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S U M M E R S A L A D S • W E D D I N G E T I Q U E T T E • W H AT ’ S B E S T F O R B E E S ? • O U T D O O R D E C O R • d i s a s t e r p r e p f o r yo u r p e t H O M E P R E P F O R S U M M E R C O M F O RT • A D E L I C I O U S B E AC H VAC AT I O N • s u m m e r b r e a k b u c k e t l i s t • g o i n g g l u t e n - f r e e ? S U M M E R G R I L I N G M A D E S I M P L E • n o t a l l s u n s c r e e n s a r e c r e at e d e q u a l • v i s i o n a n d l e a r n i n g • A N D M O R E

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A WORD FROM THE PUBLISHER

Whew, it’s hot! Yes, summer is here, and it’s hot out there … and it’s a time for summer foods, summer comfort, and summer fun. But I’m not talking about the hot summer temperatures (which seem to arrive earlier and earlier each year) – I’m talking about this hot summer issue of CIRCA Magazine that is packed full of ideas and inspiration to make this your best summer yet ... ... as for summer foods, fresh, light, and easy to make is what it’s all about. “Summer Salads” shows how to create delicious salads with flavorful seasonal fruits, while “A Delicious Beach Vacation” offers simple and savory cuisine suggestions that won’t have you slaving over a hot stove during your upcoming beach trip. “Summer Grilling Made Simple” also details easy but yummy summer recipes – this time to help you achieve the grilling king or queen status you’ve always wanted. If you are considering transitioning to a gluten-free lifestyle, be sure to check out “Going Gluten-Free?” for insight on how to make the switch without too much stress. ... as for summer comfort – whether indoor where it’s nice and cool, or outdoor where you can enjoy Mother Nature’s glory – we’ve got you covered there as well. If you’re ready to enjoy lazy summer evenings in your outdoor living spaces, but realize they need a little sprucing up, don’t miss “Outdoor Décor” for decorating and floorplanning tips and tricks. And “Outdoor Home Prep” provides a checklist for getting your outside area in tip-top shape. Need to head inside to escape the heat a little, but feel your indoor area needs some summer upkeep? “Indoor Home Prep” describes tasks that will help you get it ready for a most comfortable and pleasant season. ... as for summer fun, “Celebrating Summer In The Forest” is chock full of exciting events in the Wake Forest area that will have your calendar full of festivities for the foreseeable future. “Summer Break Bucket List” offers up fun ideas designed to get the whole family outside during the time off from school and work and creating memories to last a lifetime, rather than staying glued to their digital devices. In the mood for a party? “Summer Party Planning” delivers ideas on how to host the summer celebration that will make you the envy of all your friends and family. You won’t want to miss these and all the other hot articles that fill the following pages of this summer edition, including a guide to ensure you are watering your landscape correctly, how to keep your pets safe should a hurricane hit, recommendations for the best sunscreen for you and your family, a reminder of proper wedding etiquette, and another inviting “Driveable Destination,” featuring the quaint coastal charm of Little Washington. All of this, and so much more. So while enjoying the hot summer months, and all the fun, food, and comfort that come along with them, I hope you also enjoy reading this issue cover to cover. And as always, please visit our great advertisers, and let them know you found them in CIRCA Magazine. Have a great time celebrating summer, and I look forward to see you again in the fall!


J U LY • A U G U S T • S E P T E M B E R 2 0 1 7 6

Celebrating Summer In The Forest – Look No Further For Summer Fun

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Going Gluten-Free? Making Sense Of Transitioning To A Gluten-Free Lifestyle

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Summer Salads

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Disaster Prep For Your Pet

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What’s Best For Bees? Plant And Habitat Tips For Bees And Other Pollinators

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Vision And Learning – Is A Vision Problem Standing In The Way Of Your Child’s Learning?

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Hurricane Safety And Preparedness – There’s An App For That

Wise Watering – A Guide To Proper Landscape Watering

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Driveable Destinations – Out To Lunch In Little Washington

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Wedding Etiquette – 5 Tips For Being The Perfect Wedding Guest

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Indoor Home Prep For Summer Comfort

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Outdoor Home Prep For Summer Comfort

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The Earlier The Better – Benefits Of Early Orthodontic Treatment

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Summer Grilling Made Simple

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A Delicious Beach Vacation – Simple And Savory Recipes For The Perfect Seaside Escape

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Summer Break Bucket List

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Your Child Has ADHD ... Now What? Tips For Parenting A Child With ADHD

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Outdoor Decor

Sunscreens ... Not All Are Created Equal

42 Acne ... The Dreaded Four-Letter Word 44

It’s Not Too Late – Straight Talk About Orthodontic Treatment For Adults

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Summer Party Planning

48 Is Summer Only For Fun? 50 Our Heritage Revisited – The Two Wake Forests

PUBLISHER & EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Kent Lower CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Shannon Arner Stacey Moritz Rhonda Benvie Cheryl Nelson Anna Bolton Todd Nelson Gineen Cargo Beth Norton Margarita Cohen Amy Pierce Patti Fralix Monique M. Rogers Dr. Jason Gladwell Jennifer Smart Holly Hopkins Sarah B. Stokes Diane Mack UNC REX Healthcare Gregory Mack Thomas Walters Dr. James Martin Cassandria Warr, OD Tina Mast CONTACT INFORMATION BallPointe Publishing & Design, LLC P.O. Box 1182 Wake Forest, NC 27588 919.453.2555 • info@circamagazine.com www.circamagazine.com ADVERTISING SALES 919.453.2555 • info@circamagazine.com MANAGERS Kent Lower & Mitch Lower Printed by Theo Davis Printing, Inc.

Nick Honeycutt 919.380.5949 • nhoneycutt@theodavis.com Publisher Photo by Christina Bowman Photography, LLC

LIKE US ON FACEBOOK FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @CIRCA_Magazine FOLLOW US ON INSTAGRAM circa_magazine AD SPACE RESERVATIONS Oct / Nov / Dec 2017: August 23, 2017

CIRCA Magazine is published quarterly by BallPointe Publishing & Design, LLC. All rights reserved. No part of this magazine may be reproduced or transmitted without the written permission of the publisher. Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained within; however, BallPointe Publishing & Design assumes no liability for accuracy or omissions.


CELEBRATING

SUMMER IN THE FOREST LOOK NO FURTHER FOR SUMMER FUN! BY ANNA BOLTON

Summer’s here and the warmer days, longer evenings, and long-awaited break from school mean it’s time for you and your loved ones to have some fun. But where should you go and what should you do? Look no further because we have the answer – spend your summer in Wake Forest! Guaran-

NECK OF THE WOODS

teed to please the entire family, the town’s impressive lineup of events includes outdoor concerts, family movie nights, the Wake Forest Home & Garden Show, and more. Gather your family and join your neighbors for these exciting events for an unforgettable summer in the Forest.

FRIDAY NIGHT ON WHITE

The second season of Friday Night On White is in full swing. Known as Wake Forest’s favorite concert series, the free outdoor events continue with concerts on July 14, August 11, and September 8. Presented by White Street Brewing Company, the performances take place along South White Street and begin at 6:00 PM. All concerts are free and feature a variety of premier local bands and food trucks. Grab your lawn chair and come enjoy the music while taking in the great atmosphere of Downtown Wake Forest. Thank you to these generous sponsors – Exclusive Title Sponsor: White Street Brewing Company; Exclusive Radio Partner: iHeart Media; Stage Sponsor: Gladwell Orthodontics; Dance Floor Sponsor: McPherson Family Eye Care; Wristband Sponsor: Back Alley Coffee Roasters; Premier Sponsors: Mitchell Heating & Cooling, Capital PowerSports, Sam’s Club, Nu Image Surgical and Dental Implant Center, Wells Family Dentistry, The Rolesville Buzz, The Wake Forest Weekly, and The News & Observer; Partner Sponsors: Coastal Credit Union, Dirty Dogs Spa, Wake Forest Acoustical Corporation, B&W Hardware, Tuscan Ridge Animal Hospital, Pure Line Plumbing, Sole Dimensions, CIRCA Magazine, Break Through Physical Therapy, Lowes Foods, 6

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Stanley Martin Homes, Birkner Allstate Agency, Fidelity Bank, Chick-fil-A, and 27587 Magazine; Supporting Sponsors: Carillon Assisted Living, Candlewood Suites, Rainbow Child Care Center, Heritage Urgent & Primary Care and Heritage Med Spa. For more information, visit wakeforestnc.gov and search “Friday Night on White.”   Presented and sponsored by Wake Forest Arts, Neck of the Woods is a variety performance series featuring emerging local artists. The event will take place at the Wake Forest Renaissance Centre on Friday, July 21, at 7:30 PM. Each show is different and may include actors, dancers, musicians, comedians, writers, and spoken word artists. Come out and enjoy a truly unique and entertaining event and support your local artists. Wine, beer, and other refreshments will be available for purchase. Tickets are $5 plus tax and may be purchased online or at the box office. For more information, visit wakeforestnc.gov and search “Neck of the Woods.”  

FAMILY MOVIE NIGHTS AT JOYNER PARK

This summer, you’re invited to enjoy a movie under the stars. The Wake Forest Parks, Recreation & Cultural Resources Department is excited to host Family Movie Nights at Joyner Park. Presented by Gladwell Orthodontics, Mosquito Joe of Eastern Wake, and Allstate Insurance – Thomas Walters, the outdoor movie series continues on July 29 and August 12. Free and open to the public, the movies begin at 8:30 PM. Each night will feature a theme, as well as assorted food vendors and sponsor giveaways or activities. Bring chairs or a blanket and arrive early in order to give you and your family time to find a spot and settle in before the movie begins. Thank you to all the event sponsors: Gladwell Orthodontics, Mosquito Joe of Eastern Wake, Allstate Insurance – Thomas Walters, Primrose School of Heritage Wake Forest, Vision Martial Arts, Wells Family Dentistry, Rainbow Kids Pediatrics, Kerr Family YMCA, and New Direction Family Law. For more information, visit wakeforestnc.gov and search “Family Movie Nights.”

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CONCERTS IN THE PARK  The Town of Wake Forest and PineCone will present two free concerts at E. Carroll Joyner Park on August 6 and September 3. Both of these Sunday performances will begin at 5:00 PM in the Joyner Park Amphitheater. Food and refreshments will be available for purchase or attendants may bring their own picnic. For more information, visit wakeforestnc.gov and search “Concerts in the Park.”

WAKE FOREST HOME & GARDEN SHOW Whether you are looking for a complete home remodel, a kitchen or bath makeover, a newly landscaped yard, or just like to shop for your home, you will find it all at the Wake Forest Home & Garden Show. Presented by Mitchell Heating & Cooling, the second annual Wake Forest Home & Garden Show will take place on Saturday and Sunday, August 12-13 at the Wake Forest Renaissance Centre. Showcasing the latest in home improvement products, services, and features, the event is free and open to the public on Saturday from 9:00 AM – 4:00 PM and Sunday from 12:00 PM –5:00 PM.

community, friends, and family. Beginning at 4:00 PM, join other Wake Foresters for an afternoon of free games and activities at E. Carroll Joyner Park. The electronics-free afternoon will culminate with a concert in the Amphitheater from 5:00 PM – 7:00 PM featuring Dark Water Rising. Even if you can’t make it out to Joyner Park that day, you and your family can still participate by simply “unplugging” from your televisions, personal computers, smart phones, and video games for the afternoon and instead engage in healthier, more active pursuits. For more information, visit wakeforestnc.gov and search “Wake Forest Unplugged.”

GOOD NEIGHBOR DAY The Wake Forest Human Relations Council will host the 12th Annual Good Neighbor Day on Saturday, September 16. This free, family-friendly event will be held from 1:00 PM – 4:00 PM at E. Carroll Joyner Park. Good Neighbor Day assembles people from all walks of life for a day of

STAY CONNECTED! Always be the first to know about Town of Wake Forest programs, services, and special events by signing up for E-Notifier at www.wakeforestnc.gov/enotifier.aspx, downloading the Town of Wake Forest app at www.wakeforestnc.gov/app.aspx, or visiting the town’s website at www.wakeforestnc.gov.      Anna Bolton is the Marketing & Business Relations Specialist for the Town of Wake Forest. To learn more about promotional opportunities and event sponsorships, contact Anna at 919-610-4916 or abolton@wakeforestnc.gov.

GET IN GOOD WITH AN EXPERT

New this year, the show will feature a “shopping marketplace” where attendants can browse a variety of local vendors and purchase unique décor, artwork, and gifts. Thank you to the 2017 event sponsors: Mitchell Heating & Cooling, Champion Window of Raleigh, Century Link, and the ReFab Lab. For more information, visit wakeforestnc.gov and search “Home & Garden Show.”  

Because I know the risks in the area, I’ll use my local expertise to help you choose the right amount of protection. And I’ll be there to help you as your coverage needs change. Call or stop in for a free, no-obligation Personalized Insurance Proposal today.

WAKE FOREST UNPLUGGED … GET CONNECTED!

Personalized service. Trusted advice.

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Walters Insurance Agency 919-554-0267 3207 Rogers Road, Ste. 100 Wake Forest thomaswalters@allstate.com Subject to terms, conditions and availability. Allstate Property and Casualty Insurance Co., Allstate Indemnity Co., Allstate Insurance Co. © 2016 Allstate Insurance Co.

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Longing for an entire afternoon free from electronic devices? If so, then save the date for Wake Forest Unplugged on Sunday, September 3. Sponsored by the Wake Forest Recreation Advisory Board, the event encourages Wake Forest-area residents to “disconnect” from cell phones, PDAs, and computers, and “re-connect” with their

CIRCA Magazine

food, fun, and family entertainment. By bringing together a mix of cultures, music, ages, and ethnicities, the event celebrates diversity and promotes goodwill among all of Wake Forest’s citizens. In the event of rain, Good Neighbor Day will be held on Saturday, September 23. For more information, visit wakeforestnc.gov and search “Good Neighbor Day.” 

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and adding yummy cheeses, nuts, and herbs to baby lettuces, kale, and other leafy greens. The combinations are somewhat endless so you will never get bored with your creations. Baby arugula pairs beautifully with thinly sliced nectarines, pistachios, and goat cheese. Arugula is also perfect for fresh cubed watermelon, feta cheese, and hazlenuts. Drizzled with a simple balsamic vinaigrette, it makes a lovely luncheon or starter salad. Kale is perhaps my favorite canvas at the moment, as its hearty texture is easily tamed and complemented by a variety of fruit combinations. My preference is to thinly slice kale, toss it with my favorite fruits, and lightly drizzle it with dressing. Adding nuts and cheeses enhances the melding of flavors, and this nutritional powerhouse green will make you forget all about those boring lettuces. Fresh berries, diced fruit, and avocados can be added, along with your favorite cheese like gorgonzola, goat, or feta. Toasted sunflower seeds, walnuts, or candied almonds give a little extra crunch while adding a healthy dose of good fats and protein.

BY STACEY MORITZ

Baby spinach and field greens never go out of style and provide a great base for any salad. Toss your greens with a combination of fruit along with crumbled cooked bacon, pancetta, or a little prosciutto, and add a sprinkle of goat cheese and raspberry vinaigrette.

SUMMER

SALADS

When it comes to finding delicious fare that is perfect for

beating the summer heat, bright, cool, and refreshing is what I crave. If you’re like me, then look no further than all the gorgeous fruits that are in abundance right now at local far-

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Create amazing salas with fresh fruit and toss them with greens for a savory salad or used atop grilled steak, chicken, or fish for a bright and healthy addition to the dinner plate. Fish tacos take on an entirely new meaning when topped with a fresh mango salsa. Fresh spinach adorned with grilled steak and balsamic-glazed strawberries almost effortlessly makes a gorgeous plate. Wanting to spice up ordinary grilled chicken? Look no further than diced grilled pineapple salsa studded with a little jalapeño pepper for a delicious kickin’ chicken dish.

mers markets and your favorite grocery store. he beauty of summer fruit at its peak is that it is so versatile. You can eat with reckless abandon at every meal and never feel like you are being repetitive. With a little creativity, you can move beyond a fruit salad and enjoy food pairings that are colorful, healthy, and innovative. I love to add fresh fruit to salads and fresh salsas to my favorite grilled meats for dinner on the patio. Experimenting with different flavor combinations is fun and you will be really surprised at how easy it is to turn a simple meal into something extraordinary with just a handful of fruit.

If you are entertaining on a summer evening, add seasonal fruit to your repetoire for great appetizer fare. Simple quesadillas made with a little goat cheese and fresh berries are delightful surprises for your guests. Grilled fruit kabobs lightly drizzed with balsamic honey are beautiful and tasty, and won’t spoil anyone’s appetite for the main culinary event. Or top a warm brie with a simple topping of fresh berries that were warmed in a touch of honey, and serve with water crackers. And don’t forget dessert! A scoop of vanilla ice cream is all you need to accompany fresh baked fruit cobblers, grilled fruit, or homemade fruit syrups ... so easy and just the perfect amount of sweet to finish off your lovely, fruity summer meal. 

Salads are a summer staple because they are fresh and light and can be easily customized to your taste. Creating the perfect salad can be as painless as tossing fresh berries or sliced fresh fruit with greens and a simple dressing. Or kick it up a bit by experimenting

Stacey Moritz is the owner of The Lemon Tree Cafe, located at 113 S. White Street in Downtown Wake Forest (919-521-5806), offering freshly prepared salads, pastas, soups, and take-away fare. The Lemon Tree Cafe is open Monday - Saturday, 10:00 AM - 3:00 PM, offering lunch and catering.

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live music

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beer & wine

Second Fridays April-Sept 6-9 pm South White Street downtown wake forest

JULY 14 – BIG LOVE AUG 11 – LOVE TRIBE SEPT 8 – CRUSH and AFTER PARTY with the MAGIC PIPERS BAND wakeforestnc.gov

ProAudio

& Light Inc.

S P O N S O R S

STAY CONNECTED

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Ads N’ Art | Candlewood Suites | Carillon Assisted Living | Heritage Med Spa | Heritage Urgent & Primary Care | Rainbow Child Care Center

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WHAT’S BEST

FOR BEES?

PLANT AND HABITAT TIPS FOR BEES AND OTHER POLLINATORS BY TINA MAST

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ees and Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) have been in the news a lot recently. While the causes of CCD are still being studied and evaluated, we know part of the problem is pesticide use and habitat loss. But, it’s not just about honeybees. There are over 4,000 wild bee species in North America, many of them important pollinators, and they need help, too, as do other pollinators such as bats, birds, and butterflies. Here is a simple guide to get you started in providing a welcoming habitat for bees and other pollinators. This guide, while not comprehensive due to editorial space restrictions, is a sampling of plants, herbs, shrubs, and trees aimed at the ecoregion known as Southern Mixed Forest, to which most of the Piedmont of North Carolina belongs (for a comprehensive list, visit www.homewoodnursery.com). Plants listed here are often for providing nectar, but also forage (meaning, the insect eats the plant, as with fennel and parsley) and habitat / nesting (as with ornamental grasses). For more information, look up “The Xerces Society” and “Pollinator Partnership” online, as well as the excellent guidebook from The Xerces Society, 100 Plants to Feed the Bees.

ANNUAL FLOWERS, HERBS, AND VEGETABLES FOR POLLINATORS (An annual dies at the end of the season, as will the following herbs and veggies.) – Basil: bees, butterflies – Begonia: hummingbirds – California Poppy: bees – Eggplant: bees – Green beans: bees – Heliotrope: bees, butterflies – Impatiens: bees – Lantana: bees, butterflies – Marigolds: bees, butterflies – Morning Glory (vine): bees – Parsley: butterflies – Peas / Beans / Legumes: bees 10

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– Petunia: butterflies – Phlox: bees, butterflies – Salvia: bees, hummingbirds – Squash: bees – Verbena: bees, butterflies – Zinnias: bees, butterflies

PERENNIAL FLOWERS AND HERBS FOR POLLINATORS – Aster: bees, butterflies – Black-eyed Susan: bees, butterflies – Columbine: bees, hummingbirds – Coneflower (Echinacea): bees – Daylily: butterflies – Dianthus: butterflies – Hellebore / Lenten Rose: bees – Hollyhock: butterflies, hummingbirds – Iris: bees – Goldenrod: bees, butterflies – Lantana: bees, butterflies – Lavendar: bees, butterflies – Lemon Balm: bees, butterflies – Milkweed / Butterfly Weed: bees, butterflies – Oregano: bees – Passionflower: bees – Phlox: bees, butterflies – Pink Muhly Grass: bees (habitat) – Sage (flowering): bees, butterflies, hummingbirds – Sage (culinary): bees – Shasta Daisy: bees, butterflies – Spiderwort: bees – Sunflower (Helianthus): bees, caterpillar host – Verbena: bees, butterflies – Virginia Bluebells: bees – Wild Indigo (Baptisia): bees, butterflies – Yarrow: bees, butterflies – Yucca: hummingbirds

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SHRUBS FOR POLLINATORS – Abelia: bees, butterflies – Blackberry: bees, moths – Blueberry: bees – Butterfly bush: bees, butterflies, moths – Chinese Redbud: bees, butterflies – Citrus: bees, caterpillar host – Crepe Myrtle: bees, hummingbirds – Lilac: butterflies – PeeGee Hydrangea: bees – Raspberry: bees, moths – Spirea: bees – St. Johnswort: bees – Viburnum: butterflies

– Consider that some types of damage to plants are made by pollinators gathering nesting material or by the larval stage of a butterfly or moth that pollinates flowers. Perhaps the “15 Foot Rule” can be used in your garden. If you can’t see the damage from 15 or more feet away, consider if you want to try to control it in the first place. Some types of plant damage do not affect the long-term health of the plant. This may allow you to forgo pesticides more often. – Amend or top dress garden beds with plenty of organic matter and compost to encourage healthy plants with plentiful blooms.

– Butterflies love mud puddles which provide them with essential nutrients. A birdbath can also be used. – Pieces of fruit left out will also attract butterflies. – Early-blooming plants help pollinators through the lean part of the year when spring is coming. A succession of flowering plants that lasts from spring through fall will support a range of bee species.  Tina Mast is communications director for Homewood Nursery & Garden Center and can be reached at 919-847-0117 or info@homewoodnursery.com.

TREES FOR POLLINATORS – American Yellowwood: bees – Flowering apricot, cherry (except Kwanzan), crabapple, plum, peach: bees – Redbud: bees, caterpillar host – Magnolia: bees, caterpillar host – Mimosa: bees, hummingbirds

GARDENING TIPS FOR ENCOURAGING POLLINATORS – Provide shelter and water in addition to water sources. – Plant in groups at least four feet in diameter to maximize efficiency for pollinators who can visit many flowers of the same species more easily that way. – Use as little pesticide as possible, or none at all. Carefully manage pesticides by observing label restrictions and always spray before dawn or at dusk (or after dusk) to avoid times when bees are foraging. – Minimize soil disturbance (i.e. tilling) to protect groundnesting bees. – Plant a variety of trees, shrubs, and flowers that bloom at different times, and also those which provide shelter. – Look for flowers in different colors and shapes which will attract more and different pollinators. – Leave dead snags and stems of dormant plants for bee nesting sites. – Incorporate native plants into your landscape. Bees often prefer them to hybrids. – Provide water via birdbaths, dishes, ponds, etc., with a shallow or sloping side so pollinators may approach without drowning.

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major part of preparedness plans includes community awareness of the key principles for a sound process: Assemble an emergency kit; create an emergency plan; remain informed; and become involved.

Typically, the OEM provides information to assist families with development of their own plan in the form of lists/checklists, hints, and suggestions. In this age of smart phone technology, this information can be downloaded via an app. Now, local OEM offices use new technologies to communicate evacuation information and allow community members to report damages and assist emergency managers with developing an overall picture of the community devastation.

BY THOMAS WALTERS

HURRICANE

SAFETY

AND PREPAREDNESS THERE’S AN APP FOR THAT With summer in full swing, we are in the throes of hurricane season. Thus, residents in hurricane-prone areas like ours are exposed to multiple messages for disaster preparation. It’s important to be prepared for the storm season that is now upon us. Many coastal counties maintain Offices of Emergency Management (OEM) that are responsible for developing plans to be prepared, reduce damage, and recover from the devastating effects of a storm. 12

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I encourage the use of additional apps, which provide tools and information to assist families with their own emergency plans. For example, the free Hurricane app from the American Red Cross, provides: – Step‐by‐step instructions for the periods immediately before, during, and after the hurricane. – Suggestions on how to plan ahead, so you can protect yourself, your family, and your assets before a hurricane threatens your home. – Access to severe weather information including the ability to stream NOAA (Weather) broadcasts. – Instructions for an emergency kit, including a link to a site that furnishes pre‐assembled kits. – “Make a Plan” tool, which is a feature that allows you to delegate tasks to family members; record meeting places for after the storm, in case of separation; identify out-of-town contacts (again, in the event of separation); map a route to the evacuation point; and share the plan via email with family and designated contacts. – “I’m Safe” tool, which allows you to create a message that can be communicated via Facebook, Twitter, email, and text to concerned friends and family. – How to find open Red Cross shelters in the reigon. Everyone in this area needs to be prepared for a hurricane and the devastation it can bring – in addition to taking safety steps in advance like developing a family and pet emergency plan, creating a disaster supply kit, and securing your home, research and download apps to your smart phone now that will assist you with emergency planning so that if and when disaster strikes, you will be ready.  Thomas Walters is the owner of Walters Insurance Agency. If you’d like to talk more about how to protect your home and family during hurricane season, stop by the agency at 3207 Rogers Road, Suite 100 in Wake Forest. He may also be reached at 919-554-0267 or ThomasWalters@allstate.com.

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the North Carolina Estuarium. Located directly on the shore of the Pamlico River, the combination museum/aquarium tells the story of life in the “soundlands” through an educational film and more than 200 associated exhibits. These include everything from an early 20th century woolen bathing suit to living aquariums and fishing artifacts. When you’ve seen enough of the interior, just step outside; the Estuarium opens onto a waterfront promenade where it joins a park, playground, and blocks of downtown shops and restaurants as a main feature in this rare, open-air marketplace of nature, commerce, and water adventure.

BY JENNIFER SMART

DRIVEABLE

DESTINATIONS OUT TO LUNCH IN LITTLE WASHINGTON

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After the Estuarium and the waterfront, we piled back in the car and drove the short distance to our chosen lunch stop – said to be a personal favorite of Jimmy Buffett’s. Backwater Jack’s Tiki Bar and Grill is a local treasure with a “faux tropical atmosphere” that specializes in an outdoor mood, a selection of boat drinks, and seafood so fresh you’d almost believe the kitchen staff is fishing out the back door. The service is friendly and fast, kids are welcome, and reservations are not required. It’s only open in the spring and summer, and don’t forget to stop by the ATM before you arrive; at Backwater Jack’s, they only take cash. Being new to this part of the state, we followed lunch with a little sightseeing behind the wheel. That meant a half-hour drive through the countryside to check out another legendary community – the Town of Bath. Founded in 1705, Bath was the first town established in North Carolina. Its chief attraction at the time was the waterway; early settlers could travel 50 miles along the Pamlico River to Ocracoke Inlet, providing a direct route to the Atlantic Ocean. This gave Bath an important role in commerce. Residents made a living

ittle Washington has water and wildlife the same way fairy tales have princesses and frogs. They’re just an integral part of the story. And like a good fairytale, the town’s personality and charm bubble beneath the surface, occasionally misting the air with magic. The culture, cuisine, and attitude are strictly of the “changes in latitude” variety, and they make this picturesque community the perfect spot for a mini-vacation. That’s why, one recent Saturday morning, we hopped in the car and traveled 100 miles southeast, landing at the historic downtown that borders one of the largest estuaries in the United States. Second only to Chesapeake Bay, this scenic waterfront marks the spot where the Pamlico River empties into the Atlantic Ocean. The resulting mix of salt and fresh water – along with shallow depth and plenty of sunlight – creates a unique and vital ecosystem that supports birds, animals, vegetation, and marine life. Sea turtles, bald eagles, and fish from the amberjack to the wahoo are among the species that call this place home. To learn more about their vast watery frontier, our first stop was 14

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working the trade routes for tobacco, furs, and naval stores (products derived from pine resins and used in building and maintaining ships). All that vibrant nautical activity also attracted pirates. The most famous was Edward Teach, more commonly known as “Blackbeard.” Believed to have arrived in 1718, Blackbeard is known to have frequented the area and remains memorialized in local legend. He allegedly threw wild parties while ashore, leading to something akin to the 18th century equivalent of celebrity status. A room at the Bath State Historic Site is dedicated to Blackbeard and his men, many of whom may have been local residents. On our way out of Bath, still in sightseeing mode, we decided to take a gander at Goose Creek State Park. Less than a 30-minute drive from Little Washington, the park is fully equipped with an array of coastal Carolina’s most beautiful environmental features: live oaks, wetlands, nature trails, and a cypress swamp. In fact, Little Washington and the surrounding area boast a never-ending list of outdoor activities. The Pamlico River basin has more than 300 miles of mapped paddle trails. There’s a free boat launch on Runyon Creek and a floating dinghy dock at the west end of the waterfront for kayaks and canoes. Fishing charters are available through TarPam Guide Service; Hunters’ Pointe Sporting Clays Club offers skeet shooting and archery; and a variety of cruises are available for those in search of a quiet, restful river tour. To finish our visit in Little Washington, we opted for a different kind of tour. Accessible by sidewalk, self-guided, and free, it took us from the antique shops and local art galleries in the downtown area through the historic residential district. The first community in America to be named for General George Washington, the “original Washington” was founded in 1776, and by the 1800s, its prosperous merchants had constructed blocks of grand homes; a walk along Market Street, Main Street, Water Street, and Tenth Street lets you see them up close. Those wishing to stay the night have the option of boarding at the elegant Elmwood 1820 Bed and Breakfast Inn at 731 West Main Street. As ours was a day trip, we started home in the late afternoon. Apart from enjoying the excellent food, gorgeous scenery, and charming shops, we felt a bit more aware of the unique role this coastal community has played in our state’s history. Just as estuaries are a mix of salt and fresh water, Little Washington combines commerce and nature, education and excitement, structure and shore. It’s a place with beauty on the surface and layers underneath – just like a good fairy tale. And it all makes for a driveable destination I highly recommend.  Little Washington is about a two-hour drive from northern Wake County. Travel southeast on US-264 E, bypassing Greenville, for the easiest route. For more information, visit www.littlewashingtonnc.com. Jennifer Smart is assistant director at the Wake Forest Historical Museum. You can visit the website at www.wakeforestmuseum.org.

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WEDDING

ETIQUETTE 5 TIPS FOR BEING THE PERFECT WEDDING GUEST BY GINEEN CARGO

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ummer flowers are in full bloom, beautiful aromas are in the air, and wedding season is upon us. We all know what to expect at a wedding – food, open bar, and dancing, right? But do you know what is expected of you as a wedding guest? Whether you’re just receiving your first wedding invitation or if you’re a seasoned wedding attendee, let’s review a few tips and tricks to ensure you will be a perfect wedding guest this season.

SAY YES … TO THE INVITATION The first step to being a great wedding guest is letting the couple who invited you know that you’ll be coming. You’re likely to hear the term RSVP, which comes from the French phase “Respondez, s’il vous plait.” Loosely translated, this phrase means “Please respond.” Although the inclusion of the word “please” makes it sound like replying to an invitation is a suggestion, this is a must. Be sure to RSVP by the reply-by date listed. If asked, provide a food choice and only indicate a selection for those who are listed on the mailing envelope. Lastly, honor any special requests listed by the couple. No means no, whether that means no children or no “plus one.”

and your cell phone in your purse, and let the professional photographer and videographer do the jobs they were hired to do. If a couple asks for the wedding to be unplugged, meaning no one takes picture, do the couple a favor and comply.

CLOTHING When attending a wedding, it’s no surprise that everyone is anticipating the bride’s dress, but the guest attire is also important. Review the invitation to get a clue about how you should dress. For men, tuxedos or suits are always en vogue, while a simple sport coat and trousers will also suffice. If all else fails, a collared shirt with a tie and slacks will do. For ladies, a cocktail dress or evening

GIFTING GUIDE While you may be inspired to get creative with your gifting, avoid going over the top and stick to the basics. When selecting a gift, review and select an item within your budget from the couple’s wedding registry. When purchasing, do the couple a favor and send a gift directly to the address listed on the registry. While all newlyweds love receiving gifts in celebration of their nuptials, it’s often a nuisance to receive them at weddings. If you insist on giving the couple something on the spot, consider cash, a check, or a gift card. Note that while old etiquette guidelines state it is acceptable to send a gift up to one year after the actual wedding date, it’s best to send within two or three months pre- or post-wedding.

LEAVE THE PHOTOS TO THE PHOTOGRAPHER As a society, we have come to embrace a selfie culture. While acceptable at some social events, a wedding is not the time to try out your amateur photography skills. Leave the DSLR at home 16

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gown may be acceptable based on the invitation, wedding venue, or couple’s theme. When in doubt, a simple black dress never fails. And remember – unless asked by the bride, never ever, under any circumstances, wear white, ivory, off-white, or any other shade of white.

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JUST HAVE FUN When it comes to the wedding ceremony and reception, participation is key. During the ceremony, when the officiant instructs the guests to “please rise,” be sure to stand quickly. At cocktail hour, socialize and mingle. At the start of the reception, cheer on the happy couple during their grand entrance and make your way to the dance floor when instructed by the wedding DJ. If single, join in on the bride’s bouquet toss or the groom’s garter toss. And for goodness sakes, eat the wedding cake! And last, but certainly not least, be sure to thank the couple and their families for including you in their special day and congratulate the newlyweds before leaving the reception and calling it a night. 

http://iamgoi.ng/circa

Gineen Cargo is the owner of Cargo & Co. Events. As a certified wedding planner and certified meeting professional, Gineen is a lover of all things events. Have a question about planning your wedding or how to be the best guest? Gineen may be reached at 704-287-5761, hello@cargoandcoevents.com, or visit www.cargoandcoevents.com.

Wake Forest, NC /collegeSE

Photo courtesy of Donnell Perry Photography.

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THE EARLIER

THE BETTER BENEFITS OF EARLY ORTHODONTIC TREATMENT BY DR. JASON GLADWELL

– Catch issues early. Serious orthodontic problems can often be corrected or helped if caught early enough. When the patient is young, orthodontists have more control over permanent teeth by addressing the structure of the jaw and primary teeth. Issues such as missing teeth, extra teeth, and crowding can be fixed in a less invasive, more timely manner when the patient is young. Overbites, underbites, and crossbites can also be treated as the orthodontist modifies the growth of the jaw while permanent teeth emerge.

Considering orthodontic treatment timing for children can often be confusing for parents. People are typically used to doing things the way they have always been done, and with interceptive or early orthodontic treatment on the rise over the last 15 years, that can often mean a different treatment plan than parents are used to. The days of “wait until they are 12” or “wait until they have all of their permanent

– Prevent trauma and fix habits. When teeth are protruding out and kids are playing sports or on the playground, it’s very easy for them to fall and crack them. Correcting the problem now may prevent costly surgery later. Phase one can also help habits such as thumb sucking or tongue thrusting, which become serious when they disrupt the roof of the mouth, tissue, and gums.

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teeth” are long gone. s with most areas of medicine and dentistry, a more conservative and proactive approach to treatment has been accepted and put in place. By going away from the reactive and aggressive treatment strategies of the past and using more proactive and conservative treatment plans, we can, in a large percentage of cases, prevent the need for permanent tooth extractions and invasive and aggressive surgeries, providing a result that will be more stable and attractive.

– Experience gentle treatment. While some cases require standard braces, most phase one treatments only include four brackets on the top teeth in front and two in the back. These will gradually and effectively guide teeth into place.

The American Association of Orthodontists now recommends that every child see an orthodontist for an initial consultation at the age of seven (this period of orthodontic treatment is commonly known as “phase one”). This is much different than in the past. The reason for this change is that when caught early, numerous problems can be prevented, minimized, or at least better planned for in terms of treatment timing. – Analyze without risk. An initial consultation is the perfect time to evaluate a child’s teeth and bite without committing to braces. If parents have any questions or concerns, they can express them at this meeting and listen to the orthodontist’s suggested course of action. If the child doesn’t need braces at this point, his or her parents can walk away with peace of mind knowing that everything is developing properly. 18

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– Enjoy lasting results. Phase one treatment time typically lasts between 12 to 15 months. When completed, the patient receives a removable retainer that he or she can customize. This keeps everything secure until the permanent teeth come in before phase two treatment begins. Because orthodontic conditions are easier to correct if they’re caught early, phase one treatment is an investment that will decrease discomfort for your child – and cost for you – for years to come. So don’t wait ... start treatment early and put your child on the path to a beautiful, healthy smile.  Dr. Jason Gladwell is a Board Certified Specialist in orthodontics, certified lecturer for Invisalign, the Triangle’s only elite provider for Invisalign, and the first in the area to use a digital, impression-less scanner. To learn more, please visit www.gladwellorthodontics.com.

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ome cooking may be required to keep your beach house residents happy, of course; but if you arm yourself with a couple of easy recipes, a few key ingredients, and a great plan of action, you can spend your cooking time wisely, leaving plenty of time for extra fun in the sun.

Here are a couple of our favorite “go-to” summer recipes. These bright and sunny recipes will become part of your personal culinary arsenal, I promise – while you’re celebrating summer at the beach, and at home, all season long. Start with our refreshing Sunshine Rub. This amazing little mix is great for seasoning any protein, but will be especially tasty on that local “fresh catch” before you grill it. Loaded with turmeric, it makes a bright and lively presentation. Mix up a big batch of this rub and bring it along to use throughout the week. You will want to keep some of the delicious Honey Citrus Vinaigrette in your refrigerator while at the beach. This dressing is very simple to make and has so many great uses besides just adding a sweet and tangy zip to your favorite salad. It is the key to the following Sweet Potato Salad and the Honey Citrus Salmon dish – a beach vacation must-try. We especially love serving the salmon cold, atop a bed of greens with the Sweet Potato Salad.

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ing the cold, dark winter months. Yes, that’s it! Luckily, for many of us, summer includes a beach vacation. Days of sun and fun and sand; waves lapping at your feet; a nice ocean breeze to keep you cool; friends and family lounging around; and slaving over a hot stove ... wait. No. Definitely not that last part! 20

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This is a light and refreshing meal that you can prepare ahead of time so it will be ready and waiting when you get back from enjoying a lazy day in the sun.

maining olive oil with an emulsion blender or in a mixer. Pour in the olive oil in a steady slow stream. Use caution or the dressing will break or separate.

Wow your family and guests with these simple, but super tasty dishes. These easy recipes will let you put a delicious and healthy dinner on the beach table in no time, so you can save your energy for playing with the family in the sand.

Let the potatoes cool slightly before tossing with the vinaigrette, but toss them with enough to coat while they are still warm. This will allow the potatoes to absorb some of the vinaigrette to enhance the flavor even more. Chill.

SUNSHINE RUB

Before serving, mix in the peppers, onions, and more of the vinaigrette (to your taste) and toss all to coat. Add salt and pepper if needed.

– ¼ cup turmeric – 1/3 cup granulated garlic – ¼ cup coriander – ¼ cup salt – ¼ cup pepper – 2 tablespoons ginger

HONEY CITRUS SALMON

Mix all the spices together. Store in an airtight container. Makes a great seasoning for any protein, veggies, or mix with non-fat Greek yogurt for a tangy, healthy dip.

SWEET POTATO SALAD WITH HONEY CITRUS VINAIGRETTE Sweet Potato Salad: – 8 cups peeled and diced sweet potatoes – Salt and pepper to taste – 2 cups sweet bell pepper strips – 1/2 cup finely julienned red onion Honey Citrus Vinaigrette: – Zest of 2 lemons – 1/2 cup apple cider vinegar – 1/3 cup honey – 1/4 cup lemon juice – 2 tablespoons Dijon mustard – Salt and pepper to taste – 1/2 cup olive oil

Season salmon with salt and pepper. Add olive oil to a hot sauté pan and sear the salmon, seasoned side down first, for 2 minutes. Flip and sear 2 minutes on the other side. Remove from the pan and place on a parchment paper-lined baking sheet.

EXPLORE

Spoon some of the vinaigrette over the top of the salmon and place in a 350-degree oven for 8-11 minutes, or until salmon is cooked through. Delicious hot or cold. Now that you’re armed with simple recipes for delicious vacation fare, rest assured that your long-awaited beach escape will be full of relaxing days of fun and sun, and not evenings slaving over the stove. 

Toss the sweet potatoes in ¼ cup olive oil and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Roast in a 350-degree oven on a parchment-lined sheet pan for 20-30 minutes or until done. While the potatoes are roasting, make the vinaigrette: Mix everything except the re-

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– (4) 6-7 ounce salmon fillets – Honey Citrus Vinaigrette – Salt and pepper – Olive oil

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not just them, but the whole family, outside. So check out these suggestions for activities your family can do together to enjoy the outdoors and make the most out of summer.

START IN YOUR OWN BACKYARD

BY MARGARITA COHEN

SUMMER

BREAK BUCKET LIST

The dog days of summer are here. The sun is shining, you’re spending more time outside, and the kids are ecstatic to be done with school for the year. But there is a catch. Without school to occupy them (and wear them out), children need new activities to keep them busy, get them out of the house,

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and keep you from hearing “I’m so bored!”

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f you have read any of my previous CIRCA articles, then you know I spend a lot of time thinking about what families can do outside. After all, “making outside fun again” has become my mission in life. That’s why for this summer issue, I thought it would be great to create a “bucket list” of fun ideas designed to get

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There’s no shortage of super-duper fun things to do in the summer with your kids. Go to the beach, visit the zoo, camp, check out local fairs and festivals – the list goes on. There are also plenty of things you can do somewhere very close to home ... your own backyard! Here are just a few ideas. – Pitch a tent and camp under the stars. Why not cut out most of the work of a full camping trip and skip straight to the fun? Head out to the backyard, pitch a tent, have a bonfire, and maybe even tell a few spooky ghost stories. – Organize a scavenger hunt. This is a great option for getting your kids moving and engaging their curious minds. Check out some great scavenger hunt ideas and themes at Care.com for inspiration. – Throw a neighborhood luau or other themed party. There are plenty of ideas to spice things up and bring all the neighborhood kids together. Ease the party planning stress by making it a potluck and inviting the parents as well. – Create giant board games in the backyard. There are do-it-yourself solutions for dozens of games, from traditional ones to life-size interactions. Most of these are easy and inexpensive, and perfect for a lazy summer day. – Host your own summer Olympics. During a year without the Olympics, hold your own backyard version. Aside from having the kids participate in events, you can get them to make country flags, hold opening ceremonies, and have them even make their own medals. – Have a bonfire and backyard feast. Many of you probably have memories of summer bonfires, hot dogs, S’mores, and firecrackers. This summer is a great opportunity to pass that special memory onto your kids.

TAKE ADVANTAGE OF WHAT WAKE COUNTY HAS TO OFFER Did you know that six of the 10 fastest-growing towns in North Carolina are in Wake County? That’s what data from the most recent census shows – and the reason for this growth is clear … Wake County is a great place to live. You don’t have to take my word for it – for example, 77% of the local reviewers in Niche’s “Places to Live” described Wake Forest as an “excellent” or “very good’ place to live … and the website itself gave Wake Forest an A+! Those sentiments are shared all across Wake County. In fact, in a first-ever survey commissioned by Raleigh, 91% of the capital city respondents rated Raleigh as a great place to live. In addition,

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of the 1,200 residents that participated, 85% rated the city’s parks and recreation services as good or excellent. So, when thinking of things to do with the family this summer, I recommend you start with the Wake County Parks and Recreation website (www.wakegov.com/parks/Pages/default.aspx). Did you know that Wake County’s eight parks systems and trails facilities welcomed a combined visitation of over 1.3 million people in 2016? Or that Raleigh Parks and Recreation has over 200 hundred parks, 112 tennis courts, and over 100 miles of paved greenway for you and your family to explore? Not to be surpassed in quality outdoor living, Wake Forest offers 561 acres of parks, open space, natural land, and over 50 miles of greenway trails. Complementing the great parks that can be found throughout Wake Forest, the town’s community calendar is chock full of fun – in case you missed it, be sure to check out the article on page 6 for details on the many enjoyable events focused on the whole family around town this summer.

CREATE A FAMILY ADVENTURE Summer can be a time for making memories that you will always treasure, so why not plan one or two more ambitious activities? A few suggestions: – When everyone has a free day, take the family to a nearby park

or greenway for a hike and picnic adventure. Let the kids help you pack a picnic lunch that everyone will enjoy. – Volunteer together. Pick a weekend and take your kids to an organization of their choosing to give back. It’s a great way to teach them valuable life lessons and can serve as a great family bonding experience. – Visit a local museum or educational attraction. Whether it’s the Wake Forest Historical Museum or one of the over 20 Raleigh area museums, there’s at least one that has a program this summer that your family will find fun and educational. – Attend a kid’s DIY workshop at a local home improvement or home décor store – these free clinics offer you and your kids a chance to learn the true meaning of do-it-yourself. There are thousands of ideas to keep your kids occupied during the summer months. Hopefully I have given you a few – or better yet, motivated you to create some of your own. The important thing is to leave the TV and social media behind, go outside, and have some family fun. Make the summer of 2017 your best ever – or at least until 2018!  Margarita Cohen is the owner of Mosquito Joe, and proud sponsor of Family Movie Night at Joyner Park. Mosquito Joe provides mosquito control treatments to the greater Wake Forest area. For more information, or to schedule an appointment for treatment, call 919-926-8851 or visit www.easternwake.mosquitojoe.com.

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has been diagnosed with ADHD. (And they’re not all boys; girls have ADHD, too.) Pediatrician Ricardo Baler, MD, with REX Pediatrics of Holly Springs, recommends parents take the following steps after diagnosis so they can help and get support for their children. 1. Learn about ADHD treatment – and empathize with your child. Listen with an open mind as your child’s pediatrician – or, in some cases, a mental health professional – proposes a treatment plan. Dr. Baler says for very young children like preschoolers, the treatment will probably be therapy-based, while schoolage children usually require medication in addition to therapy. ADHD drugs are effective, but they are also stimulants that require monitoring. Ask your child’s doctor what side effects to watch for, and always give the medicine as directed. It’s important for parents to remember that ADHD is a biological disorder; it’s not their fault, and not the child’s, either, Dr. Baler says. “It’s not that the patient doesn’t want to pay attention or follow directions. He or she can’t pay attention or follow directions.”

YOUR CHILD

HAS ADHD ... NOW WHAT?

TIPS FOR PARENTING A CHILD WITH ADHD You may have seen it coming, but it’s still overwhelming

“The school needs to know,” Dr. Baler says. “They can help your child be more organized, allow him or her to sit closer to the teacher, or give more time to finish a test.” Your child’s teacher can also help determine whether an individualized education program, or IEP, is needed. These personalized plans for children with learning disabilities can make all the difference. Not all children with ADHD require them, Dr. Baler says, but some do. Learning disabilities and ADHD often go hand in hand. 3. Keep going back to the doctor – and tell all. In the early months of ADHD medication treatment, a provider needs to see the child about once a month, Dr. Baler says. This is to ensure that the medicine is working properly and not causing any major side effects. Typically, patients start at a low dose and then their doctors re-evaluate at their monthly check-ins.

to hear: Your child has attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, or ADHD. He’s been getting into trouble at school, his grades are slipping, and getting him to sit down and focus on homework – or even making it through a family

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2. Talk to your child’s teacher(s). Your child’s teacher undoubtedly knows that he or she has an attention problem. In fact, many parents find out their child has ADHD as a result of getting one too many emails or phone calls from frustrated teachers. Now that you have a diagnosis, it’s time to work as a team.

dinner – is almost impossible. ut now you know why, and you can do something about it. A diagnosis of ADHD is an important first step in helping your child, as other learning disabilities are managed differently. And know that you’re not alone – about 1 in 10 American children

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Some children experience decreased appetite, stomachaches, or depressed mood as a result of the medication, which would prompt their provider to make adjustments. But sometimes, parents don’t tell doctors that the child is still struggling with behavioral issues. Dr. Baler says it’s hard for him to give the most effective treatment when he doesn’t know how the child is doing.

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“We are not here to judge; we are here to help,” Dr. Baler says. As kids grow, their needs change. Getting accurate feedback from parents and teachers helps ensure that children are getting the correct care. Once patients are doing well, provided that their doctors have no further concerns, follow-ups can be limited to every three to six months. 4. Consider therapy – and be ready to participate. Even if your child is on medication, behavior therapy can go a long way toward helping him or her better control his or her behavior, which will improve functioning at school and home. A therapist trained in ADHD can teach skills that will help minimize problematic behavior, such as disrupting class or fighting with siblings. This improvement in behavior and self-control can raise the child’s self-esteem. A behavioral therapist might be a psychologist, licensed counselor, or social worker. Dr. Baler suggests asking potential therapists to explain their approach to ADHD. He says it’s best to find someone who has experience working with the entire family. Yes, that means you’ll be in training, too, to learn methods for helping your child deal with his or her symptoms. 5. Manage your expectations. Sometimes parents’ expectations for their child’s treatment are just too high, Dr. Baler says. They might expect a child on medication to behave near-perfectly, or that a student who struggled in school will suddenly get top grades. Focusing on your child’s success in that way will put too much pressure on both of you. Remember what really matters, and don’t show your child you’re disappointed if he or she doesn’t change overnight. “They’re not machines. They’re still children,” Dr. Baler says. “We need to create realistic expectations when they start on medication. They need to be happy, not get As.” It’s also important to know that children with ADHD often want to get off their medication during the teenage years, which can lead to disruption at home and school. Dr. Baler suggests involving teenagers in decisions about their treatment to encourage them to take ownership of their progress. Parenting is often a challenge; and parenting a child with ADHD can be even more so ... but knowing the diagnosis, arming yourself with information about it, and teaming with knowledgeable professionals on an effective long-term treatment plan can result in your child leading a happy, healthy life.  If you suspect your child might have ADHD, talk to your pediatrician. If you don’t have a pediatrician, you can search UNC Physicians Network (https://findadoc.unchealthcare.org/pn) for one near you.

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OUTDOOR

DECOR

BY RHONDA BENVIE

Outdoor spaces have become an extension of indoor spac-

warm and inviting. The furniture should have the same style and coloring as your indoor space. If you are not sure if it works or not, think about taking an indoor chair into the outside space. Does that chair look aesthetically pleasing with the furniture that you have on the screened porch? If not, you may need to rethink your choices.

es. While providing a relaxing, comfortable atmosphere for enjoying warm summer days and cool autumn nights, they also add square footage to large and small houses alike. Just like indoor spaces, outdoor spaces offer the perfect canvas

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for added decorating personality. ow you decorate your outdoor spaces ultimately depends on the location of them relative to the inside of your home. If your deck, patio, or screened porch is a focal point and can be seen from inside, then the dĂŠcor of it should be an extension of your indoor dĂŠcor. For example, you may have sliding or French doors that lead to your outdoor space from the living room; therefore, you can clearly see it from inside. This would not be a great place to establish a beach theme if you live in the mountains in a log home. It needs to flow as if it were the same room; therefore, making the spaces look bigger.

The same rules apply if you have a deck or patio off of your living space. You need to think of this area as an open floor plan with no ceiling. Floor plan the space the same way you would a screened porch, once you decide on its use. If you need shade, consider adding a retractable awning. A large moving umbrella also works well for protection from the sun. Shade needs to be a priority,

When decorating your outdoor space, the first decision is to decide how you want to use the area. Will it be for outdoor entertaining and dining? If so, think dining table with grill area and bar that can serve as a buffet area as well. Will it be a space to escape from everyday life? Then think comfy sofa, or even a daybed that can double as seating; or maybe a swing is more your style. It could be a combination of both if the space is large enough. Deciding on what you want and floor planning the space is crucial to getting the best results. Screened porches are the ultimate in outdoor spaces. They offer shade and protection from the elements and pesky bugs, while simultaneously letting you enjoy the outdoor breeze and sounds of nature. When decorating this retreat space, treat it as if it were indoors. Drapes made of outdoor fabric add height and warmth to the space. Outdoor rugs can ground it, especially if the space is large and you have set up a living and dining area on the porch. Lighting can set different moods, while plants can make it feel 26

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or you will find the space will not be used to its fullest capacity due to the southern heat. Outdoor fans come in different aesthetic styles and will help keep you cool, as well as keep some of the bugs at bay. For plants on a deck, think about a tall tree that can be strung with lights for additional lighting at night. You may have a fantastic outdoor view, and that view may be awesome from your indoor space as well. The last thing you want to do is obstruct it. When constructing a screened porch, consider incorporating larger and taller windows. Not only will this help with the scenic view, but it will also allow for more light, as screened porches tend to make the inside area a bit darker. For a deck, you must have railings for safety purposes. But think about glass panels that will not hinder the view at all. Also, cable rails are so thin, they will not obstruct your line of sight. If you have a dining table in your outdoor space, consider using benches instead of chairs, as the height of their backs could obstruct the view as well. For variety and added interest, a combination of chairs and benches look great too, if the layout allows. Maybe you do not have a porch, deck, or patio. If so, no need to fret … if you have a backyard with trees, you still have decorating options for your outdoor enjoyment. Set up an outdoor table under the trees with a grill to the side. Hang lanterns from the tree and burn citronella candles for lighting and bug control in one.

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Decorate the area with flowers. A stone path leading from your home to the area will make it feel like part of the house. If your outdoor space can’t be seen from the inside of your home at all, this gives you more freedom to go a little wild with the décor. Perhaps brighter colors or a little bit of a theme is what you desire; both are great, but still try to maintain a balance with the indoor décor. If your inside is warm in color tones, add cushions in a neutral warm hue to outdoor furniture, but toss in a handful of colorful pillows for extra pop and personality. Maybe you long for a beach house – add a few nautical decorations. Throw a few beach accessories in with other traditional accessories for a happy medium. Whatever your style or budget, an outdoor space is an extension of your indoor space. If well thought out and planned, you will certainly find that this outdoor square footage may become your favorite new spot to enjoy your morning coffee, entertain family and friends, simply escape from the daily grind, or create magical memories with loved ones. So go ahead – get decorating, and make your outdoor living space a reflection of your home and of you.  Rhonda Benvie is the owner of Help Me Rhonda Interiors, 1600 Heritage Commerce Court, Suite 103 in Wake Forest and Open Door Furniture & Accents, a furniture and accessories store also in Wake Forest. Visit www.helpmerhondainteriors.com or www.opendoorfurnitureandaccents.com, or call 919-263-9054.

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How do these people treat celiac disease? By transitioning their diet to a gluten-free one – a diet that excludes the gluten protein – these folks can help control their symptoms, prevent complications, and heal their damaged villi over time, and thus, ultimately, their nutrient absorption abilities. Going gluten-free sounds easier said than done, right? Leading a gluten-free lifestyle may seem daunting and frustrating at first. After all, gluten is so commonly found in many of our society’s foods, such as bread and pasta, and even in beer, as well as a wide range of other processed foods that contain these grains. But with time, patience, and a little culinary creativity, you will quickly discover that many of the foods you already eat are actually gluten-free (such as beans, seeds, and nuts in their natural, unprocessed state; fresh eggs; fresh meats, fish, and poultry, as long as they aren’t breaded, batter-coated, or marinated; fruits and veggies; and most dairy products). In addition, grocery stores and restaurants are offering more and more gluten-free items, including gluten-free breads and pastas. And by researching how to substitute gluten-free grains and starches for wheat, barley, and rye (including amaranth, arrowroot, buckwheat, corn and cornmeal, flax, hominy, millet, quinoa, rice, sorghum, soy, tapioca, and teff), and which flours you can safely use in gluten-free cooking, preparing healthy and delicious dishes for your family won’t seem quite so overwhelming. BY SARAH B. STOKES

If you are just starting a gluten-free diet, be sure to consult with your doctor for guidance and advice about how to avoid gluten while still eating a healthy and balanced diet.

GOING

GLUTEN-FREE? luten-free … some say it’s a fad; but for some, it’s a matter of life or death. Gluten is a protein that is found in grains such as wheat, rye, and barley. And for many of us, eating gluten doesn’t provide any medical complications. However, for the one in 133 people in the United States who have the inherited autoimmune disease celiac disease, gluten causes inflammation in their small intestines, damaging the villi that line them and promote nutrient absorption. This prevents these individuals from properly absorbing nutrients from their food into their bodies. This leaves them feeling tired, weak, and with a lack of energy. Additional symptoms that have been attributed to gluten-sensitivity include diarrhea, abdominal cramping, bloating, and headaches. 28

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BACON WRAPPED JALAPEÑO POPPERS – 1/2 cup cream cheese – 1/4 cup shredded sharp cheddar cheese – 6 large jalapeño peppers – 12 slices of bacon

MAKING SENSE OF TRANSITIONING TO A GLUTEN-FREE LIFESTYLE

G

Following is one of my favorite go-to gluten-free appetizers that is easy to prepare, super tasty, and sure to add a little spice to your summer dinner or party planning menu.

Cut jalapeño peppers in half and take out the seeds. Mix cream cheese and cheddar cheese in a bowl. Fill peppers with cheese mixture. Wrap each pepper with a slice of bacon. Use a toothpick to hold together. Grill or bake until bacon is thoroughly cooked. There are many variations you can do with this recipe. For instance, add sausage or herbs or mix in the jalapeño seeds to increase the level of heat you want in these Jalapeño Poppers. Enjoy!  Sarah B. Stokes is the owner of Gluten-Free With Sarah B, a local small business providing an array of gourmet gluten-free and allergenfriendly products and specializing in doughnuts, breads, and desserts. She may be reached at gfwithsarahb@gmail.com, or follow her on social media @GFwithSarahB with the hashtag #makelifetasty.

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DISASTER

PREP

FOR YOUR PET BY SHANNON ARNER

Tis the season! Hurricane season, that is. Living in North

your contact information is up-to-date, so check with your microchip provider to confirm they have your correct address and phone number ... otherwise, the microchip is worthless.

Carolina, we are fortunate to experience all four seasons. Unfortunately, as soon as the summer temperatures begin to rise, we begin to also contemplate if/when a hurricane is going to arrive. Summer around here brings forth opportunities for a great deal of enjoyable outdoor activity; but in many instances, tropical storms and disastrous weather

W often follow suit.

hen harsh weather arrives, it is important to have a plan. Have you thought about an emergency preparedness plan for your family? If so, does it include your pet(s)? It should. Regular emergency drills are imperative for your family to know how to respond should dangerous conditions arise. Your practice drills should also include your pet. Designate a family member to secure the dog or cat for shelter, along with the rest of the family. After all, your furry family members are unable to protect themselves in emergency situations and depend on you for help. There are some basic strategies for including your pet in your emergency preparedness plan. The first is to make sure he or she is microchipped, and has identification on his/her collar. The key to having beneficial microchip information is making sure 30

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You should always have a current photo of you and your pet. If your pet is lost or stolen, you can always prove he or she is indeed yours by having a photo of you and Fido or Fluffy. Be sure it isn’t a photo of when your dog was six months old, if he is now eight ... chances are, he looks a lot different now and it may be fruitless trying to explain that the very different looking pet is yours. A physical photo is important as there are no guarantees that your mobile phone containing digital pictures will be charged, and electricity to charge it may not be working in a disaster situation. Your home should include not only a first aid kit, but also a pet first aid kit. Do not ever assume that human medications can be used for animals. There are many human medications that are toxic to animals, so they need their own first aid. Pet first aid kits can be put together yourself, or pre-purchased from many pet stores. Always include items that are specific to your own animal, such as medications needed, oral syringes, back-up food, and an extra leash. Of course, back-up water is also valuable. It is a good idea to have a back-up travel crate for your cat, but also for your dog. Many pets become fearful during harsh weather conditions, and may be uncontrollable on a leash. Crating your pet provides safety and ease with travel or finding shelter. Many storm shelters that allow pets require them to be in a crate. If you have a cat, be sure your emergency preparedness kit has a

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small litter pan, and litter. Again, if phone and electrical lines are down, it may also be difficult to prove your pet has his/her rabies vaccine. This is also often required for many storm shelters to allow pets. Include a copy of an updated rabies certificate in your emergency preparedness kit as well. The most important way to protect your pet in a storm is to never leave him or her if you are forced to evacuate. Domesticated animals depend on you for their basic needs. Our pets are not treated like animals who live in the wild. It is untrue that your domesticated pet will rely on his or her “animal instincts” to survive. Leaving your pets can be detrimental to their lives. They can drown in flood waters, become dehydrated, or starve due to lack of survival tools that you provide them regularly. As a responsible pet parent, you should also have a plan for responding to your pet’s emergency needs when it does not involve weather. For example, imagine walking into your home one day and discovering that your dog has eaten a chocolate bar your child left lying out, or your cat is choking on a piece of string – will you know what to do? You can empower yourself as a pet parent by taking a pet CPR/first aid class so that you are prepared to act if your pet becomes hurt or injured, prior to getting him/her transported to the veterinary

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hospital. Not only will you learn the many ways to respond in the event of an emergency, but you will also learn ways to prevent many of them from occurring. Preventable accidents are the leading cause of death and injuries among pre-senior dogs and cats. Your pet already thinks you are a superhero. He/she depends on you for his or her health and wellbeing, so why not have all of the training you can to help your best friend when he/she needs you most? Always know where the nearest emergency veterinary hospital is. Store the address and phone number in your mobile phone so you can easily transport when time is of the essence. Hurricanes, tornadoes, and other disastrous weather often do not allow time to prepare. Do yourself a favor and put together a plan prior to needing one. Add to your calendar a reminder, perhaps once a quarter, to check the expiration dates of the consumables and medications, and replace as needed. Expired food or medications will most likely not behoove you or your pet in an emergency. With preparation and practice, you can feel at ease knowing that in the event of an emergency, you and your family, including your furry family, will be safe and sound.  Shannon Arner is a Certified Professional Pet Sitter and the owner/ founder of Pet ‘n Nanny LLC. Pet ‘n Nanny provides professional pet sitting/dog walking services, and pet CPR/first aid classes to Wake Forest, Rolesville, and Raleigh communities. For more information, please visit www.petnnanny.com.

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Imagine sitting in a classroom taking notes and fighting a focusing problem that won’t allow you to change your focus from near to far and back again quickly enough to keep up with the instructor. Or imagine starting the day being able to easily read this paragraph, but experiencing double vision as the day goes on. Many people block the vision in one eye to avoid seeing double. Imagine reading a paragraph and having the letters or words appear to move and jump as you are trying to comprehend what you are reading. In any of these cases, the person having the vision problem more than likely has good eyesight, seeing 20/20 either with or without corrective lenses. Most school screenings check for visual acuity alone and do not screen for visual skills including tracking, focusing, eye teaming, or perceptual skills. Many children and adults do not realize that their struggles in the classroom and/or workplace are in no way linked to intelligence or how hard they are trying; instead, they are not able to visually process the information put before them. Not knowing the cause of classroom and later adult life skills problems can have a detrimental effect on self-esteem and behavior. Many children who begin to be labeled as classroom problems can grow into troubled teens, and eventually struggling adults, if their visual problems are not diagnosed and treated.

BY CASSANDRIA WARR, O.D.

VISION AND

LEARNING

Approximately 10% of the population with symptoms of blurred

IS A VISION PROBLEM STANDING IN THE WAY OF YOUR CHILD’S LEARNING?

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ision is much more than being able to see 20/20. In order for the visual system to work properly, the eyes must work well together as a team and the brain must be able to correctly process the visual information that it receives. Dysfunction in either of these skills can cause learning delays and/or eyestrain and usually cannot be corrected with glasses or contact lenses. Vision therapy is a highly individualized, supervised program designed to correct visual-motor and/or perceptual cognitive difficulties. Vision is the prerequisite for reading. Poor visual skills can lead to poor reading skills and a significant handicap in learning disabilities. The five most common signs that a vision problem may be interfering with reading and learning are: – Skipping lines, re-reading lines; – Poor reading comprehension; – Homework takes much longer than it should; – Reversals of letters like “b” and “d” in reading and writing; – Short attention span with reading and schoolwork. 32

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vision and eyestrain have vision problems that cannot be treated successfully using eyeglasses alone. It is this group of people who need vision therapy. Vision therapy has been shown to benefit children and adults with problems of eye teaming, focusing, tracking, amblyopia (lazy eye), strabismus (crossed eye), and visual perception. Individuals with these problems experience eyestrain when reading or doing other close work, inability to work quickly, sleepiness, inability to attend and concentrate, double vision, or reduced vision. Children with vision problems can face significant problems at school and work and have difficulty with sports. With proper diagnosis and treatment, reading levels and comprehension – and thus, school or work performances – can improve significantly. If you answer “yes” or “sometimes” to any of the following questions, a binocular vision issue may be standing in the way of your child’s academic success. – Do you have concerns about your child’s reading abilities? – Does your child skip lines/words when reading? – Does your child struggle to keep attention centered on reading? – Does your child have better comprehension when someone reads to him or her? – Is homework a struggle? – Does your child have difficulty completing assignments in a reasonable amount of time? – Do you have concerns with your child’s reversals of letters/numbers? – Do you have concerns about your child’s handwriting skills? – Does your child have frequent headaches or eye discomfort while reading or doing homework? – Does your child have trouble with motion sickness during trips in the car? An individualized vision therapy program designed by a developmental optometrist can help to correct vision dysfunctions that lend to poor reading and learning abilities. A typical treatment plan includes: – Visual processing development; – Oculomotor therapy (“tracking”); – Accommodation “focusing” development; – Binocular vision therapy; – Visual imagery therapy; – Dynamic visual based reading program.  Cassandria Warr, O.D. is a developmental optometrist with McPherson Family Eye Care in Wake Forest. For more information, visit www.mcphersonfamilyeyecare.com.

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WISE WATERING

A GUIDE TO PROPER LANDSCAPE WATERING BY TINA MAST

Improper watering is without a doubt the leading cause of plant death in the landscape. One of the reasons that watering is so misunderstood is that it can be difficult to tell someone exactly how much and how often they should be watering. Each watering situation is different and depends on a number of conditions including the soil, weather, sun exposure, mulch, and whether or not the plant is actively

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growing, as well as the type of plant in question. t’s important to know the conditions in which your plants are going to best thrive. While some plants actually prefer more extreme conditions such as wet or dry soils, most plants are somewhere in the middle of the spectrum and like soil that is moist but well-drained. This means that if you squeeze together some soil in your hand, it should stick together, but fall apart easily.

warm weather. The amount you apply should be enough to thoroughly moisten the rootball. Plants with smaller rootballs, such as those in one or three gallon pots, often require more frequent watering than those with larger ones. Don’t be afraid to stick your finger down into the rootball to check for moisture. After the first month, you should be able to decrease watering frequency. Plants planted in the fall have longer to begin establishing a root system before the heat of summer, but they may still require supplemental watering for up to two years after planting. Even though the colder months are still a ways off, be aware that during that timeframe, if we have long periods without rain through winter, you need to check the soil moisture and water when needed. Be wary if forecasters call for extended periods of

ESTABLISHED TREES AND SHRUBS Trees and shrubs that have been planted in the landscape for two years or more should be pretty well established and shouldn’t require much supplemental watering. A good rule of thumb for the average plant is that you want it to get approximately one inch of water per week during periods without rain. If you have an irrigation system, you can determine the water output by putting a shallow container such as a cat food or tuna can on the ground to catch the water. It’s better if the plants receive this amount of water in one or two waterings, rather than over several waterings. It will encourage deep root growth and help prevent root rot.

NEWLY PLANTED TREES AND SHRUBS Trees and shrubs that are newly planted require more attention than established plantings. These plants usually have a small rootball in comparison to the rest of the plant. Plants should always be thoroughly watered at the time of planting. Watering during the first month after planting is especially critical. If we have little rainfall, you may need to water every two to three days during 34

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freezing temperatures and dry conditions which can be a death sentence for many plants.

ANNUALS AND PERENNIALS Annuals and perennials establish more quickly than shrubs or trees, but may have to be watered more frequently once established. Watering during the first month after planting is similar to that for trees and shrubs – every two to three days, although some plants may need daily watering initially. After that first month, two to three times per week should be enough.

TIPS FOR WATERING AND FOR WATER CONSERVATION – Water deeply to encourage deep root growth and promote better drought adaptability. Keep water pressure low so water has time to seep in, rather than run off. – Provide a 2” to 3” layer of mulch to improve moisture retention and decrease watering (and cut down on weeding). Be sure to keep mulch away from contact with the base of the plant. – During warm weather, water early in the morning or in the evening to reduce evaporation. – Choose drought-tolerant plants to reduce water needs. – Consider using rain barrels to collect runoff from downspouts. Fill watering cans while waiting for shower water to get hot. – Be mindful of plants that may be getting watered when you irrigate your lawn and make sure they are not staying too moist. – Know the signs of improper watering. Wilting, brown leaf edges, and stunted growth are signs of underwatering. Wilting that does not recover with watering can be a sign of overwatering. – Group plantings by water needs, placing drought-tolerant plants with other ones that like dry conditions and plants that require more water with similar plants. That way you can water each group accordingly. Extra tip: watering chores can be made easier by planting the droughtlovers further away from the house while the plants that need more attention are closer to the house (and the hose). – Build a watering basin around plants so that water stays in the vicinity of the root zone instead of running along the soil surface away from the plant’s roots.  Tina Mast is communications director for Homewood Nursery & Garden Center and can be reached at 919-847-0117 or info@homewoodnursery.com.

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SUNSCREENS ...

NOT ALL

ARE CREATED EQUAL BY BETH NORTON

So often, people return from their tropical dream vacations sunburned, and are confused as to why. I hear this all the time – “I used sunscreen the entire trip, so why did

T

I get so much sun?” I will try to keep it simple ... he two most dangerous types of ultraviolet sun rays are UVB and UVA. UVB are the rays most responsible for sunburning, while UVA rays penetrate deeper in the dermis and cause aging, as well as suppression of the immune system. Both rays increase a person’s risk of getting skin cancer, which is the number one cancer in the United States. It is also the most pre-

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ventable cancer, if you apply sunscreen before heading out into the sun, and if you apply it correctly. You should choose your sunscreen wisely, as not all are created equal. Make sure the one you select is a broad spectrum sunscreen (meaning it will block both UVA and UVB rays) and contains a zinc or titanium dioxide, as these provide the best coverage and protection. It may also contain a chemical block such as avobenzone or oxybenzone. Apply sunscreen 15 minutes before exposure to sun, and be sure to reapply every two hours. If swimming or sweating, consider using a water-resistant version. 

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SPF (sun protection factor) is the measure of a sunscreen’s ability to prevent UV rays from damaging the skin. Sunscreens with an SPF of 30 are sufficient, as long as they offer broad spectrum protection. While you may think it’s best to opt for a sunscreen with a higher SPF, these versions are many times more expensive, causing people to often make the mistake of using less. Instead, choose a less expensive sunscreen with sufficient SPF and reapply every two hours. Last, but certainly not least, most people simply do not use the correct amount of sunscreen for proper protection. It is recommended to use one ounce (approximately the amount that would fill a shot glass) for average size full-body application and a quarter of a teaspoon for face and neck application.  We all know that daily sunscreen protection is essential for the prevention of skin cancer, skin damage, and premature aging. But with all the brands stocking store shelves, choosing the best sunscreen can be overwhelming. And since they aren’t all created equal, be sure to keep these tips in mind when purchasing sunscreen so you can make the best choice for you and your family.  Beth Norton, MS, PA-C is with Heritage Urgent and Primary Care and Heritage Med Spa. Call 919-761-5678 today to make a primary care appointment.

Showcasing the latest in home improvement products, services and features ■

■ ■ Presented By

N U S T A S

3 1 2 1 Aug

Sat 9 am–4 pm Sun 12–5 pm Free Admission ~ Free Parking

Wake Forest Renaissance Centre

Sponsored by Mitchell Heating & Cooling Champion Windows, Sunrooms & Home Exteriors ■ Century Link

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– Clean and inspect screens; patch holes. Screens can be cleaned quickly and thoroughly with just a hose and sturdy rag to wipe away accumulated dirt and grime. Dry in the sun before installing. – Clean blinds, curtains, window shades, and valances. Keeping blinds and curtains closed is a great way to keep your home cool and save on energy costs during the months when you need to air condition. Since you’ll be seeing much more of them this summer, it’s a great time to clean all window treatments and consider lightening up on fabrics and colors. – Lighten the bedding. Think cotton in airy colors such as pure whites and pastels. Flip, rotate, and vacuum mattresses and dust thoroughly in and around beds to remove accumulated pollen and other recent spring detritus.

BY TODD AND CHERYL NELSON

– Deep clean your fridge and defrost the freezer to maximize space for lots of fresh, light foods; stock your pantry with essentials for salads, grilled specialties, and other cooling summer fare.

INDOOR

HOME PREP

S

FOR SUMMER COMFORT

– Finally, if you expect to keep your windows closed during this A/C season, freshen indoor air with new air-cleaning plants.  Todd and Cheryl Nelson are the co-owners of MaidPro of Raleigh and Wake Forest. For cleaning tips, visit www.maidpro.com/raleighnorth or call 919-871-9996.

ummer beckons us outside – but sometimes the North Carolina summer temperatures drive us back inside, seeking a little relief from the heat. And while you may be summer-ready, is your home? Here’s a checklist of tasks to prepare your home for a most comfortable and pleasant season.

– Clean and/or replace home ventilation and air conditioning filters. If you’ve not done so at least once in the past year or two, summer is also a great time to bring in a professional service to inspect and clean all central HVAC equipment, ducts, vents, and air filters. – Inspect for and address any signs of mold and mildew growth around your house, which summer’s humidity will be sure to feed. – Clean ceiling and portable fans. Note that most portable fans can be easily disassembled, enabling accumulated dust and grime to be washed from blades and grills. If you don’t have the proper tools – such as an extender pole – for cleaning ceiling fans safely, recruit at least one person to spot you on a ladder. Since you’ll have the ladder out anyway, remove and clean lighting fixture covers, recessed fixtures, and bulbs to brighten up your space. – Wash windows and clear away dead bugs and other debris that might have collected inside window casings over past seasons. 38

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– Gear up your grilling game. If you have a gas grill, fill propane tanks, and clean and inspect all gas lines and connections. – Decorate. The most enjoyable outdoor summer spaces borrow ideas from home decorating. For example, there is a whole world of amazing ideas just for outer walls. Container gardening in beautiful pots that adorn porches and patios provide non-stop color during the summer months, and all year long. Research which blooms and scents are most attractive to biting bugs and stinging creatures such as bees, as well as to more welcome visitors such as butterflies and hummingbirds. And bear in mind as you decorate that mosquitoes breed rapidly in standing water – so avoid open containers that will collect rainwater. And consider using containers to grow veggies and herbs that you can harvest literally when grilling. Talk about fresh!

BY TODD AND CHERYL NELSON

OUTDOOR

HOME PREP

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FOR SUMMER COMFORT

Other elements to consider when decorating outdoor spaces for summer include: strings of white or colorful twinkling lights; paper lanterns; kerosene or solar-powered torches; a heating element such as a fire pit, propane heater, or chiminea for cooler nights as we approach autumn; and lots of colorful pillows, cushions, and even a blanket or two for maximum lounging comfort.  Todd and Cheryl Nelson are the co-owners of MaidPro of Raleigh and Wake Forest. For cleaning tips, visit www.maidpro.com/raleighnorth or call 919-871-9996.

’ve just focused on getting the interior of your home ready for a pleasant, carefree season, but summer is about enjoying sunny days and lazy evenings outside. Here is a checklist for getting the exterior of your home summertime-ready, so you can create memorable outdoor living and entertaining experiences all season long.

– Start with repair work. Inspect for and fix any wear and tear that could pose hazards of physical injury, such as splintering or rotting wood, loose or raised nails, cracks in cement, broken flagstones, and so forth. While you’re at it, inspect for – and be sure to clean out and seal – any places that might make ideal nesting spots for wasps, hornets, or other stinging pests. – Get out the hose. Take advantage of early mornings or later evenings when it’s slightly cooler for the more physically demanding work of sweeping, pulling weeds, and hosing down, scrubbing, or power-washing patios, decks, balconies, and outdoor furniture. – Freshen the furniture. Especially if your patio furniture resides outside all year long, inspect each piece carefully for signs of rust, rot, structural weakness, loose nails, and screws, and address accordingly. Consider repainting, restaining, and/or treating for future resistance to rust. Check and treat all cushions, pillows, umbrellas, and other textiles for mold and mildew.

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FLANK STEAK GRILLED CHEESE SANDWICH (Makes four sandwiches) Grilled cheese isn’t just for kids anymore! This grown-up twist on a childhood classic will keep your guests feeling full all afternoon. Flank Steak – 1 pound flank steak – 4 ounces sundried tomatoes – 9 ounces Gruyere cheese, shredded – 4 ounces fresh basil leaves – 2 tablespoons Montreal seasoning – 8 slices sourdough bread – 3 tablespoons olive oil Season each side of the flank steak with one tablespoon of Montreal seasoning and coat with olive oil. For medium-rare temperature, grill one side of the steak for four minutes, then turn it over and cook for an additional four minutes. Remove steak from heat and lest rest for five minutes before slicing to keep all juices inside. Butter Spread – 1/3 cup unsalted butter, softened – 1 tablespoon shallots, minced – Pink sea salt and fresh cracked black pepper to taste

BY GREGORY MACK

SUMMER

Blend all ingredients in a food processor for 20 seconds. Place the spread in a small bowl.

GRILLING MADE SIMPLE

Are you feeling the heat to plan the perfect cookout this summer? With kids out of school and weekends packed with trips to the beach or the local swimming pool, it can be difficult to set aside enough time to find and shop for the perfect

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grilling recipes that will impress your family and friends. have created three easy and flavorful recipes that are sure to please palates of all ages and keep them coming back for more. What’s more, you can easily find all of these fresh, inexpensive ingredients conveniently at your local grocery store so that you can get back to catching those poolside rays stress-free.

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Put the steak on a cutting board and slice into thin strips against the grain. Set aside. Lay out two slices of bread per sandwich. Put one and a half ounces of cheese on each side. On one side, put four ounces of meat, one ounce of sundried tomatoes, and four basil leaves. Place other side on top. Using a butter spreader, coat both sides with butter spread. Put a cast iron pan on the grill over medium-high heat. Once the pan is hot, cook the sandwich on each side for two minutes. Remove from heat, and cut in half. Serve immediately.

GRILLED OYSTERS WITH BARBECUE RUM SAUCE There’s no need to feel intimidated by cooking oysters. These delicacies are deceptively simple to cook and packed with flavor that is enhanced in this recipe with an amazing barbecue rum sauce. – 1 dozen Blue Point oysters – 6 ounces spiced rum – 1 medium sweet onion, diced – 2 ounces molasses – 12 ounces barbecue sauce – 1 ounce vegetable oil

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Place a sauté pan on the grill over medium-high heat. Once it starts to smoke, add oil and onion. Sauté until the onion turns brown, then remove the pan from the grill. Add rum, then return the pan to the grill and reduce by one-third. Add molasses and barbecue sauce and let it come to a simmer. Remove from the grill and set aside. Place oysters on the grill over medium-high heat for three minutes. After they crack open, remove the top of the shell and spoon onehalf tablespoon of sauce on each oyster. Close the grill’s lid and cook for two minutes. Remove the oysters and place on a serving tray.

LIME GRILLED SHRIMP, PINEAPPLE, AND ONION SKEWERS (Makes four skewers) Time to put away those forks and knives. What says summer more than a cool drink in one hand and a shrimp skewer in the other? – 1 pineapple – 2 sweet onions – 1 pound shrimp, shell off (approximately 6 shrimp per skewer) – 2 tablespoons lime juice – 2 tablespoons cilantro – 3 tablespoons olive oil – 2 tablespoons garlic, minced

– 1 tablespoon ginger paste – Salt and fresh cracked black pepper to taste – 4 cooking skewers Peel and devein the shrimp. Place in a bowl, and add lime juice, cilantro, olive oil, garlic, ginger, and salt and pepper. Cover the bowl and let marinate in the refrigerator for 12 hours. Remove the pineapple’s skin and slice into four quarters. Cut each quarter into six evenly-sized pieces. Peel both onions, and slice in half. Cut each half into four quarters. Place one piece of pineapple, one shrimp, and one piece of onion on a skewer. Repeat six times for each skewer. Spray all skewers with nonstick cooking spray. Over medium heat, place the skewers on the grill for six minutes on each side. Remove from heat and serve. Ready to get the party started? Now there’s no need to feel stressed about firing up the grill to prepare the perfect spread of food that is deliciously satisfying, yet refreshing for the hot summer months.  Kroger Culinary Chef Gregory Mack is a highly experienced chef, having earned an AAS degree in culinary arts from the Lincoln Culinary Institute in Cromwell, Connecticut. Since moving to North Carolina in 2010, Mack has been creating delicious dishes for more than three years at Kroger. Through his imaginative appetizer, main course, and dessert recipes, he hopes to inspire others to have fun in the kitchen.

5 th Annual Dirty Dogs 5

Pet Extravaganza September 23-24

a t Joyner Park

Adopt. Donate. Educate. raise money, awareness, and food donations for all of the participating rescues • Ultimate Air Dogs • Muddy the Mudcat • Demonstrations by K-9 Unit • Seminars on Pet Care • Microchip & Rabies Clinic

• Games for Pets & Children • Contests • Music • Doggie Kissing Booth • Food Trucks • Pet Vendors & more

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ACNE ...

THE DREADED FOUR-LETTER WORD

BY DIANE MACK

Acne … teenagers shudder at the thought of another breakout. Young 20-somethings wonder why all of a sudden unsightly pimples are appearing that didn’t show up during their teenage years. Adults who thought this pesky problem was a thing of the past are discovering that it’s once again rearing its ugly head. Whatever your age, acne has been a

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struggle for many for centuries. ut over the years, we have fortunately learned a great deal about this common skin condition, and how to treat it effectively. The best part? We can now treat acne holistically, without the use of harsh chemicals.

It is important to remember that, in addition to being the first line of defense against disease, skin is a detoxification organ. As such, it attempts to remove toxins that the body can not use or does not need. We can look at the skin as an eco-system with good and bad bacteria and their byproducts balancing each other to remain healthy. Candida is one of the bad bacteria that grows in our gut. Recent studies have shown that a bloom in candida will trigger the skin’s detoxification responses. Often, we associate acne with an excess of oil – but in this case, the candida bloom in the gut will make acne worse, especially in the cheek areas, which is not necessarily where we think of oily skin. Since candida bacteria resides in the gut, 42

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what we eat will either feed or starve it. A healthy diet consisting of plenty of water and unprocessed foods will starve the candida bacteria, and others, resulting in clearing your skin, and keeping it that way. One thing I want to make clear is acne does not start on the outside. Many outside influences can exacerbate the condition – including blockages in the skin’s pores – but we find that microcomedones can be present 90 days before a breakout appears deep within the skin. Micro-comedones are what result in a pimple. The extra oils and inflammation caused by the natural detox response of the body will result in acne breakouts. So what does this mean? There are some common and practical things to know that will help you in your quest to get clear skin. Start with the external influences. For instance, use a fragrancefree detergent on laundry and stay away from dryer sheets or fabric softeners. Their chemicals leave a residue on clothes, sheets, and pillowcases which can be transferred to your skin and clog your pores, exacerbating breakouts. Cosmetics and hair products containing pore-clogging ingredients can also cause problems. Certain foods – such as dairy and sugar which feed the candida bacteria – should be avoided as well. Staying away from foods that contain androgen hormones – such as peanuts, wheat germ, and shellfish, to name just a few – should also be steered cleared of. Some medications and recreational drugs can also make acne worse (prescribed medications should be taken as discussed with your physician). It is also extremely important to receive a thorough skin analysis from a licensed professional who will take your health history,

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diet, and lifestyle into consideration when looking for answers to questions about why you may be breaking out. He or she will give you much more information and create an individualized plan to help clear your skin. Bear in mind that it can take up to a year with professional products and a treatment protocol to improve your acneic condition, so you will need to practice some patience. Remember how I said earlier that pimples can be growing for 90 days? Those will not disappear overnight, so it’s important to give your skin time to adjust to new treatment protocols. Finally, severe acne should be treated by a medical doctor. As far as skin care goes, here are some suggestions you can do right now. Start with a good cleanser – one that does not contain harsh chemicals or SLS (Sodium lauryl sulfate). Scrubbing or exfoliating too much will cause skin to overreact, producing more oil and an inflammatory response. Inflammation, whether caused by scrubbing or by the skin’s detox response, isn’t good for acneic skin … you may be making your breakouts worse. When you first feel a breakout coming on, take a small piece of ice and rub it on the lesion for about five minutes, twice a day. And most importantly, do not pick at the pimple. A corrective serum, or what I call the “work horse” of skin care, and a moisturizer are important to include in your daily regimen as well – remember that skin needs water from the outside, as well as from the inside, to be healthy. Non-chemical sunscreen during the day is also a good idea to achieve and maintain healthy skin. Whether you’re a young teen experiencing skin care challenges for the first time, or someone in your 40s who has been struggling with acne problems for decades, don’t give up on the dream of clear skin and a beautiful, healthy glow … a few simple, slight changes can help you manage acne and get you the skin you’ve always wanted.  Disclaimer: This article is strictly views of the writer and not meant to diagnose or treat a health or medical condition. Always seek advice from a medical doctor before starting or trying any new protocol. Diane Mack is a licensed esthetician and oncology certified esthetician, and is the owner of Esthetics By Caris, located inside Atlas Health & Wellness Associates, 152 Capcom Avenue, Suite 104 in Wake Forest. For questions or more information about skincare and other skin-related topics, you may reach Diane at 919-6040646 or visit www.carisskincare.com.

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irst, the patient is losing the last of his or her primary teeth as the permanent ones are in the midst of erupting, allowing an orthodontist access to straighten the permanent dentition for the first time. Second, the patient is in the process of the adolescent growth spurt, which allows the orthodontist to modify growth if that is necessary to achieve an ideal occlusion and improved facial esthetics. So performing treatment at that time is very advantageous. However, it is not the only time to perform treatment. What if you are an adult with concerns about your smile? Rest assured ‌ orthodontic treatment is still an option for you. Over the past 50 years, we have seen a trend of more adults seeking orthodontic treatment. In the United States in 1960, only about 5% of patients were adults. That percentage has increased fourfold since that time, with adults now making up over 20% of orthodontic patients nationwide. Many adults have gone years being self-conscious about their smiles, and have tried to hide their teeth with their hands or laugh less than they might have. Those folks are now visiting their orthodontists, finally receiving the care that they have always wanted, even into their 60s and 70s. By embracing the innovative technologies that are now part of our repertoire, orthodontists can offer options such as Invisalign, lingual braces, and clear ceramic brackets to help patients receive the care they have always wanted, without the

BY DR. JAMES MARTIN

IT’S NOT

TOO LATE STRAIGHT TALK ABOUT ORTHODONTIC TREATMENT FOR ADULTS When most people picture a typical orthodontic patient, they are likely to envision a teenager or pre-teen with traditional orthodontic brackets/wires and colored elastics. It is true that the largest population of orthodontics patients are in this age range. Performing comprehensive orthodontic treatment when a patient is younger is especially advantageous, because that is the time when two important events are occurring simultaneously. 44

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esthetic concerns they might have had previously. Those technologies have also allowed us to provide care without the levels of discomfort seen in past decades. What is most impressive have been the patients’ testimonials. The classic line after completion of adult treatment is, “Wow, I love my smile! I wish I had done this years ago.” While there may be an improvement in function of the teeth and jaws, the almost inevitable improvement in esthetics leads to an increase in a patient’s quality of life as well. A study done in 2012 by the American Association of Orthodontists reported that of 18 to 34-year-old adult patients, 87% described increased success with personal relationships after orthodontic treatment. If you are unhappy with your smile, it’s not too late to take action, no matter your age. The confidence you receive from proper orthodontic treatment will be apparent to others and will permeate your life in ways you may not have thought possible. Consult with an orthodontist today to see how he or she can give you the beautiful, healthy smile you have always imagined.  Dr. James P. Martin, DMD MS, is an ABO Board Certified Orthodontist with Bumgarner & Martin Orthodontics (formerly Hixson & Bumgarner Orthodontists), located at 1268 S. Main Street in Wake Forest. For more information, call 919-556-7820 or visit www.smilesbybmo.com.

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SUMMER

PARTY PLANNING BY MONIQUE M. ROGERS

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ho doesn’t love a party? Summer is the perfect time for the perfect gathering. With busy work schedules, calendars full of the kids’ extracurricular activities, etc., parties – whether small soirees or big bashes – encourage us to slow down a bit and reconnect with friends, family, and neighbors. Need some ideas for that perfect summer celebration? Read on for easy-to-achieve, inexpensive, and imaginative ideas that will have you and your guests creating wonderful summer memories that will last a lifetime.

Needlework, crocheting, and cooking teach basic skills, teamwork, and independence – so while they are having fun being creative and crafty, they won’t even realize that they’re continuing to learn, despite being out of school for the summer! Enlist other parents to help, so it’s not too overwhelming for you as the host.

The Fourth of July holiday let you kick summer off with a bang, but how do you keep the season’s revelries going? There are lots of fun and exciting celebrations around the area the next few months; but why not take some of those ideas and host your own versions? Think about your talents, or those of friends you hope will attend. First Fridays are very popular around here, offering entertaining music, artwork, wine and beer, and delicious fare. Bring this idea home (and inside where it’s cooler on a hot summer night) by hosting a party featuring an artistic friend, your favorite photographer, or a loved one who sings or plays an instrument. Spend the evening serving light appetizers and refreshing beverages and playing soft background music while showcasing a gallery of your friend’s works. Perhaps this individual has a mission for which he or she is raising money. If so, offer raffle tickets to local galleries, plays, or concerts to fundraise – not only will you and your guests enjoy a wonderful evening together, you will also be contributing to the featured artist’s cause or charity of choice. Or plan an artsy evening with painting, jewelry-making, or another craft activity at your dining room table. Teach the “class,” or have a friend do so, using products bought from local craft supply stores. Why not use these summer parties as an opportunity for the little ones in your life and their favorite friends to create artwork for parents to treasure as future birthday or Christmas presents? 46

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Even though we’re fortunate enough to be located only a couple of hours from the beach, we are also blessed with area parks with sandy beach areas … so you can enjoy that “beachy” experience without the time commitment required for a trip to the coast. You can also swim, play volleyball and other sports, boat, Jet Ski, kayak, and cookout at these local beach areas. Make it a group outing for added fun, inviting other families and friends. Assign everyone a food dish or beverage to bring and share so the planning and preparation pressure for this summer celebration doesn’t fall solely on you. What about a movie night? Purchase colorful popcorn bags or cups and boxed candies like you’d buy at the theater. Fluff up the pillows for comfy couch-lounging and movie watching, or create a more inviting living room environment with bigger pillows scattered around the floor so everyone can watch comfortably. Consider basing the evening’s party around the movie’s theme. A twist on the traditional movie night? Take it outside! Yes, watch the movie in your backyard – all you need is a movie screen or white sheet that can be hung from the trees or fence, a laptop or DVD player, a projector, and a speaker. Ask everyone to bring beach chairs or blankets and pillows. Feeling a little crafty? Decorate boxes as cars and set up the yard as a “drive-in theater” – the kids in attendance will surely love watching their favorite flick from their own “car.” Host a themed event – such as a traditional Hawaiian luau, an old-fashioned beach party, or a chilling murder mystery – serving food and drink pertaining to the theme … this is the perfect opportunity to try those new recipes you’ve found on Pinterest. Decorate in this theme using things you can find around the house

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or purchased from a party store. Take it a step further by having your guests dress the part. Food truck rodeos are extremely popular around the Triangle. So why not tap into that popularity and host your own “rodeo?” Have everyone bring a dish – possibly something they’ve never made before. This will cut down your expenses as a host, allow everyone to participate, and let you and your guests try a variety of new foods. Want to hang out with friends on a weekend night, but are looking for something a little simpler? Have a dessert party. There’s nothing like sitting around a table and catching up over coffee and a sweet treat. It may even become a new tradition – all year! Games aren’t just for kids. Family game night with games that are age appropriate for the kids is always a hit and a great way to unplug. But why not schedule a grown-up game night? Bring out the games that are family favorites, or find something you’ve only heard about, but never had a chance to play. There are plenty of card games that call for team play – rules and instructions can easily be found online and downloaded. For snacks, try popcorn and trail mixes as light treats; or get a little fancier with wine or beer, cheese, crackers, and fruit. For a heavier meal, serve pizza or make-your-own tacos or salads to keep the kitchen cool.

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Business Expo

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After all this summer fun, the season is eventually going to end, and it will be time for the kids to return to school – and thus, busier schedules. With that, a plan to conquer the hectic calendar must be devised. There is power in numbers, so why not call moms and dads together for an afternoon party of meal planning? Have everyone supply food for their favorite go-to recipes, prepare and cook their dishes, seal in freezer-safe bags or containers, and then exchange. These foods can then be pulled out of the freezer and reheated for healthy meals on-the-go, or when you’re just too tired to cook during the busy school year. And that brings us to Labor Day, a day of rest to enjoy any number of these parties; the last hurrah of the summer. But the parties don’t need to end there. Throw a bash to welcome all of your children’s classmates to a new productive year. And before you know it – more months and more parties to plan will be on the horizon. But you can do it. With a little thought and creativity, you can make the next party you host one you and your guests will never forget.  Monique M. Rogers is a creative and technical writer. She holds an Associate of Arts in Liberal Arts with emphasis in journalism and a Bachelor’s of Arts in English. She also received a diploma in graphic design and desktop publishing, and owns a freelance writing and event coordinating business, Monique M. Rogers, LLC. Contact Monique at monique.m.rogers@gmail.com or visit www.moniquemrogers.com to read her “My Midlife” blog and see other writing and event coordinating samples.

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for those who throw caution to the wind and still engage in such. As I think of my own last few summers, that is what I remember. And I am beginning to wonder, “Is that all there is?” And if so, is that enough? I can hear the thinking of some of you, wondering, now what is wrong with that? Can there be anything wrong with fun and memories? Hang with me for a few more minutes, then decide. What if today we set a goal for something tangible that we want out of this summer, and work to accomplish it before this time is past? Something more than fun – as important as that is. Would doing so give us a sense of accomplishment that we will remember when the time it took to do so is past? I know this sounds like work, and isn’t the summer for play? Bear with me a little longer as I develop this idea a little further.

BY PATTI FRALIX

I imagine there is something in your mind that needs doing, that if you completed would bring a great sense of accomplishment. I have more than one. In fact, I have three.

IS SUMMER

ONLY FOR

This summer, I will clean out my storage shed and sell or donate what is in it, so I am no longer making monthly payments to store things I will never use, and don’t even want. That will not be fun, which is why I have avoided doing it already. But it needs to be done. When I think of the money wasted for years – yes, years – I should be ashamed. No, shame is unnecessary. I just need to do it now and

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How can it be summer already? Weren’t we just celebrating New Year’s? I am sure it is my age, but the months and years seem to just fly by. I am sure that some of you can identify

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with me. Yes, summer is in full swing again. iving in the South has its benefits … and, of course, its drawbacks. One of those is one and the same – the long, hot summer. We are usually experiencing summer weather by the end of April, and can expect the long hot days to linger around until late September, and sometimes longer. Once the children are out of school for the summer (recognizing that some are in year-round school) vacation times abound. Many are going on beach trips, swimming in backyard or neighborhood pools, or boating in our area’s beautiful lakes. Some children enjoy a portion of their summer at camp.

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Regardless of the activities, there is much to do to keep us all busy during summer’s prime. There will be plenty of time for people to relax and enjoy the various recreational activities. But I wonder about the end of the summer coming soon and us having nothing to show for it, other than perhaps good memories and maybe a tan 48

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not waste any more money. I imagine some of you could also do something similar. By summer’s end, I will have cleaned out our daughters’ closets, and donated what they do not want to keep. At soon to be 40 and 42, I doubt they will come home to live here again, and if for some reason they did, they wouldn’t want that stuff, or they would already have taken it. My friend, Debbie, has a head start on me, telling her children that their old rooms are going to be like hotel rooms. She is preparing to downsize, and doing so in a manner that will result in someone else wanting to purchase their house when it is time to sell. I think she has it right. While her girls will always have a home, it will not be in the house they lived in, so why keep their stuff in it? Now, what about my closet? That is my third thing “to do,” to accomplish, this summer. By the end of July, I should be able to finally rid my closet of clothes that no longer fit and that I will never wear again. Now, I should change the wording of that sentence to read, “By the end of July, I will rid my closet of things that no longer fit and that I will never wear again.” This will require steady progress on my weight reduction plan that is in process. Wish me good progress on that! Perhaps my list of three things I will accomplish this summer has you thinking about yours. It doesn’t have to be three; it can be whatever you want it to be. Just decide on what accomplishment you want out of this summer, and do it. The summer will pass regardless of how we are spending our time. I want to look back on it and know I accomplished something important. I also want to have plenty of fun, and hope that you do as well!  Patti Fralix speaks, consults, and coaches, inspiring positive changeSM in work, life, and family. She is founder and president of The Fralix Group, Inc., a leadership excellence firm based in Raleigh, and author of A Year in the Life of a Recovering Spendaholic. She can be reached at pfralix@fralixgroup.com.

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OUR HERITAGE REVISITED THE TWO WAKE FORESTS BY AMY PIERCE “Our Heritage” is reprinting and updating earlier articles as a way of introducing a ballooning newcomer population to Wake Forest history and culture.

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he development of the two Wake Forests – Town and College – is so intertwined as to seem almost indistinguishable. During the Town’s early childhood and adolescence, what could be said was, “As goes Wake Forest College, so goes the Town of Wake Forest.” But, as is true with all children, the time comes for individuation, a process usually hastened by either internal rebellion or external circumstance. World War II became one of several precipitating factors in this individuation stage. During the war years, President Thurman Kitchin and the Board of Trustees began making plans for the anticipated expansion in enrollment due to both the admittance of women (something the College originally planned as a way of keeping the school open during the war years) and the men returning as veterans. Not to mention those veterans enrolling for the first time because of the GI Bill. Before war’s end, a $2 million Enlargement Campaign was undertaken for the construc-tion of 11 new facilities with an additional $5 million being sought as endowment. Between July 1943 and July 1944, $251,000 was raised; by the following January, another $100,000. Several supporting fund drives were initiated, including one by the Town of Wake Forest. With a regular population of only 1500, its citizens undertook the raising of $125,000, surpassing that figure in pledges within a few months. Wake Forest Baptist Church also established a 10-year goal of $125,000. And “the entire Wake Forest community was touched when Bursar E.B. Earnshaw and his wife Edith [announced] that they wished their entire estate, worth $44,000 … to go to the college, saying they hoped the bequest would eventually reimburse the college ‘for the total amount of our salaries, thus making our work with the college over the years truly a labor of love.’” As expected, enrollment increased rapidly after the war. The first four buildings of the Enlargement Campaign were begun in a postwar building program that was, according to the ’46 Howler, “our version of reconversion for peace time.” January of ’46 brought double the highest previous enrollment, resulting in nearly 500 applicants being turned away for lack of space. Both town and college made the best of these unprecedented circumstances, housing students in any nook and cranny. Even the basement of the uncompleted chapel became 50 50

a spartan home to 100 men who slept on cots each night to be rewarded each morning with cold water for showering! “Thus the college prospered in 1946, bursting at the seams, rich with student talent, preparing to enjoy its most ambitious building program ever, delighting in the war’s end. And it was just at that juncture that there arose the most dramatic development ever to occur in the life of the college …” And in the life of the little town it had birthed, which, almost a century later, surrounded it like extended family. In late March of 1946, the news reached Wake Forest by headline in the morning paper: ‘Wake Forest College Moving To Winston-Salem.” The Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation had offered $350,000 a year in exchange for the institution’s relocation. A few days after the proposal was made public, the college newspaper, Old Gold and Black, stated editorially “… the little town which has contributed more than $100,000 to the enlargement campaign of the college, and in which most citizens are bound by close personal ties to the college, could not have been more dumbfounded and aghast if foreign planes had dropped a bomb in the center of the village.” It seemed individuation was to occur at last, though ironically not through children leaving the nest; it would be, instead, by way of parents heading to the hills of Forsyth. And the rest, as they say, is history. For the college born from spiritual devotion and in part determined by the wearing down of denominational opposition to education, many battles have been waged. So, too, were battles fought for the sur-vival of the little town that was born of it, and which, ultimately, gave its parent an almost full measure of de-votion. From the legacy of these struggles and those who embraced them is woven the history, culture, and inheritance of this place. Wake Forest, and all that the name encompasses, lives on, alive as ever, to tell the tales of its testing to those who will listen.  Thanks to Jennifer Smart and Rebecca May Peters for the photo. Photo courtest of Wake Forest University. Amy Pierce lives in Wake Forest’s Mill Village, where she is a writer, minister, and spiritual counselor. She can be reached at 919-554-2711 or visit www.authenticself.us.

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