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NKU Center for Integrative Natural Science and Mathematics

Annual Report 2012 - 2013


R E P OR T A N N U A L C IN S A M

credits EDITORs Madhura Kulkarni, Ph.D. John Farrar, Ph.D.

CONTRIBUTORS Kristi Haik, Ph.D. Madhura Kulkarni, Ph.D. Beth Russell, ’12 Danielle Cirelli Emily Esham

graphic design Rebecca Schneider Beth Russell, ‘12

PHOTOGRAPHY & ARt Beth Russell, ‘12 Daniel Wilcox-Netepczuk Rebecca Schneider Timothy D. Sofranko Madhura Kulkarni, Ph.D. Google Earth

CINSAM Founders Hall 519 Northern Kentucky University Nunn Drive Highland Heights, KY 41099

url http://cinsam.nku.edu / phone

(859) 572-5381

/

© 2013 Northern Kentucky University, Nunn Drive, Highland Heights, KY 41099

fax

(859) 572-6179


C IN S A M A N N U A L

Table of

Welcome 3

Letter from the director

4

Letter from the deans

5

CINSAM Impact

Focus On:

Educators

15

31

Math Counts & First Lego League Competition

32

Hearts and Minds & GearUP Career Discovery Day

33

Science and Engineering Fair of Northern Kentucky

34

Elementary Science Days

Alliances

Biology, Chemistr y, Computer Science, Early Childhood, Earth and Space, Elementar y Math and Science, Mathematics, Middle School Science, and Physics

Our Team 21

R E P OR T

Contents

Faculty Research Grants

Focus On: 25

The Next Generation STEM Classroom

Focus On:

P-12 Students

7

Welcome Dr. John Farrar

8

Betty Stephens’ Retirement

9

CINSAM Faculty and Staff

11

Reaching Throughout the World

12

Student Spotlights

13

Faculty Spotlights

14

Teacher Spotlights

CINSAM welcomes its new director to NKU from Tifton, Georgia

27

Undergraduate Students 35

Integrative Natural Science Courses

36

CINSAM Scholarships

37

Project SOAR

38

Project FORCE

Summer Camps Math/Stats, Middle School STEM, Astronomy, Fun with Science, JAVA, Aeronautics, Engineering, Summer Science Sampler for Migrant Students, and the YMCA Black and Latino Achievers

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R E P OR T A N N U A L C IN S A M

letter from the

DIRECTOR

Dear Friends, It has been an exciting year at the Center for Integrative Natural Science and Mathematics (CINSAM)! I am proud to share with you our accomplishments from the 2012-2013 fiscal year as we further expanded our efforts to improve P-16 science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education by advancing and integrating teaching, learning, and scholarship in the STEM disciplines in Kentucky. First, I’d like to say goodbye to Ms. Betty Stephens, CINSAM’s Outreach Coordinator. Betty has been with CINSAM since 2001! She came to NKU to develop the outreach programs at CINSAM, drawing on her 30 years of relationships with northern Kentucky schools. She has had tremendous success in establishing relationships with our P-12 partners and we will miss her greatly. During 2012-2013, we continued implementation of our strategic plan and successfully found a new Director, Dr. John Farrar, whom you can read about in this report. We are excited to highlight other achievements of CINSAM, including our summer camps, Alliances, and the Next Generation STEM Classroom project (formerly the South Counties Project). You will also read about the people who make CINSAM a success, from NKU students and faculty to local teachers and our outstanding CINSAM staff. Finally, CINSAM would like to thank its corporate supporters: Toyota USA Foundation, Ashland Inc. Foundation, and the Procter & Gamble Company. These partnerships enable us to extend our programs into the greater Cincinnati and rural Kentucky areas engaging more and more students and teachers across the region. Sincerely,

Kristi L. Haik, Ph.D. Interim Director/Associate Professor of Biological Sciences

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C IN S A M A N N U A L R E P OR T

letter from the

DEANS

F

or over 12 years, CINSAM has been a defining program of NKU. As deans, we are thrilled to share with you the latest successes that CINSAM has achieved through its work with the faculty and staff of the colleges of Arts & Sciences, Education & Human Services and Informatics. The mission and goals of CINSAM are woven throughout our colleges’ goals and core values, and CINSAM provides a fulcrum to support and integrate our activities. CINSAM brings together the chairs of our departments in regular meetings to explore new ways in which administrators and faculty members can work together to be more effective in achieving the CINSAM mission. CINSAM is also spearheading a National Science Foundation grant proposal that engages all three colleges, by promoting the use of evidence-based teaching and learning in our classes in the science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) disciplines. We enthusiastically support the efforts of CINSAM to integrate our disciplines and partner with our faculty to foster innovation and creativity. By awarding competitive research grants, CINSAM stimulates cross-disciplinary interaction and creates key experiential learning opportunities for our undergraduates. CINSAM also provides outreach opportunities for our faculty to the local schools, opportunities our faculty members embrace! Above all, CINSAM provides an extra layer of cohesiveness to our colleges that we do not see at many other universities, uniting us in the common mission to improve P-16 teaching, learning, and scholarship across the STEM disciplines.

S am ue l J. Zac ha ry

, P h. D.

coll ege of arts & scie nces

K ev in G. K ir by , P coll ege of info rma tics

h. D.

M . M ar k W as ic

sk o, P h. D.

coll ege of educ atio n & hum an serv ices

4


and

R E P OR T C IN S A M

A N N U A L

VISION, MISSION,

GOALS

VISION

MISSION

To facilitate NKU becoming a nationally recognized leader in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) education and scholarship.

To improve P-16 STEM education by advancing and integrating teaching, learning and scholarship in the STEM disciplines.

GOALS 1

Facilitate the recruitment, retention and graduation of STEM students.

2 Promote faculty scholarship

and undergraduate research in STEM disciplines.

3 Enhance the teaching of

science and mathematics at P-16 levels.

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C IN S A M

CINSAM

A N N U A L

IMPACT

R E P OR T

CINSAM staff and our partners have worked hard over the past year to make a difference in Northern Kentucky and beyond. This work has resulted in quite an impact.

2760

In the 2012-2013 year, CINSAM reached over 5,000 people to improve P-16 STEM education by advancing and integrating teaching, learning and scholarship in the STEM disciplines!

NKU STUDENT

NKU FACULTY & STAFF

PARTICIPATION

PARTICIPATION

25

125

22

25

130

100

20

15

15

75

11 7

7

10

50

7 4

5

2

1

50

3

2

25

1

54

30

4

2

0

0 P P P T T P P Y IR PS M M AY ES KY M M EC AM GH DA FA SS CA CA HO UC ED CA CA NI E OJ SC G G LA CE E KS E NT C M NC N PR R N I C C NC I I T SC IE O R N IEN N KE IE SA M M U E C E D E C I C I W P N S M S U E NA OO CI NE SC SC HO LS RA RY RY GI SR AR NC ET RO NA TA TA ITH ITH OG M AS EN GE AE LIA IO W W EN PR EN CL KU N AL N M EG M A E N U E U R E V F K EL NC EL JA LF IE 13 FN EL 12 SC 20 SE 20 G LL ON N I I A T R F A SP ER EN TG X NE

P-12 STUDENT

P-12 TEACHER

PARTICIPATION

PARTICIPATION

391

500

20

100 20

5

163

136

200

10

200

12 8

200

200

200

215

212

15

250

250

400 300

P T Y P M ES AY M DA GH SS CA ED CA NI CE LA G E NC IN AM SC IEN IE NC S M D C E C I N S M S CI HO SC RA RY RY ET TA TA ITH OG M W EN EN PR KU N M M A N E U E V EL EL JA LF 13 12 EL 20 20 G LL N A I F R SP

150 40 30

9

2

0

23 17

24

21 16

20 10 0

P M CA

T Y Y IR N PS CT N KY DA GH DA FA JE HO UC TIO TIO NI CE E CE RO TA CE KS TA NT M C P N R N N N E N E A N E E O K SE CI IE SE CI CI W OM NS UP RE E RE SC CI YS YS LS RO LP AR LP NC AR AR SS NA ITH GE NA NT W NA LA NT LIA IO E L E O C O G I N A E G GI EM RE EM FU RE K NC RE EL EL A IE 13 FN TA 12 ST SC 20 SE 20 NS /N N G L A L T TIO RIN FA KS RA SP NE GE T X NE

P P P P Y T P Y Y IR M M M M EC DA AM DA CK FA CA CA E CA CA E E OJ TU SC G G NC PR CE IC NC CE NC IN IN EN E T E I N E R N I K I M M U E IE IE C O SC M SC UP NA NE SC SC Y LS RA RO RY GI AR RO AR SS NA TA ITH ITH OG EN GE AE NT IO W LA W EN PR E C G N N M M E U E RE VA FU LE K EL NC LF JA 2E IE 13 FN EL 01 SC 20 SE N G L2 L TIO RIN FA SP RA NE GE T X NE

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R E P OR T A N N U A L C IN S A M

welcome to the new

DIRECTOR

D

r. Farrar will become Director of CINSAM, effective July 1, 21013. He comes to us from Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College in Tifton, GA, where he has taught chemistry since 2005 and where he has served as Head of the Science Department since 2009. Before going to ABAC, John taught for three years at Indiana University in Purdue and before that for three years at the University of Saint Francis in Fort Wayne, IN. John completed a B.S. in chemistry at Western Kentucky University and an M.S. and Ph.D. in organic chemistry at Vanderbilt University. As head of ABAC’s science department, John supervises thirteen full-time faculty, twelve part-time faculty, and one staff member. He has been active at all levels of leadership from program building to facility planning to grantsmanship. Within the past couple years, he has helped to grow biology majors to approximately 150 and consequently promoted development of a new B.S. degree in biology. To accommodate growing numbers of students, he succeeded in securing additional lines and now is in beginning stages of planning for a new laboratory science building. To assist students in their education, John serves as co-PI and completed much of the writing for an NSF $600,000 scholarship grant, and now he sits on the three-member steering committee to oversee daily implementation of the grant. In his letter of application for the CINSAM directorship, John emphasizes the importance of academic freedom and collegial governance in his administrative style. He values academic rigor and professionalism, and he describes faculty and staff as “. . . the greatest intellectual resource of the institution.”

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Although capable and willing to make tough or unpopular decisions, John prefers consensus building and collegial collaboration in moving academic and administrative agendas. This is certainly borne out by John’s professional references who describe his management style in glowing ways. One person states that John is “a marvelous leader and motivator, always looking at new technologies and new ideas.” Another remarks how John “has a heart for STEM” and is “an intelligent organizer and problem-solver.” And still another remarks upon John’s honesty and how he “believes in standards and fairness for everyone.” John’s leadership extends beyond department boundaries. At ABAC and previous universities, he chaired the collegewide promotion and tenure committee and the college-wide assessment committee, and currently he serves as chair of the University System of Georgia’s Regent’s Advisory Committee on chemistry. This committee is populated by chemistry faculty from each of Georgia’s 35 universities and addresses business related to degree and course proposals, faculty load, online education, and more. Further, he has been one of three liaisons between Georgia’s State University System and the Technical College System to determine transfer of chemistry courses. He also helped to plan a regional STEM teaching institute in Tifton and led the focus group on chemistry. John remains active in scholarship and teaching. He has been co-PI and/or co-writer on five NSF or other successful grants and has published and presented widely. He professes “. . . an ongoing interest in the integration of technology in appropriate ways in the classroom” and has implemented into his teaching the clicker personal response system, electronic homework systems, podcasts and then videos of lectures, and most recently he has experimented with massively open online courses (MOOCs). Faculty and students have nominated John for the college-wide excellence in teaching and advising awards.


C IN S A M R E P OR T

RETIREMENT

A N N U A L

betty stephens’

T

his June, we say good-bye to one of CINSAM’s first team members. Betty Stephens came to CINSAM in 2001 after having taught math and physics at Newport High School. As CINSAM’s Outreach Coordinator, she built strong ties between NKU and northern Kentucky’s school districts. She brought more than 3 decades of experience teaching in northern Kentucky to bear on the programs she helped established and develop at CINSAM, including our summer camps, CINSAM Alliances, CINSAM Night, and Elementary Science Days, among many others. As a result of these programs, CINSAM continues to enjoy strong relationships with schools, non-profits, and families in our region and Betty Stephens can take much of the credit. On a more personal note, Betty has been a friend, a mentor, and source of institutional knowledge for the rest of us here at CINSAM. She could always be counted on for a story about how CINSAM got through a tough situation or a history of education in northern Kentucky. Her knowledge of our region’s systems and people has provided newer CINSAM employees with quick access to a wealth of resources. As we lose Betty, we also lose this precious asset, and we will very much miss her for it. Even as we say good-bye, we hope to see her return to NKU soon to say hi, visit students, and even perhaps teach another section of Pre-calculus. Whatever lies in store for you, Betty, we wish you best on your adventure!

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R E P OR T A N N U A L C IN S A M

CINSAM

Staff Kristi Haik, PHD INTERIM DIRECTOR Interim Director Dr. Kristi Haik led CINSAM through the 2012-2013 year. In addition to directing all of CINSAM’s efforts, she assisted in coordinating Project SOAR for under-represented and academically talented undergraduate students. Dr. Haik was hired as the chair for the department of Biological Sciences on July 1, 2013. She earned her Ph.D. in applied experimental psychology from Central Michigan University.

MADHURA KULKARNI, PHD INTERIM ASSISTANT DIRECTOR Dr. Kulkarni has led the development of several CINSAM programs and worked with many of our regional and national partners. She also teaches an integrated science course for NKU and is part of several university-wide and broader initiatives, including the Ecological Stewardship Institute, the Kentucky Girls STEM Collaborative and the STEM Equity Pipeline Project. Dr. Kulkarni earned her Ph.D. in biogeochemistry from Cornell University.

BETTY STEPHENS

OUTREACH COORDINATOR

Betty Stephens has coordinated a variety of CINSAM programs and events, including the CINSAM Alliances, summer camps, and science days. Additionally, Ms. Stephens has taught as a faculty member in the mathematics department. She graduated from Eastern Kentucky University with a master’s degree in education. CINSAM has benefited from Ms. Stephens’ talents since 2001 and will miss her contributions to our efforts as she retires this year.

REEDA HART, ’76 OUTREACH SPECIALIST Reeda Hart is a nationally recognized master teacher who designed and piloted the Next Generation STEM Classroom and all of CINSAM’s embedded outreach. She teaches STEM lessons in district partners’ classrooms, modeling best practices for teachers from preschool through eighth grade in northern Kentucky. She also offers professional development workshops and academies throughout the year. Reeda Hart earned her master’s degree in education from Xavier University.

THOMAS BRACKMAN STEM RECRUITING DIRECTOR Thomas Brackman leads CINSAM’s efforts in recruiting high school students into the STEM disciplines. With his extensive background in geology, Mr. Brackman also leads the Earth and Space Alliance for CINSAM and offers professional development sessions in science and engineering. He is the director of the Laboratory for Applied Geophysics. Mr. Brackman earned his master’s degree in geophysics from the University of Memphis.

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C IN S A M A N N U A L

debbie bowles, ’84 OUTREACH SPECIALIST

R E P OR T

Ms. Debbie Bowles has been contracted by CINSAM as an Outreach Specialist since 2011. Ms. Bowles models best practices in teaching in the southern counties of northern Kentucky. She brings to CINSAM over 28 years of experience teaching science at the elementary and middle school levels and has been awarded Teacher of the Year by both her school and district, Pendleton County Schools. Ms. Bowles earned her Master of Arts in Education from NKU.

BILLY RUSSELL, ’12

NETWORK LABORATORY MANAGER

Billy Russell provides personalized technical support and training to CINSAM and the academic departments housed in the Natural Science Center. He manages and maintains the computers in classrooms, offices, research labs, and the planetarium. Mr. Russell was introduced to NKU at one of CINSAM’s first summer camps for high school students in 2002. He graduated from NKU with a bachelor’s degree in Computer Information Technology.

BETH RUSSELL, ’12 PROGRAM MANAGER Beth Russell coordinates events for CINSAM and assists in developing programs. She is the Executive Director of the Science and Engineering Fair of Northern Kentucky. She specializes in new media, including web design, graphic design, photography, and social media. This year, she also administrated the department. Ms. Russell holds a bachelor’s degree in Media Informatics from NKU.

JUSTIN FELDMANN CLERICAL ASSISTANT Justin Feldmann worked as a clerical assistant to CINSAM during the summers of 2012 and 2013. He assisted with events, recruited college students into STEM programs, and provided other support to staff. During his undergraduate experience at NKU, he worked as a researcher in Dr. Haik’s laboratory. He is currently in medical school at the University of Louisville.

Student Workers REBECCA SCHNEIDER Graphic Designer

ZACHARIAH CASEY Clerical Assistant

EMILY ESHAM Clerical Assistant

DANIEL WILCOX-NETEPCZUK Network Lab Assistant

MAJOR Visual Communications

MAJOR Mathematics

MAJOR Biology

MAJOR Computer Science

“My favorite part of working at CINSAM is being surrounded by intelligent people who are passionate about what they do, and how every day I seem to learn new science trivia!”

“I love NKU because it is not too big and not too small, but just big enough for you to make friendships throughout your college experience.”

“I enjoy being part of such a great group of people who are very passionate about their work as well. I love the interesting projects I have been involved in as a part of CINSAM.”

“What I love about NKU is the quality of the professors and the amazing Informatics college we are lucky to have.”

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R E P OR T A N N U A L C IN S A M

Reaching throughout the

world

During this year, CINSAM staff members have participated in initiatives all across the region, state, and nation. Here are a few of the groups that CINSAM is proud to be involved with. Project Learning Tree (PLT) – PLT is a national leader in environmental education offering programs to educators and leaders working with P-12 students. Reeda Hart is a member of their national Next Generation Curriculum Advisory committee. As a member of this committee, she is helping to write a K-8th grade curriculum guide for PLT. Kentucky Girls STEM Collaborative (KGSC) – The Kentucky Girls STEM Collaborative grew out of the National Girls Collaborative Project and now brings together leaders from a variety of sectors and regions to engage girls in STEM disciplines and ready them for STEM careers. Madhura Kulkarni is leading the Northern Kentucky Regional Team of the KGSC in an endeavor to understand the current status of girls in STEM and figure out ways to “move the needle” in our region. STEM Equity Pipeline Project – The Kentucky STEM Equity Pipeline Project is a collaboration between the National Alliance for Partners in Equity (NAPE) and the Kentucky Department of Education, and it is funded by the National Science Foundation. It aims to promote gender equity in STEM education and careers. Madhura Kulkarni is a member of the Kentucky Leadership Team and focuses on the professional development offered as part of the project. GEAR UP Kentucky (GUK) – GEAR UP Kentucky is a statewide initiative to help low-income students prepare for and succeed in post-secondary education. It is housed at Kentucky’s Council on Postsecondary Education. GUK partnered with CINSAM in March 2013 to bring 200 students from across our region to NKU for a day that introduced them to a college campus and engaged them with hands-on STEM learning activities. Betty Stephens led the planning of this STEM day and the rest of the CINSAM team provided support.

Reeda Hart and Thomas Brackman presented workshops on ways to connect math and science using the earth sciences and incorporating engineering into science lessons at state (Kentucky Science Teachers’ Association Conference), regional (National Science Teachers’ Association Area Conference) and national conferences (National Science Teachers’ Association Area Conference). Their workshops reached participants hailing from across Kentucky and the nation, from Hawaii and Alaska to all the way to Sweden!

11

Greater Cincinnati STEM Collaborative – The Greater Cincinnati STEM Collaborative brings together educators from around the tri-state area to advance productive partnerships for improved P-12 STEM education in the region. Madhura Kulkarni is NKU’s representative on this collaborative. FIRST Lego League (FLL) – Northern Kentucky’s First Lego League held its regional competition at NKU in November 2012, hosting over a hundred elementary and middle school students and their robotics projects. The winners moved on to the national FLL competition in April. Betty Stephens was a member of the NKY FLL team and provided a great deal of operational support for the event. STEMx Network – The Kentucky STEMx Network is a part of the national STEMx network, started by Battelle to help stakeholders share ideas about, engage students and teachers in and promoted achievement in STEM. Kentucky became a STEMx state in 2012 and CINSAM is a member institution.


C IN S A M A N N U A L

student

R E P OR T

SPOTLIGHTS derek RICE gibbs

Alexus

Mr. Derek Gibbs, a SOAR scholar, graduated this year in May. He participated in organic synthesis research with Dr. Keith Walters (Department of Chemistry) for three years. This past year, Derek served as the student representative on a search committee to hire an analytical chemistry faculty member. He also held a position as Secretary for the Student Affiliates of the American Chemical Society (SAACS) at NKU; during his involvement in SAACS he co-developed two new programs with the NKU SAACS president. Derek has also been a tutor in General Chemistry for SOAR scholars and an informal tutor in physical, general and organic chemistry. Mr. Gibbs’ research with Dr. Walters has allowed him to travel to conferences, including the 243rd American Chemical Society meeting in San Diego, California. There, he was able to network with graduate students and generate ideas for graduate research. He has since been accepted into both University of Cincinnati and University of Louisville’s Medical Schools. “I feel that research has prepared me very well for the professional world,” explained Gibbs. “Research also had a profound affect on my academics. Whether it was new synthetic reactions from organic or trying to understand the way molecules absorb energy from physical chemistry, I tried to apply what I learned to my research. This increased what I remembered from lecture as it went from abstract to concrete.” “College is a time of growth, not just intellectually, but also personally. I saw myself change a lot in the past four years, primarily due to my STEM experiences.”

Ms. Alexus Rice is a junior biology major at NKU. She has been involved in Tri-Beta Biological Honor Society since the fall of 2011 and has volunteered at many events. Ms. Rice has even been elected as the Vice President for the NKU chapter and President for the Regional Chapter of Tri-Beta for the 2013-2014 term. She has also been involved in BIOTA, a biological teaching association where she held the position of Secretary in the fall of 2012 and has participated in several volunteer activities. During Ms. Rice’s time at NKU, she participated in research on many topics, including harmful algal blooms, with Dr. Miriam Kannan. She has received several grants to fund her research, including the UR-STEM summer research grant, and the Regional Ecological Stewardship Initiative Scholar grant. Through her research and involvement with STEM, she has coordinated the Ohio River STEM Institute, assisted in the development of the Water Quality App, and held position as the assistant student coordinator for the Technology to Empower Citizen Scientists Workshop. Ms. Rice has presented her research at several conferences including, the World Environmental and Water Resources Congress, where she and another student (Stefania Guglielmi) received 1st place in the Student Poster Competition, and the Kentucky Academy of Science, where she received 1st place in her division. Her research with Dr. Kannan was published in Proceedings of the World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2013: Showcasing the Future. “I believe that without these opportunities, I would not be as confident in my career choice or as prepared for the future,” said Rice. “And this is what makes NKU students stand out from the rest. Most undergraduates from other universities rarely get the chance at opportunities like we do.” “The experience I have had at NKU has changed my life.”

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R E P OR T A N N U A L C IN S A M

facul ty

SPOTLIGHTS DR. BRAD

SIEVE

Dr. Brad Sieve obtained his Ph.D. from Michigan State University in 2002 and completed a postdoctoral position at Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory. Brad has been at Northern Kentucky University since 2005 and teaches General Chemistry, Physiological Chemistry, Organic Chemistry, Introduction to Chemistry, and Chemistry and Society. Dr. Sieve also coordinates non-major chemistry courses and teaches freshmen to senior level lectures and labs. For several years, Dr. Sieve helped Dr. Vern Hicks and his P-12 partners lead the Chemistry Alliance. Two years ago, upon Dr. Hick’s retirement, he took over as university leader of the Alliance and has shown great creativity, leadership, and concern for teachers’ and students’ needs in his role with this Alliance. “I have learned that we have incredibly hard working and caring teachers in our area which makes my job easier and society better as a whole,” said Sieve. “If I can share a demonstration or give them equipment for their classrooms - that is the absolute least I can do to thank them.”

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DR. JAESOOK

GILBERT Dr. Jaesook Gilbert received her Ph.D. in Early Childhood Education from the University of Illinois in 1996. She has taught in the College of Education and Human Services at Northern Kentucky University since 2007. Her teaching interests include early childhood education and programming, family involvement, community collaboration and administration and supervision. Her research interests are professional development for those who are involved in early childhood education, family and community partnerships, as well as quality early care and education. In 2009, Dr. Gilbert created CINSAM’s Early Childhood Alliance. In her role as an Alliance Leader, she has offered many valuable workshops to early childhood educators in our region, meeting a previously underappreciated need. As our country and our region are increasingly recognizing the long term benefits of a strong early childhood education, Dr. Gilbert is helping our communities youngest children embark on a path to success in school and life. “I love the fact that the CINSAM funding for the Early Childhood Alliance allows us to reach out to the child care sector and the school systems, private and public schools,” said Gilbert. “Our Early Childhood Alliance meetings are very well attended and the attendees tell us how much they appreciate the trainings.”


C IN S A M

katy

murray Ms. Katy Murray is completing her 15th year teaching 5th grade. She completed her Master’s Degree in Gifted Education and is pursuing a second Master’s degree in Instructional Leadership, both at NKU! She is a certified math consultant and is currently teaching at River Ridge Elementary School in Kenton County. In addition to teaching, she also serves as the Intermediate Gifted Lead Teacher, EWISE Team sponsor, Online Math Team sponsor, and the 4th-5th grade leadership teacher. Katy was recently re-elected Elementary Representative on the Northern Kentucky Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NKCTM) board. She is an annual presenter at the Kentucky Council of Teachers of Mathematics (KCTM) conference and recieved the Math Educator Service Award (MESA) in 2004. Ms. Murray has been involved with the Elementary Mathematics and Science Alliance since 2001. She enjoyed the workshops so much that she agreed to become the Teacher-Leader in 2002 and has continued in that capacity since. Some of the events that she has helped coordinate and present through the Alliance include: Core Content 4.1, Common Core Math Standards (both facilitated by the Kentucky Department of Education), River Watch Cruise, Differentiating for Gifted Math/Science students, Response to Instruction (RTI) Strategies in Elementary Classroom, Haile Planetarium Workshops, and Incorporating Problem Solving in the Elementary Classroom. “My best teaching is absolutely ‘borrowed’ from the best of the best educators that took the time to share,” said Murray. “We call it outreach, apprenticeship, professional development. Keep learning and improving your craft.”

R E P OR T

SPOTLIGHTS

A N N U A L

teac her

david

myers

Mr. David Myers began his teaching career in 2007 while enrolled in NKU’s Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) program. He has taught both 6th and 7th grade science at Pendleton County’s Phillip A. Sharp Middle School. Mr. Myers became involved with CINSAM while pursuing his MAT degree. He attended CINSAM Night and was convinced that the methods demonstrated would be a vital part of his classroom effort. After he began teaching at Phillip Sharp Middle School, he started working with CINSAM’s Southern Outreach team to bring inquiry-based science lessons to his students. Ms. Reeda Hart and Ms. Debbie Bowles have been valuable resources for Mr. Myers and his students. Availability of the lesson kits allows him the flexibility to repeat the lesson in subsequent years, while new lessons are demonstrated by CINSAM Outreach Specialists during future visits. In the fall of 2012, Mr. Myers accepted the role as TeacherLeader for CINSAM’s Earth and Space Alliance, and has since collaborated with CINSAM’s Mr. Thomas Brackman to bring trainings on earth and space science to area teachers. “Involvement with CINSAM has improved my effectiveness as a science teacher,” said Myers. “It has also increased my desire to assist other teachers as they incorporate STEM lessons into their classrooms. In addition, the relationships I have developed working with CINSAM staff and the Earth/ Space Alliance are a valuable network for me to use when creating new STEM lessons or when modifying existing lessons to include STEM practices.”

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R E P OR T A N N U A L C IN S A M

BIOLOGY ALLIANCE

CHEMISTRY ALLIANCE

The Biology Alliance—led by Dr. Chris Curran of NKU’s Department of Biological Sciences and Ms. Heather Packard of Bellevue Schools—held four workshops for teachers over the 2012-2013 school year. The first was at CINSAM night in October, where 23 participants learned about resources available to them through the Alliance, the potential to develop a web portal, NKU student success data, activities presented at NKU Evolution Day, and the upcoming Ohio River Cruise Workshop.

Dr. Bradley Sieve of NKU’s Chemistry Department, Ms. Linda Weber of Campbell County High School, and Ms. Shelli Stinson of Simon Kenton High School helmed the Chemistry Alliance this year. The Alliance kicked off the year with a meeting at CINSAM Night, where they discussed and planned workshops for the rest of the school year.

On October 12, fifteen teachers (from the Biology, and Earth and Space Alliances) cruised the Ohio River on a riverboat with Ms. Heather Mayfield of the Foundation for Ohio River Education (FORE) and learned about water and macroinvertebrate sampling for water quality testing, issues relating to combined sanitary-stormwater sewers, and how to work with FORE to enhance their classroom activities. In March, the Alliance—along with the Departments of Biological Sciences, Chemistry, and Psychological Sciences—hosted the Dorothy Westerman Hermann Autism Symposium. This event convened six speakers from four institutions to discuss many aspects of autism ranging from contributing factors to treatments. The Kentucky Early Childhood Education TRIS program certified this event for 4.5 professional development (PD) clock hours, and 15 early childhood educators benefitted from this PD opportunity. A further 41 grade school teachers attended, along with many others in the NKU community. The Biology Alliance concluded their year with a collaborative workshop in April in which 13 members shared their favorite lab activities with each other. Topics ranged from field ecology to biochemistry and were linked with the new Common Core Standards and inquiry-based education.

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The Chemistry Alliance’s first workshop was their annual Share-a-thon in November 2012. About a dozen area high school teachers discussed their ideas and experiences relating to various techniques for conveying principles of chemistry. Next, the Alliance held a make-and-take event in March. Fourteen teachers worked to put together kits for chemistry demonstrations that they then took into their classrooms. In April, the Alliance held a Saturday morning workshop on the Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning© (POGIL) strategy for improving chemistry education. Nine high school teachers and three college instructors experienced what it is like to be a student working in a chemistry lab using the POGIL approach.


C IN S A M A N N U A L

CINSAM ALLIANCES

Collaborations between NKU faculty and P-12 teachers to hold professional development sessions in a variety of STEM disciplines

R E P OR T

COMPUTER SCIENCE ALLIANCE The Computer Science Alliance, led by Dr. Wei Hao of NKU’s Department of Computer Science and Ms. Kris Gordon from Ludlow Independent Schools held a variety of workshops for teachers during the 20122013 year. Their activities began on CINSAM Night, with 2 sessions in NKU’s newest facility, Griffin Hall. To help teachers engage students through mobile applications, they held a hands-on session on building mobile apps. Two NKU students from the Center for Applied Informatics’ mobile technology lab, Mr. Sean Butts and Mr. Joshua Newkirk, assisted throughout the session. At the end of the sessions, participants successfully created a mobile app. In November, the Computer Science Alliance held a mobile technology workshop for teachers. They taught 10 participants from Kentucky schools how to set up and use Mobile Mouse on iPhone and Android tablets. Mobile Mouse allows a mobile device to be used as a wireless remote control for the computer. At the session, Dr. James Walden from NKU introduced the Computer Science Department’s newest program, Data Science, to the teachers.

EARLY CHILDHOOD ALLIANCE The Early Childhood Alliance was led by Drs. Jaesook Gilbert and Sue Griebling of the Department of Teacher Education along with Ms. Shelley Engram of the Leaders of Tomorrow early childhood center and Ms. Rebecca Wilson of Kenton County Schools. On October 4, 2012, the Early Childhood Alliance presented a workshop with Mr. Tony Lawson and Ms. Karen Venetian of the Cincinnati Museum Center on the Fundamentals of Inquiry: Process Skills. The workshop helped participants develop an understanding of science process skills needed to generate and test new ideas, build new knowledge and learn scientific concepts; 38 educators attended. On April 18, 2013, Mr. Lawson and Ms. Venetian followed up on the October workshop with one on the Fundamentals of Inquiry: Subtle Shifts; 33 educators attended. Inquiry-based instruction requires teachers to understand how to give learners more responsibility for their own learning and to develop the kids of process skills used in science. The workshop trained educators in developing a facility with inquiry-based instruction for young children.

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R E P OR T A N N U A L C IN S A M

EARTH & SPACE ALLIANCE

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE ALLIANCE

Mr. Thomas Brackman from CINSAM and Mr. David Myers from Phillip A. Sharp Middle School led the Earth and Space Alliance this year for CINSAM. On CINSAM Night, approximately 40 teachers were engaged in a hands-on activity for investigating the phases of the moon and a “pocket solar system” that shows relative distances in the solar system. They also viewed and discussed a NASA video that showed the various obstacles the Mars lander had to overcome for a successful landing.

The Environmental Science Alliance was led by Dr. Steve Kerlin of the Department of Teacher Education and Ms. Julie Whitis of the Kenton County Academies. This Alliance started off the year with the Water Quality App and Foundation for Ohio River Education (FORE) Open House on January 11, 2013. They introduced 12 educators to the app, lessons and FORE field trip programs held at the Ohio River Valley Water Sanitation Commission’s office.

On October 12, fifteen teachers (from the Biology, and Earth and Space Alliances) cruised the Ohio River on a riverboat with Ms. Heather Mayfield of the Foundation for Ohio River Education (FORE) and learned about water and macroinvertebrate sampling for water quality testing, issues relating to combined sanitary-stormwater sewers, and how to work with FORE to enhance their classroom activities. On February 5, 2013, the Earth and Space Alliance co-sponsored an event that demonstrated a series of stations on heat transfer. The stations explored convection, conduction, and radiation, relating these concepts to Earth science. This seminar included make-and-take stations and participant giveaways. Materials available for make-and-take were: thermometers, convection bottles, pipettes, food coloring, and Pangaea models. Give-aways included hotplates, heat lamps, and pans for demonstrating convection. Sixteen teachers attended this event.

17

With additional support from a Senate Bill 1 P-2 Mini-grant from the College of Education and Human Services, this Alliance co-hosted the Kenton County Science Teachers Professional Development Conference on May 29, 2013. There, they offered workshops on green energy, vegetative roofs, rain gardens, and the Kentucky Environmental Literacy Plan. Environmental Science Alliance funding sponsored the attendance of teachers from outside of the Kenton County School District. In June, about a dozen teachers attended the Flying WILD Curriculum workshop sponsored by the Environmental Education Alliance. The workshop trained teachers in activities, projects, and knowledge related to birds and their habitats.


C IN S A M A N N U A L

CINSAM ALLIANCES

Collaborations between NKU faculty and P-12 teachers to hold professional development sessions in a variety of STEM disciplines

R E P OR T

ELEMENTARY MATH AND SCIENCE ALLIANCE

MATHEMATICS ALLIANCE

The Elementary Mathematics and Science Alliance was led by NKU’s Dr. Jonathan Thomas (Department of Teacher Education and Kentucky Center for Mathematics) and River Ridge Elementary School’s Ms. Katy Murray. On CINSAM Night, the Elementary School STEM Alliance offered a session titled, “What is the Whole in Cornhole? Introducing and Capitalizing upon Disequilibrium with Fraction Operations.” They presented research involving division of fractional quantities. Participants discovered and examined powerful settings and contexts to promote conceptual understanding in this historically challenging area of mathematics as well as lessons learned in the design of meaningful instruction. About 25 people attended.

Dr. Michael Waters and Dr. Bethany Noblitt of NKU’s Mathematics and Statistics department teamed up with Ms. Nadia Osterbrock of Dixie Heights High School for the 2012-2013 school year to lead the Math Alliance for CINSAM. The year’s events began at CINSAM Night, when 40 teachers attended a variety of sessions. This Alliance presented five workshops by Alliance leaders. Among them were two mathematics sessions on graphing calculator use and the characteristics of a good problem, and two sessions on statistics.

This Alliance held two more sessions on March 27, 2013, one at NKU and the other in Dayton, KY, at Queen City Riverboats. The session at NKU was titled “Supporting Student Enactment of the Standards for Mathematical Practice While Building Strong Foundations for Multiplicative Thinking.” Participants reflected on progressions for the teaching and learning of multiplication and division and acquired tools for assessing and advancing student fluency through engagement in Mathematical Content and the Standards for Mathematical Practice.

In November, the Math Alliance held a session at Dixie Heights High School in Kenton County on the standards for mathematical practice. Pre-service teachers joined the Math Alliance in presenting this workshop. Eighteen teachers attended. In March, the Math Alliance held a session titled “iPad Apps in the K-12 Mathematics Classroom” at Dixie Heights High School. This high-demand workshop taught a variety of mathematics applications for i-devices to 28 teachers. During this session, they held a raffle for an iPad, which was awarded to one of the teachers in attendance.

The second session on March 27, in Dayton, The Alliance held a second session titled “The River Reach Program.” Participants learned how their students could conduct water quality testing using the same methods as research scientists, discovering key organisms, or “indicator species,” used to determine the health of the Ohio River. They also learned how storm water runoff and combined sewer overflows impact water quality, and found out how to schedule their classes for the River Reach Program.

18


R E P OR T A N N U A L C IN S A M

MIDDLE SCHOOL SCIENCE ALLIANCE The Middle School Mathematics and Science Alliance was led by Dr. Seyed Allameh of NKU and Ms. Lila Brindley of Bracken County Schools. They presented a workshop at CINSAM Night on October 2, 2012 demonstrating a laboratory activity on energy transfer. Members were able to use different insulating materials to determine the energy lost over time to the environment. This activity allows students to undertake a design project to control the transfer of energy to the environment. There were 20 members in attendance that evening and all went home with the supplies needed to conduct the activity, as well as copies of all instructional materials. On January 15, 2013 this Alliance presented a Robotics Workshop. Participants learned how to build a Lego Robot that can sense its environment. This was also a STEM Lab that can also be used for Robotics Clubs that compete in tournaments. There were 10 members in attendance that evening and one lucky teacher went home with a new Lego Robotics Kit. On February 5, 2013 the Middle School Mathematics and Science Alliance partnered with the Earth/Space Alliance to conduct a workshop on best practices in thermal energy transfer instruction. Teachers rotated among 8 stations allowing them to experience (authentically or through models), the following forms of thermal energy transfer: oceans currents through convection; radiation and temperature; conduction using conductors and insulators; cold and hot water convection; and convection in the earth’s surface. Fifteen Alliance members attended the workshop. All went home with Pangaea kits, hard copies of the lab, pipettes, food coloring, convection kits and some teachers won hot plates and heat lamps.

19

PHYSICS ALLIANCE Dr. John Filaseta of NKU’s Physics Department and Mr. David Ledden, formerly of St. Henry District High School, Boone County High School, and Beechwood High School, led the Physics Alliance in the 2012-2013 school year. They began the year with two sessions at CINSAM Night for about 24 middle school and high school teachers. The sessions were on Data Collection, Graphing and the Scientific Method. Later in October, this Alliance held an evening workshop on scientific methods, data analysis, and graphing that aimed to help teachers avoid “cookbook” approaches to classroom experiments and promote student-led investigations. Six high school teachers attended. Next, in February, Dr. Filaseta and Mr. Ledden led a session for 12 middle school and high school teachers on circuitry basics and using batteries to turn on light bulbs. They also discussed STEM education in Kentucky and recent changes in Advanced Placement Physics. Finally, in April, the Alliance offered a workshop on Waves and Sound for eight middle grades teachers. Participants left with kits for taking the techniques they had learned to their classrooms.


sharing ideas with colleagues

R E P OR T

impr oved studen t in ter es t an d en gagemen t

A N N U A L

I have seen myself improve through time and professional development activities.

: d on p es R able chers

C IN S A M

CINSAM ALLIANCES

Collaborations between NKU faculty and P-12 teachers to hold professional development sessions in a variety of STEM disciplines

Tea

lu a v t s o m be the e? o t d n i f you ianc What do f thE CINSAM All aspect o I know that I will gain hands-on le arnin g an d somet hin g that higher level thinkin g I will use to en hance my teachin g!

T he ‘ P D activities are directly relatable to our content and are easy to implement in the classroom right away.

an d Pedagogical edg e scien t ific k nowlg trainin

I have used al mos t all of the ideas have le arned thr ough the Allianthat I ce in my own classes.

20


R E P OR T

RESEARCH

C IN S A M

A N N U A L

CINSAM-funded

Dr. kebede gemene

DEPARTMENT OF chemistry

{

Simple, Rapid, and Sensitive Assay of Protease Activities and Inhibitors

}

Proteases are found in all organisms. They are enzymes that drive biological reactions from digestion of food proteins to more complex processes like blood clotting. Proteases function by cleaving bonds of natural proteins. They are also of high biomedical interest as they are associated with a number of diseases, and inhibitors of specific proteases are widely employed as therapies for many diseases. The detection of these enzymes is critically important, but existing assays are either expensive and complicated or inconvenient. Dr. Kebede Gemene and his students Melissa Oehrle and Mark Vater developed a simple, rapid and inexpensive detection method for these enzymes. This method uses a polyion-selective electrode under a novel measurement technology called pulsed chronopotentiometry. Dr. Gemene used this technology to detect contamination of heparin preparations, commonly used for their blood thinning properties.

Dr. wei hao

DEPARTMENT OF computer science

{

Cloud-based Power Management for Mobile Phones

}

Dr. Wei Hao (Computer Science Department) and his students, Thomas Delaney and Sean Butts, have been looking into the effects that mobile phones have on our lives. As smartphones become a more essential part of our lives, the need for smartphones to be able to process and execute applications similar to those of a computer is growing. Because of these needs, power management has become a critical factor in managing the increasing power demands of mobile applications or “apps”. For their research, Hao, Delaney and Butts conducted several case studies of mobile app use on power utilization and used their results and cloud computing technology to create a new power management system, Cloudbased Power Management (CPM), for mobile phones. CPM will complement existing power management systems to help mobile phones save more energy. This system also reduces the amount of power drawn from a Wi-Fi connection, enabling the Wi-Fi connection to be more efficient. As the need for increased resource efficiencies grows, this research can help an increasingly ubiquitous technology—mobile computing—operate more efficiently.

21


C IN S A M A N N U A L

Dr. Holden, of the Mathematics and Statistics Department, worked with her students, Kirk Wallace and Lindsay Grayson, on a project exploring the mathematical properties of outer space. The interstellar medium contains a magnetic field whose strong turbulent component plays a crucial role in how high-energy cosmic-rays traverse our galaxy and influence the formation of stars and planets. Due to the turbulent nature of the magnetic field, two particles injected into a field with the same initial velocities but slightly different initial positions will subsequently follow very different paths. This effect is quantified using Lyapunov exponents. Wallace, Grayson and Holden calculated Lyapunov exponents for various models constructed from sums of Alfvénic waves and found that the turbulent magnetic field is adequately described by a model with 25 waveforms per decade of dynamic range in wavelengths. This finding allows researchers to describe the chaotic nature of the magnetic field while minimizing computational expense. The models can now be used to study star formation, cosmic ray propagation, and other astrophysical phenomena.

Absolute photolysis rates of estrone and estrone 3-methyl ether in multiple solvents

K

Krista Loose, Daniel Ghere, and Dr. Patrick M. Hare Department of Chemistry, Northern Kentucky University, Highland Heights, KY 41099

U

238.03

Abstract: The absolute photolysis rates of estrone and estrone 3-methyl ether were determined through the use of an iodide-iodate actinometer. The rate of photons absorbed by the iodide-iodate solution when exposed to three different light sources (photoreactor, handlamp, and fluorimeter) was measured with UV-Vis spectroscopy. Using this photon rate, the photolysis rates of estrone in a variety of solvents was followed with gas-chromatography/mass spectrometry and was found to differ based on solvent. Estrone and estrone 3-methyl ether were also shown to photodegrade at different rates when irradiated in the same solvent

'Iodide-Iodate absorption' 'triodide absorption'

1.3

2

1

0 200

1.2

250

300

350

400

1.1 1.0 0.9

450

Wavelength (nm)

Introduction:

0.8

8KI + KIO3 + 3H2O + hv  3I3- + 6OH- +9K+

Estrogens, both natural and synthetic, have recently become topics of interest due to their being found in increased amounts in the environment and their apparent effects on both fish in aquatic habitats and livestock {1,2}. Estrogens contain aromatic rings, therefore, they absorb ultraviolet light and can undergo photochemistry. The rate at which estrogens undergo photochemistry can be determined by measuring the amount of light absorbed by a sample and the amount of products formed. Actinometry is a process in which the amount of light that is absorbed from a light source can be quantified. Rahn, et al. has demonstrated that an iodide-iodate solution can be used as an effective chemical actinometer for light sources in the ultraviolet range because the iodide-iodate solution absorbs light of wavelengths shorter than 300nm and produces a triiodide ion that only absorbs light above 300nm.{3,4} The iodide-iodate actinometer system was a 254nm photoreactor, hand lamp, and in 254 nm setting on the flourimeter to determine a photolysis rate in these conditions. The established rate could then be applied to the rates of photodegradation found in the gas chromatography mass spectrum to reason the different speeds that estrogens photodegrade under circumstances such as different solvents and light sources.

trial 1 trial 2 trial 3

1.4

3

Absorbance

Absorbance

4

0.7 200

Actinometry Methods and Results:

Triiodide can also be formed thermally;{3,4} therefore UV-Vis kinetic scans were performed on actinometry solutions that were not exposed to UV light to determine the thermal formation rate. The thermal formation rate was found to be 6.445 x 10-11mol/min. This rate was used to subtract the change in absorbance due to thermal conversion from the measured change of absorbance in the samples exposed to UV light.

300

All light sources gave similar results but the photoreactor was used for final results since it is the light source used to irradiate the estrogen samples.

The absolute photolysis rate of estrone was monitored through use of GC-MS, determined by a ratio of photolysis product to estrone, was found to vary with different solvents.

acetonitrile1 acetonitrile2 methanol1 ethyl acetate1 ethyl acetate2

P1/E1 Ratio

2.0

1.5

Estrone in acetonitrile

200

0.0 100

0

14.8

15.0

Retention Time (min)

15.2

15.4

800

900

The iodate-iodide solutions absorb at a rate of 1.72 x 10-9 ± 2.44 x 10-10 Einsteins/sec when exposed in the photoreactor.

1.0

0.5

14.6

700

The rate of changing absorbance was converted to the rate of einsteins absorbed by the solution through use of the Beer-Lambert law and the literature value for the triiodide quantum yield {3}.

3

300x10

14.4

600

Estrone and estrone 3-methyl ether were found to have different photolysis rates when irradiated in the same solvent. This rate difference can again be credited to hydrogen bonding. Replacing the alcohol group with an ether group will reduce the amount of hydrogen bonding that occurs in the solution, resulting in one fewer deactivation paths for the absorbed energy and an increase in the quantum yield.

Solvent

2.5

14.2

500

Exposure Time (s)

Actinometry solutions were exposed to 254nm light from a photoreactor, a hand lamp, and a fluorimeter and the solutions absorbance at 352nm was monitored as a function of time.

Application of Actinometry Results:

14.0

400

50mL samples of 0.6M iodide and 0.1M iodate exposed to 254nm in a photoreactor ; the absorbance was monitored at 352nm at 2min exposure increments.

Actinometry solutions were prepared with concentrations of 0.1M iodate and 0.6M iodide.

5

10

15

20

Einsteins

25

30x10

-6

15.6

chromatograms of estrone’s photolysis in ethyl acetate; the signal at 15min represents estrone and the signal at 14.4min represents the photolysis product of estrone (P1)

Estrone Estrone 3-methyl ether

2.0

The photolysis rate was found to be fastest in acetonitile and slowest in ethyl acetate. The rate difference based on solvent is believed to be a result of hydrogen bonding between solvent and estrone, which is weakest in acetonitrile and strongest in ethyl acetate; it is possible that a stronger solvent interaction creates another outlet for the absorbed energy that reduces the quantum yield.

1.5

Estrone in ethyl acetate

Estrone in methanol

Estrone 3-methyl ether in methanol

Rate constant (Einsteins-1 s-1)

-1.40 x 105

-8.28 x 104

-1.06 x 105

-9.07 x 104

%RSD

7.46

3.19

10.9

12.9

Conclusions:

An iodide-iodate solution was used as a chemical actinometer to determine the absolute photolysis rates of estrone and estrone 3-methyl ether. Three 254nm light sources were used to irradiate the solutions and the change in absorbance was measured using a UV-Vis spectrometer. The rate of changing absorbance was converted to the rate of Einsteins absorbed by the solution, then applied to the photolysis rates of estrone and estrone 3-methyl ether.

Acknowledgements:

1.0

Department of chemistry for general support, KBRIN and NKU CINSAM for financial support, Dr. Grant Edwards for help with instrumentation

0.5

References:

0.0 0

5

10

Einsteins

15

-6

1. Swartz, C.H., et al., Environ. Sci. Technol., 2006. 40(16): p. 4894-4902. 2. Routledge, E.J., et al., Environ. Sci. Technol.,1998. 32(11): p. 1559-1565. 3. Rahn, R.O., et al., Photochemistry and Photobiology, 2003. 78(2): p. 146-152. 4. Rahn, R.O., Photochemistry and Photobiology, 1997, 66(4): p. 450-455.

20x10

Dr. Lisa Holden

DEPARTMENT OF mathematics & statistics Assessing the Chaotic Nature of Interstellar Magnetic Fields Kirk Wallace & Lindsay Grayson Faculty Mentor ~ Dr. Lisa Holden Mathematics & Statistics

Abstract

Eqn. 1

The motion of charged particles through turbulent magnetic fields is chaotic in nature. The resulting effects can be quantified through the calculation of Lyapunov exponents. Using a computer model we calculated the Lyapunov exponents for several magnetic fields in order to help other researchers choose a model for use in further studies of astronomical phenomena.

Results

Eqn. 2

Since each model consists of N randomly directed Alfven waves, we find a distribution of largest Lyapunov exponents for each value of N. Below we show our results (with 200 observations) for N = 5 and N = 25. We find that the mean largest Lyapunov exponent increases with N, indicating that the length scale over which information from the initial condition is lost is shrinking. For N greater than 100, the mean largest Lyapunov exponent plateaus indicating that 100 waves adequately describes the chaotic nature of the field while minimizing computational expense

Eqn. 3

50

Equations

Background

The space beyond our solar system, referred to as the interstellar medium, is a fluid-like structure comprised of gas and dust. Magnetic field lines are tied to the matter in the medium, commonly referred to as “frozen in.” As the interstellar medium moves, the magnetic field lines are dragged with it, altering the magnetic field. Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), the study of fluids threaded by magnetic fields , can be used to model the interstellar medium. MHD provides wave solutions that can be summed to provide an approximate model of the magnetic field in the interstellar medium. We explored magnetic fields produced by summing 5, 25, 50, 100, 150, and 200 random waves.

Cosmic rays are charged particles (mostly protons) that move throughout our galaxy. Though some of their origins remain undetermined, it is known that cosmic rays serve an important role in the formation of molecules in the interstellar medium and in the formation of stars and planets in molecular clouds. As charged particles, the rays are accelerated when traveling through a magnetic field. The turbulent nature of the field causes the propagation of the cosmic rays to be chaotic. Should two particles with identical properties be injected into the field, save slightly different starting positions, they will subsequently follow divergent paths. The chaotic environment can be quantified through the calculation of Lyapunov exponents.

N

5

40

The equations of magnetohydrodynamics governing a compressible, nonviscous, perfectly conducting fluid, such as the interstellar medium, are displayed above. They describe the interdependence between magnetism and fluid motion. Eqn. 1 ensures conservation of mass for the system. Eqn. 2 describes the forces acting on the fluid. Eqn. 3 is an alternate form of one of Maxwell’s equations that relates the change of the magnetic field to the velocity of the fluid.

Mean Largest Lyapunov Exponents

30

}

N

14.007 19 39.102 92

20

10

0

Linearizing about a steady state solution and looking for plane wave perturbations produces three types of wave solutions: sound waves, magnetoacoustic waves, and Alfvén waves.

35

0

5

N

10

15

20

25

30

Λ1 Largest Lyapunov Exponent

25

30 25

{

Calculating Lyapunov Exponents for Turbulent Magnetic Fields in the Interstellar Medium

DEPARTMENT OF chemistry 7

P1/E1 Ratio

Estrogen and compounds that mimic estrogen have recently garnered attention because of their increasing contamination of the environment and their apparent effects on fish and amphibians in aquatic ecosystems. The rate at which these compounds degrade when exposed to ultraviolet light, called photolysis, is an important research question explored by undergraduate students Krista Loose and Daniel Ghere working in Dr. Patrick Hare’s lab in the Chemistry Department. The students measured the photolysis rates of estrone and estrone 3-methyl ether, two estrogen derivatives, in different solvents and with different light sources. Using actinometry to measure the amount of light absorbed by the compounds and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to monitor the relative amounts of the compounds, Loose and Ghere found that the photolysis rate depends on the structures of the compound and the solvent. The research suggests that stronger interactions between the solvent and the compound, such as through hydrogen bonding, reduce the photolysis rate by providing alternate pathways to disperse the absorbed energy from the light.

Dr. patrick hare

Ion Count

}

Using chemical modification to investigate the photochemistry of natural estrogens

R E P OR T

{

20 15 10

Alfvén waves

5

Of the three types of waves, only the Alfvén waves are expected to propagate through the interstellar medium. Therefore, standard models for the turbulent magnetic field consist of sums of randomly directed Alfvén waves. These noncompressible, transverse-like waves have fluid motion that is perpendicular to the underlying magnetic field.

N=5

Magnetic Field Model

Magnetic fields comprised of N = 5, 25, 50, 100, 150, and 200 Alfvén waves were investigated to determine how many waves were needed to adequately describe the chaotic nature of the field while keeping computational costs low. The divergence of two field lines originating from slightly different points can be seen in in the shown graphs

Lyapunov Exponents

Lyapunov exponents (λi) measure sensitivity to initial conditions, a primary characteristic of a chaotic system. A positive exponent indicates an exponentially expanding direction in phase space and tells us that the system is chaotic. For each of our magnetic field models, we found one negative, one positive, and one zero exponent.

0

20

30

40

50

60

Λ1 Largest Lyapunov Exponent

Conclusion N=100

Our work indicates that the chaotic nature of the turbulent magnetic field is adequately described with N = 100 terms in the model. This model can now be used to study star formation, cosmic ray propagation, and other astrophysical phenomena.

References

Giacolone J, Jokipii J.R. 1994. Charged Particle Motion in Multidimensional Magneticfield Turbulence. The Astrophysical Journal. 430: L137-L140.

Gould H, Tobochnik J, Christian W. 2007. An Introduction to Computer Simulation Methods: Applications to Physical Systems. 3rd Edition. Pearson Education, Inc.

Wolf A, Swift JB, Swinney HL, Vastano JA. 1985. Determining Lyapunov Exponents From a Time Series. Physica. 16D: 285 – 317.

Jackson JD. 1975. Classical Electrodynamics. 2nd Edition. 1975 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

This research was made possible through the Center for Integrative Natural Science and Mathematics (CINSAM) and Dr. Lisa Holden.

22


RESEARCH

C IN S A M

A N N U A L

R E P OR T

CINSAM-funded

DR. kristy hopfensperger DEPARTMENT OF biological science

{

Influence of invasive honeysuckle on soil oxygen and dependent ecosystem processes

}

Dr. Kristy Hopfensperger and her student, James Brown, investigated the link between the spread of Amur honeysuckle (Lonicera maackii) and changes in ecosystem process. This invasive plant has been replacing native plants in our region and—as Hopfensperger and Brown found—has been changing the way local vernal pool ecosystems function. They found that areas with higher densities of Amur honeysuckle have higher rates of both aqueous and gaseous nitrogen loss (as nitrate and the greenhouse gas, nitrous oxide, respectively.) These losses result in increased water and air pollution. In addition to measuring nitrous oxide emissions from their study site, Hopfensperger and Brown also characterized fluxes of two other greenhouse gases from soils: carbon dioxide and methane. They found an increase in carbon dioxide emission with decreasing soil moisture, along with emissions of methane during the wet month of May followed by absorption of methane in the drier month of June. They also observed higher soil pH under the high-density honeysuckle. Hopfensperger and Brown planned to continue research into these findings and others at the site.

DR. Joseph nolan

DEPARTMENT OF mathematics & Statistics  







                                                                                                                         

                      

                                                                                                                   

                                                                           

23



                                                                                      

                         

 

                                                                                                                                                                                  



 

 

  

   

 

                                                               

                          

                                                                     

        

                                              

                            

                

                                                                

  

  

{

Knowledge elicitation study on collaborative dialogues used to handle uncertainties

}

Contestants in the Super Bowl Squares Game purchase squares on a blank 10 by 10 grid at a fixed price. After all of the squares are purchased, the digits 0-9 are randomly assigned to the 10 rows and 10 columns and represent the “ones” digit for the respective football team’s score. But what would happen if the digits were assigned before players chose a square? In football, scores of 3 and 7 points are much more likely than others, resulting in certain digit combinations that are more or less likely to occur and, therefore, more likely to win. Using statistics and probabilistic modeling, including the Markov Process, Ari Fitter—along with his advisors, Dr. Joseph Nolan and Dr. David Agard of the Mathematics and Statistics Department—investigated how much each square should cost to make the game fair if the digit combinations were known in advance. They found that, assuming a $100 pool, scores ending in 0 or 7 were the most expensive, while six squares cost only $0.10 each!


C IN S A M A N N U A L

DEPARTMENT OF chemistry 7

N

Xanthine Oxidase Enzyme Inhibition to Prevent Buildup of Uric Acid

14.007 19

K

39.102 92

Taylor Kidd, Manori Jayasinghe, Rachel Medlock, Rebekka Meeks, Dr. Lili Ma, and Dr. Stefan Paula Northern Kentucky University Department of Chemistry

U

238.03

Abstract

"Xanthine oxidase is an enzyme that aids in the process of converting hypoxanthine into xanthine and xanthine into uric acid. The buildup of too much uric acid in the body can cause joint and muscle inflammation and lead to a disease commonly known as gout. The goal of our research is to find inhibitors that latches onto the binding site of the protein xanthine oxidase and limits the amount of uric acid produced by this enzyme. Our research focuses on the reaction: the conversion of xanthine into uric acid. We are in the process of testing a few different varieties of inhibitors, mainly coumarins and chalcones. We carry out our experiments using enzyme activity assays, computational docking, and more recently, isothermal titration calorimetry."

Spectrophotometric Assays

Molecular Modeling/Docking

We use a spectrophotometer to run activity assays in a 96-well UV plate. To start, we add an equal amount of xanthine substrate (consisting of pure Milli-Q water and 98% pure xanthine) to all the wells, following up with varying amount of potassium phosphate buffer, depending on the desired final concentration of the inhibitor. Third, we add the inhibitor of choice and allow for 30 minutes of incubation at room temperature. After the incubation period, we add in the enzyme xanthine oxidase (from bovine milk) and measure the absorbance at 295 nm for 5 minutes with a spectrophotometer . We then determine the enzyme rates from the spectroscopic data and graph the activity values versus the concentration of the inhibitor (SigmaPlot). When graphed on a semi-logarithmic scale, we typically obtain graphs similar to the ones below. From graphing, we also receive an IC50 value, which is a number that tells us how potent an inhibitor is. For these assays, we hope to have lower IC50 values, in the single digits or the teens (measured in uM).

Using the program Sybyl, we are able to model the active inhibitors and then dock them into the enzyme xanthine oxidase using the docking program Gold. We used the PDB ID 3NVY as the 3D model for xanthine oxidase for docking and ChemScore for the scoring function.

Results and Data Analysis Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester_1_TK 15.June.2012

Reactions of Hypoxanthine and Xanthine with Enzyme Xanthine Oxidase O N N

H2O + O2 N

H2O2

O N N

N

hypoxanthine

H2O + O2 N

N

xanthine

O

H2O2

N

N

Binding Site for Xanthine Oxidase

25

25

20

20

15

O

15

1e-8

1e-7

1e-6

1e-5

1e-4

1e-3

0 1e-10

1e-9

1e-8

1e-7

[Inhibitor/M]

1e-6

1e-5

1e-4

1e-3

0 1e-10

1e-9

1e-8

1e-7

1e-6

1e-5

1e-4

conc vs activity x column vs y column

Inhibitors 4-Methylesculatin

7-hydroxy-4(trifluoromethyl)coumarin

7-hydroxy-4methylcoumarin

From our previous research, along with the research that we’ve completed over the summer, we are seeing a pattern of graphs with smooth curves and low IC50 values from the inhibitors that have a hydroxyl group (or multiple hydroxyl groups) off the benzene ring, like in the structures above. These inhibitors produced an average IC50 value generally less than 10 uM. Generally speaking, the compounds that we tested that did not have the hydroxyl group gave us high IC50 values and flat graphs.

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Investigation of the Impact of Nutrient Availability on Genome Stability in S. cerevisiae

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(D) Figure 4-B 4-Methylesculatin, Lin Tsai and Coworkers

1e-3

[Inhibitor/M]

[Inhibitor/M] conc vs activity x column 1 vs y column 1

The graphs above show the activity vs. concentration graphs for the inhibitor caffeic Acid phenethyl Ester (3 repeats). The red circles on the graph represent where the IC50 fall on the graphs. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester has an average IC50 of 5.20 mM, which is ideal for our research. Poor Inhibitors, such as most of the compounds tested that were in the “chalcones” category, will give us IC50’s at a much higher value, meaning it takes a lot of the inhibitor to inhibit the enzyme, if it inhibits at all.

Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester

(C) Docking of 4-Methylesculatin, Paula Research Group

The photos to the right (photos A and C) are the diagrams that we modeled in Sybyl and docked into Xanthine Oxidase with Gold. The photos on the left (photos B and D) are figures in literature by Lin Tsai and coworkers. The purpose is to show how the inhibitor interacts with the protein, and the side-by-side comparison shows that our docking technique works and is reproducible. From docking, we also get a consensus value, which also tells us how reproducible our results are. The consensus value is a number between 1 and 30, telling us how many times, out of 30 trials, we generated the same inhibitor position.

5

5

1e-9

conc vs activity x column vs y column

15

10

10

5

0 1e-10

N

uric acid

(B) Figure 4-D 7-Hydroxy-4Methylesculatin, Lin Tsai and Coworkers

30

30

25

20

10

N O

O

(A) Docking of 7-Hydroxy-4Methylesculatin in Gold, Paula Research Group

Caffetic Acid Phenethyl Ester_3_TK 15.June.2012

Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ether_2_TK 15.June.2012

IC50: 4.9

30

Activity

Inhibitors of the enzyme xanthine oxidase (XO) are of medicinal value for the treatment of gout and the prevention of certain injuries after heart attacks and strokes. Coumarins are natural compounds that have shown promise as a new class of XO inhibitors. Chemistry students Taylor Kidd, Rachel Medlock, and Rebekkah Meeks—along with their advisors, Dr. Stefan Paula, Dr. Lili Ma, and postdoctoral associate Dr. Manori Jayasinghe—worked on a project to test the efficacy of certain XO inhibitors, including coumarins. They employed a variety of techniques, including enzyme activity assays, computational docking, and isothermal titration calorimetry. They found that inhibitors with at least one hydroxyl group off the benzene ring were the most effective inhibitors. Their computational docking exercises used the programs Sybyl and Gold to model these inhibitors and “dock” them into XO to demonstrate how the inhibition works.

DR. stefan paula

Activity

}

Activity

Microcalorimetric Characterization of Inhibitor Binding by the Enzyme Xanthine Oxidase

R E P OR T

{

Future Plans

• Obtain more new inhibitors with hydroxyl groups from the Dr. Ma research group and test them with the activity assay • Use the docking program Gold to dock new inhibitors from the Dr. Ma Research Group

References

Borges, F.; Fernandes, E.; Roleira, F., Progress towards the discovery of xanthine oxidase inhibitors. Curr Med Chem 2002, 9, (2), 195-217. Pauff, J. M.; Cao, H.; Hille, R., Substrate orientation and catalysis at the molybdenum site in xanthine oxidase: Crystal structures in complex xanthine and lumazine. J Biol Chem 2009, 284, (13), 8760-7. Pauff, J. M.; Zhang, J.; Bell, C. E.; Hille, R., Substrate orientation in xanthine oxidase: crystal structure of enzyme in reaction with 2hydroxy-6-methylpurine. J Biol Chem 2008, 283, (8), 4818-24.

DR. erin strome

DEPARTMENT OF biological sciences

In many cancers the initiating event is an abnormality in DNA content (the instruction manual for the cell). Dr. Erin Strome of the Biological Sciences Department worked with three students—Brandy Ashcraft, John Crum, and Justin Gibson—to investigate genomic instability that might contribute to the development of cancerous cells. The team studied Saccharomyces cerevisiae (budding yeast) genes that may be homologous to human genes to help understand the etiology of cancer. They examined mutations in many genes and found that several of them resulted in significant increases in genomic instability, meaning chromosome fragment or even whole chromosome loss. Students explored the ramifications of this chromosomal instability, potentially including the loss of key proteins involved in cell functions. The group plans to continue their research to better understand the connections between this genome instability and cancer.

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R E P OR T A N N U A L C IN S A M

Next Generation

Stem classroom C

INSAM’s Next Generation STEM Classroom (ngSC) project was piloted in Boone and Kenton Counties during the 2012-2013 school year. The Next Generation STEM Classroom provides professional development for P-12 teachers within the classroom. The Next Generation STEM Classroom is comprised of two segments: the Fishbowl and the RECAP. First, the Outreach Director/Specialist models best practices by teaching a STEM lesson to a class of students with teachers from multiple grade levels observing around the room; this is called the “Fishbowl”. After the class is over, the teachers and CINSAM staff go to another room for the second segment, the “RECAP”, to break down the lesson for best practices in STEM teaching and to look for ways to apply it to their own teaching. “RECAP” stands for “Reflection and Exploration of Content, Alignment, and Pedagogy”. The teachers and curriculum specialists attending were then responsible for taking the lessons back to their schools to share with their students and the teachers that did not get to attend. This two-tiered professional learning community model—where directly participating teachers and administrators help train other teachers in a teacher lead model—is further supported by CINSAM online. CINSAM films the professional development sessions and then makes the videos available online to participants through BlackBoard. Other resources, such as tri-boards and Power-Points are also made available on Blackboard.

• An opportunity for teachers to see a lesson modeled by a

fishbowl master teacher with actual students.

• Outreach Specialist works with “content specialists”

(professors) at NKU to design lessons with accurate content. • 5E/7E Inquiry Model • Student-friendly learning targets • Science notebooks • Formative assessments • Inexpensive materials

25

Reflection: Teachers reflect back on the fishbowl experience, identifying best practices in STEM education. Exploration: Teachers explore additional resources and ways to bring best practices into their own teaching practice. Content: Teachers work with content, increasing their knowledge and clearing up misconceptions. Alignment: Teachers across disciplines and at varying grade levels extend the topic of the fishbowl into their classes. Pedagogy: The art of teaching – the engagement & motivation of students, classroom management, the way teachers deliver the information.

RECAP


C IN S A M

: d on p es R ers h Teacbefore & After

your involvement in this cinsam pd project

how often did you...

Ms. Reeda Hart modeled best practices in teacher’s own elementary and middle school science classrooms, demonstrating lessons chosen by the teachers to fit into their curricula. Ms. Hart and Ms. Debbie Bowles continue the Southern Counties Outreach Project in Carroll, Gallatin, Owen, Grant, Pendleton, and Bracken counties.

2011

The Sustainability Project In order to build teachers’ capacity to teach lessons and strategies shared by CINSAM Outreach Specialists, CINSAM launched the Sustainability Project in 2011. In this project, teachers observed an Outreach Specialist for one period, and then were responsible for teaching the same lesson to the rest of their classes. Ms. Hart and Ms. Bowles have continued this project in Southern Counties’ middle schools over the 20122013 year.

R E P OR T

CINSAM started the Southern Counties Outreach Project in 2003 as way to build relationships between NKU and the southern Counties of our service area.

A N N U A L

2003

The Southern Counties Outreach Project

never

1/3 of lessons

1/2 of lessons

2/3 of lessons

every lesson

Make connections to meaningful past experiences

make cross curricular connections to ela

make cross curricular connections to mathematics

require students to use critical and/or creative thinking

engage students in complex, inquiry-based instruction

use formative assessment to inform instruction

2012-2013

The Next Generation STEM Classroom Pilot Year

use active learning strategies

From the Sustainability Project, CINSAM learned that teachers needed time for reflection and the exploration of pedagogy and content. The Outreach Specialists needed to explain WHY they were doing what they were doing. So in 2012, Reeda Hart piloted the Next Generation STEM Classroom model at Boone and Kenton County Schools. This model contains the Fishbowl, RECAP, and Share-Out. The Next Generation STEM Classroom reached 8 districts of northern Kentucky this year, including: Augusta, Boone, Bracken, Gallatin, Grant, Kenton, Pendleton, and Williamstown.

how did

your involvement in this cinsam pd project

help your students...

no effect

very little

a little

somewhat

a lot

improved student behavior

improved student interest

lOOKING AHEAD

improved student engagement

The Toyota USA Foundation announced a gift of $560,000 to the Next Generation STEM Classroom, which will expand the program in 2013-2014 to an additional 9 districts in Northern Kentucky.

improved student learning

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R E P OR T A N N U A L C IN S A M

summer

camps

“My da ug h see t he ter was ab le t o aspects eng ine of w ha er ing i t s and w eng ine hat an er doe s. This g reat c wa s a hance t o enco urage her.”

engineering camp Dr. Morteza Sadat-Hosseiny and Mr. Bill Schneider introduced high school students to the ideas and practices of engineering and engineering technology. Students “learned by doing”, designing with AutoCAD and solving collision-related problems (among other things) with the guidance of NKU faculty in physics and pre-engineering. They undertook projects to build towers out of paper that maximized tower weight-bearing capacity, while minimizing costs and time; teams were on a budget and were required to “purchase” their own materials (from camp leaders) and keep their own books as an exercise in project management. Campers also took field trips to two local engineering firms, where they took tours of the facilities, talked to practicing engineers about their work, and constructed their own projects using the firms’ materials, data, and directives.

JAVA COMPUTER GAMES PROGRAMMING CAMP Dr. Richard Fox’s Java Computer Game Programming Camp offered high school students a chance to explore the exciting world of computer game programming in the high-tech Griffin Hall Media Lab. He and Dr. Gary Newell worked with NKU undergraduates to develop this exciting camp and guide students through projects like designing and coding computer games. As a result, campers created sophisticated games ranging from Who Wants to be a Millionaire to TRON Motorcycle games to Wheel of Fortune. In completing their TRON motorcycle project, one group wrote over 600 lines of code! A couple of the groups came up with ideas for their own games by themselves. The camp was such a success this year, enrollment was full by the end of May.

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A N N U A L R E P OR T

“My so cur r icu n lo ve d camp ! lum wa s taug h This camp built up t in a wa o n h is y t hat in excite d to be c tere s t. He was h t hat wa so s fun, w allenge d in a i t h an way s cientis enco ur t motiv a g ing ating h im.”

C IN S A M

who veryone e o t u able yo o enjoy “Thank s m a r g or his pro k y ou f n a made t h T . .” child program e h for my t o int him fit helping

aeronautics camp math & Statistics camp Dr. Brooke Buckley and Dr. Bethany Noblitt organized the Math and Statistics Camp with CINSAM and the PRIME grant program. Students in middle school and younger were able to work with select NKU scholarship winners as their camp counselors who will specialize in teaching math and math-related subject matter to high-need secondary schools upon graduation.

Students take flight in Mr. Bill Schneider’s Aeronautics camp. These young men and women (grades 6-10) learn about the math and science behind flight and navigation. Then they apply this knowledge and learn how to fly! Students reproduce real flight conditions using flight simulator software. Schneider says, “It’s fairly intense, but the kids really feel like they’ve accomplished something when they’re able to take off, fly, and land.” Most students also participate in an optional field trip to tour Lunken Airport’s facilities on a fourth day. By the end of the camp, students are well positioned for starting ground school, then flight school, and earning their pilot’s licenses!

The counselors planned exciting activities for the students to teach them a variety of advanced math skills including crime solving with ellipses, bungee jumping dolls, and the construction of large scaled movie props!

...

Journalism in the digital age workshop CINSAM teams up with an Informatics camp

Extra, extra! Read all about Aeronautics Camp! tudents taking part in a journalism summer camp with the College of Informatics visited CINSAM’s Aeronautics Camp to practice taking photos and doing interviews. The students filmed their interviews with Mr. Bill Schneider, the camp director, edited them into news stories, and posted them on their camp website.

S

28


R E P OR T A N N U A L C IN S A M

summer

camps

e es plac k a t g n a earni “More l this week than ” during school! n i r a e whole y

astronomy camp This year, students in grades 6-8 attended Astronomy Camp with NKU professors Mr. Dan Spence, Dr. Charles Hawkins, and Dr. Wayne Bresser. Two weeks of camp were offered for the first time this year, the second camp being an advanced week. Students who had attended Astronomy Camp in the past were invited to take the more in-depth version.

middle school stem camp Dr. Bethany Bowling aimed to get middle school students excited about science and encourage them to build a foundation necessary for academic and professional pursuits in the sciences. Her half-day week-long camp had 6th through 8th graders busy learning about topics ranging from ecology to physics to nutrition through a variety of hands-on laboratory and field activities—all under the expert guidance of several NKU STEM faculty. Students experienced creating liquid nitrogen balloons, studied DNA fingerprinting, enjoyed making monkeys into humans using the computer science facilities at NKU, and were able to take a field trip. Mr. Tim Schneider, secondary science coach at Campbell County Middle School, and Ms. Pat Brownfield, science teacher at Phillip Sharp Middle School, helped Dr. Bowling run the camp.

29

Students learned to navigate their way through the solar system in the NKU Planetarium using their own bodies. Through the use of the Microsoft Kinect video game system that utilizes body motion to achieve screen activity, students were able to virtually fly through space! During their journey they learned about the rings of Saturn, constellations, dwarf planets, and the international space station! Students also viewed the skies with a high-powered telescope and engaged in a variety of hands-on activities.


C IN S A M A N N U A L R E P OR T

r my daug hter “It’s valuable fo rsue her to be able to pu a EM subj ects in intere sts in ST ts that share g ro up of stu den s.” similar intere st

“ Th is is a g reat o pp o rtu abi l i ty nity fo ki d s in r h ig h tere s te They g d in s cie et a ch nc ance to t hey ne ver get do t hin e. g to do i classr n a reg s co llege o o m. Also, be u lar in profe ss ors is a g aro und definit e plu s.”

our river, our future Camp Fun with science camp Dr. Miriam Kannan ran an exciting camp geared specifically toward English Language Learners (ELL). This camp, co-sponsored by the English Language Learning Foundation, exposed students to a variety of fun activities in science, ranging from a microscopic Microbe Safari to the explosive Magic of Chemistry. Students collected and studied water samples, made necklaces containing their DNA, and watched a show in the NKU Planetarium. Students also ventured out on exciting field trips to learn about laboratory research at Proctor & Gamble, regional zoology at Grassy Creek, and the Ohio River system on a Queen City Riverboat ride.

Middle school and high school students from northern Kentucky spent two days exploring the Ohio River and learning about environmental careers in the field of water quality protection as part of the “Our River, Our Future” camp, hosted by Northern Kentucky University (NKU) and the Foundation for Ohio River Education (FORE). During the camp, students analyzed water samples, electrofished on the Ohio River with aquatic biologists from the Ohio River Valley Water Sanitation Commission (ORSANCO), and toured Greater Cincinnati Waterworks’ Richard Miller Treatment Plant. The 18 students who participated were enrolled in the YMCA Black and Latino Achievers, a program that engages teens in hands-on learning emphasizing college readiness, career exploration and leadership development. The camp was funded by CINSAM and the NKU Community Partnerships Program.

Students and their parents were invited to an exciting closing ceremony this year where Dr. Kannan, counselors and special guests were present to acknowledge the students efforts of the past week and counselors gave unique awards to each participant.

30


R E P OR T A N N U A L C IN S A M

mathcounts CINSAM partnered with the Department of Mathematics and Statistics to coordinate a regional competition for MATHCOUNTS, an annual national competition in mathematics for students in grades 6-8. Held on Saturday, February 16, 2013, and sponsored by the Kentucky Society of Professional Engineers, there were team and individual competitions for students to compete in. Along with assisting in coordination of this competition CINSAM provided backpacks of gifts for the competitors including the individual winner, Amanda Zahn, from Boone County’s Gayle H. Grey Middle School. Amanda’s school went on to win first place in the team competition as well.

first lego league On Saturday, December 1, 2012, over 500 students, families, coaches and volunteers participated in the Northern Kentucky Regional FIRST® LEGO League Robotics Tournament and Jr. FIRST® LEGO League Engineering Expo. CINSAM continued its support of the event by assisting with the planning and execution of the day’s activities. FIRST® Robotics programs provide hands-on learning experience in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) in addition to stressing 21st century skills that focus on communication, collaboration, problem solving and innovative thinking. Teams designed, built, and programmed LEGO NXT robots to complete up to 25 missions on a predesigned Robot Performance field. At the tournament, the teams were judged in the areas of teamwork, research presentation, and robot design/programming in the Student Union and Griffin Hall, and they competed with their robots against each other during Robot Performance Rounds in Regents Hall. Multiple teams won trophies in different competition areas, and ten teams progressed to the state competition.

31


C IN S A M A N N U A L

Hearts and Minds is a science, math, and leadership program for black male students in the 4th-6th grades throughout the Greater Cincinnati Area. Kevin Robinson, chief meteorologist from WLWT News 5, is the leader of the mentorship program.

R E P OR T

Hearts and Minds

On February 16, 2013, Hearts and Minds visited NKU for a day of STEM activities with their parents. The students did a variety of hands-on activities. Their parents met with CINSAM’s Mr. Thomas Brackman to talk about STEM and STEM careers. The students also got a chance to experience the high-tech learning environment of Griffin Hall’s Digitorium.

GEAR UP Career discovery day CINSAM partnered with GEAR UP Kentucky to host GEAR UP Career Discovery Day on March 23, 2013. GEAR UP Kentucky provides services for students beginning in 7th grade in 29 middle schools and their corresponding high schools. At NKU’s GEAR UP Career Discovery Day, approximately 200 7th graders from Trimble County, Newport, and Covington School Districts participated in hands-on activities in math and science. NKU faculty and CINSAM staff led lessons in chemistry, neurotoxicology, evolution, geology, nanotechnology, engineering, mathematics, physics, and climate change. The students were immersed in activities such as building pop bottle cars and studying brains. A special treat at lunch was an interactive performance by the NKU Improv Troupe, a group of NKU students from the Department of Theatre and Dance.

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R E P OR T C IN S A M

A N N U A L

SEFNK T

he Science and Engineering Fair of Northern Kentucky (SEFNK) held its 18th annual regional fair this year on February 23, 2013 at Northern Kentucky University’s Student Union. CINSAM continued its sponsorship of the event for the thirteenth year, and 8 members of CINSAM staff participated as judges and other SEFNK personnel. Beth Russell, CINSAM’s Program Manager, replaced Charles Bowen this year as the Executive Director in charge of the fair. Two hundred students from 39 schools of northern and northeastern Kentucky competed. The grand prize winner of this year’s event, Monica McFadden of Notre Dame Academy, was awarded a trip to the INTEL International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF) in Phoenix, Arizona in May. At ISEF, she and her project, Further Studies in Biofilm Removal of Contaminants, competed with science fair winners from across the world. Students who participated in SEFNK had the opportunity to explore their scientific interests, gain confidence about their abilities to gather, analyze, and present information, and better understand the many ways science affects their lives. CINSAM is proud to continue its support of the organization’s annual event.

Winners of the CINSAM Award

Elementary

M o n ic a M c F a d

den

2013 Best in Fair Notre Dame Academy

A J Stewart, Mar y Queen of Heaven

Middle Erin Beighle, Verona Middle School

High Hannah Rodgers, Walton Verona High School

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C IN S A M

days

R E P OR T

science

A N N U A L

elementary

F

our hundred 4th grade students from Northern Kentucky engaged in a variety of hands-on activities on campus this year during CINSAM’s Elementary Science Days. The first event, on November 19, welcomed students from Saint Therese School in Campbell County, North Point Elementary in Boone County, and Saint Joseph Elementary School in Kenton County. The second Elementary Science Day was held on April 19, when students from Erpenbeck Elementary School and Ockerman Elementary School in Boone County took part.

pre-service teachers faculty sessions The students and their teachers broke into groups, rotating through sessions held in the science labs at NKU’s Natural Science Center. Sessions were taught by NKU faculty members and CINSAM staff. Students met a variety of animals, built bridges, watched chemical reactions with dry ice, made models of coral, and much more. Topics included chemistry, engineering, biology, physics, astronomy, and environmental science.

Students also rotated through small interactive demonstrations designed and run by pre-service teachers under the guidance of their instructor, Dr. Steve Kerlin. These groups rotated throughout the Digitorium at Griffin Hall.

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R E P OR T A N N U A L C IN S A M

integrative natural

SCIENCE

course

C

CINSAM’s Integrative Natural Science (SCI 110) and Honors Integrative Natural Sciences (SCI 110H) courses are designed to introduce and engage students from all majors, especially education majors, in the discovery of the natural world. Students explore fundamentals of biology, chemistry, physics, earth sciences, and mathematics in a “hands-on” and “minds-on” studio style classroom, where students learn through active inquiry as professors circulate. By the end of the course, the students teach themselves! In the 2012-2013 academic year, 180 students enrolled in 10 sections of SCI 110 and 32 in SCI 110H. These students ranged in field from Finance and Organizational Leadership majors to Elementary and Early Childhood Education majors. This course is a shining example of NKU’s emphasis on learnerfocus. Rather than employing the traditional lecture model, in which students sit at desks and watch the professor, SCI 110 and SCI 110H students sit at laboratory benches and learn how to learn, by participating in authentic exploration of natural phenomena with their classmates. This environment not only fostered greater interest in and ownership of the students’ learning, but also trained pre-service teachers in creating the sort of learning environment for their own future students that is favored by an increasingly robust body of research.

S T UDEN T L E A R NING TA RGE T S

1 2 3 4 5

Learn how scientific, investigative, and discovery activity is conducted and engage in designing and conducting experiments.

Have an increased awareness of current scientific issues and the importance of scientific literacy to understanding and resolving issues.

Understand major scientific ideas – many of which they will experimentally discover.

Learn how scientific discovery crosses disciplinary borders.

Use mathematics and mathematical relationships to analyze data and solve problems using their data and/or other information.

In order to expand the impact of this course on pre-service teachers, the Department of Teacher Education made Integrative Natural Science a requirement for Elementary Education majors in 2012.

Integrative Natural Science in the “Real World”

As students in SCI 110 and SCI 110H learn about the integrated nature of science and mathematics through authentic, hands-on activities, they naturally make connections to their “real world” experiences…

Meteorites in Russia, Meteorites in Kentucky

O

n February 15, 2013, the Chelyabinsk meteor exploded in the Russian sky. As it happened, students in one of Bill Schneider’s SCI 110 sections were also thinking about meteors. They had been studying a rock found by the students of Walton Verona Elementary School in a Piner park to determine whether it was a meteorite. This team of students conducted a variety of physical and chemical tests on the rock in pursuit of an answer.

35

In light of the meteor in Russia, their quest garnered some attention from local media; both nky.com/Cincinnati.com and Local 12 News covered the story and gave it a wide audience. Moreover, towards the end of the semester, this team of students took their findings to one very important audience: the fourth-grade students of Walton Verona Elementary School. They concluded that the rock was likely not a meteorite, but they really learned a lot from the journey that got them their answer!

The Science of Firefighting

O

ne SCI 110 student - a part time fire-fighter - was keenly engaged in class, often asking and answering questions and helping his fellow students. For his final project he showed up with his fire-fighter’s suit and equipment. He very carefully described the creation of a fire, and how chemistry and physics can impact the intensity and danger of a fire, relating his explanation to Newton’s Laws. He also explained why Nomex material works as a fire retardant and how his boots and helmet further protect him from fire. In doing so, he demonstrated his understanding of the science behind the protection offered by his equipment as he faces the dangers of a fire.


C IN S A M

Her students also improved their understanding of… • The nature of science (by designing and conducting their own experiments with yeast), • The role of writing and other communications (through various exercises, including a persuasive essay on DNA barcoding), and • The importance of mathematics in STEM (by working through engineering problems and creating simple mathematical models).

Students concluded the semester by revising their resumes and cover letters to “apply” for a job they’d want and “interviewed” for that job.

$$

R E P OR T

Sci-101

In the Spring of 2013, CINSAM’s Dr. Madhura Kulkarni took over one section of SCI 101, Introduction to STEM Careers. She believes that an emphasis on raising awareness of skills required for STEM careers is just as important as raising awareness of the careers themselves. So she changed the course title to Introduction to STEM Careers and Skills. In order to build this awareness, she brought in guest speakers from a variety of STEM sectors, including engineering (Dr. Dale Elifrits of NKU’s Engineering Technology program), health care (Mr. Greg Schooler, COO of Cincinnati GI), STEM entrepreneurship (Mr. Jeff Varrone of NKU’s Entrepreneurship Institute and Mr. Jaydev Karande of Wearcast).

A N N U A L

Introduction to STEM Careers and Skills

CINSAM SCholarships CINSAM awards scholarships to students of outstanding academic merit and ambitions in the STEM fields. CINSAM and faculty from cooperating departments select students based on overall academic performance, strong showing in mathematics and the sciences, and plans to continue in those fields. Scholarships help pay for tuition and books for these excellent students.

Scholarship winners came from all three CINSAM colleges with majors inluding:

During the 2012-2013 year, CINSAM awarded new scholarships to 14 incoming freshman and renewed the scholarships of 19 students.

• Biological Sciences

• Chemistry

• Mathematics

• Physics

• Middle Grades Education

• Computer Science

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R E P OR T C IN S A M

A N N U A L

Soar

Emily Esham

spot lig ht

Emily Esham is a SOAR scholar and a biology major at NKU. Emily was accepted into the SOAR program in 2010 and has participated a wide variety of activities. In addition to going to Red’s games, Kings Island trips, and picnics, Emily has had the opportunity to assist with inter views for new SOAR scholars and help run open houses. She assisted in hosting the graduation celebration this year for the SOAR 2009 scholars.

Project SOAR: Scholarships, Opportunities, Achievements & Results seeks to recruit, retain, educate, and graduate financially needy, academically talented students – SOAR Scholars – who will enter the workforce or graduate school in a STEM field. We currently have 49 SOAR Scholars on campus, with 21 arriving in fall 2013. Achievements include:

1

Higher freshmen retention rates for SOAR Scholars (>82%) than their STEM peers (69%); freshmen year retention rates within STEM have improved from 2009 cohort (79% remain) to 2012 cohort (89% remain).

2

Increased number of under-represented SOAR Scholars each year (7, 10, 11, 14 Scholars per year, respectively), with an increase in the diversity of our cohorts over the last 2 years to include students of African American, Hispanic, and native Hawaiian Islander descent.

3

Significant participation of at least 25% of each cohort living in the STEM living community each year, with additional students living in other residence halls (some because of their involvement in athletics or other living communities).

4

Increased SOAR Scholar (45%) participation in summer research when compared to other STEM students (<20%) following their freshman year.

5

More frequent and improved performance reviews (i.e., every 4 weeks instead of once a semester) so students have time to implement any changes needed to improve success in their classes.

6

4-year graduation rate for SOAR 2009 is 53%; compared to 12% of their peers.

Throughout her undergraduate experience, Emily has worked in the research lab for biology professor Dr. Kristi Haik and traveled with her to present their findings at a neuroscience convention in New Orleans, LA. She was awarded the Dorothy Westermann Hermann Summer Fellowship in 2011 to fund her research. Emily has also worked as an office assistant to CINSAM since 2012, giving her the opportunity to assist with a variety of events with K-12 students, STEM majors at NKU, and faculty. “I have been involved with many projects that I can use on my resume as well as experience that will benefit me when job searching,” said Esham. “I have been able to travel to places I would not have been able to without NKU faculty, and I would not have met these people and developed such great relationships without SOAR.” “SOAR has introduced me to so many wonderful faculty and mentors as well as fellow students who have become my best friends.”

The First Graduates The 2009 SOAR cohorts don caps and gowns Congratulations!

I

n May 2013, the first group of SOAR scholars graduated from Northern Kentucky University with their undergraduate degrees in a variety of STEM disciplines. These students were the first to be accepted into the SOAR scholarship program when it was formed in 2009.

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Ryan Durbin has been involved with STEM since the fall of 2011 as an ambassador in the department of computer science. He has worked with faculty and other ambassadors to plan a social event to build the STEM community. Ryan participated in monthly leadership development workshops led by Dr. Alison Antes. In the spring of 2012, he had the opportunity to work with Dr. Antes to develop and analyze a sur vey for students involved in the STEM peer-led undergraduate study sessions (STEM PLUS Sessions). In the summer of 2012, he took the sole initiative of organizing and redesigning the STEM website. Ryan currently leads weekly peer-led undergraduate study sessions to assist students in target computer science courses. “I have developed some great experience in becoming a leader and working as part of a team that will benefit me beyond college immensely,” explained Durbin. “These skills and experiences are so valuable for me as I move into the real-world because many students and young professionals will not have had the same opportunities that STEM has provided me. “ “The most beneficial aspect of working on the STEM project for me personally has been the great friendships I have made with the great faculty and student leaders we have on the project. We work together as a group of highly driven students and the power we have to impact students’ success is remarkable.”

R E P OR T

spot lig ht

A N N U A L

RYAN DURBIN

C IN S A M

FORCE Project FORCE (Focus on Occupations, Recruiting, Community, and Engagement) is a National Science Foundation - STEM Talent Expansion Program (STEP) project that works to build a coordinated effort across the STEM departments at NKU: Biological Sciences, Chemistry, Computer Science, Mathematics & Statistics, and Physics & Geology. The project has two goals: (1) increase the retention rate of first time freshmen STEM majors from under 30% to at least 60%, and (2) increase the number of undergraduates (freshmen and transfer students) who complete a bachelor’s degree in STEM by 50%. Goal #2 has already been met with 237 graduates in the STEM disciplines in the 2011-2012 academic year. In addition, while overall undergraduate enrollment at NKU has remained around 12,000 over the last several years, enrollment in the STEM disciplines has increased from 12.0% in 2009 to 13.7% in 2012. The FORCE project has taken major steps to improve recruitment and retention of STEM students and achievements include:

1

Established an “NKU STEM” table with faculty and undergraduate representatives at 14 on-campus and 3 external recruiting events;

2

Developed a system for identifying and contacting students interested in STEM majors;

3

Host an annual STEM Showcase recruiting event and high school STEM Day with over 200 students and their parents participating over the last three years;

4

Created a plan that identifies students who switch to a different major, and notifies department chairs who will follow up with student;

5

Implemented new STEM careers seminar;

6

Strengthened the STEM community at NKU through a variety of academic and social events, as well as through social networking. Successes include annual summer research presentations, graduate school informational sessions, monthly STEM pizza suppers, and additional social events for STEM students;

7

Employed 15 STEM Ambassadors a year: Representative upperclassmen from each STEM department who organize, execute, and recruit for STEM-related events discussed above and hold weekly peer-led review sessions for identified risk-point courses.

8

Peer-led review sessions have involved over 150 unique students annually;

9

Developed a new Undergraduate Research Program focused on funding 1st - and 2nd -year students, as well as those at-risk of leaving a STEM major: >100 students funded since 2010.

10

Presented results from this award at five conferences, with one paper published.

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This publication was prepared by Northern Kentucky University and printed with state funds (KRS 57.375).

CINSAM Annual Report 2012-2013  

The mission of the Center for Integrative Natural Science and Mathematics (CINSAM) is to improve P-16 STEM education by advancing and integr...

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