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CIRCA

JA N U A RY

F E B RU A RY •

MARCH 2020

F O RG O T T E N E D I B L E T R E A S U R E S • W I N T E R C A M E L L I A S • V E G G I E S RU L E • T E AC H I N G YO U R T E E N T O D R I V E • P R E - S P R I N G C L E A N I N G N E W Y E A R , N E W S T Y L E S • ' T I S T H E S E A S O N T O S E L L • W I N T E RT I M E I S A G R E AT T I M E F O R B E E R • M E A D OW S O F DA N , V I RG I N I A W I N T E R I C E C R E A M • T H E AG I N G E Y E • WA R M U P YO U R W I N T E R T H E D I Y WAY • C O O L G A D G E T S F O R E V E RY RO O M • A N D M O R E

c i rc a m ag a z i n e . c o m


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A WORD FROM THE PUBLISHER

Happy New Year! The start of a new year (and a new decade … hard to believe!) is a time to look back on the past year, and eagerly await what’s to come. The holiday season that is now a lovely memory was a time to enjoy with friends and family, and reflect on all for which we are grateful. However, just because the holidays are behind us, that doesn’t mean we can’t still share our gratitude … and I wanted to take this opportunity to share how grateful I am that owning and publishing CIRCA Magazine has provided me with incredible friendships and partnerships – our advertisers, our writers, our readers, the community, and so much more. It’s wonderful when your business relationships become friendships, and that’s what I’ve gained with CIRCA … so thank you to everyone who is part of the CIRCA family. I look forward to another wonderful year (and decade) with you all! I’m also grateful to share with you a whole new set of articles that will help kick off the new year (and decade) with a bang! Whether you’re looking for some edible inspiration (such as “Forgotten Edible Treasures” – just like the tasty treats we’ve featured on our front cover – and “Veggies Rule”), travel tidbits (“Driveable Destination – Meadows of Dan, Virginia” and “Hidden Gem – Vollis Simpson Whirligig Park”), decorating ideas (“New Year, New Style” and “Warm Up For Winter The DIY Way”), or helpful healthy hints (“Ocular Health – The Aging Eye,” “See The World And Stay Healthy,” for instance), you’re sure to find it here in our winter issue. If you’re craving some winter coziness indoors, we’ve got you covered here, too – “Winter Ice Cream” shares a yummy recipe that is sure to warm your insides on a cold, wintery day (yes, it’s possible ... guess you’ll have to read the article to find out how), while “Good Reads” provides some must-reads to cozy up with this winter. Longing for beautiful winter blossoms outdoors that will help you survive the winter blues? “Camellias – Beautiful Blooms In A Winter Garden” explains how to care for these lovely additions that will add color to your winter landscape. Much more can be found in this issue – tips for teaching your teen how to drive; fun, family-friendly events to fill your 2020 calendar; cool gadgets for every room in the house; pre-spring cleaning tips to do now so you can enjoy the spring later; seasonal food and beer pairings; reasons why selling your home in winter is a good idea; and much more. And as always, please visit and support the many amazing businesses that advertise with us. We couldn’t do this without their partnerships, so please let them know you found them in CIRCA Magazine. As you embrace the new year and all the excitement it brings, I hope you continue to share everything for which you are grateful, and may 2020 be your best year yet. See you again this spring!


JA N UA RY • F E B R UA RY • M A RC H 2020 6

A Season Of Fun In The Forest – Kick Off The New Year With Fun, Family Friendly Events

New Year, New Style – Design Trends For 2020

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Forgotten Edible Treasures

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Warm Up For Winter The DIY Way

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Veggies Rule ’Tis The Season To Sell – 6 Reasons Why Selling Your Home In Winter Is A Good Idea

PUBLISHER & EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Kent Lower

Hidden Gem – Vollis Simpson Whirligig Park

Allison Caudle Abbott Stacey Moritz Todd Nelson Jill Bright Amy Pierce Buck Buchanan Rhonda Benvie Plummer Amanda Cochrane Dolores Riggins Mauranda Dalziel Jennifer Smart Robyn Goss-Bennai Dr. Edmond Suh Holly Hopkins UNC Center for Cynthia Klimasz Aging and Health Suzanne Lucey Thomas Walters Tina Mast Dr. Samantha K. McPherson

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Camellias – Beautiful Blooms In A Winter Garden

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Tips For Teaching Your Teen To Drive

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Wintertime Is A Great Time For Beer

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Driveable Destination – Meadows Of Dan, Virginia

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Good Gums – Taking The Pain Out Of Gum Disease

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Good Reads

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Winter Ice Cream – Warm Your Insides This Season

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Pre-Spring Cleaning – Winter Cleaning For Spring Enjoyment

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Ocular Health – The Aging Eye

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See The World And Stay Healthy – 11 Things For Older Adults To Keep In Mind For Travel

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Early North Carolina – Stories Of Turmoil And Aspiration

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Cool Gadgets For Every Room In The House – Tech Tools For A Super Smart Home

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The Power Of Positivity – 5 Tips On How To Incorporate Positive Thinking Into Your Marketing Strategy

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Around Town – The Wake Forest Garden Club

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Our Heritage Revisited – Where The Man Is Buried In The Rock

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

CONTACT INFORMATION BallPointe Publishing & Design, LLC P.O. Box 1182 Wake Forest, NC 27588 919.453.2555 • info@circamagazine.com circamagazine.com ADVERTISING SALES 919.453.2555 • info@circamagazine.com MANAGERS Kent Lower & Mitch Lower Printed by RR Donnelly Nick Honeycutt 919.380.5949 • nhoneycutt@theodavis.com

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AD SPACE RESERVATIONS April / May / June 2020: February 19, 2020

CIRCA Magazine is published quarterly by BallPointe Publishing & Design, LLC. All rights reserved. No part of this magazine may be reproduced or transmitted without the written permission of the publisher. Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained within; however, BallPointe Publishing & Design assumes no liability for accuracy or omissions.


A SEASON OF FUN IN

THE FOREST

KICK OFF THE NEW YEAR WITH THESE FUN, FAMILY-FRIENDLY EVENTS BY AMANDA COCHRANE

The new year has arrived, and that means it’s time to start filling your 2020 calendar! The Town of Wake Forest offers

MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. COMMUNITY CELEBRATION

they can enjoy.

Several local churches and community organizations will come together to honor the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. during a free, public celebration on Thursday, January 23, at Friendship Chapel Baptist Church (237 Friendship Chapel Road). Area residents are invited to attend the observance, beginning with a light meal at 6:00 PM and followed by the program at 7:00 PM. For more information, visit wakeforestnc.gov and search “MLK.”

FIRST FRIDAY FLIX, FLIX4KIDZ, AND FREE AT 3

STATE OF THE TOWN ADDRESS & DINNER

The Wake Forest Renaissance Centre for the Arts, located at 405 S. Brooks Street, offers a variety of free movie showings each month for area residents of all ages. On the first Friday of each month at 7:00 PM, the Renaissance Centre hosts “First Friday Flix.” Free and open to the public, these movie screenings feature a variety of film favorites and genres, including comedies, dramas, thrillers, and more, often with a seasonal or historical theme. Then, on the second Monday of each month at 10:30 AM, the Renaissance Centre offers “flix4kidz.” Intended for children 12 and under, flix4kidz features only G or PG-rated children’s and family films. Finally, there’s “Free at 3” on the second Monday of each month at 3:00 PM. Designed for adults ages 50 and over, Free at 3 features a variety of film favorites and genres, including art and family films, as well as comedies, dramas, thrillers, and more – also often with a seasonal or historical theme. Again, all of these movie showings are free and open to the public. For more information, visit wakeforestrencen.org.

The 2020 Wake Forest State of the Town Address & Dinner is scheduled for Monday, February 17, at 6:00 PM at the Wake Forest Renaissance Centre. Since 2009, the Town of Wake Forest has partnered with the Wake Forest Rotary Club to sponsor the annual event on the third Monday in February. The occasion offers Wake Forest citizens the opportunity to reflect on the Town’s list of accomplishments during the previous year and learn about its goals in the coming months. For more information, visit wakeforestnc.gov and search “State of the Town.”

several exciting events guaranteed to help you stay engaged and active, while kicking off the new year. From carnivals and musical performances to street festivals and community celebrations, everyone is sure to find one or more events

WAKE FOREST MARDI GRAS STREET FESTIVAL Children and adults can enjoy a fun-filled day in downtown Wake Forest during the Wake Forest Mardi Gras Street Festival on Saturday, February 22. This family-friendly celebration is scheduled from 11:00 AM – 3:00 PM and admission is free. The annual

ROCKIN’ THE FOREST Assembling some of the top musical acts in the area, the Rockin’ the Forest music series features a variety of bands that play rock and roll covers from classic to modern rock, with a little funk and original music thrown in. The series continues Friday, January 17, with The Legacy Motown Revue, followed by Jim Quick & Coastline on February 28 and The Magnificents on March 27. The Renaissance Centre is the perfect place to enjoy a fun-filled night of great music and dancing. The bar will be open for wine, beer, and other refreshment purchases. For more information, visit wakeforestrencen.org. 6

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event features music, entertainment, face painting, and a costume processional for children and adults to showcase their Mardi Gras-themed attire. There will also be a variety of contests and activities throughout the day. For more information and a schedule of events, visit wakeforestnc.gov and search “Mardi Gras.”

WAKE FOREST FILM FESTIVAL Mark your calendars for a cinematic tour de force – the second annual Wake Forest Film Festival, March 13-14. Entitled “A Light in the Forest,” this event aims to spotlight passionate, creative, and thought-provoking movies by some of today’s most promising and accomplished local, national, and international filmmakers. A two-day film showcase, the Wake Forest Film Festival will engage audiences with films of all lengths and genres, including short and feature, documentary, horror, animation, narrative, and student. Intended for both the general public and film professionals, the film festival is an opportunity for filmmakers to showcase their films in a unique location to a discerning audience. For more information, visit wakeforestrencen.org.

STEM SATURDAY The Wake Forest Technology Advisory Board is inviting area middle and high school students and their parents to Wake Forest STEM Saturday 2020 on Saturday, March 28. This free family networking fair is scheduled from 10:00 AM – 3:00 PM at the Wake Forest Renaissance Centre. Celebrating science, technology, engineering, and math, STEM Saturday will expose students to a variety of STEM career options, while featuring STEM-related exhibits, demonstrations, and hands-on learning activities.

EASTER EGG HUNT The Wake Forest Parks, Recreation & Cultural Resources (PRCR) Department will host its annual Easter Egg Hunts on Saturday,

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March 28. The festivities will take place at E. Carroll Joyner Park, 701 Harris Road, beginning at 10:00 AM. PRCR will offer several egg hunts for children of different ages, along with an Egg-ceptional Egg Hunt for children with disabilities. The occasion will also feature food vendors and Easter-themed arts and crafts activities in the Joyner Park Amphitheater. In the event of inclement weather, the Easter Egg Hunt will be held Sunday, March 29 starting at 1:00 PM. Visit wakeforestnc.gov and search “Egg Hunt.”

DIRT DAY AND ARBOR DAY Wake Forest’s 7th Annual Dirt Day will take place along South White Street in downtown Wake Forest on Saturday, April 4, from 10:00 AM – 3:00 PM. A fun-filled outdoor event for children and adults, Dirt Day features a variety of demonstrations and activities focused on gardening, landscaping, camping, and more. This year, Dirt Day will be held in conjunction with Wake Forest’s Annual Arbor Day Expo, located on Town Hall’s Centennial Plaza. The Arbor Day Expo features a tree seedling giveaway, as well as activities and educational groups promoting proper tree care and environmental stewardship. For detailed information visit, wakeforestnc.gov and search “Dirt Day.”

STAY CONNECTED! Always be the first to know about Town of Wake Forest programs, services, and special events by signing up for E-Notifier at www.wakeforestnc.gov/enotifier.aspx, downloading the Town of Wake Forest app at www.wakeforestnc.gov/app.aspx, or visiting the town’s website at www.wakeforestnc.gov.  Amanda Cochrane is the marketing and business relations associate for the Town of Wake Forest. To learn more about town events, sponsorship opportunities, and how you can be involved, contact Amanda at 919-632-3482 or acochrane@wakeforestnc.gov.

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incorporate texture/dimension, pattern, and/or color as an accent on one wall, rather than all four, for that wow factor the space craves. Create a design or pattern on a feature wall with trim. Think outside the box of just normal squares and instead, come up with a creative and unique pattern. Paint the trim all one color for a subtle dimensional look, or color block it for a more whimsical and vibrant statement.

BY RHONDA BENVIE PLUMMER

NEW YEAR, NEW STYLE

DESIGN TRENDS FOR 2020

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Color – some of us can’t get enough of it, and others are scared to death of it. 2020 welcomes an array of colors to suit the taste of anyone and everyone. Sherwin Williams’ color of the year is SW6244 Naval, a stunning navy blue hue. Other colors of the year range from the terracotta shade of Cavern Clay to the blush-pink color of Gracious Rose. Royal colors aren’t left out, though, ranging from the deep green of Ripe Olive to the burgundy-type of Juneberry, with yellow golds thrown in to complement those tones. For you neutral lovers out there, warm grays are still hot, as they mix well with all of these popular pops of color. With this assortment of colors trending, you’re sure to find the colors you love and still be in style. The idea is to do you – to discover your comfort and your sanctuary. With sustainability being all the rage these days, it’s no wonder that artisanal crafts would be so popular. This craze is all about both repurposing and the art of crafting. For instance, caning is

s we rang in the new year, we left 2019 with a renewed spirit. In this world of technology, our minds and souls are craving warmth and coziness. As computer screens glare and cell phones send out their cold blue lights, the trends for residential and commercial design are centering around wellbeing, individuality, comfort, and sustainability. Luxurious textiles and earthy materials mark one of the foremost trends of 2020. Fabrics in velvet, silks, and sheers are bringing in much-needed texture. The mixing of bold fabrics – both in pattern and in color – are hot for the new year. And offsetting these bold colors and patterns – incorporating even more texture – are the ever-so-popular earthy materials of rattan, jute, sisal, and hemp. You can effortlessly and inexpensively introduce these into your space with a rug, a wall hanging, or an assortment of baskets. Also hitting the decorating scene are terracotta and concrete. You can easily integrate these materials for on-trend décor by adding accessories, tables, and tile, and even switching out your countertops for a more dramatic effect. Also trending for 2020 is wall décor in the form of wallpaper and trimmed out walls. Fortunately, wallpaper has come a long way since the ’80s (I’m sure you’re picturing the living room from your childhood home right about now). Today, use it to 8

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back in a big way. Cane chair bottoms with wood frames or upholstered chairs with caned sides are hitting the furniture scene everywhere we look. Globally-inspired crafted items such as woven baskets and wall hangings and clay pottery are very desirable nowadays. And let us not forget about reclaimed wood. Reclaimed wood – a great example of taking something old and making it new again – is being used for everything from furniture to wall coverings. Antiques fall into the repurposing category as well. Transforming an antique secretary into a stunning conversationinvoking bar breathes life back into something old and outdated. Projects like these may take a little creative thinking and a bit of hard work, but the result will be a one-of-a-kind piece of art (that did not get thrown into the dumpster)!

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As I stated earlier, 2020 is about individuality, wellbeing, comfort, and sustainability. When it comes to decorating your home, it’s about creating a space that speaks to you and your family. Adding old with the new and mixing styles and textures is what will make your home a reflection of its owner. Happy New Year and cheers to a home that is as unique as you are.  Rhonda Benvie Plummer is the owner of Help Me Rhonda Interiors, 1600 Heritage Commerce Court, Suite 103 in Wake Forest and Open Door Furniture & Accents, a furniture and accessories store also in Wake Forest. Visit www.helpmerhondainteriors.com or www.opendoorfurnitureandaccents.com, or call 919-263-9054.

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FORGOTTEN

EDIBLE TREASURES BY STACEY MORITZ

T

he new year brings so much hope and promise, and I’m sure by now, your resolution list is posted with prominence on your fridge. If you are like me, you’ve probably given yourself some lofty goals that may not be as realistic as you’d like them to be. With our lives as hectic and stressful as they are – between work, family, and other responsibilities – I resolved this year to keep it simple and hopefully make it fun for me and my family. Even if you claim to have an adventurous palate, there are probably a few foods in your pantry that require some thought as to how to use them. I’m willing to bet you’ll find some dried fruits or trail mixes in there that you might have relegated to the back, next to the dried mushrooms you bought on a whim last year. Sauces, jams, and jellies that you purchased at that cute little kitchen store while on vacation can all provide a fun accent to kick up your winter meals and get you thinking outside the food prep box. The added bonus is that you will also do a little pantry inventory, and maybe even reorganize it a bit – isn’t that on your resolution list anyway?

peaches are delicious when dipped in a bit of melted chocolate. In your pantry recon mission, you may have discovered dried plums or figs. Don’t toss them aside! Instead, break out a bottle of wine or port – soaking them in a little wine or other liquid will plump them up and make them part of a delightful stuffing for pork or chicken. One of my favorite pork recipes is filled with port wine figs or plums, onions, and blue cheese (see recipe) – a beautiful, delicious, and easy culinary creation. Dried fruits are also appetizing when chopped up and added to wild rice during the last few minutes of cooking. They plump up nicely and add great texture

First up – trail mix, dried fruit, and all those leftover nuts from the holidays. Trail mix can make a wonderful cookie! Just take your favorite chocolate chip cookie recipe and substitute trail mix for the chocolate chips and nuts. These tasty treats make a great afterschool snack for your little ones – and you’re sneaking in some protein along the way! Those leftover nuts can be finely chopped and used as a coating for chicken breasts or fish, adding a nutty crunch and fantastic flavor to your meal. You can also mix them with panko, bread crumbs, or even cornflakes for a great crunchy coating for homemade oven-baked chicken strips that your kids will devour. Dried fruit is a favorite ingredient of everyone in my house and I keep them on hand most of the time. They can be chopped up and mixed in with cashews for a great snacking treat or paired with cocktails. Dried apricots are a fun and tasty addition to traditional desserts – simply add just a crumble of goat cheese and a few chopped pistachios. Dried mango, apricots, bananas, and 10

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and flavor to your meal. Dried fruits also pair marvelously with different cheeses, so mix a few together to stuff chicken breasts and turn an ordinary dish into something extraordinary. Goat cheese with peaches or apricots, blue cheese with dried pears, or sharp cheddar with apples all make delectable combinations. Jams, jellies, and sauces provide a wonderful opportunity to infuse flavor and create the perfect finishing touch to your meal. The stuffed chicken you’ve just created can be brushed with a bit of jam to create a stunning glaze and golden sheen. Just brush it on a couple of times during the last half of the cooking time – because of the high sugar content, you should cook at temperatures below 350 degrees so it doesn’t burn. Marmalades and chunkier jams can be added to wild rice just before serving to add a hint of sweetness and flavor. Try stirring in a handful of dried sweet cranberries and a tablespoon or two of orange marmalade to wild rice – so yummy! Splurge on a loaf of crusty artisan bread for toast with a smattering of that same marmalade, or perhaps passion fruit jam. Add a slice of brie or Havarti cheese and pop under the broiler to melt said cheese for a decadent treat that beats plain old toast any day of the week. Most jams can be melted on the stove and drizzled over cheeses, chicken, or fish – and even your favorite ice cream, for an instant sauce that will add great color and the perfect end to your meal. However you choose to use them, enjoy experimenting with these forgotten edible treasures. You’ll continue to amaze yourself with your creativity and culinary genius.

STUFFED PORK LOIN – 1 pork tenderloin – ½ cup dried figs or plums, soaked overnight in ½ cup port wine (or your favorite red wine) – ½ cup chopped sweet onions – ½ cup crumbled blue cheese – Plum or fig preserves for glazing – Salt and pepper

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Preheat oven to 325 degrees. Lay pork out and cut a slit lengthwise from end to end, being careful not to go all the way through. Open the pork and lightly pound with a meat mallet to lay flat. Chop figs or plums coarsely and mix with the onions and blue cheese. Place mixture down the center of the pork and roll the pork around the stuffing. Tie pork with kitchen twine and place in a shallow roasting pan. Salt and pepper to taste. Melt about ¼ cup of the preserves on the

stove and baste the pork lightly. Bake for about 30 minutes, basting with jam every 10 minutes until pork is done (you’ll want an internal temperature of 135-140 degrees). Delicious when served with wild rice and roasted asparagus.  Stacey Moritz is the owner of The Lemon Tree Cafe, located at 113 S. White Street in Downtown Wake Forest (919-521-5806), offering freshly prepared salads, pastas, soups, and take-away fare. The Lemon Tree Cafe serves breakfast and lunch Monday Friday, 7:30 AM - 5:00 PM and Saturdays 7:30 AM - 3:00 PM.

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light all day. Avoid hot, scorching sun locations for planting (not really an issue in winter, but you still need to keep this in mind), especially those that are windy. Some camellias are more sun tolerant than others, especially the fall-blooming sasanqua types. Those grown in sun usually look a bit sunburned while they are young; those that tolerate it eventually become accustomed to their site.

PLANTING Camellias like well-drained, acid soil with plenty of organic matter. Amend the soil when planting with a pine bark soil conditioner or Permatill, or a mix of the two such as Daddy Pete’s Plant Pleaser Plus Permatill. Never plant camellias so that the base of the trunk is below the soil line and do not permit soil or mulch to wash over the base of the trunk and cover it. However, do mulch over the root zone with your mulch of choice to a depth of 2”-3”. Camellias are also excellent container plants. Put plants that came in three or five gallon pots into half-barrel or 20”-24” pots. Larger pots such as these will help insulate the roots from winter cold. Use a planting mix that is heavy in pine bark fines or make a mix that is 50% regular fluffy potting soil and 50% pine bark soil conditioner. Avoid soil mixes with fertilizer already mixed in.

WATERING

BY TINA MAST

Camellias need regular water for the first three years in the ground.

CAMELLIAS BEAUTIFUL BLOOMS

IN A WINTER GARDEN Stunning and fabulous are two good ways to describe camellias. Add easy-to-grow to that list, too. This classic Southern plant features incomparable, often pristinely gorgeous flowers either in fall or late winter/early spring and has lustrous evergreen foliage. They make excellent accent plants, specimens, or low privacy screens. Winter blooming, fall-blooming, and tea camellias (yes, you can grow your own tea!), as well as a few hybrids, are typically available in our region. Here are some growing and troubleshooting tips.

LIGHT Camellias are adaptable to a range of light conditions, but they mainly prefer morning sun with afternoon shade or bright dappled 12

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Young plants can, and will, die on you if they get too dry. “Regular water” means watering enough to soak the rootball one or two times a week in spring and fall, and two to three times a week in summer for the first two years and supplementally during dry spells in the third year. It’s good to water newbies during late winter dry spells, too. Once established, they can survive on a natural rainfall. Old camellias are quite drought tolerant.

FERTILIZING Fertilizing is beneficial, but take care not to overfertilize as this can predispose the plants to winter injury. Use a complete, commercial acid plant food formulated for trees and shrubs such as Holly-tone, and don’t use more than called for on the label.

PRUNING Pruning is not always necessary, but if you decide to prune, do so right after the plant has finished flowering. How you prune depends on what form you would like for the plant. Cut back the top to make lanky shrubs more bushy, or thin out the bottom to form a patio tree. Shorten lower branches to promote more upright growth. It’s always a good idea to remove any wood that is dead or weak.

TROUBLESHOOTING Camellias don’t tend to have too many problems if they have been planted properly and get enough water, but here are a couple things to look out for: – Tea Scale: This is the most important insect pest on camellias – small brown/gray insects that look more like scabs than bugs (female) on the leaf underside, often with a bunch of white ones (male) as well as cottony, web-like accumulations. The upper surface of the leaf can have yellow blotches and pale speckles. Prevent by spraying with horticultural oil spray after plants have bloomed. You can also treat with this spray to control existing infestations or use a systemic insecticide labeled for scale insects. The oil spray has the added benefit of smothering eggs. Avoid spraying oil sprays when temperatures are above 85 degrees F. – Camellia Petal Blight: A serious fungal disease that lives in the soil and causes the flowers to turn brown, it can be confused with other problems that harm flowers such as cold damage. Suspect it if the brown areas on the flower rapidly spread to the center of the flower and the flower browns and drops within 24-48 hours. Sanitation is the best control for this. Pull off and destroy all infected flowers. Rake up and remove all leaves, flowers, debris, and mulch. Replace with fresh mulch. For serious infestations, spray with a fungicide such as liquid copper.  Photo courtesy of Christina Haney. Tina Mast is communications director for Homewood Nursery & Garden Center in Raleigh and can be reached at 919-847-0117 or info@homewoodnursery.com. For more information, visit www.homewoodnursery.com.

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TIPS FOR TEACHING

YOUR TEEN

TO DRIVE BY THOMAS WALTERS

If your teen has a permit and is working toward getting his

PROVIDE FEEDBACK TO YOUR TEEN DRIVER

or her driver’s license, you’ll likely need to spend some time

When your teen makes a mistake, use it as a teaching opportunity. Instruct your child to safely pull the car over, and then discuss what happened and how to prevent the mistake from happening again. Rather than get upset at your teen driver, try making comments that help make your son or daughter more aware of a mistake. For example, you might ask your teen what the speed limit is instead of expressing fear that he or she will be ticketed for speeding. In addition, be sure to praise your teen when you notice improvements.

teaching him or her how to drive. Many states – including North Carolina – require teens with learner’s permits to log a certain number of supervised driving hours outside of driver’s education, according to the Governors Highway Safety Association, and that often means parents play the role of driving instructor.

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efore you start teaching your teen to drive, it’s a good idea to brush up on our state’s requirements and prepare yourself to be a good teacher. Here are some things to consider when teaching your teen to drive.

PREPARE TO TEACH YOUR TEEN DRIVER

Prior to each lesson, choose a location and decide what skills your teen will practice. For instance, you may want to find an empty parking lot where he or she can practice braking or turns. This may also be a good place to practice using anti-lock brakes if the pavement is wet. Allowing your teen to practice in lower risk areas may help prepare him or her for future experiences on main roads. Remind your teen to constantly be on the lookout for potential obstacles, such as other drivers, bicycles, and pedestrians. Stress the importance of avoiding distractions by not using phones or eating while driving, too. It’s also important to practice safe driving habits yourself. In addition to helping yourself stay safe on the road, it’s a good idea to model good driving behavior for your teen when you’re the one behind the wheel. 14

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SET YOUR OWN RULES OF THE ROAD In addition to reviewing state laws for teens learning to drive and reminding your child of general laws, like seat belt requirements, you may want to establish additional rules of your own. For instance, even though North Carolina does not restrict the number of passengers who can ride with a teen driver after he or she receives his or her full provisional license, you may want to establish your own rule of how many can ride along. Clearly communicate any requirements you set with your driver and make sure he or she understands the consequences of breaking them. Consider putting your expectations in writing. It takes a lot of practice for a teen to become a safe driver. By patiently coaching your child and providing consistent feedback, you can help your teen gain experience and become a better driver.  Thomas Walters is the owner of Walters Insurance Agency (with offices located at 3207 Rogers Road, Suite 100 in Wake Forest and 5620 Six Forks Road, Suite 103 in Raleigh). Call 919-554-0267 or 919-848-8015 or email ThomasWalters@allstate.com for help with all of your auto insurance needs.

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DRIVEABLE DESTINATION

MEADOWS OF DAN, VIRGINIA BY JENNIFER SMART

We drove four hours into the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia to see exactly what sort of community gets blessed with so evocative a name as Meadows of Dan. It conjures images of wildflowers. Fields like the one where Julie Andrews sings the opening bars of The Sound of Music. And let me tell you, that’s not far off. The hills of Austria were never more alive than this gorgeous mountaintop where the headwaters of the Dan River flow through waves of meadow grass rippling in

T

the breeze at an air-thinning altitude of 2,964 feet.

he Mountain” is what locals call Meadows of Dan, a rural community that sits atop a winding road of curves and switchbacks with vistas too breathtaking for words. On the way up we stopped at a spectacular overlook called Lover’s Leap. The name comes from the fabled affair between a white settler’s son and an Indian maiden who, bullied by family members on both sides, escaped to the cliff and jumped into the void – ensuring they’d stay together for all eternity. According to legend, you can still hear their voices whisper in the breeze beneath the evening sky. We visited in the mid-morning hours and heard only the appreciative exclamations of other sightseers gasping at the unblemished beauty of the horizon.

miss it. The exterior is decked out in red and white checked signs, decorations, and awnings. When you step inside, it’s like entering a dream designed by Willie Wonka. The facility has a vast floor space packed with display cases holding more than 45 flavors of fudge, 80 different types of mouthwatering chocolates, 20 amazing varieties of artisan truffles, and more candy than you can imagine. Across the field of refrigerated countertops is a wall of windows where you can watch workers mixing, cooking, and packaging boxes of candy for wholesale distribution to all 50 states. As if that weren’t enough, each first-time visitor gets to select a free truffle (the size of a small hen’s egg) as a complimentary gift. When it comes to marketing strategy, this is genius. I positively challenge you to taste one and not buy a full bag. We purchased 12 truffles. On our way back to

In the interest of full disclosure, I must admit I’d never heard of Meadows of Dan until last year when I traveled to Warrenton, North Carolina and purchased three magnificent truffles – jalapeño, Grand Marnier, and peanut butter banana – at a little boutique called The Scarlet Rooster. These truffles were labeled as handmade, artisan chocolates crafted at Nancy’s Candy Company in Meadows of Dan. I loved the chocolates and loved the name. Meadows of Dan. This sparked my quest. So, as we drove up the mountain with my husband behind the wheel and our teenage daughter in the backseat, my number one priority was finding Nancy. Fortunately, it was an easy task. Nancy’s manufacturing facility is just inside the town limits at 2684 Jeb Stuart Highway. You can’t 16

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the parking lot, we passed a charter bus of retired folks from Winston-Salem who bounded inside like preschoolers. It seems Nancy’s Candy Company is a regular tourist stop. Even more famous than Nancy’s is a place called Mabry Mill. The site was built around 1910 by Edwin Mabry, an area farmer who took jobs sawing lumber and grinding corn for neighbors. Although bigger mills could sometimes turn too fast and scorch the grain, the available stream on the mountain was only strong enough to power the millstone slowly. For this reason, Mabry’s corn flour developed a reputation as particularly tasty. Eleven years after the family closed the mill in 1936, the National Park Service restored and landscaped the property. Today, Mabry Mill is the most photographed landmark on the Blue Ridge Parkway – and for good reason. It’s stunning. The site also features a collection of buildings, farm implements, and other displays that tell the story of rural life in Appalachia. Although there’s a gift shop and restaurant, much of the property is outdoors. It’s worth mentioning that weather conditions at nearly 3,000 feet can be a good deal colder and blusterier than expected. Bring extra layers, scarves, hats, and gloves. After leaving Mabry Mill, we puttered down the scenic roads that make up this section of Blue Ridge Wine Country. Friends had mentioned two establishments to check out. We found them, but both were closed due to a power outage from a storm the night

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before. (Mountaintop weather isn’t just cold, it’s also unpredictable.) Assuming you’ll have better luck, try and take some time to visit either one. The first is Chateau Morrisette, a third generation, family-owned winery with fireside dining and spirits that include wine, cider, and a trademark beverage known as Noble Fizz. The second is Villa Appalachia, a Tuscan-style home and winery that looks like it dropped into the Blue Ridge straight from an Italian hillside. Owned by Julie and Tim Block, the Villa offers Italianinspired wines made from grapes grown and harvested in Virginia. Menu items mainly consist of local cheeses, bread, fruit, and olives. We wrapped up our visit with a bit of window shopping back in Meadows of Dan, stopping at places with charming names like Christmas in the Meadows (a year-round Christmas boutique) and the Concord Corner Store (which has a very popular Facebook page touting its local art, quilts, refreshments, craft beer, gifts, jewelry, coffee, tea, furniture, good cheer, and restrooms). All in all, it was a marvelous trip. That’s why I suggest you take the mountain road. This driveable destination is historic, delicious, and movie-star pretty. Forget the Alps. In my opinion, it’s time to sing the praises of Meadows of Dan.  Jennifer Smart is senior public information and communications analyst with the City of Durham Department of Water Management. Follow the department and its mascot Wayne Drop at www.Facebook.com/DurhamWater.

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GOOD

READS

BY SUZANNE LUCEY

W

inter is here, and for many, this may not be their favorite season of the year. But for all the bookworms out there, winter – with its chilly days and even chillier evenings – is the ideal time to cuddle up under a fuzzy blanket next to a roaring fire, sip on a warm drink, and cozy up to their favorite book. I’ve rounded up some must-reads that provide the perfect excuse to stay inside and do just that. From fantasy and fiction for the older reader to short and sweet for the little book lover, these titles will have you happily reading all winter long.

CHILDREN One Of These Things Is Not Like The Others by Barney Saltzberg Available March 2020 When I think of this book, I instantly think of the Sesame Street song of the same name … not only do they have the name in common, they both share similar themes. This hilarious picture book (recommended for ages 2-5), celebrates what makes us different. With so much technology pushing perfection in our children’s faces these days, reading books like this and promoting uniqueness goes a long way. Saltzberg’s illustrations and story are delightful, and you’ll find yourself readily reading it to your child over and over again. Diggersaurs Explore by Michael Whaite Available March 2020 As described by publisher Random House Children’s Books, “Construction trucks and dinosaurs combine in this sequel to Diggersaurs! There are surprises in store in this rhyming, treasure-hunt adventure, where the emphasis is on demolition and exploration … keen-eyed readers can go back and search for jewels and treasure on every spread for added fun. Truck and dinosaur lovers will devour this all new adventure.” Recommended for ages 2-5. Escape Goat by Ann Patchett Available March 2020 International bestselling author Ann Patchett (with the help of illustrator Robin Preiss Glasser) has done it again with this hilarious play-on-words picture book. Escape Goat – about, you guessed it, a scapegoat who escapes blame – is full of illustrations that are whimsical and beautiful, creating such a sense of wonder and fun, 18

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all while teaching young readers about telling the truth. (And the puns throughout are sure to keep their parents entertained!) Blue Daisy by Helen Frost Available March 2020 An easy-to-read chapter book (illustrated by Rob Shepperson) that makes reading fun for children, Blue Daisy is a sweet and poignant story about a stray dog, and the friends who band together to help her. But when they try to help, things get a bit mixed up. How do you apologize to a dog, and how do you make amends when you do something wrong? Blue Daisy tackles this topic, and also addresses standing up to bullies and being a real friend. This book is great for beginning readers, as its illustrations aid with comprehension.

YOUNG ADULT The Conference Of The Birds by Ransom Riggs Book five of five in the #1 New York Times bestselling series Miss Peregrine’s Peculiar Children, The Conference Of The Bird continues Jacob Portman’s story – now with enemies behind him and the unknown ahead – as he takes a brave leap forward. The Night Country: A Hazel Wood Novel by Melissa Albert The highly anticipated sequel to Melissa Albert’s New York Times bestselling debut The Hazel Wood, this literary dream come true takes its readers on an exploration of what happens to the fairy tale creatures trying to make lives in New York City and the consequences of opening strange doors. Picking up where The Hazel Wood left off, Alice believes she has recovered from her adventures, but the others haven’t and are desperate to rattle doorknobs and push open windows. A trail of bodies from ritualistic murders will lead her back to her origins, where the boy she parted with grows into the confident wanderer who is also searching for her. Melissa Albert has delightfully spun another fairytale where doors are smashed open and ghosts reside within ghosts. One Of Us Is Next by Karen McManus The highly anticipated sequel to the New York Times bestselling thriller One Of Us Is Lying, One Of Us Is Next will have you gasping out loud. With a new mystery to solve at Bayview High, and a whole new set of rules, you won’t be able to put this one down.

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“Full of exciting and unexpected twists and racing toward a shocking conclusion, McManus’s tale will not disappoint fans, and those unfamiliar with her previous work will inhale this complicated story of friendship and revenge,” reviews Publishers Weekly. Anna K by Jenny Lee Available March 2020 Some people run marathons – I read Leo Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina. So you can imagine my excitement about the retelling of this epic novel, set in Manhattan in present day. As it gives the reader a sense of how hard teens have it today, I highly recommend Anna K to any parent of a teen as a common ground way to understand and chat with him/her, rather than asking the same old “How was school?” question.

ADULT American Dirt by Jeanine Cummins This spellbinding fictional work details the narrow escape of a mother and her son from the horrific massacre of their family in Acapulco by a drug cartel, and their subsequent run towards the U.S. border. As described on the author’s website (jeaninecummins.com), “Already being hailed as a Grapes of Wrath for our times and a new American classic, American Dirt is a rare exploration into the inner hearts of people willing to sacrifice everything for a glimmer of hope. American Dirt will leave readers utterly changed when they finish reading it. A page-turner filled with poignancy, drama, and humanity on every page, it is a literary achievement. It is one of the most important books for our times.” Come Tumbling Down by Seanan McGuire McGuire’s Wayward Children novellas series has been one of the best fantasy series for the past few years … and Come Tumbling Down cements that fact. Returning to the characters of Jack and Jill and masterfully tying together threads from previous volumes, his latest work – full of characters that we’ve grown to love and loathe, sharp writing, endlessly inventive world-building,

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and deep emotional resonance – finds McGuire in peak form. I loved every minute of my time spent with this book, and I hope we haven’t seen the end of McGuire’s wonderfully crafted world. The Other Mrs. by Mary Kubica Available February 2020 Mary Kubica continues to provide readers with page-turning thrillers, and just as with her other works, you will not be able to put this one down. The Other Mrs. is full of twists and turns that will keep you guessing right up until the very end. An old house off the coast of Maine in the winter, a murder, and some mental illness make for a great wintery afternoon cuddled up on the couch. Saint X by Alexis Shaitkin Available February 2020 When her much-older sister goes missing from a luxury Caribbean resort and is later found dead under mysterious circumstances, Claire and her family are changed forever. Named as one of Vogue’s best books to read this winter, Saint X starts as a page-turning thriller that morphs into a sly, but substantive, narrative on privilege. A Good Neighborhood by Therese Anne Fowler Available February 2020 Living in Wake Forest not too long ago with her teenage sons, New York Times bestselling author Therese Anne Fowler listened to her son tell a story about himself and a terrible event happening on social media … and A Good Neighborhood was born. Described on her website (thereseannefowler.com), A Good Neighborhood is a “provocative contemporary novel that examines the American dream through the lens of two families living side by side in an idyllic neighborhood, and the one summer that changes their lives irrevocably.” These times are unprecedented, and this soulsearching book is written for these times.  Suzanne Lucey and her husband Dave own Page 158 Books, located at 415 S. Brooks St. in Wake Forest. She may be reached at 919435-1843 or visit www.page158books.com.

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Mix dry ingredients; set aside. Mix wet ingredients (KitchenAid makes a great attachment); place in your ice cream freezer. Begin to freeze. When almost to a soft serve consistency, add your dry ingredients (to taste).

WET WALNUT TOPPING – 2 cups walnuts – Maple syrup BY BUCK BUCHANAN

WINTER ICE CREAM WARM YOUR INSIDES THIS SEASON

H

ere in the south, ice cream is traditionally a summer treat – enjoying a scoop after the ball game, following a trip to the lake, or during a concert in the park. But why, oh why, do we have to pack away the ice cream maker in the middle of October? Science suggests (or ancient alien theorists point to) that ice cream eating fires the metabolism and warms you from the inside – sounds like a pretty good way to kickstart your New Year’s weight loss resolution! With the recent upswing in “artisanal” ice creams, winter flavors – designed to illicit warm fuzzy feelings of yesteryear – are gaining popularity. Chilly season flavors like pumpkin pie, apple pie, pecan pie, gingerbread (see recipe), and apple cider are some of the flavors designed to mimic desserts we enjoyed in years past (and who says these flavors can’t still be savored this winter, even though Thanksgiving and Christmas are behind us?).

Pour walnuts into a small dish. Cover with maple syrup. Cover and refrigerate until serving time. (Wet nuts will stay good for at least a month and are best served after two days of soaking.)

WHIPPED CREAM – 1 cup heavy cream – 1 teaspoon vanilla extract – 2 tablespoons powdered sugar In a cold steel bowl, whip cream until soft peaks, then add the rest of the ingredients and whip until hard peaks are achieved.  Buck Buchanan is the owner of Lumpy's Ice Cream, located at 306 Wait Avenue in Downtown Wake Forest. Lumpy's uses the finest local ingredients and crafts them into ice cream without any preservatives, additives, or synthetic hormones. For more information, visit lumpysicecream.com or follow them on social media.

For some of us, just a scoop won’t satisfy our craving for winter treats. No, we want a sundae! The combination of a scoop and hot fudge, caramel, wet walnuts, and a dollop of fresh whipped cream gets the motor running in a way that warms the soul like nothing else. So, put another log on the fire, wrap yourself in a good blanket, turn on Netflix, and grab a scoop!

GINGERBREAD ICE CREAM – 1 pint heavy cream – 1 pint whole milk – 1 cup brown sugar – 1 teaspoon ground ginger – 3 teaspoons vanilla extract – ½ teaspoon ground cloves 20

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SEE THE WORLD

AND STAY HEALTHY 11 THINGS FOR OLDER ADULTS TO KEEP IN MIND FOR TRAVEL

Big trips require a lot of planning, and your health should be one of your considerations. Claire Larson, MD, a geriatrician with the UNC Center for Aging and Health, says there are 11 key things older travelers should keep in mind before and during a big trip to stay healthy. Make sure your immunizations are up to date and check to see if any additional shots are suggested for your destination. “Vaccinations are really important when traveling,” Dr. Larson says. “Make sure you have all the routine vaccines that are recommended based on your age and any health issues you may have.” It’s best to check this six months before your trip, Dr. Larson says, because you might need a series of shots over time for full protection. At a minimum, you should give yourself four weeks for the vaccines to take effect. Arrange wheelchair transport with your airline before your flight, if needed. “There is lots of walking at airports, and it is often more than my patients are able to do on a daily basis,” Dr. Larson says. Airline wheelchair transport is free and available to anyone with a disability or difficulty walking. Besides the physical assistance provided, airline staff can help you find your gate or connect on time when you have a short layover. If you require a CPAP (continuous positive airway pressure) machine or supplemental oxygen, make arrangements ahead of time. People with sleep apnea need a CPAP machine to get an adequate oxygen supply while they sleep at night. Going without one can affect quality of sleep and put stress on the heart and lungs. The same issues arise for people with breathing disorders that require supplemental oxygen. The Federal Aviation Administration has a list of approved devices, but check with your airline ahead of time, as some have different rules and may require a doctor’s note for your device. Dr. Larson says there are travel-sized CPAP and supplemental oxygen machines that may be easier to transport. This advice goes for bus and car trips as well. Plan ahead to make 22

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sure that your transportation allows your device on board and that, if you need oxygen, you have enough for the trip. Carry on your medications and simple first-aid supplies. If you pack all your medications in checked luggage before boarding your plane, you won’t have access to it during your flight and you run the risk of your bag being lost – and your medications too. Having your medication on board allows you to stick with your schedule throughout the trip. Depending on the length of the vacation and time difference, it may make sense to adjust the timing of some of your medications. Talk with your doctor before making any adjustments. “Keep a list of all your medications on you in case something gets lost or you need to see a doctor during travel,” Dr. Larson says. “Also, keep all of your medicines in their original bottles to avoid being flagged by TSA or customs agents for unidentifiable substances.” Dr. Larson also says simple first-aid supplies such as antibiotic ointment, bandages, over-the-counter painkillers, and antidiarrheal medication can go a long way to keep you comfortable. Pack a change of clothes in your carry-on. This one is mostly for comfort, but it can be especially helpful for people concerned about bathroom problems. “In case you have travel delays or lost luggage, it’s nice to have a fresh change of clothes available,” Dr. Larson says. “It’s also a great idea for those who have issues with incontinence. Knowing that you have a spare outfit can help relieve some worries.” Wear comfortable and supportive footwear. “People tend to be more active than usual on trips, and even just walking through the airport can add up to a lot of steps,” Dr. Larson says. “It is important to have comfortable, supportive footwear because you don’t want pain, blisters, or a stress fracture while traveling.” And don’t wear that new pair of shoes for the first time when you expect to be doing a lot of walking. During long flights or road trips, walk or stretch every one to two hours. Sitting still for too long can be deadly because of the risk of deep vein thrombosis – blood clots in the legs. “The risk for

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this is highest when sitting still for over four hours, but you should move around every one to two hours to keep your blood flowing properly,” Dr. Larson says. People with varicose veins, leg swelling, or a history of blood clots may find compression socks helpful during long periods of sitting. Long stretches of sitting are bad for arthritis, too, because joints need movement to keep them limber and mobile, which reduces pain. Whether in a car or on a plane, be sure to take pit stops or get up to stretch and walk. Hydrate. It’s especially important for older adults to stay hydrated because they naturally have less water in their bodies. They also may have conditions or take medications that increase the risk of dehydration, which can cause fatigue, dizziness, confusion, or low blood pressure. “Stay away from caffeine or alcohol, because they’re dehydrating,” Dr. Larson says. “Drink something, preferably water, every few hours, even if you don’t feel thirsty.” Try to maintain your sleep schedule. “Jet lag is a real thing,” Dr. Larson says. “Even if you don’t change time zones, just changing your routine can affect your sleep.” Quality sleep is important to feel your best and stay healthy during travel. Lack of sleep can lead to confusion and depression and can even affect your metabolism and endurance. Sleep aids such as melatonin can help you readjust your sleep schedule, but be sure to consult your doctor first. Have an emergency plan for medical issues. Enjoy your trip, but take the time to think about worst-case scenarios. “You should know beforehand where the nearest hospital or medical clinic is and what your health insurance will cover abroad,” Dr. Larson says. “You should have the list of your medications and contact information for your primary physician readily available, along with a plan of how to get in touch with your family if needed.” Contact your insurance company to learn about what it will cover, and consider travel insurance. Notify your physician before you travel so he or she can help create a plan for your medical conditions and travel destination. Share your emergency plan with loved ones before your trip. Don’t overdo it. “Don’t do things really out of the norm for yourself when you travel,” Dr. Larson says. “This applies to sleep, physical activity, and food and alcohol consumption.” Don’t feel compelled to hike up that mountain, try every food truck, taste all the wines, or catch that late-night show just because you are on vacation. If you deviate greatly from what you’re used to, you may end up with a stomachache or an injury from simply trying to do too much. Use these guidelines as a starting point for planning your trip, but always be sure to check with your physician and airline for an individualized care plan and alternative travel options.  Claire Larson, MD is a geriatrician with the UNC Center for Aging and Health. For more information, visit med.unc.edu/aging/.

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COOL GADGETS FOR

EVERY ROOM IN THE HOUSE

TECH TOOLS FOR A SUPER SMART HOME BY CYNTHIA KLIMASZ

N

ow that the holidays are a beautiful memory, are you finding yourself dreaming of all those gadgety tech gifts that you didn’t find under the Christmas tree or stuffed in your stocking? Why not kick off the new year by spoiling yourself with a few of those hot technology offerings that didn’t get checked off your holiday wish list? I’ve selected a few smart systems and devices that will add comfort, convenience, and a “cool factor” to every room in the house. (Please note this is not an advertisement or endorsement for these specific products, but rather just some of my personal favorites.)

LIVING ROOM These fun and functional gadgets are perfect for anyone who is big on style, but short on time. Automated Planter: Thanks to advancements in technology, caring for household plants is easier than ever. Perfect for frequent travelers or forgetful friends, the Dewplanter uses moisture in the air to water plants without manual intervention. Now nature lovers can enjoy the beauty and health benefits of houseplants without the hassle. Plus, for each unit sold, the company pledges to plant a tree somewhere it’s needed. Retails for $69.50. (Photo courtesy of Dewplanter.)

Smart Art: Instead of buying a single painting for your wall space, ENTRYWAY why not display 30,000? With the Meural Canvas, you can access BY STACEY MORITZ Ensure safety with these smart security upgrades. an extensive collection of artwork from around the world to display Smart Lighting: Ring, a company best known for its video doordigitally in your own home. Meural utilizes proprietary technology bells, has added smart lights to its series of integrated devices. Their to deliver an anti-glare matte display that automatically adjusts to Smart Light System includes motion sensors, pathlights, spotlights, the lighting in the room. Personal artwork and photographs can be and even step lights, which can be turned on and off using voice showcased, as well. Retails for $445 with annual membership. commands when paired with an Amazon Alexa device. Users may opt to receive a notification when motion is detected on the premMotorized Shades: Motorized window coverings aren’t new, but a ises, and – if integrated with Ring security cameras – access a live lower price point and enhanced features have helped to boost their video stream for an added layer of security. Systems start at $69.99. popularity. The latest motorized shades from Somfy can be preprogrammed to raise or lower at certain times of the day or controlled Video Doorbell: Video doorbells have become increasingly popular on-demand via a remote, smartphone app, or voice command security enhancements for homes, and for good reason. Homeownwhen paired with Amazon Alexa or Google Home. They can also ers can detect activity at their front door while away, view visitors be set to operate automatically in response to the amount of sunvia video stream, and communicate without opening the door. Since light or temperature of the room. Contact a dealer for pricing. Ring released its first smart doorbell in 2013, a number of competitors have entered the market. For instance, the Nest Hello Video KITCHEN Doorbell has some unique features – like facial recognition, packThese kitchen gadgets make life a little easier, and a lot more enjoyable. age detection, and pre-recorded quick responses. Retails for $229. Pressure Cooker: Have you jumped on the multi-cooker bandwagon yet? If so, you know how fast and simple these multifuncSmart Lock: Smart locks are a great way to ensure your friends and tional appliances make meal preparation. The InstantPot Duo is a family are never left out in the cold, and the August Smart Lock pressure cooker, sauté pan, steamer, slow cooker, rice cooker, food Pro+ Connect is among the most highly rated. One of the easiest warmer, and yogurt maker all-in-one. It reduces cooking time models to install, it pairs with an existing deadbolt and enables users and lowers energy consumption. Who wouldn’t love one of these to lock and unlock their doors remotely with an app on their phone. versatile tools? With numerous cookbooks and blogs devoted to And with the auto-lock/unlock feature, it can be set to open autoInstantPot recipes, the meal options are virtually endless. Retails matically upon approach and relock after entry. Retails for $279. for $99.95. 24

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Cocktail Machine: Cocktail connoisseurs will appreciate the ease and convenience of the Bartesian Premium Cocktail Machine. Listed among “Oprah’s Favorite Things” for 2019, the Bartesian mixes drinks with the touch of a button. Simply fill the canisters with base spirits, choose a cocktail capsule, and the machine does the rest. Now you can mix a margarita, whiskey sour, cosmopolitan, and other favorites as easily as you brew a cup of coffee. Retails for $349.

Smart Thermostat: Temperature fluctuations during the night can disrupt sleep. The Nest Learning Thermostat uses smart technology to track a user’s preferences and build a schedule around them. Place one of its integrated sensors in your bedroom to maintain a consistent temperature throughout the night. And Nest thermostats cut energy consumption, so you’ll rest easier knowing you’re saving the planet and money on utility bills. Retails for $249.

Smart Refrigerator: Kitchens are often called the “heart of the home,” and a new refrigerator from Samsung aims to be the hub. The Samsung Family Hub Refrigerator helps busy families stay organized. Grocery shopping becomes a breeze with built-in cameras that allow owners to peek inside their fridge from anywhere. The interactive touchscreen displays pictures, notes, and reminders for family members. And the integrated SmartThings app enables users to control smart devices and appliances from a central point. Base model starts at $3,099.

BATHROOM

BEDROOM Wake up refreshed with these smart devices for the bedroom. Baby Sleep Soother: As any parent knows, when your baby isn’t getting sleep, neither are you. Help everyone in the family catch some zzzzs with a Bubzi Co Soothing Owl. This cuddly creature plays lullabies while projecting a starry scene on the bedroom wall to calm young children and help them drift off to sleep. And for every purchase, Bubzi Co makes a donation to Postpartum Support International. Retails for $30.95. Sunrise Alarm Clock: Hate getting up in the morning? Alarm clocks that utilize light instead of a noisy alarm can provide a more peaceful transition in and out of sleep. The Philips SmartSleep Connected Sleep and Wake-Up Light includes customizable sunrise and sunset simulation, guided breathing exercises, and sensors that track room conditions like temperature, humidity, noise, and light. Retails for $199.95.

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Bathrooms don’t have to be boring. Technology can add flair to your daily routine. Waterproof Speaker: Music enthusiasts and podcast fans will enjoy streaming their favorites in the shower with a wireless waterproof speaker. The Ultimate Ears Wonderboom 2 is a mid-priced and versatile option that can go from the bath to the beach. It packs an impressive 13-hour battery life in a small, portable case that’s waterproof, dustproof, and floatable. Retails for $99.99. Digital Smart Scale: Diet and fitness enthusiasts may appreciate the high-tech features available with the Withings Body+. This scale tracks weight, body water, fat, muscle, and bone mass for up to eight users. It can also be set to display local weather and the previous day’s step count. Customized pregnancy and baby modes make this a suitable choice for a growing family, as well. Retails for $99.95. Considering a permanent technology upgrade for your own home? Buyer expectations and preferences vary depending on price point, architectural style, and neighborhood. Consider contacting a realtor first, as he or she can help you determine how the enhancement will impact the value of your home before you make the investment.  Cynthia Klimasz is a broker/realtor with Carolina Charm Real Estate in Wake Forest, and is also a seniors real estate specialist (SRES®), designated by the National Association of Realtors. She may be reached at cynthia@carolinacharmrealty.com or visit cynthiaklimasz.com.

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Federation of Garden Clubs; organized a Junior Garden Club; established a bird sanctuary at the now Paschal Golf Club; and decorated, furnished, and landscaped the historical Wake Forest Community House. They worked hard to help revitalize and preserve wildflowers at the Natural Gardens of Rockcliff Farm and at B. W. Wells Association near Falls Lake. Most importantly, they were instrumental in saving, preserving, and then moving The Calvin Jones House, home of Wake Forest College, to North Main Street, now the site of the Wake Forest Historical Museum. If you stroll the landscaped grounds of this museum, marvel at the thousands of daffodils in the median of North Main Street, and see the large decorative flower pots filled with colorful plants on White Street in downtown Wake Forest, you should thank the Wake Forest Garden Club for their hard work in planting and maintaining these floral visions. A few of their other community outreach efforts include The Mad Hatters Tea Party and Garden Tour; decorating the community house while serving refreshments during the Historic Homes Christmas Tour; maintaining and replacing native plants at the WCPE classic radio station; and assisting with Arbor Day, Dirt Day, and the 4th of July Children’s Parade.

BY JILL BRIGHT

Their Flower Cart started in 2010, when WFGC members decided to bring greenery from their yards, secure flowers at no cost, and arrange them into smaller containers. Still going strong, much appre-

AROUND

TOWN F THE WAKE FOREST GARDEN CLUB

ortunately, spring isn’t too far off on the horizon, which means it’s time to start thinking about checking your lawn and shrubbery conditions, preparing your flower and vegetable gardens for planting, and looking forward to arranging freshly cut flowers into beautiful arrangements. If you love doing these things and would like to learn and/or do more with gardening, then you should consider joining the Wake Forest Garden Club (WFGC). Since its inception in 1924 – making it the longest continuing community service organization in Wake Forest – the WFGC has since expanded its membership, projects, and achievements that enhance the beauty and enjoyment of nature in our communities. This club was one of the earliest to become a member of the State 28

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ciation is given for donated mugs and small containers, money for green oasis, and to their co-sponsor, Saint John’s Episcopal Church, for generously providing work and storage space. Weekly, unwanted and soon-to-be discarded flowers from local grocery and discount centers are picked up by these volunteers. We often have families that cannot transport or accept sprays of floral arrangements after funerals, so we donate them to The Flower Cart. Every Friday at 9:00 AM, teams prepare and arrange 35-45 little floral arrangements and deliver them to local nursing homes, shut-ins, and worthy recipients who need a bit of blooming brightness in their day. Today, this organization continues their goal of community service, along with educational projects and programs that encourage gardeners to be water-wise; users of native and pollinator-friendly plants; and to appreciate nature, our environment, and natural resources. Club meetings are usually held at the Wake Forest Historical Museum at 9:30 AM on the second Tuesday, September through May. To learn more about the Wake Forest Garden Club and their schedule of programs, floral design, and workshops, please visit their website (wfgardenclub.org) and Facebook page.  Jill Bright is with Bright Funeral Home, located at 405 S. Main Street in Wake Forest. Bright Funeral Home serves the Wake Forest, Rolesville, Youngsville, Franklinton, Falls, Bay Leaf, Loiusburg, Raleigh, and surrounding areas. For more information about Bright Funeral Home, call 919-556-5811 or visit www.brightfunerals.com.

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yarn all the way around the cone, starting about 2-inches from the top (be careful with the hot glue … speaking from experience, it hurts when you get it on your fingers). Pull the sock about halfway down the cone. Using your small rubber band or hair tie, gather the toe of the sock and wrap the rubber band around it, making a little “pom pom” at the top. Go back around the cone to make sure there aren’t any large spaces in the yarn. If there are, simply glue more yarn in those areas. Attach the wooden knob just below the “hat” and you are finished! This is such a fun project and you will definitely want to create a whole village of gnomes for your winter décor.

BY DOLORES RIGGINS

Mention the month of February and my thoughts immediately go to candy. Sure, some people think of Valentine’s Day when thinking of February, but candy is such a big part of celebrating the day of love. Since I’m talking about delicious sweets, let’s make a precious candy dish using clay pots to hold all that chocolate goodness. For this project, all you will need are the following materials: 4-inch clay pot, 3-inch clay pot saucer, a glass bubble bowl (which can be found at your favorite dollar store), a one-inch wooden dowel cap, and red and white craft paint. To kick off this craft, first paint the clay pot and saucer red, applying two or three coats (allowing the paint to dry between coats). Dip the wooden end of a small paint brush in the white paint to add polka dots around the top and bottom of the clay pot and the outer edge of the saucer.

WARM UP YOUR

WINTER THE DIY WAY

A

hhhh … winter has arrived. It seems we either love it or don’t care for it very much at all. Whichever way you lean, you can warm things up inside while it’s cold outside (and possibly snowy or rainy) with some fun and simple DIY projects.

Gnomes are all the rage this year (you may have seen them adorning homes all over this past Christmas season – but these fun fellas can be enjoyed all year long!) – and I have a wonderfully simple activity to create your own versions of these adorable little guys. Gather together your supplies: a foam cone (I use a 7- or 8-inch cone), chunky yarn for the hair and beard, a festive sock that represents the season (I find that fuzzy socks work best), a wooden knob for the nose, small rubber bands, scissors, and a glue gun. Cut the yarn into about 7-inch pieces and separate – each piece is made up of four strands, so you’ll have a pile. Next, glue strands of 30

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Paint the dowel cap white. Finally, it’s time to assemble your candy jar. Glue the bubble bowl to the clay pot using craft glue or any strong adhesive. Then glue the dowel cap to the bottom of the saucer to complete the lid … that’s it! Oh, except the best part – filling it with your sweetie’s favorite candy for a gift he or she can use all year long. Don’t limit yourself to making these for only Valentine’s Day – they can be crafted for any holiday, special occasion, or just for fun. Use a variety of colors and maybe adhere foam shapes that can be attached for a little extra decoration – what a great, simple, and fun project to help pass the time on a dreary, wintery day.

Now that winter has arrived, take advantage of this time indoors by stocking up on craft supplies, snuggling in for the season, and spending these cold, snowy, rainy days creating! Here’s to having loads of fun and sharing great times with family and friends.  Dolores Riggins is the co-owner of Southern Suds & Gifts, featuring over 35 craftsmen and artists, located at 213 S. White St. in Downtown Wake Forest (www.facebook.com/SouthernSudsAndGifts).

With spring’s approach, thoughts turn to Easter and Mother’s Day. Candles are great gifts for these special occasions, and they wonderfully fill your home with a sweet, springy aroma after the cold winter months. Mason jars are so very versatile, and we will use these to make an easy soy candle. For this project, gather soy wax flakes, lavender essential oil (or any scent of your choice), a large glass measuring cup, pint mason jars, and candle wicks with a metal base. Get started by gluing the candle wick to the center bottom of the mason jar. Have a wooden skewer or pencil on hand. Wrap the wick around either one of these to keep it centered. Pour three cups of soy wax flakes into the measuring cup. To melt the flakes, place the measuring cup inside a double boiler or the microwave (if using the microwave, be sure to stir the wax every 30 seconds until all of it is melted). If you find you haven’t melted enough wax, just melt a little more to fill the jar to its top. Add a tablespoon of essential oil to the wax, using a tablespoon for each candle you make. Finally, pour the wax into the jar, making sure the wick stays centered. Allow the wax to harden for several hours, or overnight, and lastly trim the wick to a quarter inch. And for added flair, wrap the jar in twine or a colorful ribbon, adhere a beautiful bloom, and just like that you have a lovely, wonderfullyscented candle that will help cure your spring fever.

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BY HOLLY HOPKINS

VEGGIES

RULE Remember growing up, when a standard dinner at home consisted of and centered on the meat: chicken, ground beef, pork, etc.? The protein was the star and the veggies and starch were merely the extras to fill up the plate. But, the times, they are a-changing, and minds are swaying. Meat-

the most to fill up more of the plate, then make your burgers smaller or cut down on the amount of chicken you prepare to go with it. You could also make lasagna with a smaller portion of ground beef and more diced veggies in the layers. You can always put together a giant salad with tons of veggies and hard-boiled eggs in place of meat. Soup is another great option for keeping your veggies on the forefront.

less Mondays are in practice with many people; veggies have been turned into meat-like substitutes for burgers that actually “bleed” when you bite into them; restaurants have expanded their vegetarian and vegan menu selections; varieties of protein-loaded meat substitutes are plentiful; and

Y

recipes abound on the Internet, just waiting for you to try. es, vegetarianism has come a long way. I flirted with embracing the vegetarian lifestyle 20 or so years ago and most definitely enjoy plenty of vegetarian dishes these days. In fact, some of my current favorite dishes are vegetarian – heck, a few are even vegan! So, vegetarianism isn’t scary or bland or boring or hard. It can be delicious and enjoyable. And I have a recommendation for you. You don’t have to go cold turkey (pardon the pun …) into the world of vegetarianism. Instead, think of a transition to a “veggie forward” menu. Simply swap the spotlight on the meal by making your veggies the star and utilize the meat in more of a supporting role. There are a few ways to accomplish this feat. The easiest way is to simply increase the veggie portioning on your plate. Pick the veggies that everyone enjoys 32

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A warm bowl of chili is the perfect way to warm up on a cold day. This simple but delicious chili recipe will satisfy even the meatiest eater – it contains just a small portion of meat, but lots more veggies, diced to any size you like. I prefer to keep them big and chunky, but a small dice works just as well. For a bit of a twist, leave out some of the diced tomatoes from the recipe, and cook the chili a little longer to let some of the liquid evaporate ... now you’ve got a great burrito filling! With this versatile dish, there are so many options just waiting for you to give it a try.

Stir and reduce to a simmer, cover, and simmer for another 15-20 minutes. Taste and adjust seasonings to your liking: add hot sauce or chipotle powder for more heat. Garnish with shredded cheese, scallions, sour cream, and enjoy. This is great served over rice or barley for a change of pace. For a completely vegan recipe that packs a flavor punch and is sure to heat up your insides on a chilly, wintery evening, give this next option a try. One taste of this delicious veggie dish, and you’ll quickly find you don’t even miss the meat!

VEGGIE-FORWARD CHILI

BOMBAY CURRY VEGGIES

Makes 8-10 servings – 1 tablespoon olive oil – ½ pound ground turkey or beef – 1 small onion, chopped – 3 cloves garlic, finely minced – 2 teaspoons ground cumin – 2 tablespoons dried oregano – ¼ cup chili powder – 1 tablespoon salt – 1 tablespoon ground black pepper – 2 stalks celery, chopped – 2 green bell peppers, chopped – 2 jalapeño peppers, minced (remove pith and seeds to reduce the spice, if needed) – 2 (4-ounce) cans chopped green chile peppers, drained – 3 (28-ounce) cans whole peeled tomatoes, crushed – 1 (15-ounce) can black beans or garbanzo beans, drained and rinsed

Makes 8 servings – 1 tablespoon olive oil – ½ cup minced shallots – 1 tablespoon curry powder – 3 cups diced peppers – 2 cups medium diced zucchini – 2 cups medium diced summer squash – 1 (14-ounce) can coconut milk – 2 cups diced fresh tomato – 1 apple, peeled and diced small – 1 mango, peeled and diced small – 2 tablespoons julienned basil leaves – 1 tablespoon lemon juice – 1 teaspoon salt (or to taste) – 1 cup veggie broth or water

Heat the olive oil in a large pot over medium heat. Add the meat and cook until brown. Remove some of the oil if needed before adding the veggies. Stir in the onion and garlic. Then season with cumin, oregano, chili powder, pepper, and salt. Cook and stir until onion is tender, then mix in the celery, green bell peppers, jalapeño peppers, garlic, and green chili peppers. Add the diced veggies and cook for 3-5 minutes, or until the veggies start to soften. Add the tomatoes to the pot and stir in your black beans and corn. Bring to a boil.

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Heat oil in a large pot over medium heat, add shallots, and sauté for a minute or two. Add curry powder, then sauté for 1 minute. Add peppers, zucchini, and squash; sauté for 3 minutes, just until vegetables start to soften. Add coconut milk, tomato, apple, mango, basil, lemon juice, sugar, salt, and veggie broth. Bring to a boil, reduce to a simmer. Cook 5 minutes. Serve over basmati rice.  Holly Hopkins has spent many years working in and with food, starting off at her Grandma’s elbow, making wedding cakes and cookies galore. Since then, she has been a manager and business owner and is thrilled to be combining her passions for high quality food and superior customer service at Chef Mario’s. For more information, visit www.chefmario.com.

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1. Less competition: More homes are on the market in the srpingtime, which means your home is up against more competition. By listing your home in the winter months, when other homeowners shy away from listing their homes, there is less competition, resulting in a supply versus demand situation for those buyers who are interested in home buying right now, and who want and/or need to purchase, regardless of the season.

BY ALLISON CAUDLE ABBOTT

’TIS THE

SEASON TO SELL

2. Pull on people’s emotions: It’s chilly outside, so when buyers come in to your home, the cooler temperatures give you the chance to have the fireplace going; drape a throw blanket over the couch; place a board game atop the coffee table; illuminate the room with warm, soft lighting; and perhaps casually display some warm cookies on the kitchen counter. Tug on prospective home buyers’ heartstrings a bit by showcasing how your house is inviting, cozy, and truly feels just like home – a home they just might see themselves in one day. People buy based on emotion, and the winter months provide the perfect opportunity to evoke that emotion. 3. Serious buyers: The start of the new year is a busy time for most. Only the most serious buyers are out looking, so by listing your home during January, February, and March, it is being looked at by those serious buyers who either need to buy now or who don’t want to miss out on a great home by waiting until spring

6 REASONS WHY SELLING YOUR HOME IN WINTER IS A GOOD IDEA Spring is a busy time of year in real estate … as spring flowers bloom, real estate signs seem to pop up at every turn. But the spring season isn’t always necessarily the best time to sell your home. Traditionally, the winter months are considered a less desirable time to put your house on the market. However, there are many reasons why this time of year is perhaps a better time to sell your home than in the spring. January, February, and March can bring you less competition, offer the opportunity to engage and pull on people’s emotions, entice more serious buyers, bring you more money, allow you to work with relocation opportunities, and attract those who have strong new year’s resolutions. Yes, the winter months just may be the ideal time to list your home … read on to learn more! 34

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to purchase one. Listing your home now gives you the advantage that each showing will be scheduled by more serious buyers than those who are out browsing in the spring or summer months.

The Keystone Account. Because you have better things to do than worry about how much your checks cost.

4. More money: Due to less competition and the serious, motivated buyers who don’t want to miss out on a home that they want/need, statistics show that homes sell for a higher price in the winter months versus the other more popular home-selling months of the year. 5. Relocation opportunities: The busiest time for corporate relocations is the start of the new year (primarily during January and February). By having your home on the market during the beginning of the year, your home will now be available to those seeking relocation. As we all know, those are some of the most serious buyers in the market. 6. New Year’s resolutions: There are many people who take the start of the new year extremely seriously, and as soon as the clock strikes midnight, whatever goals they have set out, they are excited to accomplish. If that goal is home ownership or the purchase of a new home, having yours on the market means those serious buyers’ eyes are on your home.

Wake Forest 12335 Wake Union Church Rd. #206 • (919) 556-5972 www.BCBonline.com Named one of American Banker’s Top 200 community banks since 2007!

Keeping these six reasons for selling your home during the winter months in mind, and having flawless staging, a robust marketing campaign, and a knowledgeable agent will only add to your success of a desirable outcome in the sale of your home. Enlist a trusted professional who understands these reasons, your goals, and your selling motivation, and your “For Sale” sign will be topped with a “SOLD” sign in no time!  Allison Caudle Abbott is the owner and broker-in-charge of Southern Lux Living, serving buyers and sellers throughout the Triangle. She may be reached at 919-3956186 or visit www.southernluxliving.com.

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HIDDEN

GEM

VOLLIS SIMPSON WHIRLIGIG PARK

F

arm machinery repairman Vollis Simpson began making gigantic, fanciful, wind-driven sculptures – popularly called “whirligigs” – at his family farm in Wilson County when he was nearing retirement age. Having gained an interest in collecting odd machinery parts, industrial salvage, transportation supplies, and other useful objects that he didn’t want to go to waste over the years, the story of Vollis Simpson’s famous whirligigs began, and where this issue’s “Hidden Gem” takes us.

A LITTLE HISTORY While his fame came near the end of his life, Simpson’s story began in 1919 when he was born to a farming family with 12 children. As a boy, he helped his father supplement the family income by moving houses. He served in the Army Air Corps during WWII with duty on the South Pacific island of Saipan. The isolated troops struggled to keep uniforms clean, so Simpson experimented with rudimentary windmill technology using a junked B-29 bomber to power a large washing machine. After the war, Simpson partnered with several friends to open a machinery repair shop. As the years passed, he followed in his father’s footsteps and developed a house-moving side to the business. During both jobs, he began to collect the aforementioned machinery parts, industrial salvage, and transportation supplies. After retiring at 65, he started tinkering around with his collection of odd parts. Using some of the same rigs he’d developed for moving houses, Simpson began constructing enormous windmills in his yard. They did not resemble the working windmills of grinding or irrigation use, but rather referenced the concepts of weather vanes and handcrafted whirligigs that are still seen locally on houses, fence posts, and barns. These creations incorporate highway and road signs, HVAC fans, bicycles, ceiling fans, mirrors, stovepipes, I-beams, pipe, textile mill rollers, ball bearings, aluminum sheeting, various woods, steel rods, rings, pans, milkshake mixers, and many more such materials that form the support and moving parts. He even cut decrepit road signs into one-inch and larger squares so that the whirligigs would be reflective at night. And images inside the whirligigs are farm animals and people – references to Simp36

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son’s experiences, such as the many WWII era airplanes, lumberjacks sawing wood, and a guitar player based on Simpson’s son. The field of these “whirligigs” soon began attracting the attention of locals. And he kept making these whirligigs – which in 2013 were named North Carolina’s official folk art – seven days a week, up until about six months before he died in May of 2013 at the age of 94. By that time, Vollis Simpson was famous. But he never called himself an artist. Upon his death, though, The New York Times did, describing Simpson as “a visionary artist of the junkyard … who made metal scraps into magnificent things that twirled and jangled and clattered when he set them out on his land. The field, which was located 11 miles outside the City of Wilson, had already attracted the attention of local people. But after the rise of the Internet, out-of-state visitors began making their way to Simpson’s farm too, resulting in it becoming one of Wilson County’s top tourism destinations, as well as propelling the city’s downtown into the national spotlight. His work began to be discovered by art collectors, too. At the American Visionary Art Museum in Baltimore, Maryland, for instance, you will find his 55-foot-tall, 45-foot-wide “Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness” creation on permanent display. His works are part of several other collections as well, including the American Folk Art Museum in Manhattan and the one-time feature in a popular window installation at New York’s Bergdorf Goodman department store. As Simpson’s health declined, he was no longer able to grease or paint the 40'-50' tall sculptures that were made from recycled industrial parts and had endured rain, sun, and hurricanes for 30 years. It became clear that without intervention, Wilson’s number one attraction would soon disappear. So in 2010, a plan was announced to create the Vollis Simpson Whirligig Park in Historic Downtown Wilson. A grassroots effort of many townspeople (and fans worldwide) banding together to save these beloved works of art – rescuing the whirligigs, and the city, at the same time – was underway. By leveraging one of Wilson’s most unique cultural assets into an economic engine of entrepreneurial job creation and tourism, the Wilson community added vibrancy to its Historic Downtown.

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Simpson was delighted to see that his work would survive and continue to delight people for generations to come. He assisted in the effort to relocate the whirligigs to a downtown warehouse where they were restored, rebuilt in some cases, and repainted. 30 whirligigs, some standing 50 feet tall or more, were eventually transported, restored, and installed. Grants from ArtPlace America, the Kresge Foundation, and the National Endowment for the Arts helped the project become what is now the Vollis Simpson Whirligig Park and Museum, a part of a public/private partnership that includes City of Wilson, Wilson Downtown Properties, Wilson Downtown Development Corporation, Kohler Foundation, and others.

concrete and garden squares in the park pay homage to Wilson’s agricultural heritage. The Pavilion – a large, open-air shelter that was created to house downtown arts, crafts, and farmers markets, as well as other community events, activities, and educational programs – echoes surrounding tobacco auction warehouses. Specialty night lighting illuminates the thousands of reflectors attached to the whirligigs, recreating the mystical experience at the original location when car headlights rounded the curve near the Simpson farm. Benches, tables, and chairs invite picnicking, reading, or just

enjoying art and nature. Practice Tai chi, have a picnic, celebrate a family reunion, or play flashlight tag among the reflective whirligigs – the possibilities are endless.  Vollis Simpson Whirligig Park is free and open daily, including holidays, from 5:00 AM to 12:00 AM. For more information about this nearby hidden gem, directions, photo gallery, calendar of events, and more, visit wilsonwhirligigpark.org and follow them on Facebook (@V.S.WhirligigPark) and Instagram (@whirligigpark). Special thanks to Jeff Bell, executive director of Vollis Simpson Whirligig Park. Photo by Duffy Healey, Healey Publishing.

THE PARK The two-acre Vollis Simpson Whirligig Park was originally conceived with the input of hundreds of Wilson citizens including downtown stakeholders, artists, youth groups, neighborhood associations, and business leaders. Through multiple community meetings, Wilsonians helped contribute to the design and vision for the park. As the project progressed, a workforce training program was developed and implemented in partnership with Wilson Community College, Opportunities Industrialization Center of Wilson, and St. John’s Community Development Corporation for whirligig repair and conservation. Over 50 jobs were created throughout the course of the whirligig restoration effort. Designed by award-inning landscape architecture firm Surface678, the park features 30 of Vollis Simpson’s whirligigs. This is the largest collection in the world and includes some of his most colossal and impressive sculptures. The Green – a central grass amphitheater and stage, where everything from music to film engages the audience – is a reference to the pond on the Simpson farm, with the surrounding whirligigs installed as they originally were around the body of water. Mimicking rows of crops in the fields and long lines of tobacco ready for auction in the warehouses, the rows of

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winter months. There are hundreds of options, so the chances of finding one that best satisfies your needs won’t be too difficult with a little trial and error.

FIND A COMPLEMENT – MATCH STRENGTH WITH STRENGTH

STOUTS: A style marked by the use of roasted malts and barley, stouts are dark beers that are full-bodied: think dark roast coffee. There is a range of stouts available from a dry stout made famous by the Irish, to ones with hints of chocolate, gingerbread, cinnamon, or coconut. Stouts can easily overpower some dishes, so consider drinking stout with rich spicy food like barbeque beef, foie gras, or smoked goose. 

BY ROBYN GOSS-BENNAI

WINTERTIME IS A

GREAT TIME

FOR BEER

BROWN ALES: Often having a sweeter, full-bodied, and fruity taste, the winter ales are typically malty, sweet, and strong. They are dark beers with a strong malt presence, but not as dark as stouts. Holiday ales can have hints of cranberries and gingerbread, while stronger ales often have warm spices such as ginger or nutmeg. Brown ales pair well with roast pork, smoked sausage, and grilled salmon. Brown ales are great choices for big intense dishes such as roast beef, lamb, or game that is grilled or roasted. PORTERS: As a beer choice that tends to be fruitier, sweeter, and less bitter than stouts, the porter tastes spicy, chocolatey, and is

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As the cold weather settles in, we begin to wonder why we were so eager to ditch the heat of summer for the cold of winter. In order to restore the warmth lost to us by the tilt of the earth, we often turn to comforting food and beverages to give us that cozy feeling we crave. When we think of wintery dishes, the first foods that come to mind are best described as roasted, slowly cooked, or smoked. “What is the best beverage to increase the efficacy of a full-flavored, rich meal?” you ask. The answer may surprise you – it’s often the

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right beer. While beer doesn’t heat you up, per se, it can give

S

you a toasty feeling to go along with that hearty winter meal. o, how do we pair our favorite winter dishes with the right beer to bring back that warmth? Take these suggestions, perhaps while sipping your favorite ale, as a starting place for what to consider when deciding which beer to pair with your meals during the

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dominated by a distinctive dark malt or grain flavor with a slight sweetness. Porters will complement the flavors of a roasted or smoked dish. They nicely complement stew, cream-based meals, barbeque, sausages, roasted meat, or blackened fish. 

of beers containing a bitter flavor. Second, the aperitif of choice is often served with an array of light foods such as crackers and cheese. You can find a beer that doesn’t fill you up before you begin the first main course.

DARK LAGER: Don’t be fooled by the darkness of these beers; dark lagers will taste more familiar than some of the other dark beers. Considered clean beers, dark lagers get their color from dark malts, but have less roasted character to them. This may be the best option to satisfy the palates of most of your guests. Dark lagers blend nicely with hearty and spicy foods such as barbeque, sausage, and roasted meat, stew, or corned beef. 

BEER AS A DIGESTIF: The purpose of having a digestif is to aid in digestion. Traditionally, this role has been filled by scotch, bourbon, or brandies. However, beer is a great alternative for a digestif. It contains soluble fibers that promote healthy blood-sugar and blood-cholesterol levels. Beer can also stimulate the digestion of fat and protein.

CONTRAST: Aside from complementing dishes with your choice of beer, you also have the option to contrast the flavors for an equally satisfying experience. Hoppy beers, such as IPAs, can cut through the fat in a rich dish, while sour ales can cut through the gaminess of duck or venison. Additionally, consider serving a subtle ale with Indian or Thai food to contrast the hotter flavors in the dish. 

As you can see, there really is no reason not to include beer before, throughout, or after your meal during any season of the year. There are so many choices available that the task of finding the right beer for your purpose can feel daunting at times; however, part of the fun should be trying a variety of styles and flavors until you have found the perfect one. It’s doubtful you’ll have a difficult time finding friends willing to come over for dinner and help you through this formidable task. Perhaps, they will even bring their own favorite beers to assist in the search. 

BEER AS AN APERITIF: Beers can satisfy this role for more than one reason. First, an aperitif is meant to stimulate the appetite. Bitterness is one way to accomplish this goal, and there are plenty

Robyn Goss-Bennai, Norse Brewing Company. Norse Brewing Company is located at 203 Brooks Street in Downtown Wake Forest. Visit norsebrewingco.com and follow them on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter.

DIVERSIFY – OTHER WAYS TO MAKE THE MOST OF BEER THIS WINTER

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GOOD

GUMS

TAKING THE PAIN OUT OF THE TREATMENT OF GUM DISEASE BY DR. EDMOND SUH

Do you notice a bit of blood when brushing and flossing your teeth? Maybe you think this is normal … it’s not. Healthy gums should not bleed at all when brushing and flossing. In fact, bleeding gums are the most common symp-

and bone that support the teeth. As the gums start to separate from the teeth and the infection progresses, teeth can become loose and may have to be removed. The treatment process for periodontal disease has historically been

tom of gum disease. Other symptoms may include chronic bad breath or discoloration and lesions on your gums. Many people ignore the treatment of gum disease for fear of a painful dental procedure – but going untreated could lead to greater impacts on their health, not to mention potentially

E

losing their teeth. ssentially, there are two types of gum disease: gingivitis and periodontitis. Understanding how to prevent gum disease is important, as prolonged gingivitis can turn into periodontitis. Some of the causes for gingivitis include diabetes, smoking, aging, genetics, stress, inadequate nutrition, substance abuse, HIV infection, and certain medications or diseases that impact other parts of the body. Hormonal fluctuations like those experienced during puberty and pregnancy can also increase your risk. When gingivitis is ignored and not properly treated, the more severe form of gum disease, periodontitis, can occur. This happens over time as plaque spreads and grows below the gum line. Bacteria generated from this plaque cause a chronic inflammatory response where the body starts to break down the tissues 40

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rather painful, requiring anesthetic for the entire mouth. The process of scaling and root planing (smoothing of the root’s surface) works to treat the disease by removing plaque and tarter that have built up deep on the root. Gum grafting has also been used in treatment to cover roots of teeth where severe recession has occurred. Thanks to advances in dental technology, contemporary approaches to treat periodontal disease can be achieved with nonsurgical or non-painful procedures. Modern technology, instrumentation, and equipment can now deliver more pleasant and effective solutions – such as dental lasers that are used to kill bacteria via a comfortable, scalpel-free surgery, if required – than those of days past. As always, prevention should be the first approach. Regular dental check-ups and good oral hygiene are the basis for keeping gum disease at bay. A few quick oral hygiene reminders:

– Don’t forget that as you brush your teeth, you should also brush your tongue, which can easily harbor bacteria. – Flossing is a key element to good oral hygiene as it allows particles of food that may get trapped between teeth and along the gum line to be removed. – Adding an alcohol-free mouthwash or salt water rinse helps to reduce the potential of gum disease.

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As certain health factors like age, smoking, diet, and genetics can increase your risk, it’s important to consult with your dental professional for your best treatment plan.  To learn more about gum disease and ways to prevent it, contact Dr. Edmond Suh, DDS of Supremia Dentistry, located at 1711 S. Main Street in Wake Forest. Dr. Suh is an international lecturer on contemporary dental techniques. At Supremia Dentistry, expect something different as they welcome you to their patient family. Call 919-556-6200 to learn more or schedule an appointment. You can also visit www.supremiadentitsry.com.

Schedule your appointment or request a complimentary consultation today! 1711 South Main Street Wake Forest www.supremiadentistry.com CIRCA Magazine

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PRE-SPRING

CLEANING WINTER CLEANING FOR SPRING ENJOYMENT

BY TODD NELSON

CURTAINS/DRAPES/BLINDS. Some curtains can go right into the washing machine, but many will require professional dry cleaning. For washable types, you’ll want a detergent formulated specifically for delicate fabrics and/or to guard against color fading. For vinyl blinds, especially if you don’t wipe or vacuum them regularly, be prepared to take them down for a good soak and scrub in the tub.

HEAVY BED LINENS. Wool blankets need professional dry cleaning, but virtually everything else can go right into the wash with a mild detergent. Note that down and other heavy comforters and quilts need front-loading machines and dryers with extra-large capacities (think laundromat), both to ensure cleanliness and to avoid damaging the filling. Avoid using fabric softeners with down and use dryer or tennis balls to restore maximum fluffiness. PILLOWS. It’s best to wash bed pillows at least once every six months. For regularly-maintained pillows, a daily detergent should do the trick; for heavier soils, though, add a detergent booster such as OxiClean or Borax. Never use bleach or fabric softeners,

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CLOSETS/DRAWERS/BASEMENT/ATTIC/GARAGE STORAGE AREAS. This one comes first on the list, because you can get started with purging and organizing your stuff long before the weather turns nice – laying a nice groundwork for all the heavyduty cleaning to come. For added efficiency, pre-gather suitable containers for carting away no-longer needed or wanted items, plus a list of local organizations that accept donations – or even better, ones that will come and pick up your donations.

for a few hours of fresh air and bright sunshine to kill off any dust mites that might have taken up residency.

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e all know that spring screams spring cleaning … but these cold winter months have us stuck indoors, dreaming of the throw-open-your-windows-and-doors weather that spring brings. Why not take advantage of this stuck-inside season and get ahead of the so-called spring-cleaning game by attacking those cleaning jobs now? When it’s finally warm again, you won’t have to spend your days tackling these tasks, and instead, can start soaking up the spring sun!

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CARPETS/RUGS. It is strongly recommended that you clean your carpets and rugs at least once every 12 to 18 months (why, you ask? Your carpet contains roughly 200,000 bacteria per square inch on average, making it technically 4,000 times more germier than a toilet seat; it can hide one pound of dirt per yard and still appear clean; 2,000 dust mites can survive on a single ounce of carpet dust; and even the most powerful vacuums struggle to extract dirt and germs from the base of carpet fibers). Steam- or dry-machine clean your rugs, which can be done by a professional or with rented equipment, to help get rid of this grossness. Go ahead and book your slot now to get ahead of the upcoming spring-cleaning rush. MATTRESSES. Flip, rotate, and vacuum mattresses thoroughly with an upholstery attachment at least twice a year. And once spring does finally return, if you’re able, move mattresses outside 42

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which will damage the filling. Use dryer or tennis balls for fluffing. FURNITURE UPHOLSTERY. While regular vacuuming is best for preserving upholstered furniture, deep cleaning at least once a year is recommended. How you clean depends entirely on the material, and most sofas and chairs will be clearly labeled (usually under the cushions) with cleaning instructions. For fabrics that can withstand a little moisture, steam cleaning – often with the same machine you rent for cleaning carpets – is one great option. Sprinkling with baking soda or even a bit of rug cleaner then vacuuming after 30 or so minutes is an effective, dry alternative. BATHROOM. In addition to deep cleaning the bathrooms, and tidying up items under the sinks, a few other things to address specifically include: de-clogging drains; cleaning steam exhaust fans; washing or replacing mildewed shower curtains and liners; and addressing any hard soap scum buildup on shower doors and walls. FLOORS. The floors in your home bear the biggest burdens of both winter (wet, salt, and grit) and early spring (mud). Your last big task of the pre-spring cleaning season should be to deep clean your floors, plus any needed stripping, waxing, and re-sealing.  Todd Nelson is the owner of MaidPro of Raleigh and Wake Forest. Visit www.maidpro.com/raleigh-north or call 919-871-9996.

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holding reading material further away or increasing the font size makes it easier to see. Eventually, your arms just aren’t long enough, and either reading glasses or bifocals are required. It may be a surprise that many people in their 40s start wearing contact lenses for the first time with the onset of presbyopia. For people who have been glasses-free their entire lives, the sudden dependence on glasses can be very troubling. Monovision or multifocal contact lenses are the solution for those who are looking to minimize their need for near vision glasses. If you are affected by presbyopia, see an eye doctor who can make sure that you are seeing your best and are using the most appropriate prescription.

BY NELSON K. McPHERSON BY TODD DR. SAMANTHA

OCULAR

HEALTH

THE AGING EYE

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rinkles on our skin, weakening bones, and slowing of our metabolism with subsequent weight gain are all very familiar aging changes. Attempts to slow down or minimize the impact of these changes is a multi-billion dollar industry. But do you know what happens to your eyes as you age? Of the five senses, many people are most afraid of losing their vision as they get older. Despite this, many are not aware of what they can do to care for their ocular health and neglect getting routine eye care as they age. The most obvious aging change that occurs in the early 40s is called presbyopia, which affects the ability of the eye to focus up close. A tell-tale sign of presbyopia kicking in is the feeling that 44

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Drying of the eyes is another very common aging change. As we age, the ability of our eyes to produce the tears and good quality oils that are necessary for a healthy ocular surface diminishes. This can lead to chronic grittiness, burning, and light sensitivity. Dry eye can also cause excessive tearing, which is very counterintuitive to what most of us imagine is a “dry” eye. When dry eye is severe enough, it can cause blurred vision, ocular pain, and significantly affect quality of life. In its milder forms, it can be a daily frustration and can cause contact lens intolerance. According to a recent estimate, Americans spend about a third of a billion (yes, billion!) dollars on over-the-counter eye drops each year. Over-the-counter eye drops can provide temporary relief from dry eye symptoms, but generally do not alter the course of dry eye disease – and in some cases, can exacerbate dry eye with chronic use. There are a multitude of treatment options for dry eye other than over-the-counter drops, so if you are suffering from dry eye symptoms, seek out the advice of an eye doctor who has a special interest in treating it. Cataracts begin to affect vision for most people in their 60s or beyond. A cataract develops when the lens of the eye becomes cloudy. They are an expected and normal aging change that happen to just about everyone. Symptoms often develop slowly and can include blurry, hazy, or dim vision. People with cataracts often describe their vision as similar to looking through smudged glasses or a dirty windshield. Cataracts can also cause difficulty with seeing at night due to glare and halos. UV exposure and smoking are important risk factors for developing them. In the early stages, cataracts can cause changes in the glasses or contact lens prescription, and simply making those adjustments is enough to keep vision sharp. In more advanced stages, if the cataract is affecting your ability to perform daily tasks, a cataract surgeon can remove it and replace it with a clear lens implant. Cataract surgery is one of the most commonly done surgeries in America; it is an outpatient procedure and improvement in vision is generally appreciated soon afterwards. Aging increases your risk for other ocular conditions that can be potentially devastating to your vision. One such condition is glaucoma. Glaucoma is a group of diseases that damages the optic nerve, the cable that carries visual information from the eye to the brain.

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The most common type of glaucoma develops as a result of increased pressure inside of the eye. Glaucoma is sometimes called the “silent thief of sight” because it can cause irreversible damage to the eye before there is any vision loss, and it doesn’t cause any symptoms, such as eye pain. Glaucoma causes a loss of peripheral vision, resulting in tunnel vision, and ultimately can lead to blindness. There are treatments to delay vision loss, but there is no cure for glaucoma. Treatments include eye drops, lasers, and surgery. More than 2.7 million people in America have glaucoma, and there are many people who have the condition, but don’t realize it. Being screened regularly for glaucoma by way of having an annual eye examination is a very important preventive measure to protect your eyes from vision loss as a result of undetected glaucoma. With early detection and treatment, it is possible to slow its progression and preserve vision. Anybody can develop glaucoma; however, you are at higher risk if you have a family history, are African American or Hispanic, have high levels of either farsightedness or nearsightedness, have a history of an eye injury, have low blood pressure, or are diabetic.

or causing small parts of letters or words to be missing. Needing more light to see comfortably is also common in those with AMD. The wet type causes sudden, severe loss of central vision from leaking blood vessels growing in or under the retina. It can cause a large dark spot in the center of your vision and significantly distorted and blurred vision. Dry AMD can develop into wet AMD, so it’s important to know if you have it, even if you do not have any symptoms. If you have dry AMD, you may be monitored more closely and may be given specific recommendations about lifestyle changes or nutritional advice that may reduce your risk for developing wet AMD. AMD is more common in caucasians and in those with a family history. Smoking doubles the risk, and UV exposure, obesity, and poorly controlled cardiovascular disease or high blood pressure are also important risk factors for AMD development. If you have macular degeneration or have many risk factors for developing it, your eye doctor will likely recommend nutritional

supplementation in the form of vitamins and minerals, including zinc, vitamins C and E, and the carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin. There is no cure for AMD; however, prompt treatment and taking preventive measures can help to delay visual impairment and improve your prognosis. Aging affects just about every structure of the eye. Visiting your eye doctor on an annual basis is the best thing that you can do to protect your eyesight for the future. He or she will be able to assess your risks for developing potentially devastating ocular conditions and if needed, initiate prompt treatment. If it has been awhile since you have seen your eye doctor, schedule an appointment today.  Samantha K. McPherson, OD, FAAO, is with McPherson Family Eye Care, and is also founder of its subspecialty clinic, Dry Eye Center of NC. They are located at 3150 Rogers Road, Suite 110 in Wake Forest. For more information, call 919-263-9163 or visit mcphersonfamilyeyecare.com.

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is another ocular condition that is highly associated with aging and has potential to cause significant reduction in central vision. Macular degeneration is the leading cause of vision loss, affecting more than 10 million Americans. The retina is the delicate layer of nerve cells lining the back wall of the eyeball. This layer senses light and sends signals to the brain via the optic nerve so that visual images can be formed. AMD damages the macula, the central part of the retina, which can make tasks involving central vision such as reading fine print or distinguishing facial details much more difficult. The dry type is the most common form. Many people with dry AMD do not know that they have it because it often does not affect vision in the early stages. It can cause subtle changes in vision, such as making straight lines appear wavy

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EARLY

NORTH CAROLINA STORIES OF TURMOIL AND ASPIRATION

The Wake Forest Historical Museum is pleased to announce “Early North Carolina: Stories of Turmoil and Aspiration,” a course hosted by the WFU ADVENTURES with Lifelong Learning program on March 21, 2020. From early confusion over boundaries and property lines, to the influx of a wide variety of racial and ethnic cultures, to war, and to the struggle for settlement and civic stability, guest lecturers Jake Ruddiman and Mary Tribble will examine the fascinating, complex,

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and often troubling story of North Carolina’s history. eginning with how North Carolina compared to other colonies, this daylong course will explore varied episodes of the state’s narrative. Course topics include the upheaval of revolution for the peaceful Moravian settlers, the shock for soldiers from northern colonies coming to the state to fight in the Revolution and seeing slavery of Africans firsthand, and the determination of educated clergy hoping to establish lasting institutions such as Wake Forest College. Course participants will examine letters of soldiers, detailed reports of the Moravians, and letters and diaries of the Wait and Merriam families contemplating a college in a slave-holding state. With ample time for questions and the opportunity to tour the museum galleries and historic Calvin Jones House, it will be a full and absorbing day. Course instructors are Jake Ruddiman and Mary Tribble from Wake Forest University where Ruddiman is an Associate Professor of History and Tribble is the Senior Advisor for Engagement Strategies. Ruddiman received his A.B in History from Princeton University and his M.A., M.Phil., and Ph.D. from Yale University. His 2014 book, Becoming Men of Some Consequence: Youth and Military Service in the Revolutionary War, explores the lives and choices of young men in the Continental army. His current research explores the Revolutionary era in the Southeast, where he is particularly interested in the Moravian Brethren of Salem, North Carolina. He is also researching the place of slavery in soldiers’ travel writing during the War of American Independence and the diverse relationships among American and European soldiers and enslaved people. Across these projects, his work as a historian of Revolutionary 46

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America explores how people built their lives, reshaped their communities, and constructed meaning for themselves and for posterity. Tribble graduated from Wake Forest University in 1982 with a degree in Art History and completed her Master of Arts in Liberal Studies in 2019. Her thesis, directed by Ruddiman, Bill J. Leonard, and Michele Gillespie, studied Sally Merriam Wait, wife of the first President of Wake Forest. A fifth generation Wake Forester, Tribble returned to her alma mater in 2014 to become Senior Advisor for Engagement Strategies where she is responsible for creating meaningful experiences for the approximately 70,000 members of the alumni family. She also oversees the Wake Forest Historical Museum at the site of the original campus here in Wake Forest and is a member of the steering committee of the Slavery, Race and Memory Project, an initiative that reexamines

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the university’s history with regard to slavery and its legacies. Tribble serves on the National Advisory Council at Reynolda House Museum of American Art and has recently restored an 1824 house in Old Salem. Prior to her return to Wake Forest, Tribble owned an event marketing firm in Charlotte for 25 years. Established five years ago, the Lifelong Learning with Wake Forest University program offers courses throughout the year in WinstonSalem at the Brookstown Campus, Reynolda House Museum of American Art, and Wake Downtown. “Early North Carolina: Stories of Turmoil and Aspiration” is the first lifelong learning course to be offered at the Wake Forest Historical Museum. The Wake Forest Historical Museum, owned and operated by the Wake Forest College Birthplace Society, includes the historic Calvin Jones House, modern museum building, and gardens. The Birthplace Society’s mission is to preserve, share, and support the unique history and culture of Wake Forest – College, Town, and University. The course will be held at the Wake Forest Historical Museum (414 N. Main Street, Wake Forest) on March 21, 2020 from 9:30 AM – 4:30 PM and includes a morning snack and lunch. Course registration costs $125. Seating is limited, so register early. Registration details can be found at https://go.wfu.edu/kf8. For more information, email lifelonglearning@wfu.edu or call 336-758-5232.  Photo Courtesy of Ken Bennett.

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THE POWER OF

POSITIVITY 5 TIPS ON HOW TO INCORPORATE POSITIVE THINKING INTO YOUR MARKETING STRATEGY

BY MAURANDA DALZIEL

Positivity is important for your mind and your spirit – and for all you marketing readers out there, your marketing. When you are marketing your business, your brand, or your product and/or service, your reflection on topics will be shown through your overall branding voice. Take social media, for example. The content that you post or that you share of someone else’s is seen by hundreds – if not thousands – of people and starts to become your professional voice if you are viewed as a professional in the community, either as a

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business owner or someone who has a public facing role. aving positive thinking, a positive voice, and a motivational mindset will set you apart from others out there – and when tied into your overall marketing strategy for your brand, can help launch your brand into a powerful movement which becomes top-of-mind for your target demographic. Here are five tips and ideas on how to incorporate positive thinking in your marketing strategy. 1. INSPIRATIONAL QUOTES THROUGH SOCIAL MEDIA: Whether you post them each and every day, or choose an attainable schedule that keeps you consistent, utilizing inspirational quotes as part of your marketing and branding strategy will inspire people each time they see them. These quotes are easily shared by others who get to know you and your brand, and you’ll start to see this trend happening, without you even asking people to share them. This is because positivity is magnetic and when people feel inspired, they will want to share that feeling and emotion with others. 2. ALIGN YOUR BRAND WITH A CAUSE: By aligning yourself with a cause that you truly believe in and get excited about, you are able to both help others with that cause and work towards inspiring others to get involved as well. Many people don’t like to post these moments of helping others on social media or 48

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through email campaigns, and even say “no” to news interviews, for risk of looking like they are doing these efforts for show. If this resonates with you, keep in mind that these moments should be used to motivate and inspire others. This is positive marketing as a goal to rally other people who are like-minded and want to help others, and your brand is the vehicle to make that happen. If your brand has a large following and audience, you are able to use that audience to get the attention that this cause you are working with deserves. 3. SHARE INSPIRATIONAL STORIES: You decide the avenue that works for you, whether it be through video or blogging, prefer-

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ably on your business website or Facebook page. Have a campaign around helping others, making an impact in the community, helping other business owners, those looking to get into your industry, etc. Share stories pertaining to business or intertwine personal and work life. Perhaps you can share an inspirational story on how you overcame obstacles when you first went into business, or how you handled objection when you first got started. If you’re not a business owner, you can share a story on how you handled specific interview questions. We all have something that we can share with other people to inspire and motivate them – use your voice to help others! 4. WORK WITH A NON-PROFIT: If you know of a non-profit that can benefit from your products or services, work with them to establish a win-win for the benefit of both your company and their organization. When this is done with an open mind and positive thinking, a goal of a marketing campaign can be planned and executed around the partnership for the common good of all involved. 5. BE THANKFUL … AND SHARE IT: Share on social media each day for what you are thankful or grateful. This has an immediate impact on your audience, your family, your friends, your colleagues – and yourself. When you stop each and every day and think about for what you are most thankful, you open your heart and mind to the “little things” and to truly what life is all about. Pausing and reflecting on what we are all thankful for is great for both our business lives and our personal lives. Let those around us – our coworkers, our family, our friends, our clients, our prospects, our vendors – know how much we truly appreciate them. Also, being in front of the camera each day and sharing a vulnerable moment lets people get to know you, like you, and trust you, and keeps you top of mind when they need your product or service. We all know that the more you can get in front of your customer (or prospect) the better – and this is a great way to do it without having to sell anything. Now that you have the tools to be more positive in your marketing strategy, have fun, engage, and make it happen!  Mauranda Dalziel is the founder and CEO of Gather Group & Co., a full service marketing firm located in Wake Forest. She may be reached at 919-446-5511 or gathergroupco.com.

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OUR HERITAGE REVISITED WHERE THE MAN IS BURIED IN THE ROCK "THE WORMS CRAWL IN, THE WORMS CRAWL OUT, THE WORMS PLAY PINOCHLE ON YOUR SNOUT." BY AMY PIERCE “Our Heritage” is reprinting and updating earlier articles as a way of introducing a ballooning newcomer population to Wake Forest history and culture.

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he second earliest forerunner (1810) of what’s now known as “The Hearse Song” is an 1810 nursery rhyme: “… On looking up, on looking down, she saw a dead man on the ground; and from his nose unto his chin, the worms crawled out, the worms crawled in.” One wonders if the young man we write of in this article (b.1817, d.1845) may have known the nursery rhyme and … For this issue’s “Our Heritage Revisited,” we turn to two historical articles, one from the late T. H. Pearce, “Unique Tomb,” written for the 100th Anniversary Issue of The Franklin Times (1970), and the other, “Unmarked, Senator’s Rock Grave rests in Peace,” written by News & Observer staff writer Josh Shaffer (January 2, 2012). The subject of both men’s attention is the unique tomb of Senator William A. Jeffreys, and the reason this distinctive resting place exists at all. The News & Observer article began with the following: “Weak, feverish, hours from death, young state Sen. William A. Jeffreys begged his family not to bury him in the cold, wet clay. He pleaded from his sickbed for a sturdy grave, a resting place carved inside a 20-foot boulder on his family’s Franklin County farm, safe harbor from worms.” Pearce’s version is similar: “County legend has it that young Jeffreys had always expressed a horror of being buried in the ground. Following his son’s wishes his father had his body placed in a vault while his unusual tomb could be prepared. … “Legend also has it that the young man’s body was preserved in brandy until the arduous task of chiseling his final resting place in the granite boulder was completed, but whether this is fact or fiction has been impossible to determine. It is fact, however, that the tomb was finally completed and young Jeffreys remains placed therein, the opening being sealed with a marble slab.” The one-term legislator died in the 1845 typhoid fever epidemic, too early in his career to have become distinguished. In Franklin County, however, lore surrounding his final resting place has certainly provided notoriety for the young man whose tomb inscription describes “… a kind husband and parent, an honest man and an able and faithful public servant.” Few would have known about the young lawyer, so afraid to turn to dust within the ground, had the N.C. Historical Marker Program not erected one of its distinctive silver and black signs in 1942 along Highway 401. As Shaffer tells us, “The only reason he merited a highway sign in the first place was an ancestor who worked at the N.C. Office of Archives and History who nudged his name into distinction in 1942. It was a different world in the 1940s. People really used to go gaga over this kind of thing. Two years before the marker went up, a Canadian named Albert Legnini stole a mail truck in Raleigh and drove north to gawk at Jeffreys’ boulder, fulfilling a lifelong wish. He later

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explained that he didn’t have a car and planned to bring the postal vehicle back after a few hours.” Through the years, border disputes between Franklin and Wake have been important to the former state historic site. Pearce’s humorous and relevant account is worth attention: “The fact that the tomb is located in Franklin County rather than Wake is a tribute to the uncompromising nature of William Jeffreys’ grandfather, Osborne Jeffreys, according to the story handed down in the county. Sometime around the turn of the century (1800), surveyors were attempting to establish the boundary line between Wake and Franklin. When going across the Jeffreys’ holdings the line placed Osborne Jeffreys’ home in Wake County. This didn’t go over at all well with Jeffreys, whose family had been in Franklin since its beginning. As a matter of fact, the story handed down stated that Jeffreys got out his flintlock to help show the surveyors the proper location of the boundary line. The surveyors, being prudent souls, quickly decided that a flintlock in the hands of a determined and irate Franklin county man was much more accurate than their transits. The result being that the Jeffreys’ land was left in Franklin County. “The Wake-Franklin line was in dispute for many years, with a half dozen or so surveys being made before it was finally settled in 1915. It is of interest to note, however, that present day maps show a slight bulge in the line, a permanent tribute to a resolute Osborne Jeffreys. It is in this light bulge that William Jeffreys’ unique tomb is located … known to Franklin Countians simply as ‘Where the man is buried in the rock.’” The huge granite boulder, which took a Scottish stonemason an entire year to carve out, like many roadside attractions, took a little effort to get to – but not enough to keep out the “hooligans,” as Shaffer refers to those who smashed the marble slab atop the tomb. “Times, alas, have changed. ‘Jeffreys likely wouldn’t qualify for a marker today,’ said Ansley Wegner, a researcher with Archives and History. Being buried in a rock doesn’t really rise to statewide significance. The visitors that Jeffreys gets in the modern era tend to enjoy smashing things – his grave marker, for instance.” At the request of Jeffreys’ descendants, the state marker was removed in 2008. Locals, though, still know how to find the site. Despite the vandals, we hope that the long sleep of the man (and little boy he was) within his unique tomb has been a peaceful one.  Thanks to Deana Vassar and Joe Pearce; Kim Anderson and Michael Hill of the State Archives of North Carolina; Joe Shaffer and the News and Observer; and Martha Mason. Amy Pierce lives in Wake Forest’s Mill Village, where she is a writer, minister, and spiritual counselor. She can be reached at 919-554-2711 or visit www.authenticself.us.

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