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a little collection of typo-experiments by Cinzia Bongino Schrift und Typografie with Victor Malsy Wintersemester 2015/16 Hochschule D端sseldorf 7


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0. SCHRIFT 0. SCHRIFT 1. BUCHSTABE 0. SCHRIFT 1. BUCHSTABE 2. WORT 1. BUCHSTABE 2. WORT 3. ZEILE + TEXT 2. WORT 3. ZEILE + TEXT 4. BUCH: TEXT 10


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3. ZEILE + TEXT 4. BUCH: TEXT 3. ZEILE + TEXT 4. BUCH: TEXT 5. BUCH: TEXT + BILD 6. IDENTITÄTSKARTE 5. BUCH: TEXT + BILD 6. IDENTITÄTSKARTE 6. IDENTITÄTSKARTE

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LIGHT REGULAR DIN PRO MEDIUM BOLD BLACK

DIN 1451 by Ludwig Goller FF DIN redesigned by Albert Jan Pool

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Ludwig Goller was a German engineer who worked at Siemens in Berlin. Next to being the head of the central standard office at Siemens, he chaired the DIN Committee on Type. This commitee developed and established DIN 1451 which provides standard typefaces fo public signage. Released as a norm in 1936, DIN 1451 includes DIN Engschrift and DIN Mittelschrift until today; It’s used for german road wayfinding. 15


95pt 30mm -

6pt 3mm -

DIN Pro a little collection of Medium typo-experiments by Cinzia Bongino

The DIN 1451 typeface family includes both a medium and a condensed version; an older extended version is no longer used since the early 1980s, but may still be encountered on older road signs in Germany. DIN 1451 is the typeface used on road signage in Germany and a number of other countries. It was also used on German car number plates as from 1956, until replaced there in November 2000 by FESchrift, a typeface especially designed to make the plates more tamper-proof and to optimize automatic character recognition. The typeface has gained popularity due to its wide exposure through its release as a PostScript typeface in 1990. Since then it is also used by non-

Ludwig Goller was a German engineer who worked at Siemens in Berlin. Next to being the head of the central DIN 1451 IS A standard office at SANS-SERIF Siemens, he chaired TYPEFACE THAT the DIN Committee IS WIDELY USED on Type. This FOR TRAFFIC, commitee developed ADMINISTRATIVE and established DIN AND TECHNICAL 1451 which provides APPLICATIONS. standard typefaces fo public signage. First issued as a pre-norm in 1931, and released as a norm in 1936, DIN 1451 includes DIN Engschrift and DIN Mittelschrift until today. 20pt 8mm -

Schrift und Typografie with Victor Malsy Wintersemester 2015/16 Hochschule DĂźsseldorf

governmental organisations and businesses. For graphic design and desktop publishing, several type foundries offer redesigned and extended versions of this typeface.In 1923 Stempel was the first type foundry that produced printing types according to a DIN Standard. The design follows DIN 16, an earlier standard for oblique lettering on technical drawings which had been released in 1919. In 1929, the Berthold type foundry released a similar typeface. DIN 16 had also been made available as lettering templates engraved in celluloid material for drafting use by the company of Filler and Fiebig in Berlin. Within the scope of public and technical lettering the use of the DIN 1451 typefaces spread rapidly, once they were adopted. They were released as celluloid lettering stencils for

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6pt 3mm -

14pt 6mm -

20pt 9mm -

72pt -

ABC abcd 0123

F

The DIN 1451 typeface fam a medium and a condensed extended version is no long early 1980s, but may still older road signs in German typeface used on road signa a number of other countrie on German car number pla until replaced there in Nove Schrift, a typeface especiall the plates more tamper-pro automatic character recogn has gained popularity due to through its release as a P in 1990. Since then it is a

Ludwig enginee in Berli of the ce

IT WAS DEFINED BY THE GERMAN STANDARDS BODY DIN - DEUTSCHES INSTITUT FĂœR NORMUNG (GERMA INSTITUTE FOR STANDARDIZATION IN THE STANDARD SHEET DIN 1451-SCHRIFTEN I 1931.

governmental organisation For graphic design and d several type foundries offe extended versions of this Stempel was the first t produced printing types a Standard. The design follow standard for oblique lette drawings which had been In 1929, the Berthold type similar typeface. DIN 16 ha available as lettering te in celluloid material for d company of Filler and Fiebig

sign pos number


20pt 9mm -

72pt -

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 0123456789 (,.;:!?&/@-*<=+>%#$ÂŁ)

Font

31pt -

The DIN 1451 typeface family includes both a medium and a condensed version; an older extended version is no longer used since the early 1980s, but may still be encountered on older road signs in Germany. DIN 1451 is the typeface used on road signage in Germany and a number of other countries. It was also used on German car number plates as from 1956, until replaced there in November 2000 by FESchrift, a typeface especially designed to make the plates more tamper-proof and to optimize automatic character recognition. The typeface has gained popularity due to its wide exposure through its release as a PostScript typeface in 1990. Since then it is also used by non-

Ja

72pt -

Sportzentrum Konzerthalle The DIN 1451 typeface family includes both a medium and a condensed version; an older extended version is no longer used since the early 1980s, but may still be encountered on older road signs in Germany. DIN 1451 is the typeface used on road signage in Germany and a number of other countries. It was also used on German car number plates as from 1956, 10pt until replaced there in November 2000 by FE4mm Schrift, a typeface especially designed to make the plates more tamper-proof and to optimize automatic character recognition. The typeface has gained popularity due to its wide exposure through its release as a PostScript typeface in 1990. Since then it is also used by nongovernmental organisations and businesses. THE DIN 1451 TYPEFACE For graphic design and FAMILY INCLUDES d e s k t o p BOTH A MEDIUM AND A publishing, several type CONDENSED VERSION; foundries offer AN OLDER EXTENDED redesigned and extended VERSION IS NO LONGER versions of USED SINCE THE EARLY this typeface.In 1923 Stempel 1980S, BUT MAY STILL was the first BE ENCOUNTERED ON type foundry that produced OLDER ROAD SIGNS IN printing types GERMANY. according to a DIN Standard. The design follows DIN 16, an earlier standard for oblique lettering on technical drawings which had been released in 1919. In 1929, the Berthold type foundry released a similar typeface. DIN 16 had also been made available as lettering templates engraved in celluloid material for drafting use by the company of Filler and Fiebig in Berlin. Within the scope of public and technical lettering the use of the DIN 1451 typefaces spread rapidly, once they were adopted. They were released as celluloid lettering stencils for 6pt 3mm -

Ludwig Goller was a German engineer who worked at Siemens in Berlin. Next to being the head of the central standard office at Siemens, he chaired the DIN Committee AS DEFINED on Type. This HE GERMAN commitee developed NDARDS BODY and established DIN - DEUTSCHES 1451 which provides ITUT FĂ&#x153;R standard typefaces fo MUNG (GERMAN public signage. First ITUTE FOR issued as a pre-norm NDARDIZATION) in 1931, and released HE STANDARD as a norm in 1936, ET DIN DIN 1451 includes -SCHRIFTEN IN DIN Engschrift and . DIN Mittelschrift until today. Many other DIN governmental organisations and businesses. standards (legibility, For graphic design and desktop publishing, several type foundries offer redesigned and sign posts, warning signs, house extended versions of this typeface.In 1923 Stempel was the first type foundry that numbers etc.) refer to DIN 1451. produced printing types according to a DIN

Ludwig Goller was a German engineer who worked at Siemens in Berlin. Next to being the head of the central standard office at Siemens, he chaired the DIN Committee on Type. This commitee developed and established DIN 1451 which provides standard typefaces fo public signage. First issued as a pre-norm in 1931, and released as a norm in 1936, DIN 1451 includes DIN Engschrift and DIN Mittelschrift until today. Many other DIN standards (legibility, sign posts, warning signs, house numbers etc.) refer to DIN 1451. The role of Ludwig Goller in the actual design process has not been clarified

Standard. The design follows DIN 16, an earlier standard for oblique lettering on technical drawings which had been released in 1919. In 1929, the Berthold type foundry released a similar typeface. DIN 16 had also been made available as lettering templates engraved in celluloid material for drafting use by the company of Filler and Fiebig in Berlin.

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The DIN typeface originated in the German railway system, and is therefore most associated with public transportation signage. After the unification of the German states in 1915, Prussian-Hessian Railways decided that all lettering on railway platforms and stations must also be executed according to the 1905 master drawing. The Weimar Republic and the unification of the German states lead to the merging of all state railways by Deutsche Reichsbahn in 1920, causing the Prussian railway typeface to spread across Germany. From 1920 to 1945, engineer Ludwig Goller of the DIN Committee lead the central standardization process of the typeface at Siemens & Halske in Berlin. The name DIN 1451 is an acronym for â&#x20AC;&#x153;Deutsches Institut fur Normungâ&#x20AC;?. D. Stempel AG was the first type foundry that produced printing types according to DIN Standard, and released versions of DIN to be used outside of the German railway system. By 1936, DIN became a country-wide standard and was officially adopted by Germany. The typeface was first used as a standard for traffic signs, street signs, building signs, airplanes, machinery, and house numbers.

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DIN 1451 has a corporate, clean, and functional design. It is rid of any social and cultural references. The DIN letter-forms were not derived from human hand strokes, but rather were based on a grid. The geometric aesthetic agreed with the Modernist, Constructivist, and Bauhaus designers. There are two categories within DIN 1451: Mittelschrift (medium, the main typeface) and Engschrift (condensed), that is only really used when there is not enough space to use Mittelschrift. Within each style of DIN 1451, there are no variations in stroke widths, or any fancy ornaments. Its direct nature allowed it to be legible by all, embodying a democratic and global perspective. DIN 1451 continued to be present in street life throughout the second half of the 20th century via German car number plates from 1956 to 2000. Overtime the typeface was revisited by graphic designers and adapted to digital formats, like Albert-Jan Pool a type designer who has redesigned DIN 1451 to FF DIN in 1995, transforming the typeface to be applicable to graphic design and publishing in mags, advertisements, web, and corporate logos.

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The DIN typeface originated in the German railway system, and is therefore most associated with public transportation signage.

After the unification of the German states in 1915, Prussian-Hessian Railways decided that all lettering on railway platforms and stations must also be executed according to the 1905 master drawing. The Weimar Republic and the unification of the German states lead to the merging of all state railways by Deutsche Reichsbahn in 1920, causing the Prussian railway typeface to spread across Germany. From 1920 to 1945, engineer Ludwig Goller of the DIN Committee

lead the central standardization process of the typeface at Siemens & Halske in Berlin. The name DIN 1451 is an acronym for â&#x20AC;&#x153;Deutsches Institut fur Normungâ&#x20AC;?. D. Stempel AG was the first type foundry that produced printing types according to DIN Standard, and released versions of DIN to be used outside of the German railway system. By 1936, DIN became a country-wide standard and was officially adopted by Germany. The typeface was first used as a standard for traffic signs, street signs, building signs, airplanes, machinery, and house

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numbers. DIN 1451 has a corporate, clean, and functional design. It is rid of any social and cultural references. The DIN letter-forms were not

derived from human hand strokes, but rather were based on a grid. The geometric aesthetic agreed with the Modernist, Constructivist, and Bauhaus designers. There are two categories within DIN 1451: Mittelschrift (medium, the main typeface) and Engschrift (condensed), that is only really used when there is not enough space to use Mittelschrift. Within each style of DIN 1451, there are no variations in stroke widths, or any fancy ornaments. Its direct

nature allowed it to be legible by all, embodying a democratic and global perspective. DIN 1451 continued to be present in street life throughout the second half of the 20th century via German car number plates from 1956 to 2000. Overtime the typeface was revisited by graphic designers and adapted to digital formats, like Albert-Jan Pool a type designer who has redesigned DIN 1451 to FF DIN in 1995, transforming the typeface to be applicable to graphic design and publishing in mags, advertisements, web, and corporate logos.

85


The DIN typeface originated in the German railway system, and is therefore most associated with public transportation signage. After the unification of the German states in 1915, Prussian-Hessian Railways decided that all lettering on railway platforms and stations must also be executed according to the 1905 master drawing. The Weimar Republic and the unification of the German states lead to the merging of all state railways by Deutsche Reichsbahn in 1920, causing the Prussian railway typeface to spread across Germany. From 1920 to 1945, engineer Ludwig Goller of the DIN Committee lead the central standardization process of the typeface at Siemens & Halske in Berlin. The name DIN 1451 is an acronym for â&#x20AC;&#x153;Deutsches Institut fur Normungâ&#x20AC;?. D. Stempel AG was the first type foundry that produced printing types according to DIN Standard, and released versions of DIN to be used outside of the German railway system. By 1936, DIN became a country-wide standard and was officially adopted by Germany. The typeface was first used as a standard for traffic signs, street signs, building signs, airplanes, machinery, and house numbers. DIN 1451 has a corporate, clean, and functional design. It is rid

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of any social and cultural references. The DIN letter-forms were not derived from human hand strokes, but rather were based on a grid. The geometric aesthetic agreed with the Modernist, Constructivist, and Bauhaus designers. There are two categories within DIN 1451: Mittelschrift (medium, the main typeface) and Engschrift (condensed), that is only really used when there is not enough space to use Mittelschrift. Within each style of DIN 1451, there are no variations in stroke widths, or any fancy ornaments. Its direct nature allowed it to be legible by all, embodying a democratic and global perspective. DIN 1451 continued to be present in street life throughout the second half of the 20th century via German car number plates from 1956 to 2000. Overtime the typeface was revisited by graphic designers and adapted to digital formats, like Albert-Jan Pool a type designer who has redesigned DIN 1451 to FF DIN in 1995, transforming the typeface to be applicable to graphic design and publishing in mags, advertisements, web, and corporate logos.

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The DIN typeface originated in the German railway system, and is therefore most associated with public transportation signage. After the unification of the German states in 1915, Prussian-Hessian Railways decided that all lettering on railway platforms and stations must also be executed according to the 1905 master drawing. The Weimar Republic and the unification of the German states lead to the merging of all state railways by Deutsche Reichsbahn in 1920, causing the Prussian railway typeface to spread across Germany. From 1920 to 1945, engineer Ludwig

Goller of the DIN Committee lead the central standardization process of the typeface at Siemens & Halske in Berlin. The name DIN 1451 is an acronym for â&#x20AC;&#x153;Deutsches Institut fur Normungâ&#x20AC;?. D. Stempel AG was the first type foundry that produced printing types according to DIN Standard, and released versions of DIN to be used outside of the German railway system. By 1936, DIN became a country-wide standard and was officially adopted by Germany. The typeface was first used as a standard for traffic signs, street signs, building signs, airplanes, machinery, and house numbers. DIN 1451 has a corporate, clean,

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and functional design. It is rid of any social and cultural references. The DIN letterforms were not derived from human hand strokes, but rather were based on a grid. The geometric aesthetic agreed with the Modernist, Constructivist, and Bauhaus designers. There are two categories within DIN 1451: Mittelschrift (medium, the main typeface) and Engschrift (condensed), that is only really used when there is not enough space to use Mittelschrift. Within each style of DIN 1451, there are no variations in stroke widths, or any fancy ornaments. Its direct

nature allowed it to be legible by all, embodying a democratic and global perspective. DIN 1451 continued to be present in street life throughout the second half of the 20th century via German car number plates from 1956 to 2000. Overtime the typeface was revisited by graphic designers and adapted to digital formats, like Albert-Jan Pool a type designer who has redesigned DIN 1451 to FF DIN in 1995, transforming the typeface to be applicable to graphic design and publishing in mags, advertisements, web, and corporate logos.

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two columns Bea dus as auta volorestrum imagnat atector poreri vellessi dolupta qui inullut invelenimus dolut int eles et rem quas mi, velitatium quate aut volores quam, con nobis ium qui ut quias ad est, omnimin cuptat optat. Et expedi tem doluptatem ipsam sincien ecerspist dolorae dollorionem volupta qui sitibusdam si consed ut veriat. Les vollabo rationsero optaeriae sequaecest, simperc hictatiis et ute periae vidis dolecullorit dus. Ces doloribea venes as Bea dus as auta volorestrum imagnat atector poreri vellessi dolupta qui inullut invelenimus dolut int eles et rem quas mi, velitatium quate aut volores quam, con nobis ium qui ut quias ad est, omnimin cuptat optat. Et expedi tem doluptatem ipsam sincien ecerspist dolorae dollorionem volupta qui sitibusdam si consed ut veriat. Les vollabo rationsero optaeriae sequaecest, simperc hictatiis et ute periae vidis

Bea dus as auta volorestrum imagnat atector poreri vellessi dolupta qui inullut invelenimus dolut int eles et rem quas mi, velitatium quate aut volores quam, con nobis ium qui ut quias ad est, omnimin cuptat optat. Et expedi tem doluptatem ipsam sincien ecerspist dolorae dollorionem volupta qui sitibusdam si consed ut veriat. Les vollabo rationsero optaeriae sequaecest, simperc hictatiis et ute periae vidis dolecullorit dus. Ces doloribea venes as Bea dus as auta volorestrum imagnat atector poreri vellessi dolupta qui inullut invelenimus dolut int eles et rem quas mi, velitatium quate aut volores quam, con nobis ium qui ut quias ad est, omnimin cuptat optat

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The DIN typeface originated in the German railway system, and is therefore most associated with public transportation signage. After the unification of the German states in 1915, Prussian-Hessian Railways decided that all lettering on railway platforms and stations must also be executed according to the 1905 master drawing. The Weimar Republic and the unification of the German states lead to the merging of all state railways by Deutsche Reichsbahn in 1920, causing the Prussian railway typeface to spread across Germany. From 1920 to 1945, engineer Ludwig Goller of the DIN Committee lead the central standardization process of the typeface at Siemens & Halske in Berlin. The name DIN 1451 is an

acronym for â&#x20AC;&#x153;Deutsches Institut fur Normungâ&#x20AC;?. D. Stempel AG was the first type foundry that produced printing types according to DIN Standard, and released versions of DIN to be used outside of the German railway system. By 1936, DIN became a country-wide standard and was officially adopted by Germany. The typeface was first used as a standard for traffic signs, street signs, building signs, airplanes, machinery, and house numbers. DIN 1451 has a corporate, clean, and functional design. It is rid of any social and cultural references. The DIN letter-forms were not derived from human hand strokes, but rather were based on a grid. The geometric

92


aesthetic agreed with the Modernist, Constructivist, and Bauhaus designers. There are two categories within DIN 1451: Mittelschrift (medium, the main typeface) and Engschrift (condensed), that is only really used when there is not enough space to use Mittelschrift. Within each style of DIN 1451, there are no variations in stroke widths, or any fancy ornaments. Its direct nature allowed it to be legible by all, embodying a democratic and global perspective. DIN 1451 continued to be present in street life throughout the second half of the 20th century via German car number plates from 1956 to 2000. Overtime the typeface was revisited

by graphic designers and adapted to digital formats, like Albert-Jan Pool a type designer who has redesigned DIN 1451 to FF DIN in 1995, transforming the typeface to be applicable to graphic design and publishing in mags, advertisements, web, and corporate logos.

93


The DIN typeface originated in the German railway system, and is therefore most associated with public transportation signage. After the unification of the German states in 1915, Prussian-Hessian Railways decided that all lettering on railway platforms and stations must also be executed according to the 1905 master drawing. The Weimar Republic and the unification of the German states lead to the merging of all state railways by Deutsche Reichsbahn in 1920, causing the Prussian railway typeface to spread across Germany. From 1920 to 1945, engineer Ludwig

Goller of the DIN Committee lead the central standardization process of the typeface at Siemens & Halske in Berlin. The name DIN 1451 is an acronym for â&#x20AC;&#x153;Deutsches Institut fur Normungâ&#x20AC;?. D. Stempel AG was the first type foundry that produced printing types according to DIN Standard, and released versions of DIN to be used outside of the German railway system. By 1936, DIN became a country-wide standard and was officially adopted by Germany. The typeface was first used as a standard for traffic signs, street signs, building signs, airplanes, machinery, and house

94


numbers. DIN 1451 has a corporate, clean, and functional design. It is rid of any social and cultural references. The DIN letter-forms were not derived from human hand strokes, but rather were based on a grid. The geometric aesthetic agreed with the Modernist, Constructivist, and Bauhaus designers. There are two categories within DIN 1451: Mittelschrift (medium, the main typeface) and Engschrift (condensed), that is only really used when there is not enough space to use Mittelschrift. Within each style of DIN 1451, there are no variations in stroke widths,

or any fancy ornaments. Its direct nature allowed it to be legible by all, embodying a democratic and global perspective. DIN 1451 continued to be present in street life throughout the second half of the 20th century via German car number plates from 1956 to 2000. Overtime the typeface was revisited by graphic designers and adapted to digital formats, like Albert-Jan Pool a type designer who has redesigned DIN 1451 to FF DIN in 1995, transforming the typeface to be applicable to graphic design and publishing in mags, advertisements, web, and corporate logos.

95


The DIN typeface originated in the German railway system, and is therefore most associated with public transportation signage.

After the unification of the German states in 1915, Prussian-Hessian Railways decided that all lettering on railway platforms and stations must also be executed according to the 1905 master drawing. The Weimar Republic and the unification of the German states lead to the merging of all state railways by Deutsche Reichsbahn in 1920, causing the Prussian railway typeface to spread across Germany.

From 1920 to 1945, engineer Ludwig Goller of the DIN Committee lead the central standardization process of the typeface at Siemens & Halske in Berlin. The name DIN 1451 is an acronym for â&#x20AC;&#x153;Deutsches Institut fur Normungâ&#x20AC;?. D. Stempel AG was the first type foundry that produced printing types according to DIN Standard, and released versions of DIN to be used outside of the German railway system. By 1936, DIN became a country-wide standard and was officially adopted by Germany. The typeface was first used as a standard for traffic signs, street signs, building signs, airplanes, machinery, and house numbers.

96


DIN 1451 has a corporate, clean, and functional design. It is rid of any social and cultural references. The DIN letter-forms were not derived from human hand strokes, but rather were based on a grid. The geometric aesthetic agreed with the Modernist, Constructivist, and Bauhaus designers. There are two categories within DIN 1451: Mittelschrift (medium, the main typeface) and Engschrift (condensed),

that is only really used when there is not enough space to use Mittelschrift. Within each style of DIN 1451, there are no variations in stroke widths, or any fancy ornaments. Its direct nature allowed it to be legible by all, embodying a democratic and global perspective. DIN 1451 continued to be present in street life throughout the second half of the 20th century via German car number plates from 1956 to 2000. Overtime the typeface was revisited by graphic designers and adapted to digital formats, like Albert-Jan Pool a type designer who has redesigned DIN 1451 to FF DIN in 1995, transforming the typeface to be applicable to graphic design and publishing in mags, advertisements, web, and corporate logos.

97


The DIN typeface originated in the German railway system, and is therefore most associated with public transportation signage. After the unification of the German states in 1915, Prussian-Hessian Railways decided that all lettering on railway platforms and stations must also be executed according to the 1905 master drawing. The Weimar Republic and the unification of the German states lead to the merging of all state railways by Deutsche Reichsbahn in 1920, causing the Prussian railway typeface to spread across Germany. From 1920 to 1945, engineer Ludwig Goller of the DIN Committee lead

the central standardization process of the typeface at Siemens & Halske in Berlin. The name DIN 1451 is an acronym for â&#x20AC;&#x153;Deutsches Institut fur Normungâ&#x20AC;?. D. Stempel AG was the first type foundry that produced printing types according to DIN Standard, and released versions of DIN to be used outside of the German railway system. By 1936, DIN became a country-wide standard and was officially adopted by Germany. The typeface was first used as a standard for traffic signs, street signs, building signs, airplanes, machinery, and house numbers. DIN 1451 has a corporate, clean, and fun-

98


ctional design. It is rid of any social and cultural references. The DIN letter-forms were not derived from human hand strokes, but rather were based on a grid. The geometric aesthetic agreed with the Modernist, Constructivist, and Bauhaus designers. There are two categories within DIN 1451: Mittelschrift (medium, the main typeface) and Engschrift (condensed), that is only really used when there is not enough space to use Mittelschrift. Within each style of DIN 1451, there are no variations in stroke widths, or any fancy ornaments. Its direct nature allowed it to be legible by all, em-

bodying a democratic and global perspective. DIN 1451 continued to be present in street life throughout the second half of the 20th century via German car number plates from 1956 to 2000. Overtime the typeface was revisited by graphic designers and adapted to digital formats, like Albert-Jan Pool a type designer who has redesigned DIN 1451 to FF DIN in 1995, transforming the typeface to be applicable to graphic design and publishing in mags, advertisements, web, and corporate logos.

99


not justified Bea dus as auta volorestrum imagnat atector poreri vellessi dolupta qui inullut invelenimus dolut int eles et rem quas mi, velitatium quate aut volores quam, con nobis ium qui ut quias ad est, omnimin cuptat optat. Et expedi tem doluptatem ipsam sincien ecerspist dolorae dollorionem volupta qui sitibusdam si consed ut veriat. Les vollabo rationsero optaeriae sequaecest, simperc hictatiis et ute periae vidis dolecullorit dus Ces doloribea venes as Bea dus as auta volorestrum imagnat atector poreri

vellessi dolupta qui inullut invelenimus dolut int eles et rem quas mi, velitatium quate aut volores quam, con nobis ium qui ut quias ad est, omnimin cuptat optat. Et expedi tem doluptatem ipsam sincien ecerspist dolorae dollorionem volupta qui sitibusdam si consed ut veriat. Les vollabo rationsero optaeriae sequaecest, simperc hictatiis et ute periae vidis dolecullorit dus. Ces doloribea venes as

100


101


The DIN typeface originated in the German railway system, and is therefore most associated with public transportation signage. After the unification of the German states in 1915, Prussian-Hessian Railways decided that all lettering on railway platforms and stations must also be executed according to the 1905 master drawing. The Weimar Republic and the unification of the German states lead to the merging of all state railways by Deutsche Reichsbahn in 1920, causing the Prussian railway typeface to spread across Germany. From 1920 to 1945, engineer Ludwig Goller of the DIN Committee lead the central standardization process of the typeface at Siemens & Halske in Berlin. The name DIN 1451 is an acronym for â&#x20AC;&#x153;Deutsches Institut fur Normungâ&#x20AC;?. D. Stempel AG was the first type foundry that produced printing types according to DIN Standard, and released versions of DIN to be used outside of the German railway system. By 1936, DIN became a country-wide standard and was officially adopted by Germany. The typeface was first used as a standard for traffic signs, street signs, building signs, airplanes, machinery, and house numbers.

102


DIN 1451 has a corporate, clean, and functional design. It is rid of any social and cultural references. The DIN letter-forms were not derived from human hand strokes, but rather were based on a grid. The geometric aesthetic agreed with the Modernist, Constructivist, and Bauhaus designers. There are two categories within DIN 1451: Mittelschrift (medium, the main typeface) and Engschrift (condensed), that is only really used when there is not enough space to use Mittelschrift. Within each style of DIN 1451, there are no variations in stroke widths, or any fancy ornaments. Its direct nature allowed it to be legible by all, embodying a democratic and global perspective. DIN 1451 continued to be present in street life throughout the second half of the 20th century via German car number plates from 1956 to 2000. Overtime the typeface was revisited by graphic designers and adapted to digital formats, like Albert-Jan Pool a type designer who has redesigned DIN 1451 to FF DIN in 1995, transforming the typeface to be applicable to graphic design and publishing in magazines, advertisements, web, and corporate logos

103


The DIN typeface originated in the German railway system, and is therefore most associated with public transportation signage.

After the unification of the German states in 1915, Prussian-Hessian Railways decided that all lettering on railway platforms and stations must also be executed according to the 1905 master drawing. The Weimar Republic and the unification of the German states lead to the merging of all state railways by Deutsche Reichsbahn in 1920, causing the Prussian railway typeface to spread across Germany. From 1920 to 1945, engineer Ludwig Goller of the DIN Committee lead the central standardization process of the typeface at Siemens & Halske in

Berlin. The name DIN 1451 is an acronym for â&#x20AC;&#x153;Deutsches Institut fur Normungâ&#x20AC;?. D. Stempel AG was the first type foundry that produced printing types according to DIN Standard, and released versions of DIN to be used outside of the German railway system. By 1936, DIN became a country-wide standard and was officially adopted by Germany. The typeface was first used as a standard for traffic signs, street signs, building signs, airplanes, machinery, and house numbers. DIN 1451 has a corporate, clean, and functional design.

104


It is rid of any social and cultural references. The DIN letter-forms were not derived from human hand strokes, but were based on a grid. The geometric aesthetic agreed with the Modernist, Constructivist, and Bauhaus designers. There are two categories within DIN 1451: Mittelschrift (medium, the main typeface) and Engschrift (condensed), that is only really used when there is not enough space to use Mittelschrift. Within each style of DIN 1451, there are no variations in stroke widths, or any fancy ornaments. Its direct nature allowed it to be legible

by all, embodying a democratic and global perspective. DIN 1451 continued to be present in street life throughout the second half of the 20th century via German car number plates from 1956 to 2000. Overtime the typeface was revisited by graphic designers and adapted to digital formats, like Albert-Jan Pool a type designer who has redesigned DIN 1451 to FF DIN in 1995, transforming the typeface to be applicable to graphic design and publishing in magazines, advertisements, web, and corporate logos.

105


The DIN typeface originated in the German railway system, and is therefore most associated with public transportation signage. After the unification of the German states in 1915, Prussian-Hessian Railways decided that all lettering on railway platforms and stations must also be executed according to the 1905 master drawing. The Weimar Republic and the unification of the German states

lead to the merging of all state railways by Deutsche Reichsbahn in 1920, causing the Prussian railway typeface to spread across Germany. From 1920 to 1945, engineer Ludwig Goller of the DIN Committee lead the central standardization process of the typeface at Siemens & Halske in Berlin. The name DIN 1451 is an acronym for â&#x20AC;&#x153;Deutsches Institut fur Normungâ&#x20AC;?.

106

D. Stempel AG was the first type foundry that produced printing types according to DIN Standard, and released versions of DIN to be used outside of the German railway system. By 1936, DIN became a country-wide standard and was officially adopted by Germany. The typeface was first used as a standard for traffic signs, street signs, building signs, airplanes, machinery, and house numbers.


DIN 1451 has a corporate, clean, and functional design. It is rid of any social and cultural references. The DIN letter-forms were not derived from human hand strokes, but rather were based on a grid. The geometric aesthetic agreed with the Modernist, Constructivist, and Bauhaus designers. There are two categories within DIN 1451: Mittelschrift (medium, the main

typeface) and Engschrift (condensed), that is only really used when there is not enough space to use Mittelschrift. Within each style of DIN 1451, there are no variations in stroke widths, or any fancy ornaments. Its direct nature allowed it to be legible by all, embodying a democratic and global perspective. DIN 1451 continued to be present in street life throughout the second half of the 20th century via

107

German car number plates from 1956 to 2000. Overtime the typeface was revisited by graphic designers and adapted to digital formats, like Albert-Jan Pool a type designer who has redesigned DIN 1451 to FF DIN in 1995, transforming the typeface to be applicable to graphic design and publishing in magazines, advertisements, web, and corporate logos


The DIN typeface originated in the German railway system, and is therefore most associated with public transportation signage.

After the unification of the German states in 1915, Prussian-Hessian Railways decided that all lettering on railway platforms and stations must also be executed according to the 1905 master drawing. The Weimar Republic and the unification of the German states lead to the merging of all state railways by Deutsche Reichsbahn in 1920, causing the Prussian railway typeface to spread across Germany.

From 1920 to 1945, engineer Ludwig Goller of the DIN Committee lead the central standardization process of the typeface at Siemens & Halske in Berlin. The name DIN 1451 is an acronym for â&#x20AC;&#x153;Deutsches Institut fur Normungâ&#x20AC;?. D. Stempel AG was the first type foundry that produced printing types according to DIN Standard, and released versions of DIN to be used outside of the German railway system.

By 1936, DIN became a country-wide standard and was officially adopted by Germany. The typeface was first used as a standard for traffic signs, street signs, building signs, airplanes, machinery, and house numbers.

108


DIN 1451 has a corporate, clean, and functional design. It is rid of any social and cultural references. The DIN letter-forms were not derived from human hand strokes, but rather were based on a grid. The geometric aesthetic agreed with the Modernist, Constructivist, and Bauhaus designers.

There are two categories within DIN 1451: Mittelschrift (medium, the main typeface) and Engschrift (condensed), that is only really used when there is not enough space to use Mittelschrift. Within each style of DIN 1451, there are no variations in stroke widths, or any fancy ornaments. Its direct nature allowed it to be legible by all, embodying a democratic and global perspective.

109

DIN 1451 continued to be present in street life throughout the second half of the 20th century via German car number plates from 1956 to 2000. Overtime the typeface was revisited by graphic designers and adapted to digital formats, like Albert-Jan Pool a type designer who has redesigned DIN 1451 to FF DIN in 1995, transforming the typeface to be applicable to graphic design and publishing in magazines, advertisements, web, and corporate logos


After the unification of the German states in 1915, Prussian-Hessian Railways decided that all lettering on railway platforms and stations must also be executed according to the 1905 master drawing. The Weimar Republic and the unification of the German states lead to the merging of all state railways by The DIN typeface Deutsche Reichsbahn originated in the in 1920, causing the German railway system, Prussian railway and is therefore most typeface to spread associated with public across Germany. From transportation signage. 1920 to 1945, engineer Ludwig Goller of the DIN Committee lead the central standardization process of the typeface at Siemens & Halske in Berlin. The name DIN 1451 is an acronym for â&#x20AC;&#x153;Deutsches Institut fur Normungâ&#x20AC;?. D. Stempel AG was the first type foundry that produced printing types according to DIN Standard, and released versions of DIN to be used outside of the German railway system.

By 1936, DIN became a country-wide standard and was officially adopted by Germany. The typeface was first used as a standard for traffic signs, street signs, building signs, airplanes, machinery, and house numbers.

110


DIN 1451 has a corporate, clean, and functional design. It is rid of any social and cultural references. The DIN letter-forms were not derived from human hand strokes, but rather were based on a grid. The geometric aesthetic agreed with the Modernist, Constructivist, and Bauhaus designers. There are two categories within DIN 1451: Mittelschrift (medium, the main typeface) and Engschrift (condensed), that is only DIN 1451 continued to really used when there be present in street life is not enough space to throughout the second use Mittelschrift. Within half of the 20th century each style of DIN 1451, via German car number there are no variations plates from 1956 to in stroke widths, or 2000. any fancy ornaments. Its direct nature allowed it to be legible by all, embodying a democratic and global perspective.

Overtime the typeface was revisited by graphic designers and adapted to digital formats, like Albert-Jan Pool a type designer who has redesigned DIN 1451 to FF DIN in 1995, transforming the typeface to be applicable to graphic design and publishing in magazines, advertisements, web, and logos.

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OCEAN SEA Alessandro Baricco

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graphic design and other stuff

cinziabongino.com +39 334 344 7269 Turin, Italy

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cinziabongino.com graphic design and other stuff +39 334 3447269 Turin, Italy

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graphic design and other stuff

cinziabongino@gmail.com +39 334 344 7269 Turin, Italy

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cinzia bongino

graphic design and other stuff

cinziabongino@gmail.com +39 334 344 7269 Turin, Italy

onignob aiznic

moc.liamg@onignobaiznic ylatI ,niruT 9627 443 433 93+

161

ngised cihparg f f u t s r e h to d n a


cinzia bongino graphic design and other stuff

cinziabongino@gmail.com +39 334 344 7269 Turin, Italy

onignob aiznic moc.liamg@onignobaiznic ylatI ,niruT 9627 443 433 93+

162

ngised cihparg f f u t s r e h to d n a


cinzia bongino

graphic design and other stuff

cinziabongino@gmail.com +39 334 344 7269 Turin, Italy

onignob aiznic

moc.liamg@onignobaiznic ylatI ,niruT 9627 443 433 93+

163

ngised cihparg f f u t s r e h to d n a


aiznic onignob

cinzia bongino

graphic design and other stuff

ngised cihparg f f u t s r e h to d n a

cinziabongino@gmail.com +39 334 344 7269 Turin, Italy

moc.liamg@onignobaiznic ylatI ,niruT 9627 443 433 93+

164


graphic design and other stuff

ngised cihparg f f u t s r e h to d n a

cinziabongino@gmail.com +39 334 344 7269 Turin, Italy

moc.liamg@onignobaiznic ylatI ,niruT 9627 443 433 93+

cinzia bongino

aiznic onignob

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Din Pro Medium 32pt 100pt paper 90gr/m² 200gr/m² print und binding Hochschule Dϋsseldorf


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Profile for Cinzia Bongino

din pro medium  

A little collection of typo-experiments realised during the class of Victor Malsi. Hochschule Duesseldorf 2016

din pro medium  

A little collection of typo-experiments realised during the class of Victor Malsi. Hochschule Duesseldorf 2016

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