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C L U S T E R O F C O L O R . . . H E AV E N LY H Y D R A N G E A S • S P R I N G D E S I G N F O R E C A S T • W E D D I N G W H I M S Y • P E S T O T O T H E R E S C U E K N I F E S K I L L S F O R T H E H O M E C H E F • RU G S 1 0 1 • N I P S P R I N G A L L E RG I E S I N T H E B U D • T H E O R I G I N O F FA R M T O TA B L E A F R E S H S P I N O N C I N C O D E M AYO • O U T D O O R P R I VAC Y • M E M O R A B L E P E T P H O T O G R A P H Y • S P R I N G I N T O AC T I O N • A N D M O R E

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A WORD FROM THE PUBLISHER

This is the time of year to celebrate all things spring … spring is a time of rejuvenation and revitalization. With its warmer days, longer evenings, and spirit of renewal, the glory of spring helps to melt away the memories of winter’s chill. It’s a time of transition and a time to refresh … and with this issue of CIRCA Magazine, we explore how you can refresh the many aspects of your life with insightful information, words of wisdom, and expert editorial. So whether you’re looking to fill your calendar with exciting adventures, tap into your inner chef, update your home’s interior, or enhance its exterior, this issue of CIRCA is all you need. And here’s just a sampling of what you’ll find on the following pages … Spring offers a multitude of opportunities to enjoy all that Mother Nature has to offer. “Spring Into Action” describes an array of area events that are sure to provide a family-filled season of fun and entertainment, while “Driveable Destinations” details the charm that awaits you in the quaint city of Charlottesville, Virginia if you’re feeling the need for a little weekend escape. Looking to stay a little more local? “Around The Triangle” offers many suggestions for spending quality time with your furry family member so Fido can enjoy all that this magnificent time of year is known for. Speaking of your favorite four-legged friend … “Memorable Pet Photography” provides tips and techniques for capturing fantastic photos of your pet. So while out and about enjoying the season with your pup, keep in mind these helpful hints. And if your dog is one who experiences a bit of stress and anxiety, don’t miss “Reducing Stress” to learn how quality time together can help you both enjoy a happier, healthier life. Spring presents a time to break out of that culinary rut you’ve been in, or lighten up your family’s fare. “Pesto to the Rescue” shows how you can create your own versions of pesto that will surely delight any palate, while “A Fresh Spin On Cinco De Mayo” provides delicious recipes to bring tastes from south of the border to your table. But before tackling these delectable dishes, be sure to read “Knife Skills” for cutlery tips that all home chefs should know. Spring is a time to embrace all that is new and fresh … including where you spend most of your time. “Spring Design Forecast” details what’s on trend these days when it comes to interior decorating so you can give your living spaces a springtime makeover. “Rugs 101” is here to educate you for making the best buying decisions if you’re looking to purchase floor coverings, and “Spring Cleaning” reminds us that now is the perfect time to tackle the daunting task of cleaning the bathroom, making it fresh and spotless once again. The warmer weather invites us to spend more time outside, so take advantage of it and spruce up your outdoor living area … your ordinary landscape will thank you. “Cluster Of Color – Heavenly Hydrangeas” educates on the various species that are popular in our area, and how to best care for them so they bloom in all their grandeur. If you’re ready to check things off that home improvement list, especially that privacy hedge you’ve been talking about for years, peruse “Outdoor Privacy” first, so you can make the right planning and planting decisions. As always, we thank you for bringing us into your home each quarter, and for the opportunity to help you benefit from this season of revitalization. I hope you enjoy reading this issue as much as I enjoyed putting it together. And please be sure to visit our many advertisers in the community who are here to also serve you. May you savor this wonderful spring season, and I’ll see you again soon!


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Spring Into Action – Get Out And About And Celebrate Spring Around Town

8 Spring Clean – Tackling The Bathroom

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Spring’s Design Forecast

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Custom Home Building – The Shift From “Downsizing” To “Righsizing”

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Nip Spring Allergies In The Bud

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Bug Off – Good News Concerning Zika Virus

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Rugs 101 – What You Need To Know To Pick The Perfect Rug

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Knife Skills – Cutlery Tips For The Home Chef

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Wedding Whimsy – Serving Up A Sweet New Trend

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Reducing Stress – Leash Your Dog ... And Unleash Your Endorphins, Stress, And Anxiety

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Making Memories While Celebrating Mom And Dad

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Driveable Destinations – Charlottesville, Virginia

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Around The Triangle – Fun Area Springtime To-Dos For You And Your Pet

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A Fresh Spin On Cinco De Mayo

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Outdoor Privacy

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Orthodontics: Why Do We Do It?

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A Woman’s Life – A Timeline Journey

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Pesto To The Rescue

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Brace Yourself For An Orthodontic “Emergency”

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Farm To Table – The Origins Of The Movement

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Staying Safe

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Clusters of Color – Heavenly Hydrangeas

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Memorable Pet Photography – Tips And Techniques For Capturing Fantastic Photos Of Your Pet

52 Let’s Get Started – And Keep The Journey To Being Our Best Selves Going 54 Our Heritage Revisited – That Same Small Town In Each Of Us

PUBLISHER & EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Kent Lower CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Shannon Arner Tina Mast Rhonda Benvie Stacey Moritz Anna Bolton Cheryl Nelson Christina Bowman Todd Nelson Ben Case Amy Pierce Margarita Cohen Monique M. Rogers Patti Fralix Jennifer Smart Jennifer Gasque Kelly Trimyer Dr. Jason Gladwell UNC Rex Healthcare Dr. Alexa Gonzalez WakeMed ENT Holly Hopkins Thomas Walters Gregory Mack Kasey Wright Dr. James P. Martin John Young CONTACT INFORMATION BallPointe Publishing & Design, LLC P.O. Box 1182 Wake Forest, NC 27588 919.453.2555 • info@circamagazine.com www.circamagazine.com ADVERTISING SALES 919.453.2555 • info@circamagazine.com MANAGERS Kent Lower & Mitch Lower Printed by Theo Davis Printing, Inc.

Nick Honeycutt 919.380.5949 • nhoneycutt@theodavis.com Publisher Photo by Christina Bowman Photography, LLC

LIKE US ON FACEBOOK FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @CIRCA_Magazine FOLLOW US ON INSTAGRAM circa_magazine

AD SPACE RESERVATIONS April / May / June 2017: May 19, 2017 CIRCA Magazine is published quarterly by BallPointe Publishing & Design, LLC. All rights reserved. No part of this magazine may be reproduced or transmitted without the written permission of the publisher. Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained within; however, BallPointe Publishing & Design assumes no liability for accuracy or omissions.


SPRING INTO

ACTION GET OUT AND ABOUT AND CELEBRATE SPRING AROUND TOWN

BY ANNA BOLTON

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he Town of Wake Forest is offering area residents an incredible array of fun and exciting events over the next few months. Craving a concert? The Town is sponsoring several live music series this season, and there’s even a “Wake Forest LIVE” webpage and Facebook page to help you keep track of all the live music events happening around town. But that’s not all. Starting in April, Wake Forest also offers an impressive lineup of “Wake Forest Outdoors” events, guaranteed to help you shake the winter blues and welcome the return of glorious spring weather. From Friday Night on White and Six Sundays in Spring to the Arbor Day Celebration and Family Movie Nights at Joyner Park, there’s no shortage of first class entertainment – all at no cost to you!

EASTER EGG HUNT The Wake Forest Parks, Recreation & Cultural Resources Department (PRCR) will host its annual Easter Egg Hunts on Saturday, April 8. Presented by Primrose School of Heritage Wake Forest, the festivities will take place at E. Carroll Joyner Park, 701 Harris Road, beginning at 10:00 AM. PRCR will offer several egg hunts for children of different ages, along with an egg-ceptional Egg Hunt for children with special needs. The event will also feature food vendors and Easter-themed arts and crafts activities in the Joyner Park Amphitheater. In the event of inclement weather, all hunts will be moved to the Flaherty Park Community Center (1226 N. White Street). For more information, visit www.wakeforestnc.gov and search “Egg Hunt.”

in Downtown or enjoy delicious food from several food trucks that will be onsite. Event sponsors include the Exclusive Title Sponsor: White Street Brewing Company; Exclusive Radio Sponsor: iHeart Media; Stage Sponsor: Gladwell Orthodontics; Dance Floor Sponsor: McPherson Family Eye Care; Wrist Band Sponsor: Back Alley Coffee Roasters; Premier Sponsors: Mitchell Heating & Cooling, Capital Powersports, Sam’s Club, Nu Image Surgical and Dental Implant Center, Wells Family Dentistry, The Rolesville Buzz, The Wake Forest Weekly, and The News & Observer; Partner Sponsors: Coastal Credit Union, Dirty Dogs Spa, Wake Forest Acoustical Corporation, B&W Hardware, Tuscan Ridge Animal Hospital, Pure Line Plumbing, Sole Dimensions, CIRCA Magazine, Break Through Physical Therapy, Lowes Foods, Stanley Martin Homes, Birkner Insurance, Fidelity Bank, Chick-fil-A, and 27587 Magazine; and Supporting Sponsors: Carillon Assisted Living, Candlewood Suites, Rainbow Child Care Center, and Heritage Urgent & Primary Care and Heritage Med Spa. For more information, visit www.wakeforestnc.gov and search “Friday Night on White.”

ARBOR DAY CELEBRATION AND TREE SEEDLING GIVEAWAY

FRIDAY NIGHT ON WHITE

Wake Forest’s annual Arbor Day Celebration, featuring an Expo and Tree Seedling Giveaway, is scheduled for Saturday, April 22, at E. Carroll Joyner Park, 701 Harris Road. The Expo and tree seedling giveaway begin at 11:00 AM, and the Arbor Day ceremony gets underway at noon. Volunteers will distribute free tree seedlings to area residents and the event will feature exhibits and vendor booths, a tree photo booth, face painting, and kids’ activities. For more information, visit www.wakeforestnc.gov and search “Arbor Day.”

Presented by White Street Brewing Co., “Friday Night on White” takes place along South White Street, typically on the second Friday night of each month from April through September. Due to Good Friday falling this year on the second Friday in April, the 2017 series will get underway on April 28. The remaining concerts will occur on the second Friday of each month from May through September. These free concerts begin at 6:00 PM and end at 9:00 PM, and feature a variety of premier local bands. While you’re enjoying the music, be sure to visit the outstanding dining establishments

Grab your lawn chair and head to Joyner Park for the 2017 Six Sundays in Spring concert series. Offered on consecutive Sundays from April 30 through June 4, these free concerts get underway at 5:00 PM in the E. Carroll Joyner Park Amphitheater. Food and refreshments will be available for purchase, or you may bring your own picnic. For more information, visit www.wakeforestnc.gov and search “Six Sundays.”

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MUSIC AT MIDDAY Wake Forest now offers Music at Midday in spring! Area residents are invited to enjoy local musical talent in the Town Hall’s Centennial Plaza every Thursday in May from noon – 1:00 PM. Assorted dessert food truck vendors will be onsite during each concert, so grab your lunch and come enjoy the tunes. For more information, visit www.wakeforestnc.gov and search “Midday Music.”

ing interactive education stations. Set up throughout the park, the stations will offer both children and adults a unique opportunity to experience the wonders of nature while learning about the environment. As part of the Expo, attendees will have the opportunity to get an up-close look at some of the living things you might encounter on the trails. For more information, visit www.wakeforestnc.gov and search “Trails Day.”

FAMILY MOVIE NIGHTS AT JOYNER PARK

WAKE FOREST CHARITY CAR SHOW

HISTORIC CEMETERY WALKING TOUR

The Wake Forest Charity Car Show is Saturday, June 17, from 9:00 AM – 2:00 PM in Downtown Wake Forest. Benefitting several area charities, this free event will showcase vehicles of all makes and models, including muscle cars, sports cars, pony cars, classic and antique autos, street rods, and trucks. Presented by Grand Sponsor Chris Leith Dodge/Ram, the show will feature a “Take-Apart-T” Model T assembly demonstration, the Leith Kia Monster Truck, the Wake Forest Fire Department’s Jaws of Life, and assorted food vendors. In the event of rain, the exhibit will be June 24. For more information, visit www.wakeforestnc.gov and search “Car Show.”

The 2017 Historic Wake Forest Cemetery Walking Tour will offer unique insight into the lives of Wake Forest residents from generations past. The tour will take place on Saturday, May 13, from 9:30 AM - 12:30 PM, at the Wake Forest Cemetery located at 400 N. White Street. This event is free and open to the public, and parking is available within the cemetery grounds. In the event of rain, the tour will be May 20. For more information, visit www.wakeforestnc.gov and search “Cemetery Tour.”

Always be the first to know about Town of Wake Forest announcements, programs, and special events by signing up for E-Notifier at www.wakeforestnc.gov/enotifier.aspx, downloading the Town of Wake Forest app at www.wakeforestnc.gov/app.aspx, visiting the town’s website at www.wakeforestnc.gov, or following the town on social media @TownofWakeForest. 

The Parks, Recreation and Cultural Resources Department is delighted to offer Family Movie Nights at Joyner Park. Movie Nights are scheduled for May 20, June 24, July 29, and August 12, starting at 8:30 PM. Admission is free and assorted food vendors will be onsite selling snacks and beverages. Area residents planning to attend are encouraged to arrive early, as viewing space may be limited. Find out the name of the movie to be shown by calling the Special Events Hotline at 919-556-7063. For more information, visit www.wakeforestnc.gov and search “Movie Nights.”

NATIONAL TRAILS DAY The Town of Wake Forest will celebrate National Trails Day on Saturday, June 3, from 9:00 AM – 1:00 PM at Joyner Park. The free event will include an Environmental Education Expo featur-

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Anna Bolton is the marketing and business relations specialist for the Town of Wake Forest. To learn more about town events, sponsorship opportunities, and how you can be involved, contact Anna at 919-610-4916 or abolton@wakeforestnc.gov.

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Inspect and discard all expired stuff. If you have unused prescription meds, bring them to your pharmacy for proper disposal or find out if your city or town offers a drug take-back program. Expired OTC meds can go right into the trash. Be sure to inspect all lotions, creams, and makeup items too, as many have surprisingly short shelf lives. Toothbrushes should be replaced about once every three months, and be sure to store new ones in an upright position to enable complete air drying between uses. Purge the excess. As bathrooms tend to have limited space, give careful consideration to everything you store there. Is there a curling wand that gets used only two or three times a year, but is taking up precious real estate? Are there five hair brushes, where one might do? Are you storing large refill containers of shampoos and conditioners bought at wholesale clubs? Remove rarely-used items to a different location, such as a linen closet. The less you keep in your bathroom, the more functional it becomes and the easier it will be to keep clean and tidy all week long.

BY TODD AND CHERYL NELSON

SPRING

CLEAN E TACKLING THE BATHROOM

very room in your home needs a deeper-than-usual clean and refresh at least once or twice a year. With its fresh air and tone of rebirth and renewal, there is no time like spring for finding the inspiration to get it all done. Here are five tips for tackling the ever-daunting bathroom this spring.

Get into the nooks and crannies. Bathrooms have plenty of tiny, inconvenient-to-clean spaces that you might pass over on regular daily or weekly cleanings. For example, when is the last time you dusted out the narrow space between your toilet tank and the wall? Or the last time you cleaned just under and around the lid of the tank? Both are great spaces for mildew and other germs to hang out and multiply. Other oft neglected spots include around the bases of faucets and fixtures where soap scum and grit builds up and hardens, often requiring scraping for a true clean. While you’re at it, take a good look at your grout, which can usually be brightened up with the right cleaner, a small sturdy brush, and a bit of elbow grease. 8

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Do make room for critical supplies. No one wants to be the person using a bathroom when it runs out of toilet paper, hand soap, or towels. Nice baskets filled with unwrapped toilet paper rolls and a soap display add decorative elements to your bathroom, while also making family members and guests feel most comfortable. Pre-moistened wipes or a spray bottle and clean rag strategically placed make it easy for you and family members to wipe up toothpaste gobs, stray hairs, and other small daily messes. If you ever entertain overnight guests, extra new toothbrushes are convenient and helpful items to keep on hand as well. Get organized. If your bathroom often resembles a jumble sale, it might be worth investing in a few elegant, yet simple and inexpensive organizing solutions. Think wooden drawer organizers, canvas totes, shower caddies, and the like. Refresh your look. Your bathroom is one of the easiest and least expensive rooms to completely re-style with a new look or color scheme, especially if floors, counters, and tile are white or neutral in tone. Consider changing up your shower curtain, bath mat, or towels and “shopping” at home for things you might repurpose to add style and keep your bathroom organized. A china sugar bowl, for example, makes a great decorative container for cotton balls or tooth-floss picks, while a shallow serving tray can be a great way to corral lots of small items you want close by, such as lotions, creams, and perfume bottles. There are also hundreds of chic, decorative paper designs available at low costs for lining shelves and adding visual pop to the insides of bathroom cabinets and drawers.  Todd and Cheryl Nelson are the co-owners of MaidPro of Raleigh and Wake Forest. For cleaning tips, visit www.maidpro.com/ raleigh-north or call 919-871-9996.

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live music

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food

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beer & wine

begins

April 28 with

The Magic Pipers Band 6-9 pm South White Street downtown wake forest free admission wakeforestnc.gov

series continues on the second friday of each month, may-september

ProAudio

& Light Inc.

S P O N S O R S

STAY CONNECTED

TUSCAN RIDGE

w w w. r o l e s v i l l e b u z z . c o m

ANIMAL HOSPITAL

Ads N’ Art | Candlewood Suites | Carillon Assisted Living | Heritage Med Spa | Heritage Urgent & Primary Care | Rainbow Childcare

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KNIFE

SKILLS

CUTLERY TIPS FOR THE HOME CHEF

BY HOLLY HOPKINS

Do you have a nice collection of shiny knives in the knife block on your counter or tucked in your utensil drawer? Most people do, but don’t really know how to use them. Are they sharp enough to get the job done in your kitchen? Do you know how to hold one properly to give you the best grip and angle to make cutting safer, easier, and faster? Would you love to have readily available cut vegetables to use in your cooking? You may have seen a great demo on a cooking show or even watched some tutorials online, but it

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never hurts to hear it again. hef Mario is very passionate about knife skills and has taught many a “kitchen warrior” during his time. He even plans to start an open kitchen “Knife Skills Sunday” class to pass on his wisdom and give people the space and equipment with which to practice. With a few tips from a pro, good tools, and a little practice, you too can master that knife and turn those veggies into healthy snacks, a delicious accompaniment to your meal, colorful and crisp additions to a pasta salad, or nice bites in a homemade soup – all prepped with your own, skillful hands.

the Santoku, as the blade size and shape work great for most kitchen cutting tasks. You may also want to invest in a knife steel to keep the edge honed on your knife for easy slicing and dicing. Speaking of sharp knives, if you haven’t used those knives in a while, you may want to take them somewhere to get them professionally sharpened. A good test: if you can’t easily cut through the skin of a tomato, your knife is too dull. A sharp knife will allow you to slice through veggies with little pressure, making it easier on you and reducing the chances of slicing yourself in the process. Pick a knife that fits well in your hand – it shouldn’t be too heavy or too light. Another essential tool is your actual cutting surface. Use a cutting board that is big enough to work on comfortably with enough space for the food item you are in the process of cutting, as well as some of the partially prepped items that are awaiting their final chop. To make your task a little easier, place a rubber mat (a piece of rubber drawer liner works good) or even a folded, wet paper towel under your cutting board – this will keep it from sliding around, giving you a stable surface for your slicing and dicing fun. Now, the most important tip: hold the knife properly. Master

Of course, if you want to have good knife skills and be comfortable cutting like a “kitchen warrior,” a good knife is your first necessity. It is an essential tool for every chef and should be a staple in your kitchen. There are two styles of knives that work best for basic slicing and dicing in your kitchen: the classic chef ’s knife and the Santoku – both serve the same purpose, so whichever you choose is a matter of personal preference. Chef Mario is personally a fan of 10

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the correct grip by following these simple steps: hold the knife in an upright position, grasping it between your index finger and thumb on the metal, right at the point where the blade meets the handle. Then, wrap the rest of your fingers around the handle. This will give you the best grip and the most control over your movement. Do not lay your index finger across the top of the blade; doing so will actually cause you to lose some of the stability you have when holding the knife in a proper grasp.

– 2 small zucchini, diced – 2 cups shredded green cabbage – 2 cups small florets, cauliflower – 2 cups small florets, broccoli – 6 cups water, enough to cover veggies – 1 tablespoon hot sauce – 2 tablespoons soy sauce – 1/2 teaspoon salt or to taste – 1/4 teaspoon black pepper or to taste – 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice, optional Put garlic, vegetables, and water into a large soup pot. Cover and bring to a boil over high heat; reduce heat to low and simmer

Once you have your knife under control, you need to protect your non-knife hand by employing “the claw.” Curl your fingers inward, almost like you are gently holding a small ball, and keep your thumb tucked in. In this form, your “claw’ hand will gently hold and guide your food items while you cut. With your fingers curved inward, if you slip with the knife, there shouldn’t be any fingertips in harm’s ways. But, as always, remember that you are using a sharp knife, so take it slowly and easily until you get comfortable with the utensil.

10 minutes. Season to taste with hot sauce, soy sauce, salt, pepper, and lemon juice. Use any number of vegetables in this soup to make it full of all the things you love.  Holly Hopkins has spent many years working with food, starting off at her Grandma’s elbow, making wedding cakes and cookies galore. Since then, she has been a manager and business owner and is thrilled to be combining her passions for high quality food and superior customer service at Chef Mario’s. She may be reached at chefmario@bellsouth.net, 919781-4141, or visit www.chefmario.com.

A few simple tricks and tips can make you feel like a master chef in your own kitchen. So spend a relaxing weekend morning this spring with some great music, a cup of coffee, and get chopping. You can turn your handiwork into roasted veggies and tuck them into small packages in your freezer for many uses. Keep some cut and ready to munch on when you need a snack and that chocolate croissant is calling your name. Or prep the following yummy Zero Guilt Veggie Soup for dinner. But as always – don’t be afraid and practice, practice, practice!

ZERO GUILT VEGGIE SOUP

Makes approximately 12 servings. (We call it “bottomless” as you can eat as much as you want and remain guilt-free!) – 2 medium garlic cloves, minced – 1 medium onion, diced – 2 medium carrots, diced – 1 medium sweet red pepper, diced – 1 medium celery stalk, diced

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In this age of Pinterest, when brides and grooms can find inspiration for every detail of their big day, donut displays can be adapted to fit any venue – from the rustic elegance of a restored barn (a donut bar on antique plating, please) to the modern sophistication of a converted Downtown warehouse (perfect for a clean and simple donut tower). Couples have nailed other thoughtful touches like to-go boxes for after-party snacking and whimsical donut tower toppers with slogans like “Donuts for each other” and “All you need is love. And maybe a donut.” Some brides and grooms have even served wedding donuts perched on champagne glasses filled with milk, while others have paired donut bars with coffee stations. If you or a loved one are in the throes of planning this special day, deciding upon which sweet treats to serve your guests is likely on your to-do list. A customary wedding cake is certainly an option, but if you’re unfettered by tradition, the possibilities are endless.  BY KELLY TRIMYER

WEDDING

WHIMSY

Kelly Trimyer is owner and on-site operator of Duck Donuts locations in North Raleigh and Cary. Duck Donuts’ signature vanilla cake donuts are produced on demand, customized with a variety of icings, toppings, and drizzles, and served warm to customers. Check out www.facebook.com/duckdonuts.RaleighNC to learn more about seasonal flavors, customer specials, and fun and festive catering options.

SERVING UP A SWEET NEW TREND Perhaps it started with elopements. Or could it have been the personalized vows? Maybe it was the brides who skipped the white dress. It seems that modern couples are more eager than ever to express their unique personalities through their wedding celebrations, and many wedding traditions are no longer “must-haves.” One of the latest

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traditions in question? The classic wedding cake. very week, we hear from couples who want to serve donuts instead of cake at their weddings. What’s the appeal? The majority say they simply don’t like cake very much, and are unwilling to foot the bill for an expensive dessert that they’re not excited to eat themselves. Many also like the idea of offering sweet, savory, and unusual flavors to their guests. For instance, maple iced donuts with bacon pieces or strawberry shortcake donuts are delicious and memorable treats that all guests are sure to enjoy. 12

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REDUCING

STRESS

LEASH YOUR DOG ... AND UNLEASH YOUR ENDORPHINS, STRESS, AND ANXIETY BY SHANNON ARNER

You have likley heard your co-workers or friends say how “stressed out” they are, or how they may need to take a “mental health day” off from work. It seems stress and anxiety in our culture go hand in hand these days. But what about our dogs? Studies have shown that owning and/or interacting with dogs helps to reduce stress and anxiety, but what about when your dog is stressed? How do you know when your dog needs a mental health day or a relief from the stress and

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anxiety he/she is experiencing?

From your pet’s perspective, a walk is a great way to expel some of that pent-up energy, and release some of the anxiety he/she is experiencing from you being away all day. Many pet health professionals recommend that a healthy, orthopedically-sound dog receive at least two 30-minute walks each day. That is about the same as we as humans need to stay healthy, so it’s a win-win. You’ve probably heard the term “A tired dog is a happy dog;” – meaning that if Fido gets the exercise he needs, he is generally happier and healthier. If the task seems overwhelming to you, take small steps. Start with once a day. As soon as you arrive home from work, leash your pup and go for a walk. Not only does this release endor-

ou may think your pup has a pretty cushy life – no bills to pay, no rush hour traffic to fight, no deadline pressures at work … but there are plenty of things that bring your dog anxiety. You may not know it, but your stressors and reactions bring about anxiety for your furry one as well. If you are tense and anxious, your dog picks up on that. If you are arguing with your spouse or children, your pup begins to tense up and may even cower in the corner, waiting for the tension to die down. Stress is unhealthy for you, and your best friend. The things that constitute a healthy lifestyle for humans are very similar to what bring about positive health for your dog: quality nutrition, exercise, regular checkups at the doctor (veterinarian), and a little TLC. Dogs need stimulation and activity to make them happy and healthy. When dogs lack some of these healthy contributors, they become stressed, anxious, and often, destructive. He or she may chew up your shoes, the corner of the rug, or rip your favorite chair into a million pieces of confetti, just waiting to greet you upon your arrival home. This is enough to make anyone upset; but before you get angry, ask why this behavior is occurring. Are you meeting your pet’s needs? You have a busy life, so how can you be a great pet parent by giving your dog all he/she needs, and lead a healthy lifestyle for yourself? You can do it with your dog. 14

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phins, it will also remove some of the end-of-day anxiety you have from work, traffic, etc. and will ease your tense muscles from a long day at the office. Plus, you bond with your dog when walking, creating memories together. If you have extra time after work or on the weekend, you can make that walk into a venture on the greenway or a hike on nearby trails. We are fortunate to live in a beautiful area, perfect for hikes, so you and Fido can enjoy what is available by Mother Nature, at no cost to you, except a little of your time. It is a small price to pay for both you and your pup’s health – and for he/she to view you as pet parent of the year! If the afternoons or evenings seem too daunting, then start your day with a morning walk with your pup. This is a great way to get the day moving and your pooch on the way to feeling tired and less anxious when you leave for work. Similar to their human parents, pets have packed on the pounds over the last decade. According to the Association for Pet Obesity Prevention, more than half of the cats and dogs in this country are overweight or obese. The extra weight brings forth the increased risk for diabetes, heart disease, and other illnesses – no different than humans. More illness and disease mean more money spent at the veterinarian’s office, and more stress and anxiety for you and your dog. It can become a vicious cycle if you allow it. The good news is that some of the anxiety you and your pup have can be remedied simply by some fresh air. So, what do you do if you are in a super busy household where time just doesn’t seem to be an option? Often, the rush of getting the kids to school and hurrying out of the house to beat the morning traffic can leave your furry pal unable to get the exercise he/she needs to feel comfortable with being left at home all day. Then, when you get home, you may be too tired from the busy work day, helping the kids with homework, preparing dinner, and getting ready for it all to begin again the next day. In cases where time is just not a possibility, you can delegate your dog walks to a professional pet sitter/dog walker. He or she can come in and walk your dog in the mornings, midday, or evenings. Having a dog as a part of your family means providing the necessities he/she needs. There is no shame in hiring a professional to take care of your pet, similar to hiring a landscaper, housecleaner, or a nanny for your child. It may take some time to get into these habits of living healthier with your pet, but once you do, you’ll be happier, healthier, and less stressed – and so will your pup.  Shannon Arner is a Certified Professional Pet Sitter and the owner/founder of Pet ’n Nanny LLC. Pet ’n Nanny provides professional pet sitting/dog walking services to Wake Forest, Rolesville, and North Raleigh communities. For more information, please visit www.petnnanny.com.

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For aficionados of acoustic guitars, the Rockbridge instrument is akin to the Holy Grail. The partnership between Ray and cofounder Brian Calhoun dates back to 2002, when the craftsmen came together with an idea for an old-style instrument that would have a unique, new sound. The goal was to create a guitar somewhere in scale between a Martin and a Gibson, with fresh new clarity and a somewhat vintage feel. Over the past 15 years, they have succeeded beyond their wildest dreams. Rockbridge guitars have appeared on stages, in private collections, and at music festivals around the world. It’s a passion for Ray, and a growing source of pride for both Charlottesville and the Town of Wake Forest.

BY JENNIFER SMART

DRIVEABLE

DESTINATIONS CHARLOTTESVILLE, VIRGINIA ... MONTICELLO, MICHIE TAVERN, AND THE RISING FAME OF ROCKBRIDGE GUITARS

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ur story of Charlottesville, Virginia will begin with the astounding success of the Rockbridge Guitar Company. There are two reasons for this. First, it may be the only famous thing in Charlottesville that you don’t already know about. Second, this thriving business that produces handcrafted guitars for artists including Keith Urban, Dave Matthews, and Mary Chapin Carpenter was co-founded by Wake Forest native Randall Ray, who as a boy learned woodcarving from his father in our own small northern Wake County town.

Of course, the Rockbridge Guitar Company is but a blip in the epic sweep of people, places, and things that make up the history of the greater Charlottesville area. The shop is only a short stroll from the historic Downtown Mall, which ranks as one of the city’s most popular public attractions. This is where you’ll find more than 120 shops and 30 restaurants, red brick walking paths, fountains, sidewalk cafes, and shade trees. It’s a lovely stop for tourists visiting in the spring or summer months. The Downtown Mall also has convenient parking and a free trolley connecting it to the University of Virginia along West Main Street. Chartered in 1819 by the Virginia General Assembly, the University of Virginia stands on a piece of land once owned by our fifth president, James Monroe, with buildings famously designed by our third president (and principal author of the Declaration of Independence), Thomas Jefferson. Jefferson also planned the curriculum. The heart of his “academical village” is the historic Rotunda. Rebuilt following a destructive fire in 1895, the Rotunda was last restored in the 1970s and is now undergoing its latest major renovation. Charlottesville is also home to Monticello, Jefferson’s “essay in architecture.” The name means “little mountain” in Italian, the mansion once stood on a 5,000 acre plantation, and Jefferson’s process of designing, building, imagining, and reworking the home – along with its outbuildings, gardens, and grounds – covered a time span of nearly 50 years. The initial structure was built with local brick, lumber, stone, and limestone, with additional enhancements added later. These include the central hallway, the mezzanine bedroom floor, and the first octagonal dome ever constructed in the United States. Visitors to Monticello enter the property through a freestanding Visitor Center where tickets are purchased for the shuttle ride to the main house. The property is open year-round with guided tours that focus on the first floor, the plantation’s slave history, and the extensive gardens and grounds. Those willing to pay higher ticket prices can also gain access to the private rooms on the home’s second floor. Yet another option allows visi-

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tors interested in the fascinating history of Sally Hemings and her family to register for a small-group interactive experience that includes both the mansion and Mulberry Row, the hub of dwellings, workshops, and storehouses that served as the working center of the plantation. The Hemings family is one of the most researched and best documented enslaved families in our nation’s history, and the descendants have provided information and oral histories that help illustrate the challenges faced by Americans whose family stories include ancestral links to both slaves and slave owners.

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Not far from Monticello is Michie Tavern, where traditional Southern dishes are served buffet style, making this an excellent place for lunch. Built by Corporal William Michie following the Revolutionary War, the tavern opened in 1784 in a remote part of Albemarle County and quickly became a popular stop for politically-minded locals. It was large and spacious enough to host debates, dances, church services, entertainment, and traveling doctors and dentists. The property operated as an eatery and inn until the Civil War, then as a private home for the next 70 years. In 1927, the nation’s first upswing in automobile traffic led to motorists searching for tourist stops. Michie Tavern was taken apart and the pieces were numbered, trucked 17 miles, and fully reassembled just half a mile from Jefferson’s plantation. The tavern is now a Virginia historic landmark. The ambience is entirely authentic, the staff is dressed in period costume, and the “bill of fare” includes fried chicken, hickory smoked pork barbecue, black-eyed peas seasoned with country ham, stewed tomatoes, and cornbread and biscuits.

Wake Forest, NC /collegeSE

With Charlottesville a little more than a three hour drive from Wake Forest, we managed this itinerary over the course of a very long day trip – though in retrospect it seems a destination with too many highlights to pack into a single afternoon. Next time we go, we’ll stay for the weekend.  Charlottesville has a robust online presence and top attractions are easily found through a Google search. Most mapped routes rely on I-85 North when traveling from northern Wake County. If you prefer only highway driving, aim for Richmond then head west. Jennifer Smart is assistant director at the Wake Forest Historical Museum. Wake Forest College Birthplace Society Vice-President Durward Matheny and his wife Shirley are the proud godparents of Randall Ray, cofounder of the Rockbridge Guitar Company.

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A FRESH

SPIN ON CINCO DE MAYO BY GREGORY MACK

2017 marks the 155th anniversary of Cinco de Mayo, the bicultural Mexican holiday that Americans love to celebrate with colorful plates of Hispanic delectable delicacies – like enchiladas verdes, carnitas, fajitas, arepas, tacos, chili, and nachos – or our favorite cervezas and margaritas. But, do you know why we celebrate Cinco de Mayo? Before you say, “the food,” which in some ways is correct, let’s look into the

C

original reason Cinco de Mayo is celebrated in the first place. inco de Mayo celebrates Mexico’s victory over France in the Battle of Puebla in 1862. In 1861, Benito Juárez, Mexico’s former president, was forced to default on the country’s debts to three European governments – Britain, France, and Spain. Britain and Spain both peacefully negotiated with Mexico, but France’s ruler Napoleon III saw an opportunity to expand his empire into Mexico. He sent 6,000 French troops to attack Puebla de Los Angeles, a small town in eastern Mexico, en route to Mexico City. Juárez gathered a force of 2,000 Mexicans of indigenous and Mexican-American descent to ward off the French fleet. On May 5, 1862, the Mexican troops won the battle, losing less than 100 men and killing nearly 500 French soldiers. With this victory, the Mexican resistance movement saw increased support and gained a new sense of purpose. Today, we observe Cinco de Mayo to celebrate our neighbor’s symbolic victory and because several Mexican-Americans fought during the battle. A great way to celebrate Mexico’s heritage, culture, and influence on the American way of life is through adopt18

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ing Mexican recipes into your diet plan for Cinco de Mayo – and the rest of the year. Let’s look at a couple of healthy recipes for Cinco de Mayo to bring tastes from south of the border to your table this May.

MEXICAN PULLED PORK WITH JICAMA CORN COLE SLAW ON A TOSTADA In the South, we love our good ol’ pulled pork and coleslaw, but it’s always nice to reinvent the wheel. Try this colorful, South American variant of a southeastern classic for your Cinco de Mayo celebration. Pulled Pork – 8 pounds pork butt – 1 bunch cilantro, coarsely chopped – 2 oranges, cut into quarters – 2 limes, cut into quarters – 1 quart white vinegar – 1 quart water – Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste Cole Slaw – 2 cups jicama, julienned – 3 cups green cabbage, julienned – 1½ cups corn kernels – 1 jalapeño, julienned – ½ cilantro, coarsely chopped – 1½ cups cider vinegar – 2 cups mayonnaise – ¾ cup sugar – 1 bag of any style tostada – Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste

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Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Place the pork in a roasting pan with all the pulled pork ingredients, cover with foil, and cook for five hours or until the pork pulls apart easily. Pull the whole pork apart and set aside. Discard the oranges, limes, and liquid.

Cut the salmon into medium-sized dices and place in a bowl. Remove the whole shell and tail of the shrimp and place in the bowl. Add the lime and lemon juice to the seafood mixture, and refrigerate for 12 hours. Look for the shrimp to turn pink – that’s an indication it’s good to go.

In a saucepan, add vinegar and sugar together and bring the mixture to a simmer. Remove the mixture from the heat, and whisk in mayonnaise, salt, and pepper. Set the mixture aside and let it cool. Put the jicama, cabbage, corn, jalapeño, and cilantro in a bowl. Pour the slaw liquid in the bowl, mix well, and refrigerate for two hours.

Pour out one-third of the lime and lemon juice from the seafood mixture. Add all ingredients except avocado to the seafood and toss well. Place the mix into a martini glass, top it with avocado, and enjoy this delicious South American treat.

Now that you’re armed with some delectable dishes, make your Cinco de Mayo celebration the fiesta of the year!  Kroger Culinary Chef Gregory Mack is a highly-experienced chef, earning degrees from both the Lincoln Culinary Institute in Cromwell, Connecticut and the AAS Culinary Arts. Since moving to North Carolina in 2010, Mack has been creating delicious dishes for over three years at Kroger. With ideas for appetizers, main courses, and desserts, he is sure to get anyone excited to cook. This article was written with the help factual information from the Library of Congress and history.com.

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Place the tostado on a plate and cover it with a good amount of warm pulled pork. Top the pulled pork with the cole slaw, garnish, and cilantro leaves.

SALMON AND GULF SHRIMP CEVICHE This tasty appetizer features bright, firm salmon and shrimp, the refreshing flavor of lemon and lime, and a little jalapeño heat. What’s the best part? Once the seafood is marinated, this Cinco de Mayo culinary classic only takes minutes to make, freeing you up to enjoy the fiesta with your friends and family.

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– 1½ pounds clean salmon – 1 pound 21-25 gulf shrimp – 1 medium-sized tomato, diced small – 1 small sweet onion, diced small – 1½ bunches of green onion, cut on the bias – 2 celery stalks, diced small – ½ red and yellow bell pepper, diced small – 15 limes, juiced – ¼ cup fresh cilantro, coarsely chopped – 3 tablespoons avocado oil – ¼ cup fresh parsley, coarsely chopped – 1 jalapeño, diced small – 1 whole avocado, diced small – ½ lemon, juiced – Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste

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OUTDOOR

A

PRIVACY

BY BEN CASE

s spring brings us outside, many homeowners get the itch to take on outdoor home improvement projects. Outdoor areas become the favored living space “in” the home, and one of the most frequent requests we get is for privacy. This can be a challenge for many neighborhood lots, especially when homes push the building envelope and bring us closer to our neighbors.

There are several options depending on the size of the area with which you have to work. Fences, decorative panels, and walls are options, while plantings are typically the most popular and often most cost-effective – but also must grow to complete the effect.

Privacy depends on the lines of sight into or out of the place you are creating. There may be a home just 30 feet away, an unsightly view, or a spot that you would like to feel more secluded. If you are elevated on a deck, you’ll need a taller element for screening than if your vantage point is from a sunken patio. Consider the shadow that large plants will create, and how the airflow will change.

Several plants may fit the bill, and for decades, fast growing evergreens like leyland cypress, green giant arborvitae, or cryptomeria have been go-to choices. They may be fine if you have a large space to cover and plenty of room for them to grow, but they really do need at least 15 – 20 feet to spread out over time. A quick online search for recommended leyland spacing suggested “five feet apart,

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What plants come to mind when you consider plants for privacy? Something evergreen? Something tall and fast-growing?

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or even closer if you want them to fill in sooner,” but please don’t space large growers that close … otherwise, “planter’s remorse” will follow in a few years. True, they will close the gap sooner as a quick-fix, but a plant that is 15 feet tall for a five feet space will soon outgrow and overcrowd it, leading to poor plant health, much more effort needed to prune and maintain, and eventually the need to thin and remove overgrown plants. Consider the longer term and the mature size for a given species after 15-20 years for a more sustainable plant choice. Remember that mature sizes listed for most plants are subjective and you should consider the microclimate, soil type, drainage, and exposure among other variables. A hedge or row of tall, fast-growing evergreens seems like a natural choice for screening a view, but they are often planted much too close to the house foundation, property line, or neighboring plants. The “green wall” approach can quickly swallow a small space, especially if homeowners on each side of the property line are both planting heavily. We often have to remove nice shrubs that were planted two to three feet, or closer, to a home’s foundation years ago and have become major maintenance problems. Few homeowners need a tree that will grow 50 feet for privacy, and there are many smaller-growing choices available. Rather than a monotonous single line of plants, consider a staggered double row, or a mixed border that uses a more natural arrangement of groups or clusters of plants with a more free-flowing design.

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Some plants that I recommend for privacy include relatively newer introductions, such as Red Holly Hybrids. Most of these, like ‘Festive,’ ‘Oakleaf,’ ‘Little Red,’ and ‘Robin,’ will range from 10 – 14 feet in height and 6 – 8 feet in width. Several cultivars of Yew can also make a nice upright but manageable privacy border, including Taxus x media ‘Hicksii’ and Cephalotaxus harringtonia ‘Fastigiata.’ One of the most exciting new plant introductions is the ‘Virginian’ Arborvitae. It is a smaller growing sport of ‘Green Giant’ and appears to max out around 15 feet tall and 8 feet wide (as opposed to 30 – 40 feet tall and 15 feet wide). This is proving to be a perfect plant for screening without outgrowing the smaller landscape, or as an upright accent that won’t get unruly. It is a fast-growing, dense evergreen, and as a bonus, is showing great resistance to bagworms. Availability is a bit limited for now, as growers are still building up their stock, but inquire at local garden centers and they will be happy to locate a source. There is a plant that will fit just about every situation. Just be sure to do your homework on the growth characteristics (and take specs with a grain of salt), consider the microclimate you’re working within, and consult a landscape architect or plant professional if you need more detailed assistance with plant choices.  Ben Case is with Down to Earth Landscapes, located at 3109 Gresham Lake Road in Raleigh. He may be reached at 919-875-8008 or visit www.raleighlandscape.com.

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A WOMAN’S

Female bodies are amazing in what they can do, from childbearing to marathon running. But while a woman’s body has incredible potential, it also brings challenges that change as we age. OB-GYNs see women throughout their lives; here, two of them take us from the teens to the senior years. Katherine Barrett, MD, of Capital Area OB-GYN, and Phelicia Flanagan, MD, of Wilkerson OB-GYN, are both based in Raleigh.

BY 21

SEE A Use your birth control as directed. GYNECOLOGIST. And use condoms in addition to other Some women will start younger, especially if forms of contraception, to help protect they have concerns about reproductive health or against STIs, Dr. Barrett says. contraception. Dr. Flanagan likes women to check in with her before college. “I tell her, you’re coming to the gynecologist, you’re treated as an adult. Anything we discuss, I’m not going to speak about it with your mom unless you tell me to.” FERTILITY STARTS Pap tests to screen for cervical cancer generally begin at 21; talk to your TO DECLINE SLIGHTLY. doctor about how often to get them. That doesn’t mean it’s time to panic, but it does mean it’s time to think REMEMBER STI TESTING. Sexually active women younger about making kids a priority if you know you want them, Dr. Barrett says. “Don’t wait for the perfect time.” than 25 should be tested for gonorrhea and chlamydia annually, because they can lead to infertility and often don’t show any DIVORCES LEAD TO NEW symptoms, Dr. Barrett says. PARTNERS, AND POTENTIALLY S. After marriages end, some women find themselves STI POSTPARTUM STRESS. dating again in their 30s, 40s and 50s. Herpes and HPV Dr. Flanagan sees a lot of anxiety infections are especially prevalent in this population, and depression among moms of babies or young children. “For Dr. Barrett says. a lot of women, managing home life and work life without losing themselves, without feeling like all the responsibility is on them, can FERTILITY be very stressful. There’s an uncertainty: ‘Am I doing this right?’ ” DECLINES OB-GYNs can refer patients to therapy, prescribe antidepressants FURTHER. The number 35 is not a magic or simply provide reassurance. moment when fertility plummets, but the second half of your 30s is definitely HPV TESTING BEGINS. less fertile ground. That said, more and HPV testing is different than a Start more women are having babies after Pap test. A Pap test looks for abnormal cells thinking about your 35. “I would want someone on the cervix that could become cancer; an bone health early. who is that age and trying to have Make sure you get enough HPV test looks for the virus that causes those calcium and do weighttheir first baby not to waste time,” abnormal cells. Many young women get human bearing exercises. Dr. Flanagan says. “If you’ve been papillomavirus (HPV), but the body clears it by trying several months, don’t wait a the time they reach 30. After 30, a positive test year to talk to your doctor.” may trigger more frequent Pap tests.

20s-30s

30+

35-40

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LIFE

Take a journey through this timeline from UNC REX Healthcare to learn about health issues and risks that are unique to women.

40

GET YOUR FIRST MAMMOGRAM, IF YOU’RE AT AVERAGE RISK. Different physician groups now have varied recommendations, but Dr. Flanagan sticks with the old standby of annual mammograms starting at 40. “I may be a little conservative with that because my mom died of breast cancer. But I want the patient to catch breast cancer early.”

40s

PERIMENOPAUSE. Dr. Barrett calls this decade “the peri-40s.” During this time, periods become irregular, and women may struggle with weight or emotional challenges. “It’s the sandwich age where you’re Seek help for pelvic worried about your parents and your children are getting floor disorders. After childbirth, and as estrogen decreases to the age where they’re more difficult,” some women where it with age, urinary incontinence and other Dr. Barrett says. “Marriages can get more just changes their lives problems may develop or worsen. Doctors can prescribe medication, physical therapy stale in the 40s, and women might not completely,” Dr. Flanagan and, in more severe cases, surgery. feel as sexy.” Dr. Barrett sees part of says. Some women her job as helping women through experience hot flashes, vaginal this time. dryness, fatigue and difficulty concentrating. Sometimes, painful intercourse affects women’s MENOPAUSE. relationships. Fortunately, OB-GYNs have a variety of methods for Like getting your treating it, from exercises to medication. first period, the process of stopping them is different for GET A BONE DENSITY SCREENING every woman. “I have some FOR OSTEOPOROSIS. Don’t forget to keep women kind of skate through up your calcium and weight-bearing exercises. White, slim women menopause, and I have are at highest risk of osteoporosis, but it can happen to anyone.

50s

60+

HAVE QUESTIONS?

VISIT REXHEALTH.COM/WOMENS-SERVICES TO LEARN MORE ABOUT WOMEN’S HEALTH. Illustrations by: Christ-Claude Mowandza-Ndinga/UNC Health Care


BY DR. JASON GLADWELL

BRACE YOURSELF FOR AN ORTHODONTIC

“EMERGENCY”

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ost orthodontic patients, at some point, will experience broken brackets, loose bands, or a poking tie wire. While these are common occurrences in the world of braces, there are some simple guidelines to practice at home to help prevent problems and make the braces experience more comfortable.   Should you encounter a problem with your braces, don’t stress! Many of the common orthodontic “emergencies” aren’t really emergencies at all. In some cases, there are simple at-home “quick fixes” you can do in a pinch until you’re able to see your orthodontist.     First of all, if any sort of problem should arise with your braces, 24

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call your orthodontist before performing any type of “at-home fix” – even if it is a tiny problem, we want to stay informed and know what’s going on with you during the entire treatment process. Not only will you need to schedule an appointment for a permanent fix, but your problem could be more serious and require immediate, expert attention.   In general, though, the following problems are fairly common for orthodontic patients and can be temporarily remedied at home:  – Loose bracket or band: If the bracket or band is still attached to wire, leave it in place. If it’s uncomfortable, cover with wax. If it comes out completely, bring it with you to your next appointment. It is important to remember not to connect head gear or elastics to a loose band.  – Wire out of tube: Using a pair of tweezers, try to place the wire back into the tube. Cover with wax if there is discomfort.  – Rotated archware: Try to slide the wire around to the other side. If unsuccessful, place wax on the wire.  – Poking tie wire: Bend the wire back with a spoon or a pencil eraser. If unsuccessful, place wax on the wire.  – Poking archware: Cover with wax or wet cotton.    There are simple guidelines you can follow at home in order to avoid the problems I’ve just listed, most of which have to do with what you eat. It’s widely known that orthodontic patients should stay away from sticky candy like chewing gum and caramel, but there are quite a few other foods that can cause problems for braces. In general, orthodontic patients should stay away from:   – Biting ice: Can cause brackets to loosen.  – Chewing on pens or pencils: Can cause bent archware and/or loose brackets.  – Caramel: Can loosen bands.  – Biting into a whole apple: Can displace brackets.  – Drinking soda or other acid beverages: Can lead to swollen gums, white spots on teeth, and decay.  – Eating nuts, popcorn, hard candy, crunchy foods, gum, or simply picking at your braces: All can cause major problems and break your braces.    In addition to watching what you put in your mouth, it is equally important that patients protect their mouths when playing sports by wearing mouth guards. Whether it’s a relaxed pickup game with friends or the state championships, trauma to teeth – even during “low-contact” games – is very common and a mouth guard is a good idea. Custom mouth guards can be made by most dental offices and are an affordable way to keep your teeth healthy if an accident occurs.  Dr. Jason Gladwell is a Board Certified Specialist in orthodontics and a premier provider for Invisalign. To learn more about Dr. Gladwell and his staff, please visit www.gladwellorthodontics.com. 

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CLUSTERS OF

COLOR THE HEAVENLY HYDRANGEA

BY TINA MAST

Known for their lush foliage and supersized blooms of beautiful spring shades such as clear blues, vibrant pinks, and snowy whites, hydrangeas provide outstanding interest in any spring and summer landscape and old-fashioned charm filling a mason jar or tin vase atop your kitchen table.

COMMON SPECIES IN OUR AREA Big-leaf Hydrangea (aka French Hydrangea, Garden Hydrangea; Hydrangea macrophylia): The most popular and commonly grown group which includes the favorite blue and pink large, rounded cluster of blooms which are produced in summer. Colors are dependent on the pH of the soil and the amount of aluminum it contains. Most grow four feet to eight feet, depending on the cultivar.

BASIC CULTURE Hydrangeas prefer to be planted in moist, well-drained, fertile soils. When planting, amend the soil with leaf mold and/or compost along with soil conditioner to improve drainage if you have a clay soil. If conditions become dry, you will probably have to supply additional water. Mulch your hydrangeas to insulate roots against heat and conserve moisture in the soil. They should be sited in areas where they will receive morning sun and afternoon shade or in bright, dappled shade. When fertilizing, feed hydrangeas with a balanced, slow-release granular food or organic fertilizer in April and May, making sure the formulation is not too high in nitrogen. If there is a lot of rain-

Hydrangea Serrata: Similar to big-leaf hydrangeas, but generally with smaller leaves and flower clusters. This species generally grows to about three feet to five feet and tends to be more cold hardy. Panicled Hydrangea (Hydrangea paniculata): A large grower to about 10 feet to 20 feet, and can be trained into a small tree. It grows quickly and produces large pyramidal panicles of white flowers starting in mid-summer (as the season progresses, they change to pink and stay attractive until about September). These prefer sun, but not a full day’s worth, and require regular moisture. Oakleaf Hydrangea (Hydrangea quercifolia): A trouble-free native plant that is excellent for southern gardens. It bears panicles of white-changing-to-pink flowers from June through July and later. Its attractive leaves are dark green, changing to spectacular scarlet and burgundy in fall. Best with afternoon shade, generally growing to about four feet to six feet tall, sometimes eight feet or taller. Smooth Hydrangea (Hydrangea arborescens): Growing to about three feet to five feet tall, it does well in full shade. In early summer, it produces large globe-shaped flower clusters that start out apple green in color and gradually turn white. The ‘Annabelle’ cultivar is the most commonly available and one of the showiest. 26

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fall during this timeframe, you may want to fertilize again in July. Hydrangeas are generally vigorous, fast-growing, and long-lived plants that are seldom bothered by pests and disease. Their main problem is leaf spot diseases which generally occur late in the season and are common in our humid climate. Pruning requirements for hydrangeas vary by species, so be sure to research your particular plant before you start cutting them back.

FLOWER COLOR Color on big-leaf hydrangeas varies from pink to blue (occasionally white) and is usually dependent on the pH of the soil and the amount of aluminum it contains. The same cultivar can produce completely different flower colors when growing in soils of different pH ranges and aluminum content. Generally, acid soils, such as ours, in the 5 to 6 pH range, produce blue flowers on big-leaf hydrangeas, while more alkaline soils will result in plants with pink flowers. Sunlight can also affect flower color, making white hydrangeas redden or colored hydrangeas fade with too much light. You can change flower color on colored hydrangeas by applying a liquid soil drench. To turn hydrangeas blue, dissolve a tablespoon of aluminum sulfate in a gallon of water and drench the soil around the plant in March, April, and May. A gentler, more environmentally friendly but slower method, is to use an organic fertilizer for acid-loving plants. Apply to the plant in spring and again in early summer. To make flowers pink, dissolve one tablespoon of hydrated lime in a gallon of water and drench the soil around the plant in March, April, and May. Avoid getting the solution on the leaves. This treatment will not change flower color on white hydrangeas.

WHY DIDN’T MINE BLOOM? 1. Incorrect pruning: If you prune the common big-leaf hydrangeas too early, you will cut off the flowering wood. 2. Late frosts: This is not as common in our area, but it still occasionally happens. A late frost can damage buds that have already started to break dormancy in spring weather. 3. Too much nitrogen: If you are feeding with a high nitrogen fertilizer, switch to a lower nitrogen, higher phosphorous fertilizer such as 15-20-15. Nitrogen is represented by the first number in the three-digit sequence. 4. Not enough sun: Hydrangeas are shade tolerant but they do need some sun. Plant in morning sun and afternoon shade or where the plant will receive some later afternoon sun. 5. Not enough water: This can be a problem in drought years. Be sure to supplement with water if it’s dry.  Tina Mast is communications director for Homewood Nursery & Garden Center in Raleigh and can be reached at 919-847-0117 or info@homewoodnursery.com.

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MEMORABLE

PET

PHOTOGRAPHY TIPS AND TECHNIQUES FOR CAPTURING FANTASTIC PHOTOS OF YOUR PET BY CHRISTINA BOWMAN

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lobbery kisses. Snuggles on the couch. Unconditional love. Every day our furry friends add an immense amount of joy to our lives. You most likely snapped a lot of pictures when your pet first joined the family, but have you taken time to really capture the personality of your pet since? Just as we take many photos of our human children, shouldn’t we capture the joys of our furry ones too? Here are a few tricks and camera settings to help you create your own pet masterpieces.

CARING FOR YOUR PET Be sure your pet looks its best by grooming it the day before: bathe, brush, trim, cut nails, and make sure the areas around the eyes are clean. Decide if you want your pet to wear its collar. If you prefer a collar, consider treating your pet to a new one if the old one is worn. A tag can be a distraction, so take it off temporarily unless it is a focal point. If needed, you can lightly exercise your pet right before picture time to get out its nervous energy.

CONSIDER THE LOCATION Your home is one of the best places to photograph your pet. Declutter the selected space so your pet is the focus in the resulting pictures. Decide whether you prefer a neutral-colored background that will contrast well with your pet’s coloring, or one that has a lot of character. Find areas with as much diffused natural light as possible, such as near a window or glass door. Stay away from direct sunlight, as it can cause harsh shadows and squinty eyes. Avoid the use of flash to achieve a softer overall look to your photographs. Flash can also distract or frighten pets, and may produce a red eye effect. If you do need to use a flash, it is ideal to have a flash that can be pointed at the ceiling or covered by a diffuser. If you choose to photograph outdoors, be sure you check the leash law for your location. You may want to bring a long lead with you 30

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just in case. Select a location that will keep distractions to a minimum, including other people or pets. Open spaces, such as a field or lake, can be a visually appealing backdrop. A slightly overcast day provides great lighting so that you can photograph your pet without the distraction of sun splotches. If it is sunny outside, look for shady spots or photograph during the “golden hours,” which are the last two hours before sunset when the sun is lower in the sky.

COMFORT Many pets can sense their owners’ emotions and will react accordingly. When interacting with your pet, it is best to be at ease and go with the flow, as your pet will most likely do the same. A reasonable amount of time to photograph your pet is about 30 minutes. If you don’t get the shot you were hoping for, try again the next day. Determine what motivates your pet, such as treats and toys. Throw a treat to the spot you want to photograph your pet, and then snap your picture when he looks up for more. Try taking the squeaker out of a toy and hiding it in your hand. When the squeak is a surprise, your pet’s curious head tilt will be adorable to capture. There are even apps for pet noises, such as Dog Squeaky Toy, Dog Sounds and Body Talk, Human to Cat Translator, and Magic Cat Whistle. If your pet responds positively, use treats and noises sparingly towards the end of your photography time, or your pet may become overzealous and focus solely on these motivators.

CHARACTER Think about what is unique about your pet and make it a goal to capture those characteristics on camera. Some initial ideas to highlight them might include: showing off special abilities, playing with favorite toys, sleeping, enjoying a favorite pastime, playing with a buddy, or taking a bath.

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Photograph your pet from different angles, including from above to capture how you normally see him. Shoot at or below eye level for a unique perspective, and to add a level of intimacy to your pet portraits. Don’t be afraid to lay on the ground to capture unique shots. A standard lens (50 mm) will work well for these shots. For an artistic, blurred background effect, choose a shallow depth of field (f/2.8 – f/4) by using the Aperture Priority mode. Vary full body, three-quarter body, and close-up shots. If you cannot physically get close with your camera, use a zoom lens (28-70 mm or 70-200 mm). Image stabilization is an advanced feature on some zoom lenses that will help achieve photographs that are sharp and in focus. You can get fantastic, expressive facial shots by focusing on the eyes. Automatic focus will focus on the closest part of the subject, which is often the nose. Instead, make sure the eyes are sharp by changing to a single focal point. You can also take individual details such as ears, eyes, nose, tail, and paws. A micro lens (100 mm) is best for these extreme close up shots. Check out Pinterest as well as professional photographers’ websites for inspiration. Notice that photographers vary the placement of their subjects within the frame. Besides centering your pet, try using the rule of thirds to switch up the positioning and create interest. Imagine lines dividing the frame into thirds, both vertically and horizontally. The intersections of those lines are great options to place the subject to create a variety of photographs that are ascetically pleasing.

the ground and stabilize the camera by using your arms on your knees. To further reduce camera shake, take a breath and hold it as you click the shutter release button. Try the Shutter Priority mode (sometimes called Sports Mode) on your camera in order to have a shutter speed of at least 1/250 second or faster. To track your moving pet, select the continuous Auto Focus mode (AI Servo AF Canon/AF-C Nikon). Also, continuous shooting will be the perfect drive mode so you can take a series of images to show movement. Keep in mind that practice, timing, and a little bit of luck all come into play when photographing pets. Taking pictures should be fun for both of you. All of your efforts will pay off with fantastic images of your beloved pet to print and share on social media. If you prefer to leave it up to the experts, professional pet photography has become quite popular. When selecting a professional, be sure his or her website includes a portfolio that shows experience working with your type of pet. During your consultation, the photographer should touch upon the aforementioned aspects, and ask if there are any special considerations for photographing your pet. If everyone is on the same page the day of the photo session, it will result in amazing, treasured memories of your furry friend!  Christina Bowman is the owner of Christina Bowman Photography, LLC, www.cbowmanphotography.com.

CONNECTION To show the emotional connection with your furry friend, consider including family members interacting with your pet. Our eyes automatically go to the brightest part of a picture, so subjects should not wear white. They should also take care to avoid materials that overly attract fur, including black fabric. It is wise to stay away from bold patterns, stripes, logos, or graphics on clothing. Shoes will most likely be in the pictures, so make sure they are in good shape.

CHAOS IS ACCEPTABLE The unpredictable nature of some pets is half the fun of pet photos. Embrace it and work with your pet’s demeanor instead of trying to force him to be unnatural. Try photographing your pet paparazzi style without him noticing. You will end up with some delightfully candid portraits. Let him do what he does best, which is being spontaneous! If your pet is fast, you will want to be outside where there is a lot of light so you can use a fast shutter speed. It will be easier to focus on a pet going side to side, than one coming towards you. Sit on

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worry – you are surely not alone in this. Changing home décor can be very overwhelming for many people – but getting started doesn’t have to feel so daunting; and I’m here to help ... Many of you may be asking what’s “on trend” when it comes to home decorating these days. Modern farmhouse décor is very popular right now, and provides a great place to land – this design style tends to be very approachable, warm, and inviting, yet can be modified fairly easily to fit either a contemporary vibe or a more traditional farmhouse feel. HGTV’s hit show Fixer Upper with Joanna and Chip Gaines has really inspired this trend, and moved this design esthetic to the forefront of interior design for today’s homeowners. When starting your décor transition, consider donating or selling décor items that you no longer wish to display in your home. Eliminating pieces you don’t want to feature anymore frees up space for new, fresher items, and is also a great way to get a starter budget for those new goods.

BY KASEY WRIGHT

SPRING’S

DESIGN FORECAST

The flowers are blooming, the birds are singing, and the days are warmer. Yes, spring has arrived – and for many of us, that means it’s spring cleaning time. It’s a welcome time for that annual, good ol’ fashioned deep cleaning. But spring also offers a great opportunity to freshen up your home’s décor.

A

fter all, this time of year represents a time of revitalization, so what better time is there to revitalize your living spaces?Maybe you have been wanting to spruce things up a bit in your house, but just don’t know where to start. Don’t

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One quick thought – before deciding to toss or sell an item, take a second look at said item and think to yourself “Can I repurpose this? Can I paint it to give it new life?” Repurposing items is another decorating trend, and is one that allows you to try your hand at a little DIY fun. Some of the first places I like to explore are local thrift stores and flea markets, where you can discover old treasures that can be transformed into new pieces with little cost and effort. If you aren’t able to find any hidden gems at these shops, we are fortunate to have many great local businesses that carry beautiful décor items that you can incorporate into your home. Once you’ve purchased these decorative items, what to do with them? Filling a vintage vase with fresh spring flowers like colorful hydrangeas simply placed on an entry table can provide a warm welcome to family and friends. Painting and distressing old candlesticks or items like vintage watering cans can provide additional warmth and character to any space. Removing the covers from old books and stacking them at varying angles underneath one of these items or a frame or wire compote basket gives added dimension to shelves or built-ins. Wood signs are another extremely popular decorating trend right now, allowing you to get a lot of bang for your design buck – these can be purchased ready-made and ready to display, but if you’d like to unleash your hidden DIY talents, don’t hesitate to tackle making one yourself. Distressed plank wood or framed wood signs add personality to an entry way, over the bed, or mixed in a gallery wall with frames, wreaths, and such. You can personalize them with your family name, quotes of meaning, fun sayings, and so much more, letting you really make this design element unique to you and your home. Other items such as personalized lazy susans can add both function and design to a kitchen

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or dining area. These custom items also make great gifts for those you want to honor with something more than the traditional, perhaps less-creative ideas – go ahead and share your passion for design and personalization with those you love so they too can enjoy this popular decorating trend in their own homes. Mixing up design styles and introducing fresh pieces is a great way to slowly see if you like the feeling you get with these new items. Stick to neutral designs when it comes to the bigger and more expensive pieces like sofas, tables, chairs, and hutches, but have fun and add in pops of color when bringing in new, smaller, and less pricey décor items such as pillows, rugs, runners, florals, etc. – you’ll be amazed at how easily these items can liven and freshen up a room. Keeping things monochromatic with whites, cream, and subtle hues of greens and blues is always inviting, but choose durable fabrics and darker accents for more well-traveled walkways and such. Changing out floral arrangements with cotton stems, tobacco leaves, greenery, or berries is a great way to start a subtle movement to the modern farmhouse feel (and will let you incorporate some North Carolina history as well). Mixing in wood and metal, old and new, and layering your décor like you layer your accessories is sure to pay off in a pleasing way. If this isn’t your strong suit, that’s ok – just ask a friend for help or seek a design consultant’s guidance. Many will provide a brief consultation for a small fee to help kickstart your spring decorating transformation. Take advantage of spring’s promise of rebirth and revitalization by breathing new life into your home and giving it a new look for the new season.  Kasey Wright is the owner of AR Workshop Raleigh, offering hands-on graphic design and DIY workshops in a studio boutique that is located at 14460 Falls of the Neuse, Suite 175 in Raleigh. For more information, please visit www.arworkshop.com/raleigh.

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CUSTOM HOME

BUILDING

THE SHIFT FROM “DOWNSIZING” TO “RIGHTSIZING” BY JOHN YOUNG

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ith the current seller’s market and home inventory at an all-time low, there is no better time than now to consider building your fully-custom dream home. Let the elegance of Avalaire, home to the Triangle’s newest premier destination for luxury living, inspire you to build the home that is perfectly constructed to match your family’s lifestyle.

pocket to disappear, thereby extending the casual living space out onto the oversized, covered verandas, patios, and porches. What’s more, these outdoor spaces now also include the option for dining areas, outdoor kitchens, fireplaces, phantom screens, pools, fountains, and lush, meticulously landscaped gardens. With summer just around the corner, it’s difficult to think of a more perfect setting to enjoy North Carolina’s fresh air.

Nestled in the heart of North Raleigh, Avalaire is one of the first new affluent communities introduced to the Triangle in almost 10 years. Now, more and more people currently living in or seeking to relocate to the Triangle have the right combination of opportunity, confidence, and desire to build their next home at such a level where anything less than perfection is out of the question. The 56 homesites available in phase one of the community are all intended to capture the latest trends and unique spaces that are fully customized for each family’s wants and needs in a new luxury home. Nine of the most respected, highly sought-after builders in the area are working collaboratively to produce homes crafted with the best quality materials on the market.

Customers are also yearning for further personalization with spaces unique to their interest or needs. These include separate “his and her” offices, bunk rooms for multiple children and guests, wet bars, wine cellars, home breweries, golf simulator rooms, hobby rooms, yoga and exercise rooms, and even indoor pools.

For a long time, “downsizing” has been a buzzword when people are selecting a new home. However, after reviewing their design requirements, we found that it’s quite the opposite. They still want the gourmet kitchens, dramatic great rooms, expansive master suites, luscious spa baths, and private retreats. The biggest difference is now also the desire for expanded outdoor living spaces that can rival interior living areas in terms of cost and features. Once all of these key spaces are included, the total square footage is comparable to their previous homes, yet completely redefined to fit a modern lifestyle. For this reason, the more appropriate term would be “rightsizing.” Each and every room, nook, and cranny is designed for optimal use and efficiency. By dedicating more space where it will be used most, everyday living and entertaining areas blur the lines of traditional, outdated layouts. Great rooms, kitchens, dining areas, and breakfast spaces, along with large central islands, are now combined to flow seamlessly from one space into the other. In addition, the entire back walls or doors in these key spaces have the capability to open, fold, or 34

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Almost 40% of all custom-designed homes no longer have formal living and dining rooms or wasted “bonus” areas that were typically only finished to increase the quantity of the square footage. Now it is all about quality. Focusing on quality indoor and outdoor spaces, all drenched in natural light beaming through abundant glass panels and windows, contributes to a much more simplistic, fresh, bright, and modern feel many of today’s home buyers desire. If you are looking for the perfect opportunity to build your own dream house, visit Avalaire for inspiration or talk to their builders to start planning. Whether your taste is for a more modern home with clean lines, or a traditional-style home that will stand the test of time, relaying your custom home needs to a professional builder will allow them to craft the ultimate retreat to fit your lifestyle.  Located in the heart of North Raleigh just off Durant Road, Avalaire is minutes from great schools, fantastic restaurants, and shopping. Avalaire will offer beautiful parks throughout the community, 25% of which is dedicated to the preservation of its natural resources. Twocenturies-old oaks will border the grand entrance, leading the way to home sites which range from three-fourths of an acre to just under three acres. For more information, visit Avalaire.com. John and Leslie Young are Avalaire’s exclusive sales team. Both have earned the prestigious Certified Luxury Home Marketing Specialist designation (CLHMS), and Leslie is a member of the local Luxury Home Marketing Group. The Young Team has served the Triangle for 19 years and have been consistent multi-million dollar producers specializing in the North Raleigh market.

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North Carolina is a particularly bad state for allergies. Our environment is a great place for plants and trees that produce allergycausing pollen to grow, making spring in central North Carolina a challenge for many allergy sufferers. Typically, this cloud of yellow dust arrives towards the end of March or beginning of April, and lasts a couple of weeks. “You might be surprised to learn that the yellow pollen coating your car, driveway, and every other surface is actually not the kind of pollen that contributes to allergies,” explained Dr. Allen Marshall. That dreaded yellow pollen is, however, a good sign that other allergy producing pollens that are not visible to the eye have also arrived. What are the most common types of seasonal allergies that we tend to experience in the Triangle? Dr. Michael Ferguson gave us a rundown: – Grasses (Bermuda, Bluegrass, Bahia, Johnson); – Trees (Oak, Hickory, Cedar, Birch, Elm); – Dust mites, pet dander, mold, cockroach, fungus.

NIP SPRING

ALLERGIES

If you know that you suffer from spring allergies, it is probably a good idea to proactively begin treating yourself when you start seeing the flowers bloom or traces of pollen in the air. “The good news is many people are able to control their allergies with overthe-counter drugs and remedies,” said Dr. Ferguson. There are

IN THE BUD

We started seeing the pops of color on forsythia bushes and daffodils a little earlier this year due to an unseasonably warm winter. It is these blooms that are the typical hallmarks of the transition from cold and flu season to spring allergy season. Some have welcomed an early visit from warm weather and blooming flowers with open arms. But if you suffer from allergies, you may be in no rush for the

W seasons to change.

e spoke with ear, nose, and throat specialists Dr. Michael Ferguson and Dr. Allen Marshall from Wake Physician Practices-Ear, Nose & Throat (ENT) – who both see and treat patients at the practice’s North Raleigh office – about how to find some relief against the itchy, sneezy, stuffy side effects of allergies. 36

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several over-the-counter allergy medicines on the market that are quite effective, including oral antihistamines and topical nasal steroid or antihistamine sprays. But it’s important to note that antihistamines containing decongestants may impact blood pressure. Those with known high blood pressure should check with their physician before taking these medications regularly.

2012-2016

Prescription drugs often have fewer side effects than over-thecounter allergy offerings. Your doctor can help determine which medicine or treatment plan will work best for you and your allergy symptoms, whether seasonal or year-round. Both Drs. Ferguson and Marshall advised that if your symptoms are more severe than normal, if your symptoms are not responding to treatment as you expected, or if you suspect your cold or spring allergy has caused a respiratory or sinus infection, make an appointment with a doctor. Your primary care doctor or a specialty physician, such as an ENT doctor, can prescribe an allergy drug for you or refer you to an allergist if needed. Additionally, those with chronic allergies can develop sinusitis. According to Dr. Marshall, cardinal symptoms of sinusitis include facial pressure as well as pain in the face, forehead, or teeth that persist for more than a week. The American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery reports an estimated 35 million people develop chronic sinusitis each year, making it one of the most common health complaints in the U.S. It is important for those suffering from allergies to limit their exposure to allergens. Of course it’s not feasible to avoid allergens altogether, so Dr. Ferguson and Dr. Marshall suggested a few helpful tips to remember: – Shower or bathe after spending time outdoors; – Wash your sheets and pajamas in hot water to kill dust mites; – Use hypoallergenic bedding; – Wash your clothes often to remove allergens; – Indoor humidity levels should run between 30% to 40%. Use a humidifier or dehumidifier to prevent mold growth; – Limit your time outside during peak pollen seasons; – Close doors and windows during high pollen count seasons. While organic honey may offer some dietary benefit, it has no measured impact on preventing and/or treating seasonal allergies added Dr. Marshall.  WakeMed ENT physicians offer a wide range of ear, nose, and throat services to adults and children including nasal and sinus care along with allergy treatment. Their North Raleigh office is conveniently located in the Physician Office Pavilion at WakeMed North, near the corner of Falls of Neuse and Durant Roads. For more information about their board-certified ENT physicians, services, and locations, visit www.wakemed.org/ear-nose-throat.

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BUG OFF GOOD NEWS CONCERNING ZIKA VIRUS

BY MARGARITA COHEN

Over the last year, you have undoubtedly heard some troubling news about Zika virus, a mosquito-borne illness with potentially devastating effects that made landfall in the U.S. in 2016. While the disturbing headlines and distressing cases of Zika tend to be what stick in our minds, there is a lot of positive work being done around the world to combat

been reported in North Carolina. The 92 confirmed cases here are associated with travel, and not contracted in our state, according to the North Carolina Division of Public Health. Health organizations and mosquito control professionals are working tirelessly to contain the spread of the virus. The public (pregnant women especially) is encouraged to delay travel to other affected countries. A current list of these countries is available on the CDC website (www.cdc.gov/zika/geo/active-countries.html).

the effects of this disease. Scientists and research organiza-

ZIKA VIRUS IS BEING TAKEN SERIOUSLY

tions have dedicated millions in resources to the cause, not

The rapid spread of Zika virus and its link to microcephaly have governments, scientists, and corporations dedicating vast resources to combatting the negative impacts of Zika virus around the world.

to mention the actionable steps people can take right away to prevent mosquito bites and reduce the likelihood of contracting mosquito-borne diseases. So let’s take a look at the bright side of the conversation around Zika virus, and what you can do to protect yourself and your loved ones.

THE REALITY OF THE HEALTH RISKS If you’ve heard one thing about Zika, it’s probably the virus’s link to microcephaly, a birth defect that results in smaller brain and head sizes in infants. Pregnant women can pass the virus onto a fetus during pregnancy, which can result in several brain-related birth defects. Zika is also sexually transmittable from either gender during unprotected sex. However, most people who contract Zika virus are minimally affected, if at all. Symptoms include fever, rash, joint pain, muscle pain, headache, and conjunctivitis (pink eye). Most infected people don’t even realize they have Zika because the symptoms simply don’t manifest, according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The illness is usually mild, lasting several days to a week. Few cases result in hospitalization, and death is extremely rare. Although hundreds of locally-transmitted cases of Zika have been confirmed in the U.S., as of February 15, 2017, none have 38

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The U.S. Congress approved over $1 billion in federal funding for Zika virus to develop vaccines, implement early diagnostic testing, and create long-term studies on how the virus affects exposed babies and mothers. The CDC has a large hand in the control of Zika virus as well. Aside from their continuous stream of information, tips, and health advice, it is actively tracking the spread of Zika and other mosquito-borne illnesses in order to provide the most accurate travel information possible. The organization is also vital to teaching healthcare providers the latest about the virus through new materials, test results, and surveillance tools. While there is currently no vaccine or full-proof treatment for Zika, scientists are confident that vaccine trials will start as early as this summer.

YOU CAN DO SOMETHING NOW Luckily, there are steps you can take right now. The best defense against mosquito-borne illnesses like Zika virus is to avoid mosquito bites, so here are some actionable tips to reduce mosquito activity around your home. – Eliminate standing water around your property by emptying and overturning vessels that may collect water, such as kids’ toys, old tires, unused potted plants, and bird baths (sorry birds). – Keep your gutters clean. Clogged gutters can accumulate stand-

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ing water, which create breeding grounds for mosquitoes. – Fill in any low areas under decks or throughout your yard where water may collect after a rainstorm. – Wear long sleeves and pants when spending a lot of time outdoors. – Use mosquito repellant when outside, and even mosquito netting if necessary. – Pay attention to CDC travel advisories and avoid traveling to countries affected by mosquito-borne illnesses if possible. – Consider using professional mosquito control services to provide an added layer of defense. There is plenty of available information about Zika virus, its effects, and the importance of mosquito control through organizations such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, World Health Organization, and Pan-American Health Organization. Awareness, education, and being proactive now to defend your home against these pesky pests will help you and your family stay safe this spring.  Margarita Cohen is the co-owner of Mosquito Joe of Eastern Wake. Contact Mosquito Joe for more information on their mosquito control services (www.easternwake.mosquitojoe.com). Their barrier spray treatments rid your yard of mosquitoes, fleas, and ticks and will help make outside fun again for you and your family.

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add warmth and coziness to a space in which a hard surface cannot even dare to compare. And in a house with all hard elements such as hard floors, walls, trim, cabinets, countertops, etc., rugs really help to absorb sound in the space. The choices of rug materials are endless and thus, can be quite confusing to the consumer. Fibers and processing techniques seem to change and improve constantly, and their price points are in every range. So how do you know what to pick? It really depends on your family’s lifestyle and what you want to spend. It is best to determine your floor covering needs, set a budget, and educate yourself about what is best for your home and personal tastes. To help you decide, you need to know the pros and cons of every type of rug fiber. Wool rugs are the most commonly known type of rug. They are durable and soft to the touch, with great natural stain and water repellency. Wool is a great choice for all high-traffic areas except damp ones, due to the fact that they absorb moisture in the air. Fading happens a little faster with these, so direct sunlight can cause them to lose their color faster. New wool rugs will shed for a while, so be prepared to vacuum them a little more frequently at first. The price points of wool rugs vary in extreme ranges. BY RHONDA BENVIE

RUGS 101

Animal skins have many of the same characteristics of wool rugs. They are easy to clean and offer a uniqueness that no other rug

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW TO PICK THE PERFECT RUG

R

ugs – they bring all kinds of different emotions to people. Some people love having them in their homes, while others don’t get why they are needed. If you fall into either category (which pretty much everyone does), then this article is for you.

Why do you need rugs? If your house is entirely carpet, then you don’t need them. You can, however, put rugs over carpet, but you really need to know exactly the right way to do so. A rug to be placed over carpet should have lots of texture and not be too plush. Usually cotton rugs work best for this. And it is imperative that you use the correct rug pad under it so that it lays flat. If you have tile, wood, or any other hard surface flooring, then a rug is a must. In addition to providing a pleasing design element to a living space, rugs have other uses as well. They help to define spaces in the ever-so-popular open floor plans of today’s homes. They also 40

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can. However, they are best suited for low traffic areas in the home.

fit for your home. Synthetic and cotton rugs are best if you or a family member suffers from allergies. If you are allergic to dust mites, most allergists recommend no rugs or carpet because they become a breeding ground for these allergen triggers.

For the person who wants the most luxurious of all rugs, then silk is the one. There are no rugs any softer than silk ones. They have a shine and sheen that cannot be duplicated. Low traffic and dry areas are best suited for silk rugs, as they are not as durable and do absorb moisture. Be ready to pay for this divine rug of luxury – they are rather expensive.

So if rugs are causing allergy issues, what does a person do to add the design element and function to their space that only a floor covering can provide? Hot on the market right now are vinyl rugs. These coverings come in all sizes, designs, and colors, and look great on any floor, whether you have allergies or not. Of course, vinyl rugs won’t offer the cozy softness of a more traditional rug, but they do absorb sound, are very durable, and will not stain. You clean them like any other hard surface floor, making them a great option for underneath kitchen tables where you worry about food and drink spills. With vinyl rugs, that constant worry can now be eliminated – simply wipe up the spill with a paper towel and spray cleaner. They are also perfect for under an

Cotton rugs are probably the most affordable of all rugs. They are easy to clean and somewhat durable in medium traffic areas. You do not have to worry about damp areas with cotton, because they will dry if they absorb wetness. Cotton rugs are not known for their softness and most are a flat weave. Sisal, jute, and seagrass rugs offer more texture than any other. They mix with any style of décor, as well as with other rugs. They are extremely durable, but staining can be a problem with these options. They have a coarse feel, with jute being the most prickly. Sisal is a little smoother, but is still somewhat scratchy, and seagrass is the least rough. The price points of these rugs vary like wool rugs.

office chair, letting you protect your beautiful hardwood floors. Sunrooms, decks, and patios are also ideal places for these versatile rugs. Selecting rugs for your home, coordinating them for all the spaces where they are needed, and getting the right sizes can be a daunting task. To make this process a little easier, consider hiring a designer to help you, or go to a retailer that offers in-store design assistance to help with your selections, making sure they offer samples that you can take home and look at in your space for color. These can be big purchases, so you want to make sure you are making the right rug decisions for you and for your home.  Rhonda Benvie is the owner of Help Me Rhonda Interiors, 1600 Heritage Commerce Court, Suite 103 in Wake Forest and Open Door Furniture & Accents, a furniture and accessories store also in Wake Forest. Visit www.helpmerhondainteriors.com or www.opendoorfurnitureandaccents.com, or call 919-263-9054. All of the rugs described here can be found at Open Door.

Synthetics rugs such as polyester, acrylic, olefin, nylon, viscose, and polypropylene are the most durable of all the options. They are also the most stain and fade resistant. Synthetic rugs are easy to clean and can be used anywhere, even outdoors. The indoor/outdoor ones are made of polypropylene. Synthetic rugs from days past got a bad rap because they looked as if they were very cheaply made. However, with today’s new techniques, it is sometimes hard to tell the difference between a higher end synthetic rug and a wool one. The price of these vary as well, but you can definitely tell the difference between an inexpensive one and one that may cost a bit more. Allergies sometimes are a determining factor when selecting which rugs are the best

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MAKING

MEMORIES

WHILE CELEBRATING MOM AND DAD

BY MONIQUE M. ROGERS

M

other’s Day and Father’s Day – two special opportunities to honor the people who raised you and loved you each and every day of your life. If you’re looking to celebrate these very important people a little differently than with the standard card, flowers, etc., plan a special day for your spouse on your little ones’ behalf or carve out some quality time to spend with him or her instead. There’s nothing Mom and Dad enjoy more than time with their children. We are fortunate in that the Triangle offers a multitude of great ways to spend these days, and even these weekends, making memories with them. Mother’s Day is May 14 and Father’s Day is June 18 this year, so go ahead and save these dates on your calendar – and if you need a little inspiration to fill those dates with family fun, following are some great ideas that will be sure to put a smile on Mom’s and Dad’s faces, while warming their hearts at the same time. For the parent of little ones, consider spending a family day in a child-friendly environment. Our region offers many scenic parks where you can enjoy a picnic, go on a hike, pose for pictures in the gardens, and swim in either a pool or sand-beached lake. Some parks have playgrounds or offer amusement rides such as carousels, kiddie boats, and trains. The joy on their child’s face will be a gift that Mom and Dad will surely treasure. For those with older kids, consider renting boats such as paddle boats, kayaks, canoes, or sailboats. Some parks allow you to fish and offer batting cages and courts for basketball, bocce ball, and tennis. Are Mom and Dad a little more on the adventurous side? Why not 42

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plan a quick camping trip to celebrate Mother’s Day or Father’s Day? Many local parks offer tent sites so you don’t have to travel far. If you are the parent of little ones who may not be ready for overnight camping, but you still want those tots to honor your spouse on his or her special day with a camping experience, simply set up a tent in the living room or backyard. Provide entertainment by organizing camping activities such as making S’mores, telling ghost stories in front of your fireplace or fire pit, creating animal shadows with flashlights, and performing skits. These are sure to make wonderful Mother’s Day or Father’s Day memories. If camping isn’t Mom or Dad’s thing, they can still be whisked away from the normal day-to-day life in other ways. For instance, local hotels and bed-and-breakfasts allow them to stay local, be pampered, and enjoy their town in a new way without dealing with the housework, chores, and responsibilities that are left at home. While on this Mother’s Day or Father’s trip, discover what familyfriendly activities there are around town. Interested in a tour? Walking, Segway, and trolley tours offer a chance to learn about history, gourmet foods, and sightseeing. Area museums featuring child-like entertainment, science and nature, art, and history are always fun. The whole family is bound to have a good time, even though it’s a day or weekend meant for the parents. With their hectic schedules, Mom and Dad may not have the opportunity to eat out much. Take advantage of these holidays to patron nice area restaurants – ones that they may not normally try. Investigate small cafés for an intimate breakfast, lunch, or dinner, or consider dining somewhere a little more fancy with more flare to spoil them on their special evenings. Perhaps a cooking class

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or a visit to a local coffee or chocolate shop should be added to the day’s agenda. Or better yet – have Mom and Dad visit one of the many wineries in the surrounding area that feature North Carolina wines. Adults focusing on time with their mothers may want to take them shopping. While we do have several malls in our area, perhaps take her off the normal path by visiting local Mom and Pop stores of our region’s quaint, small towns. Search artsy stores, flea markets, and antique stores where conversations of reminiscing the past bonds the next generation. Or if you think she’d be in the mood for a little art project, there are several pallet and clay painting studios around; and if jewelry making or flower arranging is more her forte, studios that teach those as well can be found around the Triangle. Is your mother one who likes to stay active for fun? Take her to a yoga or Pilates class. Afterwards, spend time together getting pampered in a salon with massages, facials, manicures, or pedicures. For fathers of adult children, they may enjoy visiting one of the area’s numerous breweries featuring Carolina specials. Want to get Dad more into action on his special day? Treat him to a game of paint ball or laser tag with other family members, or make it a father/son activity with a group of friends. He may also enjoy a game of golf, time at a shooting range, biking, or running the trail, working out at the gym, or checking out motorcycles. Why not challenge Dad to a game of darts, pool, or bowling? Think Mom and Dad would enjoy just sitting back and being entertained? Check newspapers, magazines, and online calendars for plays, orchestras, bands, concerts, and comedy listings in the area. For those who have unfortunately lost one or both of these treasured people in their lives, consider doing something special to remember them. Plant a tree, lay flowers at their grave, or make a donation to an organization that was important to them in their honor. You may even want to enjoy his or her favorite meal or do something of remembrance that meant something special to the two of you. We want to honor the people who gave us life and raised us. We are fortunate to live in an area that offers wonderful and creative ways to celebrate Mother’s Day and Father’s Day, making memories with them and reminding us what great people they are.  Monique M. Rogers is a creative, journalistic, and technical writer with an Associate of Arts in Liberal Arts with an emphasis in journalism and a Bachelor’s of Arts in English. She also received a diploma in graphic design and desktop publishing. She owns a freelance writing and event coordinating business, Monique M. Rogers, LLC. Contact Monique at monique.m.rogers@gmail.com. Monique’s “My Midlife” blog is also available at www.moniquemrogers.com.

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AROUND THE

TRIANGLE FUN AREA SPRINGTIME TO-DOs FOR YOU AND YOUR PET

BY DR. ALEXA GONZALEZ

Springtime is upon us and the weather is quickly warming up. It’s time to come out of hibernation and enjoy the warmth and fresh air of the beautiful spring weather – but don’t forget your pets too! Your furry family members are probably just as, if not more, excited about the spring weather, so bring them along for your fun adventures in the Triangle. Here are some great ideas for getting active locally with your pet this spring.

GET MOVING Many of us made New Year’s resolutions to get into shape this year – what better training partner than your pup? Our area offers a multitude of parks and trails that are perfect for hiking. Not into hiking? There are other sports that you can enjoy with your best bud, such as jogging, cycling, and roller-skating. Another great idea that can be physically stimulating and challenging for both you and your pet is setting up an agility course in your backyard. When spending time outdoors, always remember to keep you and your pets hydrated and cool.

ENJOY THE WATER The Triangle is home to so many fun water activities for humans and canines alike, given our great terrain and climate. At our fingertips, we have access to beautiful public lakes, ponds, rivers, and our wonderful North Carolina beaches, which are all great for our pets who enjoy taking a dip, too. Water activities can be excellent exercise for older dogs or dogs with arthritis with low impact on their joints. Keep in mind that not all parks and beaches are petfriendly, so check before you head out. Also, ensure your pets are up-to-date with their Leptospirosis vaccine to prevent any bacterial infections from our local ponds and lakes.

BREWERIES AND FOODIE ADVENTURES If there is one trait we have in common with our pets, it’s our ability to work up an appetite or thirst, so there is no need to leave your best friend at home while you head out on the town. 44

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The Triangle is known throughout the southeast for its agricultural roots, foodie culture, and love of everything craft beer. If you’re a craft beer connoisseur, perhaps taking Lucky for a walk to one of the Triangle’s many pet-friendly breweries is more your cup of tea. The area offers more than 180 local breweries and these places are often pet-friendly – not a bad way to enjoy a lovely spring Saturday.

SEE WHAT’S HAPPENING LOCALLY There is always an area event in which you and your pets can get involved, such as dog-friendly walks or 5Ks. If you’re looking for something more laid back, consider taking your pet to a drivein or outdoor movie theater or one of the many, local farmers markets. These are all great opportunities for you and your pet to socialize, but be careful if your pet is anxiety-prone in crowds.

GO OUTDOORS The list for outdoor activities goes on and on, but one that you may not have considered and is especially fun to do with your animals is geocaching, a problem-solving experience that allows you and your pet to go on a treasure hunt around your community – bring your pet as your partner in crime to help in the search. You can also always relax with a great camping trip where you and Fido can get away and unwind in nature – just be sure to keep him on a leash in case he decides to chase after any wild animals, and keep him out of the bonfire cookout food! The next time you’re thinking about your agenda for a glorious, weekend day, think how you can involve your pet too. Have an idea you want to share? Tweet us @NCVMA and show how you and your pets enjoy the beautiful springtime weather.  Dr. Alexa Gonzalez is a veterinarian at Park Veterinary Hospital & Urgent Care in Durham. She received her Bachelor of Science in biology from Syracuse University and received her doctorate of veterinary medicine from North Carolina State University. She resides in the Triangle with her pets Phoenix, a Bengal cat, and Cheddar, an African pygmy hedgehog. Dr. Gonzalez is a member of the North Carolina Veterinary Medical Association (NCVMA), www.ncvma.org.

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BY DR. JAMES P. MARTIN

BY DR. JAMES P. MARTIN

ORTHODONTICS: WHY DO WE DO IT?

“I

s it just esthetic?” a patient recently asked me in a consultation regarding orthodontic treatment. I get these kind of questions on occasion, and I think they are valid and deserve a good answer. What I try to convey to my patients is that there are numerous reasons to pursue orthodontic treatment. In treatment, we are typically pursuing three objectives: 1. Improving oral health; 2. Improving the function of the teeth and jaws; and 3. Helping patients overcome psychosocial handicaps created by discrimination based on facial and dental appearance. The first two objectives may seem obvious, but I always make sure that the third is not overlooked.

So where does orthodontics come in? One of our goals with orthodontic treatment is to give our patients an esthetic, consonant smile so that they can put their best foot forward in each interaction that they have

in life. Of course we respect the fact that the health of the dentition (development and arrangement of teeth), periodontium (the teeth’s supporting structures), and the occlusion (the position of the teeth when the jaw is closed) is important, but we also recognize the value of the confidence that comes with being proud of your smile. Research has shown that adults who have undergone orthodontic treatment have improved self-assessment attractiveness scores than they did pre-treatment, and anecdotally, I have talked to many adult patients whose confidence, extroversion, and self-esteem has soared after completing orthodontic treatment. These are qualities that improve overall wellness and are excellent predictors of career success and a high quality of life. So, is it esthetic? Most definitely. But orthodontics is also a whole lot more ...  Dr. James P. Martin, DMD MS, is an ABO Board Certified Orthodontist with Hixson & Bumgarner Orthodontists. For more information, visit www.bracesbyhb.com.

We live in a world where first impressions are of the utmost importance, and through experience, I know that folks are geared to make judgments about people the first time they meet them by processing contextual visual information, including information from someone’s face and smile. I think we all would agree that the best policy is “don’t judge a book by its cover;” – but as human beings, we have a tough time separating these principles from our subconscious associations.

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the base of your sauce, and there are so many wonderful additions you can include to elevate it to a new pesto level. Tossing in ingredients such as the aforementioned nuts, roasted or sun dried tomatoes, and caramelized onions can turn the ordinary pesto into something unique and allow you to fold it into your mainstay dishes for a completely exceptional result. Pesto is a wonderful topping for grilled steak, fish, and chicken. It can be stirred into mayonnaise for a full-of-flavor sandwich spread, whisked into a dressing that will turn an ordinary salad into one with a kick, or used as a topping for pizza in lieu of the traditional sauce. Toss freshly cooked pasta for a delightful cold side dish or stir into your favorite cream or tomato sauce for a lovely dinner entrée. The options for adding pesto to your mealtime fare are as endless as your imagination. When it comes to making pesto, your food processor or blender will be your best friend. If you are making an herb- or greensbased pesto, you will need to wash and dry them very well before proceeding. Most recipes call for a good quality olive oil, a little salt, fresh garlic, and an acid to help retain color – lemon juice is extremely versatile and can be used universally in most pestos. Simply toss your herbs and/or greens in the processor and add the oils, garlic, salt, etc. until you achieve the consistency you desire. If you are using the pesto on its own as a topping or as an addition

BY STACEY MORITZ

PESTO TO THE

RESCUE

N

ow that spring has arrived, you may have found yourself in a culinary rut. The hearty soups, stews, and heavy dishes you enjoyed in winter now seem like overkill on your table. It’s time to lighten and brighten your dinner plate – but where to start?

Think pesto! Unbelievably versatile and full of flavor, pesto provides an endless array of possibilities that will dazzle your taste buds and add the perfect touch to almost any meal. While there are plenty of jarred versions on the market, it is incredibly easy to make your own pesto sauce that is full of unmatched freshness and flavor. Traditional pestos include herbs and greens and often contain nuts and cheeses, which are delicious but can be problematic for those with nut or dairy allergies. By making your own, you can control the ingredients and customize the flavors to your family’s taste and dietary needs. Just about any herb and green can be 46

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to dressings, sauces, mayonnaise, etc., use a little less oil. If you are tossing it with pasta, use a bit more. Because you are using fresh herbs and greens, pesto can darken a bit over time, so I suggest not making too large a quantity if you plan on serving it fresh. There are many wonderful combinations that include pesto, and you can have a lot of fun creating them on your own – but if you need a little inspiration, these should help get you going. – Traditional basil pesto: Combine fresh basil, a pinch of salt, a clove or two of garlic, and extra virgin olive oil. You can also add pine nuts and a little Parmesan cheese if you desire. – Spinach and walnut pesto: Fresh baby spinach, a pinch of salt, garlic, extra virgin olive oil, and a handful of walnuts. Amazing when tossed with tortellini or as a dipping sauce for crudité. – Your favorite baby greens like arugula, kale, or watercress … a little lemon, olive oil, and salt are all you need. – Roasted or sundried tomatoes, garlic, olive oil, salt, and pepper ... perfect as a sandwich spread or tossed with warm pasta. – Cilantro lime pesto: Combine cilantro, lime juice, garlic, a pinch of salt, and vegetable oil – delicious atop grilled chicken, spread on a quesadilla, or stirred into sour cream for a yummy dip. As the days of spring turn to summer, you will surely find endless ways to incorporate pestos into your menus. Toss them with grilled or fresh veggies, drizzle over grilled meats, stir into rice and pasta, or sprinkle over tomatoes with fresh mozzarella or goat cheese. Whichever culinary route you choose, trust me when I say that you will never tire of having this quick and healthy goodness at your disposal.

ARUGULA AND LEMON PESTO – 1 bunch of baby arugula, washed and dried well – 1 garlic clove, peeled – Extra virgin olive oil – Juice of one lemon – Pinch of salt

Before Gazebo, ca. 1920

THIS SPRING: VISIT THE OLD WELL

Combine all ingredients in food processor or blender and puree to desired consistency. Use more olive oil if tossing with pasta. Keeps refrigerated in an airtight container for about two to three days. 

The Old Well dates back to the early days of Wake Forest College. Reportedly dug by the Wilson Artesian Company through 70-feet of solid rock, the first pump was replaced when the Class of 1911 purchased the elegant marble fountain for which the well later became famous.

Stacey Moritz is the owner of The Lemon Tree Cafe, located at 113 S. White Street in Downtown Wake Forest (919-521-5806), offering freshly prepared salads, pastas, soups, and take-away fare. The Lemon Tree Cafe is open Monday - Saturday, 10:00 AM 3:00 PM, offering lunch and catering.

CIRCA Magazine

Last WFC Graduation, 1956

When SEBTS decided it was no longer needed on campus, the well was donated to the museum and today is a focal point of the gardens.

FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

The Old Well in Spring

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I

hope not. Agriculture is the number one industry in North Carolina, and our state is the top producer of both sweet potatoes and tobacco in the country, according to the USDA. Family farms have been a staple in the U.S. economy since the early 20th century. This trend is no more prevalent than within North Carolina with family-owned and operated farm businesses.

BY JENNIFER GASQUE

FARM TO

TABLE THE ORIGINS OF THE MOVEMENT

Known as the “sweet potato state,” North Carolina is rooted in agriculture. When Columbus reached the New World in 1492, the Native Americans of what would soon become North Carolina grew sweet potatoes – so naturally, agriculture is in our blood. For centuries, North Carolinians have felt the outside calling to embrace the warmth, get some soil under their fingernails, and plant some crops. But, for those of us who are not natural gardeners or farmers, what steps are involved that take crops from the earth to our tables? What challenges does the industry face that affects us? And furthermore, have we dug out our roots to agriculture? 48

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Our food scene is applauded across the nation for our culture of delectable southeastern foodie pleasures, but we often forget about our strong agricultural backbone. According to NC State University, the agricultural industry accounts for $84 billion of our state’s economy, and per the North Carolina Department of Agriculture, over 52,000 farms – led by farmers including Reggie Strickland of Strickland Farms, in Mount Olive and Stacy Ham Thomas of Ham Farms in Snow Hill. Reggie and Stacy are just like us – Reggie is a husband and father of two and Stacy is a wife and mother of two. Reggie serves as the general manager of Strickland Farms, an eighth-generation crop and livestock family farm with roots back to the 1860s. Since its inception, the farm has grown to encompass a whopping 4,200 acres of your favorite spring crops, such as watermelons, yellow squash, and cucumbers, among others. Founded in 1975 by Bobby, Al, and Woody Ham, Ham Farms has diversified from a 200-acre row crop farm to a 15,000-acre farm with fans of their sweet potatoes extending far past the Mason-Dixon Line. Each farm specializes in its own host of agricultural treats, but both Stacy and Reggie’s operations share one commonality – a true commitment to feed and clothe their communities. Though feeding a global population is just one of many challenges that these farmers face today, it is an important one. Research by the Food and Agriculture Organization suggests that farmers must increase their agricultural production by 60% - 70% to feed nearly 10 billion people by 2050. While the population is growing, the amount of available farmland is shrinking due to factors such as heat, drought, flooding, erosion, and urbanization. This poses the question: How do we grow more with less land available, while also sustaining our earth’s resources? Agricultural biotechnology companies in the Triangle, such as Bayer Crop Science, are making great strides towards solving this problem through innovative technologies and research. Both family farms and agricultural technology companies are unified in their efforts to produce products that will achieve consistently higher crop yields through sustainable measures. In today’s information age, we’re currently in one of the most food conscious eras in the history of North Carolina. With this comes a lot of farming questions and sometimes, misconceptions regarding innovative farming practices that protect crops from pests and disease. Today, family-run farms must run marketing campaigns to encourage education on best farming practices, such as the sustainability processes on their farms.

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Ham Farms is implementing several sustainability measures within its operation every day. The farm utilizes 100% of its harvests through its two processing facilities and compost program. This is one way farmers in the Triangle are giving back to the land and ensuring only the best yields reach your plates. So, what are the steps from the soil to your table? Let’s look at the process of growing and packaging the ever-popular sweet potato at Ham Farms. – Seeding for growth: From December to March, certified seeds are used in all greenhouses, ensuring healthy, disease-free sweet potatoes. – Growing sweet potato sprouts: In March, “seed potatoes” are placed in the ground to sprout plants that will be planted for the current year’s crop. – Transplanting for yields: In early May, precision transplanters are used to uniformly place plants in 12,000 acres of bedded sweet potato fields. – Harvesting with technology: From there, a modified disc is used to uncover the sweet potatoes, hand harvest the roots, and transport the sweet potatoes to one of its controlled storage facilities. – Curing for sweetness: In order to enhance the sweetness of the sweet potatoes, the sweet potatoes are cured, converting starch into sugar, and the product is prepped for shipment. – Storing for flavor: To maintain the freshness and natural flavor of their sweet potatoes, Stacy and her team store up to 13 million bushels of sweet potatoes in their forced air coolers. – Sorting for quality: Precise sorting equipment is then used, allowing the sweet potatoes to be sorted by color, diameter, grade, length, or weight. – Packaging by preference: Before shipment, packaging can be tailored to the buyer’s preference – from individually wrapped potatoes to mesh bags by the pound to custom boxes. – Shipping to you: Sweet potatoes are then shipped both internationally and nationally to retail stores. Over the past 30 years, we’ve seen a lot of changes in the world of agriculture, from technology to the evolution of agribusiness and its rise of female leaders, but one thing has remained the same – the undeniable passion of farmers across North Carolina. The people behind these operations lead with purpose, knowing that each day is a new opportunity to confront and conquer the next challenge, never losing sight of their goal to feed their communities.  Jennifer Gasque has served nine years at Bayer Crop Science and is a senior technical field sales representative. Jennifer has a huge passion for agriculture, working with growers to bring the best technology to the area to help increase crop yields and increase productivity. She is the definition of what people in the industry refer to as an “AgVocate,” actively promoting and educating the public about the agricultural industry.

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Arts & Crafts Food Trucks Beer Garden Live Music Performances Family Fun Grand Sponsor

Saturday

MAY

6

10AM - 5PM

DOWNTOWN WAKE FOREST Catch the free shuttle from Sam’s Club! Visit wakeforestchamber.org for event schedules and more details. June 2017

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know you’ll be away from your home for a long period of time. Similarly, consider changing the “Home” setting on your car’s GPS to a nearby location – such as a store or gas station, for example – so that you can still find your way home, but not give a car thief directions to your house.

BY THOMAS WALTERS

STAYING

SAFE

Another tech tip you should avoid is using nicknames like “Husband,” “Son,” or “Mom” in your cell phone. If you got a text from “Hubby” that said “In line at grocery store. Forgot PIN for debit card. Text it to me please;” or from “Mom” that said “What’s our garage door keypad code again?” you would likely text the requested information. If said cell phone falls into the hands of a thief, you have just given him or her access to your bank account or your home. In addition, if someone requests sensitive information from you via text, I recommend calling the person to confirm his or her identity. Plus, it’s more secure to share that information via a phone call rather than having it sitting in texts on a couple of phones. We can’t avoid all of life’s risks, but we can take steps to minimize them and protect our property and family as much as possible.  Thomas Walters is the owner of Walters Insurance Agency. If you’d like to talk more about how to protect your home this spring, stop by the agency at 3207 Rogers Road, Suite 100 in Wake Forest. He may also be reached at 919-554-0267 or ThomasWalters@allstate.com.

We all want to ensure that our loved ones are protected from life’s uncertainties – this includes preventing losses from happening in the first place. While the majority of people are good and trustworthy, it’s a sad fact of life that there are some out there who look to take advantage of honest individuals.

W

Following are a few tips to help you avoid becoming a victim. hile a thief is obviously a person making a bad decision, he or she is not necessarily unintelligent. Don’t underestimate someone who is determined to rip you off in one way or another.

Think about the items you keep in your car, and how these could be a boon to a thief. One thing you should consider is taking the remote garage door opener with you when you leave your car, even if you are only going to be gone for a short time. If you keep your registration in your car, or any other items that contain your home address, you’ve just told your thief where you live and provided a way to get into your house. Taking the garage door opener with you can be particularly important before parking at long-term parking at an airport, which also lets thieves 50

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Well, I have had a slow start with mine. I have not made much progress with the 20 pounds I want to lose, going down and up a couple of pounds a week. I am trying to be kind to myself, and focusing on the fact that I have started, that I have at least not gained any more, and that losing one or two pounds is better than adding to that. While this is true, and I do need to focus on the positive to keep moving forward, I am still disappointed with myself. Instead of allowing myself to have a pity party, I kicked myself into gear, and recently started getting serious about losing the weight. To do so, however, required that I get serious about something else. I long ago realized that for me to lose weight, I must couple better and less eating with exercise. I also learned many years ago that as much as I plan to, regardless of how many gyms I join, I will not consistently go to a gym and exercise. Nor will I get on a bicycle or treadmill at home – I do not like to exercise on machines. The only exercise that has worked for me over the years is walking. And not running, just walking. I also know that I am cold-natured, so walking outside when it is cold is not something I easily do. Although there are indoor areas for walking, such as the mall and my church recreation center, I have not used those. So, winter weather has given me a great excuse to not exercise. With spring now here, I have no excuse. And I am on a consistent walking routine now. And that one good habit has led to another – better and less eating.

BY PATTI FRALIX

LET’S GET

STARTED AND KEEP THE JOURNEY TO BEING OUR BEST SELVES GOING

S

pring has sprung, and with it comes the promise of warm weather, flowers blooming, and longer days. For the next few months we will have more daylight hours, and more time in which to be outdoors. I love this time of the year, when there is beauty all around. Although there are also allergens all around, most people have found a way to work with those, so they can enjoy being outside. At least in the southeast we have successfully weathered the cold winter months, and can look forward to increasingly warmer and longer days. If we allowed ourselves to hibernate indoors the past few months, we can spring forth now and enjoy nature’s beauty.

Authentic Self, Life in Balance Counseling, Spiritual Direction, Coaching Together, we’ll transform your struggles ... self esteem, communication, relationships, fear and worry, depression, grief and loss, aging, illness, caregiving, animal loss, spirituality/religion to encourage . . . For more than a decade, the integrative counseling and healing work of AmyPierce, M.A., has benefitted hundreds of folks from all walks of life and from all faith - and no faith - traditions.

Authentic Self Center of the Triangle Integrative Healing for SpiritMindBody

919.554.2711 www.authenticself.us Perhaps like me you made some New Year’s Resolutions, which I prefer to call commitments. How have you been doing with those? 52

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Have you found that once you start doing something, it is easier to keep doing it? Also, that one good habit or routine seems to make it easier to develop and maintain others? That is what I have found to be the case. Once I got serious about eating better and less, and the weather cooperated, I found it much easier to get outside and walk for exercise. Once I walked the first time, the second time was easier. I found that getting started was the hardest part, and that once I got started, it was harder to quit than to continue. And that being consistent with one good habit made it easier to be consistent with others. Enough about me. I am honest about my struggles, hoping that in so doing, it will inspire others to deal better with theirs. Sometimes, however, we let ourselves off the hook by focusing on the struggles of others. It can become too easy to look at others and fail to look at ourselves. What do you need to get started doing? It may not be weight control and exercise for you. It could be stopping something, such as smoking or spending too much money, or getting in control of some other area of your life. Whatever it is, whatever promise you made to yourself at the beginning of the new year, there is still plenty of time in 2017 for you (and me!) to be successful.

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53 6/14/16 2:51 PM


OUR HERITAGE REVISITED THAT SAME SMALL TOWN IN EACH OF US BY AMY PIERCE

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“Our Heritage” is reprinting and updating earlier articles as a way of introducing a ballooning newcomer population to Wake Forest history and culture. Italicized lyrics are from Mary Chapin Carpenter’s I Am A Town.

’m a town in Carolina, I’m a detour on a ride for a phone call and a soda, I’m a blur from the driver’s side … We southerners like “ridin’ around.” While ridin’ around off Highway 98 recently with a friend, I noticed she suddenly took a really deep breath. Looking questioningly at her, she answered my look by saying, “It’s just that it’s so nice to be away from the interstates and all the concrete of Capital Boulevard.” I was quick to agree, noting that moving outside North Carolina’s metropolitan areas, sometimes only a few miles, can automatically bring a relaxing, deeper breath. I’m the language of the natives; I’m a cadence and a drawl … Both of us having grown up in small towns (Seaboard and Jackson, North Carolina, respectively), my friend and I began talking about the enduring internal compass the experience gave us. Clearly never far from our roots, we easily swapped stories of dirt roads, country stores, and people who knew “our people” long after we’d left and come back to visit. I’m the last gas for an hour, if you’re going 25 … Riding around also reminds us of our agricultural and smalltown history. Old filling stations and silos pepper the state’s rapidly dwindling rural landscape; and if you look closely, you’ll find fading, hand-painted advertisements on the grayed sides of barns. For decades now, hundreds of America’s thriving, selfsufficient little places have been either left behind, or gobbled up by surrounding towns’ needs for stretching room. Some no longer appear on any map other than the one of memory. Yet, for those of us who grew up in small towns, or “just outsid’a town,” there remains “somewhere back there in the dust, that same small town in each of us” that Don Henley wrote about in his song, The End of the Innocence. I am Texaco and tobacco; I am dust you leave behind … Back there in the dust of Wake Forest’s S. Main Street is one of those little self-sufficient places, the former town of Forestville. An inhabited area at least as early as the 1700s, its 1879 incorporation pre-dates those of Wake Forest College (1888) and Wake Forest (1909). Forestville’s charter was revoked in 1915. Along with Forestville Academy, a cluster of late 18th- and 19th-century homes characterized the community. The area even boasted what was possibly Wake County’s first printing press. “John Dunn’s Store” was a gathering place for people all around. Stocked thoroughly enough from suppliers in Raleigh, Baltimore, and Richmond, it was actually an early “department store,” and storekeepers from nearby communities purchased goods here for their establishments. The store even housed a post office, though generally, as in Wake Forest (one mile north), postmasters distributed mail from their homes. I am Pabst Blue Ribbon, American and ‘Southern Serves the South’… With completion of Wake County’s first railroad (the Raleigh and Gaston, 1839/40) and establishment of a depot in Forestville, seeds of change were planted for both communities, seeds that would grow and lead to hard feelings. For now, though, a depot and train were welcome additions for both. Wake Forest residents found they preferred the Forestville post office, since the “daily walk … furnished a pleasant exercise and was a kind of social promenade – and offered opportunity to see the train, no little privilege in those days,” (History of Wake Forest College, by George W. Paschal).

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I’m a church beside the highway, where the ditches never drain … Clearly, Forestville was heading toward a bright future, and the train and depot led the community to greater prosperity. “By the time of its incorporation (1879), Forestville boasted several general stores, a liquor store, a shoemaker, a manufacturer of agricultural implements, a Masonic lodge and two Baptist congregations,” (The Historic Architecture of Wake County by Kelly Lally). Churches, like general stores, were central and necessary gathering places. Forestville had two – Forestville Baptist and Friendship Chapel Baptist. One of the best preserved of Wake County’s several antebellum churches, Forestville Baptist Church (1860) is on the National Register of Historic Places. Both simple and elaborate in design, the structure expresses a quiet elegance, and remains the central landmark of the old town. I’m a Baptist like my daddy, and Jesus knows my name … Church membership consisted of both whites and slaves, but not all local slaves worshipped there. According to records at Friendship Chapel Baptist, the town’s historically African-American church, that church’s movement began with slaves worshiping secretly, “under a bush arbor.” Though accounts differ as to the slaves’ actual departure date from Forestville Baptist, several structures were built between 1867 and 1890, eventually leading to the dedication of what is now Friendship Chapel’s “old sanctuary” in May 1929. My sleep is f illed with dreams, I never can fulf ill them … 1852 could be arguably considered the year that the earlier-mentioned seeds of change visibly emerged from dormancy. In that year, College Trustees “unsuccessfully asked Raleigh & Gaston to establish a ‘place of reception’ at the College.” Twenty years later, they asked again, this time successfully. The depot’s 1874 removal to Wake Forest caused much “hard-feeling between the two towns, which extended to the dividing asunder of pastoral relations in the Forestville Baptist Church,” (George Paschal’s History of Wake Forest College). The station’s relocation was a harbinger of a greater division than just that within the church; what was inevitable would be Wake Forest’s knock on Forestville’s door – and Forestville’s deep anguish at having to answer. I am not your destination; I am clinging to my ways … By the second half of the 20th century, the two towns were visibly growing toward – and into – each other. Wake Forest considered annexation at least as early as the mid ’60s, though it was December 1983 that Commissioners’ affirmative votes made it a reality. The ensuing court case went to the NC Supreme Court; then, in February, 1988, Forestville was no more. I am memory and stillness; I am lonely in old age … The day before and the day after the ruling, the landscape looked as it had for years. Moreover, Forestville had not been an officially recognized town since 1915. “What changed?” you might ask. Those of us who grew up in small towns, like Seaboard, Jackson, and Forestville, are the ones who can answer – “Somewhere back there in the dust, that same small town in each of us.”  Thanks to Jennifer Smart for photography. Amy Pierce lives in Wake Forest’s Mill Village, where she is a writer, minister, and spiritual counselor. She can be reached at 919-554-2711 or visit www.authenticself.us.

CIRCA Magazine | April May June 2017 | www.circamagazine.com | CIRCA | April | January | www.circamagazine.com www.circamagazine.com CIRCA MagazineCIRCA October Magazine Magazine November December May June February 2009 2017 | March 2009


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