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CIRCA

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P U B L I C A RT A RO U N D T OW N • D E C O R D I L E M M A ? • B R E A K FA S T – I T ' S W H AT ' S F O R D I N N E R • A C L E A N S L AT E • B OAT I N G B A S I C S P O R K B B Q . . . I T ' S P E R S O NA L • S P R I N G P L A N T I N G S • T H E R E WA R D S O F R E S A L E • T H E WO N D E R F U L WO R L D O F G A R D E N I N G B AC K YA R D OA S E S • T H E E D E N T O N E X P E R I E N C E • RO S é A L L DAY • TA L K I N G T E E T H • F L I P P I N G L I K E A P RO • E N J OY- M I N T • A N D M O R E

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A WORD FROM THE PUBLISHER

What a year! As I write this, it’s been almost one year to the day that our lives changed forever. I had just sent the spring 2020 issue to the printer, eager to share great articles, events, and businesses with you. And then, in what felt like an instant, the world seemed to shut down. Like all of you, my team and I had to make some immediate changes to ensure CIRCA would still be available, not just in April of last year, but throughout these challenging 12 months. Thankfully, you – our incredible readers for whom we are so grateful – have continued to support us by reading each issue of CIRCA Magazine that has been published since the pandemic began. Our amazing advertisers – local businesses in our community that have all been impacted in some way, yet remain open and happy to serve – have supported us. Our wonderful contributing writers – whose words of wisdom eloquently grace the pages each and every issue – have supported us. Our great distribution locations – the numerous businesses in the area that so generously allow us to distribute CIRCA in their establishments – have supported us. It’s because of this vast community support that I am proud to say that after a crazy year, another awesome issue of CIRCA Magazine has arrived!

We have all faced obstacles and changes since last year’s spring issue hit the streets. But with a shift in perspective, not all change is bad … the past year has given us the opportunity to slow down and appreciate our surroundings. It’s given us time to experience and embrace nature. It’s given us the chance to explore our culinary capabilities. It’s allowed us to discover new talents and interests, or revisit hobbies previously pushed to the wayside. And while everyone is surely ready for a post-pandemic world, it is my hope that these silver linings remain. In this edition of CIRCA Magazine, you’ll find ways to acknowledge these silver linings while savoring the splendor of spring … warmer weather, longer evenings, and an overall feeling of serenity. First, the opportunity to appreciate our surroundings … what better way to do so than to get outside and explore? Our community boasts many visual art pieces awaiting your enjoyment. “Hidden Gems” details art pieces that can be found around Wake Forest, including Joyner Park’s magnificent “Ribbon Wall,” which is showcased on our cover (thank you to the Town of Wake Forest for this beautiful photograph!). “Driveable Destination” highlights “The Edenton Experience” – just two hours away – if you find yourself needing to escape to what’s known as the “prettiest small town in the South.” Next, the opportunity to experience and embrace nature … spring signifies beautiful blooms, picturesque plantings, and admiring Mother Nature’s glory. “Spring Plantings” shares various plants native to North Carolina that will thrive in your spring garden, while “The Wonderful World of Gardening” provides tips for growing a successful container garden. Additionally, the chance to explore our culinary capabilities … spring is a great time to get outside and get grilling. “Cooked In Tradition,” featuring recipes submitted by CIRCA’s awesome readers, includes two delicious dishes to be devoured on a warm spring evening, and a delectable brownie recipe for an exceptional encore. “Breakfast – It’s What’s For Dinner” offers morning meals tailored for evening enjoyment … not only are these great go-tos for busy weeknights, they’re also opportunities for treasured family fun. Finally, discovering new interests, talents, and hobbies … spring is the ideal time to try out some new pastimes. Looking for book recommendations, perhaps for reading in a beach chair? Check out “Good Reads” for some of the latest and greatest works that will soon be hitting the shelves (and maybe even your beach bag). Feeling crafty? Don’t miss “Refresh And Renew” for sweet DIY projects to tackle this season. All in all, the past year has been a whirlwind, to say the least. With highs and lows galore, it’s safe to say that lessons have been learned, experiences have been shared, and everyone has been impacted in different ways. I hope that the collection of articles, recipes, artwork, and businesses featured in this issue bring a smile to your face and some sunshine to your spring. And I hope you feel the pure joy that I hold in sharing this edition – and every edition – of CIRCA Magazine with you. As always, an enormous “thank you” is owed to the many businesses, writers, distribution locations, and readers that make CIRCA Magazine possible. I appreciate you today and every day, and I wish you the happiest of spring seasons. See you in the summer!


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Show Some Love, #KeepWFclean

Breakfast – It’s What’s For Dinner 10

Decor Dilemma? Design Tips Tricks, And Helpful Hints

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Talking Teeth – Do You Have Receding Gums?

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Hidden Gems – Public Art Around Town

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Pork BBQ ... It’s Personal

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Good Reads

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The Rewards Of Resale – How To Compete With New Construction In Today’s Hot Real Estate Market

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Rosé All Day (And Year)

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Backyard Oases – Making The Outdoors An Extension Of Our Indoor Living Spaces

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Care Giving – A Responsibility To Oneself

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Boating Basics

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A Joint Effort – Image-Guided Steroid/Anesthetic Injections To Treat Chronic Joint Pain

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Renew And Refresh With Springtime DIY Fun

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Driveable Destination – The Edenton Experience

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Bariatric Surgery – Your Toolkit For Success

40 A Clean Slate – The Ultimate Spring Cleaning Checklist 42

Enjoy-Mint

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Flipping Like A Pro

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Cooked In Tradition

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Protect Your Pearly Whites – Food And Drink Ideas To Enjoy (And Avoid) After A Teeth Whitening Procedure

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Mapping Out Myopia

52 The Wonderful World Of Gardening

PUBLISHER & EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Kent Lower CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Allison Caudle Abbott Todd Nelson Joe O’Keefe Robyn Goss Bennai Nick Pione Dr. Jeffrey Browne Rhonda Benvie Plummer Buck Buchanan Dolores Riggins Margarita Cohen Dr. Macon Singletary Jonathan Daniel Dr. Edmond Suh David Greenwell Jimmy Tompkins Stacy Kropp, PA-C Thomas Walters Grace Lower Town of Wake Forest Suzanne Lucey WakeMed Stacey Moritz Dr. Cassandria E. Warr Ed Morris CONTACT INFORMATION BallPointe Publishing & Design, LLC P.O. Box 1182 Wake Forest, NC 27588 919.453.2555 • info@circamagazine.com circamagazine.com ADVERTISING SALES 919.453.2555 • info@circamagazine.com MANAGERS Kent Lower & Mitch Lower

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CBD For Canines Spring Plantings – Native Plants To Consider For Your NC Landscape

INTERN Grace Lower

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Our Heritage – Dr. Calvin Jones: Groundbreaking Physician

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CIRCA Magazine is published quarterly by BallPointe Publishing & Design, LLC. All rights reserved. No part of this magazine may be reproduced or transmitted without the written permission of the publisher. Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained within; however, BallPointe Publishing & Design assumes no liability for accuracy or omissions.


SHOW SOME LOVE ANTI-LITTERING CAMPAIGN AIMS AT KEEPING WAKE FOREST CLEAN BY TOWN OF WAKE FOREST

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ake Forest is a wonderful community to live, work, play, and visit. We have so much to be proud of, but like many communities across America, litter can be found along many of our streets and highways.

In response to this issue, the Town of Wake Forest has launched a comprehensive anti-littering campaign aimed at eliminating unsightly trash along roadways, in neighborhoods, and in other parts of our community. Entitled “Show Some Love, #KeepWFclean,” the initiative focuses on education, awareness, and enforcement, while encouraging residents, businesses, neighborhoods, and community organizations to take action to ensure that litter finds its rightful place. The campaign emphasizes the message that litter is not only unsightly, it is also a costly problem that can be only be addressed with behavioral changes at the community and individual levels. “We have all noticed the significant increase in litter around town,” said Wake Forest Mayor Vivian Jones. “We are asking all Wake Forest residents to take a renewed pride in our community by properly disposing of their trash and securing their truckloads.”

JOIN THE FIGHT AGAINST LITTER! Residents and business owners can help the Town of Wake Forest create awareness about the “Show Some Love, #KeepWFclean” initiative by displaying a yard sign, car magnet, or proud supporter window decal at their place of business or on their vehicle. All items are available for contactless pickup in the lobby of Town Hall, 301 S. Brooks Street. As a part of the campaign, the Town of Wake Forest is also inviting individuals and families to join in by picking up trash in their neighborhoods and along local streets and roadways. Designed to encourage maximum public participation, the initiative allows volunteers to pick up litter on a one-time or ongoing basis. Participants may also choose the area they wish to clean or request direction to high-need areas around town. To aid the effort, volunteers may reserve one or more litter kits at no charge by completing the online form at wakeforestnc.gov/ keep-wf-clean. Each litter kit includes reflective vests, gloves, buckets, grabbers, trash bags, data collection sheets, hand sanitizer, and litter education materials. A special thank you to B&W Hardware for sponsoring the litter kits.

The “Show Some Love” campaign features the logo below and the hashtag #KeepWFclean that is being used in a range of promotional materials, public service announcements, and on social media. The “Show Some Love” logo appears on Town email signatures, posters, yard signs, banners, vehicles, and other areas throughout the community.

SHOW SOME

L VE #KeepWFclean

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Residents are strongly encouraged to do their part to eliminate litter by putting trash in its proper place. And, if you see a friend or family member litter, politely remind them that trash only belongs in a recycling bin or trash can.

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Once reserved, litter kits may be picked up at the Public Works Operations Center located at 234 Friendship Chapel Road, Monday - Friday, between 7:00 AM and 3:30 PM, and must be returned within one week, unless otherwise requested. Due to COVID-19 and out of concern for public safety, the Town is currently limiting participation in the roadside cleanup program to individuals and families. Once state restrictions are lifted, the invitation to participate will be extended to schools, churches, civic groups, and community organizations.

SECURE YOUR LOAD One of the main issues the campaign will tackle is confronting unsecure truckloads. In North Carolina, half of the litter along state highways is blown – not thrown – from uncovered trucks. Debris that is tossed or falls from your vehicle becomes a safety hazard to other drivers. Make sure your loads are secure and that no loose trash can fly out of your open window or your truck bed. Littering is a violation of state law that the Highway Patrol takes seriously. The Town wants residents to know both private and commercial drivers are responsible for anything that is blown from the uncovered bed of their pickup trucks. Penalties for littering include up to a $2,000 fine, community service work, and one point on a motorist’s driver license upon conviction. To secure your load: – Tie it down using rope, netting, straps, or chains. Securely fasten large items directly to your vehicle. Make sure that any covering is securely tied down. – Put lighter items lower and place heavier items on top to help keep them in place and secure the heavy items directly to your vehicle. – Cover your load with a tarp. Doing so and then securely fastening the tarp to the vehicle is a good way to ensure that your load is secure. – Don’t overload your vehicle. – Double-check that your load is secure.

GET IN GOOD WITH AN EXPERT Because I know the risks in the area, I’ll use my local expertise to help you choose the right amount of protection. And I’ll be there to help you as your coverage needs change. Call or stop in for a free, no-obligation Personalized Insurance Proposal today.

Personalized service. Trusted advice.

LEARN MORE

CIRCA Magazine

Walters Insurance Agency 919-554-0267 3207 Rogers Road, Ste. 100 Wake Forest thomaswalters@allstate.com Subject to terms, conditions and availability. Allstate Property and Casualty Insurance Co., Allstate Indemnity Co., Allstate Insurance Co. © 2016 Allstate Insurance Co.

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For more information about “Show Some Love, #KeepWFclean,” including opportunities to join the fight against litter, visit wakeforestnc.gov/keep-wf-clean. You may also contact Sustainability Coordinator Jeanette Johnson at 919-435-9585 or jjohnson@wakeforestnc.gov. 

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BREAKFAST IT'S WHAT'S FOR DINNER

BY STACEY MORITZ

We all know that breakfast is the most important meal of the day and a great way for a family to kickstart an awesome morning. But let’s face it – sitting down together for a lovely breakfast is not realistically going to happen on a hectic weekday. While a lazy Sunday morning is a good time to pull out all the stops for a delicious family breakfast, why not have a

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little morning meal fun on a random weeknight too? ’m sure that you’ve done the “breakfast for dinner” routine on a crazy night when you are pulled in a thousand different directions. But I’m not talking about an ordinary bowl of cereal here. So settle into your PJs, get inspired with some of these delectable suggestions, and have some fun with breakfast – tonight!

The nice thing about breakfast for dinner is that you can double your duty by popping leftovers in the freezer to save for another busy evening. You can go as easy as scrambled eggs, bacon, and toast, or more elaborate such as Eggs Benedict. If eggs are on the dinner menu, pre-chop several ingredients for an at-home omelet bar. Designate an omelet “chef,” have everyone choose their fillings, and let the chef have at it. A favorite in our house is the breakfast egg burrito – perfect for leftovers you may already have in the fridge from previous dinners, like potatoes, ham, and steak. Add salsa, cilantro, and green chiles for a southwest flair. Toss in some sausage or bacon and cheese and freeze a few extras for quick protein-packed meals on busy mornings. Homemade breads or muffins aren’t only for morning enjoyment ... no matter what time of day, they are always a big hit. If you have a favorite basic muffin recipe, vary the “mix-ins” according to everyone’s tastes – just add fresh berries, chopped apples and cinnamon, or mashed bananas and chocolate chips, and each family member gets a custom muffin baked to his or her liking. Another go-to in our kitchen is French toast casserole, a delicious dish that offers a great way to use leftover bread. Small ramekins 8

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or mini loaf pans let everyone make their own. Simply toss cubed bread into your dishware and sprinkle in your favorite fruit, chocolate chips, or even a few chunks of cream cheese. Feeling adventurous? Try a savory version using ham, brie or smoked gouda, and a handful of raspberries – no maple syrup required. Next, simply whisk two eggs, a cup of whole milk, and ¼ cup sugar, and pour over your bread mixture. Let sit for one to two hours, then bake uncovered at 350 degrees for about 30 minutes, or until the liquid is absorbed and the bread is golden. Another great dinner option is the breakfast casserole. The beauty of this dish is you can make it ahead of time and simply bake it right before serving, saving time on a busy evening. Favorites of ours include an egg, sausage, and cheese strata; baked French toast; baked cheese grits; and of course, a hash brown casserole. All are hearty and comforting – everything you need for a great family dinner. If your family is more of a pancake and waffle crowd, again, start with a basic batter recipe – but get creative with the toppings. While chocolate chips and berries are obvious choices, think outside the box – maybe go tropical with pineapple and coconut, or go nutty with macadamia nuts, pecans, pistachios, and walnuts. Or make a hearty waffle sandwich filled with ham and cheese, bananas and peanut butter, or fruit and chocolate. For a healthier twist, top with Greek yogurt and honey, or maybe almond butter and sliced apples. You can also have a great time making your own crepes. If you’re not up to making them from scratch, purchase ready-made crepes from the grocery store and customize them as you wish. Fill them with bananas and Nutella or fresh berries and whipped cream – or even ham, eggs, and cheese. You are only limited by your imagination. Once you’ve enjoyed your breakfast for supper, you just might decide that this mealtime switch should become a weekly ritual. It’s a great way to break out of a boring dinner routine while enjoying family fun at the same time.  Stacey Moritz is the owner of The Lemon Tree Cafe, located at 113 S. White Street in Downtown Wake Forest (919-521-5806), offering freshly prepared salads, pastas, soups, and take-away fare. The Lemon Tree Cafe serves breakfast and lunch Monday - Friday, 7:30 AM - 5:00 PM and Saturdays 7:30 AM - 3:00 PM.

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Q: My front porch is a great porch for autumn since the colors of my house and stone are deep orange, purple, black bean, and tan. How can I decorate for spring? A: With your particular house colors, I recommend incorporating the colors of spring – think greens, yellows, oranges, purples, and pinks. These hues look brilliant and work cohesively when incorporated together, going a long way in offsetting the fall-like colors of your house and brightening it up for spring. Always remember that when it comes to interior design, black is your friend. This neutral color allows everything else in a space to be the star of the show. Fill black pots with flowers of these spring shades so their vibrancy adds a pop of color to your porch. To summarize, think nature. Visit your favorite garden center to see how nature puts colors together for you – or take advantage of Mother Nature’s spring bounty growing right in your own yard. Bring in those same colors with pillows on rocking chairs and accessories on steps, porch tables, etc.

BY RHONDA BENVIE PLUMMER

DECOR

DILEMMA?

Q: I am thinking about updating my lighting, as I think new fixtures will brighten and freshen up my space. Do you recommend this? If so, I need your help because I have no idea what to get, and what size. I can hang the fixtures myself, but I’m not sure of the correct height at which to hang them. Any tips? A: I think lighting is one of the best ways to update a space – along with faucets and knobs. The mixing of metals with color is very

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DESIGN TIPS, TRICKS, AND HELPFUL HINTS

ome has extraordinary meaning these days. It is not just a place where we live, but many of us are now also working and teaching our children here, too. We have spent more time in our special havens over the past year than ever before … thus, many of us are finding ourselves looking at spaces and imagining how we can amp them up a bit. Maybe you’ve thought, “Can I knock down this wall, and will it look right?” Do you find yourself daydreaming of breathing new life into a particular room with vibrant paint colors, new modern light fixtures, or funky accessories? Did you conclude during these long hours at home that you need a drastic change because you’ve discovered your home’s functionality isn’t serving your needs anymore? Or perhaps you’re simply interested in taking advantage of the spring weather and just want to spruce up your surroundings for the season. If so, there’s a good chance that you don’t know how or where to start with your project, and welcome any design advice and expertise. If you had an interior designer on speed dial, what would you ask? We polled several homeowners just like you and inquired about their burning decorating dilemmas. Here are their top three … 10

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trendy right now – but be careful not to mix finishes. In other words, if you have stainless steel or brushed nickel faucets and want to incorporate gold, then make sure the gold is a brushed finish, and not shiny. Of course, black fixtures are also a good complement to all metal finishes (remember, black is always your friend when it comes to interior design). For sizes of lighting, a design “rule” says that you add the length and width of a room to determine fixture size. For example, a 12’ x 14’ room would need a 26” fixture. This is a good start, but I tend to break this rule a lot, depending on ceiling height. If you have 10’ ceilings, then your fixture needs to be a bit bigger – more like 30”. For heights, you want the light to be 30”- 36” above table height. I gravitate more toward the 36” end of this range, depending on ceiling height. For a light not over a table or bar, the bottom of the fixture must be 7’ off the floor. Bathroom lights are usually two-thirds of the vanity width for the best scale. So, if your vanity is 36”, then 24” minimum is the best look. Q: My family is expanding, and we love our location, but are outgrowing our house. We also will be working from home indefinitely. We would love to add on, but have no idea where to start. Should we call a contractor, engineer, architect, or designer? A: If you are adding on to your home, I recommend working with an architect and interior designer simultaneously to start. They will work great together to come up with the best outcome. Architects look at a space and how it will attach seamlessly to the existing structure. They think more about the lines of the “guts” of the house, while interior designers focus on how additional space will function and how its layout will best work for the family. The designer is considering furniture layout and where to put doors for optimized space. Having this plan in place before you contact contractors will save you an abundance of time and allow you to receive more accurate bids. The contractors will be bidding on an actual final plan, rather than an idea that can be interpreted hundreds of different ways (and you’ll find yourself comparing apples to oranges). Getting the best outcome from the building process – whether starting from the ground up, adding on, or remodeling – happens when you have a team that works together. If you’ve got design questions, I’m here to help! Please send inquires for consideration, and possible inclusion in CIRCA Magazine, to hmrhondaint@hotmail.com or info@circamagazine.com. And stay tuned to see if your question will be featured in a future issue!  Rhonda Benvie Plummer is the owner of Help Me Rhonda Interiors and Open Door Furniture & Accents, a furniture and accessories store located at 11605 Durant Road in Raleigh. Visit helpmerhondainteriors.com or opendoorfurnitureandaccents.com or call 919-2639054. Rhonda is also a regular guest on WPTF’s “Making Your Home Great” radio show, the second Saturday of every month, when you can call in with any design questions you may have.

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TALKING TEETH 5 DO YOU HAVE RECEDING GUMS?

BY DR. MACON SINGLETARY

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ingival recession is a common result of periodontal disease. It occurs when the gums pull away from the tooth because of bacteria or occlusal trauma, increasingly exposing the tooth surface and often giving the tooth a longer appearance. Because the onset of gum disease is initially painless, one of the best ways to determine whether your gums are at risk is to check for gingival recession. But sometimes it can be hard to tell. How do you know if your gums are receding? First, simply look at your teeth in the mirror. Do they appear longer than usual? If so, this means the gums have shrunk away from the tooth. This recession is sometimes caused by the bacteria that has accumulated underneath the gum line in an area not visible to the naked eye. That bacteria is eating away at the gum tissue, causing the gums to recede from the tooth, and giving it the deceiving appearance of greater length. Recession can occur in a non-inflammatory situation when there is no keratinized gum, prominent root, and no bone on the cheek side of the root.

ened oral sensitivity to hot and cold likely means that the gums have pulled away, leaving the roots exposed. Lastly, assess if your teeth feel loose or mobile. When gums recede, the teeth lose the surrounding support that formerly kept them secure and immobile. Mobile teeth are a sure sign of recession. Upon noticing any of these symptoms, seek the advice of a periodontist. If you have periodontal disease, he or she will be able to create a personally tailored, effective treatment plan to fight it and your gum recession.  Dr. Macon Singletary, periodontist at North Raleigh Periodontics, is a diplomate with the American Board of Periodontology, and has been improving smiles in the Raleigh area for over 25 years. For more information, visit northraleighperio.com or call 919-518-8222.

Second, check to see if your gums are red, inflamed, puffy, and/or tender. These are symptoms of irritated gums caused by bacteria busily at work damaging the gum tissue. Healthy gums are firm, light pink, and elastic. Gums near the beginning of periodontal disease appear darker and inflamed in the “C” shape surrounding the tooth, while those in the more advanced stages have a greater overall appearance of inflammation and redness. Third, notice whether your gums bleed and feel tender when you floss and brush. If flossing causes blood to flow from the area where the floss has cleaned between each tooth, this could indicate gum inflammation, which eventually leads to gum recession. Recession is especially likely to be present if the gums bleed when brushing and flossing despite attentive care, gentleness, and regularity. Fourth, assess your teeth’s sensitivity to hot and cold food and drink. When gums recede, the tooth roots become increasingly exposed. The tooth root, unlike the top portion of the tooth, is not covered in protective enamel. Instead, its only covering is a thin layer called cementum, which does not as effectively protect the nerves in the tooth root from painful exposure. Therefore, height12

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We’ve got your back. WakeMed Women’s From pregnancy and childbirth to mammograms, menopause and more, the care is compassionate, comprehensive and here for you at every life stage. Inpatient and outpatient surgery. Specialty and subspecialty services. Urgent care and emergency care. Diagnostics and imaging. Rehabilitation and more. How much more? Let’s just say, at WakeMed Women’s, we’ve got a lot more than your back. wakemed.org/womens-services


riences in ways that best meet their needs: meditative, reflective, inquisitive, or simply reacting to the artwork itself. Fortunately, we live in an area that has given our community an abundance of visually artistic hidden gems, sometimes in the least expected places. The Town of Wake Forest Public Art Commission’s mission is to provide the community with a number of opportunities to enjoy visual art throughout the town. The Chair of the Public Arts Commission, Elizabeth Hayes, explained to me, “We hope public art creates a sense of place in Wake Forest – a place that draws people to spend time with their thoughts or with others.” So, if you’re out enjoying a bike ride on the greenway, walking the path at Joyner Park, strolling in Downtown, or just exploring Wake Forest on a warm, spring day, be on the lookout for the many murals and sculptures sprinkled around town, and take time to enjoy and appreciate these beautiful hidden gems. BY ROBYN GOSS BENNAI

CREATING A LIFELONG LOVE OF ART Children are wonderful observers of art. Their perspective is pure and true to their hearts. I remember one of my children thinking aloud, “The painter must have been really sad that day, or he ran out of white paint,” upon seeing a painting that used dark shadows to create drama. Benefits for children who spend time observing visual art include higher thinking skills, creativity, understanding of emotions, curiosity, and a connection to the community.

HIDDEN

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PUBLIC ART AROUND TOWN While I have personally studied art and love painting, I certainly know that not everyone is cognizant of all the benefits that visual art has to offer. There are several forms of art, and most people enjoy at least one on a daily basis. Music, for example, is an art that fills our car rides with entertainment. There is nothing like playing a song you love and belting out the lyrics that you may or may not actually know. Another form of art that seems to naturally become part of our lives from a young age is dance. Children love to move to the sounds

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of music – twirling in circles or bouncing up and down. nlike music or dance, most forms of visual art, such as paintings and sculptures, are more formfocused and viewers can be more deliberate in their interactions with the art. In other words, you can stand and look at the same piece for as little or as long as you want without any change in it. In this way, visual art provides the viewers the possibility to shape their expe14

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There are four pieces available for observation at the Renaissance Centre, located at 405 Brooks Street in Wake Forest. In front of the building is a sculpture by Jordan Parah, titled “Dancing in the Moonlight.” It is an interesting sculpture that can lend itself to an engaging conversation with your child. For example, you may ask questions such as: – Why do you think the artist named it “Dancing in the Moonlight?” – Does it make you think of moonlight? – What do you like about it, and how does it make you feel? – How do you think it was made? – How long do you think it took to make? – From what do you think it is made? – How do you think it was transported here?  There is an endless amount of questions that can be asked about Parah’s sculpture, or any other piece of art. Focusing on feelings provided by the artwork, an exploration of meaning, and a discussion about materials is a great way to get the conversation started. Additionally, there are three murals at the Renaissance Centre. There is a large permanent mural on the side of the building by Taylor White, “Flora and Fauna” (pictured) and two temporary murals, “If Mother Nature Could Dance” by Maureen Seltzer and “NC Spring Road” by Delphine Peller. You can also discover another fantastic sculpture until June, “Orpheus” by Charles Pilkey, just down the road in H.L. Miller Park.

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HISTORY, UNDERSTANDING, AND EMPATHY There is often an opportunity to connect art to other aspects of life. Art and history are intimately intertwined. Art is often a reflection of the current events during its creation. There is much to be gained when studying it from a historical perspective – for instance, a greater understanding of the society and the quality of life of the people living during that time. Within Smith Creek Soccer Park, the “FREEDOM: An Homage to Martin Luther King, Jr.” sculpture by Vandorm Hinnant presents a chance to remember the life of this impactful civil rights leader and the positive influence he had on the lives of so many people, both then and today.

FINDING PEACE Stress has been a constant for lots of people recently. Many have faced financial challenges, worked in less-than-ideal circumstances, felt isolated, or have experienced stress thanks to online classes and sheer boredom. The good news is that there are two art installations at Joyner Park that not only allow you to enjoy nature, but also provide a place for introspection. Jim Gallucci’s “Oak Leaf Horizon Gate IV” sits in the park next to a bench for viewing. Focusing on the intricate details of the leaves and the many shapes that form within those details creates something on which to concentrate and help your brain relax, allowing you to refocus on the beauty of the piece. Also located at Joyner Park is the incredible 2,000 feet linear “Ribbon Wall” by Brooks Burleson. His creation uses ancient tech-

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niques and knowledge that don’t require mortar. This wonderful form of art that we are so fortunate to have in our community, (and that beautifully graces our cover), spans both space and time. There are many other visual hidden gems waiting to be enjoyed around town. Download the Town of Wake Forest app to find a Public Art Tour that highlights some of the many artworks in our area. There is an active arts community here, so consider supporting local artists by visiting galleries, shops selling their wares, and artisan fairs. The Public Art Commission also sponsors the greenway beautification Sewer Structure Beautification Project. Groups and individuals paint these structures along the paths – a great way for children and adults alike to share their love of art with the community. This opportunity is open to anyone interested in submitting a proposal. Information can be found on the Town of Wake Forest website.  It is my hope that you will find new and creative ways to enjoy the art that surrounds us. Sometimes, the routine of life can hide many beautiful sights in its repetitiveness. These hidden gems that started as raw materials and were shaped as expressions of the artists in order for you to create your own impressions are truly gifts to enjoy.  Robyn Goss Bennai is a local artist and instructor at Pint + Paint at Norse Brewing Co. in Downtown Wake Forest. Article photo and front cover photo courtesy of Town of Wake Forest.

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pulled pork, cook the pork butt until the internal temperature is 190 degrees F. Finally, wrap it in tinfoil and let rest in an insulated cooler or warm oven for at least 30 minutes before pulling/chopping.

BY DAVID GREENWELL

PORK BBQ ... IT’S PERSONAL

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arm temperatures and longer days mean more time spent outdoors with family and friends – especially in the form of backyard cookouts. So now that it’s time for cookouts, we have to ask, “What should we cook?” My easy answer is pork BBQ – with buns, slaw, sauces, and a variety of scrumptious sides so everyone can fix their meals to their own personal tastes. And speaking of personal tastes, there are about as many opinions on pork BBQ as there are folks cooking it. My style is heavily influenced by that of Lexington, North Carolina.

While the pork rests, simmer up a Lexington style vinegar sauce – locally, it’s known as “Dip” and is served hot. Here’s a simple and delicious version to make and enjoy yourself: – 4 ounces ketchup (Hunts is region-accurate) – 3 ounces water – 3 ounces cider vinegar – 1 teaspoon salt – 1 teaspoon black pepper – Big pinch crushed red pepper flakes Combine all ingredients and bring to a simmer. Cover BBQ with hot dip just before eating. Add slaw, buns, and side dishes of choice for a delicious meal. Aside from my suggestions shared here, there are infinite ways to season, prepare, and serve this southern staple this spring. After all, BBQ is always personal in our home state of NC!  David Greenwell is the owner of The Forks Cafeteria, offering classic southern fare for lunch and dinner, as well as catering. The Forks Cafeteria is located at 339 S. Brooks Street in Wake Forest. Visit www.theforkscafeteria.com for their daily menu.

To make your own, first, you’ll need the right equipment – use a smoker, pellet, or kamado-type ceramic grill to ensure the right temperature and length of cooking time. Second, you’ll need meat. In Lexington, you’d use an entire pork shoulder, but the Boston pork butt is a trimmed version available at most grocery stores and warehouse clubs around here. I season generously with a rub made of equal parts salt and black pepper, with just a bit of granulated onion and garlic. Season the meat ahead of time for a better result – a few hours is good; overnight is even better. Third, you’ll need a smoke source. Hickory wood, natural lump hickory charcoal, or hickory pellets are good choices, depending upon your grilling equipment. After preparing your equipment and meat, it’s time to cook. Set your smoker or grill between 200 and 220 degrees F. Place the pork butt (fat side down) about 12-14 inches above the coals (if using a kamado-type grill; otherwise, refer to your manufacturer’s recommendations). Keep the temperature in the above range for 11-12 hours. At around the ninth hour, begin occasionally checking the internal temperature with a meat thermometer. For succulent 16

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GOOD

READS

S

BY SUZANNE LUCEY

pring brings such a feeling of hope and renewal. Longer days, windows open, and more time to be outside. Vaccines are being rolled out and there is even more hope that a “new normal” will soon be upon us. No matter what is happening this spring, reading can transport you to where you want to go.

CHILDREN

Those Are Not My Underpants! by Melissa Martin (Available May 11) One morning, Bear Cub wakes up to see a pair of underwear waving down at him from a tree. Always inquisitive, he seeks to solve the tighty whitey mystery of to whom those bloomers belong. What ensues is so hilarious that you will want to read this picture book again and again so you can enjoy the giggles of even the most reluctant underwear-wearer.

woman must be sacrificed to the legendary Wolf of the Wood in order to save her kingdom. But what is the Wolf? Are the fables real? Find out in this new fantasy novel.

ADULTS Under the Southern Sky by Kristi Woodson Harvey Under the Southern Sky is my all-time favorite Kristy Woodson Harvey book! This must-read from “the next major voice in Southern fiction” (as described by #1 New York Times bestselling author Elin Hilderbrand) shares a great deal of depth, reflection, and thoughtprovoking questions that hit home for so many. The characters are real, and you root for them all as they adjust to life’s best-laid plans gone accordingly to Murphy’s Law. Amelia and Parker are

Too Much Stuff! by Emily Gravett (Available June 22) Marie Kondo will make no appearance in this fun book as a pair of birds gather supplies to make their new homes comfortable. But when is it too much? Too Much Stuff! teaches that we can have too much stuff and that a home is made with love, not things.

YOUNG ADULTS Ace of Spades by Faridah Àbíké-Íyímídé (Available June 1) As described by publisher Feiwel & Friends, “with heart-pounding suspense and relevant social commentary comes a high octane thriller by debut author Faridah Àbíké-Íyímídé. Gossip Girl meets Get Out in this contemporary thriller about two students, Devon Richards and Chiamaka Adebayo, and their struggles against an anonymous bully.” And according to Aces, the anonymous bully, “All you need to know is ... I’m here to divide and conquer. Like all great tyrants do.” For The Wolf by Hannah Whitten For The Wolf is getting some serious buzz in the book world. Filled with fantasy and fables, it’s a wild ride. The story goes that a young 18

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the children of best friends and next-door neighbors. Life takes them for a ride, and those aforementioned best-laid plans die … and that is when real life unfolds. The Newcomer by Mary Kay Andrews (Available May 4) The Newcomer is Mary Kay Andrews – queen of the beach reads – at her finest. Her latest page-turner is full of romantic tension, murder, and crookedy crooks, featuring a beautiful little girl who is grieving for her mom and is protected by a toughas-nails aunt, a hunky cop, and a beautiful Florida beach. The Newcomer is paradise with an underlying chutzpah. Once again, Mary Kay supplies all the wit and sense of humor she has mastered while leading you into a den of murder. Local Woman Missing by Mary Kubica (Available May 18) Holy smokes Batman! I think I lost a couple years off my life with this book. Local Woman Missing wrapped around my neck, squeezing the whole way through. There were no clues to its mind-blowing ending – I need my fellow thriller lovers out there to read this ASAP so we can talk about it! Mary Kubica has always been a favorite of mine, but she has definitely upped the ante with this one. Her latest work is destined to be in every beach bag this summer (along with a flashlight and a baseball bat)! With Teeth by Kristen Arnett (Available June 1) What the heck are you making for dinner? How do you stay in love in a marriage? How do you talk to your teenager? These questions are so relatable and so run-of-the-mill, but With Teeth’s characters and the situations in which they end up are so not. This fun, unlike-no-other read will transport you to Florida and bake you in the absurd. Five Days: The Fiery Reckoning of an American City by Wes Moore Written by Wes Moore and journalist Erica Green, this telling of the Baltimore Rising in the spring of 2015 gives detailed points

CIRCA Magazine

of view from all sides, including a white district attorney, a black woman protesting her brother’s death, the executive vice president of the Baltimore Orioles, and the black captain of the police. Penguin Random House says, “Each shifting point of view contributes to an engrossing, cacophonous account of one of the most consequential moments in our recent history – but also an essential cri de coeur about the deeper causes of the violence and the small seeds of hope planted in its aftermath.” As described by Publishers Weekly, “Readers will be enthralled by this propulsive account.” It’s Always Freezer Season: How to Freeze Like a Chef with 100 Make-Ahead Recipes by Ashley Christensen The freezer is the secret weapon in the home kitchen of renowned Raleigh chef Ashley Christensen and her wife, cookbook author Kaitlyn Goalen. It makes a convenient 15-minute meal more delicious. It makes project cooking worth the effort. It makes grocery shopping less wasteful and more economical. And it enables Ashley and Kaitlyn to use food to support their friends and community. In It’s Always Freezer Season, they reveal how the freezer can easily become the single most important kitchen tool for a home cook. Within its pages, you’ll discover makeahead meal prep solutions to help you transform your kitchen workhorse into a fully provisioned pantry. Stock it with freezer pantry staples and use those staples to make cornbread panzanella with watermelon, cucumber, and za’atar vinaigrette; pan roasted chicken breast with preserved lemongarlic butter; and braised short ribs with cauliflower fonduta. Create make-ahead dishes, like pistachio croissant French toast with orange blossom soft cream, chicken and kale tortilla soup, and pimento mac and cheese custard, plus snacks, sweets, and drinks ready to be pulled out of the freezer and enjoyed at a moment’s notice.  Suzanne Lucey and her husband Dave own Page 158 Books, located at 415 S. Brooks St. in Wake Forest. She may be reached at 919435-1843 or visit www.page158books.com.

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MAKE UPDATES / UPGRADES TO THE HOME New grout, caulking, fresh paint, clean carpets, curb appeal, and new light bulbs are a few things you can do to give quick updates to your home. For bigger projects, if you are going to make updates to your home, focus on the kitchen and bathrooms. These are the areas where sellers are historically known to get the most out of their returns, if done right. Keep in mind that a timeless design – and a design that matches with the home as a whole – will always go a long way when it comes to any home projects. Great craftsmanship is also key!   With a resale home, updates may have already been made during the time that you or previous owners lived in it. Do you have an amazing outdoor living space? Share it! Do you have stunning built-in desks from a home improvement project? Showcase them! Any and all upgrades make a huge difference when selling a resale home.  

SHOWCASE THE ESTABLISHED NEIGHBORHOOD

Many times with new construction neighborhoods, there will be nearby construction happening for months. One of the frequently asked questions I receive from prospective buyers who look at new construction homes is “When will the construction be done?”

BY ALLISON CAUDLE ABBOTT

RESALE THE REWARDS OF

HOW TO COMPETE WITH NEW CONSTRUCTION IN TODAY'S HOT REAL ESTATE MARKET

I

n the Triangle area, there is an abundance of new construction homes for sale, and new construction neighborhoods are saturating Wake Forest, Rolesville, Raleigh, Youngsville, and beyond. It’s likely that prospective buyers who are looking at your resale home are also interested in one of those homes currently being built. Some may have the mindset of “It’s brand new! Wouldn’t I want that over a resale home?” While there are certainly many positives and advantages to buying new construction houses, I’m here to remind you that your home can still be a top contender in today’s hot real estate market. Following are a few detailed tips to help you compete against that brand-new house when selling your home. 20

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These neighborhoods can mean construction trucks, added noise, the inconvenience of narrow roads from additional vehicles, and debris. It also takes time for landscape components, like trees and bushes, to mature. In an established neighborhood, however, all construction is completed, and trees and landscaping are fully grown. Another aspect to keep in mind when considering a home in an established neighborhood is that the homeowner’s association and committees that host events and activities are likely already in place. Therefore, there are past events to promote and share with prospective buyers who are looking at your home.  

LOT SIZE

If your lot size is larger than what is being offered within many of today’s new construction neighborhoods, promote that as a positive. Outdoor living can be just as important to prospective buyers as indoor living. Take into account that many people are visual, when given the opportunity. So if your lot allows for a pool or amazing outdoor oasis, perhaps have a rendering done to showcase its full potential. This will help prospective buyers visualize what their dream property can look like.

STAGED TO SELL

Staging your home prior to having professional photographs taken and placing your home on the market is also a great way to allow others to feel a connection to it while searching for houses online or visiting for a showing. While some new construction homes are also staged, a lived-in and well-staged space can exude that warm “feels like home” emotion that buyers experience when they walk into a house and know it’s “the one.” Removing personal items from the home, decluttering from countertops, and keeping walkways open is crucial. Walls of a neutral color, fresh landscaping for curb appeal, and open windows will also help establish a fresh feel for a resale home.  

SHARE YOUR STORY

You know your home better than anyone else. As the seller, there are specific ways to be involved in the sales process. When homeowners share their stories, amazing things happen. The bond between a prospective buyer and a home portrayed through the heart of someone who has already loved it and created so many memories there is special. A new construction home doesn’t have those unique experiences.  Allison Caudle Abbott is the owner and broker-in-charge of Southern Lux Living, serving buyers and sellers throughout the Triangle. She may be reached at 919-395-6186 or visit www.southernluxliving.com.

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such as White Zinfandel. Not knocking that, but it must ferment longer … just saying! Food pairing: Oysters.

DIRECT PRESSING About three years ago, I won a trip to Chile (thank you for buying all of that Chilean wine that made that possible). I learned quite a bit about winemaking on that trip, but one of the processes that stuck with me the most is the way Calcu rosé is made. They do not re-use grapes from other wines; instead, they have specific vineyards dedicated solely to the rosé making program. In this scenario, fully ripened grapes are pressed about two-thirds of the way to create the rosé. While these versions can be lighter in color many times, they have the most flavor, because the drinker is experiencing the full power and taste of the original grape. Food pairing: Burgers with all the fixings, especially bacon and feta.

BY JOE O’KEEFE

ROSÉ ALL DAY

(AND YEAR)

When I opened my shop almost 13 years ago, I barely knew what rosé was. Today? Oh my word. Now it’s a year-round obsession! We have gone from two cases sold per year to almost 200 cases per year. And it’s no wonder ... North Carolina is the perfect state for enjoying a good rosé all day – and all year. Whether sipped on a cool wintery afternoon or savored on a sizzling summer night, rosé is always on the menu around here. The most-of-the-time great weather, the delicious food, and the stunning sunsets that abound make

T

rosé an integral part of wine drinking in the Tarheel state. here are four different ways rosé is made. Let’s take a peek behind the wine-making curtain and learn a bit about them. Of course, food pairing is a huge part of the taste of rosé, so some suggestions to enjoy with your favorite bottle will be added after each style.

LIMITED SKIN MACERATION

Most rosés are made this way. Basically, this process means that a red wine has already been made, but then its winemaker comes back and takes the skins of the grapes and soaks them. The soaking usually takes 24 to 48 hours. The remaining pigment of the grapes is left soaking to create pink juice. Then the juice is taken and ferments for a period of time, creating a dry wine. Shorter fermentation leads to more sugar, resulting in a sweeter version, 22

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SAIGNÉE METHOD

The saignée method literally refers to the bleeding of grapes or red wine already in the vats and fermenting. I asked Michael Hirby,BY TODD NELSO my good friend and outstanding winemaker and owner of Relic Wine Cellars, about his process. “We use the saignée method, simply because we don’t bring in any fruit explicitly for rosé. We try to bleed the vats as soon as possible.” He added there will not be much 2020 rosé from Relic this year, as there was not enough wine to sacrifice a little bit for it. I lobbied for it all! He usually uses Grenache, which is the main grape used in rosé from France, where the processes originated. Michael’s reference to 2020 brings up another valuable point about making rosé – because of the limited skin contact, it is best to buy rosé from the previous year in which you are living. This is a wine that is usually unstable and is not meant to age. That fresh bowl of strawberry nose and crispness is most effective when consumed out of the gate. Do not age! Food pairing: Barbecue, all the way.

BLENDING Yes, there is a fourth process – blending. However, due to many rules, particularly in Europe, this method is often frowned upon. The one exception? Champagne. Of course, Champagne, where the weather is terrible and most good Champagne is the result of blending multiple years together. Therefore, it is not a stretch to make sparkling blends of rosé. Food pairing: Salads, or by itself while meal prepping. Anyone who knows me and has read my previous articles in CIRCA is aware of my philosophy – if you think a wine tastes good, then it is. So now that spring is here and the chilly temperatures of winter are in our rearview mirror, get outside and enjoy our state’s amazing weather with a nice glass of rosé. Cheers!  Joe O’Keefe is the founder of Wine & Beer 101, located at 1228 Heritage Links Dr., #104 in Wake Forest. They are offering deliveries throughout Wake Forest, virtual tastings, and socially-distanced live music. Stop by anytime for a drink or to chat.

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ON


BACKYARD

OASES

MAKING THE OUTDOORS AN EXTENSION OF OUR INDOOR LIVING SPACES

BY MARGARITA COHEN

T

he emergence of spring’s warm weather brings a growing feeling that we might finally be turning the corner and are on the road to normalcy. However, as someone who spends a lot of time helping people enjoy their yards, there is one change that I hope will live on after this pandemic – how backyards have transformed into outdoor oases. Last summer, families were forced to spend more time at home. Travel plans were put on hold; many neighborhood pools were closed; and events like concerts, plays, and festivals were cancelled. As a result, the role of the backyard in our daily lives increased dramatically, and with that came an outdoor project boom. For example, deck projects grew by 275%, landscaping was up 238%, and fencing was increased 144% nationwide.

a masterplan and then slowly bite off smaller projects. This not only minimizes how much money you spend upfront, but it can also accelerate completion of the projects and will quickly increase the use of your outdoor oasis. This approach will work whether you are contracting someone to do the work for you or if you are tackling DIY projects. Regardless, some thoughts to consider are: – Lighting: In addition to extending the hours of use you can get from your outdoor space, lighting also enhances mood and beauty. Consider pathway lights, tree lights, or even string lights. Their type and placement will often depend on your choice of power supply, but there is also always the option of using solar lighting or tiki torches where power is not available.

During the pandemic, many began to view their home’s outdoor areas differently. The role of the backyard expanded simply beyond being a place where kids played or adults grilled, and it instead became a more integral part of our living spaces. Families spent more time in them than ever before. Will this trend continue? It’s likely that a post-vaccine world will make us more comfortable leaving our homes. The result of this could be that less time will be spent in the yard this year in comparison to last year. However, I do believe that our eyes have been opened from this experience, and I am convinced that the trend will continue. I know that making our backyards an extension of our living rooms is not just a passing fad. The first step in planning a backyard project is determining the space’s use. For example, are you looking to create an outdoor entertaining space or rather a cozy spot for intimate conversations? Do you want to enhance your grilling area or perhaps create a fullblown outdoor kitchen? You might even be considering a play space for kids or adults that could range anywhere from adding a new pool to simply creating more areas for games such as corn hole, horseshoes, or volleyball. Maybe you just want a private retreat where you can read, listen to music, or just sit and relax.

The stage is set for unlimited possibilities! At Kiddie Academy® of Wake Forest, we encourage your child to step out, be bold and act on their natural curiosity. We believe that sense of discovery helps nurture a love for learning that reaches beyond our walls and lasts a lifetime. Schedule your visit to find out more.

Now pre-enrolling at Kiddie Academy of Wake Forest 945 Gateway Commons Circle Wake Forest, NC 27587 kiddieacademy.com/wake-forest (984) 251-1550

For whichever project interests you, it is a great idea to start with 24

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– Plants and trees: Plants can be used as accents, borders, and even structural elements. Take advantage of the natural canopy provided by trees, or train plants to climb an arbor. Choose foliage to enhance your existing landscape design and the furniture you plan to use. – Furniture: Stackable and foldable chairs are excellent for smaller spaces. Other ideas include hammocks, pouf seats, and beanbag chairs. To complement your furniture, try designing shaded areas with patio umbrellas, canopies, drapes, or shade sails. – Flooring options: The right flooring can be a game changer, starting with the visual and aesthetic appeal. Flooring should be low-maintenance, durable, and slip resistant. – Partitions and divisions: Utilize hedges, lattice screens, vertical gardens, and fences to act as walls or partitions for privacy. – Outdoor storage: This may not be your first priority initially, but outdoor storage is still important, especially in spaces that serve multiple uses. You can use trolleys, crates, and even nifty built-in storage to go along with your typical sheds. For many projects, homeowners are turning to contractors for help. For more elaborate projects like a new pool, deck or patio, or outdoor kitchen, you might want the talents of an experienced professional. If you do, you will certainly not be alone. In a recent COVID-19 impact survey by Consumer Specialists, the role of contractors in projects grew substantially during the pandemic. This is great news for the contractors, but since they are so busy, it may be challenging to find one available for your project right now. With that said, for those smaller project goals you have in mind, you might go the do-it-yourself route. A quick Internet search can arm you with the tools you need to implement these tasks. One of my favorite sources for DIY projects, including ones for outdoor living spaces, is Pinterest. For tight areas, for example, you can discover many creative ideas like “how to build a Murphy bar” or a “tabletop fire bowl.” For you more ambitious do-ityourselfers, you can even find videos for projects such as building your own pergola, installing patio light poles, creating fire pits, and even making DIY games for the whole family. My goal is to help people enjoy their outdoor living spaces. I know firsthand just how awesome many have made their yards recently, and I have seen the great enjoyment the entire family gets from them. So now that spring is here, whether you’re looking to tackle a major project or a take on a small DIY task, I encourage you to make the most out of your outdoor living space. After all, “A yard is a terrible thing to waste.”  Margarita Cohen is the owner of Mosquito Joe of Raleigh – Durham – Chapel Hill, making “Outside Fun Again” with mosquito, tick, and flea control treatments for residential and commercial customers. For more information, or to schedule a treatment, call 919-926-8851 or visit Raleigh-Durham-Chapelhill.MosquitoJoe.com.

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COMMIT TO SELF-CARE TECHNIQUES Find techniques that allow you to decompress and nurture your mind and body. Both yoga and meditation can help clear your mind and alleviate stress. They can also be beneficial in reducing depression and anxiety. The benefits of getting enough sleep and eating healthy are well-documented, so try to maintain a regular sleep schedule and plan meals in advance. Remember that you deserve to be cared for – so go ahead and treat yourself to that massage or manicure and relax.

CREATE SOLUTIONS

BY ROBYN GOSS BENNAI

CARE

GIVING

I

A RESPONSIBILITY TO ONESELF

f you are a caregiver to an older adult or anyone in need of support, you know that it can be both rewarding and challenging. While the rewards include the time spent with the person knowing that he or she is loved, well cared for, and has the companionship you provide, the challenges can feel overwhelming. That being said, there are ways to reduce your stress and make caregiving a better experience for everyone involved. Caregivers often struggle to manage their time due to other responsibilities such as jobs, caring for children, and daily commitments. The stress caused by caregiving can result in financial difficulties, sleep deprivation, isolation, and depression. As a result, one of the most important aspects of caregiving is self-care. Managing your own self-care can feel impossible, but it is crucial to your well-being. Following are a few ways to alleviate some of the challenges that come along with taking care of another person.

DO WHAT MAKES YOU HAPPY Whether you enjoy reading, biking, or binge watching a new series, it is important that you carve out time for these activities. Spend time with people who bring you joy. Taking a walk or having lunch with a friend can prevent loneliness if you have been feeling isolated. Creating happy moments will give you a renewed sense of self and allow you to strike a balance between your life and caregiving. 26

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Many people feel guilty asking for help, or simply don’t know how to prioritize what kind they need. A great place to start is identifying areas of stress and then making a list of ways you can benefit from help. Do you need someone to be there as a companion in your place so you can attend to other obligations? Would assistance with doctor visits or outings be beneficial? Whatever tasks you determine would be most helpful, put your mind to creating a solution. Aid can come from community resources, businesses that specialize in caregiving, friends, and other family members. Knowing that you don’t have to carry the responsibilities alone will allow you to breathe and focus on some of the other ways to stay healthy.

KNOW THAT YOUR EMOTIONS ARE VALID Feelings of frustration, sadness, and even anger are often a result of feeling overwhelmed. Talking to a friend or loved one about your stress can alleviate those feelings by helping you process them. Sometimes, a professional therapist is needed to deal with any negative emotions that are persistent or you feel are detrimental to your mental health. Be aware of the signs of depression, such as not enjoying activities you previously enjoyed. You are not alone. According to a 2020 study conducted by AARP and National Alliance for Caregiving, there are more than 53 million adults who are providing unpaid care to an adult or child. Knowing that others are going through the same challenges allows you to feel understood and connects you to them. When you are aware that other people are facing the same obstacles and successfully navigating them, it provides a sense of hope. Once you are able to evaluate your own needs, set short- and longterm goals, and make changes accordingly. A short-term goal could include researching available resources or planning a better sleep schedule. While your long-term goals may feel formidable at times, stick to your plan and create changes as you can. In order to be the best caregiver you can be to someone of any age, you need to prioritize your health and emotional well-being.  Robyn Goss Bennai is the Naborforce lead for the greater Raleigh metro area. She may be reached at robyn@naborforce.com, or visit naborforce.com.

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BOATING

BASICS

BY THOMAS WALTERS

S

pring is here, boating season has arrived, and it’s time to take your vessel out for its first voyage of the year. But boat ownership comes with a lot of responsibility – from maintaining your boat to keeping your passengers safe. Whether you’ve just purchased your first watercraft or you’re a seasoned sailor, here are some tips and resources to help you enjoy your time on the water.

BUYING A BOAT Choosing a boat typically involves more than just price considerations. It’s also important to think about how you plan to use your boat, so you can determine what type best suits your needs. If you want to purchase a new boat, but aren’t quite sure where to start, your answers to the following four questions may help you narrow down your options and make your decision a little easier. 1. What do you want to do with your boat? Not all boats are appropriate for all activities. For example, sailing, fishing, cruising, and water sports may each require a different type of boat. So, consider how you envision spending time on the water. Will you be waterskiing or wakeboarding? Do you want to entertain friends and family? Will you spend nights on the boat? Make sure you really research the kind of boat that matches your needs and planned activities, as one type may not transition well to another. 2. What is your budget? Before you begin shopping for a boat, have a budget in mind. You need to know what you can afford in terms of price and, when applicable, monthly payments. You should consider the additional costs, such as fuel, maintenance, and insurance. Also, consider whether you’ll need to purchase a trailer to transport and store your boat. 3. What is the cost of owning a boat? The costs associated with owning a boat extend beyond its purchase price. You’ll need to keep these additional costs in mind: – Maintenance and operating costs: While the costs of boat maintenance vary, they are typically dependent on the size of the vessel and, when applicable, its engine. You’ll need to keep up with routine maintenance. Don’t forget to consider the costs of fuel and unexpected repairs, too. 28

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– Marina fees: If you keep your boat at a marina, you’ll be responsible for monthly fees. These fees are typically based on the size of the boat, where it is kept, and if the marina provides any additional services, such as cleaning. – Storage costs: If you store your boat for the winter, you will incur a seasonal or monthly fee that is typically based on its size, as well as whether it will be kept indoors or outside. – License and class fees: Many states require a boating safety class be taken before you can obtain a boating license, and you’ll be responsible for the fees for both. 4. What features do you actually need? It’s important to separate your boating wants from what you truly need. Determine which features you will actually use, as opposed to those that are just nice to have. You don’t want to pass up a boat or drive up your expenses over something you may not actually need. Knowing the answers to these questions when you’re buying your next boat can help make the process a little smoother. Knowing your budget, having an idea of the costs, and understanding which features are must-haves can help you find the right one.

BOAT MAINTENANCE AND CLEANING Already a boat owner? Taking steps to keep it clean and protected and performing some routine maintenance will help keep it looking good and performing well. Before you hit the water for the first time this season, ensure your boat and its equipment are in proper working order to avoid some unpleasant surprises. Specifically, inspect the hull and propellers for cracks, holes, damage, etc.; check the fuel and electrical systems to make sure they are in good working order; examine any belts, hoses, and cables, and tighten and replace as needed; and check the engine oil, power steering fluid, and coolant, topping off or replacing as needed (and change the oil and filter if you didn’t do so prior to storing your boat this past winter). If your boat was covered during the off-season, it may not need more than a quick cleaning with an all-purpose cleaner. If you notice heavier dirt and grime, use an appropriate cleaner to remove

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it. Once it’s clean, wax the boat with a heavy-duty polish that will last throughout the season. Also check the deck vinyl for any areas that may need repair, and apply a UV protectant to help prevent sun damage.

BOAT SAFETY Before you put the boat in the water, do a safety check. Make sure your life jackets are in good condition and that you have enough for all passengers (don’t forget to check the sizes and make sure they fit everyone – kids may have outgrown theirs during the winter). Ensure fire extinguishers are charged and that there is at least one working carbon monoxide detector in any enclosed or semi-enclosed area. Remember to check and restock your first aid kit. Is there anything else you can do to help make your trip safe and enjoyable? From completing a safety course to knowing what to do if bad weather strikes, it’s a good idea to prepare for the unexpected – just in case.

BOAT INSURANCE Even if you take every possible safety precaution and keep your boat in tip-top condition, unexpected situations may make waves in your boating plans. For instance, imagine you accidentally damage someone’s property with your vessel, another boat collides with yours, a passenger is injured, or your boat is stolen. Boat insurance may help you recover from situations such as these. Your insurance agent can help you understand how certain boat insurance coverages may help protect you and your boat. Boat owners have a lot to consider, but a little preparedness can go a long way. Armed with some basic knowledge of how to properly keep your boat maintained, you and your passengers safe, and your watercraft protected against certain risks, you can focus on the good times aboard.  Thomas Walters is the owner of Walters Insurance Agency (with offices located in both Wake Forest and Raleigh). Call 919-554-0267 or 919-848-8015 or email ThomasWalters@allstate.com for help with all of your insurance needs.

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D OW N TOW N

WAKE FOREST LIVE IT UP IN DOWNTOWN!

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his spring, head on down to Downtown Wake Forest and discover all that awaits ... whether you’re looking to grab a bite to eat or a cup of coffee, do some shopping, listen to some music, and more, you’re sure to find it here. It’s “Where Quaint Meets Cool” _ so come explore this unique variety of businesses, restaurants, shops, and more for yourself ... you’ll be glad you did!

www.wakeforestdowntown.com


̶ Janice Originals Jewelry

̶ Backporch Pottery

̶ Pink Lady Candles

̶ Pretty Practical

̶ Keepsakes By Kim

̶ Time Step Boutique

̶ Jennifer Niesel Designs

̶ Wiener Dog Pottery

̶ MD Furniture Rehab & Sales ̶ Positively Lettering ̶ Jeanne Steck - Gems By Jeanne Marie

̶ Dick Larsen Pet Portraits ̶ Closet Sikeology ̶ Reflect Gifts & Decor

̶ Wine and Rita’s

̶ Carolina Clover

̶ Storybook Cottage

̶ Saving Grace

̶ The Budding Artist

̶ Urban Mercanitile

̶ And many more!

̶ Lola + Jane

̶ The Artists’ Loft

̶ BJS Design Studio

#WHEREQUAINTMEETSCOOL

COME DISCOVER IT FOR YOURSELF!


A JOINT

EFFORT

IMAGE-GUIDED STEROID/ANESTHETIC INJECTIONS TO TREAT CHRONIC JOINT PAIN

Osteoarthritis and chronic joint pain impact more than 25 million Americans. If you’re a sufferer, you know how this pain can hinder your daily life, holding you back from your normal, daily activities. Maybe you’ve had to give up walking or golfing with friends because your ankles or knees won’t allow you to keep up. Maybe it has become too difficult to play with your children or grandchildren because your joints

benefits to having the treatment administered by a board-certified musculoskeletal radiologist who has image-guided technology at his or her fingertips. Using ultrasound or low dose imaging, a radiologist can see directly into the joint to ensure the treatment is placed correctly every time. Image-guided joint injection therapy can also be used to diagnose the site of pain, control pain in non-surgical candidates, diminish pain to allow patients to begin physical

continue to ache. Or maybe your yard and garden have suffered because mowing grass, weeding, and trimming hedges

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are impossible with pain in your shoulders, elbows, or wrists. cute and chronic joint pain are common conditions that can certainly put a damper on life. Often this type of pain is caused by an acute inflammatory process or trauma – such as a sports or overuse injury – or a chronic, degenerative disorder such as rheumatoid arthritis or osteoarthritis. It may be that you have already tried conservative therapy for your pain, such as over-the-counter medication, physical therapy, massage, heat packs, stretching, and/or even acupuncture, but nothing seems to work. Fortunately, there is another option that doesn’t involve surgery.

IMAGE-GUIDED STEROID/ANESTHETIC JOINT INJECTIONS For chronic joint pain sufferers, steroid injections can provide fast and long-lasting relief. These injections typically comprise of a short-acting anesthetic and long-acting corticosteroid – which allows patients to feel relief almost instantly. It’s a safe and effective pain relief method that comes with minimal side effects. While these injections are often given by orthopedic doctors, rheumatologists, or even in some cases, primary care physicians, there are 32

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therapy or exercise, and eliminate or delay surgical intervention. “Radiologists will always use image guidance to confirm that the injection is going directly into the affected joint – where it will have the greatest impact,” explains Dr. Jeffrey Browne, a musculoskeletal radiologist with Raleigh Radiology. “X-ray guidance allows us to see inside the body in real-time, leading directly to the appropriate treatment location. This more exact science has been shown to have better outcomes compared to blind injections. It’s quick, more accurate, more effective, and reduces risk of complications.”

THE APPOINTMENT – QUICK AND EASY From start to finish, a patient having joint injection therapy will likely spend less than 30 minutes in the imaging center. He or she will lie down on a table and be prepped for the procedure by a radiologic technician. A musculoskeletal radiologist will then enter the room and discuss the procedure with the patient. He or she will confirm the correct joint for treatment and also explain the risks and benefits of the injection, before sterilizing and draping the injection site and applying a local anesthetic. Once confirming the needle is in the correct location by ultrasound or fluoroscopy, the radiologist will then inject a shortacting anesthetic and an intermediate to long-acting corticosteroid into the joint. Complications are infrequent.

designdevelopment.com

919-848-4474

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IMMEDIATE RELIEF AND LONG-TERM RESULTS In general, a patient will feel immediate relief of his or her symptoms but may be sore for one or two days after the injection until the long-term steroid becomes effective. Patients with an acute inflammatory condition or trauma may only need one injection; however, patients with arthritis or chronic conditions may need multiple. Three to four injections can be given per year, and they typically provide three to six months of pain relief. “As musculoskeletal radiologists, we are well-trained in performing these injections for multiple joints, including shoulders, elbows, wrists, hips, knees, ankles, and feet,” adds Dr. Browne. “During each appointment, I enjoy the opportunity for facetime with my patients, as well as the ability to relieve their pain using such a simple procedure.”  If you have been experiencing persistent joint pain and feel imageguided injections may be the right option for you, speak with your primary care physician, orthopedist, or rheumatologist, or contact a Raleigh Radiology’s imaging center near you directly today (919-781-1437). Jeffrey Browne, MD is a board-certified musculoskeletal radiologist and medical director with Raleigh Radiology. He earned his medical degree from the University of Connecticut School of Medicine and completed his fellowship at Duke University Medical Center. He has been with Raleigh Radiology since 2008.

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For this project, you will need a long sock (no holes!), rice, embroidery thread, ribbon, pom-poms, scissors, a marker, and a hot glue gun (socks of spring colors are great to use for this craft). To begin, make the body by filling the sock with rice to just below the heel area, then tying off with the embroidery thread. Next, create the head by filling the heel area with rice, tying this off as well. The ears will come next – cut straight down the middle of the ankle piece to make two ears. At the end of each, cut and shape the material so that it resembles a pointed ear. Tie a coordinating ribbon around the bunny’s neck. Using your marker, draw its eyes, nose, mouth, and whiskers. Finally, glue the pom-pom onto the bunny’s “bottom.” If you want to take this project a bit further, use embellishments such as black rhinestones or “googly” eyes, a small pink pom-pom for the nose, and twine or yarn for the whiskers. You’ve now got a sock bunny crafted with love! May welcomes a special day for honoring all the lovely ladies in our lives. I like to make Mother’s Day gifts that can be enjoyed all year long, to remind these women how much they are loved and appreciated. Herbs are so popular and easy to grow, allowing you to have fresh flavor enhancers right at your fingertips. Not only that, but they are also attractive and many have a wonderful scent. A potted herb is so simple, yet so lovely. For this springtime gift, head to the nearest garden center, pick out an herb, and grab some potting soil. Rosemary, thyme, and dill are great options, but consider

BY DOLORES RIGGINS

RENEW AND

REFRESH

WITH SPRINGTIME DIY FUN

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hhh … spring. Its warm weather, fabulous flowers, and spectacular sunshine inspire us to spruce up our homes after a cold, wet winter. It’s a time for fun and whimsy, a time to freshen and brighten our surroundings. It’s a time to show our loved ones how much we care (yes, Mother’s Day is right around the corner … don’t forget!). And it’s a time to create and craft! So if your creative side is busting at the seams, but you need a little DIY inspiration, I’ve crafted a few simple ideas to help out. Spring always makes me think of cute little bunnies, as they are always happily hopping through my yard this time of year. So naturally, crafting homemade sock bunnies comes to mind. These simple, no-sew little guys are so adorable, and are sure to bring “hoppiness” to “somebunny” special. They can also be used as book rests, set atop a bookshelf or end table, and would make the cutest favor for a bunny-themed baby shower. 34

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what you think that lucky lady will like. Stop by your favorite dollar store and pick up a plain coffee mug. (A clay pot can also be used, perhaps decorated with little one’s thumbprints in the shape of a flower.) Then simply plant the herb in the coffee mug, adding extra potting soil to fill the cup. Be sure to push down the soil as you add it so that the roots have something in which to grow. For that extra touch of love, tie a pretty bow around the cup. Add a sweet note, and don’t forget to stick the herb’s care instructions in the mug as well. You have quickly created a special gift that is not only functional, but will remind your loved one of you every time she looks at it. As June rolls around, my thoughts immediately turn to decking out my house in patriotic décor. What’s better than red, white, and blue decorations to prepare us for summer and all the good times coming up? I love fabric, but can’t sew a lick! However, I have found another simple no-sew craft that is fun and super cute, and allows me to tap into my love for it – fabric garland. This simple craft that can adorn your mantel is a perfect way to showcase your patriotism. To get started, select up to 10 different red, white, and blue fabrics (fat quarters are perfect for this). Choose different patterns – chevron, gingham check, stripe, polka dots, whatever you prefer (try to have at least two solids). Some fabrics may need to be cut –

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if so, a quarter of a yard is perfect. The only other material you need is twine. Begin by cutting the fabric into 15-inch strips, one to one-and-a-half inches wide. Next, cut the twine to the length you desire. It can be any size that you want, but for reference, bunting for a fireplace mantel is generally 48 inches long. Be sure to add about eight inches to the length of twine so you will be able to tie it off and attach. Now it’s time to start attaching the fabric strips. Make sure that the “pretty” side of the fabric is facing out. Fold the strips in half so that the ends touch, forming a loop at the top. Place the loop one inch above the twine. Then pull the ends of the twine through the loop to attach. Pull down gently, and then tug on both ends to tighten around the twine. Repeat this process until you have a beautiful garland. I don’t go in any particular order, but you certainly can. If you find you really enjoy crafting fabric garland, these DIY decorations are perfect for hanging in a nursery or child’s bedroom, make fun and festive backdrops for a shower or graduation party (especially in the school’s colors), and are perfect for any holiday or birthday celebration. I hope that you find these springtime projects as much fun to craft as I do. They are easy and affordable, but equally awesome and enjoyable. Here’s to a beautiful spring season from me to you!  Dolores Riggins is the co-owner of Southern Suds & Gifts, featuring over 35 craftsmen and artists, located at 213 S. White St. in Downtown Wake Forest (www.facebook.com/SouthernSudsAndGifts).

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BY GRACE LOWER

DRIVEABLE DESTINATION THE EDENTON EXPERIENCE Edenton, North Carolina – the prettiest small town in the South. Home to amazing architecture, long-standing lighthouses, historic homesites, and more, Edenton is surely a sight to behold. Located in Chowan County, Edenton has played a thorough role in North Carolina’s vast history. While Chowan County is NC’s smallest geographical county at only 233 square miles, its position as “the cradle of the colony,” as well as its many modern-day attractions, exem-

The picturesque waterfront town played a major role in colonial America, as it was home to many famous patriots and revolutionaries, as well as important figures in state and national government. A distinguishable historical event is the Edenton Tea Party of October 1774. Fifty-one women conducted the protest against taxation without representation. Penelope Barker is credited with gathering the women and information needed to organize the event; today, the Penelope Barker house is a landmark and welcome center. Visit the building for maps, trolley and tour information, and a gift and book shop. In addition to the beautiful Barker House, other historic sites include: – 1767 Chowan County Courthouse, described as the most intact colonial courthouse in the U.S.; – 1886 Roanoke River Lighthouse, which operated from 1887 to 1941; – Cupola House, built in 1758 by Francis Corbin, an agent of Lord Granville (one of eight Lords Proprietors); – Iredell House Homesite, home of NC Superior Court Judge, American Revolution Attorney General, and Associate Justice of the first US Supreme Court James Iredell, and birthplace of son NC Governor James Iredell Jr.; – St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, the second oldest church in North Carolina, with a historic cemetery; – Civil war sites, including: War on the Chowan River/Buffalo, Battle of the Albemarle Sound on Edenton Harbor, and the Edenton Bell Battery; – Edenton Cotton Mill Historic District, consisting of 57 mill houses, office and industrial buildings, and First Christian Church, all dating to the late 1800s/early 1900s; – Maritime Underground Railroad, which helped enslaved people escape via ships. Abolitionist Harriet Jacobs’ escape from slavery in 1842 is one of very few written accounts. With its multitudinous must-sees, Edenton is guaranteed to provide an enjoyable and educational experience. However, not only does the quaint town have wonderful sights, it has plenty of activity to keep you moving. Put on your walking shoes and partake in a guided or self-guided tour, or travel on a tranquil trolley ride.

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plify quality over quantity. isit Edenton shares that Chowan County was founded in 1668 by English settlers, and was originally named Shaftesbury Precinct of Albemarle County. Around 1681, the area was given the name the Chowan Precinct, after the Chowan River and Chowanoac Indians native to the region (alongside the Weapemeoc Indians). Edenton, the seat of the county, was initially known as Roanoke and later the Town of Queen Anne’s Creek; finally, it was renamed Edenton after NC Governor Charles Eden when the town was incorporated in 1722. 36

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Absorb the peaceful ambience of Edenton through birdwatching, golfing, or exploring luscious walking trails. Looking for something with a little thrill? Kayaking, canoeing, stand-up paddleboarding, fishing, boating, and sailing in the Chowan River and Albemarle Sound are great fun for the whole family. (Watersport gear is available for rent through Edenton Town Harbor.) And the outdoor enthusiast might try camping at Bennett’s Millpond, or Holladay’s Island or John’s Island Camping Platforms. Also, the Wharf Landing Marina is a full-service marina with many accommodations available, including slip rentals. It is evident that Edenton has plenty to keep visitors entertained. To make the trip comfortable and easy all-around, the town hosts a variety of places to stay. Choose from one of the stunning historic inns, or reserve a lovely vacation rental. Additionally, hotels, motels, boat slips, and RV campgrounds are available as well. As for

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dining, Edenton has a large selection of local coffee shops, luncheonettes, restaurants, and fine dining facilities for any occasion you desire. Not to mention, Edenton is a short two-hour drive from Wake Forest via US-64 E, making it a great destination for weekend getaways and weeklong trips alike. All in all, Edenton’s presence as a picturesque yet prominent community is sure to provide a memorable visit. The vast historical significance of the town, coupled with its modern amenities and activities, makes the Edenton experience a perfect “Driveable Destination.”  Many thanks to Visit Edenton and the Edenton-Chowan County Tourism Development Authority (visitedenton.com) for providing much of the information included in this article, and to Kip Shaw Photography for the featured photos. Grace Lower is a senior at Heritage High School, and is part of the CIRCA family by birth, and now by interning. Grace enjoys dance, theater, science, and all things outdoors.

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BARIATRIC

SURGERY YOUR TOOLKIT FOR SUCCESS

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BY STACY KROPP, PA-C

ariatric surgery is an excellent tool for managing obesity, but it is not effective alone. It takes continued hard work and dedication to lifestyle changes in order to realize and maintain substantial weight loss and to avoid or control chronic diseases, such as diabetes, high blood pressure, or cancer. Regardless of where you are in your bariatric surgery journey, stock your toolbox with the following tools.

who do not get enough sleep actually eat more than people who sleep adequately. So how much is enough? Information on CDC.gov indicates that adults need a minimum of seven hours of sleep per night. Nationally, greater than 33% of all adults are not getting this minimum each night. There is some really interesting work that has been done in this area, including evidence that your food choices may also be driven by lack of sleep.*

NUTRITION

The relationship status of obesity and mental health issues should be described as “it’s complicated.” Evidence supports a correlation with the onset of depression and obesity and obesity with the onset of depression. It’s a classic chicken-or-egg situation. Depression predicts reduced success with weight loss. There is also a reduction in depression symptoms associated with weight loss. At the same time, there are links between anxiety and PTSD with weight gain. The biochemical mechanisms at play here, some of which we understand and some of which we don’t, make the relationship between weight management and mental health very complicated. But what we do know is that when we improve our mental health, improvements in our physical health often follow. Seeing a therapist or psychologist or having a spiritual leader who is trained in counseling can be hugely beneficial. Remember your support team: talk with your primary healthcare provider or bariatric provider for community resources that may help. Take time to tend to your mental health and look for ways to incorporate people who support your mental well-being into your life. 

Bariatric surgery will help you feel more satisfied with less food. Committing to a diet full of nutritious options is the best choice for getting the building blocks that your body needs after surgery. Choose nutritionally-dense foods – foods that are rich in protein, supplemented with non-starchy vegetables – to form the basis of your meals and snacks. Serving sizes after bariatric surgery are much smaller, so you will also need to consistently take your bariatric vitamin and mineral supplements to ensure that you are getting adequate nutrition. Don’t forget your support team: schedule an appointment with your bariatric dietitian to check in early and often.

FITNESS Another key to long-term weight maintenance and chronic disease management following bariatric surgery is exercise. This does not mean that you have to run a marathon (unless you want to), but it does mean that you should look for ways to be more active. Incorporate things you enjoy or be creative in how you get in your fitness: dancing, walking, and hiking are great options. Or try something new – whether it’s a different setting or a new activity. Are you interested in power lifting, ballroom dancing, yoga, softball, kickball, or martial arts? Are you the kind of person who likes to take a solo walk on the greenway, or are you more motivated by being part of a class? Are you interested in more one-on-one or small group training environments? A bariatric fitness specialist can help you create or further develop a fitness plan.

SLEEP According to the CDC, some research has found that a shortened sleep duration results in metabolic changes that may be linked to obesity. The American Heart Association reports that people 38

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MENTAL HEALTH

*If you want to learn more about how sleep effects weight, visit the WakeMed Voices blog (wakemedvoices.com) and type WakeMed surgeon Dr. David Pilati in the search box to read his blog post. Stacy Kropp is a certified physician assistant with WakeMed Bariatric Surgery & Medical Weight Loss, specializing in surgical weight loss, nutrition, and wellness. WakeMed Bariatric Surgery & Medical Weight Loss is dedicated to educating the community and providing the surgical and non-surgical tools necessary to begin and continue along a weight loss journey. Patients are supported by board-certified physicians with expertise in medically-directed weight loss and a multidisciplinary team of diet, exercise, and wellness specialists. To learn more, visit wakemed.org/weight-loss.

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A CLEAN

SLATE THE ULTIMATE SPRING CLEANING CHECKLIST

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BY TODD NELSON

pring means spring cleaning. There are many things you need to deep clean at least once or twice a year, both for health and safety reasons and to preserve the long-term value of your home and furnishings. So here is a checklist to tackle that deep spring clean.

BEDROOMS

– Linens: clean and stow heavy comforters and blankets; swap in spring/summer bedding. – Under/behind beds and dressers: move and vacuum/dust. – Mattresses: vacuum, flip, and rotate. – Carpets/rugs: shampoo and/or steam clean. – Wood floors: fill scratches/inspect sealant to determine if resealing is needed (typically once every three to five years). – Light fixtures: remove and dust lamp shades, bases, and cords; remove and clean overhead fixtures. – Closets: purge, organize, and turn over for spring/summer clothes. – Picture frames/mirrors: remove and dust, check color contrast to determine if walls need washing. – Walls: wash or spot clean fingerprints and other marks, inspect paint to decide if repainting or touchups are needed. – Vent covers: remove and wash or dust. – Ceiling: inspect to decide if repainting is needed/dust any overhead beams, light fixtures, ceiling fans, etc. – Window treatments/blinds: remove and clean, including hardware.

KITCHEN – Refrigerator/freezer: deep clean as recommended, two to four times per year. – Garbage disposal/drains: de-clog and deep clean. – Cupboards: remove all items, discard expired or stale items, wash shelves and all outer surfaces. – Drawers: remove and organize contents, wash inside and outside surfaces, clean and tighten grimy/loose hardware. – Food storage: sort, match containers to lids, discard orphan items. – Small appliances (toaster, coffee maker, mixer, etc.): deep clean. – Oven/oven racks/stove/drip pans: deep clean as recommended two to four times per year.

BATHROOMS – Medicine chest/vanity drawers/cabinets: remove all contents, discard overused and expired items (including makeup, toothbrushes, flossers, etc.); clean inside before replacing contents. – Drains: de-clog and deep clean. – Grout: inspect and decide whether to clean or re-grout. – Light fixtures/fans: remove covers and deep clean. – Walls/ceiling: inspect to decide if cleaning and/or repainting is needed. – Behind/inside toilet tank and around base/bolts: deep clean. – Bathmats, shower curtains, curtain liners, and hardware: inspect to determine if any need deep cleaning and/or replacing. 40

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– Light fixtures: remove, wash, and replace covers. – Behind/under refrigerator and other moveable appliances: sweep, dust, and/or vacuum. – Walls: wash or spot clean fingerprints and other marks; inspect paint to decide if repainting or touchups are needed. – Backsplashes: deep clean and degrease. – Vents/fans: deep clean and degrease.

LIVING/FAMILY ROOM – Window treatments/blinds: remove and clean, including hardware. – Walls/woodwork: wash or spot clean fingerprints and other marks, inspect to decide if repainting or touchups are needed. – Carpets/rugs: shampoo and/or steam clean. – Wood floors: fill scratches/inspect sealant to determine if resealing is needed (typically once every three to five years). – Light fixtures: remove and dust lamp shades, bases, and cords; remove and clean overhead fixtures. – Ceiling fans: dust or wash blades and housing. – Furniture upholstery: remove cushions, vacuum, inspect to decide if professional steam cleaning is needed. – Behind/underneath TVs, stereo equipment, entertainment consoles: dust, de-tangle/organize cords, disinfect remotes.

LAUNDRY – Washer: sanitize washer drum, inspect for and clean away mold, mildew, and detergent buildup. – Dryer: deep clean tumbling drum, remove back and vacuum out all lint-clearing apparatus (as recommended at least two to four times per year).

HOME OFFICE – Physical papers/filing cabinets: sort, declutter, shred. – Behind/under desks and other furniture: vacuum or dust. – Computers/keyboard: dust, clean screens, organize cords.

BASEMENT/GARAGE/ATTIC – Replace HVAC filters. – Sweep/vacuum/dust, as these spaces rarely get cleaned. – Inspect/replace any filters or devices used for controlling moisture.

MISCELLANEOUS – Fireplaces/wood/pellet stoves: have professionally cleaned. – HVAC systems/vent work: have professionally serviced. – Windows: wash inside and out, including sills, frames, and screens. – Smoke/CO detectors: check batteries and test. – Linen/other storage closets: purge, organize, and turnover for spring/summer. – Stairways: deep clean.  Todd Nelson is the owner of MaidPro of Raleigh and Wake Forest. Visit www.maidpro.com/raleigh-north or call 919-871-9996.

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hy am I talking about mint, you ask? Because this treat’s bright flavor and invigorating scent adds the perfectly refreshing accompaniment to a delicious spring menu.

Mint’s culinary uses run the gamut from appetizers to desserts to garnishes to sauces to beverages. It is delicious when served fresh and is easy to preserve for future enjoyment as well. Toss onto a fruit salad for an added pop of flavor. Or if you happen to be a northern transplant, perhaps top a leg of lamb with mint jelly (not my favorite, but I’m not judging if that’s your cup of tea). Why not give a cool mint julep or a mojito a whirl on a nice warm spring evening?

BY BUCK BUCHANAN

ENJOY-

MINT Mint. There are more than 7,500 types of it. It’s a very popular

plant, as well as a popular flavoring – peppermint, spearmint, chocolate mint, lemon mint, globe mint, and more. Most are easy to plant, very hardy, and self-propagating (meaning that they will grow more plants on their own). With that said, mint will take over wherever it is planted. While I am not a horticulturist, I do grow plenty of this plant. If you are looking to cultivate mint around here, you may want to touch base with the Wake Forest Garden Club (wfgardenclub.org/ contact). I am sure they can help you more than I can. 42

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If the many varieties, ease of growth, and culinary uses weren’t enough, you’ll be happy to know that mint is good for you! Let me start with the obvious … mint stops bad breath in its tracks. Sure, it’s not a cure – but chew a leaf and those stolen kisses will surely be returned. Also, it’s high in vitamin A, iron, manganese, and folate, and its antioxidants help protect cells from damage caused by free radicals. In addition, mint also aids in digestion, as it has been proven to contain menthol (go figure) which relieves the symptoms of stomach pains, gas, bloating, and bowel problems (all part of irritable bowel syndrome). Not to mention, it relaxes the muscles of the digestive tract. The aroma of mint is one of its biggest pluses. I love to walk by and run my hand across a mint plant. I also plant a low-growing variety among the grass in my yard so that when I mow, the scent of my lawn is most pleasing. The smell is good for mental health and improves the memory. For those of you with “spirited” children, mint increases alertness and decreases frustration, anxiety, and fatigue. Remember, I am a chef, not a doctor, so don’t quit taking your medications and start sniffing or eating mint. And certainly don’t start smoking it! This spring, make the most of all that mint has to offer – use that green thumb of yours and grow your own, or pick some up at your favorite grocery store or local farmers market. Either way, the many flavors of mint provide the perfect ingredient for the perfectly refreshing springtime recipe. Mint Syrup – 1 cup filtered water – 1 cup sugar – 1 cup fresh mint leaves Combine water, sugar, and mint leaves in a saucepan. Bring to a boil, stirring until sugar dissolves. Simmer for one minute. Remove from heat and let syrup steep for 30 minutes. Pour into a sterilized

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jar through a strainer and let cool. Store in refrigerator until use. Mint Extract – 1 cup mint leaves – 1 cup 100 proof Everclear Mix mint leaves with Everclear in a sterilized jar (make sure all the leaves are covered). Place the jar in a sunny spot and let steep for at least a month. Strain and store until needed. Mint Julep – 4 mint leaves – ¼ ounce mint syrup – 2 ounces bourbon In a rocks glass, muddle mint leaves in the mint syrup, add bourbon, and pack with crushed ice. Stir and garnish with a mint leaf. Mint Brownie Sundae – Use your favorite brownie recipe or boxed brownie mix – 3 tablespoons mint extract – Vanilla ice cream* – Hot fudge – Whipped cream

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Add mint extract to your brownie recipe and bake as instructed. Let cool (but not too much, since a warm brownie is awesome). Place a scoop of vanilla ice cream atop, smother with hot fudge, add a dollop of whipped cream, and garnish with a sprig of mint. You can find my recipes for hot fudge and whipped cream in past issues of CIRCA Magazine, available online at circamagazine.com.  Buck Buchanan is the owner of Lumpy’s Ice Cream, located at 306 Wait Avenue in Downtown Wake Forest. * Visit Lumpy’s Ice Cream for fresh vanilla ice cream, and their many other unique, fresh, all-natural flavors. You can also find Lumpy’s online at lumpysicecream.com, on Facebook (LumpysIceCream), and on Instagram (thelumpysicecream).

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BY JONATHAN DANIEL

FLIPPING LIKE A PRO

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lipping real estate has become trendy and fun thanks to house flipping shows like Flip or Flop and Love It or List It, just to name a couple. These shows are great for entertainment and give viewers ideas for updating their homes. But many people become inspired and take on flipping, only to realize it’s not for them. Having worked with investors whose business is flipping houses, I think there are a few things that are important to consider when contemplating it. When people begin looking at homes as potential flip properties, there are many components of the total investment. First, you need to have a realtor run comparative analyses around the property. Once you look at the report, it is important to determine your goal price for purchase, your rehab cost, and the resale value of the home. Each of these are critical for understanding how much capital you will need to successfully execute the project.  Purchase price is important, as you don’t want to overpay for a property that you’re trying to flip and from which you want to make a profit. Many houses seem like they are affordable because they are cheaper than those around them. It’s important to consult a realtor who can figure out the expected value of a dilapidated home in the area you are looking to buy. Many homes that are perfect for flipping will be listed above what you would want to pay for such a project. Along with a realtor, it’s important to work with a contractor whom you trust to give you a fair and accurate cost on materials and labor. Rehab cost is the next factor you need to consider. Many people believe they can DIY through a rehab project – but unless you are a licensed contractor, I don’t suggest flipping a house on your own. 44

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Working with licensed contractors is necessary, as they have certifications and expertise in the property industry, and can therefore ensure proper construction regulation. This is important, especially for the resale of the home, as all work can be certified as completed by a licensed contractor. Once you have selected a trustworthy contractor, I suggest you have him or her walk the property of interest and share your vision for the project. Discussing your ideas will help you and your contractor predict the rehab cost, and can determine what aspects of your project are doable. Additionally, while you may have the cost of the project covered, you’ll want to have reserve funds available. Having worked personally with a couple of flippers, I can attest to the fact that budgets can be exceeded once drywall comes down and you begin looking at the “bones” of the house. Avoid running into financial trouble by saving a reserve fund to help overcome hurdles as they arrive.  The final component of a successful house flip is figuring out the resale plan for your newly improved property. Your realtor will help you determine whether the scope of work that you and the contractor envisioned will result in a higher price point for the home. Therefore, it is important to have your team working together to come up with prices to make your flip profitable. Once you and your partners have a plan of action for highest profitability, your realtor can assist you in making the purchase – and the work can begin!  As I just stated, you need to work with a realtor and contractor whom you trust will make flipping profitable for you. These two roles are critical for your flip and will help to make the process easier by serving as “project managers.” Your realtor can guide you in understanding area trends and help make selections that will appeal to potential buyers. You will also need his or her assistance in making sure your selections won’t under- or over-price you in the neighborhood in which you are working. Your contractor partner will work with you to make projects as cost effective as possible, and ideally won’t mark up your costs too significantly. Finding a reliable licensed contractor is critical in making your flip projects profitable and turning the property around in a timely manner.  Ultimately, flipping can be a very profitable business if you have the right components. Remember that you should always have a reserve to cover inevitable surprises that may pop up. Furthermore, build the right group of realtor, contractor, and team members to help you deal with those surprises and enjoy the overall house flipping adventure right along with you. Finding success in the flipping business begins with planning and networking to find those right people. So, if you’re able to gather a great team, find a high-potential property, and prepare for the process, you should be ready to start your journey toward fabulously flipped homes.  Jonathan Daniel is a realtor with Bespoke Realty Group at Next Stage Realty, LLC. He may be reached at 919-897-4501.

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COOKED IN TRADITION

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any thanks to our loyal readers for sharing recipes that bring us together – and nothing says camaraderie like enjoying a splendid springtime cookout! This edition of “Cooked In Tradition” features these savory and sweet recipes that are perfect for savoring all the sweet moments of a beloved backyard barbecue. As you whip up these delicious dishes, please feel free to share compliments, photos, or recipes of your own by emailing them to info@circamagazine.com. Who knows? Your recipe just might be featured in an upcoming issue!

SPICED BACON WRAPPED SHRIMP – 1 pound 16-20 count shrimp – 10 strips bacon, cut in half – 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil – 2 teaspoons fresh squeezed lime juice – 2 tablespoons spicy seasoning* – 1 quart brine * Seasoning suggestions: Mild: Dizzy Pig Pineapple Head Medium: Heath Riles Garlic Jalapeño Medium+: Meat Church Holy Voodoo

REVERSE SEARED TRI-TIP – Tri-tip roast, typically 2-3 pounds – 1 tablespoon vegetable oil or olive oil – Your favorite steak seasoning or BBQ rub* * Seasoning suggestions: Sauced BBQ Company All-In Obi Cue Double Garlic Pepper Dizzy Pig Red Eye Express

Trim any excess fat and sliver skin off of tri-tip. Before seasoning, look closely at the tri-tip. This cut has two distinctly different grain patterns; make note of where the grain changes direction for slicing later. Apply a light coat of oil on the meat, followed by seasonings. If possible, let tri-tip rest in refrigerator for 1-2 hours.

Setup grill for two-zone cooking. For gas grills, light burners on one side only; for charcoal, place lit coals on one side only. Preheat to 425 degrees F. For the brine, combine all ingredients in a medium plastic bowl. Whisk until sugar and salt are dissolved. Refrigerate until cool. Peel and devein shrimp leaving the bottom of the tail on. Add the shrimp to the brine and place in refrigerator for 20-30 minutes. Remove shrimp from brine, rinse, and pat dry. Combine olive oil, lime juice, and seasoning rub in a small bowl and stir well. Brush mixture onto shrimp, wrap with ½ slice bacon, and secure with a toothpick.

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Slide shrimp on skewers leaving a small space between each. Tip: double prong skewers to keep shrimp in place when turning on the grill. Grill on unlit side of grill for about 20 minutes until bacon is fully cooked. Turn skewers after 10 minutes. If you prefer crispier bacon, place skewers on hot side of grill for additional 20-30 seconds per side.

Prepare grill for indirect cooking and preheat to 250 degrees F. For gas grills, light burners on one side only; for charcoal, place lit coals on one side only.

For the brine: – 4 cups warm water – ¼ cup salt – ¼ cup sugar

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Cook on unlit side of grill until internal temperature reaches 120 degrees F, about 60-75 minutes. Optional: Add a smoke generator such as wood chips, a pellet tube, or Grill Kickers. Remove tri-tip and raise grill temperature to 550-600 degrees. Sear tri-tip on hot side of grill about 3 minutes per side until it reaches an internal temperature of 130 degrees F. Cook longer if you prefer more than medium rare. Remove tri-tip from grill, cover loosely with foil, and let rest about 10 minutes. Slice tri-tip in half where the grain changes direction. Thinly slice each half perpendicular to grain and serve. Thanks to Kevin Kopec, pitmaster and instructor for GrillBillies BBQ Supply (with locations in Wake Forest and Wendell) for these spring grilling recipes. Kevin enjoys sharing his love for grilling and cooking with his family, friends, and community.

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OOEY-GOOEY CHOCOLATE BROWNIES “Growing up, brownies were a staple in my family – we even seemed to be sort of famous for them! However, what most did not know was that they came from a grocery store box. For years, I tried making the perfect brownie that would resemble the childhood feeling associated with a warm treat straight from the oven. After countless trials, I was finally able to master a brownie recipe that features the fudgy flavor, moist texture, crispy edges, and crackly tops I adored as a kid.” – Blair Beaulieu To make, you’ll need: – 10 tablespoons salted butter, melted – 1 cup granulated sugar – 2 eggs – 2 teaspoons vanilla extract – ½ cup milk chocolate chips melted – ¾ cup all purpose flour – ¼ cup unsweetened cocoa powder – ½ teaspoon salt (optional) – ¾ cup milk chocolate chips Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Spray 8”x 8” pan with cooking oil or line with parchment paper.

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Pour melted butter into a large mixing bowl. Whisk (by hand) sugar into butter until smooth, about 30 seconds. Add eggs and vanilla extract. Whisk until even, about 1 minute. Whisk in melted chocolate chips until combined and smooth. Use a rubber spatula to stir in flour, cocoa powder, and salt until just combined. Do not over-mix. Stir in whole chocolate chips. Pour into the prepared pan and spread evenly. Bake for 30-35 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted into the center appears clean. Let cool in pan 30 minutes before slicing.  Thanks to Blair Beaulieu, a senior at Heritage High School. She enjoys cooking, baking, traveling, and volunteering. Grace Lower is a senior at Heritage High School, and is part of the CIRCA family by birth, and now by interning. Grace enjoys dance, theater, science, and all things outdoors.

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PROTECT YOUR PEARLY

WHITES

FOOD AND DRINK IDEAS TO ENJOY (AND AVOID) AFTER A TEETH WHITENING PROCEDURE BY DR. EDMOND SUH

Who doesn’t love a bright smile? Sure, you brush and floss regularly ... but your teeth just aren’t as white as they used to be. While brushing and flossing are crucial for healthy teeth, food and beverage choices often mean people need professional whitening treatments to restore their natural whiteness, allowing them to get their beautiful smiles back.

– White yogurt: any colored yogurt may result in staining; – Bananas; – Lemonade: not pink or other fruits; – Water and sparkling water; – Skim milk: avoid whole or 2%; – Coconut water: avoid coconut milk; – Colorless, carbonated-free cocktails.

These procedures require an investment of money, time, and

WHAT NOT TO CONSUME

effort, so you will want to enjoy the results for the longest

Now that you have an idea of what’s recommended to consume after teeth whitening, let’s take a look at the foods to avoid. Generally, it’s advised that you steer clear of any colored foods and drinks as they risk staining your teeth.

time possible. Therefore, choosing what to eat and drink

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after teeth whitening is of utmost importance. entists advise that you avoid foods that stain teeth after whitening for at least two to three days after the procedure. A rule of thumb is that anything that can stain your white shirt can also stain your teeth. So, what can you eat after teeth whitening, and what should you avoid? (Please note these are not comprehensive lists.)

WHAT TO CONSUME Generally, it’s recommended that you stick to a white diet after teeth whitening, to ensure best aftercare results, such as: – White fish: such as Atlantic cod and albacore; avoid dark species; – White rice; – Skinless chicken or turkey: these are lightly colored, healthy, and acid-free; – Egg whites: be sure to do away with the yolk when cooking because of its color; – White cheeses: because of their high calcium content, white cheeses improve overall enamel and gum health; – Pasta: also a good choice, but avoid colored sauces like green pesto and tomato sauce; – Potatoes: just make sure you peel them before cooking; – White bread: great for breakfast, but remove the crust to avoid any staining risks; – White onions: avoid red onions in your meals; 48

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Following is a list of foods from which you should stay away: – Fruit juices: besides their color, these are highly acidic and contribute to teeth staining; – Wine: its acidity makes the enamel vulnerable to staining, and what’s more, red wine contributes to staining since it is colored; – Coffee: While this may be hard to cut out, it is advisable to abandon this beverage after teeth whitening. If you can’t, add some milk, limit the amount you consume, sticking to no more than two cups per day; – Cola: any fizzy drink is acidic; cola is particularly colored and therefore could stain your teeth after whitening; – Tea: avoid any dark tea as its effect on your teeth could be worse than coffee; – Dark chocolate; – Candy; – Dark fruits: generally, avoid any berries for their color; – Citrus fruits;

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– Soy sauce, balsamic vinegar, and dark marinades; – Dark soups; – Popsicles; – Tobacco: this may not be a food per se, but smoking tobacco is a habit that contributes hugely to teeth staining. After teeth whitening, consider using nicotine patches or alternative products. Teeth whitening helps remove years of unwanted stains and makes you proud to display your smile. If you’ve gone the extra mile to achieve a bright smile by investing in a teeth whitening treatment, it’s vital to follow a special diet for several days after to ensure shiny, healthy teeth.  Dr. Edmond Suh, DDS is with Supremia Dentistry, located at 1704 S. Main Street in Wake Forest. He is an international lecturer on contemporary dental techniques. At Supremia Dentistry, expect something different as they welcome you to their patient family. Call 919-556-6200 to learn more or schedule an appointment. You can also visit supremiadentistry.com.

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Myopia control is a term used to talk about slowing the progression of myopia in children and young adults. There are four commonly used forms of treatment – orthokeratology (Ortho-K) or CRT lenses, multifocal soft contact lenses, bifocal or progressive eyeglasses, and atropine therapy.

CRT/ORTHO-K

BY DR. CASSANDRIA E. WARR

MAPPING OUT

MYOPIA

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yopia, commonly known as nearsightedness, is the most common cause of impaired vision in people under the age of 40. If you are nearsighted, you have difficulty seeing things at a distance, such as road signs while driving or the board at school. Myopia occurs when the eyeball is too long or the cornea (the clear front cover of the eye) is too curved. As a result, light entering the eye isn’t focused correctly and distant objects appear blurred. Having myopia can increase the chances of getting other eye conditions – such as cataracts, glaucoma, and retinal detachments – in the future. Today, myopia affects about 30% of the U.S. population. It is projected that about 50% will be myopic by 2050. This condition typically begins in childhood, and there is an increased risk if one or both parents are nearsighted. Unfortunately, studies show that myopia is becoming more common among children. Some research suggests that kids who spend more time indoors – doing near-focused activities like reading, computer work, and video games – have higher rates of myopia than those who spend more time outdoors.

Corneal refractive therapy (CRT) or orthokeratology (Ortho-K) is the use of specifically designed gas permeable lenses that are worn while sleeping to temporarily correct nearsightedness, so that glasses or contact lenses do not need to be used during the day. These lenses have also been used to reduce myopia progression in children. Ortho-K lenses are a non-surgical form of correction for myopia. While the lens is on the eye, it gently changes the shape of the cornea, resulting in a corneal shape that focuses light properly on the retina. While a significant improvement in vision is usually experienced after only one night of wear, this is not a permanent correction. If lens wear is discontinued, the cornea will revert to its normal shape, and the glasses prescription will go back to what it was before starting the lenses. It is important to note that Ortho-K cannot be used with all prescriptions, they are more difficult to fit compared to regular contacts lenses, and more follow-up visits to the doctor are needed.

MULTIFOCAL SOFT CONTACT LENSES Multifocal soft contact lenses are worn by children six to 12 years of

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Myopia is most often treated with glasses or contact lenses. It can also be treated with surgical procedures, such as LASIK or PRK – however, these procedures are typically only effective if the myopia is stable, and cannot be performed on anyone under the age of 18. 50

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age with myopia. This “multifocal” contact lens has different areas of focus. Think of this type of lens as looking like a dartboard, with multiple circles inside of each other. The center of the lens, or “bullseye,” corrects blurry distance vision, while the outer portions of the lens “defocus” or blur the child’s peripheral (side) vision. Blurring side vision is thought to slow eye growth and limit myopia. Peripheral defocus contact lenses might not work in all cases. However, these lenses seem to help certain children, including those whose parents are nearsighted and whose own myopia is worsening.

PROGRESSIVE OR BIFOCAL EYEGLASSES Progressive or bifocal eyeglasses are glasses that correct for myopia when one is looking straight ahead, with a different prescription at the bottom to help with near-point stress. This is a good option for very young children or kids who are not yet ready for contact lenses.

ATROPINE DROPS Atropine drops are eye drops that relax the focusing system, which has been shown to help reduce the progression of nearsightedness due to focusing fatigue. Low-dose atropine for myopia is used for children between five and 18 years old. These drops are placed in the eye each night at bedtime. Side effects at low doses may include redness or itchiness around the eye. There are drawbacks to this treatment such as discomfort and light sensitivity due to pupil dilation, blurry near vision, and the added expense of needing bifocal or

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progressive glasses to help with near vision while the drops are used. Of all these different treatments, CRT/Ortho K has been shown to have the highest effectiveness at reducing the progression of myopia. None of these treatments will completely halt the prescription from increasing. However, if we can slow the rate of progression, we may be able to prevent some other issues that can occur in conjunction with high amounts of myopia. Other steps that help to slow the progression of myopia include spending more time outdoors and limiting screen time on computers or other digital devices. By balancing screen time with outdoor time, you may help limit your child’s myopia and protect his or her vision as he or she grows older. During this time of COVID and remote learning, it is much more challenging to limit screen time with computers and other digital devices. Thus, it is quite possible that we will witness a much more drastic change with the progression of myopia and that the 50% mark will be seen much sooner than 2050. If your child is myopic and the amount of prescription has been increasing, ask his or her eye doctor if any of these options would be helpful to help reduce progression.  Cassandria E. Warr, OD, FAAO, COVD is an associate doctor with McPherson Family Eye Care / Myopia Control Center, located at 3150 Rogers Road, Suite 110 in Wake Forest. For more information, call 919-263-9163 or visit mcphersonfamilyeyecare.com.

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THE WONDERFUL

WORLD OF

GARDENING From beautiful flowers and fresh produce to the numerous mental and physical benefits it provides, there’s no arguing that gardening is good for you. If you’ve never tried your hand at gardening, the great news is it’s never too late to start. From the very young to the very old, gardening is a hobby that can be enjoyed at any age. Plus, we’re all spending a little more time at home these days, making gardening a great way to get active, enjoy nature, and reap some great

“G

(and healthy!) benefits. ardening is a great way to stay physically active for heart patients of any age, as it requires bending, stretching, and moving on a regular basis. Caring for life outside yourself is also mentally and spiritually rewarding. Plus, it gives you a reason to become more active, doing something you enjoy – which is great for your mind, body, and spirit,” explains WakeMed Physician Assistant Tom DeVito, PA-C. If you fall too far down the rabbit hole of gardening research, it can feel a bit overwhelming. Dr. Jeana Myers with the North Carolina Cooperative Extension – Wake County explains that there are three primary types of gardening: in-ground, raised bed, and container gardening, the last of which we are going to focus on here. Because of its versatility, simplicity, and accessibility to everyone regardless of where they live, container gardening is popular and convenient. Dr. Myers says it’s perfect for those who don’t have a lot of space and for those who have a hard time bending down since containers can be placed on tables for easy watering and maintenance. She shares a few easy steps to help get you started. 1. CHOOSE YOUR PLANTS: Decide first whether you want to grow flowers, ornamental plants, herbs, or vegetables. Important considerations before picking your plant(s) include: space you have available, amount of sunlight for that space, and maintenance required for your garden type. 52

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Remember that plants are just like people – some require very little attention while others need all the TLC you can give them, so choose wisely. Finally, be sure that all plants in the same container have similar requirements for water, light, and nutrients. 2. SELECT YOUR CONTAINER(S): Choosing the correct pot can have a big impact on the health of your plants. Dr. Myers suggests plastic pots for container gardening, since clay ones can dry out more quickly. Check your plants’ rooting depth and estimated height before picking a pot to ensure plants will have ample room for growth so they can flourish over time. Finally, all containers need good drainage, so make sure there are plenty of holes in the bottom. In some ornamental pots, you may need to drill holes to ensure roots don’t drown in standing water. 3. FIND THE PERFECT SPOT: Some plants like sun, others like shade, and some need a combination. Place your containers in the best location for your plants’ needs – and move them around as needed if they require extra sun or a break from direct light. 4. GET PLANTING: Using the right soil with container gardening is critical. Dr. Myers stresses that potting mix should always be used since it allows for better drainage, which will ensure the roots can breathe. Because potting mix is sterile, it’s also free of fungus which will help control disease and prevent insects. While it’s more expensive than regular gardening soil, potting mix can be used for several years and really is a musthave for container gardening. 5. DON’T FORGET TO WATER: Be vigilant about watering or try drip irrigation. This is particularly useful if you have a lot of pots, or if you go out of town regularly. To set it up, purchase drip tape from your local garden or home improvement store and add emitters as needed – you can find ones that drip or spray a fine mist over the plants to keep them watered without much effort. A timer can make it all automatic.  For more healthy lifestyle tips, visit the WakeMed Voices blog (where you can also subscribe) at wakemedvoices.com. The WakeMed Voices blog provides an outlet for their many experts to share information on topics important to the health of patients and the community.

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Specific situations like visiting the vet’s office, going for car rides, and walking on surfaces like grass or wood floors may also be a factor. Although some dogs may only have brief reactions to these kinds of stimuli, anxious dogs may be more affected. According to the ASPCA, separation anxiety is triggered when dogs become upset because of separation from the people to whom they are attached – perhaps becoming agitated or depressed when their human family members are preparing to leave the home or feeling anxious while their owner is away. If you’ve lived an active lifestyle, arthritis will more than likely become a factor for you – and your pet as he or she ages. Arthritis is one of the most common ailments affecting middle-aged to senior dogs and cats, and it can be a source of chronic pain, negatively affecting their quality of life. Signs of arthritis can be as obvious as limping, trouble with stairs, or difficulty getting in and out of a car. The more common could be described as “slowing down,” and can easily be dismissed as part of the normal aging process. The reality is that your dog could be limiting his or her activities due to pain.

BY NICK PIONE

CBD FOR

If you have an anxious pup, of course you want to do all you can to provide relief. This relief may be available thanks to cannabidiol, commonly known as CBD.

CANINES When are you going back to work? I’d like the house back during the day. Signed, your dog. The past year has been just as confusing for our pups as it’s been for the rest of us. Having the entire family at home has been a big change and has likely

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disrupted their routines of long naps and chasing their tails. nxiety is just as real for dogs as it is for people, and according to the Merck Veterinary Manual, their anxiety can come from a variety of causes. Some of the most common are fear, separation, and aging.

The American Kennel Club (AKC) states that fear-related anxiety can be caused by loud noises, strange people or animals, visual stimuli like hats or umbrellas, and new or strange environments. 54

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If you haven’t heard all the buzz surrounding CBD these days, you may be asking yourself what exactly it is. CBD is one of the 100+ cannabinoids that can be found in the hemp plant. It contains very low THC (the active ingredient in marijuana) at less than 0.3%, so it does not cause a psychoactive effect, making it safe and non-altering. Animals and people have an endocannabinoid system, ECS, that helps regulate homeostasis or balance. CBD works with CB1 and CB2 receptors throughout the body to help bring calmness, reduce inflammation, and relieve pain.

night, and naturally, we panicked. She’s only four years old, but we were thinking hip dysplasia – or even worse, potentially something neurological was going on. We took her to the vet where she was diagnosed with a strained CCL and was prescribed anti-inflammatories and pain medication. However, we didn’t want to medicate her if at all possible, and decided instead to try CBD oil. After two weeks of taking the oil daily, Hadley was back to her old jolly self, taking care of us. I share this because I know if you’re reading this story, you care about your pets as I do, and want to give them the best life possible. While

medication prescribed by a veterinarian is definitely necessary in certain situations, CBD may be a beneficial alternative to treating Fido and Fluffy if they feel anxious or uncomfortable. Should you have any questions about whether or not CBD is a good option, consult your veterinarian prior to giving it to your pet.  Nick Pione is a local business owner, blog writer, and natural wellness expert. He co-founded Trek CBD and contributes to medium.com and trekcbd.com. For more information, please contact Nick at nickpione@trekvitality.com or stop by Trek CBD at 1968 S. Main St. in Wake Forest.

And while you might be thinking about yourself and how CBD can help you, let’s stick with man’s best friend for now. CBD can be a great natural alternative to antianxiety or pain medications for your furry family member. CBD products that help provide soothing support for dogs include treats, oils, chews, and peanut butter. Whichever product you choose for Fido, it’s vital to know that quality and potency matter. Why? Because in an unregulated industry, many products tested for quality and potency come up short, meaning some contain heavy metals, pesticides, or too much THC, which can be toxic for animals. It should be noted that CBD may have potential side effects for your pup. According to the AKC’s chief veterinary officer Dr. Jerry Klein, be on the lookout for: – Dry mouth: Research has shown that CBD can decrease the production of saliva. For dogs, this would show as increased thirst. – Lowered blood pressure: High doses of CBD have been known to cause a temporary drop in blood pressure. Even though the drop is small, it might create a brief feeling of light-headedness. – Drowsiness: CBD’s calming effect can also cause drowsiness, especially when using higher doses. A quick story before I finish … several months ago, our English Golden Retriever, Hadley, couldn’t get up off the floor one

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BY JIMMY TOMPKINS

SPRING

PLANTINGS NATIVE PLANTS TO CONSIDER FOR YOUR NC LANDSCAPE

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EASTERN BLUESTAR This is one plant that will continue to delight throughout the entire year. In the spring, you will enjoy small, delicate periwinkle flowers. Once summer temperatures arrive, the blooms will fall off and you will be left with a rich, green shrubbery. When the leaf colors change in the fall, the eastern bluestar will turn a bright yellow. It is a truly beautiful and attention-grabbing plant that thrives here in North Carolina. One of our state’s most beautiful native species, eastern bluestar prefers full sun, is tough enough to require almost no maintenance, and is adaptable to most garden situations.

s you invest in your landscape, you will want to make sure that you are spending time and money on plants that will do well in the North Carolina climate. Using native plants that have thrived for centuries in the state’s weather, water, and soil conditions will help you enjoy a beautiful and healthy landscape that also supports the rest of the local ecosystem. With that in mind, here are some suggestions for plants you should consider.

WOOD-ANEMONE This flowering plant (pictured), which thrives in moist, well-drained soil and requires little maintenance, provides a nice contrast of bright green foliage and large, white flowers for added beauty to any springtime landscape. Wood-anemone reaches a height of about 12 inches, making it a great border plant to fill in different garden areas. This plant really comes to life in the spring and will provide some much-appreciated color after the winter months.

NORTHERN MAIDENHAIR FERN If you have spent any time in the North Carolina mountains, you have probably noticed this fern. It is hardy enough to handle a variety of temperatures and does best in shady locations with moist soil. Planting the northern maidenhair fern can provide ground cover and can add texture to your landscape. Eventually, it can grow to be about two feet tall. 56

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FLOWERING DOGWOOD The dogwood flower is the state flower of North Carolina – and a beloved sign of spring. The flowers are actually considered bracts and grow on the flowering dogwood. This tree, which can be found from the mountains to the coast, is considered a smaller species, since most will only reach 15 to 25 feet tall. From April to June, they are covered in white blooms that often have a hint of pink. These enchanting trees do best in well-drained soil and lots of sun.

CLIMBING HYDRANGEA If you would like to add some privacy or coverage to your home, the climbing hydrangea is a deciduous plant that flowers and uses suckers to climb up walls and trellises. The lacy white flowers come out in early summer and emit a nice fragrance. You can creatively use the climbing hydrangea, which grows well in both sun and shade, by adding some vertical interest to your landscape design.

SWAMP MILKWEED Getting its name from the milky-looking appearance of its sap and delightful aroma, the swamp milkweed can thrive in North Carolina native plant landscapes, as long as the soil does not dry out completely. Best of all, the swamp milkweed attracts butterflies, and is the only host plant for the monarch butterfly. This spring is all about rebirth and creating a landscape that is beautiful and functional throughout the entire year. From colorful perennials and ferns to plants that help attract butterflies, there are a variety of native options that can be easily integrated into your existing landscape.  Jimmy Tompkins is the owner of JT’s Landscaping and Lawncare. If you want help adding any of these native plants in your own yard or you are looking for additional inspiration, be sure to contact the experts at JT’s. They have decades of experience serving homeowners throughout Raleigh and the Triangle area. Jimmy may be reached at 919-453-2716, or visit jts-landscaping.com for more information.

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OUR HERITAGE DR. CALVIN JONES: GROUNDBREAKING PHYSICIAN

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BY AMY PIERCE BY ED MORRIS

ecently, I introduced Dr. Calvin Jones, the founder of the place most of us call home – Wake Forest. On April 2, 1775, Calvin Jones was born in Great Barrington, Massachusetts. As a young physician of just 20 years old, Jones moved to Smithfield, North Carolina in neighboring Johnston County. While residing in Smithfield, he began to develop a reputation as one of the leading medical minds in the southeast. In addition to the field of medicine, Jones made significant contributions in the areas of public health, education for women, public schools, politics, publishing, and military strategy. By the age of 25, Calvin Jones had made a name for himself in a pioneering series of newspaper editorials on smallpox. Smallpox in the 18th and early 19th centuries was much like the Spanish Flu pandemic of 1918 and, of course, the COVID-19 pandemic we face today. It was a deadly and devastating disease that often left those who survived disfigured for life. Jones began urging the people of North Carolina to understand the vital importance of the new, yet lifesaving, smallpox vaccine that had just been developed in England. As far as can be determined, Dr. Jones was the first physician in North Carolina – and one of the first in the country – to discard the old and ineffective treatment of smallpox and substitute with the new process of inoculation that we know now as vaccination. Even before the experiments of Dr. Edward Jenner on smallpox vaccines were completed in England, Dr. Jones was commonly utilizing this therapy. In fact, he developed a long-distance relationship with Dr. Jenner and the two corresponded regularly. Jones received the formula for the vaccine from Jenner and began to manufacture the precious cure himself in his home office – right here in our home state. For a time, Dr. Jones had a hard time selling the idea of vaccination to the people of North Carolina; however, over time, his articles and reputation began to make the idea an accepted alternative to smallpox.

married Temperance Bodie Williams Jones, a wealthy widow of Franklin County physician and planter Thomas Jones (no relation). By this time, Dr. Calvin Jones’s primary interest was the surgical treatment of eye ailments. Also in 1821, he traveled to Paris to study diseases of the eye under French and Italian surgeons. Upon his return home, patients visited with a wide range of disorders, and Jones treated such eye ailments as cancer, blindness, and cataracts. Ophthalmology was a new medical discipline at that time, and he acquired a significant reputation in the area as an eye surgeon whose focus was using surgical procedures to improve vision. His innovative work, described in medical writings of the time, was important in the development of treatments for many conditions of the eye. Dr. Jones followed each patient and their progress years after their surgeries. In one such case, he wrote to an early cataract patient. Shortly after, he received a reply from a family member. The quote is memorable: “My brother-in-law is now deceased. I have often had regrets having paid for his surgery as his only accomplishment with his restored vision was to visit grog shoppes and cause misery for the family.” In another note on one of his early patients, Jones described the surgery: “I had only finished one eye when the patient said, ‘I see ducks;’ they were actually geese, but he could see them …” Dr. Jones was considered a miracle worker, as most of his patients had been nearly or completely blind prior to his care, and almost immediately had their sight restored.

In 1803, Calvin Jones moved from Smithfield to Raleigh. That same year, he was invited by the Moravian settlement of Salem (now WinstonSalem) to come and vaccinate the entire village. As a result of his efforts, not one case of smallpox was documented there.

Dr. Calvin Jones’ fame and wealth grew rapidly. He continued to develop his surgeries while in northern Wake County, and for a time, trained medical students at his Wake Forest home. He was lured by the prospect of plentiful and cheap land in the state of Tennessee and his desire to enhance his status and wealth. In 1832, Jones sold his plantation to the North Carolina Baptist Convention to be used as a college (now Wake Forest University). The family moved to Tennessee where Dr. Jones gave up the practice of medicine to focus on scientific methods of farming. He continued to consult on medical issues and train young physicians in his surgical techniques, furthering the efforts of his groundbreaking work. 

In 1821, after two decades in Raleigh, Dr. Jones moved to northern Wake County to a plantation he named “Wake Forest.” In 1819, he

Ed Morris is executive director of the Wake Forest Historical Museum & Wake Forest College Birthplace. For more information, visit wakeforestmuseum.org.

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