Seeing recent pictures of loved ones can brighten your mood as well. Maybe your accessories have been around for way too long. Replace a few with a ones in a new popular color that coordinates with your space. And again, incorporate some flowers and greens from your garden for added color and dimension. Ta da – with these simple tweaks, the whole space has been transformed.

2012-2017

THE BEDROOM After a long day at work, who doesn’t want to come home and relax in a safe haven? Your bedroom should be the perfect place to unwind from a hectic day. How long has it been since you bought new linens? A nice set of sheets can instantly bring desired relaxation to fruition. Or maybe it’s time for an entirely new comforter set. This update alone can renew and refresh this room. Adding some flowers and updated accessories will easily breathe new life into this space again. A new coat of paint in a new, calming color may upgrade the space to a whole new level, helping to turn this space from just a place to sleep to a soothing, peaceful retreat right inside your own home.

THE BATH When it comes to redecorating, we often tend to forget the bathroom – whether it’s the master bath, the kids’ bathroom, or the guest powder room, this important space shouldn’t be overlooked. Update towels with ones of a fresh hue. And just like with the other rooms I’ve discussed, adding fresh flowers will integrate summer’s colors into the space. Rugs can also bring an entire new look to this room by adding color and texture. Display some new soaps or essential oils for a fresh smell that is pleasing, but not overpowering.

THE OUTDOOR LIVING AREA Outdoor spaces are used more than ever during the summer months. Paint that dull or rusty outdoor furniture for an updated look. Go bright and cheery with new colorful pillows. Lightweight drapes on a porch can add softness to the space. Plants and flowers alone can transform a porch, patio, or deck. To ward off mosquitos, choose plants that do double duty – for instance, lavender, rosemary, basil, lemon balm, peppermint, and citronella not only smell nice, they also ward off those pesky pests. And of course, the herbs you grow can be used in the kitchen for scrumptious summer fare. These quick, simple tweaks will give you a fresh new outlook on your home – not only this summer, but any time you feel like tackling a redecorating task. Cheers to your fresh, newly updated spaces – may they bring a smile to everyone who enters.  Rhonda Benvie is the owner of Help Me Rhonda Interiors, 1600 Heritage Commerce Court, Suite 103 in Wake Forest and Open Door Furniture & Accents, a furniture and accessories store also in Wake Forest. Visit www.helpmerhondainteriors.com or www.opendoorfurnitureandaccents.com, or call 919-263-9054.

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MAKING THE

MOST OF LABOR DAY

BY MARGARITA COHEN

F

or most Americans, Labor Day means one last day off before summer seemingly goes away forever (don’t worry, it’ll be back). But while celebrating, we should also take a moment to think about how this farewell-to-summer celebration began.

– Pack a lunch, drive to the outskirts of town, and have a picnic; – Enjoy an outdoor concert or performance.

The late 1800s saw a rise in protests from workers dissatisfied with unsafe and unfair working conditions. The first Labor Day “parade” took place on September 5, 1882 with 10,000 workers marching in New York City. From there, the idea of a “workers’ holiday” spread among unions around the country, with parades and festivals becoming the normal way to celebrate. By 1894, 34 states passed Labor Day bills, and Congress made it official later that year by making Labor Day a national holiday on the first Monday of every September.

As you would expect, there are many Labor Day festivities from which to choose. Looking to turn your Labor Day celebration into a mini-vacation with an escape a little further from home? Consider a trip to our nation’s capital for the Annual Labor Day Concert – a great opportunity for a family picnic on the West Lawn of the U.S. Capitol while you listen to a free concert by the National Symphony. How about the Sky High Hot Air Balloon Festival near Atlanta in Pine Mountain, Georgia, or maybe the Chicago Jazz Festival, or perhaps the New York City Unicycle Festival? Never ridden a

In addition to recognizing the role of the American worker in our nation’s history, the day has become an important time for much needed rest and relaxation. As someone who is committed to “making outside fun,” my first choice is always to get outside. Labor Day is a great chance to revel in the summer sunshine with family and friends. To help you get started planning your celebration, here are a few unique ideas for enjoying some good ol’ family fun. Be active ... take the day to try some different outdoor activities: – Explore a national or state park in your area; – Take to the water with a sailing lesson or kayak/jet ski rentals; – Go ziplining or try a nearby adventure park; – Rent a bike and go for a long ride. Be a local tourist ... spend the day visiting a local attraction: – Take the family to an amusement or water park; – Head to the zoo or science museum for an educational experience; – Take a tour of a local historical site; – Keep your eye out for the usual Labor Day parades and festivals. Relax ... take advantage of your downtime during the holiday weekend and have a mini-adventure of your own: – Watch a movie under the stars at a drive-in theater; 40

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unicycle before? No worries … although there are some expert riders you will enjoy watching, there are plenty of first timers as well. Even if you choose not to jump on a unicycle, there’s plenty of other fun things to do. Maybe you prefer some more adult-oriented Labor Day fun to bid summer adieu. If so, consider the Oktoberfest in Cleveland – yes, even in Germany, Oktoberfest starts in September – or the Key West Brewfest in Florida. Of course, you don’t need to travel too far for a great family celebration ... after all, our great state of North Carolina is an ideal place to be on any holiday, and Labor Day is no exception. For example, check out the Annual African American Cultural Festival of Raleigh and Wake County. Over the past seven Labor Day weekends, this two-day festival has connected diverse people and families from across our region with local, national, and international artists, performers, food vendors, area business owners, and local media outlets. Just a few hours away in Charlotte, you will discover the U.S. National Whitewater Center. In addition to the center’s regular activities – like adventurous rafting and kayaking on the largest manmade whitewater river in the world, mountain biking, rock climbing, and ziplining – during the Labor Day holiday, they also offer a major festival with a triathlon, a trail race, live music, and evening fireworks.

Why not travel to the scenic Blue Ridge Mountains where Asheville hosts the Emerald Village Rockfest? This three-day Labor Day event features underground mine tours, treasure hunts, and live blue grass music. Or maybe the four-day Apple Festival in Hendersonville is of interest. How about trekking to Bryson City, where the Great Smoky Mountain Railroad rolls out a steam engine to power its Fontana Trestle Train BBQ and Brews excursion? And Beech Mountain’s Mile High Kite and Craft Festival or High Point’s John Coltrane International Jazz and Blues Festival – where every year, the country’s top jazz and blues musicians perform in concerts at the festival – are also great Labor Day celebrations. These are just a handful of the many options to consider for family fun for the Labor Day weekend. The important thing is to pick something the whole family will enjoy and spend it together. Of course, one of the best spots to be on Labor Day is your own backyard. In my opinion, and I may be biased, there is nothing better than gathering your friends and family together for some good food, lots of laughs, and a good old-fashioned Labor Day celebration. Just take my advice and leave those pesky mosquitos off your guest list!  Margarita Cohen is the owner of Mosquito Joe of Eastern Wake, providing mosquito control treatments to the greater Wake Forest Area. For more information or to schedule an appointment, visit www.easternwake.mosquitojoe.com or call 919-926-8851.

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ture of the small oil producing glands in your eyelids, measure the thickness of the oil layer in your tears, observe the stability of your tear film, and monitor how effectively you blink. Blinking is essential for activating the small oil producing glands in your eyelids and spreading those oils smoothly across the surface of your eye. When you use a computer or a digital device, your blink rate naturally drops. If you compound that with poor quality blinking, the oils in your eyelids can become thickened, causing the quality of your tears to degrade dramatically, resulting in fluctuating vision and red, irritated eyes. Knowing the condition of the oil producing glands and the quality of your oil layer is critical when developing the course of your dry eye treatment. BY SAMANTHA K. McPHERSON, OD, FAAO

DITCH THE

DROPS

An instrument can tell us how concentrated your tears are by measuring a very small sample of them, right in the office. The more concentrated your tears, the more likely you are to have dry eye. If your tears have normal concentration levels but you have a lot of dry eye-like symptoms, then you may be dealing with a condition that mimics dry eye, but requires a completely different type of treatment. The most common examples of this would be ocular allergies or an irregular ocular surface. Eye drops have been the mainstay of dry eye management for years. For many, switching from an over-the-counter eye drop to a prescription one that addresses the inflammation associated

WHAT'S NEW IN DRY EYE DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENTS

A

re you one of the estimated 20.7 million people in the United States who suffers from chronic dry eye? If the answer is yes, then you know all too well how frustrating it can be to deal with burning, itchy, and scratchy eyes. People with dry eye often feel that there is no hope because they have tried a variety of overthe-counter or prescription eye drops and are still suffering from the irritation and blurred vision caused by it. While it’s true that there is no cure, the field of dry eye is exploding and there are many new diagnostic tools and treatment options that are now available. Is your dry eye aqueous deficient dry eye, meaning that you do not have enough tears? Or is your dry eye evaporative dry eye, meaning that you may have enough tears, but they are in poor condition so they evaporate too quickly? Or do you have dry eye symptoms, but actually have an entirely different condition? The precision of dry eye diagnosis has improved with new technology. We can now differentiate between various types of dry eye and tailor your treatment plan accordingly. A special infrared camera provides a wealth of information that was previously not visible during standard examination. We can now clearly see the struc42

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FOLLOW THE FOOTSTEPS OF 9/11 HERO, FIREFIGHTER STEPHEN SILLER TO ENSURE THAT WE NEVER FORGET AND HONOR THE SACRIFICES OF OUR FIRST RESPONDERS AND MILITARY HEROES.

SATURDAY, SEPT. 15, 2018, 8:00 AM CORNER OF SOUTH WHITE ST AND ELM ST WAKE FOREST, NC 27587

All proceeds will benefit the Stephen Siller Tunnel to Towers Foundation, including our Smart Home Program, which builds specially adapted, custom designed homes for our nation’s most catastrophically injured service members.

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with dry eye is enough to get them feeling and seeing better. For many others, they need more. Fortunately, there are many new options that treat dry eye in non-traditional ways. LipiFlow is a revolutionary procedure that eliminates any obstructions present in the oil producing glands in a very quick and painless way. Clearing the oil glands of poor quality oils helps them to function more effectively, bringing significant relief to those who have been suffering from dry eye symptoms. This is a one time, in-office treatment that takes less than 15 minutes. There is no downtime afterwards, so you can get back to your routine in no time at all. Intense pulsed light (IPL) treatment is another treatment option increasing in popularity as a dry eye treatment. IPL is a light-based technology commonly used in dermatology to treat rosacea and other skin inflammatory conditions. During the procedure, a strategic level of light pulses is administered to penetrate the skin under the eye and targets the root cause of the inflammation. As the IPL treatment treats your overall skin appearance, your eyelid inflammation is reduced and the function of your oil glands will subsequently improve. IPL procedures are effective, gentle, and safe and also have no downtime following. Persistent defects in the cornea – the front surface of the eye – are common in dry eye. They cause chronic irritation, blurred vision,

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and are oftentimes very challenging to heal with eye drops alone. Now we have therapeutic tissues that we can place on the ocular surface like a bandage. These tissues contain many natural, therapeutic healing factors that can promote quality healing and lessen inflammation in a very short period of time. One of the newest innovations in dry eye treatments is a device that uses state-of-the-art technology – neurostimulation – to help your eyes temporarily make more of your tears. This is an ideal option for those who prefer a drug-free, drop-free treatment option. The device is portable (smaller than a cell phone) so you can create tears essentially on demand, anytime of day. Neurostimulation is a proven technology that uses tiny pulses of energy to stimulate the nerves that act on the tear glands to produce more of your own tears. You do not have to merely accept dry eye symptoms as a normal part of aging or contact lens wear. Many new options are available to improve the comfort of your eyes. If dry eye treatments in the past have left you disappointed, don’t give up. Discuss your symptoms and concerns with your eye doctor, who will be your best resource for determining if you are a good candidate for any of these new treatment options.  Samantha K. McPherson, OD, FAAO is the founder of Dry Eye Center of NC, a subspecialty clinic of McPherson Family Eye Care. For more information, visit www.mcphersonfamilyeyecare.com.

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YOU ARE

ENOUGH BY JESSICA McMICAN

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see you moms out there. I see you at the grocery store, pushing your baby in the cart, begging your toddler to stay close as you rush down the aisles, only to get home and realize you forget the one thing you needed the most. I see you signing your children into the gym nursery, partially excited about your workout, but mostly anticipating a little time to think and use the bathroom alone. I see you holding your screaming toddler in the checkout lines as he arches his back and pulls your hair, adamant that you are the worst mother ever because you never let him do anything, like buy him candy just because he demanded it. I see you rushing into day care clearly running late, yet again, begging your child to let go of your leg so you’re not tardy to work, meanwhile torn between the guilt of leaving your little one behind and secretly looking forward to some adult conversation. I see you rolling your eyes at that school letter asking for one more donation, one more event, one more obligation of time you are convinced you don’t have, but will somehow miraculously find.

Back in May, we celebrated Mother’s Day. Many of us were showered with gifts, cards, and/or words of affirmation from our children and families insisting we are rocking this whole mother thing. We smiled, cherished our tokens of appreciation, and soaked up every moment of recognition we got in hopes of convincing ourselves that yes, indeed, we aren’t screwing up this mother thing as much as we thought. But then our special day came and went, and we immediately put our heads back down to our never-ending lists and feelings of guilt, already counting down the days until next year when we get to spoil ourselves and feel valued once again. Can you relate? How many of you even fell into the comparison trap on Mother’s Day, comparing what you got to what someone

I see you moms, I do. You are busy. You are tired. You are overwhelmed. Your never-ending to-do list has seemingly morphed into your never-ending should-do list, and quite frankly, you’re over it. No matter how hard you try, you just can’t seem to get ahead and yet, somehow, every other mother seems to be doing it better than you. Your social media feed confirms it. As you scroll past Pinterest crafts, successful DIY projects, luxury vacations, intense workouts, well-behaved children, and perfect family photos, you are certain you are the only mother who doesn’t have it all together. All those moms must be more organized, more motivated, more educated, more supported, more something than you. I see you. I hear you. I get you. I am you. As women, and especially moms, we notoriously take on too much. We have this relentless desire to please everyone and prove that we can handle it all. From making crafts, to volunteering in the classroom, to building careers, we are constantly bombarded with opportunities to compare ourselves, often to distorted standards of success – and we take on those comparisons like it is our job, a job we have mastered. 44

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else did? Yes. I see that hand. It’s ok. You’re not alone. Comparison is an ugly, mean trap. It’s deceivingly disguised as a method of measurement for our success, and far too many women have allowed it to make them feel inadequate and incapable of ever being enough. I want to encourage you today. I want to remind you of something you have probably heard a million times, yet still struggle to grasp. You are enough. Yes, you. We all struggle with doubt, fear, and feelings of inadequacy. We all struggle to find that balance between work, motherhood, relationships, and life. It doesn’t matter if you work or not. It doesn’t matter if you have one child, five, or none. It doesn’t matter if you are married or single. It doesn’t matter if you are young or old. It doesn’t matter what you have accomplished or not accomplished. Whatever is looming over your head as your reason for not being enough, it does not matter. We all struggle in some area of our lives, because we are all human. One of the things that I enjoy the most is connecting with women and listening to their stories over coffee. But while I listen, I also watch. I watch their facial expressions and their bodies relax as they begin to share their struggles and find comfort in the fact that someone can relate. I offer encouragement, but also stories of my own. I reassure them that they are not the only ones going through what they are going through and that their story isn’t unlike so many others I have heard. I do my best to offer hope, because I, too, know what it feels like to be without it at times. I, too, know what it feels like to be surrounded by people and yet still feel completely and utterly alone and afraid and insufficient. I see you. I hear you. I get you. I am you. Women, it’s time for us to stop trying to outperform our neighbors and start supporting our fellow humans. To stop making judgements and start making friends. To stop painting illusions of perfection and start focusing on the art of authenticity. It’s time to be real. It’s time to be vulnerable. It’s time to indulge in self-love. It’s time to truly grasp the truth – you are enough. 

CALVIN JONES… THE MAN WHO NAMED WAKE FOREST ALSO NAMED THE SCUPPERNONG GRAPE.

ORIGIN OF THE WORD SCUPPERNONG– “THE WORD SCUPPERNONG IS A CORRUPTION OF THE INDIAN WORD ASCUPONUNG, MEANING PLACE OF THE ASCUPO, ASCOPO, OR ASKOPO. THIS TREE IS VERY ABUNDANT ALONG THE SCUPPERNONG RIVER.” VISIT THE MUSEUM FOR MORE ON THE HISTORY OF W AKE FOREST. WAKE FOREST HISTORICAL MUSEUM FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

O PEN T UES -F RI: 9:00 AM- NOON AND 1:30-4:30 PM O PEN S UNDAY: 2:00-5:00 PM

Jessica McMican is the owner of A Moment’s Grace and the founder of The Bloom Community, and devotes her time to empowering women inside and out through photography, coaching, and community events. For more information, visit www.amomentsgrace.com.

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F

ortunately, there are simple steps that you can take to ensure your teeth and gums stay healthy during this process, keeping you on the right path to a happy and healthy smile.

– Brush after every meal. Food and plaque can get trapped in the spaces between braces and wires, which can be very dangerous to the health of your teeth. Besides causing decay and enamel stains, food can react with the bacteria in your mouth and the metal of the braces to produce decalcification. This can lead to small, permanent light spots on your teeth. Besides brushing at home, carry a travel toothbrush so you can brush while at school or work. – Floss at least twice a day. Flossing can be difficult while wearing braces, as the wires make it difficult to get in-between the teeth and floss properly. Luckily, a floss threader or water flosser makes the process much easier. Be sure to not only floss in-between teeth, but around the brackets and wires of the braces as well. Flossing regularly helps to ensure that all trapped food has been removed, greatly reducing your risk of decay and stains. – Avoid sugary foods. Food and drinks high in sugars lead to tooth decay and gum disease. Harmful oral bacteria feed on the sugars you eat to create acids that destroy tooth enamel. Avoiding sugary foods helps to limit the amount of acid produced. 

BY DR. JASON GLADWELL

BRACE

YOURSELF TO MAINTAIN HEALTHY, PEARLY WHITES DURING ORTHODONTIC TREATMENT Choosing to get braces means choosing to have a perfect smile. After spending your time and money on perfect teeth, the last thing you want is to have them ruined with stains and decay because of improper care. Wearing braces means you are more prone to dental problems such as gingivitis, tartar, and demineralization. Also, if proper hygiene is not maintained while wearing braces, it can prolong your treatment time. 46

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– Consider Invisalign. Invisalign is a great alternative for patients who have difficulty with oral hygiene or who are concerned about the possibility of staining. Invisalign aligners are just as effective as traditional braces, but have the benefit of being removable. Aligners should be worn for 22 hours a day and only removed when eating, brushing, and flossing. The custom-made, clear aligners, created for you – and only you – will gradually and gently shift your teeth into place. A white and perfect smile is not something that happens overnight. Regularly following these simple tips to ensure your oral hygiene habits don’t fall by the wayside while wearing braces, and making some small positive changes in your daily and nightly routines, will help you work towards that healthy, happy smile of which you’ve always dreamed – not just for now, but for a lifetime. If you are considering braces or Invisalign, contact an orthodontist for a consultation and take the first step towards a beautiful, confident smile.  Dr. Jason Gladwell is the #1 Invisalign Provider in North Carolina, the #1 Invisalign Teen Provider on the East Coast, a top 5 Invisalign Provider in the nation, and a distinguished Invisalign faculty member. Gladwell Orthodontics has been serving Wake Forest for over 10 years and recently expanded into Raleigh. For more information, visit www.gladwellorthodontics.com.

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Research & Treatment of Mental Illness

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walkforhope.com • 919.781.9255

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MOMENTS AND

MEMORIES

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BY PATTI FRALIX

e are knee-deep in summer here in North Carolina. Lazy days, sun and water activities, and time together with family and friends fill our days. We are engaged in moments that create memories. An advertisement recommends “Spend More Moments in the Moment.” What a wonderful message. Too often we are so busy going, doing, and acquiring that we fail to be present in the moment. Summer allows us to slow down and enjoy those moments that create memories. But all moments are not the same, even when they create memories. It is not uncommon to see families and friends at a restaurant, all on their phones, totally unconnected with those present. When seeing this, I am curious about how could whatever is on the phone be more important than those with whom one is sharing a meal? This is not spending the right kind of moments in the moment. Quite the opposite, rather. It’s time to put technology in its place. It should be used for work and occasional relaxation, not to entertain us when we should be present with others. While we wouldn’t think to carry a board game into a restaurant for entertainment, our devices are small enough to accompany us almost everywhere we go. This is creating the wrong kind of moments in the moment. These are not the memories that we should savor. With most of summer still ahead of us, let’s make memories from the right kind of moments. Most of us have boxes and bins of photos clogging our spaces. Many of those photos are of events and people that are so far removed from our present lives that we do not need to keep them – they were our past and can be discarded. Before doing so, however, commit some time to this, for there are surely some pictures in with those others that you do want to keep – perhaps some of your distant relatives. Create memorable moments with your children by involving them in this process, introducing them to those relatives, sharing stories about them, and bringing them to life for a short while. We should assure that the photos are labeled with all pertinent information, especially names, relationship, and dates. You can probably discard all negatives, for it is unlikely that those would ever be converted to photos, and 48

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discard duplicates – yes, even those duplicates of your children’s school photos – unless you plan to give those to different family members. Another option is to create a memory book with your children and grandchildren of their parents, themselves, and even some more distant relatives. A few other points about photos. Yes, those can be scanned and maintained digitally, and they will require less space. Before spending the time and money to do so, however, consider whether the digital form will ever be viewed again, or just sit on a shelf. Recently, I found some printed pages of our daughter’s blog that she wrote years ago, which included photos of her two oldest children. I took those pages with me when I visited the grandchildren, and we relived memories and created new ones while going through those

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together. I don’t think the experience would have been as memorable in digital form. Another idea is to create rituals with your family that are memorable moments that become traditions, such as something as simple as a regular weekly night of pizza and movie watching. For some, traditions like these are so sacred that they supersede any other activity. Summer, with no homework and fewer extracurricular activities clogging the calendar, is a good time to begin such a tradition. Also, if you already have such a tradition in place, do not allow the different schedule of the summer to change it, unless doing so is a conscious decision. Traditions can change, but if they just get set aside or lost in the shuffle of the different season, it does not take long before it loses its meaning, or goes by the wayside. Summer of course is a wonderful time to play, but it shouldn’t be just about play. With more time available this time of year, create memorable moments by choosing to spend some of it with your children while volunteering to help those in need. If you establish a regular time for this, it will not just create memorable moments, but also a meaningful tradition. If the volunteer effort has a special meaning, it will become even more memorable. Volunteering with your children is two-fold – creating memorable moments while helping those in need. There are many ways to create moments and memories this summer – whether it be as simple as savoring a tech-free meal or relishing a long-walk together on the beach at sunset. No matter the experience, the particular activity is less important than the commitment to be present with others, consciously and consistently turning precious moments into lifelong memories.  Patti Fralix speaks, consults, and coaches, inspiring positive changeSM in work, life, and family. She is founder and president of The Fralix Group, Inc., a leadership excellence firm based in Raleigh, and author of A Year in the Life of a Recovering Spendaholic. She can be reached at pfralix@fralixgroup.com.

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OUR HERITAGE REVISITED THE FALLS, WAKE COUNTY’S BRIGADOON: YOU CAN’T HARDLY GET THERE FROM HERE BY AMY PIERCE “Our Heritage” is reprinting and updating earlier articles as a way of introducing a ballooning newcomer population to Wake Forest history and culture.

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he ways of time are often difficult for us to comprehend and accept, especially when in the name of progress, we turn beauty into sorrow. In northwestern Wake county, just southwest of Wake Forest, there yet remains, albeit barely, one of the most beautiful spots in the Old North State. To those folks who grew up there, and to those still living there, it was a bit like Brigadoon, the fictional enchanted Scottish Village that appeared out of the mists once every 100 years. Its residents slept through the lapse, though, so every 100-year dawn in Brigadoon was simply the next morning to those blessed to live in paradise. Wake County’s Brigadoon sat alongside and upon hills cradling the Neuse River (“Wee Quo Whom” to the Occaneechi who named it). Not so long ago it was a region of fishers, farmers, and the faithful. Some of the faithful still reside there; the farmers and fishers, though, have ’bout disappeared. To our nation’s first people, as well as to those who long ago forced their leave-taking and those who came after, the area was a benison. In good times and bad, it was land, water, and community, ’twas Wakan Tanka and God that sustained all whoever dwelt in this place. The area and its community are still known as The Falls, but you can’t hardly get there from here. In the haunting words of Joni Mitchell, “They paved paradise.” During the last quarter of the 20th century, it was in this place, this paradise, where a spade dipped into Earth yielded a shovel-full of arrowheads; where strangers crossing the river bridge would be so mesmerized by natural beauty that they had to stop and get out of their cars; that the government, after 40-plus years of dallying with the idea, dammed the Neuse for flood control and, in the process, seemed to damn the people by stealing, some said, their land and way of life. Though there have been at least two other dams at The Falls since the 1880s, negative impact on the surrounding land and community was little to none. Not this time, though … not by a long shot. Dams existed at The Falls to harness river power for a mill industry. For over 200 years – under numerous mill owners, several suffering bankruptcies and receiverships – the “mills at the Great Falls” consisted of a grist mill, sawmill, two tanneries, a paper mill, and possibly other manufacturing industries. Well known for its stationery and newsprint, Josephus Daniels, late editor/publisher of Raleigh’s News & Observer, considered the rag paper made at The Falls the finest quality newsprint that man has ever made. The mills, of course, led to the defining character of The Falls Community as a Wake County mill village. Villagers and folk from nearby communities, including The Harricane,

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worked in the mills until the doors closed in 1959. Though the work was welcome, the days were long and hard, so play was eagerly anticipated. It was common for 20th century mills to sponsor community baseball teams. “The Falls team was so good they were often written about in the N&O,” says longtime resident Linwood Barham. “We played hard and we played to win. Children learned to play with corn cobs and tobacco sticks, not bats and balls, because that’s what they had.” A close-knit community proud of its semi-pro team, villagers often traveled to watch match-ups against other mill team opponents. At The Falls could be found boarding houses and taverns, cotton fields and a dairy farm (complete with a cow hospital), several churches (baptisms were held in the river), and general stores (Fonville’s was known for selling “everything but the casket”), a fire department and post office, and those Brigadoon-like vistas to die for. Until the late ’70s, many folks still farmed; most all had vegetable gardens. Though times were often hard, these folks took care of each other, weathering together the 1918 flu epidemic, both World Wars, and the Great Depression. Nothing was ever so hard to bear, though, as coming home to find pink ribbons around so many houses, ribbons representing property acquisition lines established by the Army Corps of Engineers as a result of the government’s decision to dam the river and create Falls Lake as a drinking water source for Raleigh. The decision, along with an ever-encroaching, northern-moving capital city, simply undermined and broke apart the community. “No one knows where it begins and ends anymore,” says Barbara Barham. Raleigh eventually overtook The Falls, and the city now abuts Wake Forest. Roads at The Falls have been rerouted and renamed. Its fire department is now under threat by the capital. “They say it’s no longer needed,” says former fire chief Johnny Ray. “We’re fighting that.” The beautiful mill still remains alongside the river though, as River Mill Condominiums. Although it is true that, as Chaucer wrote, time and tide wait for no man, perhaps there will come a day one cool spring morning when our Brigadoon will rise out of mists spiraling upward from the river; perhaps in that momentary lifting of the veils you will be there as witness. If so say a prayer of blessing for all that was – and will never be again. Thanks to Barbara and Linwood Barham, Gabriel Lauro, Deana Vassar, Tom Wright at River Mill Condominiums, and Ed Morris of the Wake Forest Historical Museum. For additional photographs, visit www.fallscommunity.org. Amy Pierce lives in Wake Forest’s Mill Village, where she is a writer, minister, and spiritual counselor. She can be reached at 919-554-2711 or visit www.authenticself.us.

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