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G O T S U C C U L E N T S ? • WA K E F O R E S T O U T D O O R S • T O P I T O F F W I T H G R A N O L A • T H I N K O U T S I D E T H E T E N T • T H E B I G S P R I N G C L E A N S I M P L E S P R I N G D I Y D É C O R • T O S AV E O R N O T T O S AV E ? • G O O D R E A D S • R A D I A N T RO S E S • A H E A LT H Y D I E T F O R H E A LT H Y E Y E S A B AC K YA R D R E VA M P • L O C A L FA R M S F O R S T R AW B E R RY S E A S O N • RO B E RT S O N M I L L P O N D P R E S E RV E • I T S TA RT S W I T H U S • A N D M O R E

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CRAVINGS, CRADLES and EVERYTHING in BETWEEN.

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A WORD FROM THE PUBLISHER

Warm, sunny days. The inviting outdoors. Beautiful blooms. A time to refresh and rejuvenate. Pollen-covered everything. All of these must mean that the glorious season of spring in North Carolina has arrived – a very welcome guest after Ol’ Man Winter has finally bid his adieu (minus the pollen ... I can do without that part). And this edition of CIRCA Magazine says hello to our welcomed visitor with all things spring. Speaking of getting outside and enjoying the warm, sunny days … “Wake Forest Outdoors” provides an array of exciting and entertaining family-friendly events that will surely have you celebrating spring – from getting dirty at Dirt Day; to dancing, eating, and drinking at Friday Night On White (proud partner sponsor here!); to oohing and aahing while watching power lineworkers compete 30 feet in the air; to cruising around classic cars at the Wake Forest Charity Car Show, and more. Looking to tap into your inner explorer and adventurer this season? “Hidden Gems” has just the answer – Robertson Millpond Preserve, featuring the area’s only blackwater swamp, is the perfect place to canoe, kayak, or paddleboard on a peaceful weekend afternoon. And if you’re available May 10, go ahead and mark your calendars for a one-of-a-kind event we are lucky enough to have in our own backyard, and be sure to read “Field Of Dreams” – an opportunity for student athletes in Wake County with special needs to participate in a fun day of friendly baseball competition. Don’t miss this chance to cheer them on right here in Wake Forest! Nothing screams spring more than gorgeous plants and flowers. That’s why we are showcasing some spectacular ones on our front cover this issue – shout out to Kelle Sullivan of Sully’s Succulents for the amazing plants and Audrey Priel of Rose Trail Images for capturing their loveliness! If you’re like me, though, you love a spectacular succulent, but don’t know how to properly care for one. “Got Succulents?” is here to save the day with proper care tips and techniques to ensure these stunners survive and thrive. And the same goes for one of spring’s garden staples – the magnificent rose. “Radiant Roses” offers a guideline for planting, growing, and maintaining these beautiful blooms. There is no better time to refresh and rejuvenate your home than spring. Whether that means sprucing up its interior, enhancing its exterior, or cleaning and purging throughout, we are here to help. “Think Spring – And Spring Clean Your Décor” offers up ways to freshen and brighten a space and invite the beauty and warmth of the outside in, while “Simple Spring DIY Décor” reveals how you can show your outdoor living area some do-it-yourself decorating love. If it’s time to tackle that spring cleaning and purging task, don’t miss “To Save Or Not To Save?” for advice on sorting, selling, and donating stuff in your home that needs offloading or recycling, and “The Big Spring Clean” for tips on quickly and effectively taking on those big, daunting cleaning jobs that we dread every year. As you flip through this issue of CIRCA, you will find not only these great features, but also helpful hints for transforming your backyard into a campground for a fun night full of family memories; recommendations for local strawberry picking (with a simple yet delicious recipe for fresh spinach and strawberries); tips for keeping bad breath at bay; suggestions on cooking and baking with granola (also with an easy, can’t-miss recipe); a Q&A to remind us about the importance of mammograms and breast cancer screenings; and so much more. So much more expertise, advice, and insight to enjoy while you delight in the glorious season of spring. (And while you’re out and about embracing all things spring, be sure to visit our many wonderful advertisers – and tell them you found them in CIRCA Magazine!) Thanks for reading, and I’ll see you again this summer!


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Wake Forest Outdoors – Dirt, Cars, Powerline Rodeos, Movies, Music, And More ...

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Simple Spring DIY Décor

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The Big Spring Clean

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Got Succulents? How To Grow And Care For Your Spectacular Succulents

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Field Of Dreams – Playing Ball With Heart

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Top It Off With Granola

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Treasure Your Chest – A Q&A About Mammograms And Breast Cancer Screenings

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Driveable Destinations – Local Farms For Strawberry Season

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Stop The Burn

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Radiant Roses

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To Save Or Not To Save? Spring Cleaning Advice For Old Souls And Downsizers

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A Backyard Revamp For A New Generation Of Gardening

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What Is Microblading? And What You Need To Know About It

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A Healthy Diet For Healthy Eyes

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Hidden Gems – Robertson Millpond Preserve

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Good Reads

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Orthodontic DIY Or DI-Don't?

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Think Outside The Tent

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Think Spring And Spring Clean Your Décor

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It Starts With Us

All Gave Some, Some Gave All

48 Bye Bye Bad Breath – Halitosis Prevention Is Easier Than You Think 50 Our Heritage Revisited – Romance Under The Magnolias

PUBLISHER & EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Kent Lower CONTRIBUTING Rhonda Benvie Anna Bolton Jill Bright Margarita Cohen Cindy Davis Dr. Jason Gladwell Greg Harrington Holly Hopkins Suzanne Lucey Tina Mast Jessica McMican

WRITERS Dr. Samantha K. McPherson Todd Nelson Amy Pierce Joe Rabione REX Digestive Healthcare Naomi Saphire Jennifer Smart Dr. Edmond Suh Kelle Sullivan WakeMed Kasey Wright

CONTACT INFORMATION BallPointe Publishing & Design, LLC P.O. Box 1182 Wake Forest, NC 27588 919.453.2555 • info@circamagazine.com www.circamagazine.com ADVERTISING SALES 919.453.2555 • info@circamagazine.com MANAGERS Kent Lower & Mitch Lower Printed by Theo Davis Printing, Inc.

Nick Honeycutt 919.380.5949 • nhoneycutt@theodavis.com Front Cover Photo By Audrey Priel, Rose Trail Images www.rosetrailimages.com Publisher Photo by Christina Bowman Photography, LLC LIKE US ON FACEBOOK FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @CIRCA_Magazine FOLLOW US ON INSTAGRAM circa_magazine AD SPACE RESERVATIONS July / August / September 2018: May 18, 2018 CIRCA Magazine is published quarterly by BallPointe Publishing & Design, LLC. All rights reserved. No part of this magazine may be reproduced or transmitted without the written permission of the publisher. Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained within; however, BallPointe Publishing & Design assumes no liability for accuracy or omissions.


WAKE FOREST

OUTDOORS DIRT, CARS, POWERLINE RODEOS, MOVIES, MUSIC, AND MORE ... BY ANNA BOLTON

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he Town of Wake Forest is offering a wonderful array of fun and exciting events over the next few months guaranteed to help you shake the winter blues and celebrate the return of spring. From Friday Night on White and Six Sundays in Spring to the Arbor Day Celebration and Family Movie Nights at Joyner Park, there’s no shortage of first-class entertainment – all at no cost to you. For complete details on all these events, visit wakeforestnc.gov and search “Wake Forest Outdoors.”

DIRT DAY Promising something for the entire family, Wake Forest’s 5th Annual Dirt Day is Saturday, April 7, from 10:00 AM – 3:00 PM along South White Street in Downtown Wake Forest. Kids will have a blast playing in an oversized sandbox, exploring big trucks and equipment, or making wheatgrass containers for home windowsills. Adults can discover the newest techniques in gardening and composting, check out the latest in outdoor activity gear, buy spring plants, and visit with a variety of vendors offering information and insight. A variety of food trucks will be provided along Owen Avenue. Don’t miss the Draw on the Street chalk art contest entries. Visit wakeforestnc.gov and search “Dirt Day.”

FRIDAY NIGHT ON WHITE Presented by White Street Brewing Co., Friday Night on White takes place along South White Street from 6:00 PM – 9:00 PM on the second Friday night of each month, from April through September. The 2018 series gets underway April 13 with The Magic Pipers, and continues May 11 with Love Tribe, June 8 with Bull City Syndicate, July 13 with Sleeping Booty, August 10 with

Big Love, and September 14 with Crush. While you’re enjoying the music, be sure to visit Downtown’s outstanding dining establishments or enjoy delicious food from several food trucks that will be on-site. Event sponsors include White Street Brewing Co., iHeart Media, Gladwell Orthodontics, McPherson Family Eye Care, Mitchell Heating & Cooling, Capital PowerSports, Nu Image Surgical and Dental Implant Center, Wells Family Dental Group, Local Charm Home & Gifts, Benchmark Community Bank, Orangetheory Fitness Wake Forest, Pro Audio & Light, The Wake Forest Weekly, Coastal Credit Union, Dirty Dogs Spa, B&W Hardware, Tuscan Ridge Animal Hospital, Sole Dimensions, CIRCA Magazine, Stanley Martin Homes, Birkner Insurance, Rainbow Child Care Center, Hasentree by Toll Brothers, Orthopedic Physical Therapy, Avance Primary Care, Carillon Assisted Living, Chronic Tacos, Triangle Family Dentistry, Nutrishop, 27587 Magazine, Fidelity Bank, Chick-fil-A, The Dental Care Center, Lowes Foods, Massage Envy, Ads N Art, For Your Occasion Party Rentals, and Wake Forest Federal. Visit wakeforestnc.gov and search “Friday Night on White.”

ARBOR DAY CELEBRATION AND TREE SEEDLING GIVEAWAY Wake Forest’s annual Arbor Day Celebration is Saturday, April 21, at E. Carroll Joyner Park, located at 701 Harris Road. The festivities get underway at 11:00 AM with the Arbor Day Expo and Tree Seedling Giveaway, followed by the Arbor Day ceremony at noon. Volunteers will distribute free tree seedlings while they last, while the Expo will feature various exhibits and vendor booths, a tree photo booth, face painting, kids activities, and more. Visit wakeforestnc.gov and search “Arbor Day.”

2018 PUBLIC POWER LINEWORKERS RODEO The nation’s foremost showcase of public power lineworker skill and knowledge is coming to Wake Forest on April 28. During the Public Power Lineworkers Rodeo, apprentice and journeyman lineworkers from across the United States will compete for professional recognition and display essential job skills – 30 feet above ground! Free and open to the public, the rodeo will take place in Wake Forest’s Holding Village, located off South Franklin Street, via Rogers Road. Visit wakeforestnc.gov and search “Lineworkers Rodeo.” 6

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SIX SUNDAYS IN SPRING

within the cemetery grounds. Visit wakeforestnc.gov and search “Cemetery Tour.”

Grab a blanket and lawn chair and head to Joyner Park for the 2018 Six Sundays in Spring concert series. Scheduled from 5:00 PM – 7:00 PM on consecutive Sundays from April 29 through June 3, these free outdoor concerts offer something for all music lovers. Food and refreshments will be available for purchase or bring your own picnic. Visit wakeforestnc.gov and search “Six Sundays.”

NATIONAL TRAILS DAY Celebrate National Trails Day on Saturday, June 2, from 9:00 AM – 1:00 PM, at E. Carroll Joyner Park, 701 Harris Road. The free event will include an Environmental Education Expo featuring interactive learning stations. Set up throughout the park, the stations will offer both children and adults a unique opportunity to experience the wonders of nature while learning about the environment. As part of the Expo, attendees will also have the opportunity to get an up-close look at several living things they might encounter on the trails. Visit wakeforestnc.gov and search “Trails Day.”

MUSIC AT MIDDAY Beginning Thursday, May 10, and continuing on consecutive Thursdays throughout May, area residents are invited to enjoy live performances by local music artists in Town Hall’s Centennial Plaza from noon – 1:00 PM. Assorted dessert food truck vendors will be onsite. Bring your lunch and come enjoy the entertainment while experiencing springtime in beautiful Downtown Wake Forest. Visit wakeforestnc.gov and search “Midday Music.”

WAKE FOREST CHARITY CAR SHOW The Wake Forest Charity Car Show is Saturday, June 16, from 9:00 AM – 2:00 PM. Presented by Wake Forest Downtown, Inc., the event will take place along South White

Street in Downtown Wake Forest. This year’s Grand Sponsor is Auction Direct USA. Benefitting several area charities, this free event will showcase vehicles of all makes and models, including muscle cars, sports cars, pony cars, classic and antique autos, street rods, and trucks. Visit wakeforestnc.gov and search “Car Show.”

STAY CONNECTED! Always be the first to know about Town of Wake Forest announcements, programs, and special events by signing up for E-Notifier at www.wakeforestnc.gov/ enotifier.aspx, downloading the Town of Wake Forest app at www.wakeforestnc.gov/ app.aspx, visiting the Town’s website at wakeforestnc.gov, or following the Town on social media @TownofWakeForest.  Anna Bolton is the marketing and business relations specialist for the Town of Wake Forest. To learn more about town events, sponsorship opportunities, and how you can be involved, contact Anna at 919-610-4916 or abolton@wakeforestnc.gov.

FAMILY MOVIE NIGHTS AT JOYNER PARK The Parks, Recreation and Cultural Resources Department is offering family movie nights at Joyner Park, presented by McPherson Family Eye Care, Edward Jones, Thomas Walters Allstate, and Capital PowerSports. Showings are scheduled for May 26 (Coco), June 30 (The Lion King), July 30 (Cars 3), and August 11 (Beauty & the Beast). Showtime is 8:30 PM and admission is free. Assorted food vendors will be on-site selling snacks and beverages. Anyone planning to attend is encouraged to arrive early, as viewing space may be limited. Visit wakeforestnc.gov and search “Movie Nights.”

GET IN GOOD WITH AN EXPERT Because I know the risks in the area, I’ll use my local expertise to help you choose the right amount of protection. And I’ll be there to help you as your coverage needs change. Call or stop in for a free, no-obligation Personalized Insurance Proposal today.

HISTORIC CEMETERY WALKING TOUR

Personalized service. Trusted advice.

The Historic Wake Forest Cemetery Walking Tour offers unique insight into the lives of Wake Forest residents from generations past. Free and open to the public, this year’s tour is Saturday, May 12, from 9:30 AM – 12:30 PM, at the Wake Forest Cemetery, 400 North White Street. Parking is available

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180908

3207 Rogers Road, Ste. 100 Wake Forest thomaswalters@allstate.com

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here are so many tutorials online for creating a piece of décor for a variety of occasions that there just aren’t any good excuses for tackling that project you’ve been considering. A little sweat equity can be a great way to cut decorating costs for your home, wedding, or party.

Spring is officially here and with its warmer days and cozy evenings calling you outside, it’s the perfect time to show your patio or porch a little decorating love. DIY doesn’t have to be intimidating or revolve around big complicated projects. Smaller projects – like simply repurposing a tablecloth as curtains for your screenedin porch – can add just the right amount of color, texture, and coziness. Installing a rod or hooks and using clip-on curtain rings to attach the tablecloth is a great no-sew way to give instant bang to your outdoor living space. See? Not so daunting after all!

BY KASEY WRIGHT

SIMPLE SPRING

DIY DECOR There is something to be said for getting your hands dirty and working on a little springtime do-it-yourself project. Surely you have been all over Pinterest, scouting ideas on how to decorate this season, what to build, and how to do it. So what’s holding you back? Even if your DIY venture doesn’t come out quite perfectly, there is immense satisfaction in giving it a try and exclaiming “I did that!” Homemade isn’t supposed to look like it came off a machine, because … guess what? It didn’t! 8

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Build a small planter box out of that scrap wood that’s been laying around your garage all winter long and fill the container with lining, rocks, and succulents or fresh flowers placed in mason jars for a trendy and colorful tablescape. Take this project up a notch by adding your family surname stenciled or a favorite quote painted onto the sides of the box for a personal touch. Not sure if you want the upkeep of having a rug outside? Try taping off a grid or diamond pattern on your porch floor and painting it with either tone-on-tone colors or a vibrant contrast to give the space a whimsical feel. There is an option for every style out there … don’t be afraid to try bold patterns and mixing in plants and candles for a tropical feel or soft blushes, gold accents, and neutral pillows for a more bohemian vibe. Complete the look with a fun porch sign that incorporates the colors you’ve chosen for your accents, pulling it all together. Include your family members’ names; fun sayings about porch life like “Come sit on the porch with me … where the drinks are cold and the friendships are free,” or “Life is better on the porch;” or something like mile markers to your favorite vacation destinations or your home’s map coordinates. Prop your DIY creation up in the corner or rest it on the mantel if you have an outdoor fireplace.  Every time you look out at that space, you will feel so much pride knowing that you put it all together yourself with a little elbow grease and a lot of TLC. So take advantage of the warm sunny spring days that are upon us and grab your tools, paintbrushes, and a refreshing drink, and get to work!  Kasey Wright is the owner of AR Workshop Raleigh, offering hands-on graphic design and DIY workshops in a studio boutique that is located at 14460 Falls of the Neuse, Suite 175 in Raleigh. For more information, please visit www.arworkshop.com/raleigh.

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live music

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food

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beer & wine

begins

April 13 with

The Magic Pipers 6-9 pm South White Street downtown wake forest

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free admission

wakeforestnc.gov

MAY 11 – LOVE TRIBE | JUNE 8 – BULL CITY SYNDICATE JULY 13 – SLEEPING BOOTY | AUG 10 – BIG LOVE | SEPT 14 – CRUSH

ProAudio

& Light Inc.

S P O N S O R S

TUSCAN RIDGE ANIMAL HOSPITAL

Ads N’ Art | For Your Occasion Party Rentals | Lowes Foods | Massage Envy | The Dental Care Center | Wake Forest Federal

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can be used to remove cooked-on gunk up above. Pull apart everything that moves – burner grills, drip pans, and so forth – and soak and/or scrub accordingly, using a small, stiff brush to get into nooks and crannies. If you have a range hood overhead, you may have a grease-fire waiting to happen. Most have removable filters that can be cleaned easily if you do so regularly. 6. REFRIGERATOR. Deep cleaning your fridge is a big enough task to save for its own day. If you do it right, it can be accomplished in just a few hours with minimal impact. BY TODD NELSON

THE BIG SPRING

CLEAN

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pring is the best time of year to go big with your cleaning. Warmer temps and fresh air energize, and with days growing longer and more light streaming in, there’s no more hiding winter’s accumulated grime. Here are seven cleaning jobs that ought to be tackled at least once a year, with quick tips for getting them done thoroughly and effectively.

7. WINDOWS. Remove all treatments and either launder, wash, or send out for professional cleaning. Vacuum accumulated dirt, cobwebs, and dead bugs from window sills, sashes, and jams. Clean screens with either a damp rag or garden hose and allow to dry in the sun while you wash all the glass panes. 8. DECK/PATIO. On a day that you just can’t stand to be inside, focus on cleaning up the patio, deck, or other outside living spaces. Sweep or hose off loose debris. Scrub outdoor furniture, touching up paint and treating rust stains as needed. Then clean your grill to get ready for some al fresco cooking and dining.  Todd Nelson is the owner of MaidPro of Raleigh and Wake Forest. For cleaning tips, visit www.maidpro.com/raleigh-north or call 919-871-9996.

1. CARPETS, AREA RUGS, AND FURNITURE UPHOLSTERY. Even if they don’t look dirty ... they are. Pick an arid, sunny day, rent a steam cleaner, and open the windows to encourage fast drying. 2. WALLS. Walls need a good washing at least once a year, especially if you burn candles, wood fires, or set off smoke alarms when you cook. Don’t believe us? Remove a picture that has been hanging around for a while and observe the contrast. To minimize mess, start high, work your way down, and have lots of absorbent towels on hand to catch drips. 3. OVEN. Speaking of setting off smoke alarms when you cook, if it happens to you, your oven needs attention. Even continuous cleaning ovens need to be wiped occasionally. For conventional models, a thick paste of baking soda and water, left to sit for several hours, works wonders for loosening all that baked-on brown stuff. Beware of self-cleaning ovens, as they use super high heat to burn off the mess. This can stink up your home and shorten the life of your oven by burning out its heating mechanism. 4. STOVE TOP. The same baking-soda paste that cleans your oven 10

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BY KELLE SULLIVAN

GOT

SUCCULENTS? HOW TO GROW AND CARE FOR YOUR SPECTACULAR SUCCULENTS Unless you’ve been living under a rock, you know that succulents are popping up everywhere. There are so many different beautiful varieties out there and they’re so fun to grow and decorate with. Succulents and cacti are drought-tolerant plants that require very little watering, making them perfect for people who travel a lot or just don’t have the time to care for plants. In fact, mine do so much better when I just leave them alone and let them do their own thing. It’s all about

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practicing patience with these succas! here’s a lot of different advice out there on how to grow succulents. Let me tell you, we North Carolinians in good ’ol zone 7b have our work cut out for us in this humid climate. We have the opposite of desert climate conditions, so growing and caring for them can be a little tricky. But don’t fret … I’m here to help with a few tips and tricks to keep your beauties thriving. 12

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LOCATION, LOCATION, LOCATION The very first thing to consider is where you plan on placing them – indoors or outdoors? That’s the key question … there are some succulents that do great in low light conditions, but most require a good dose of sunlight. Be sure to protect them from direct sun when temperatures reach above 80 degrees; this will help to prevent them from burning. (FYI – they love the morning sunlight!) Jades, aloes, and haworthias are some of the most popular indoor succulents. Echeverias, cacti, and sedums require lots of indirect sunlight – without that major ingredient, you will surely have sad plants. When indoors, place by a bright window or under a grow light. You’ll notice if they’re not getting enough light when they start to “stretch” or their colors start changing.

SUCCULENT SHOPPING Now that you know where you want your plant, it’s time to shop for one. Be sure to pick out healthy, pest-free plants, checking the leaves for breakage, discoloration, or pitting, which is a sign that pests have been eating the foliage. Here in North Carolina, our arch nemesis is mealy bugs – little white specs that will wreak havoc on your beauties. Mealies and aphids love to get in the tight crevices of the leaves and blooms, but both can be removed by spraying lightly with a soapy water solution (I also recommend applying 70% Isopropyl rubbing alcohol on a Q-Tip to the affected area). If using alcohol, only spray the foliage, as spraying the roots can kill the plant. Neem oil is also oftentimes recommended. I personally don’t like using neem oil because it can discolor succulents and also ruin their powdery finish, called farina. Farina is a waxy film that protects the plant’s leaves from sun damage and aids in keeping the surface of the plant dry.

PERFECTING THE PLANTING Once you’ve picked out your succulents, it’s time to plant them. Sure, there are so many cute coffee mugs and planters out there to

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house them, but if these containers don’t have drainage holes, your succulents will be sitting in wet soil with no way to drain and dry out (if your container doesn’t have one, using a drill bit that can make a drainage hole works perfectly). I recommend terra cotta pots, as they allow the soil to breathe and usually have drainage holes. Trust me … cacti and succulents thrive in terra cotta. (A little hint for planting cacti: Use a set of kitchen tongs!) I also believe they play a huge part in beating the humidity. Consider breaking out the paint brushes on a beautiful spring day, and get creative painting your pots.

and different types of sedums. Hen and chicks really thrive outside and do not like to be grown indoors. They produce beautiful colors during the cold season. Spring is the best time to fertilize your succulents and cacti. Most are coming out of winter dormancy and love the boost. Use a fertilizer with low nitrogen such as 5-10-10. Dilute to half strength to prevent burning.

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Now let’s talk temperatures. Here in North Carolina, we can experience winter and summer all in the same week. Soft succulents (echeverias or any with thicker leaves) need to be protected from freezing temperatures, so they will need to come inside during the winter months. Just be sure they get as much light as possible. Hardier succulents do just fine outside during the that time of year. Some of the most popular are sempervivums (aka hen and chicks)

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Kelle Sullivan is the owner of Sully’s Succulents, located in Rolesville, offering succulent sales, classes, parties, and special events. For more information, check them out on Facebook (@SullysSucculents) or Instagram (@sullyssucculents).

This is the most important part of succulent care. Overwatering is the number one cause of death for these plants; only water when the soil is completely dry. When it’s

Choosing the right soil is crucial when it comes to growing healthy plants. You’ve heard that saying, “You get what you pay for;” well, that applies to succulent and cacti soil as well. Just because the brand is popular, it doesn’t mean that it’s the best soil for your succulents. You don’t want to use garden soils because they help to hold moisture. Succulents want gritty, fast draining soil. Personally, I think commercial soil mix for succulents and cacti are light on grit and hold more water than I like. Making your own succulent soil is super easy and much cheaper. I make mine by mixing organic soil with course sand and pumice. Not the playground sand, sand you brought back from the beach, or from your garden – you’ll have all kinds of nasties in those. Mix in equal parts for the perfect ingredients for healthy plants. Organic succulent and cactus mixes are pretty hard to find locally, but can be found online.

time to water, give your plants a thorough watering until the water drains from the drainage holes. This will help with proper root growth. Never mist them. When watering, let it go around the plant and its roots. You don’t want to water from the top. If water gets in the rosette (the middle part), blow it out with a straw or blot with a towel to prevent root rot which is caused by the plant sitting in too much water. 

Michele Benoit-Wilson, MD, FACOG Curt Jacobs, MD, FACOG Amantia Kennedy, MD, FACOG Netasha McLawhorn, MD, FACOG Julie Stembridge, CNM Cara Cameron, CNM

OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY CONT. Dedra Sally, CNM Chantel Roedner, MD Elizabeth Jarvis, MD

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FIELD OF

DREAMS PLAYING BALL WITH HEART

BY JENNIFER SMART

Wake Forest is growing and changing. But it’s also staying the same. Nobody said it better than Wake Forest College basketball standout Jack Murdock (WFC ’57). Jack is featured in the Wake Forest Historical Museum’s orientation film, and when I interviewed him 10 years ago, I asked how he felt about Wake Forest. More specifically, I wanted to know how he felt playing sports in Wake Forest. This is what he said: “It just seemed to make you play harder, try harder, and the people who came to the games, every game, you

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knew them – and you had plenty of reason to try hard here.” ruer words were never spoken. That feeling you get when you’re here? That’s the part of Wake Forest that doesn’t change. It’s the part of our history that Wake Forest Downtown’s new hashtag campaign #WakeForestVibe is designed to capture. It’s the idea – or maybe the feeling – that our home is special because it’s filled with people who are special. And this spring our town has the privilege of hosting an event that perfectly represents the values and traditions of our special community. That event is the 10th anniversary of the Field of Dreams, a groundbreaking Wake Forest program that makes a real difference in the lives of special needs students across Wake County. The program gives these young athletes an opportunity to wear their team colors and proudly represent their high schools during a day of friendly competition. Field of Dreams is the brainchild of two Wake Forest High School instructors, Special Education teacher Gail Tucker and Wake Forest Army JROTC Sgt. Maj. Ginger Cribb, who together developed a perfect formula. Special needs students are matched with varsity baseball players as “buddies;” cadets from the WFHS JROTC organize and staff the event; visiting teams from nine Wake County high schools arrive on buses with their own special players; sponsors and spectators are welcome – and excitement ensues. In fact, the Field of Dreams is now such a success that 14

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schools across the country are launching similar programs on their own baseball diamonds. That’s why we hope to make this 10th anniversary year even more amazing. A committee is working to provide every Field of Dreams player with a commemorative cap, t-shirt, and photo. The Wake Forest High School team members were already honored as Grand Marshals of the Wake Forest Christmas Parade. Now with May 10 fast approaching, they’ll finally get to take the field. That’s the real goal here – to play ball! And that’s the part that got me thinking about Jack Murdock. When Jack made his comment about “plenty of reason to try hard,” he was looking back on an athletic career that earned him a place in the North Carolina Sports Hall of Fame. But he wasn’t talking about prowess or strength or coordination. He was talking about heart. Wake Forest has heart. These special athletes have heart. #WakeForestVibe, indeed. The Field of Dreams is scheduled for Thursday, May 10 from 9:00 AM to 2:00 PM at the North Wake Baseball Complex at The Factory. Please consider stopping by to cheer on these remarkable student athletes. Nobody plays harder or tries harder – or has more fun doing it.  If you are interested in becoming a sponsor to help support this worthy event, please contact Jennifer Smart at smartjl@wfu.edu or 919-556-2911. Jennifer is a Field of Dreams committee member and assistant director of the Wake Forest Historical Museum.

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One of my favorite ways to enjoy fresh berries in the spring, juicy melons in the summer, and even apples and oranges in the winter is to use them in a yogurt parfait. I know, I know … blah, blah, parfaits are ubiquitous – everyone eats parfaits and you can get them anywhere you go. But wait – I have more to say on this matter of parfaits. It isn’t just the delicious fruit and creamy yogurt that bring the parfait to perfection. Close your eyes again. Picture a perfect parfait – what is the best part? Think carefully. Yup, you got it. The best part truly is the granola – the crunchy combination of sweet and toasty nuts and oats that crown the top. What if I told you that you can make your own granola from scratch using ingredients that you likely have in your cupboards at this very moment? And, what if I told you it would taste better than any granola you ever bought from a store? And, then, what if I mentioned that the ingredients you would be using to make this granola wouldn’t contain all of the fillers with names you can’t pronounce (unlike most of the granola you buy from the store)? Are you sold yet? If so, I have the most amazing granola recipe to share with you (and even if you aren’t sold yet, I think you should still give it a shot – you will be happy you did). It is truly easy to put together; has only a few ingredients; and, as I mentioned earlier, you will likely find most of those ingredients in your cupboards at most

BY HOLLY HOPKINS

TOP IT OFF WITH

GRANOLA Close your eyes. Picture it – that perfectly ripe, red strawberry delicately balanced in your palm. Imagine how juicy it will be, how biting into it and tasting that one-of-a-kind flavor will make you smile out of sheer happiness. Think of

I

the days of joy to come. Hello spring! t’s just about time for all of those sweet and juicy fruits we look forward to in the warm spring and summer months to become amply available. I don’t know about you, but my mouth is watering just waiting for those big, juicy strawberries and blueberries to start showing up at local farmers markets.

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times. Winner! Make a big batch of this granola, package it into individual freezer bags, and freeze until you need it. Once removed from the freezer, be sure to keep it in a well-sealed container or freezer bag in your refrigerator, where it should be good for two weeks – but, seriously, it won’t last that long. I promise! There are so many things that are perfect for granola besides putting it on parfaits: – Sprinkle on muffin batter before baking; – Roll cookie dough in it, then bake; – Top ice cream with a nice caramel drizzle and some granola; – Crumble some on top of your bowl of hot oatmeal along with a few chocolate chips; – Use to make a yummy chocolate or vanilla bark; – Use in place of half of the pecans in your favorite pecan pie recipe to make a fun new sweet treat (we make a version of pecan pie bars like this and call them Gooey Wonder Bars). So many uses for a simple, scratch-made treat. You don’t even have to wait for strawberry season to start. Maybe you should make a couple of practice batches first … you know, just to be sure you have it down!

EASY GRANOLA – 3 cups rolled oats (not quick oats) – 1 cup slivered almonds – 1 cup roasted, salted cashews – ¾ cup shredded sweet coconut – ¼ cup plus 2 tablespoons dark brown sugar – ¼ cup plus 2 tablespoons maple syrup – ¼ cup vegetable oil – ¾ teaspoon salt Preheat oven to 250 degrees. In a large bowl, combine the oats, nuts, coconut, and brown sugar. In a separate bowl, combine maple syrup, oil, and salt. Combine both mixtures. Stir to evenly coat all the dry ingredients and pour onto a parchment-lined sheet pan. Cook for 1 hour, stirring every 15 minutes to achieve an even color. You will see the mixture change from a light tan to a nice, dark tan. Remove from the oven and let cool completely. To store: place in an airtight container or freezer bags. Keep frozen until ready to use. If you store in smaller batches in freezer bags, simply remove them as needed from the freezer and transfer to the refrigerator.  Holly Hopkins has spent many years working in and with food, starting off at her Grandma’s elbow, making wedding cakes and cookies galore. Since then, she has been a manager and business owner and is thrilled to be combining her passions for high quality food and superior customer service at Chef Mario’s. For more information, visit www.chefmario.com.

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with a close relative who had breast cancer at a young age, breast screenings should start 10 years younger than the relative’s age at diagnosis. For women who have a mutation in BrCa 1 or 2, screenings should start in their mid-20s.

TREASURE

YOUR CHEST A Q&A ABOUT MAMMOGRAMS AND BREAST CANCER SCREENINGS

– Should I get a regular mammogram or a 3D mammogram? While traditional 2D screening mammography is a valuable tool in the early detection and diagnosis of breast cancer, a 3D mammogram is superior to a 2D one. 3D mammography has been shown to improve breast cancer detection by providing a more detailed, complete view of the breast tissue. In a 3D mammogram, also known as “breast tomosynthesis,” many slices are taken through the breast at 1 mm intervals, and they are put together in a three-dimensional way. It becomes easier to see masses, especially in dense breast tissue. There are also less callbacks for false positives. – Is there a lot more radiation for 3D mammogram? No, only a small amount more. – Is an ultrasound better? An ultrasound is helpful for some lumps, but the best screening tool is still an annual mammogram. If a mass is palpable (able to be touched/felt) and not seen on mammogram, an ultrasound is used to assess the breast tissue. An ultrasound can also tell us if a mass is solid or cystic.

Every two minutes, a woman is diagnosed with breast cancer in this country. Even though treatments are better than ever, one person dies every 13 minutes from breast cancer. Inc .

The good news is that there are 3.3 million breast cancer survivors in the United States. The best thing you can do is

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r. Lori Lilley, a board-certified surgeon with more than 20 years of experience, discusses the most frequently asked questions related to mammograms and breast cancer screenings. Dr. Lilley leads WakeMed’s Breast Services Program, dedicated to the management of breast health issues – from early diagnosis to surgical intervention and long-term treatment planning. Throughout her career, Dr. Lilley has focused much of her work on breast surgery, which is used to explore palpable shadows, spots, or tumors that may show up on imaging studies. – When should I start getting mammograms? Although there is some controversy regarding this subject, in general, women should start getting mammograms at age 40. One out of six breast cancers occur in women ages 40 to 49 – and a majority of these women had no family history of breast cancer. For women 18

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– Do I need genetic testing? Sometimes your family history raises suspicions, and we order genetic testing. If there is breast and ovarian cancer, early prostate cancer, or pancreatic cancer in your family, you may need testing. If you get breast cancer at a young age, you may need testing. If you develop a second or contralateral cancer, you may need testing. There may be other hints as well that you need genetic testing. Some insurance carriers require that you see a genetics counselor prior to having these tests. – Do mammograms cause cancer? No. Mammograms can save your life or the life of someone you love. 

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The goal of WakeMed’s Breast Services Program is to provide comprehensive and coordinated care to patients from diagnosis through treatment. The dedicated program offers services including advanced imaging, minimally invasive breast biopsy, ultrasound and stereotactic procedures, sentinel lymph-node mapping and biopsy, mastectomy with concurrent breast reconstruction, and second opinions for breast disease treatment and involved breast conditions. They understand that timely appointments and swift intervention are important. Knowing waiting and worrying are not an option, they offer same or next day appointments. Dr. Lori Lilley is available for consultation in Cary, Raleigh, and North Raleigh. Currently, procedures are performed at the WakeMed Raleigh Campus, WakeMed North, and WakeMed Cary Hospital, a Breast Center of Excellence. For more information, call 919-350-PINK (7465).

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/collegeSE Wake Forest, NC

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DRIVEABLE DESTINATIONS LOCAL FARMS FOR STRAWBERRY SEASON

W

ith a perfect combination of big city bustle and country charm, northern Wake County strikes a delightful balance between metropolitan and rural. We’re sophisticated but also authentic. We have a sense of history and place. We can joyfully embrace hip cultural trends like “shop local” and “farm-to-table” by actually visiting real life farms while on a single, fantastic road trip. That’s because when you live in the Wake Forest area, a short drive in any direction will take you to gorgeous fields packed with “pick your own” fruits and vegetables – an activity that peaks with strawberry season. Nothing says spring like dropping fresh juicy berries into a plastic bucket, which is why I’m offering a guide to three of the area’s premier strawberry farms, all family-owned and authentically hardworking … and all delicious driveable destinations just down the way.

VOLLMER FARM Located at 677 NC Highway 98 E in Bunn, Vollmer Farm is about a half hour from Wake Forest. This is a fifth generation family farm that’s a certified organic berry producer and a big local favorite for everything from parties to field trips. The Vollmers’ mission is to grow wholesome, healthy produce, while simultaneously providing visitors with a meaningful “real farm” experience. What you get is a one-price admission ticket that covers a full day on the property – whether you want to pick berries, visit the Farm Market and Ice Cream Shop, or simply enjoy the fresh air. The tricky thing about berry picking is setting a date. The “pick your own” season is a bit of a moving target. Although May is always correct in a general sense, the exact starting point can shift forward or 20

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BY JENNIFER SMART

back depending on rainfall totals, temperatures, and other weather conditions. To cope with these variables, the Vollmers rely on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram to provide followers with regular crop reports. Sign up at www.vollmerfarm.com for “opening date” announcements, and you’ll be the first to know when it’s time to hit the rows. Blueberries and blackberries follow in June and July.

LYON FARMS A rustic property in Granville County, Lyon Farms is hugely popular among locals, many of whom return year after year to cruise the endless rows of spectacular spring strawberries. The farm is located at 1544 Munns Road in Creedmoor, again about a half hour from Wake Forest. The drive takes you along a quiet road that winds through the countryside surrounding Falls Lake, ending at acreage that has belonged to members of the Lyon family since 1861. Now registered as a North Carolina “Century Farm,” Lyon Farms produces fruits and vegetables year-round, along with seasonal items such as jams, cider, and corn on the cob. Offerings include dozens of healthy choices that are available at regional produce stands, the on-site market, or as “pick your own.” When picking strawberries here, the family atmosphere makes for a really special experience. Visitors who plan to stop by early in the season are advised to check their website (www.lyonfarms.com) or call ahead to guarantee the strawberry plants have grown enough to produce the best fruit and the fields are open to the public. Strawberries are harvested straight from the rows or purchased in pre-picked baskets. As spring turns to summer, consider going back for the blackberries, blueberries, tomatoes, and peaches.

PAGE FARMS Roughly 20 miles southwest of Wake Forest, Page Farms is located at 6100 Mt. Herman Road in Raleigh and advertises a “pick your own” season that normally begins in mid-April and lasts through the first week of June. This 100-acre farm was purchased by the Page family in 1922 and was initially cultivated to produce tobacco.

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It’s been handed down through the years, and today the property is managed by the family’s fourth generation. Members are striving to keep their proud agricultural heritage alive by growing fresh fruits and vegetables, developing healthy crops ranging from strawberries in the spring to corn and pumpkins in the fall, and educating visitors about the life of a real working farm. Page Farms (www.pagefarmsraleigh.com) maintains a Facebook page with news and updates and, as the only of one of these three that’s not out in the country, this farm offers a somewhat different experience. Really, it’s not every day you come across a farm that’s right in the heart of a metropolitan area – and which features wholesome delicious crops that also come from the heart.

PICKING THE BEST STRAWBERRIES All three farms make finding beautiful berries a breeze, but I do have a few tips. – One pound of fresh berries is equal to about 2/3 of a quart. – It takes about 10 to 15 minutes to pick a quart of berries. – Heaping berries more than 5 inches deep will bruise those at the bottom. – Pick only berries that are fully red. – Avoid placing picked berries in the sunshine; they do better in shade. – Don’t wash berries until you’re ready to use them.

FRESH SPINACH AND STRAWBERRIES – 1 pound fresh spinach, washed and dried – 1 pint fresh strawberries – ¾ cup sliced almonds, toasted – Dressing (recipe following) Dressing – ½ cup sugar – 1 tablespoon poppy seeds – 2 tablespoons sesame seeds – 1½ teaspoons minced onion – ¼ teaspoon paprika – ½ cup red or white vinegar – ¼ cup cider vinegar – ½ cup salad oil Mix dressing ingredients and refrigerate (dressing will keep for up to one month). Toss spinach and strawberries. Pour dressing over salad, then top with almonds.  Thank you to former Wake Forest College Birthplace Society President Susan Brinkley who provided this recipe that comes from the Junior League of Raleigh. Jennifer Smart is assistant director at the Wake Forest Historical Museum. You can visit the website at www.wakeforestmuseum.org.

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like Barrett’s esophagus or esophageal cancer.” A complication of long-term GERD, Barrett’s esophagus changes a patient’s esophageal lining. This tissue damage leads to an increased risk of cancer.

SYMPTOMS OF ACID REFLUX If you have acid reflux, you might experience the following: burning sensation or discomfort in your chest; burning sensation or discomfort in the back of your throat; unpleasant taste in the back of your throat; burping; chronic cough; unpleasant hiccups that seem to carry acid up your throat; nausea; problematic or painful swallowing; and vomiting.

WHAT CAUSES ACID REFLUX?

STOP THE

BURN I

f you’ve ever felt a fiery sensation behind your breastbone or tasted something like battery acid in the back of your throat, then you might have had acid reflux, also known as heartburn. If so, you’re certainly not alone. In the United States, about one in five people have gastroesophageal reflux disease, or GERD, which is characterized by acid reflux and heartburn. But what is acid reflux exactly, and what can you do about it?

WHAT IS ACID REFLUX? There’s a ringlike muscle where your esophagus meets your stomach called the lower esophageal sphincter (LES). A properly working LES protects the esophagus from the acid in your stomach by keeping the pathway between them clenched shut. When the LES is loose or too relaxed, acidic gastric juices (the stuff in your stomach) can bubble up into your esophagus, which is a major cause of acid reflux. (Other causes include hiatal hernias, when part of the stomach pushes through the diaphragm.) A little bit of reflux is normal. But if you have excessive stomach acid in your esophagus, you’re likely to be in a lot of discomfort. “It’s very common,” says Naveen Narahari, MD, of REX Digestive Healthcare. “On any given week, 60 percent of the adult population might have some kind of reflux. But we look closely at patients who have symptoms frequently over the course of a week.” “Three or more times a week is cause for concern,” adds Ruth Mokeba, MD, also of REX Digestive Healthcare, “as well as high intensity of symptoms. We can help these patients improve their quality of life and hopefully reduce their chances of developing a more serious disease 22

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When the LES becomes weakened or relaxed, it is less protective against gastric contents, which can flow backward into the esophagus. The most common culprits of acid reflux are lifestyle choices such as overeating, eating before bed, or exercising immediately after a large meal. Other causes include: obesity; too much alcohol or coffee; acidic foods; cigarettes; certain drugs, especially blood pressure, anti-anxiety, and pain medications; hiatal hernia; and pregnancy.

HOW TO TREAT ACID REFLUX If you see a doctor or a gastrointestinal specialist, he or she will determine what’s causing your discomfort and how to treat it. Diagnostic tests might include an upper endoscopy, in which a long, flexible tube explores the esophagus (under sedation), or the esophageal pH test, an outpatient procedure in which the patient wears a small probe for 24 hours to detect the amount of acid being produced. Once GERD is confirmed, treatments include lifestyle changes, medications, and surgery. – Lifestyle changes: quit smoking; lose weight; wear looser clothes; avoid food for a couple of hours before bedtime; prop yourself up slightly to sleep instead of lying flat; eat smaller meals; stay upright for three hours after a meal. – Medications: over-the-counter antacids to neutralize the acid in your stomach (such as Maalox, Mylanta, and Rolaids); prescription antacids; H2 blockers that reduce the amount of acid your stomach makes (such as Zantac and Pepcid); proton-pump inhibitors that further reduce the amount of acid your stomach produces and are available both over the counter and by prescription (such as Prilosec, Nexium, and Prevacid); prokinetics that help clear stomach contents and strengthen the LES (such as Reglan). – Other therapies: upper endoscopy can be used to tighten the LES or fix a hiatal hernia; fundoplication, which is a surgical procedure in which the upper part of the stomach is wrapped around the lower part of the esophagus to strengthen the LES.  If you’re suffering from acid reflux, talk to your doctor about your options or contact REX Digestive Healthcare at 919-791-2040 to schedule a consultation.

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RADIANT

ROSES

BY TINA MAST

The rose is known as a lovely addition to the garden. It’s also known to be high maintenance. The secret of success is to give it regular attention and provide it with the most optimal growing conditions that you can. Here are some guidelines for planting, growing, and maintaining radiant roses. LOCATION AND SPACING: Plant roses in full sun where they will receive at least six hours of light a day. Most bush-types should be spaced at least three to four feet apart, and space climbers six to 10 feet apart. PLANTING: If your soil is very poorly drained, plant roses higher than the ground surface on a mound to facilitate better drainage. Make sure plants are well-watered before planting. Dig a wide hole about three times the size of the rootball. The hole should be about the depth of it. Rough up the sides of the hole so there are no slick surfaces. Toss the dirt into a large container or wheelbarrow. Create a mix of 50% native soil, 40% pine bark soil conditioner, and 10% organic material (or more for sandy soils) such as composted manure in your container or wheelbarrow. Carefully remove the plant from the container and set it in the hole making sure the top one-eighth of the rootball is above the grade of the surrounding soil if you have clay, and at the grade if you have sandy soil. If the roots are compacted and tangled, gently loosen them by hand. Backfill the hole with the soil mix and build up soil in a mound up to the level of the rootball. Make sure that the soil is one to two inches below the bud graft union (the knotty, burled part from which the shoots are coming). This will help prevent suckers coming from below the graft. Create a three-inch lip of soil around the edge of the planting hole to catch water. Water thoroughly with a diluted solution of Fertilome Root Stimulator. 24

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MULCHING: Mulching conserves water, insulates plant roots from temperature extremes, and reduces weeds and the spread of soilborne disease. I recommend a two-inch layer of mulch. WATERING AND FERTILIZING: Water deeply and soak the root area once or twice a week, preferably in the morning, if there has been less than one inch of rain. Avoid getting water on foliage as it can promote disease. The amount needed will vary based on weather conditions, natural rainfall, plant size, soil structure, and sun duration/intensity. Use a fertilizer formulated for roses and feed according to label instructions. Generally, roses should be fed monthly during the growing season, usually April to midAugust. A couple shovelfuls of compost spread under each rose’s mulch layer at the beginning of the season will promote beneficial soil organisms as well as feed the plant. SPRAYING: Roses are prone to a number of diseases and pests. A healthy, well-cared for plant is better able to resist attack than a neglected one. Keep roses well fed and watered, and regularly remove dead wood, fallen leaves, and spent blooms. During the dormant season, right after annual pruning, spray with dormant season horticultural oil to destroy many disease organisms as well as overwintering insect eggs. To control disease and insects on many hybrid roses, a regular spraying regimen during the growing season will most likely be required. The best time to spray is in the early morning before the sun hits the plants. PRUNING: Pruning extends the life of your roses, improves flower quality, regulates size and shape, and reduces disease. It is a good idea to have a bucket of 10% bleach solution to dip your pruners in between cuts in order to prevent the spread of disease. Bypasstype pruners and loppers are recommended for hand pruning. For annual pruning, prune in spring just as the buds begin to swell prior to the unfolding of vegetative growth, usually late February or early March. Remove all shoots growing out from under

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the knotty, burled bud graft union at the base of the plant and dead, damaged, or diseased wood. Gently flake off old bark from the graft union to help promote new shoots. Remove all inward-growing branches and any that are pencil-sized or smaller to form a neat, open-centered plant. Remove canes that are four years or older, leaving about three to five canes of about one-half inch in diameter for hybrid teas, and five to seven canes for floribundas and grandifloras. On the remaining canes, reduce them down to leave at least three to five outward-facing buds on each cane. Make all cuts at an angle about onequarter inch above an outward-facing growth bud. On climbing roses, don’t prune for the first two to three years, except to remove dead, diseased, damaged, or crossing canes and any suckers. After two to three years, remove older gray and weak canes, leaving at least three to five vigorous ones. On onceblooming types, prune after their spring bloom. Prune climbers every few years. “Knock Out” roses can be pruned in late winter or early spring. Remove any dead wood and cut large canes down to about 24-30 inches tall (or two inches lower than the desired height of the shrub) making a slanted cut (away from the bud) about one-quarter inch above an outward-facing bud. Remove any diseased and/or spindly growth in the center of the plant. For seasonal pruning, roses should be “deadheaded” regularly. Prune away old blooms once they are spent. The cut should be one-quarter inch above an outward facing set of leaves that contains five or seven leaflets. Control cane height by choosing any set of five or seven leaves along the stem to make the cut. In general, don’t remove more than one-third of the plant during the growing season.  Tina Mast is communications director for Homewood Nursery & Garden Center in Raleigh. She can be reached at 919-8470117 or info@homewoodnursery.com, or visit www.homewoodnursery.com.

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from a “big box” store and experienced a feeling of disappointment as you unpacked boxes of furniture “parts” made of particle board and plastic, all bearing labels saying “Made Somewhere in Asia.” Just as there is fast food, there is also fast furniture – inexpensive, easyto-assemble designs that you essentially buy knowing you’ll toss it in a few years or the next time you move, likely one day becoming landfill material. Contrast that scenario to furnishing your home with products made for America’s finest homes in an era when quality materials and craftsmanship were the norm. Often you can acquire antique furnishings that do not depreciate for the same price you would pay for that box of unassembled furniture parts. Despite the ebb-and-flow tide of heirloom and antique love, the process of getting rid of your old pieces doesn’t have to be tedious or wasteful. Following are a few common sense suggestions for what to do with all this stuff as your spring cleaning marches on.

OFFER OR SELL YOUR STUFF ONLINE

BY CINDY DAVIS

TO SAVE OR NOT TO SAVE SPRING CLEANING ADVICE FOR OLD SOULS AND DOWNSIZERS

O

h, how we love everything about spring. Everything, that is, except spring cleaning – not just deep cleaning the house, but also the inevitable, impending process of sorting, selling, and donating stuff in your home that needs offloading or recycling. Are you one of those desperate souls looking to dispose of that vintage or antique glassware, china, or furniture you inherited? Or maybe you are downsizing, wanting to get rid of pieces your millennial children aren’t interested in. Those heirlooms of significance, that awesome but unneeded furniture, those pieces of lesser significance (aka junk) that have been floating down the generations, collecting dust in our basements and closets … the stuff you no longer want or have room for. But do you get rid of it, and if so, how? Sadly, many just don’t value family heirlooms and antiques the way they used to. They would rather buy cheap, light furniture instead of having to lug around bulky, large furniture with dated designs. But how many times have you purchased home furnishings online or 26

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Sometimes you really can get something for free. You can join local groups, which are moderated by people within your community via Facebook, eBay, craigslist, and other cyber venues to offer your items at no charge. Smaller items like antique collectibles and unique furniture pieces may potentially be worth some money. There is a wide array of ways to sell your items. In addition to these online buy-sell-trade sites, there are also auctions, online retailers, consignment stores, and private estate sales through a broker.

DONATE TO CHARITIES AND NON-PROFITS Find meaningful causes you support. Make a list and call up the corresponding non-profits, churches, rescue missions, share shops, etc., and see what items they can use. Many may need items for their offices or other operations. Or they may know how to give the items away on your behalf, as is the case with many organizations that give to the needy. You can also give your items to basic resell stores like Goodwill, The Salvation Army, or Raleigh/Durham Rescue Missions. There are also Planet Aid drop-off boxes, Purple Heart, Habitat for Humanity ReStore stores, etc. Many of these services will also come get bulkier items if you schedule a pick-up. The satisfaction knowing those beloved items you can no longer house may help someone in need offers its own value.

HAVE A GARAGE SALE Even if large items aren’t on buyers’ radars, collectors may be scouting garage sales looking for antique ones. Or someone who thinks outside the box may want to work his or her DIY magic on that old end table for only $10. And who knows? Maybe someone will take that bulky trunk off your hands and you’ll get a little extra cash.

DON’T DUMP Whatever you do, don’t dumpster your old stuff. If you have tried everything and everyone, and no one will take it (even for free),

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check to see if your local recycling center will accept what you have. Some cities have a bulk pick-up date, some require you to schedule a pick-up, and others require you to drop off your items.

FIND A NEW WAY TO DISPLAY HEIRLOOMS Before you make haste to dispose of any heirlooms, set aside those that have special significance to you or your family history. Find out if there are any cool stories about the people or the pieces themselves that go along with them. There are dozens of ways to display old family heirlooms. One of the best is a shadowbox with the items arranged in an attractive fashion. Memo boards can work if most of the items are flat, or a smaller photo book could work as well.

OUR FAVORITE – UPCYCLE/RECYCLE If you’re creative enough, there’s a new use for anything. Have an old toy truck? Make a planter out of it. How about a rolling pin towel holder or architectural art with random pieces of salvaged metal and wood? Have some outdated furniture? If the bases are still in good shape, consider getting them reupholstered with patterns that are more modern or to your taste. Don’t be afraid to get creative with paint. An old bedside table can be transformed into a funky colorful piece with a textured interior. A beat-up vanity can look amazing if given a shabby-chic flair. Suitcases/trunks are wonderfully versatile items in the upcycling world – think suitcase cabinets and suitcase tables. Make a vintage cake stand with a fine china dinner plate ad-

Outside is fun again.

hered atop a glass candlestick for the base. Old jewelry can be literal and figurative gems. Use the beads and gems in craft projects. Make brand new necklaces and earrings. Glue the old vintage jewelry pieces to a picture frame and put a photo of the person who owned them in it. It’s common to end up with dozens of old, bulky photo albums. Of all the antique items, these are the ones most worth keeping. It may be worth salvaging the pictures of people you do recognize and recycling the rest. These pictures could be put in custom frames, placed into a creative scrapbook, or even decoupaged to something meaningful that person kept, like an old journal.

THROW IT AWAY If any of your smaller stuff is truly just junk or beyond repair with no hope of recycling, upcycling, or repurposing, and there is no facility, person, or charity that will take or buy it, then maybe it’s time to throw it away. But first, pat yourself on the back for trying the aforementioned options before opting for this last resort. So there you have it – ways to resourcefully keep, creatively recycle, and wisely offload your old stuff, or any stuff, for that matter. Happy spring cleaning, y’all!  Cindy Davis is the display and retail floor manager and Laura Cashwell is the owner of For Old Times Sake Antiques, located at 223 S. White Street in historic downtown Wake Forest. They may also be reached at 919-554-1744 or visit www.foroldtimessakeantiques.com.

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One major factor driving the gardening trend is people’s increased interest in growing their own food. With heightened public awareness about health and nutrition, more people want to go organic, eat vegetarian, and eliminate genetically-modified foods from their diets. Plus, of course, it’s cheaper to eat food grown at home and not bought at a grocery store. It’s not just millennial homeowners pursuing this trend, either – aging baby boomers want to grow their own food, too. As a result, raised gardens and container or planter gardens are increasingly sought after. They’re easier to maintain, for one, and bending down typically isn’t required to work on them – a major benefit for older people.

BY JOE RABIONE

A BACKYARD

REVAMP

These garden types can be an extension of the outdoor living space. Use your garden as periphery for a patio, or design it with brick paths. Hardscaping wall products can work wonders for these purposes. Walls can also be used for creating platforms and privacy fences, which can rise to about six feet. If you want to plant something with a vine, like peas or beans, you can integrate different kinds of wall products to create a premium growing space. Meanwhile, smaller lots mean less space for planting, so interest in vertical gardens is also on the rise. The best product for that would be one like a modular wall system, which allows you to build out of a wood structure. Or, tweak that format to create a horizontal garden by essentially making troughs – like a windowsill

FOR A NEW GENERATION OF GARDENING

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ardening isn’t just for suburban backyards anymore. A new generation of gardeners is taking to the soil, and they’re often planting in urban settings that present unique challenges and opportunities.

Urban gardening is gaining steam with both millennials and baby boomers, who increasingly seek downsized homes in denser areas. While these neighborhoods have lots of amenities to offer, they typically don’t come with the same amount of yard space that a house in a more rural area might offer. There can be other compromises as well, such as fewer hours of direct sunlight or compromised soil quality. But aspiring urban gardeners needn’t fear: Integrating hardscaping elements with softscapes can solve many potential problems, and hardscapes can add additional aesthetic touches to gardens of any size. There are plenty of opportunities even for tighter budgets or unconventional environments, and contractors (who often don’t realize the untapped value of softscapes) can help homeowners realize all their gardening ambitions. 28

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box but bigger. To guarantee maximum sunlight, build it facing the sun in southern exposure. Another way to create a slightly elevated garden is through edgers, which carry additional benefits for homeowners seeking a simplified gardening experience. Edgers can be used to create pathways that connect different garden areas, meaning there’s less lawn to mow and fewer weeds to deal with. And, linked pathways add a lot of new possibilities for design. Homeowners can form a symmetrical grid of planting beds, for example, or the center might have a fountain area with benches beside it. Swings and other aesthetic elements can be added around the perimeter, and small structures might have a roof enclosure for a hanging bed. Both raised and vertical gardens will get a little warmer and dry out faster than a garden that sits at grade, so it’s a great idea to install drip irrigation. Gardeners who want to minimize their environmental footprint could also use permeable pavers, which allow people to capture water runoff (similar to how a rain barrel would). These pavers can make for a creative and eco-conscious way to water a garden. When gardeners do smaller plantings and have a perimeter, like gravel, it’s easier to weed and maintain (and there are fewer herbicides required). For people who are completely new to gardening, contractors can offer valuable beginner tips before making hardscape recommendations. Background research is crucial for burgeoning gardeners, especially if they want to grow particular kinds of foods. They’ll need to think about the amount of space they’ll have to work with, since growing produce like watermelons, for example, would require much more room than something like tomatoes. Most plantings need a site that gets between six and eight hours of direct sunlight, so homeowners should keep in mind that gardens don’t need to be

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in their backyards – spaces off the side of a house or driveway can work just as well too. Raised gardens are particularly good for these locations, because they look like hardscape features (so homeowners’ associations are typically more lenient with them). Soil type and quality are important early considerations, too. Gardeners will usually need 12-18 inches of quality soil with which to work. For soil that’s not quite gardener-ready, buy some compost, add sand, and create a new mix that’s more conducive to growing. The bigger a garden is, of course, the more labor-intensive it will be, but hardscaping elements like walls and edgers can reduce some of the burdens. Raised and vertical gardens, bolstered by hardscaping, can also help ward off common hazards like rabbits and deer. In some cases, homeowners may want to fence off their gardens too. Softscapes tend to be viewed as independent from hardscaping, but with urban gardening taking off, homeowners should embrace the growing opportunity. Hundreds of farm-centric communities around the country, known as “agrihoods,” are raising awareness about foods origins’ and increasing demand for locally-grown produce. Chicken coops are popping up in city gardens and on rooftops, illustrating owners’ commitments to eating food literally from their own yards. Homeowners who already have outdoor living spaces now have new opportunities to integrate gardens. The proliferation of outdoor kitchens, for example, invites herb gardens that can yield salsa ingredients. Or, a fire pit can become a hub for friends and family members to gather and snack on food grown just a few feet away. If you are considering an outdoor living space, let me suggest a garden – no matter how urban the area in which you live may be.  Joe Rabione is a national design and training specialist with Belgard. For more information, visit www.belgard.com.

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WHAT IS

MICROBLADING? AND WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT IT BY NAOMI SAPHIRE

Beautiful eyebrows can make a huge difference to your face. Some people are genetically fortunate to be born with

brows last an average of 12-24 months, mostly depending on your skin type. Brows on those with normal and dry skin last significantly longer than those with oily skin.

nicely shaped brows with just the right amount of hair. Many need to pencil in the deficit on their own, day after day. Yet others start losing their brows as they grow older, suffer from disease, or have undergone medical treatments

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that affected their brows. enciling in your own brows each and every day can be a serious but necessary time waster, because without those brows looking as full as you desire, you are not walking out the door as the best-looking version of you.

Microblading is changing this for thousands of men and women across the country. With the right artist and technique, you can have eyebrows that look very realistic, even under the scrutiny of that 4K phone camera. Microblading is making a huge difference in the lives of people with severe hair loss, like Alopecia or disorders like Trichotillomania, and those who may have overplucked in their younger years or simply aren’t one of the lucky folks who are naturally brow blessed. But the pitfalls are many, because the microblading industry is not as regulated as most consumers might assume. Unlike traditional tattoos, which are permanent, microblading is a semi-permanent, manual technique that infuses pigments (ink) into the upper layer of the epidermis, a more superficial part of the skin. This makes the strokes crisper than a traditional tattoo, which penetrates deeper into the epidermis. Small incisions, or scrape-like cuts, are etched into the brow in the shape of individual hairs and those incisions are filled with the pigments, generally over one or two sessions. Certain microblading techniques layer the strokes in ways that create the optical illusion of depth and give the brows more of a 3D look, rather than just drawn lines. Because of the shallower depth of microblading strokes, they fade naturally over time. The eye30

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Most people need a follow-up procedure within six to eight weeks of the initial session to make the strokes last. It is perfectly normal to lose some of the pigment after the first session, especially for those who have oily skin. Many industry experts credit as much as 70% of the skin’s retention potential with the post treatment care in the days after the microblading. Following your artist’s aftercare instructions to a T can determine a successful outcome and add months to the lifespan of your new brows. Is there pain? There is some discomfort by varying degrees, depending on your pain threshold. Some shops offer a topical anesthetic before the microblading starts, but this is a courtesy you might want to consider declining. When your skin is satiated with the anesthetic cream, it leaves less room for the pigments to be absorbed, making the retention level less than ideal and can result in blurred strokes and cuts that go too deep. Once the initial incisions are made, numbing gel can safely be applied directly into the tissue before the pigment is spread. When anesthetic is applied directly, without having to be absorbed through the skin, the numbing is instant and doesn’t adversely affect retention. While microblading has been enjoying a nice grace period of goodwill, the industry is now starting to experience a bit of a backlash from the increased prevalence of substandard work and even botched jobs. To become a microblading artist – or a tattoo artist for that matter – all you need is to make sure your work area passes a local health inspection. In many states, including North Carolina, there are no government-regulated course materials on microblading procedures that need to be passed, nor is there a quality control of the workmanship. There are academies and techniques of microblading that enjoy high esteem within the microblading community, but this is not something a consumer would be privy to without considerable effort spent doing online detective work. And even then, there is no guarantee that a person who received a diploma from a top microblading course will excel as an artist. Microblading is a procedure that requires both

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an artistic eye, highly developed fine motor skills, and the type of personality that can patiently work with a client to collaboratively design his or her new brows. That means it is all up to you to choose the right microblading artist. So how can one sift through all the clutter to determine who is a great one? Facebook recommendations can only get you so far. Assuming you don’t have a friend with microbladed brows that you can personally inspect, the best predictor of the quality of work you will experience should be found on the artist’s website. Every artist has their past work portfolio on their website in the form of accumulated “before” and “after” photos. But be wary of judging the work from poor quality photos. At low resolution, an artist’s work may look acceptable when the fuzzy image doesn’t distinguish one individual stroke from another. But how do those strokes hold up on a high-resolution image? People will be judging your finished brows in the cold light of day, not while squinting from a distance in a dark closet. Be sure the artist’s work is available in high resolution photos that don’t obscure any flaws in the workmanship. If the pictures are grainy, soft, or pixelated, you should be suspicious. Cost for microblading ranges anywhere from a couple hundred dollars all the way up to about $900, with most studios averaging upward of $500. Just remember, this is your face. You probably wouldn’t want to go to the cheapest plastic surgeon for a facelift. The same mind-set should be applied when selecting a microblading artist. Don’t rush into microblading until you’ve had a consultation with the artist. This is your opportunity to ask questions, discuss what type of eyebrows you hope to achieve, and establish a good rapport. Microblading is not for everybody. If you’re pregnant or currently undergoing a medical treatment that compromises your immunity, put those dreams of gorgeous brows on pause. Also, if you’re a workout fanatic and can’t go a couple of weeks without breaking a sweat, this is not for you, because you can’t get your new brows wet for two whole weeks following the procedure. Many people spend 10 to 20 minutes every day filling in their eyebrows and then worry for the rest of the day about just how much their work has deteriorated. Microblading is saving them hours every week in addition to giving them the incredible confidence gained from having beautiful brows. I encourage you to audition the artists in your area with a discerning eye and wish you good luck on your quest for those perfect brows.  Naómi Saphire is a PhiBrow certified microblading artist and a clinical esthetician. Her microblading studio INKOLOGY is located in Wake Forest. Naómi can be reached at www.inkology.org or 919-454-2415.

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BY DR. SAMANTHA K. McPHERSON

A HEALTHY

DIET FOR HEALTHY EYES

enoids that are densely located in the macula, the central portion of the retina. The retina is the most metabolically active tissue in the body. It has the highest demand for oxygen and has nearly continual exposure to light. This creates high vulnerability to light-initiated oxidative damage. Lutein and zeaxanthin protect the macula from the ravages of oxidative stress and help filter out the short-wave blue light rays that can be damaging to vision. Their role in protecting against age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is of particular interest, as research is suggesting that those with lower levels may be at higher risk of developing AMD and that lutein and zeaxanthin may be protective against its progression. Lutein and zeaxanthin are most abundant in dark green leafy vegetables such as kale, collard greens, turnip greens, and spinach. Broccoli, peas, and avocados are also good sources of this superstar antioxidant combo. If you are curious about your levels, some eye doctors have equipment that can indirectly measure the amounts in your macula. If your levels are low, you can increase your intake of lutein and zeaxanthin-rich foods or you can take supplements. Â An estimated 1.8 million Americans have vision loss associated with advanced AMD, while another 7.3 million are at substantial risk. People with advanced AMD have blurred and distorted central vision. They are unable to drive, read, or see details on faces. In addition to lutein and zeaxanthin, nutrients such as vitamins

We all know that eating a well-balanced diet rich with fruits, vegetables, and whole grains is important for overall good health. But have you ever considered which foods have super powers to help prevent serious eye conditions and preserve good vision for years to come? We grew up learning that carrots are healthy for our eyes – their beta carotene does have a critical role in forming vitamin A and rhodopsin, the visual

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pigment needed for night vision. esearch is continuing to demonstrate the influence of diet on eye health. And, as it turns out, the list of nutrients needed to keep your vision sharp is much longer than just vitamin A. Other important nutrients include two related carotenoids, lutein and zeaxanthin; vitamins C and E; and two omega-3 fatty acids, docosahexanoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). So what are these nutrients and what are their roles? Carotenoids are plant-based pigments that protect cells by fending off harmful free radicals. Lutein and zeaxanthin are two carot32

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C and E have also been found to be helpful in the fight against AMD. Both vitamins C and E are powerful antioxidants and are important for cellular repair. Oranges, grapefruits, lemons, and berries are high in vitamin C, while foods high in vitamin E include sunflower seeds, almonds, spinach, avocados, squash, kiwifruit, trout, shrimp, olive oil, wheat germ oil, and broccoli. There are many supplements for macular degeneration available over the counter. Be sure to ask your eye doctor which supplement, if any at all, is right for you.

fast foods, cookies and cakes, processed pork products, fatty chicken cuts, dairy and eggs, and fatty beef cuts. Last, but not least, we can’t forget that vitamin A that I mentioned earlier. Along with its crucial role in providing night vision, it is also important in maintaining a healthy ocular surface. Vitamin A is derived from beta carotene, another carotenoid that is a strong antioxidant capable of scavenging potentially harmful free radicals. In addition to carrots, excellent sources of beta-carotene include watercress, pumpkins, winter squash, sweet potatoes, yams, apricots, papayas, and mangoes.

The omega-3 fatty acids DHA and EPA have been found to help those suffering from dry eye disease. Chronic dry eye affects an estimated 20.7 million people in the United States. Omega-3s improve the quality of the tears on the ocular surface by way of reducing inflammation in the small oil producing glands in the eyelids, thus improving the quality of the oil layer in the tears. If you suffer from dry eye and wish to consider adding omega-3 supplementation, discuss this with your eye doctor as there is great variation in the quality and dosage of various products. Omega-3s may have many other health benefits including reducing the risk of heart disease, improving cognitive function, and helping to reduce symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis. They are found in some plants and nut oils, but Omega-3s are most abundant in fatty fish such as mackerel, lake trout, herring, sardines, albacore tuna, and wild salmon. If you are allergic to fish or are vegan, consider trying flax seed or black currant seed oil. It is important to have the proper ratio of omega-3 and omega-6 (another fatty acid) in your diet. Omega-3 fatty acids help reduce inflammation, and most omega6 fatty acids tend to promote inflammation. The typical American diet contains 14 to 25 times more omega-6 fatty acids than omega-3 fatty acids, which experts consider to be excessive on the omega-6 side. The pro-inflammatory omega-6s are found in mayonnaise, processed snacks,

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The following recipe is chock full of nutrients that your eyes crave. It’s a quick, easy, and delicious way to give your eyes the antioxidants that they need to continue fending off the oxidative stress that puts them at risk for problems in the future.

FIESTA KALE BOWL – 1 large bunch kale, cut into thin strips – 1 can black beans, drained and rinsed  – 1 cup sliced almonds or pumpkin seeds, toasted – 1 avocado diced – Chopped cilantro Dressing: – 3 tablespoons each of olive oil and fresh lime juice – 1 teaspoon honey – ½ teaspoon ground cumin – ¼ teaspoon ground coriander – Salt, to taste Whisk all dressing ingredients together in a small bowl. Put kale and beans in a large bowl and mix together with dressing. Top with nuts, avocado, and cilantro.  Samantha K. McPherson, OD, FAAO is with McPherson Family Eye Care. She may be reached at 919-263-9163 or visit www.mcphersonfamilyeyecare.com.

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visit to the exquisite 85-acre refuge for nature lovers, canoeists, and kayakers, located nearby at 6333 Robertson Pond Road in Wendell, transports you back to nature, back to peace, and back in time.

A RICH CULTURAL HISTORY

Robertson Millpond Preserve is part of Buffalo Creek (named for the herds of buffalo once seen watering there), that was dammed back in the 1820s. The dam, part earthen and part masonry, is still in place today. The mill – a significant focal point of economic activity in the Wendell community for almost two centuries – was removed in the mid-1970s, but the dam and remaining foundation of the mill have been designated as historic landmarks. In the 1820s, William Avera operated a 600-acre farm and gristmill with his wife and two children, dwelling in a Federal-style house at the time. As an adult, William’s son, Thomas, became a farmer and doctor, eventually serving as a surgeon in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Thomas constructed an Italianate-style home in the early 1870s (also designated a historic landmark), and the family moved the original house to the new homesite on Robertson Pond Road, where it still stands today. The Robertson family – for which the road and pond are named – gained ownership of the property following land sales in 1887 and

HIDDEN

GEMS ROBERTSON MILLPOND PRESERVE Spring offers a great opportunity to shake off the rust from a cold winter when we are forced to spend so much of our time indoors. The arrival of warmer weather is the perfect time to get outside to embrace nature and enjoy some new sights, new sounds, and new experiences ... this issue’s “Hidden Gem” – Robertson Millpond Preserve – is the ideal place to do just that. 34

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1914. They owned the land west of the pond and are believed to have operated the mill until the 1940s. In 1960, the Robertson estate was divided into 11 tracts for surviving heirs. Nettie Robertson Fowler inherited the millpond, where her family operated a boathouse in the 1960s, renting wooden boats for fishing.

forest (Robertson Pond, with a maximum depth of approximately 15 feet, is all flatwater and is very protected from the wind, as you are literally in a forest; there is no detectable current). In some places, the pond is wide enough to feel like a small lake, while in other places, it is not much wider than your kayak. With a relaxed paddling speed, one hour is just enough time to complete the trail. Two hours will give you ample time to explore, relax, and enjoy the beautiful natural surroundings as you meander through the trail.

The Wake County Open Space Program purchased the site in September 2013, and opened Robertson Millpond Preserve to the public in October 2015.

A SIGNIFICANT NATURAL AREA

Got a little extra time? Bring your fishing pole (for designated fishing areas) – fish populations include sawcheek and swamp darters, flier, ironcolor shiner, and mud, bluespotted, and pigmy sunfish. In addition, the cypress swamp is also habitat for common birds, including wood and black duck, pileated and downy woodpeckers, prothonotary warblers, screech and great horned owls, great blue heron, and more. Also be on the lookout for beavers, muskrats, rac-

The North Carolina Natural Heritage Program has identified the site as one of 47 significant natural areas in Wake County and it has also been recognized as a Wetland Treasure by the Carolina Wetlands Association. This blackwater cypress-gum swamp is unique this far north and this far west in North Carolina (blackwater is formed when a river or creek flows through forested swamps or wetlands; as vegetation decays, tannins leach into the water, making a transparent, acidic water that is darkly stained, resembling tea or coffee).Thus, many species from the coastal plain are present. The bases of the cypress trees provide habitat for swamp rose and several coastal plain plants, shrubs, and vines, including the coastal fetterbush and sweetspire. Virginia blue flag, another species found primarily in the coastal plain, can be found blooming near the boat dock in the spring.

coons, water snakes, frogs, and turtles. Robertson Millpond Preserve is open to the public on weekends and some holidays. Gates open Saturdays and Sundays at 8:00 AM, and are locked at sunset. The pond closes 30 minutes earlier than the preserve. The site offers vehicle access, parking, and unloading area; sheltered picnic tables; access to the pond by a short pier/dock or from the shoreline; and access to see the original gristmill site foundation. This spring, step back from the business of every day life and let the unique beauty and history of Robertson Millpond Preserve welcome you. This local hidden gem provides the perfect opportunity for you and your family to make memories together while going back to nature, back to peace, and back in time.  Information courtesy of www.wakegov.com/ parks/robertsonmillpond/Pages/default.aspx. Visit the website for detailed park information, park rules, and more.

GET OUT AND EXPLORE Bring your own canoe, kayak, paddle board, or small trolling boat (which can be launched at the grassy launch site or from the ADA-accessible boat dock). Don’t have your own? No problem. From midApril through October, Paddle Creek rents kayaks from the shoreline. Outside of the season, contact them directly for rentals. (Please note that life jackets are required.) The paddling trail consists of 73 buoys that lead you on a 1.15-mile loop through the

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BY JILL BRIGHT AND GREG HARRINGTON

SOME GAVE ALL ALL GAVE SOME,

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Wake Forest Purple Heart Foundation (WFPHF). A new board of directors planned the first dinner for Veterans Day 2009 at the Ledford Center, where 32 Purple Heart recipients and four families representing their veterans brought together 175 people. The guest speaker was the only World War II fighter pilot to fly all of the major air missions in the Pacific.    It was decided that all future events were to be held on or close to National Purple Heart Day.  For the growing crowd, banquets were held at the Wake Forest Presbyterian Church, and are now at the larger Richland Creek Community Church, where attendance in 2017 was close to 550 people, including 70 Purple Heart recipients.  Past speakers have included four-star generals, an active duty command sergeant major, a Medal of Honor recipient from the Vietnam War, a blind active duty captain, a retired sergeant who lost both legs, and a colonel who was portrayed in Black Hawk Down.     Prior to each banquet, these honored veterans attend a private reception where they share their military memories with those who have had similar experiences. After the colors are presented and bagpipes play, each recipient is introduced, walks through an Honor Guard of Wake Forest High School JROTC cadets with their sabers raised, is presented a gift, and then escorted to their table. Near the conclusion, military members in the audience are asked to stand as their branch of service song is played, closing with Taps.  

ne of the most respected, recognized, and oldest military awards presented to a member of the United States Armed Forces is the Purple Heart. It is a unique decoration, not given because of a recommendation, but rather awarded to those who have been wounded, or posthumously to the families of those who made the ultimate sacrifice, during action against an enemy of the United States.     The original Purple Heart was established by George Washington on August 7, 1782, as a cloth badge called the Badge of Military Merit. In 1932, on the 200th anniversary of Washington’s birthday, the Purple Heart was reestablished to its current design, as a symbol of honor for sacrifice. This heart-shaped purple service award has a gold border with George Washington’s profile on the front and his coat of arms between sprays of leaves at the top, with purple and white ribbons attached. Inscribed on the back of each are the words “For Military Merit.” The color purple was chosen because it represents bravery, courage, value, and sacredness. For each subsequent injury, an oak leaf cluster or 5/16-inch star is given.   Every August 7, our country celebrates Purple Heart Day to honor, remember, and thank those wounded or killed while defending our country. Wanting to honor our local Purple Heart recipients, Greg Harrington, Lisa N. Hayes, and Mike Johnson formed the 36

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Due to the efforts of this Foundation, a state Purple Heart Foundation was formed in 2012, and banquets patterned to Wake Forest’s are now held in at least five other North Carolina cities. Preparations are now underway for the 10th annual banquet that will be held this summer on August 4. Ticket sales, along with sponsorships, donations, scholarship applications, and more information can be found on the WFPHF  web page, Facebook page, by emailing info@wakeforestpurpleheartfoundation.org, or contacting co-chairs Mandy Duguid, Greg Harrington, or any board member. The hard work and months of planning by many has made this a successful banquet that definitely accomplishes its mission statement ... “to provide a forum for the local community to honor Purple Heart recipients and their families, to foster an environment of goodwill among combat wounded Veterans, to promote patriotism and to encourage the sharing of recipient experiences so future generations will know of the sacrifices made by Veterans and their families.”  Jill Bright is with Bright Funeral Home, located at 405 S. Main Street in Wake Forest. Bright Funeral Home, which serves the Wake Forest, Rolesville, Youngsville, Franklinton, Falls, Bay Leaf, Loiusburg, Raleigh, and surrounding areas, is honored to be a sponsor of the WFPHF and is proud to set up their large flags inside and out for their banquets. For more information about Bright Funeral Home, call 919-556-5811 or visit www.brightfunerals.com.

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GOOD

READS

BY SUZANNE LUCEY

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he warm weather of spring offers the perfect opportunity to get outside and take advantage of the sunshine on our faces. It encourages us to get some outdoor exercise like riding a bike or going for a long walk, helping to get our bodies back in shape after enjoying the comfort foods of winter. Spring is also a great time to exercise our minds and get them in shape as well – what better way to give our minds a good workout than with a good book? Here are some of my recommendations for you to enjoy this season.

CHILDREN Don’t Blink, by Amy Krouse Rosenthal (Ages 3-7) For the little reader in your life who may have a hard time falling asleep, Don’t Blink is a playful, interactive story that is narrated by a cheeky stuffed owl and is guaranteed to make bedtime easier and more fun. How, you ask? If you can avoid getting to the end of the book, you can avoid bedtime … but, each time you blink, you have to turn a page – that’s the rule! So, whatever you do, don’t blink. How To Code A Sandcastle, By Josh Funk (Ages 4-8) (Available May 5, 2018) All summer long, protagonist Pearl sets out to build the perfect

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sandcastle that will not be destroyed by the beach environment (think out-of-control Frisbees and pesky puppies). Running out of options, she sits down with her friendly robot pal Pascal, and using simple math and fundamental computer coding, comes up with the perfect plan. With its humor and vibrant artwork, How To Code A Sandcastle is a great way to introduce kids to the fun of coding. Baby Monkey, Private Eye, by Brian Selznick (Ages 4-8) From the author of Hugo Cabret and The Marvels comes Baby Monkey, Private Eye, a funny and smart book about a monkey … who is a baby … and who is a private eye. This chapter book is geared to the beginning reader, and with its creative illustrations and unique concept of monkey-solving investigations, is sure to inspire. Peanut Butter and Jelly, by Ben Clanton (ages 6-9) The much-anticipated third graphic novel in the “A Narwhal and Jelly Book Series” is finally available. Yes, Narwhal and Jelly are back with their positive thinking, imagination, and joyfulness. This time, Narwhal has a new obsession with – you guessed it – peanut butter. This book is about trying new things and accepting who we are. Peanut Butter and Jelly, with its simple and witty storyline, is perfect for young, independent readers.

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ADULTS

Ice Wolves, by Amie Kaufman (8-12 years) New York Times bestselling author Amie Kaufman introduces an electrifying new series for young readers about Rayna and Anders, orphaned twins living on the streets of a city guarded by ice wolves against the threat of their sworn enemies, the scorch dragons. During a city ritual, their lives change as Rayna transforms into a scorch dragon and Anders, an ice wolf. Adventures, friendship, and the power of sibling love – all discovered throughout this heartpounding, fantastical thrill ride of a story.

Enlightenment Now, by Steven Pinker This witty, lucid, and enthralling nonfiction work of intellectual depth chiefly focuses on the enlightenment values of reason, science, and humanism that have led to scientific and moral progress, and the notion that the embracing of these values will continue the trend. This, as opposed to counter-enlightenment values (religious faith, nationalism, tribalism, relativism, declinism) is the recipe for the maximization of human flourishing and the minimization of human suffering.

YOUNG ADULT Dread Nation, by Justina Ireland The Civil War is on hold as the dead begin to rise. Jane has been taken from the relative safety of her mother’s plantation home to start training as an attendant at Miss Prescott’s Academy for Young Women. The Native American and Negro Re-Education Act holds that the minority youth be trained in weaponry and manners to serve as the protectors of the upper class white families across the eastern states. Jane is a smart, sassy, and strong heroine whom you will continue to root for as she faces true horrors of humanity, far worse than the walking dead shamblers. Dread Nation is an important coming-of-age story about slavery and the years that followed.

Bring Me Back, by B.A. Paris Another thrilling page turner by the author of Behind Closed Doors, Bring Me Back starts off with a young couple, Finn and Layla, vacationing in France when they stop for gas. When Finn returns to the car, his love has disappeared, never to be seen again. Ten years later, questions are raised and strange things are happening. Is she alive? Is whoever took her playing games?

This can’t-be-put-down psychological thriller will have you questioning everything and everyone until the very end. Children of Time, by Adrian Tchaikovsky Our sci-fi club’s favorite book of the year, Children of Time is about a race for survival among the stars. Humanity’s last survivors escaped Earth’s ruins to find a new home … but when they find it, can their desperation overcome its danger? Brush With Death, by Ware Wilkins Raleigh’s own fantasy author Ware Wilkins has launched a new series (“The Sadie Salt Series”) that is flying off the shelves. Brush With Death, featuring paranormal dentist (yes, you read that right) Sadie Salt, is a sarcastic, dark, and funny urban fantasy that takes place in the Blue Ridge Mountains and centers around her many misadventures.  Suzanne Lucey and her husband Dave own Page 158 Books, located at 415 S. Brooks St. in Wake Forest. She may be reached at 919435-1843 or visit www.page158books.com.

Furyborn, by Claire Legrand (Available May 22, 2018) The two main storylines in Furyborn (Book 1 of “The Emporium Trilogy”), the must-read fantasy of 2018, take place 1,000 years apart and feature two fiercely independent young women. One is about the Sun Queen, the savior; the other about the Blood Queen, responsible for opening a gate to their world that lets in evil angels who have the power to take over the minds and bodies of the citizens. I’m afraid to share more as everything seems like a spoiler – you’ll just have to read for yourself. Twists, turns, characters, action, world building, cool magic systems, suspense, friendship, romance, threats – you name it, and it’s within the pages of Furyborn.

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ORTHODONTIC

DIY OR DI-DON'T? BY DR. JASON GLADWELL

This is the age of Pinterest and DIY projects. As you scroll through Facebook, you see a dozen do-it-yourself video tutorials of projects ranging from painting flower pots to house building. If you are familiar with projects like these, then you are also probably familiar with Pinterest fails. Let’s be honest … some projects are not meant to be done yourself – electrical jobs, open heart surgery, haircuts, and

T

straightening your teeth, just to name a few.

hat’s right, at-home, DIY orthodontic treatments are all the rage. By now, you have probably seen or heard the commercials for different companies offering a “quick and easy” at-home solution for crooked or crowded teeth, in which you essentially become your own orthodontist. Giving yourself orthodontic treatment at home may seem easier, cheaper, and quicker than visiting an orthodontic office; but in reality, it could lead to longer, more expensive, and even potentially dangerous outcomes. Here are a few things to think about before attempting at-home braces or invisible aligners.    There are many considerations an orthodontist looks for and factors in when developing a treatment plan for a patient. It’s not just the visible part of the teeth that has to move; there is also a complex and sensitive root system that provides stability and life to the tooth. The unseen part is just as important, and this is what allows for tooth movement. If teeth are moved without considering the whole tooth, disastrous results could follow.     Along with root health and positions, orthodontists also look at 40

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bone health. If they try to move teeth without solid and healthy supporting bone, teeth can be damaged or lost as well. Bone levels and support must be determined to be healthy and stable before any orthodontic tooth movements should be undertaken. Despite what may be said on a commercial or an online post, those determinations should only be made in person by a qualified and trained professional. With the DIY approach to orthodontics, people are relying on a lab technician – who has never seen those patients in person – to make decisions about final positions of teeth that could negatively affect their smiles and even give the opposite end result of the desired outcome. All these movements should be thought through by an experienced orthodontist. Facial profiles, tooth angulations, severity of crowding or spacing, and many other factors need to be considered when determining the best course of treatment.   Orthodontists treat a wide variety of cases – some ranging in length from only a few months to complex cases spanning years. In either case, the diagnosis and treatment planning is equally crucial. Even with short cases, it is just as important for the orthodontist to see the patient in person to gather information and confirm essential details to make his or her smile perfect.   In an ever-increasing aesthetic world, your smile is one of the first and most impactful impressions you give off. It is a lasting one, so make sure it is healthy and beautiful.  Dr. Jason Gladwell is a distinguished Invisalign Faculty Member, one of the top 10 Invisalign Providers nationwide, the #1 Invisalign Teen Provider on the East Coast, and the #1 Invisalign Provider in North Carolina. Visit www.gladwellorthodontics.com to schedule your complimentary consultation appointment at their Raleigh or Wake Forest locations.

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kids to put away the video games, dust off the sleeping bags, and get ready to pitch a tent. To help you get started, I’ve put together a guide to guarantee your experience goes off without a hitch.

GATHERING THE ESSENTIALS

BY MARGARITA COHEN

THINK OUTSIDE THE TENT

W

Some items are essential to ensuring your campers feel like they’re having a true backyard adventure. Starting with the basics, make sure you have enough tents, pillows, sleeping bags, and blankets for friends and extended family who may be joining in on the camping fun. Make it easier on yourself by asking each guest to bring his or her own sleeping materials. If you don’t have a tent and prefer not to buy one, no problem. Just go to Google or YouTube for plenty of “do-it-yourself ” versions. Doityourself.com offers a pretty straightforward guide to building a tent from a tarp, rope, and wooden posts. When it comes to food planning, you can always ask guests to contribute. But no matter who brings what, make sure you have enough to feed your campers all night. Grilling out with hot dogs and hamburgers is an easy, inexpensive, and traditional camping option. Accompany with a veggie platter, chips, and pasta salad, and you’re all set. Of course, don’t forget the s’mores! Above all else, you want to ensure everyone feels comfortable and safe throughout the night, so items like water and flashlights are

ith spring here and summer just around the corner, your backyard is likely becoming the prime playtime spot for your family. But as a parent, you know summer requires a little imagination on your part to keep the kids entertained, especially if plans include sleepovers and playdates. Being organized and having some creative ideas up your sleeve is an easy way to make childhood memories that will last a lifetime. One of my family’s favorite warm-season activities is camping. Our fondest memories include singing songs, eating s’mores, and playing flashlight tag. North Carolina offers many family-friendly campgrounds from the mountains to the coast. And you can find some of those right here in our area of the state. Wake Forest itself boasts several great places for camping. For example, Holly Point offers 153 campsites, 89 with water and electric hookups. Similarly, Rollingview offers 80 campsites. Both include picnic tables, outdoor grills, and tent pads. But you don’t have to pack up the car with all the camping gear to start a new family tradition. The best campground around may very well be right outside your back door. By sticking close to home, your kids can feel safe and secure, be within walking distance of a bathroom, and still enjoy a wonderful family bonding experience. So with the days warmer and the evenings longer, tell the 42

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good to have on hand. If you aren’t already protected by a mosquito control service, mosquito repellent will be essential too.

PITCHING A TENT If you’re an experienced camper and have a regular tent, this should be an easy step for you. If not, it could be the most frustrating part of the process. Check out online articles for tips on setting it up. Regardless, it’s recommended to pitch the tent(s) before everyone arrives in order to avoid any delays in the fun.

BUILDING A FIRE Camping is not camping without a campfire! A portable fire pit is best for keeping this camping staple contained at night and easy to clean up the following morning. It’s recommended to start this earlier in the evening than needed in case you run into any hiccups. If you’re planning on making s’mores for dessert, provide roasting sticks or make it a fun activity to see who can find the best one. It’s crucial to keep everyone safe around the campfire. Take a few minutes before the fun begins to educate the group on the dangers of fire and show them where water is in case of an emergency.

TELLING STORIES AND PLAYING GAMES If ghost stories are going to play a role in the evening’s festivities, make sure everything is in place beforehand. For optimal scariness, employ a partner to provide sound effects or jump scares at opportune moments in the story. Of course, a flashlight to hold under your face is critical for extra spooky effect.

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There are plenty of backyard game ideas to fill in the gaps between dinner, ghost stories, s’mores, and calling it a night. For instance, Twister – this classic is a family favorite, and it’s easy enough to turn your lawn into a giant board by spraypainting colored circles on the grass; just be sure to use something that will wash off like contractor’s spray paint. Create your own bean bag toss game by grabbing a ladder from the garage and labeling each rung with a different point value. Make your own bowling alley using empty water bottles and a soccer ball. If you have a big enough space, “Capture the Flag” is a great way to get the kids active, burn off some of the s’mores sugar, and tire them out before bedtime. There are hundreds of ideas to make this adventure the best it can be, and plenty of great places to camp all over North Carolina. But speaking from experience, some of the best family camping memories can easily be made right in your own backyard.  Margarita Cohen is the owner of Mosquito Joe of Eastern Wake, making “Outside Fun Again” with mosquito control treatments for residential and commercial customers in the greater Wake Forest area. For more information, or to schedule a treatment, visit https://easternwake.mosquitojoe.com or call her at 919-926-8851.

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some people. This is a time when a consultation with an interior designer could be well worth the money. It will cost less than all of those quarts of paint you buy to “try” the color on the wall.

WALLPAPER Yes, wallpaper is back … but in moderation. Gone are the days of using wallpaper on every surface in the room. Trending now is wallpaper on an accent wall, with limitless choices including plain textures, wood looks, geometrics, funky patterns, and bright florals. Visit your favorite wallpaper store and browse the books for inspiration. You just may discover the perfect paper to transform an ordinary space in your home into an extraordinary one.

FLOWERS Easily bring the bright colors of spring into your home with fresh flowers. Flowers not only brighten up your home, but they will lift your spirits as well. If you are allergic, purchase some realistic artificial blooms – you may pay a little more for them, but they are worth the investment, as they never go out of style and can be used over and over again. Greenery and succulents are on trend today, as well as cotton and different textures mixed together. Experiment with arrangements that invoke happiness when you look at them.

THINK BY RHONDA BENVIE

SPRING

AND SPRING CLEAN YOUR DÉCOR Every year, we all look forward to spring. The warm weather invigorates us and gets us in the mood to spring clean and de-clutter from the winter season. What is the status of your décor? Does it need a fresh and springy update? Here are some ways to freshen and brighten up your space and invite the beauty and warmth of the season inside.

PAINTING Nothing changes the look of a home more than paint. Pick a fresh new color that still flows with the colors of your house. If it’s in your budget, paint the trim – a fresh coat of paint screams fresh and clean. But selecting the right colors can become a chore for 44

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PILLOWS AND BEDDING Out with the old and in with the new – this is especially true when it comes to pillows. Toss pillows can completely change the look of a sofa or chair, freshening it up easily and affordably. This season, it’s all about color, pattern, and texture, so go a little bold with your choices and pick ones that complement your décor. In your bedrooms, think about changing out your bedding for a new look. New bedding, new paint color, and an accent wall of wallpaper can take a room from boring to fabulous in no time flat.

ACCESSORIES Have you been displaying the same ol’ accessories year after year … after year? Recycle some of those old accessories and introduce a few new ones. Set out around your home a few vases in colors and patterns that speak to you and fill them with good quality artificial flowers and/or greenery or fresh blooms clipped right from your own backyard. Got bookcases? Hardback books mixed in with small knick knacks are perfect adornments to fill their shelves. Pick books with bindings of hues that complement the colors in your space. A mix of metals and colors are trending for 2018. Copper, golds, and silvers mixed in with the bold colors of blues, greens, purples, and yellows are the hits of the season. Updating a few pieces of art can bring a fresh new look to your space as well. Also moving art to a different space in your house could bring new life not only to the space, but to the art as well.

NEUTRAL HOME DÉCOR Has your sofa lived a full, happy life? If so, it may be time to bid

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it farewell. Or maybe your sofa is still awesome, but your chairs have seen better days. Maybe it’s time to update them with neutral upholstery pieces so they stand the test of time. A neutral-colored sofa – think cream or black – will go with anything, much like the classic black dress or cream blouse. Going neutral with these items makes incorporating more disposable accessories and pillows in updated colors, textures, and patterns much simpler. Black is scary for some people, I know … but remember that black is the most neutral color there is in the color palette – it goes with everything and every room should have at least a little black in it. When it comes to spring cleaning your décor, whatever you decide to do, make sure you have fun planning and shopping for your home and opt for items that make you happy to be there. If this seems daunting and more of a chore than you’d like to tackle this spring, hire an interior designer to help you with some or all of the things you would like to do in your house. Also, finding the right retail store in which to shop for furniture and accessories can make all the difference when pulling your room together. Happy spring and happy spring décor cleaning! 

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IT STARTS

WITH US BY JESSICA McMICAN

H

ave you ever caught yourself saying something, quickly realizing it is something your closest friend says all the time? Or maybe you noticed one day that you know all the words to a song you didn’t realize you had even paid attention to. That’s because what we surround ourselves with influences us on every level, even subconsciously. You may have heard it said before that we are like the five people with whom we spend most of our time. I’m a firm believer in this. If positive and successful people consistently surround you, you are more likely to be a positive and successful person. If you tend to be around folks who complain, struggle with work ethic, or act or speak negatively, chances are you will find yourself doing the same. As parents, it is important to recognize that we have the opportunity and yes, responsibility, to be the positive influence for our children. The opportunity to influence their foundation of moral structure, beliefs, and attitudes about themselves and others is an important key to setting them up for long-term success that often gets overlooked. So how can we help our children grow up feeling loved, accepted, and respected in a world that is filled with negative propaganda that tells them they are never enough? How do we compete with the peer pressure often seen on social media and mainstream entertainment that leaves them feeling discouraged?

that they are picking up on all the things we say and do. If you have a child who says things like “I can’t ever get anything right; nothing ever works for me; I have the worst luck, that’s just who I am …” ask yourself if this is something you often say. Is your self-talk positive? Do you talk poorly about yourself or others? If your children throw things when they are mad or resort to violence when they don’t get their way, consider where they might be seeing this behavior and make sure it’s not at home. 2. WORDS MATTER. All of them. It’s important that when we speak to our children we are honest, yet cognizant about what we say and how we say it. Our words could impact our child’s confidence and self-perspective for much longer than the conversation itself. If your child makes a mistake, address the mistake/ action for what it is; don’t imply that he or she is wrong or bad, but rather, his or her choice was. If you are quick to throw out phrases like “You always do this; you never listen; you drive me crazy …” these will become their inner voice and eventually what they believe about themselves to be true until they are taught otherwise. The same holds true when we talk to others about our kids. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve been around parents and I overhear a conversation where one says to another “He can be such a pain; she never does what I tell her; he is so oversensitive …” Think their children didn’t hear them? Think again. Words matter. Make sure you aren’t saying things to your children or about them you wouldn’t say to or about yourself.

Here are five tips I find helpful with my own children … 1. WALK THE TALK. The number one thing we must realize is that our children are always watching and always listening. If you are constantly talking down about yourself, others, or your circumstances, your children will begin to mimic this behavior. How many times have you laughed at young children who say adult phrases or words? What we sometimes fail to consider is the fact 46

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3. SUPPORT THEIR DREAMS. Kids aren’t born with limiting beliefs. If you ask young children what they want to be when they grow up, they almost always have an answer. Everything from teaching to saving the world, they believe this is what they want to do, and will inevitably do. They have no reason to doubt their ability to be what they want. Support them. Cheer them on. Does this mean your three-year-old should have an action plan to

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become the next president or that you are setting him or her up for disappointment? No. It provides an opportunity to help children understand the characteristics and skill sets required for what they want to be, and it shows them you believe in them too. As adults, we often try to keep things “realistic” – we laugh at their dreams and encourage them to find an alternative dream or a “backup plan.” Why? Typically, it’s because over time we lost faith in our own dreams or we lacked the belief in ourselves to go after them at all. Children who are repeatedly told they are crazy for their dreams, or sarcastically told “Good luck with that,” will struggle to find their passions until someone else pours belief back into them. 4. BE AVAILABLE. Life can be hectic at times, yet our children need to know we are there for them, we are listening, and we are available when they need support. They need to know they can come to us for guidance and comfort without judgment. If we don’t create an environment where they feel safe to talk to us, this can lead to feelings of loneliness, confusion, or that they are not respected or valued. Show them they are worth your time. 5. TEACH THEM HOW TO COPE WITH DISAPPOINTMENT. Not everyone should get a trophy. The reality is not everyone can always win all the time. Disappointment is a natural part of life and if we do not show our children how to process disappointments and cope with the emotions that stem from this, they will struggle in every area of their life. Whether it’s life goals, career goals, or relationship goals, they will inevitably be faced with disappointment either in themselves, their circumstances, or others. Teach them patience, respect, and forgiveness. 

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Jessica McMican is the owner of A Moment’s Grace, empowering women inside and out, through her photography, health and wellness services, and networking and community events. For more information, visit www.amomentsgrace.com.

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in the form of volatile sulfur compounds, which if not balanced, cause the breath to worsen. According to the Academy of General Dentistry, in more than 90% of bad breath cases, foul odor starts in the mouth, throat, and tonsils. Preventing bad breath and keeping this naturally occurring bacteria in check starts with the fundamentals of good oral hygiene: brushing, flossing, and rinsing with an alcohol-free mouthwash, which prevents drying out the mouth. Dry mouth is one of the most common causes of bad breath, as it provides the anaerobic bacteria an ideal environment for reproducing. Dry mouth can be caused by a number of factors such as snoring, drinking alcohol, and prolonged speaking. Some medications like antidepressants, blood pressure, and antihistamines can also reduce saliva production. “Morning breath,” which many experience when waking, is generally caused from the lack of saliva production while sleeping, drying out the mouth. For those suffering from chronic dry mouth, even minor food odors can be more pronounced.

BY DR. EDMOND SUH

BYE BYE

BAD BREATH HALITOSIS PREVENTION IS EASIER THAN YOU THINK

Some foods contribute to bad breath. Onions and garlic are probably the two foods that come to mind for most people as they are malodorous. Both contain sulfur compounds which create their foul smell and contribute to bad breath. Of course, they are not the only culprits – foods that are acidic like coffee and juices provide

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No one intentionally wants to walk around with bad breath and it can be an awkward conversation to tell a family member, friend, or colleague, let alone a complete stranger, that his or her breath stinks. The good news is preventing bad breath

B

is easier than treating it and it starts with good oral hygiene. ad breath, the common term for halitosis, affects about 30% of people worldwide. Generally, it is caused by a buildup of anaerobic bacteria in the mouth, which do not require oxygen to live and are part of the normal oral environment. They aide in digestion by helping the body breakdown proteins. As these bacteria feed on the protein supply, they also release waste 48

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the anaerobic bacteria a perfect breeding ground. In addition, dense protein sources like meat, fish, and dairy are a buffet for anaerobic bacteria to feed on, again increasing the sulfur compound waste they produce. Foods that are high in fiber help reduce bad breath, as does drinking water – but the simplest way to prevent bad breath associated with food is by brushing your teeth after meals. Bad breath is rarely associated with life-threatening diseases; however, it can be caused by certain illnesses. Those with lung, liver, or kidney disease; respiratory tract infections; metabolic disorders; and diabetes can experience chronic bad breath due to dry mouth. Additionally, sinusitis, post-nasal drip, pneumonia, bronchitis, dehydration, and zinc deficiency can also contribute to bad breath. The best prevention of bad breath is to have routine dental checkups at least twice a year and maintain good oral hygiene by brushing, flossing, and rinsing. Talk to your dentist if you have concerns about bad breath so he or she can rule out causes related to any dental problems. Your family doctor may also help solve issues with bad breath, especially if you have an infection. ď Ž Dr. Edmond Suh, DDS is with Supremia Dentistry, located at 1711 S. Main Street in Wake Forest. At Supremia Dentistry, expect something different as they welcome you to their patient family. Call 919556-6200 to learn more or schedule an appointment. You can also visit www.supremiadentistry.com.

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OUR HERITAGE REVISITED ROMANCE UNDER THE MAGNOLIAS BY AMY PIERCE “Our Heritage” is reprinting and updating earlier articles as a way of introducing a ballooning newcomer population to Wake Forest history and culture.

T

he front page of the April 2, 1999, Wall Street Journal

the campus at old Wake Forest. They are sort of a symbol of our first

reported, “Lovers These Days Are Going Anywhere

days; here we are, 50 years later, still together.” – Jim & Peggy Frisbie,

But to the Lanes.” The article bemoaned the fact

classes of ’49, ’51

that “a quaint relic of romance falls on tough times; there’s no place to park.” To those men and women

“There is probably nothing so symbolic of the old campus as the

who attended Wake Forest Col-

stately, old, ‘sweeping-down-

lege, the tree of the heart was

to-the-ground’ magnolias,

the magnolia. Sadly, with the

which fairly covered it during

“limbing” in recent years of

our days. Although our

these grand dames on the old

courting began on the steps

campus, what’s true in New

of the Chemistry Building, it

York is true in Wake Forest.

soon graduated to the nearest magnolia whose sheltering

In early 1999, alumni Jim and

arms gave us our own private

Peggy Frisbie gave a magnolia

little world, complete with a

to the Wake Forest Historical

bench, from which we could

Museum with the stipulation

watch and listen to the rest of

that the branches not be cut,

the world go by, and perhaps

but rather be allowed to grow

even steal a kiss with no one

naturally low to the ground.

being the wiser. We felt a great

This magnolia was gifted to

sense of loss when, some years

honor those graceful, sweeping

later, we observed that those

branches that served as play-

lovely old branches no longer

grounds for “children” of all

swept down to the ground,

ages and were so much a part

and that our little private

of Wake Forest, harbored many

world no longer existed.” –

a pair of courting and sparking

Grady & Ann Patterson, classes

sweethearts back when they at-

of ’48, ’51

tended the college. We decided to contact several alums and

“We didn’t use those mag-

invite them to share, spouses

nolias for shade; we used

willing, their recollections of

them for ‘shading out’ out-

romance under the magnolias.

siders! There was no better fun than mad whoopee under

“Wake Forest in the late ’40s was a church-sponsored school and courtship was very different from

a magnolia.” – Harold “Rick” & Mattie Greene Riddick, classes of ’49, ’48 

what I perceive it to be today. Privacy was not a part of the occasion. We went to the movies, played ping-pong in the basement of the religion building, or strolled around the campus. On those strolls we found that many of the magnolia trees had concrete benches under them and branches that draped toward the ground, which allowed a little privacy. Peggy and I have fond memories of the magnolias on 50 50

Special thanks to Jennifer Smart, Gabriel Lauro, Kent Lower, and Deana Vassar. Amy Pierce lives in Wake Forest’s Mill Village, where she is a writer, minister, and spiritual counselor. She can be reached at 919-554-2711 or visit www.authenticself.us.

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