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Langcliffe A conservation village in the Yorkshire Dales National Park

Langcliffe History Including:Langcliffe Hall History of the Village Institute Families from the area


The Early History of Langcliffe in Craven ................................................................................................ 5 In the beginning .................................................................................................................................. 5 The sale of the Manor of Langcliffe .................................................................................................... 6 The key events ................................................................................................................................ 6 The Darcy family ............................................................................................................................. 6 Nicholas Darcy, Henry Billingsley and the feoffees......................................................................... 8 The transactions............................................................................................................................ 10 Major Dawson's poem ...................................................................................................................... 15 Sir Isaac Newton and the Langcliffe Mathematicians ........................................................................... 16 Family Trees .......................................................................................................................................... 22 The Carrs of Langcliffe....................................................................................................................... 22 The Carrs of Giggleswick ................................................................................................................... 24 The Carrs of Stackhouse.................................................................................................................... 25 The Carrs of Grainhouse ................................................................................................................... 27 The Carrs of Closehouse.................................................................................................................... 30 The Swainsons................................................................................................................................... 32 The Somerscales ............................................................................................................................... 36 Sale of the Manor ................................................................................................................................. 39 Sale of the Manor No. 1 MIC 1874 PC/LAC 13 Northallerton PRO C54/1408 CP 3572 ......... 39 29th November 1591 .................................................................................................................... 39 Nicholas Darcy and Henry Billingsley to the Fosters et al. ........................................................... 39 MIC 1874 PC/LAC 13 Northallerton Sale of the Manor of Langcliffe by Nicholas Darcy and Henry Billingsley 29 November 1591 ...................................................................................................... 43 No. 2 Thomas Kidd et al. ............................................................................................................... 43 PRO C54/1419 CP 3572 Sale of the Manor No. 3 Darcy/ Billingsley/ Atwill 9th February 1585 ...................................................................................................................................................... 47 MIC 1874 FC/LAC 13 Northallerton Sale of the manor .............................................................. 49 No. 4 Darcy/Billingsley/Atwill 8th August 1586 ...................................................................... 49 Sale of the Manor No. 5 Darcy/ 9 feoffees/ 24 others 29th November 1591 PRO C54 / 1419 CP 3572 ............................................................................................................................. 50 Sale of the Manor No. 6 Darcy/Billingsley/Somerscales/Armystead 29th November 1591 .... 52 Sale of the Manor No. 7 ................................................................................................................... 56 29th November 1591 PRO C54 / 1419 CP 3572 Northallerton PC/LAC 13 MIC 1874 ................ 56


Langcliffe Wills ...................................................................................................................................... 60 CARR .................................................................................................................................................. 65 THOMAS CARR of Stackhouse........................................................................................................... 66 WILLIAM CARR of Grainhouse 1587................................................................................................ 69 ELIZABETH CARRE 1587..................................................................................................................... 70 RICHARD CARR of Grainhouse 1593............................................................................................... 70 Borthwick 25 1523 ............................................................................................................................ 70 ROGER CARR of Closehouse 1597 ................................................................................................... 72 ANNE CARR of Grainhouse (nee Armitstead) 1607......................................................................... 72 ROBERT CARR of Stackhouse 1612 .................................................................................................. 74 LEONARD CARR 1696 ....................................................................................................................... 80 LAWRENCE IVESON 1548 ................................................................................................................. 98 Borthwick vol. 13 fol. 426 mf 920 .................................................................................................... 98 Latin text ........................................................................................................................................... 98 RICHARD LAWSON of Langcliffe 1699 ............................................................................................ 104 Elizabeth Paley de Langcliffe bd 1604/5 ......................................................................................... 108 THOMAS PALEY 1669/70 ................................................................................................................ 108 (Rev.) WILLIAM PALEY of Giggleswick 22 March 1796 .................................................................. 111 Canon WILLIAM PALEY 1804 ........................................................................................................... 112 HENRY SOMERSCALES 1609 ........................................................................................................... 119 The Land .............................................................................................................................................. 124 Farming In and Around Langcliffe ................................................................................................... 124 James aged 9 ............................................................................................................................... 124 Jackie Towler, A Farmer’s Wife Today ........................................................................................ 125 In the Past ................................................................................................................................... 125 Westside House .......................................................................................................................... 126 A list of the Farms of Langcliffe – Past and Present.................................................................... 126 Victoria Cave. SD 8384 6505 ........................................................................................................... 127 Church and Chapel .............................................................................................................................. 133 The Church of St. John the Evangelist ............................................................................................. 133 Stained Glass: .............................................................................................................................. 133 Langcliffe Church............................................................................................................................. 135 Stained Glass: .............................................................................................................................. 135 The Methodist Chapel..................................................................................................................... 138


Methodism in Langcliffe.............................................................................................................. 138 The Methodist Community ......................................................................................................... 138 Memories of The Chapel and the Sunday School ....................................................................... 138 School picnics .............................................................................................................................. 139 Chapel and Church ...................................................................................................................... 139 Langcliffe - New Zealand ..................................................................................................................... 140 Murder at the Bay Horse, Langcliffe ................................................................................................... 141 Langcliffe Community Primary School ................................................................................................ 143 This Old House .................................................................................................................................... 144 The War Memorial .............................................................................................................................. 150


The Early History of Langcliffe in Craven In the beginning The history of Langcliffe, a small village near Settle in Craven, can be traced back to the Domesday book. Its development is very closely tied to the histories of several local families which can be followed over several hundred years. The whole of the parish of Giggleswick in which the village of Langcliffe lay before it became a parish in its own right in 1851 was at the time of the Domesday book in the possession of Roger Poitou and soon after it became united with the Percy family fee as overlords. The Domesday record (1086) notes that "In Lanclif Feg had 3 carucates of land to be taxed". A carucate is roughly an area of land between 60 and 120 acres or the area an ox-team was capable of ploughing in a year. William de Percy founded the Cistercian Sawley (Sallay) Abbey in 1148. The Sallay Chartulary completed soon after 1333 is a collection of deeds for lands possessed in Yorkshire and Lancashire by the Abbey. From this we know that Elias de Giggleswick held a carucate of land in Langcliffe (1223), probably kept in hand for himself, and in about 1240 he granted his body and all his land in Langcliffe, in demesne and in service, and the mill with its suit, etc. to Sawley Abbey with full manorial rights. " …bosco ejusdem ville et molendino cum secta sua et cum omnibus pertinenciis, libertatibus et aisia mentis dicte ville de Langclif pertinentibus." The mill was later confirmed to be the property of Sallay Abbey by Henry de Percy. The Abbot of Sawley then became the Lord of the Manor of Langcliffe. In the time of Edward II (1284-1327) the Lord of the Manor for Langcliffe was still the Abbas de Sallay (1284) and this continued until the time of Henry VIII (died 1547). The Scots ransacked the village after the battle of Bannockburn won by Robert the Bruce in 1314 and after 1318 or 1319 the village was rebuilt, half a mile south of the supposed original site in Pesbers field on the west side of the lane to Winskill. Stockfarming for wool was the most likely occupation at this time. A series of Lay Subsidies in the 1500s, detailed censuses of the nation’s military resources – manpower and weapons, show the names of Langcliffe residents (at least those who did not evade the officials!);

In 1522: - Armetstede, Brache, Bradley, Browne, Foster, Kedde, Kyng, Paycoke, Sailbanke and Yveson In 1524: - Kydson, Wylman At the time of the Lay Subsidy of 1524 all 18 tenants held their houses from the Abbot of Sawley. In 1543: - Armitstead, Braschay, Browne, Foster, Iveson, King, Kyd(son), Lawson, Paicocke, Sailbank In 1547: - Kydde, Lawsonne, Paycok The Clifford Muster roll of 1510/11 gives the names: For Langclyff: Browne, Pakok, Yveson For Gygilswyk: James Carr etc.


From these lists it seems that the family of Carr was not resident in Langcliffe before 1547. The James Carr of Giggleswick on the roll for 1510/11 who died in 1528 has descendants who can be identified with some certainty but his forebears are shadowy and cannot be linked to him with documentary evidence. A descendant, James Carr, is noted below as a holder of the office of feoffee when the manorial rights of Langcliffe were bought jointly from the Darcy family by several of the families in Langcliffe in the period 1591onwards. The connection with the Darcy family comes from the Tempest family who passed the baronial possession of Little or Knight Stainforth by marriage to the Darcy family in 1511. The sale of the Manor of Langcliffe The key events The three key events which triggered the sale of the Manor of Langcliffe at the end of the 1500s were the Dissolution of the Monasteries (1535/6-9) by Thomas Cromwell for Henry VIII, the Pilgrimage of Grace (1536), and the Rising of the North (1569). All these followed from the move to Protestantism in England under Henry VIII. The monasteries had built up consolidated estates and at the Dissolution these were returned to the Crown and in turn were granted in whole or in part to local lords or to local families for a consideration. Land in the feudal system was not the subject of ownership but of tenure – the king was the owner. The word ‘sold’ as used now has a different meaning concerning ownership. In 1533 in the reign of Henry VIII the Statute of Appeals forbade appeals from English courts to Rome, part of Henry’s resistance to papal domination. Sir Thomas More died for his Catholic beliefs and Thomas Cromwell rose to power. An Act was passed in 1535/6 to dissolve lesser monasteries, including Sawley Abbey in 1536. The Pilgrimage of Grace in 1536 was a revolt of the peasants under Robert Aske of Gray’s Inn against the ejection of monks from the abbeys (including Sawley and Whalley) and a culmination of a generation of growing discontent and fear; the lords of the manor and gentry often tried illegally to enclose land and to abuse peasants’ land use rights. The Royal forces refused to fight the rebels and Aske and the rebels were pardoned. A few months later the King arrested the leaders and executed them. In 1539 the dissolution of the greater monasteries began. Thomas Cromwell lost his head in 1540. Henry died in 1547 to be succeeded by Edward VI and then Elizabeth in 1558. The Rising of the North in 1569 concerned an attempt to secure the succession of the Catholic Mary Queen of Scots to the English throne. The defeat of the Rising led to the sequestration of lands of those involved which also therefore went to Crown ownership. Many of these old estates were sold to London merchants and speculators who sold on to local gentry, tenants (generally in trust for all the tenants of the manor, who became freeholders), or other speculators. Later James I (1603-1625) and Charles I (1626-1649) both needed money to re-develop the navy so sale of Crown lands was still helpful in filling the coffers. The Darcy family The Darcy family became the next owners of the Manor of Langcliffe after the Abbot of Sawley. They played an important role in national affairs in the 16th century: Lord Thomas Darcy (1467-1537) was a statesman and friend of Thomas Cromwell with land and properties in Lincolnshire and Yorkshire.


Thomas was involved in parliamentary matters and the rebellious Pilgrimage of Grace; he was decapitated for treason in 1537. His elder son Sir George Darcy was heir and the younger son Arthur was given an appointment by Cromwell despite the behaviour of his father. As a reward for helping to pacify the rebels in the north of England Henry VIII in 1535 sold (granted in fee simple – then the securest form of tenure) to Sir Arthur Darcie and to his heirs and assigns for ever the Monastery of the Blessed Mary of Sawley according to Letters Patent (of 1538) ‘by the authority of Parliament lately dissolved and suppressed with all houses and idifices situate and built upon and within the same and all singular demesne lands and tenements aforesaid of the late Monastery and also the Lordships or Manors of Staynforth Langclif and Stanton (and Gisbourne) within the appurtenances etc.’. The value of all the property involved was £147-3s-10d a year. The price was ‘in capite for ever by the service of a Knight’s fee and by the annual rental of £25-8s-10d. To be paid to the Treasurer for the time being of the Court of Augmentation of the Revenues of our Crown……’ (in addition Whitaker says that Sir George Darcy obtained and transferred Langcliffe land in 1539 to his younger brother Sir Arthur). In a letter written February 1536/7 to Cromwell Sir Arthur describes how he took possession of the Abbey from rebels. All the removable possessions of the Abbey were sold to Sir Arthur and he became the first grantee of the Manor. Sir Arthur died in April 1561 and left property to his seven sons by his will of September 1560. To his son and heir Henry he left "the demesne landes of the late monasterie of Salley" and half of the manor of Bolton, lordship of the manor of Aldeondesbury, chaunteries in Thornebury (in Gloucester) and the manor of Hutton Rudby. Sir Henry sold the half of the manor of Bolton in 1567 for £400. To Thomas he left the manor of Stirton and to Edward he left the manors of Stainforth Underbergh and Arneforth. To Arthur heleft the late monastery of Arden (in Yorkshire). To Nicholas the fifth son he left the manors of Langcliffe and Nappey with a yearly rent of £38-9s-8d of which 21shillings was paid "yearly to the Collectors of St. Leonard in the City of York to the Queens majesties use". John was left the manor of Potter Newton and lands in Ardenside, and Francis was left the manor and forest of Gysborne and ix closes in Gonby and Brotofte in Lincolnshire. Finally he leaves to Henry as heir one third part of his estate by law; the long list of property includes lands in Horton, Newby, Rawthemell, Cleitopp, Gygleswyke, Lytton, Ilkeley, Farnely, Weston and Gargrave. The total annual income from the property was £378-12s-8d. In 1560/1 it was found by Inquisition that Sir Henry held the manors of Langcliffe and Gisborne all of the Queen, in capite, by Knight’s service (Whitaker). In 1582 there was a transaction by Final Concord before the Court of the Queen’s Bench between Henry Darcy, Knight, with his six brothers (including Nicholas) Esquires and Richard Cutt(es/is) junior, esq. and Raphael Pemberton gent.. The transaction involved Langcliffe and Nappay; 2000 acres of land, 300 acres of meadow, 2000 acres of pasture, 30 acres of wood, 50 messuages, 30 cottages, 40 tofts, a water mill, 40 gardens, dovecotes, etc. (Nappay is shown on a Saxton map of Yorkshire in 1577 as being just south of Hellifield and on the river). The document is a Fine with proclamations known as ‘sur cognizance de droit come ceo qu’il a de son done’. The Darcy family appear to be agreeing to transferring the property through ‘an amicable agreement, whether real or fictitious, between a demandant (plaintiffs, Cutts and Pemberton) and tenant (owner Darcy), with the consent of judges….’. ‘The Darcys have recognized that the manors and tenements involved are the right of Cutts which Cutts and Pemberton have by gift of the Darcys and they have remised and quitclaimed them from the Darcys to Cutts and Pemberton for ever’. Since Nicholas Darcy still holds the properties to transfer to the villagers some years later this agreement seems odd. The properties are stated by the original agreement in 1535 with Henry VIII to pass to Darcy heirs and assigns for ever.


Perhaps an agreement was needed to convey the property to Nicholas and to alienate it from the other older sons. A method of conveyance by Fine was used. The purchaser (plaintiffs, Cutts and Pemberton) alleges fictitiously that the deforciant (Darcys) has agreed to convey the property but has failed to do so. Before judgement the parties come to an equally fictitious agreement whereby the seller (the Darcy family) acknowledged that the property really belonged to the purchaser (Cutts and Pemberton). This agreement was written out three times - the bottom part (the foot) of the Fine was kept by the court, the other two parts, left and right, by the parties. This bizarre procedure gave Cutts and Pemberton the fee simple (the most complete tenure known to the law); however, they hold the property only as trustees under the control of the Darcys. A Fine alone does not reveal the purpose of a transaction; it is impossible to deduce either that the plaintiffs, Cutts and Pemberton, are acting as agents of the deforciant (Darcys) or purchasing the property from the Darcys. Nevertheless it is probable that Cutts and Pemberton were acting as legal intermediaries rather than as buyers in the modern sense since Richard Cutts was a lawyer. The Fine was usually accompanied by a private deed giving full details of the transaction. This therefore appears to be a legal fictional sale simply to establish the Darcy title securely and to allow transfer to Nicholas Darcy. This sale is recited in Letters Patent dated 1630, purpose unknown, but is a copy of an agreement made in 1582. The value of the transaction was £740 but the sum of money is meaningless if the property does not change hands. The Cutts (Cutt, Cutte, Cuttes) family with property in Arkesden and Matching in Essex is almost certainly the one involved: Richard Cutts the eldest son of Richard of Debden in Essex took his BA at Christ’s College Cambridge 1576/7 and was admitted to the Inner Temple in 1578 and died in 1607. His brother William was admitted to the Middle Temple in 1578 and was called to the Bar in 1587. Brayshaw states that the other Darcy brothers possessed other local manors and property and were also selling in the decades after the death of their father in 1560. The third son Edward Darcy had the manor of Stainforth in 1579 and he sold some of the land to several parties prior to selling the manorial rights in 1595 as a lease for 500 years to four people probably acting as trustees for the then occupiers of properties. Those not able to purchase paid quit rents to the feoffees or to those who had made purchases. Nicholas Darcy, Henry Billingsley and the feoffees To appreciate what follows it is necessary to know something of the types of manorial landholding at the time. The township or parish was not necessarily co-extensive with the manor. The first type of manorial land is demesne land which was kept by the lord for his own use and support. The second is land granted by the lord in fee simple to free tenants (freeholders), descending as of right from father to son in return for for a defined service – and is conveyed by feoffment. The third type is land granted in return for undefined service – a risky matter. Finally waste or common land was held by the lord but the freeholders had rights of pasturage and turbary. It is also helpful to understand the date system: Elizabeth reigned from 17th November 1558, from which date regnal years are counted. The date of the start of a new year was then March 26th in our current calendar. It is now that Henry Billingsley becomes involved. Henry Billingsley was the son of Roger of Canterbury. Henry went to Cambridge in 1551 and also Oxford but did not graduate. He became apprenticed to a London haberdasher and rapidly became a wealthy merchant. He was chosen


Sheriff of London in 1584 and was elected Lord Mayor in 1596; he was knighted in 1597. From 1589 he was a farmer of customs duties at the Port of London. He died in 1606. It is known that by Statute Staple ( a very secure bond) Nicholas Darcy was bounden to Henry Billingsley for £1000 on 18th November 1583 and £1200 on 14th August 1584. A few months later in 1584/5 (9th February) in a key document leading to transfer of the manor we find that Nicholas Darcy is jointly bound with Henry Billingsley (as security?) to Lawrence Atwill for £1400 endorsed for payment on 31st November 1585 of £863-6-8 (essentially one third of £2600; by Statute Staple Darcy owes Billingsley £1000 from November 1583 plus £1200 from August 1584). Darcy is stated as the sole and lawful owner in fee simple for 500 years and proposes to farm-let the manor to Henry Billingsley (presumably to pay his debts to Billingsley). However the agreement is void if the part payment is made by November 1585, otherwise in May 1586 Billingsley takes over the lease of the manor and within two months Darcy must give all deeds to Billingsley. A deed of 8 August 1586 quotes the above agreement and states that Darcy failed to pay the £863-6-8 by the agreed date. Billingsley is forced to pay the sum to Lawrence Atwill and so Darcy confirms the lease of the manor to Billingsley. The manors of Langcliffe and Nappay are farm-let to Billingsley by Darcy as recited in an indenture between William Carr and Thomas Lawson in 1611. In 1586 (8 August) there is a deed extinguishing the condition in the 9th February 1584/5 deed confirming lease and grant without impeachment of waste, i.e. without reducing the value of the property. At this time the country was swamped with ex-manorial property for sale so buyers at high prices were hard to come by and Nicholas Darcy was perhaps financially embarassed as a result. In 1587 a Fine document shows that Henry Byllyngsley junr. Gent. (eldest son of Henry the haberdasher) bought (farm-let) property from Nicholas Darcy esq. This comprised the Manor of Nappay and 10 messuages and 4 cottages with lands in Nappay, Gysborne in Craven, Gargrave, Kildewicke, Skipton, Arneclyff, Gigleswick, and Lynton. In 1591 a key series of transactions were made by Darcy and Billingsley, on 29th November, to transfer the manor of Langcliffe and its property to villagers (and other local people). At this point the complicated financial arrangements between Darcy and Billingsley may have been settled. The first and most important deed to be considered concerns Darcy alone of the one party and nine men of the locality of the other party. These were Richard Foster of Stainforth (died 1603) and Chris.Sailbank of Stainforth (died 1600), James Carr of Stackhouse (died 1654) and Richard Clapham of Stackhouse, Lawrence Lawson of Giggleswick (died 1617/8), Adam Browne (elder) (de Winskall died 1622/3), John Wildman (?de Stackhouse died 1608, ?de Gigleswick 1625, ?de Rathmell 1639), William Lund of Settle (died ?1600), and William Bank of Huggon House, Rathmell (died ?1608, ?1622, ?1654).


These nine men appear to be feoffees acting on behalf of a large number of villagers purchasing (for an undisclosed amount) the "whole manor". The 24 villagers named are Henry Somerscales, Richard Somerscales, William Armysteade, Christopher Armysteade, Thomas Kydde, William Browne, Richard Kydson, Thomas Sowden, Antony Armysteade, Mathew Giggleswick, Richard Foster, Gyles Foster, Henry Paycocke, Michael Saylebanke, Thomas Foster elder, Richard Lawson, Bryan Cookeson, Thomas Newhouse, Thomas Preston, John Lupton, William Carre, John Brayshawe, George Lawson and Lawrence Iveson. The agreement excepts seven messuages in the tenure of Lawrence Swayneson, John Kidde, John Armysteade, Richard Brayshawe, Margaret Iveson widow, Thomas Carre and Robert Saylebanke. Further excepted were 101 acres of land in the tenure of Nicholas Darcy and these seven people. The extract of 1834 noted below confirms that the feoffees have to sell to tenants on demand by the tenants or their heirs. The transactions On the same day, 29th November 1591, we have a transaction between Nicholas Darcy and Henry Billingsley of the one party and eight men of the other party, William Carr, John Brayshawe, George Lawson, Lawrence Iveson, Thomas Preston, Thomas Newhouse, John Lupton and Bryan Cookeson, all yeomen and all mentioned in the document just noted as purchasers of the "whole manor". For ÂŁ194-0-7 the sale is of (i) Six messuages "now or late in the tenure of" Henry Thompson, William Carr, John Brayshawe, George Lawson, William Iveson and Lawrence Iveson all in Langcliffe (ii) All houses, yards, gardens, crofts and adjoining ground in the tenure of Hugh Kidd (iii) Two little closes of pasture called Thowker Heades and Holme Close in Langcliffe late in the tenure of Thomas Kinge and Richard Kinge (iv) 67 acres of arable lands and meadows in Langcliffe now or late in the tenure of William Carr, Thomas Preston, Thomas Newhouse, John Brayshawe, George Lawson, Lawrence Iveson, John Armysteade, William Iveson, Thomas Kinge and Richard Kinge (v) 6 acres of Hawfeld wood in Langcliffe (vi) 142 acres of pasture in Langcliffe (vii) 33 acres of pasture to be sold to Bryan Cookeson, Thomas Newhouse and Richard Somerscales These in south part of Langcliffe moor Flatt Heades field wall up to Carelae then to Warnedale Head and down Warnedale westwards to a great stone above the lambfolds and then to Stubbyn wall. (viii) 6 acres of pasture in Langcliffe on Warnedale Knotts adjoining the Yawe closehead


(ix) 39 acres of pasture in Langcliffe on north side of Cowe Close ascending to Turfmore yeate, then to Skarries by side of Cowside Close to the side of Henside Close (x) 64 acres of pasture on north side of the 33 acres noted above. The next deed between Nicholas Darcy and Henry Billingsley is with Thomas Kydde, William Browne, Thomas Sowden, Richard Kidson and Anthony Armysteade all yeomen in Langcliffe, Mathewe Giggleswick (glover of Langcliffe) and Thomas Giggleswick son of Mathewe. For ÂŁ398-2-6 the sale comprises (i) Five messuages (all houses, buildings, yards, gardens) now in the tenure of all except the son of Mathewe Giggleswick (ii) 46 acres of arable and meadows held by the same (iii) 152 acres of pasture near Cow Close, Skarris and Henside. The next deed dated the same day concerns Nicholas Darcy and Henry Billingsley of the one party and the Foster family and others living at Winskill and Cowside. The second party are Richard Foster the younger, Gyles Foster, Thomas Foster the elder, Richard Foster his son, Thomas Foster the younger, Christopher Lawson, Henry Paycock and Michael Saylbanke For ÂŁ537-12-9 the sale is of (i) Seven messuages (all houses, buildings, yards, gardens and crofts) now in the tenure of the second party except for Elizabeth Foster widow and one of the Richard Fosters. (ii) 62 acres of arable and meadow in Wynskall and Cowsyde now or late in the tenure of most of the second party (iii) 206 acres of pasture near Henside, Robert Saylbanke's calfe close, Cow Close and Wynskale Ing. On the same day Darcy and Billingsley of the one party agree to sell property to Henry Somerscales, of Stockdale, gent, and Richard Somerscales of Settle, yeoman, William Armysteade and Christopher Armysteade both husbandmen of Stainforth. (i) Langcliffe water corn mill with the dam, watercourse, soken tolls and fishing (ii) a little grove or spring of wood called Langcliffe spring (5 acres) and several small parcels of land held by Lawrence Swayneson, Anthony Armysteade, William Carr, Margaret Iveson widow, William Kidd, John Browne, Thomas Kinge, John Brayshawe and Richard Kidson (iii) one little close of pasture on west side of grove late in the tenure of Lawrence Swayneson and now in the occupation of Henry and Richard Somerscales (iv) woods, underwoods and trees in the grove (v) One messuage in Langcliffe (with all houses, buildings, gardens, crofts)


(vi) Six and a half acres of arable and meadow within Langcliffe now or late in the tenure of Thomas Kinge and Richard King (vii) One acre of ground in Langcliffe adjoining the south side of the wall of the spring issuing and ascending from the yeate called lee yeate eastward (viii) 16.5 acres of pasture next to the 33 acres sold to Richard Somerscales, Bryan Cookeson and Thomas Newhouse on Langcliffe moor Finally Nicholas Darcy and Henry Billingsley assign a lease on the same day for a messuage and land for 500 years to Richard Lawson and his son Thomas of Langcliffe at a cost of £156-13s-00d. There is an extract made in 1834 referring to all these transactions of 1591 saying that "Nicholas Darcy did grant bargain and sell unto Richard Foster of Stainforth James Carr of Stackhouse and others the Manor of Langcliffe with all rights members hereditaments and appurtenances thereunto belonging or of right in any wise appertaining and the Reversion and Reversions remainder and remainders thereof and all Rents suits and services of and belonging all and every the said premises To have and to hold the said manor of Langcliffe and other the said premises unto the said Richard Foster James Carr and others their heirs and assigns for ever by the said Deed remaining upon Record in the high Courts of Chancery……………..and the rest of the said Feoffees and their heirs and the survivor of them and his heirs should stand and be seized of the said Manor of Langcliffe with all the messuages tenements lands and hereditaments with the appurtenances and of the freehold estate of them and every of them to and for the only use and uses of the several and respective tenant and tenants of and in the said Manor of Langcliffe and their heirs and assigns for ever. And that they the said Feoffees and survivor and survivors of them and his and their heirs should upon demand grant and convey to every several and respective Tenant his heirs or assigns their several and respective messuages tenements lands parts and parcels of the said Manor." (This deed is endorsed "extract from a deed now in the possession of the Langcliffe Cooperative Association, showing the manor of Langcliffe to belong to the owners of lands therein" dated 1834). The demesne and freeholder land and manorial rights concerning the other types of land are presumably at issue in this document and the purchasers become feoffees in place of a Lord of the Manor. Feoffees were in effect trustees but with rights to do what they liked with the land (in contrast trustees are limited to specific tasks). The later purchases Thus we have evidence for 21 people involved with property purchases in Langcliffe in 1591 and probably resident in the village. The Lay Subsidy of 1524 quotes 18 tenants. The 21 names are: Armysteade John, Anthony, William, Christopher Brayshawe John, Richard Browne William Carr Thomas, William


Giggleswick Mathew Iveson Lawrence, Margaret, William Kidde John, Thomas Kidson Richard Lawson George Saylbanke Robert Somerscales Henry, Richard Swayneson Lawrence Many of the further deeds relating to this transfer of the Manor properties refer back to the Darcy/Billingsley agreement of 9th February 1584/5. From now on various transactions refer to dates later than 29 November 1591 for agreement between Darcy, Billingsley and others. These seem to concern the exceptions being transferred in November 1591 (e.g. John Kydd and Thomas Carr). In 1593 (August) William Carr(1) of Langcliffe, yeoman, assigns a lease of 500 years to Christopher Preston of Settle, for part of William’s share of the six messuages with appurtenances in Langcliffe and partition of the same amongst various other parties assigned on 31st January 1592 by Darcy and Billingsley. William Carr(1) makes his mark so could not write – he did not go to Giggleswick School! The other parties are named as in one of the transactions of 29th November 1591: Willm Carr, Thomas Newhouse, John Brayshay, George Lawson, Lawrence Iveson, Thomas Preston, John Lupton and Bryan Cookson. In 1593 (Brayshaw states – the deed has not been found) Richard Armitstead of Langcliffe purchased from Darcy and Billingsley a block of property in Langcliffe and sold portions to local families. It is not clear what this means if the whole manor was supposedly sold in 1591 but this is the first mention of Richard Armitstead's name. An indenture made on 10 February 1599/00 is cited by the Knipe family concerning the transfer from Henry Billingsley and Nicholas Darcy to Henry Somerscales of Stockdale of Langcliffe moore adjoining lands of Malham Moor, lands of the Earl of Cumberland and of Henry Somerscales. In 1604 a parcel of the lease made by Darcy and Billingsley with John Kydd in December 1592 was leased by John Kydd and Christopher Rediaghe to Thomas Gelderde. In 1611 William Carr(3) of Langcliffe, bachelor, signature cites a lease for 500 years from Darcy and Billingsley to Thomas Carr (William’s father) in June 1592 for a dwelling house, a garden with appurtenances in Langcliffe (then in the occupation of Thomas Carr), three little closes called Haggwormebotham, Stubbin Close and Leyes Close, 3 roods of arable land and 10 acres of pasture, all for £29-13s-9d.. William Carr now leases to Thomas Lawson of Langcliffe, husbandman, for £700s-00d a close called Thowkarrdale (one rood) etc. William was the elder son of Thomas Carr


(married Agnes Paley in 1581, buried 1596) who himself married Elizabeth Brayshaw in 1616. Thomas Carr is one of the original purchasers of the manor along with his brother William(1) mentioned above. In 1617 Thomas Lawson then passes the lease to his son Richard on the marriage of Richard to Isabel Clapham in 1617. An indenture of 1622 concerns Thomas Newhouse elder of Giggleswick transferring Swainson’s farm and land (Thowtterthwaite) in Langcliffe to Thomas Lawson and his son Richard. The Swainson property is being exchanged for land at Barrel Sykes plus 52 shillings four pence. The indenture quotes the transfer from Darcy and Billingsley to Thomas Newhouse in December 1593 and the lease to Billingsley from Darcy in 1584/5 of the manors of Langcliffe and Nappay and the further agreement of 1586. Thomas Newhouse is quoted in the 1584/5 indenture. A deed of 1647 conveys a messuage with appurtenances, pasture and closes from James Carr of Stackhouse to Richard Lawson the younger of Langcliffe, yeoman, It cites conveyance in November 1591 of the manor of Langcliffe from Darcy and Billingsley to Richard Foster and others. Richard Lawson is a tenant of a messuage and lands in Langcliffe. James Carr (bd 1654) is quoted as the sole surviving feoffee for the tenants of Langcliffe and to vest the estate of inheritance in the premises concerned on Richard Lawson he enfeoffees Richard of the property. In 1699 Richard passes all his freehold and leasehold property and lands lying in Langcliffe to his son Richard in his will. This presumably included the house with datestone 1681 LRM (Richard and Margaret Lawson) in the centre of the village. James Carr of Stackhouse outlived the other feoffees and the office of feoffee descended in his family for several generations. The Letters Patent of 1630 referred to above, a certified copy of transactions between Nicholas Darcy, Cutts and Pemberton in 1582, might have been needed by James Carr (died 1654) to demonstrate his rights associated with this office. The Carr families of Stackhouse and Langcliffe therefore possessed land in Langcliffe by 1591 (as distinct from leasing land and property) and this led to a branch of the family living and working in Langcliffe from at least that time on. Many further land transactions were carried out in the 1600s. For example, in 1599/1600 Sir Henry Billingsley and Nicholas Darcy leased Langcliffe Moor, called Scarr Close, to be divided into ten parts containing in all 300 acres (excepting 50 acres next to the Yaw Close) to Henry Somerscales (who built Langcliffe Hall in 1602). The property passed to Isaac Knipe and then to his son William and his wife Jane and daughter Jane by Isaac’s will in 1618. Then in 1631/2 Richard Braishey of Langcliffe, yeoman, rented one twentieth part for the remainder of 500 years (from 1584/5). Similarly in 1631/2 William Foster leased 3/20ths part from the Knipes at £3 a year rent, Thomas Carr of Langcliffe, yeoman, rented 1/10th part for £2 a year, William Carr(3) of Langcliffe, yeoman, rented 1/20th part at £1 a year, Thomas Paley took 1/10th part at £2, and Thomas Geldarde took a lease of 1/20th part for £1. Then in 1637 William Foster, yeoman, took over the assignment of rent charges for 500 years paying William Knipe and his family £180 for the privilege of rent collection from the six tenants.


Major Dawson's poem The transfer of ownership of the manor to local people was obviously a major turning point. Major William Dawson of Langcliffe Hall, an educated man, in 1690 wrote a poem in Latin to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the event; the last few lines are In laudem Langcliviae Libertas, sed sera, tamen respexit avitos Indigenas; illis Darcy sua vendidit arva Vivitur ingenue, nunc candida tecta resurgent, Nunc lautae mensae, nunc rerum copia abundans; Incola, non dominus, spatiosis imperat arvis. Freedom, although late in coming, was mindful of their forebears who had been born there. Darcy sold his lands to them and they lived as free men. Gleaming dwellings now appeared again, and now there were splendid spreads and an abundant supply of everything; instead of an overlord, the inhabitants now rule over the extensive fields. BY MICHAEL SLATER


Sir Isaac Newton and the Langcliffe Mathematicians The ancient small village of Langcliffe near Settle in the Craven district of Yorkshire is graced by Langcliffe Hall, a building probably altered from an earlier one on the site by Henry Somerscales in 1602; the first Dawson to occupy the hall as a family seat was Christopher Dawson (1647- 1693). It is claimed by several authors of books on the region that his son William Dawson was a noted mathematician and scholar and a friend of Sir Isaac Newton (1642-1727), who visited Langcliffe Hall. However, the very extensive literature on Sir Isaac Newton contains no reference to any such visit or to friendliness with the Dawson family and indeed Sir Isaac had no interest in travelling far from his homes in Woolsthorpe, Lincolnshire where he was born, Cambridge where he became Lucasian Professor of Mathematics, or London where he was Warden and Master of the Mint. Travel by stagecoach started in 1658 in Yorkshire on very rough roads with risk of robbery – London to York or Wakefield took four days. He is known to have visited friends in Stoke Park, Towcester, for two weeks in 1672 and to have stayed at Oates near Harlow in Essex to philosophize with John Locke in later life, after 1693 or so, but otherwise no other trips out are recorded. So what might lie behind these intriguing comments about a visit of Newton to Langcliffe?

Langcliffe Hall, approaching from Settle. The datestone SHI 1602 is over the main door facing west. Dr T. D. Whitaker, author of The History and Antiquities of the Deanery of Craven in the County of York, (first edition 1805), made the cautious remark "Major (William) Dawson was a man of talents and literature, and is said to have been one of the first persons in the North of England who understood Newton’s Principia". The same statement was made in the later editions of 1812 and 1878 with apparently no challenge to its accuracy. W. Howson in his book An Illustrated guide to the Curiosities of Craven (1850) comments that "Sir Isaac is said to have been an occasional visitor at Langcliffe Hall, and to have made an arbour, still existing in the garden, his favourite retreat for philosophical meditation". He admits indebtedness to Whitaker’s book so this comment is not new. H. Speight in The Craven and North-West Yorkshire Highlands (1892) is more effusive. "He (William Dawson) was a man of high classical attainments, and, it is averred, was one of the very few persons living at that time who could comprehend Sir Isaac Newton’s Principia Philosophae, an erudite and once much-talked-of work, which unfolds various mathematical principles of philosophy, the chief


novelty or discovery being that of the principle of universal gravitation, as deduced from the motion of the moon. This important book was published in 1687. The great philosopher is said to have been an occasional visitor of Major Dawson at Langcliffe, who had an arbour purposely constructed in the garden for him, wherein he is said to have passed many hours in solitary meditation, and also not unfrequently in learned converse with his friend over a mutual pipe. Before the re-arrangement of the gardens and outbuildings there was a rookery and a small orchard at the north side of the house, where the kitchen garden now stands, and two old apple-trees yet remain. It is here where Newton’s arbour stood, and the two fruit trees are credited with having sprung from cuttings derived from an old tree planted by the Major to commemorate the philosopher’s great discovery of the law of gravitation, from the well-known story of his watching an apple fall while sitting alone in his home garden at Woolsthorpe, in Lincolnshire." Further relevant information is found in John Peile’s Biographical Register of Christ’s College 15051905 and of the earlier foundation, God’s House (1910). "Dawson William, son of Christopher, born Langcliffe, Giggleswick School under Mr Armitstead. Admitted pensioner under Mr Lovett January 1691/2 age 15. BA 1695/6. Admitted Gray’s Inn October 1693. Married Jane Pudsey. Friend of Sir Isaac Newton who visited him at Langcliffe. Perhaps he is the author of some very good hexameters describing the older village of Langcliffe which was destroyed in a Scottish raid in the time of Edward I". (Due to the calendar change, 1691/2 refers to the period 1 January to 25 March of what we would now call 1692). In A History of the ancient parish of Giggleswick by T. Brayshaw and R. M. Robinson (1932) the story is modified to "(Major Dawson) was noted for his classical and scientific attainment and is said to have been one of the first in the North of England to understand Sir Isaac Newton’s Principia. Dr Whitaker, who was born before Major Dawson died and was acquainted with the family, states that Sir Isaac Newton visited him at Langcliffe, and an old arbour in the orchard, which fell to pieces some years ago, was always pointed out as the philosopher’s favourite resort for study or writing during his stay". Finally an article in the Yorkshire Evening News of 27th August 1948 by ‘Ben Rhydding’ claims that "Newton is said to have spent many hours there smoking and conversing with his host as well as in solitary meditation." All this information is seen to be based solely on Whitaker’s statement, elaborated by Howson. Whitaker was born in 1759 and Major William Dawson was born in 1676 and died in 1762. The story was therefore told to Dr Whitaker by later family members, maybe by William’s son Ambrose, (who joined Cambridge a few years after Newton when Newton was Lucasian Professor of Mathematics), and so may have become distorted or misunderstood and embellished. If Isaac Newton did visit Langcliffe, as a dinner, bed and breakfast guest he may have left something to be desired. There is no evidence that he ever washed or bathed (public bathing in pools or the river was forbidden by the Vice-Chancellor of Cambridge and punished by public whipping). His eating habits were careless, he forgot to eat or sleep when in a brown study, his dress slovenly – shoes down at heel, stockings untied, his head scarcely combed (the typical undergraduate one supposes). What lies behind this legend is however illuminating if the wider context of Newton’s world and that of the villagers of Langcliffe and the parish of Giggleswick in which it used to lie is considered. The story becomes a remarkable one with a theme of mathematics and natural philosophy – which in Newton’s time was


essentially the unfolding of our understanding of forces which hold the universe together and motion of heavenly and other bodies, described mathematically. In the second half of the 17th C. there was an intense appreciation of mathematics throughout Europe, especially England. DeMoivre, Leibniz, l’Hôpital, McClaurin and Taylor are well-known mathematicians of this time who contributed, amongst others, to modern mathematical techniques still in use. Yet other philosophers and mathematicians concerned with understanding natural phenomena such as Bernoulli, Biot, Fermat, Flamsteed, Hooke, Huyghens, Halley, Mohr, Pascal and Wallis were prominent men. Newton overshadowed most of these with his insistence on rigorous experimental observations to support scientific theories. The educated men of Langcliffe must have been aware of this intellectual ferment in the land. Newton was born in 1642, a time of civil war, and was admitted to Trinity College, Cambridge, in 1661 at the age of 18 (older than the usual 15 or 16). He was resident there in various capacities until 1696. He did not make friends easily, being of a studious, silent, sober nature, absent-minded and paranoid at times, but he did evidently enjoy drinking and buying clothes. From a meagre student allowance from his grudging mother of £10 a year, he spent £10 on acquaintances at taverns, 17 shillings and sixpence to celebrate his BA in 1665, and lost 15 shillings at cards. "He conversed chearfully with his friends assumed nothing and put himself upon a level with all mankind". Many students from Giggleswick School went to Christ’s College or were in residence at about the same time as Newton: Roger Altham, Hugh Armitstead (BA 1672/3), Robert Armitstead (BA 1662/3), Robert Banks (BA 1670/1, MA 1675), Henry Bradley (BA 1670/1), John Carr (born Langcliffe 1630?, died 1675, son of William, MB, MD, Fellow 1662-5, FRCP 1669/70, Regius Professor of Physic), John Carr (born Langcliffe, son of William, BA 1664/5), Richard Carr (BA 1667, MA 1671), Thomas Catterall (BA 1666), Oliver Craven (BA 1665/6), Christopher Dawson, Thomas Gibson, Edmund Green, Thomas Paley (BA 1671/2), Ambrose Stackhouse (BA 1670/1, MA 1674), and Richard Tennant (ordained at York, 1664). Christopher Dawson, born in Langcliffe in 1647, went to Giggleswick School and was admitted to Christ’s College as a pensioner under Mr Stanford in 1663, (in common with many other students he did not graduate), and should therefore have been aware of Newton’s presence and could have made friends with him. Christopher’s son William also went to Christ’s College, in 1691/2, and became BA in 1695/6. During this time in Cambridge William could well have made friends with the much older man Newton, now highly respected for his work, perhaps recalling acquaintanceship with his father Christopher in earlier times. William was admitted to Gray’s Inn in October 1693; he probably lodged at the Inn as required for his studies but some students are known to have been allowed to lodge nearby outside the Inn. William was not called to the Bar so it is not known how long he might have resided in London. Newton often travelled to London around this time and is known to have had a circle of young friends in London so William may well have been welcomed – particularly if he did have exceptional mathematical ability and understanding to discuss weighty mathematical, theological and philosophical problems with Newton and others in the coffee houses of the day. Since 1690 as a Member of Parliament Newton "found new acquaintances under whose encouragement his accustomed reserve began to melt". Newton moved from Cambridge to London as Warden of the Mint early in 1696. It is known that in the period around 1706 in London Newton would wait for Abraham DeMoivre in a coffee house to discuss mathematics; DeMoivre was one of the young men in London, disciples really, with whom Newton found companionship possible in a way it had never been in Cambridge.


After 1687 and the formal publication of the Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica (Samuel Pepys as President of the Royal Society signed the imprimatur in 1686) Newton became the most famous intellectual in England and became increasingly known to the wider world after he left Cambridge in 1696 and it is not surprising that many of his acquaintances would have told their friends and offspring about such a great man. Among the stories may have been that about the apple: the story unfortunately is not well-founded and Newton’s predilection for sitting in orchards is probably more apparent than real, yet Langcliffe Hall orchard appears in the tale! In the search for other possible reasons for a visit of Newton to Langcliffe one finds a reference to Newton’s friendship with Samuel Pepys in later years in London. Pepys had a brother John admitted to Christ’s College, Cambridge in 1660 who took his BA while Newton was there, and later a nephew (admitted 1695) and a cousin, Roger Pepys, who married Anne Bankes of Giggleswick in 1640. A little further afield, in Bradford, Abraham Sharp (1653-1742) had his home in Little Horton (Horton Hall in which he was born and returned to in 1694 was demolished some years ago). Abraham Sharp was assistant, astronomical instrument maker and confidant to John Flamsteed the Astronomer Royal at Greenwich and was a very able mathematician. His mural tablet in Bradford Cathedral says (in Latin) "He was rightly counted among the most accomplished mathematicians of his day. He enjoyed constant friendship with the very famous men of the same repute, notably Flamsteed and the illustrious Newton. He drew up the description of the heavens made by the former of these (Flamsteed) in (astronomical) tables of the greatest accuracy; he also published anonymously various writings and descriptions of instruments perfected by himself.. …..". Sharp’s papers were lost by fire so little is known of his mathematical work. While Sharp was working in London (1684-90) he became the friend of a group of mathematical practitioners frequenting the coffee houses. Sharp was unmarried, was unmindful of his meals, led a reclusive existence later in life – rather like Sir Isaac in his early days - and is said by Cudworth (1886) to know a Mr Dawson (however, probably one of a Dawson family living in Bradford, not Langcliffe). Relationships (after 1694) between Newton and Flamsteed were rather acid and there is unfortunately no reason to suppose that Newton would have troubled to visit Sharp in Bradford on the way to Langcliffe on the stage coach. Were there perhaps other first class mathematicians Newton would have liked to confer with in and around Langcliffe to make a short visit worthwhile and relaxing after a period of intense work in the university or in the Mint? Newton certainly absented himself from Cambridge many times for a week or two, sometimes his whereabouts unknown. Surprisingly the Parish of Giggleswick produced a number of mathematicians of notable ability during Newton’s lifetime (1642-1727) and after. Giggleswick Parish Church of St Akelda contains a plaque (in Latin) commemorating "Thomas Swainson, son of Laurence Swainson of Langcliffe, and who ‘knew arithmetic, geometry and astronomy perfectly' died 1733 aged 70." (So born 1664, baptised 1672(?)). A Thomas Swainson was a Governor of Giggleswick School in 1721 and 1730 but there is no record of his attendance at Giggleswick School as a pupil or at University. Thomas’s father was a haberdashery merchant in London and paid tax for five hearths in Langcliffe in 1672, so was wealthy. No more is known of Thomas in the mathematical archives but being 22 years younger than Newton he must have known of his work. Thomas was contemporaneous with and 11 years older than William Dawson (1676-1762) of Langcliffe Hall and on a social par so could be expected to have discussed the mathematics of the day together. Thomas and William are mentioned in Parish Memoranda of 1723 so they certainly knew each other.


Hic jacet THOMAE SWAINSON (cui Pater LAURENTIUS SWAINSON de LANGCLIF) pars corruptibilis Aet in Coelum Calorum Animarum beatarum & ipsius Dei Augustam sedem Abiit Incorruptibilis Artium Ingenuarum Scientia ci non defuit ille enim Arithmeticam ille Geometricun ille Astronomiam probe Cognovit nec vero ci sotum utilis Ars Numerandi sed ad quam plurimos sese Extendebat illam aliis Communicare & juvenum Animos Informare Docere Imbuere Arithmetica literatura Nemo illo peritior Nemo promptior Nemo diligentior Modestia Probitate justitia pietate Pauci cum Anteibant Excessit die quatuordecimo Decembris Ann Dom 1733 Aetatis 70 The district of Craven is notable in England for a number of families who have been resident in this small area for many centuries – Armitsteads, Brayshaws, Brownes, Carrs, Catteralls, Claphams, Dawsons, Fosters, Ivesons, Kings, Kydds, Lawsons, Nowells, Paleys, Procters, Stackhouse, Swainsons, Tennants and a few others. Many of these families intermarried extensively; many of the children went to Giggleswick School and were fortunate in having a scholarship available, set up in 1616 by Richard Carr, to go to Christ’s College, Cambridge. Peile’s record of the very many admittances to Christ’s College shows how nationally important a school Giggleswick was at this time. Giggleswick was one of about 40 schools in England sending pupils to Oxford and Cambridge Universities around 1700. Schooling at a good local grammar school cost only about 1% of the income of a squire or gentleman but nearer 10% for a farmer. At this time Giggleswick School was purely a classical school so mathematics was not taught. In Langcliffe village there are three houses next door to each other – The Old Vicarage (modified c. 1676) (at the time a farmhouse belonging to the Paley family), a house belonging to the Lawsons (1681, built by Richard and Mary Lawson), and the Manor Farm House built by Leonard and Isabel Carr in 1678. The nearby Swainson house built in 1660 by Lawrence and Margaret Swainson (parents of Thomas the ‘perfect mathematician’) was unfortunately pulled down in about 1860 (the ‘Naked woman’ datestone remains displayed). Brayshaw and Robinson tell the story that William Paley (born in Langcliffe) as a boy attending Giggleswick school was neighbour to young Alice Lawson in the house next door. These two went their separate ways in marriage, Alice becoming a Starkie, and both had sons. In 1763 William Paley’s son William became Senior Wrangler in Cambridge, the topmost student in the first class of the final mathematics examinations. In 1771 Alice Starkie’s son Thomas astonishingly became Senior Wrangler also. But Alice went further. In 1803 her grandson Thomas reached the same pinnacle of achievement. Apparently this ‘record’ has not been broken. The Starkie family eventually inherited the Lawson property and it passed by marriage to the Prestons of Mearbeck, yet another family with deep roots locally. The Carrs of Langcliffe in the Manor Farm House may have been wealthy but showed no signs of academic achievement (although Leonard did possess a "reading desk and books in his Closset" as noted in his will) and in the1740s


the house passed out of the Carr family. Dissenters were excluded from schools and universities until the early 1700s but it is not clear that the Carrs were Dissenters. A distant relative John Carr (of the Stackhouse side of the family) baptised 1785, died 1833, did however, become a second Wrangler at Trinity College Cambridge in 1807 and became Professor of Mathematics in Durham University. The intriguing possibility that Sir Isaac Newton came to Langcliffe and passed the time of day with villagers, mathemically-minded or otherwise, during a stay at the Hall is hard to let go of, but there is no evidence from letters to or from Newton in the large quantity of correspondence extant that supports the legend. Nevertheless Langcliffe’s claim to be a hotbed of mathematics is a strong one! And my guess is that the apple trees in the Langcliffe Hall garden did come from Newton’s garden. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS T. Thom, Librarian, The Honourable Society of Gray’s Inn Trust Fund, London; M. Courtney, Librarian, Christ’s College, Cambridge; P. Spargo, University of Cape Town, South Africa; S.A. Craven, Wynberg, South Africa; R. Bell and R. Davies of Langcliffe. BIBLIOGRAPHY Brayshaw, T. and Robinson, R.M., 1932. A History of the ancient parish of Giggleswick. Pub. Halton and Co. Ltd., London. Craven, S. A., 2000. Private communication. Cudworth, W., 1886. Rambles round Horton. Pub. T. Brear and Co. Ltd. Cudworth, W., 1889. The life and correspondence of Abraham Sharp. Pub. Sampson Low, Marston, Searle and Rivington Ltd.. Foster, J., 1889. The register of admissions to Gray’s Inn 1521-1889 together with the marriages in Gray’s Inn chapel 1695-1754. Pub. Hansard Publishing Union. Howson, W., 1850. An Illustrated guide to the Curiosities of Craven. Pub. Whitaker, Wildman, London and Settle. Mullins, H.L., 1913. Giggleswick School Register, 1499-1913. 1st. Edn. Pub. R. Jackson, Leeds Norway, A.H., 1899. Highways and Byways in Yorkshire. Pub. McMillan, London. Peile, J., 1910. Biographical Register of Christ’s College and of the earlier foundation, God’s House. Vol. 1, 1448-1665. Pub. CUP. Speight, H., 1892. The Craven and North-West Yorkshire Highlands. Pub. Elliot Stock, London. Taylor, E.G.R., 1954. Mathematical practitioners. Pub. CUP. Trevelyan, G.M., 1973. English Social History. Pub. Book Club Associates, London. Westfall, R.S., 1980. Never at rest: a biography of Isaac Newton. Pub. CUP. Whitaker, T.D., 1805, first edit.. The History and Antiquities of the Deanery of Craven in the County of York. Pub. J. Dodgson, Leeds and Cassell Petter and Galpin, London. BY M.J.SLATER


Family Trees The Carrs of Langcliffe Manor Farm House (Leonard and Isabella Carr 1678) The datestone is over a door which faces west over the valley, not eastwards looking towards the village green as might have been expected.


The Carrs of Giggleswick


The Carrs of Stackhouse

Plaque on the floor in Giggleswick Church to mark the vault of Carrs of Stackhouse "In a vault beside this pillar lie the mortal remains of many members of the Carr family, of Stackhouse in this parish of which family were James Carr, priest 1513, founder of the Grammar School in Giggleswick, and roode chantry in this church Richard Carr, M.A., Vicar of Hockley in Essex, 1616, a benefactor to the same school. John Carr, M.A., Head Master 1720-1741 and many others of the family who after worshipping God in this place, rest here awaiting a blessed resurrection. Ut posteris innotescat majorum pietas pio animo posuit

(N.B. Richard Carr the vicar of Hockley was in the Closehouse branch of the family)

WC "


The Carrs of Grainhouse


The Carrs of Closehouse


The Paleys


The Swainsons

The Swainson house stone 1660 L and M S (Lawrence and Mary Swainson) (house rebuilt) (opposite Cock House)

'The Naked Lady'

The Swainson family tree has been researched by Frances Healy Hope, BA. "An historical narrative of a Swainson family from the West Yorkshire and Lancashire Counties of England 1513 to the 1880s" 1993 Library of Congress no. 93-71656 Amundsen Publishing Co., 108, Washington St., Decorah, Iowa, 52101 USA. Copy in Yorkshire Archaeological Society, Leeds, Ref. 59 U 33

The Swainsons of Langcliffe include Lawrence mentioned in concern with the sale of the manor in 1591 onwards, and a later Lawrence and Thomas, his son, who was a mathematician and astronomer.

It is known that a Lawrence Swayneson had tenure of a messuage and land in Langcliffe in 1591 from Nicholas Darcy when the sale of the manor was taking place. In 1622 a deed (Northallerton Archives ZXC I 1/21/1) quotes a deed of 1593 of sale of Swainsons tenement or farm to Thomas Newhouse. This deed of 1622 concerns Thomas and Richard Lawson, his son, and the exchange with Th. Newhouse of Swainsons farm with Barrel Sykes and other land. The Giggleswick Parish Registers give data which can be used to propose the following relationships.


Lawrence Swainson married Anna Iveson in 1567 - presumed to have tenure of a farm in Langcliffe at some stage. They had children: Robert bp 1569/70; James bp 1572 died 1597; Elizabeth bp 1575/6 bd 1576; Thomas bp 1577; John bp 1584; John bp 1587; Isabella bp 1591 Robert married Alicia who died in 1599/1600 and they had children: Anna bp 1592; John bp 1594; Agnes bp 1597. Having lost his wife Alicia, Robert married Agnes Cookeson, a widow in 1605.

There is a family based in Stainforth which eventually produced Lawrence and Thomas living in Langcliffe. Unfortunately the family tree is confused since the PR data and the will of Roger in 1610 only make sense if Roger married twice and there was a second Roger who died in 1587 - perhaps his father. Roger Swainsonne married Jeneta Palaie in 1560 They had children: George bp 1564/5; John bp 1567; Elizabeth bp 1571. Jana Swainsonne was buried in 1570. (Is this the same person as Jeneta? There are no Janes as children or wives in the register). Roger Swainsonne then married Isabella Wilsonne in 1573. His will states that Elizabeth (?bp 1571) was his daughter (FHH); she was perhaps the one who married Richard Foster of Stainforth in 1605/6 and had a child Anthony Foster bp 1609 who was active as a Parliamentarian in the Civil War. Children of Roger with Isabella: Richard bp 1573/4; Katherine bp 1574/5; Thomas bp 1576/7; William bp 1578 bd 1598; ?Katherine bp 1588; ?Robert bp 1589. Roger Swainson de Stainforth bd 1610 (will FHH). Isabella relictaRoger Swainson de Stainforth bd 1624. Robert of Stainforth married Alicia Bainbrigg in 1615 They had children: Elizabeth bp 1617; Roger bp 1619/20; Anna bp 1622; Lawrencebp 1625 (and (?) William bp 1637). Robert died 1639 (FHH) (will). The son Lawrence Swainson of Fryer Stainforth (wollen webster) married Margaret Armitstead in 1655 (alive in 1699 (FHH)). The children were: Thomas bp 1664; John bd 1663/4; Lawrence bp 1670; Ann bp 1673; Catherine bp 1677. In 1652 Lawrence bought Sandyeholme in Stainforth for ÂŁ12 from James Foster. Langcliffe house date stone 1660. Hearth tax 1672 for 5 hearths in Langcliffe. Merchant in London ÂŁ13 rent pa for a haberdashery.


Deed of 1699/70 to son Thomas for ÂŁ95 - title deeds of house (W.Yorks. Archives DW405). Promised his parents they could dwell in parlour and chamber above with access to half back turf house and half garden. Lawrence died 1711 will probate 1712. The son Thomas married Maria , child Maria bp 1704. Maria died in 1704. Governor of Giggleswick School 1721 and 1730, mentioned in Parish Memoranda 1723. Plaque in Giggleswick Church ".....knew arithmetic....see Isaac Newton story). Thomas died in 1733.

Other Roger Swainson data from the Giggleswick Parish Register are difficult to place without further information. Roger Swainson married Elizabeth Roome in 1593 Roger Swainson de Settle bd 1605 ux Roger Swainson de Settle bd 1609/10


The Somerscales HENRY SOMMERSCALES of LANGCLIFFE There is a large number of Sommerscales recorded in the Giggleswick Parish Registers but it is not possible to ascertain the various relationships using these data alone. As far as the name Henry Sommerscales is concerned there are two baptisms in the Parish Register Henry (1) bp 27 February 1576/7 son of George Sommerscales (i.e February 1577 in current calendar) Henry (2) bp 28 September 1584 and two deaths Henry Sommerscales (1) bd 19 October 1578 Henry Sommerscales (3) of Langcliffe bd 24 September 1609 We also know from Parish Registers that there are 6 children of Henry Sommerscales (3) baptised between 1583 and 1596. This Henry(3) cannot be either of those baptised in 1576/7 or 1584 since he must have been born around 1560. So there must be three Henry's to consider. The death in 1578 presumably relates to Henry (1) since Henry (2) was not yet born. Henry (3) was probably married about 1582 and born just before 1558 when the Parish Registers start. Henry (3) is likely to be the one who built Langcliffe Hall in 1602 with the initials SHI over the doorway. It is possible that his wife was Jeneta de Settle, widow buried 1609/10 (Henry being buried 1609). (J and I are interchangeable capital letters). Henry (3) was a Governor of Giggleswick School in 1599 and 1604. His brother Arthur had the living of Gargrave in 1600 (Brayshaw and Robinson). His will was proved in York in 1609. His name is not in the list of students at Giggleswick School. Henry(2) bp 1584 is associated with Trondheim in Norway. He was apprenticed to John Toy(?) of Bassinghall in the Merchant Taylors in 1605 (Apprentice binding books, 1583-94, Guildhall Library). In 1609 there was a case before the High Court of Admiralty in which Henry Somerscales gave evidence. He was "of the city of London merchant taylor there for four years aged 22 years...." This suggests he was born in 1587 but it perhaps means that he was 22 years old when he became a Merchant Taylor in 1605. "He was born in a town called Settle in Yorkshire and is a merchant...." (Henry’s signature is appended). A further case before the Court in 1612 shows that Henry was "of the city of London merchant aged 25 years." These dates are not completely reconcilable. There were other Somerscales in London at this time so some confusion is possible. In 1613 toll records in Trondheim show the name of Hendrick Sommersskeils of London and in 1614 the name Hendrich Sommerschales of London although the signature style is not the same as in the court proceedings.


See "Slekten Sommerschild - Sommerschield " by Henrik Sommerschild published Oslo (Mittet ?) 1951 available in various Norwegian libraries (NBO, UBIT/GUN (Trondheim)) (see internet BIBSYS) The Lawsons Richard Lawson's house (Richard and Margaret) 1681


Author Michael Slater


Sale of the Manor These documents are available in original roll form at The National Archives (Public Record Office as was) and on microfilm at the North Yorkshire Record Office at Northallerton. They have been transcribed from photocopies by Michael Slater, to whom acknowledgement should be made in any publication. Some abbreviated words have not always been written in full if the word is understandable. Sale of the Manor No. 1 MIC 1874 PC/LAC 13 Northallerton PRO C54/1408 CP 3572 29th November 1591 Nicholas Darcy and Henry Billingsley to the Fosters et al. This Indenture made the nyne and twentith daye of November in the foure and thirtith yeare of the raigne of our sovraigne ladye Elizabeth by the grace of god Quene of England France and Ireland defender of the faithe etc. between Nicholas Darcye of Northampton in the countie of Northampton Esquire one of the sonnes of Sir Arthure Darcye knight deceased and Henry Billingsley citizen and Alderman of London of the one partie And Richard Foster the younger Gyles Foster Thomas Foster thelder Richard Foster his sonne Thomas Foster the younger Christopher Lawson of Wynskale.........Lordshippe of Langcliffe in the parishe of Gigleswicke in the Countie of York yomen Henry Paycocke and Michell Saylbanke of Cowsyde within the said Lordshipp of Langcliffe in the said Countie of York yomen of the other partie witnesseth that whereas the said Nicholas Darcy by his Indenture of lease bearing date the nynth day of February in the seven and twentith yere of the raigne of our said sovraign ladye Quene Elizabeth (1585) for and uppon dyv[er]se good and lawfull causes and considerations in the said Indenture mentioned dyd demys grant and to farme lett unto the said Henry Billingsley by the name of Henry Billingsley citizen and haberdasher of London All those the mannors of Langcliffe and Nappey withall and singular theire righte members and appurtenances whatsoever in the said Countie of York And all and singular messuages edyffices buildings lands tenements rents revercions suits court letes libties franchises profitts comodities and heredytaments whatsoever to the said mannors of Langcliffe and Nappey or to either of them belonging or in any wise appteyning or accepted reputed taken known used occupyed demysed or letten to or with the said messuages or either of them or as part parcel or member of them or either of them And all and singular other the messuage lands tenements rents revercions suites profitts and heredytaments whatsoever of the said Nicholas Darcy withall and singuler theire appurtenances situate lyinge being comying growing or renewing of or within the townes parishes hamletts and feilds of Langcliffe and Nappey aforesaid and in either or everye of them in the said Countie of York And also the revercion and revercions of all and singuler the premisses and all and singuler rents and profitts whatsoever incydent unto the same revercion and revercions to have and to hold the same unto the said Henry Billingsley his executors admynystrators and assignes from the day of the date of the said rented Indentures unto thende and terme and for and during all the terme of fyve hundreth yeares from thence next following and fully to be complett and ended under the condition in the said rented Indentures mentioned with dyvse other covenants matters agreements and things in the same recited Indentures mentioned as by the same Indentures more at large appeareth And whereas the said Nicholas Darcy for the further assurance of the said manor of Langcliffe and the better confirmyng of thestates of the said Henry Billingsley and his saide terme of yeares therein And uppon intent to extinguish the condition conteyned in the said recited Indenture of lease by his other dede or wryting under his hande and seale bearing date the eight day of August in the eight and twentith yeare of the raigne of our said sovraigne ladye Quene Elizabeth (1586) for the consideration therein specified dyd approve ratyfie and confirme unto the said Henry Billingsley his executors admynystrators and assignes the said Indenture of lease and the grante thereby made of the said manors of Langcliffe and Nappey together withall and singular the messuages lands tenements rentes revercions heredytaments comodities and premisses by the saide Indenture of lease mentioned to be demysed with the appurtenances and all and every other things conteyned in the said Indenture of lease and thestates right title interest and terme which the said Henry Billingsley had to and in the saide mannors and premysses with theire appurtenances and to and in everie parte thereof by force of the said Indenture of lease to have and to hold the said manors messuages lands rents heredytaments and premisses by the said Indenture of lease mentioned to be demysed with the appurtenances unto the said Henry Billingsley his executors admynystrators and assignes from the day of the date of the said recited Indenture of lease for and during all the residue of the said terme of fyve hundreth yeares therein mentioned to be demysed and then remayning to come and unexpyred without ympeachment of or for anye manner of waste with further covenants grants agrements and


things therein conteyned as by the said last recited dede more fully appeareth And whereas also the said Nicholas Darcy by one recognizance of the nature of the statute staple bearing date the ayatenth day of November in the six and twentith yeare of the raigne of our said sovraigne ladye Quene Elizabeth (1584) standeth bound unto the said Henry Billingsley in the some of one thousande poundes of lawfull money of England payable as by the said recognizance or statute more playnely maye appeare And whereas also the said Nicholas Darcy by one other recognizance of the nature of the statute staple bearing date the fouretenth day of August in the said six and twentith yeare of her highnes said raigne (1584)standeth bound unto the said Henry Billingsley in the some of one thousande and two hundreth pounde of lawfull money of England payable as by the said recognizance or statute more playnely also may appeare Nowe this Indenture witnesseth that they the said Nicholas Darcy and Henry Billingsley aswell for and in consideration of the some of fyve hundreth thirtie seaven pounds twelve shillings and nyne pence of lawfull money of England to them the saide Nicholas Darcy and Henry Billingsley in hande before thensealing and delyverie of these presents by the saide Richard Giles Thomas Richard Thomas Christopher Henry and Michael well and trulye contented satisfied and payde whereof and wherewith they the saide Nicholas Darcy and Henry Billingsley doe acknowledge and confess them selves and either of them to be well and trulye contented satisfied and payde and all the other persons above named and everie of them theire and everie of theire heyres executors and admynystrators thereof and of evrye parcell thereof to be fully and clerelye acquited exonerated and discharged forever by these presents have demysed bargained solde assigned sett over and confirmed and by theise presents doe clerelye and absolutely demyse bargaine sett assigne sett over and confirme unto the saide Richard Foster Gyles Foster Thomas Foster Richard Foster Thomas Foster Christopher Lawson Henry Paycocke and Michael Saylbanke theire executors administrators and assignes All those seaven several messuages with theire appurtenances nowe being in the several tenures or occupations of the saide Richard Foster Gyles Foster Thomas Foster thelder Thomas Foster the younger Christopher Lawson Henry Paycocke Michael Saylbanke and one Elizabeth Foster Wydowe or of theire assigne or assignes sett lying and being in Wynskall and Cowesyde aforesaide within the saide Lordshippe of Langcliffe And also all howses buildings yardes gardens and crofts to the saide messuages or anye of them nowe belonging or to or with the same or anye of them nowe used occupied or letten And also threescore and two acres twentie and fyve polles be they more or lesse of arrable lande and meadowe lying and being in Wynskale and Cowsyde aforesaide within the saide Lordshippe of Langcliffe and nowe or late in the several tenures or occupations of them the saide Richard Foster Gyles Foster Thomas Foster thelder Thomas Foster the younger Christopher Lawson Henry Paycocke and Michael Saylbanke or theire assigne or assignes And alsoe two hundreth sixe acres two roodes and foure polles of pasture lyinge and being within the saide Lordshippe of Langcliffe in the saide countie of yorke that is to witt begynnyng att a certen close called the Purse And soe following the wall and dytche to the west ende of one greate close of pasture called Hensyde And from thence following the south (of hensyde inserted) syde nere to a geate of Hensyde close called the Locke grene gate And from thence .......to a certen close called Robert Saylbanke calfe close att Cowsyde aforesaide And from the same calfe close to a certen close called the Cow Close and soe to the corner of Wynskale ynge as measure shall aforde the same All which acres of lande meadowe and pasture shall conteyne the the (sic) rate of fyve ells and a halfe to everie polle and one polle in breadthe and fortie polles in lengthe to everie roode And the saide Nicholas Darcye and Henry Billingsley for the consideration aforesaide doe clerelye and absolutely bargayne and sett over unto the saide Richard Foster Gyles Foster Thomas Foster thelder Richard Foster his sonne Thomas Foster the younger Christopher Lawson Henry Paycocke and Michael Saylbanke theire heyres executors and assignes all woodes underwoodes and trees growing or being in or uppon the premisses before by theise presents intended to be bargayned solde demysed assigned sett over or confirmed together with the revertion revertions remaynder and remaynders of all and everye the saide premisses and of everye parte and parcell thereof before by theise presents to be bargayned and grannted over as aforesaide for the saide time of fyve hundreth yeares And all rents yssues and yerely proffitts whatsoever uppon any demyse or lease made of the premisses of anye parte or parcell of the same togeather alsoe withall the whole estate righte title interest use possession or inheritance benefytt proffitt clayme and demande which they the saide Nicholas Darcye and Henry Billingsley or either of them theire or either of theire heyres executors admynystrators or assignes att anye tyme or tymes heretofore have had att this tyme have or otherwyse shall inioye or ought to have to be entytled to have of in or to the saide messuages tenements and premisses afore by theis presentes .... to be demysed bargayned solde assigned settover or confirmed with theire appurtenances or of or to anye parte or parcell of the same to have and to holde the saide messuages tenements and all other the saide premisses before in and by theise presents bargayned alyned solde settover and assigned as aforesaide withall and singular theire appurtenances unto the saide Richard Foster Gyles Foster Thomas Foster thelder Richard Foster his sonne Thomas Foster the younger Christopher Lawson Henry Paycocke and Michael Saylbanke theire executors admynystrators and assignes from and ymedattlye after the making of theise presents for and during and unto the full ende and time and


duringe all the reste and residue of the saide time of fyve hundreth yeares soe thereof grannted by the saide Nicholas Darcy unto the saide Henry Billingsley as aforesaide as yett are unexpyred not ended or determyned without ympeachment of anye manner of waste And alsoe in as full free large and ample manner and forme to all intentes and purposes as they the saide Nicholas Darcy and Henry Billingsley or either of them have or of right oughte or are entytled to have the saide premisses or anye parte thereof by anye waye righte title or meanes whatsoever And the saide Nicholas Darcy from hym selfe his heyres executors and admynystrators and anye of them dothe covenante grannte conclude condyscende and fullye agree to and with the saide Richard Foster Gyles Foster Thomas Foster thelder Richard Foster his sonne Thomas Foster the younger Christopher Lawson Henry Paycocke and Michael Saylbanke and everye of them theire and everye of theire executors admynystrators and assignes by theise presents thatt the saide Richard Foster Gyles Foster Thomas Foster thelder Richard Foster his sonne Thomas Foster the younger Christopher Lawson Henry Paycocke and Michael Saylbanke theire and anye of theire executors admynystrators and assignes and heires of them shall and maye att all and everye tyme and tymes hereafter during the contynuance of the saide time of fyve hundreth yeares soe before tyme grannted of the saide premisses as aforesaide lawfullye quyetlye and peceably have holde occupye and enioye the saide premisses with theire appurtenances and everye parte and parcell thereof before in and by theise presents bargayned solde and grannted over as aforesaide without anye lett suite denyall troble vexation interruption eviction acttion or anye other incombrance whatsoever of hym the saide Nicholas Darcy his heyres or assignes or of anye other person or persons lawefullye clayming by or under his estates or title or by or under the title of Sir Arthure Darcye knighte father of the saide Nicholas or anye of the sonnes of the same Sir Arthure in anywyse And further also that the saide premysses withall and singuler theire appurtenances before an and by theise presents mentioned to be bargayned solde and grannted over as aforesaide the daye of the date of theise presents are and soe from tyme to tyme and att all and anye tyme and tymes hereafter during the contynuance of the saide time of fyve hundreth yeares soe thereof grannted as aforesaide shall remayne contynue and be unto them the saide Richard Foster Giles Foster Thomas Foster thelder Richard Foster Thomas Foster the younger Christopher Lawson Henry Paycocke and Michael Saylbanke theire and anye of them theire executors admynystrators and assignes free and clere and frelye and clerelye acquited exonerated discharged or otherwyse from tyme to tyme saved and kepte harmeles by the saide Nicholas Darcye his heyres and assignes of and from all and all manner of former bargaynes former sales gyftes granntes leases estates annuyties fees ioynters dowers fynes intailes accomptes condempnacions iudgements extents executions rents rente charges rente secke arrerage of rents uses conditions forfeytures statutes and recognizances and from all other acts charges titles troubles incumbrances and demandes whatsoever heretofore had made done knowledged or suffred or hereafter to be had made done knowledged or suffred of the saide premisses by the saide Nicholas Darcye or by the saide Sir Arthur Darcy knight or either of them or anye clayming by or under them or either of them or anye of the sonnes of the saide Sir Arthure in anywyse the rentes and suites hereaftyer to be due to the cheyfe Lorde or Lorde of the fee or fees thereof and all leases made of the premisses to the saide Richard Foster Gyles Foster Thomas Foster thelder Richard Foster Thomas Foster the younger Christopher Lawson Henry Paycocke and Michael Saylbanke and by vertue whereof they the saide Richard Foster Gyles Foster Thomas Foster thelder Richard Foster Thomas Foster the younger Christopher Lawson Henry Paycocke and Michael Saylbanke or anye of them have or hathe occupyed and taken the proffitte thereof And the saide first recyted Indenture of demyse and lease and the saide statute or recognizance soe had made or knowledged by the saide Nicholas of the saide premisses onlye excepted and foreprysed And further also that he the saide Nicholas Darcye his heyres and assignes and all and anye other person or persons which nowe stande or are seized or which att anye tymes hereafter shall stande contynue or be seized of the saide premysses and lawfullye clayming by from or under the title of the saide Nicholas Darcye his heyres or assignes or from by in or under the saide Sir Arthure Darcye for the tyme beinge as he they or anye of them shalbe thereunto required by the saide Richard Foster Gyles Foster Thomas Foster thelder Richard Foster his sonne Thomas Foster the younger Christopher Lawson Henry Paycocke and Michael Saylbanke or anye of them theire and anye of theire executors admynystrators and assignes shall doe make suffer execute and accomplishe and cause to be made done knowledged suffered executed and accomplished all and everie suche further and other acte and actes thinge and things devyse and devyce assurance and assurances of the saide premysses before in and by theise presents mentioned to be bargayned solde and assigned over as aforesaide as by the saide Richard Foster Gyles Foster Thomas Foster thelder Richard Foster his sonne Thomas Foster the younger Christopher Lawson Henry Paycocke and Michael Saylbanke theire heyres executors admynystrators or assignes or theire or anye of theire learned councel in the lawe shalbe reasonably devysed advysed required or councelled att the onlye coste and charges in the lawe of them the saide Richard Foster Gyles Foster Thomas Foster thelder Richard Foster his sonne Thomas


Foster the younger Christopher Lawson Henry Paycocke and Michael Saylbanke and everye of them for the further better and more perfecte assurance suertie suermaking and assuring of the saide premisses unto the saide Richard Foster Gyles Foster Thomas Foster thelder Richard Foster his sonne Thomas Foster the younger Christopher Lawson Henry Paycocke and Michael Saylbanke theire executors admynystrators and assignes for the saide time of fyve hundreth yeres And the saide Henry Billingsley for hym selfe his heires executors admynystrators and assignes dothe covenante grannte conclude condescende and agree to and with the saide Richard Foster Gyles Foster Thomas Foster thelder Richard Foster his sonne Thomas Foster the younger Christopher Lawson Henry Paycocke and Michael Saylbanke and everye of them theire and everye of theire executors admynystrators and assignes by theise presentes that they the saide Richard Foster Gyles Foster Thomas Foster thelder Richard Foster his sonne Thomas Foster the younger Christopher Lawson Henry Paycocke and Michael Saylbanke and everye of them theire and everye of theire executors admynystrators and assignes shall and maye att all tymes hereafter during the contynuance of the saide tyme of fyve hundreth yeres soe grannted of the premisses as aforesaide lawfullye peceablye and quyetlye have holde occupye and enioye the saide premisses with thappurtenances and everye parte and parcell thereof before in and by theise presentes bargayned solde and grannted over as aforesaide without anye execution uppon anye statute or recognizance knowledged to the saide Henry Billingsley to be sued by the saide Henry his heyres executors admynystrators or assignes or anye of them and without anye other lett suite trouble denyall vexation interruption eviction eiection or anye other incombrance whatsoever of hym the saide Henry Billingsley his heyres executors admynystrators or assignes or of anye other person or persons lawfullye having anye estate or title in or to the premisses by from or under the same Henry Billingsley his heyres or assignes or anye of them And further alsoe that the saide premysses withall and singuler theire appurtenances before in and by theise presentes mentioned to be bargayned solde and grannted over as aforesaide the daye of the date of theise presentes are and soe from tyme to tyme and att all and everie tyme and tymes hereafter during the contynuance of the saide tyme of fyve hundreth yeres therof grannted as aforesaide shall remayne contynue and be unto the saide Richard Foster Gyles Foster Thomas Foster thelder Richard Foster his sonne Thomas Foster the younger Christopher Lawson Henry Paycocke and Michael Saylbanke and everie of them theire and everie of theire executors admynystrators and assignes free and clere and freely and clerely acquyted exonerated and dyscharged or otherwyse from tyme to tyme within convenyent tyme after notice and request thereof to be made and gyven unto the saide Henry Billingsley his heyres executors or admynystrators saved and kepte harmeles of and from all and all manner of former and other bargaynes sales gyftes granntes leases annuyties fees ioynturs accomptes condempnacions iudgements executions rentes arrerages of rentes uses conditions forfeytures statutes and recognizances and of and from all other actes charges titles troubles incombrances and demandes whatsoever heretofore hadd made done or knowledged or hereafter to be hadd made done or knowledged by or unto the saide Henry Billingsley his heyres executors admynystrators or assignes or by anye other person or persons having anye estate or interest of the saide Henry Billingsley in anywyse the rentes and suites heretofore due or hereafter to be due for the saide premisses to the cheyfe lorde or lordes of the fee or fees thereof onlye excepted and foreprysed And the saide Henry Billingsley for hym selfe his heyres executors and admynystrators dothe further covenante and grannte to and with the saide Richard Foster Gyles Foster Thomas Foster thelder Richard Foster his sonne Thomas Foster the younger Christopher Lawson Henry Paycocke and Michael Saylbanke and everye of them theire and everie of theire heyres executors and admynystrators that he the saide Henry Billingsley his heyres executors admynystrators or assignes or anye of them shall not att anye tyme or tymes hereafter by force of the saide severall recited statutes or recognizances or uppon anye suite iudgement extente or execution thereuppon to be sued extended or cause to be extended the saide premisses before by theise presentes mentioned to be bargayned solde and grannted over as aforesaide or anye parte or parcell thereof nor otherwyse by collor or vertue of the same take anye the rentes yssues or proffittes thereof nor otherwyse interupte or disturbe the possession of them the saide Richard Foster Gyles Foster Thomas Foster thelder Richard Foster his sonne Thomas Foster the younger Christopher Lawson Henry Paycocke and Michael Saylbanke or anye of them or of theire or anye of theire executors admynystrators or assignes of in or to the premisses or anye parte thereof in anyewyse In witnes whereof the parties above named to theise presente Indentures interchangeablye have sett theire handes and seales geven the daye and yere first above written Et memorandum qd die et Anno suprascript prefati Nichus Darcye Armiger et henricus Billingsley venerunt coram dict dna Regina in cancellar sua et recognoverant Indenturam predict ac omia et singula in eadem content et specificat in forma supradict Ill xiij die Aprilis Anno predict


MIC 1874 PC/LAC 13 Northallerton Sale of the Manor of Langcliffe by Nicholas Darcy and Henry Billingsley 29 November 1591 No. 2 Thomas Kidd et al. This Indenture made the nine and twentieth day of November in the four and thirtieth year (1591)of the reign of our sovereign lady Elizabeth by the grace of god Queen of England France and Ireland defender of the faith etc. between Nicholas Darcy of Northampton in the county of Northampton Esquire one of the sons of Sir Arthur Darcy knight deceased and Henry Billingsley citizen and Alderman of London of the one party and Thomas Kydde of Langcliffe in the parish of Giggleswick in Craven in the county of York yeoman William Browne of Langcliffe aforesaid yeoman Thomas Sowden of Langcliffe aforesaid yeoman Richard Kidson of Langcliffe aforesaid yeoman Anthony Armysteade of Langcliffe aforesaid yeoman Mathewe Siggesweke of Langcliffe aforesaid glover and Thomas Siggesweke son of the same Mathewe of the other party Witness that whereas the said Nicholas Darcy by his Indenture of lease bearing date the ninth day of February in the seven and twentieth year of the reign of our said sovereign lady Queen Elizabeth for and upon diverse good and lawful causes and considerations in the said Indenture mentioned did demise grant and to farm let unto the said Henry Billingsley by the name of Henry Billingsley citizen and haberdasher of London All those the manors of Langcliffe and Nappey with all and singular their right members and appurtenances whatsoever in the said county of York And all and singular messuages edifices buildings lands tenements rents reversions suits courts leets liberties franchises profits commodities and heriditaments whatsoever to the said messuages of Langcliffe and Nappey or to either of them belonging or in any wise appurtaining or accepted reputed taken known used occupy demysed or let to or with the said manors or either of them or as part parcell or member of them or of either of them And all and singular other the messuages lands tenements rents reversions suits profits and heriditaments whatsoever of the said Nicholas Darcy with all and singular their appurtenances situate lying being coming growing or renewing or or within the said town parishes hamlets and fields of Langcliffe and Nappey aforesaid and any or either of them in the said county of York And also the reversion and reversions of all and singular the premises and all and singular rents and profits whatsoever incident unto the same reversion and reversions to have and to hold the same unto the said Henry Billingsley his executors administrators and assigns from the day of the date of the said recited Indentures unto the end of term and for and during all the time of five hundred years from thence next following and fully to be complete and ended under the condition in the said recited Indentures mentioned with diverse other covenants matters agreements and things in the same recited Indentures mentioned as by the said Indentures more at large appears And whereas the said Nicholas Darcy for the further assurance of the said manor of Langcliffe and the better confirming of the estate of the said Henry Billingsley and his said time of years therein And upon intent to extinguish the condition contained in the said recited Indenture of lease by his other deed or writing under his hand and seale bearing date the eighth day of August in the eight and twentieth year of the reign of our said sovereign lady Queen Elizabeth for the consideration therein specified did approve ratify and confirm unto the said Henry Billingsley his executors administrators and assigns the said Indenture of lease and the grant thereby made of the said messuages of Langcliffe and Nappey together with all and singular the messuages lands tenements rents reversions hereditaments commodities and premises by the said Indenture of lease mentioned to be demised with the appurtenances and all and any other thing contained in the said Indenture of lease and the estates right title interest and term which the said Henry Billingsley had to and in the said manors and premises with their appurtenances and to and in any part thereof by force of the said Indenture of lease to have and to hold the said manors messuages lands tenements hereditaments and premises by the said Indenture of lease mentioned to be demised with the appurtenances unto the said Henry Billingsley his executors administrators and assigns from the day of the date of the said time of five hundred years herein mentioned to be demised and then remaining to come and unexpired without impeachment of or for any manner of waste with further covenant grant agreement and thing therein contained as by the said last recited deed more fully appeareth And whereas also the said Nicholas Darcy by one recognizance of the nature of the statute staple bearing date the nineteenth day November in the six and twentieth year of the reign of our said sovereign lady Queen Elizabeth standeth bound unto the said Henry Billingsley in the sum of one thousand pounds of lawful money of England payable as by the said recognizance of statute more plainly may appear And whereas also the said Nicholas Darcy by one other recognizance of the nature of the statute staple bearing date the fourteenth day of August in the said six and twentieth year of her highness said reign standeth bound unto the said Henry Billingsley in the sum of one thousand and two hundred pounds of lawful money of England payable as by the said recognizance or statute more


plainly also may appear Now this Indenture witnesses that they the said Nicholas Darcy and Henry Billingsley as well for and in consideration of the sum of three hundred four score and eighteen pounds two shillings and six pence of lawful money of England to them the said Nicholas Darcy and Henry Billingsley in hand before the ensealing and delivery of these presents by the said Thomas Kidd William Browne Thomas Sowden Richard Kidson Anthony Armystead Mathew Siggesweke and Thomas Siggesweke well and truly contented and paid whereof and wherewith they the said Nicholas Darcy and Henry Billingsley do acknowledge and confess themselves and either of them to be well and truly contented satisfied and paid And the said Thomas Kidd William Browne Thomas Sowden Richard Kidson Anthony Armystead Mathew Siggesweke and Thomas Siggesweke their heirs executors and administrators and every of them thereof and of every parte thereof to be fully and clearly acquitted exonerated and discharged for ever by these presents have demised bargained sold assigned set over and confirmed and by these presents do clearly and absolutely demise bargain sell assign set over and confirm unto the TK, WB, TS, RK, AA, MS, and TS their executors administrators and assigns All those five messuages with their appurtenances now being in the several tenures or occupations of the said TK, WB, TS, RK, AA, and MS [TS missing] or their assign or assigns set lying and being in Langcliffe aforesaid in the said county of York And also all houses buildings yards gardens belonging to the said messuages or any of them now belonging or to or with the same or any of them now used occupied or let And also forty and six acres three rods and one pole of arable land and meadows lying and being within the town and common fields of the Lordship of Langcliffe aforesaid and now (being) in the several tenures or occupations of them the said TK WB TS RK AA and MS [no TS]or of their assign or assigns And also one hundred fifty and two acres and one rod and twenty poles of pasture lying and being within the said Lordship of Langcliffe that is to wit on the north side of one close of pasture upon Langcliffe moor called the Cow Close beginning at the east end of the town of Langcliffe and descending directly to a place called the old turf moor yeat and so from there folowing the wall there to a place there called Skarris and so following the same wall on the east side of the great close called Cowside Close to the side of one great close of pasture called Henside and so [to] the place assigned and measured out for the tenants of Wynskall towards the west All which acres of land meadow and pasture are to contain the rate of five ells and a half to every pole and one pole in breadth and forty poles in length to every rood. And the said Nicholas Darcy and Henry Billingsley for the consideration aforesaid do thereby and absolutely bargain and sell assign set over and confirm unto the said TK WB TS RK AA M Siggesweke and Thomas Siggesweke their executors administrators and assigns the reversion and reversions remainder and remainders of all and every the said premises and of every part and parcell thereof before by these presents mentioned to be bargained and granted over as aforesaid for the said term of five hundred years And all rents issues and yearly profits whatsoever reserved upon any lease demise or grant made of the premises or any part or parcel of the same together also with all the whole estateright title interest use possession inheritance benefit claim and demand which they the said Henry Billingsley and Nicholas Darcy or either of them their or either of their heirs executors administrators or assigns at any time or times heretofore have had at this time have or otherwise shall may or ought to have or to be entitled to have of in or to the said messuages tenements and premises afore by these presents mentioned to be demised bargained sold assigned sett over or confirmed with their appurtenances or of in or to any part or parcel of the same To have and to hold the said messuages tenements and all other the said premises before in and by these presents bargained aliened sold sett over and assigned as aforesaid with all and singular their appurtenances unto the said TK WB TS RK AA MS and TS their executors administrators and assigns from and immediately after the making of these presents for and during unto the full end and term and during all the rest and residue of the said term of five hundred years so thereof granted by the said Nicholas Darcy unto the said Henry Billingsley as aforesaid as yet are unexpired not ended or determined without impeachment of any manner of waste And also in as full free large and ample manner and form to all intents and purposes as they the said Nicholas Darcy and Henry Billingsley or either of them have or of right ought or are entitled to have the said premises or any part thereof by any ways right title or means whatsoever And the said Nicholas Darcy for him self his heirs executors and administrators and every of them doth covenant grant conclude condescend and fully agree to and with the said TK WB TS RK AA MS and TS and every of them their and any of their executors administrators and assigns by these presents that they the said TK WB TS RK AA MS and TS they and every of their executors administrators and assigns and every of them shall and may at all and any time and times hereafter during the continuance of the said term of five hundred years so before time granted of the premises as aforesaid lawfully quietly and peaceably have hold occupy and enjoy the said premises with their appurtenances and every part and parcel thereof before in and by these presents bargained sold and granted as aforesaid without any lett suit denial trouble vexation interruption eviction action or any other incumbrance whatsoever of him the said Nicholas Darcy his heirs or assigns or of any other person or persons lawfully claiming by or under his estate or title or by or under the title of Sir Arthur Darcy knight father of the said Nicholas or any of the sons of the same Sir Arthur in anywise


And further also that the said premises with all and singular their appurtenances before and in and by these presents mentioned to be bargained sold and granted over as aforesaid the day of the date of these presents are and do from time to time and at all and every time and times hereafter during the continuance of the said term of five hundred years so thereof granted as aforesaid shall remain continue and be unto them the said TK WB TS RK AA MS and TS and every of them their and every of their executors adminstrators and assigns free and clear and freely and clearly acquitted exonerated and discharged or otherwise from time to time saved and kept harmless by the said Nicholas Darcy his heirs and assigns of and from all and all manner of former bargains former sales gifts grants leases estates annuities fees jointures dowers fines entails accounts condempnacions judgements extents executions rents rent charges rents secke arrerages (arrears) of rents uses conditions forfeitures statutes and recognizances and from all other rent charges titles troubles incumbrances and demands whatsoever heretofore had made done knowledged or suffered or hereafter to be had made done knowledged or suffered of the said premises by the said Nicholas Darcy or by the said Sir Arthur Darcy knight or either of them or any claiming by or under them or either of them or any of the sons of the said Sir Arthur in anywise the rents and suits hereafter to be due to the chief Lord or Lords of the fee or fees thereof and all leases made of the premises to the said TK WB TS RK AA MS and TS and every or any of them for term of years not yet determined And by virtue thereof they the said TK WB TS RK AA MS and TS or any of them have or hath occupied and taken the profit thereof And the said first recited Indentures of demise and lease and the said statute or recognizance so had made or knowledged by the said Nicholas of the said premises only excepted and foreprised And further also that he the said Nicholas Darcy his heirs and assigns and all and every other person and persons which now stand or are seized or which at any time hereafter shall stand continue or be seized of the said premises and lawfully claiming by from or under the title of him the said Nicholas Darcy his heirs or assigns or from by in or under the said Sir Arthur Darcy for the time being as he they or any or them shall be thereunto required by the said TK WB TS RK AA MS and TS or any of them their or any of their executors administrators or assigns shall do make knowledge suffer execute and accomplish all and every such further and other act and acts thing and things devise and device assurance and assurances of the said premises before in and by these presents mentioned to be bargained sold and assigned over as aforesaid as by the said TK WB TS RK AA MS and TS or any or them their or any of their heirs executors adminstrators or assigns or there or any of their learned counsel in the law shall be reasonably devised advised required or counselled at the only cost and charge in the law of them the said Thomas William Thomas Richard Anthony Mathew and Thomas and every or any of them for the further better and more perfect assurance surety sure making and assigning of the said premises unto the said TK WB TS RK AA MS and TS their executors administrators and assigns for the said term of five hundred years And the said Henry Billingsley for him self his heirs executors administrators and assigns doth covenant .............. conclude condescend and agree to and with the said TK WB TS RK AA MS and TS and every of them their and every of their executors administrators and assigns by these presents That they the said TK WB TS RK AA MS and TS and every of them their and every of their executors administrators and assigns shall and may at all times hereafter during the continuance of the said term of five hundred years so granted of the premises as aforesaid lawfully peaceably and quietly have hold occupy and enjoy the said premises with the appurtenances and every part and parcel thereof before in and by these presents bargained sold and granted over as aforesaid without any execution upon any statute or recognizance knowledged to the said Henry Billingsley his heirs executors administrators or assigns or any of them and without any other lett suit trouble denial vexation interruption eviction action or any other incumbrance whatsoever of him the said Henry Billingsley his heirs executors administrators or assigns or of any other person or persons lawfully having any estate or title in or to the premises by from or under the same Henry Billingsley his heirs or assigns or any of them And further also that the said premisses with all and singular their appurtenances before in and by these presents mentioned to be bargained sold and granted over as aforesaid the day of the date of these presents are and do from time to time and at all and every time and times hereafter during the continuance of the said term of five hundred years thereof granted as aforesaid shall remain continue and be unto the said TK WB TS RK AA MS and TS and every of them their and every of their executors administrators and assigns free and clear and freely and clearly acquitted exonerated and discharged or otherwise from time to time within convenient time after notice and request thereof to be made and given unto the said Henry Billingsley his heirs executors or administrators saved and kept harmless of and from all and all manner of former and other bargains sales gifts grants leases estates annuities fees jointures accounts condempnacions judgements executions rents arrerages or rents uses conditions forfeitures statute and recognizance and of and from all other acts charges titles troubles incumbrances and demands whatsoever


heretofore had made done or knowledged by or unto the said Henry Billingsley his heirs executors administrators or assigns or by any other person or persons having any estate or interest by or under the estate title or interest or the said Henry Billingsley in anywise the rents and suits heretofore due or hereafter to be due for the said premises to the chief Lord or Lords of the fee or fees thereof only excepted and foreprised And the said Henry Billingsley for him self his heirs executors and administrators doth further covenant and (line obscured) .......TK............and TS and every of them their and every of their executors administrators and assigns shall and may at all times hereafter during the continuance of the said term of five hundred years so granted of the premises as aforesaid lawfully peaceably and quietly have hold occupy and enjoy the said premises with the appurtenances and every part and parcel thereof before in and by these presents bargained sold and granted over as aforesaid without any execution upon any statute or recognizance knowledged to the said Henry Billingsley his heirs executors adminstrators or assigns or any or them and without any other lett suit trouble denial vexation interruption eviction action or any other incumbrance whatsoever of him the said Henry Billingsley his heirs executors administrators or assigns or of any other person or persons lawfully having any estate or title in or to the premises by from or under the same Henry Billingsley his heirs or assigns or any of them And further also that the said premises with all and singular their appurtenances before in and by these presents mentioned to be bargained sold and granted over as aforesaid the day of the date of these presents are and do from time to time and at all and every time and times hereafter during the continuance of the said term of five hundred years therof granted as aforesaid shall remain continue and be unto the said TK WB TS RK AA MS and TS and every of them their and every of their executors administrators and assigns free and clear and freely and clearly acquitted exonerated and discharged or otherwise from time to time within convenient time after notice and request thereof to be made and given unto the said Henry Billingsley his heirs executors or adminstrators saved and kept harmless of and from all and all manner of former and other bargains sales gifts grants leases estates annuities fees jointures accounts condempnacions judgements executions rents arrerages of rents uses conditions forfeitures statutes and recognizances and of and from all other acts charges titles troubles incumbrances and demands whatsoever heretofore had made done or knowledged or hereafter to be had made done or knowledged by or unto the said Henry Billingsley his heirs executors administrators or assigns or by any other person or persons having any estate or interest by or under the estate title or interest of the said Henry Billingsley in any wise the rents and suits heretofore due or hereafter to be due for the said premises to the chief Lord or Lords of the fee or fees thereof only excepted and foreprised And the said Henry Billingsley for him self his heirs executors and administrators doth further covenant and grant to and with the said TK WB TS RK AA MS and TS and every of them their and every of their heirs executors and administrators That he the said Henry Billingsley his heirs executors and administrators or assigns nor any of them shall not at any time or times hereafter by force of the said several recited statutes or recognizances or upon any suit judgement extents or executions thereupon to be sued extend or cause to be extended the said premises before by these presents mentioned to be bargained sold and granted over as aforesaid or any part or parcel thereof nor other wise by colour or virtue or the same take any the rents issues or profits thereof nor otherwise interrupt or disturb the possession of them the said TK WB TS RK AA MS and TS or of any of them or of their or any of their heirs executors administrators or assigns or in or to the premises or any part thereof in any wise In witness whereof the parties above named to these present Indentures interchangeably have set their hands and seals given the day and year first above written. Et memorandum qd die et Anno suprascriptis prefati Nichus Darcy Armiger et henricus Billingsley venerunt coram dict dna Regina in Cancellar sua et recognoverant Indenturam predict ac omia et singula in eadem contenta et specificat in forma supradict Ill quartodecimo die Aprilis Anno predict


MIC 1874 PC/LAC 13 Northallerton PRO C54/1419 CP 3572 Sale of the Manor No. 3 Darcy/ Billingsley/ Atwill 9th February 1585 In modern English This Indenture made the ninth day of February in the seven and twentieth year (1585) of the reign of our sovereign lady Elizabeth by the grace of god Queen of England France and Ireland defender of the faith between Nicholas Darcy of London Esquire on the one party And Henry Billingsley citizen and haberdasher of London on the other party Witnesses that where the said Henry Billingsley together with the said Nicholas Darcy at the special instance and request of the same Nicholas and for his only debts by one obligation bearing date the day of the date of these presents stand jointly and equally bound unto Lawrence Atwill citizen and scrivener of London in the sum of one thousand and four hundred pounds of lawful money of England with condition thereupon endorsed for the payment of eight hundred three score three pounds six shillings eight pence of like money on the last day of November next coming after the date hereof At the now mansion house of the said Lawrence Atwill set and being in the parish of St Andrew undershaft in London As by the same obligation with condition more plainly may appear Now the said Nicholas Darcy for the Indemnity and discharge of the said Henry Billingsley his heirs executors and administrators and his and their lands tenements goods and chattels and any of them against the said Lawrence Atwill his executors and assigns as well of and for the said recited obligation and all actions suits judgements executions and demands continuing the same hath demised granted and to farm let and by these presents does demise grant and to farm let unto the said Henry Billingsley All those the manors of Langcliffe and Nappay with all and singular their right members and appurtenances whatsoever in the county of york And all and singular messuages houses edifices buildings lands tenements rents reversions suits courts leet liberties franchises profits commodities and hereditaments whatsoever in the said manors of Langcliffe and Nappay aforesaid or to either of them belonging or in any wise appurtaining or accepted reputed taken known used occupied demised or let to or with the said manors or either of them or as part parcel or member of them or either of them And all and singular other the messuages lands tenements rents reversions suits profits and hereditaments whatsoever of the said Nicholas Darcy with all and singular the appurtenances situate lying being coming growing or remaining of or within the towns parishes hamlets and fields of Langcliffe and Nappay aforesaid and in any or any of them in the said county of york. And also the reversion and reversions of all and singular the premises and all and singular rents and profits whatsoever incident unto the same reversion and reversions To have and to hold the said manors messuages lands tenements rents reversions suits and hereditaments and all and singular other the premises with their appurtenances unto the said Henry Billingsley his executors administrators and assigns from the day of the date of these presents unto the end and term and for and during all the term as five hundred years from thence next following and fully to be completed and ended under the condition hereafter in these presents mentioned and.declared And the said Nicholas Darcy for him his heirs executors and administrators and any of them doth covenant and grant to and with the said Henry Billingsley his executors administrators and assigns and any of them by these presents in manner and form following That is to say That he the said Nicholas Darcy now is the very true sole and lawful owner of the fee and inheritances of all and singular the premises and thereof and of any part thereof now is and stands solely and lawfully seized of a good sure perfect and absolute estate in the law in fee simple to the only use of the said Nicholas and of his heirs and assigns for ever without any deference condition or mortgage And that of such estate he the same Nicholas has good right and lawful authority to grant lease and demise all and singular the premises to the said Henry Billingsley his executors administrators and assigns in manner and form aforesaid And that all and singular the same premises at the ensealing and delivery of these presents are and at all times hereafter for and during the said term of five hundred years under the condition hereafter in these presents expressed shall be discharged acquitted or otherwise by the said Nicholas Darcy his heirs executors or administrators at all times well and sufficiently saved and kept harmless of and from all and singular former bargains sales leases grants statutes recognizances estates titles charges and incumbrances whatsoever The chief rents and suits hereafter to be due to the chief Lord or Lords of the fee or fees thereof and all leases made by the said Nicholas Darcy to any person or persons whereof there is not above eleven years to come end and determine and whereupon the old usual yearly rents or more are reserved yearly to be paid during the continuance of any of the same leases only excepted and foreprised And also that the said Henry Billingsley his executors administrators and assigns by and during all the said term of five hundred years upon and under the condition aforesaid shall or may lawfully have hold occupy and enjoy all the said manors and all


and singular other the premises and all the rents issues and profits thereof to his and their own uses shall or may lawfully ..... receive and take without any let or interruption of the saide Nichus or his heires and without any lawful lett trouble interruption execution eviction or recovery of any other person or persons whatsoever except before excepted And further that the premises by these presents mentioned to be demised now are and from henceforth for and during all the said term of five hundred years shall or may continue remain and be unto the said Henry Billingsley his executors administrators and assigns under the condition aforesaid of the full and clear yearly values of thirty and eight pounds of lawful money of England or above over and beyond all charges and reprises whatsoever Provided always that if the said Nicholas Darcy his heirs executors administrators or assigns or any of them do well and truly content and pay or cause to be contented and paid unto the said Lawrence Atwill his executors or assigns the said sum of eight hundred three score three pounds six shillings eight pence of lawful money of England on the said last day of November next coming after the date hereof At the place aforesaid for the discharging and making void of the said recited obligation without any fraud or further delay That then and from thenceforth these presents and the lease demise and grant thereby made of all and singular the premises and all and singular the covenants herein contained and all bonds and statutes made or to be made for or continuing the performance of the covenants herein contained or any of them shall be clearly and utterly void frustrate and of none effect And that then and from thenceforth at all times it shall and may be lawful to and for the said Nicholas Darcy his heirs and assigns unto the said premises with the appurtenances wholly to re-enter and the same to have again and repossessed as in his and their former estate These presents or any thing therein contained to the contrary thereof in any wise notwithstanding And the said Nicholas Darcy for him and his heirs executors and administrators and any of them doth covenant and grant to and with the said Henry Billingsley his executors administrators and assigns and any of them by these presents That if the said Nicholas Darcy his heirs executors and assigns shall make default of or in the payment of the said sum of eight hundred and three score three pounds six shillings eight pence or any part contrary to the form and true meaning above declared That then he the said Nicholas Darcy his heirs or assigns within the space of six months then next ensuing shall and will pay and cause that all and any the premises farmers and occupiers of all and singular the said manors and other the premises with their appurtenances and of any or any part thereof do and shall any of them for his particular estate attain and become tenants upon this demise and lease unto the said Henry Billingsley his executors or assigns for payment of their several yearly rents therefore unto the said Henry Billimgsley his executors and assigns And also that if default be had or made of or in the payment of the said sum of eight hundred three score three pounds six shillings eight pence or any part or parcell thereof to the said Lawrence Atwill his certain Attorney executors or administrators contrary to the form aforesaid That then and at all times during three years next after such default made The said Nicholas Darcy and all and any other person and persons having or lawfully claiming any estate in the premises or any part thereof by from or under the said Nicholas or any of his Ancestors Other than only such lessees and their assigns as shall claim their several estates and interests in the premises by force of such leases as are before excepted at and upon the reasonable request and at the costs and charges in the law only of the said Henry Billingsley his executors or assigns shall and will do make knowledge and suffer and cause to be made done knowledged and suffered all and any such lawful and reasonable act and acts thing and things in the law either for the further and better confirmation and assurance of this present demise and lease or else for the clear and absolute conveying of the fee and inheritance of all and singular the premises with their appurtenances to the said Henry Billingsley his heirs and assigns for ever absolutely without any manner or condition As by the said Henry Billingsley his heirs or assigns or any of them or by his or their counsel learned in the law of this realm shall be lawfully and reasonably demised or advised And moreover the said Nicholas Darcy doth for him his heirs executors and administrators covenant and grant to and with the said Henry Billingsley his executors and assigns by these presents That he the same Nicholas his heirs executors or assigns within the space of two months next after default to be had or made of or in the payment of the said sum of eight hundred three score three pounds six shillings eight pence or any part thereof contrary to the form and true meaning above said shall and will Sell and truly deliver or cause to be delivered unto the said Henry Billingsley his heirs executors or assigns at the now dwelling house of the said Henry situate and being in the parish of St Katheryn Colman near Algate in London All such deeds indents counterpaynes of leases and writings as he the said Nicholas Darcy hath or any other person or persons to his use or by his delivery hath or have which he may lawfully get or come by without suit in law concerning the premises or any part thereof whole safe and uncancelled And where the said Nicholas Darcy by one recognizance of the nature of the statute staple bearing date the nineteenth day of November in the six and twentieth year of the reign of our said sovereign lady Queen Elizabeth stands bound unto the said Henry Billingsley in the sum of one thousand pounds of lawful money of England payable as by the same recognizance or statute more plainly may appear And where also the said Nicholas Darcy by one other recognizance of the nature of the staute staple bearing date the fourteenth day of August last past stands bound unto the said Henry Billingsley in the sum of one thousand and two hundred pounds of lawful money of England payable as by the same recognizance


or statute more plainly also may appear Nevertheless the said Henry Billingsley is pleased contented and agreed and for him his heirs executors and administrators doth covenant and grant to and with the said Nicholas Darcy his heirs executors administrators and assigns and to and with any of them by these presents That if he the said Nicholas Darcy his heirs exeutors and administrators and any of them do well and truly observe perform fulfill and keep all and any the covenants grants articles and agreements above said which on his and their part are or ought to be performed and kept That then the said two recited stautes shall be utterly void and of none effect or else they shall stand and remain in full strength and virtue In witness whereof the said parties to these present Indentures interchangeably have put their hands and seal given the day and year first above written Et memorandum qd vicesimo nono die Novembris anno regni dte dne ... Elizabeth Regine Tricesimo quarto prefat Nichus Darcy Armiger venit coram dta sua Regina in Cancellaria sua et recognouit Indentur predictam ac omnia et singula in eadem content et specificata in forma supradicta Ill viij die Decembris anno ER xxxiiij MIC 1874 FC/LAC 13 Northallerton Sale of the manor No. 4 Darcy/Billingsley/Atwill 8th August 1586 To all men to whom this present writing shall come Nicholas Darcy of London Esquire sendeth greetings in oure lorde god everlasting whereas I the said Nicholas Darcy by my Indenture of lease bearing date the ninth day of February in the seven and twentieth year (1585) of the reign of our sovereign lady Elizabeth the Queen’s majesty that now is did for the consideration therein specified demise grant and to farm let unto Henry Billingsley citizen and Alderman of London by the name of Henry Billingsley citizen and haberdasher of London All those the manors of Langcliffe and Nappay with all and singular their right members and appurtenances whatsoever in the county of york And all and singular messuages houses edifices buildings land tenements rents reversions suits courts leets liberties franchises profits commodities and hereditaments whatsoever to the said manors of Langcliffe and Nappay aforesaid or to either of them belonging or in any wise appurtaining or accepted reputed taken known used occupied demised or let to or with the said manors or either of them or as part parcel or member of them or either of them And all and singular other the messuages lands tenements rents reversions suits profits and hereditaments whatsoever of me the said Nicholas Darcy with all and singular their appurtenances situate lying being coming growing or rem[ai]ning of or within the towns parishes hamlets and fields of Langcliffe and Nappay aforesaid and in every or any of them in the said county of york And also the reversion and reversions of all and singular the premises and all and singular rents and profits whatsoever incident unto the said reversion and reversions To have and to hold the said manors messuages lands tenements rents reversions suits and hereditaments and all and singular other the premises with their appurtenances unto the said Henry Billingsley his executors administrators and assigns from the day of the date of the said recited Indenture of lease unto the end and term and for and during all the term of five hundred years from thence next following and fully to be complete and ended under the condition in the said Indenture mentioned and declared that is to say That if I the said Nicholas Darcy my heirs executors adminstrators or assigns or any of us did well and truly content and pay or cause to be contented and paid unto Lawrence Atwill citizen and scrivener of London his executors or assigns the sum of eight hundred three score three pounds six shillings and eight pence of lawful money of England on the last day of November next coming after the date of the said Indenture of lease at the then dwelling house of the said Lawrence Atwill set and being in the parish of St. Andrews undershaft in London for the discharging and making void of an obligation bearing the date of the said Indenture of lease wherein the said Henry Billingsley and I the said Nicholas Darcy for the only debt of me the said Nicholas made jointly and severally bound unto the said Lawrence Atwill in the sum of one thousand and four hundred pounds of lawful money of England with condition endorsed for payment of the said sum of eight hundred three score three pounds six shillings and eight pence in manner and form aforesaid That then and from thenceforth the said Indenture and the lease demise and grant thereby made of all and singular the premises (and) all and singular the covenants therein contained and all bonds and statutes made for or continuing the performance of the covenants therein contained should be utterly void frustrate and of none effect As by the said Indenture of lease amongst diverse other convenants grants articles and agreements therein contained more at large it doth and may appear Now I the said Nicholas Darcy do by these presents acknowledge and confess that I the said Nicholas did not perform or accomplish the said condition or proviso And that I or any for me did not pay or tender to pay to the said Lawrence Atwill or his assigns the foresaid sum of eight hundred sixty three pounds six shillings and eight pence or any part thereof at the


day time or place of payment thereof above mentioned or at any time si[nce]thence? And that the said Henry Billingsley of his own money hath been compelled and forced to pay all the said sum of eight hundred sixty three pounds six shillings and eight pence by force of the foresaid obligation And therefore now be it known by these presents that I the said Nicholas Darcy for and in consideration of a certain sum of money to me in hand before the ensealing hereof by the foresaid Henry Billingsley truly paid whereof I knowledge the receipt and thereof and of any parcel thereof I do by these presents clearly acquit and discharge the said Henry Billingsley his heirs executors and administrators by these presents Do by these presents for me and my heirs approve ratify and confirm unto the said Henry Billingsley his executors administrators and assigns the said Indenture of lease and the grant thereby made of the said manors of Langcliffe and Nappay together with all and singular the messuages land tenements rents reversions hereditaments commodities and premises by the said Indenture of lease mentioned to be demised with the appurtenances and all and any other things contained in the said Indenture of lease and the estate right title interest and term which the said Henry Billingsley hath to and in the said manors and premises with the appurtenances and to and in any part thereof by force of the said Indenture of lease To have and to hold the said manors messuages lands tenements hereditaments and premises by the said Indenture of lease mentioned to be demised with the appurtenances unto the said Henry Billingsley his executors administrators and assigns from the day of the date of the said recited Indenture of lease for and during all the residue of the said term of five hundred years therein mentioned to be demised and now remaining to come and unexpired without impeachment of or for any manner of waste And further he the said Nicholas Darcy for him his heirs and assigns doth by these presents grant to the said Henry Billingsley his executors and assigns that he or they or any of them shall not at any time hereafter during the said term be in any wise implemented impeached or charged by him the said Nicholas Darcy his heirs or assigns or any others with or for any manner of spoil or waste to be committed suffered or done of in or upon the said premises or any part thereof In Witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal dated the eighth day of August in the eight and twentieth year (1586) of the reign of our sovereign lady Elizabeth by the grace of god Queen of England France and Ireland defender of the faith Anno dni 1586 Et memorandum qd vicesimo nono die Novembris anno regni ... domine nostre Elizabeth Regine tricesimo quarto prefat Nichus Darcy Armiger venit coram dicta dna Regina in Cancellaria sua et rocognovit scriptum predictam ac omnia et singula in eodem content et speficat in forma supradicta Ill ix die Deembris Anno ER xxxiiij Sale of the Manor No. 5 Darcy/ 9 feoffees/ 24 others 29th November 1591 PRO C54 / 1419 CP 3572 Northallerton PC/LAC 13 MIC 1874 Modern English This Indenture made the nine and twentieth day of November in the four and thirtieth year (1591) of the reign of our sovereign lady Elizabeth by the grace of god Queen of England France and Ireland defender of the faith etc. Between Nicholas Darcy of Northampton in the county of Northampton Esquire one of the sons of Sir Arthur Darcy knight deceased of the one party And Richard Foster the elder and Christopher Saylebank of Fryer Stayneforth in the parish of Giggleswick in the county of york yeomen James Carre and Richard Clapham of Stackhouse in the said parish of Giggleswick and county of york yeomen Lawrence Lawson of Giggleswick aforesaid in the said county of york yeoman Adam Browne the elder John Wildman and William Lunne of Settle in the said parish of Giggleswick and county of york yeomen and William Banke of Huggon House in the said parish of Giggleswick and county of york yeoman of the other party Witnesseth that the said Nicholas Darcy as well for and in consideration of a certain sum of lawful money of England to him the said Nicholas Darcy by Henry Somerscales Richard Somerscales William Armysteade Christopher Armysteade Thomas Kydde William Browne Richard Kydson Thomas Sowden Anthony Armysteade Mathew Siggeswick Richard Foster Gyles Foster Henry Peycocke Michael Saylbanke Thomas Foster the elder Richard Lawson Bryan Cookeson Thomas Newhouse Thomas Preston John Lupton William Carre John Brayshawe George Lawson and Lawrence Iveson of the parish of Giggleswick in the said county of York well and truly contented and paid whereof and wherewith he the said Nicholas Darcy acknowledges himself fully satsified contented and pleased And the persons above named and any of them their and any of their heirs executors and


administrators thereof and of any part and parcel thereof clearly acquitted exonerated and discharged for ever by these presents As also for diverse other good causes and considerations him the said Nicholas Darcy thereunto especially moving hath clearly and absolutely aliened bargained and sold And by these presents for and from him and his heirs doth clearly and absolutely alien bargain and sell unto the said RF CS JC RC LL AB JW WL and WB All that the manor of Langcliffe aforesaid with all and singular the right members and appurtenances thereof whatsoever in the said county of York And all and singular messuages mills edifices buildings lands tenements meadows closes pastures feeding commons woods underwoods groves springs rents reversions suits courts leets views of frankpledge liberties franchises royalties profits commodities and hereditaments whatsoever to the said manor (of) Langcliffe of right belonginging (sic) or in any wise appurtaining or to or with the same or any part thereof at any time heretofore within the time and space of twenty years before the day of the date of these presents used occupied demised or let or as part parcel or member thereof within the said time and space of twenty years accepted reputed taken or known And all and singular other the messuages mills dovecotes lands tenements meadows closes pastures feeding commons woods underwoods rents reversions suits profits and hereditaments whatsoever of him the said Nicholas Darcy with all and singular the appurtenances situate lying being coming growing or renewing of or within the town parish hamlet and fields of Langcliffe aforesaid And also the reversion and reversions of all and singular the premises And all and singular rents and profits whatsoever incident unto the same reversion and reversions excepting out of this present alienation bargain and sale unto the said Nicholas Darcy his heirs and assigns all and singular those seven messuages with their appurtenances in Langcliffe aforesaid and in Wynskall and Cowside within the said parish of Giggleswick now in the several tenures or occupations of Lawrence Swayneson John Kidde John Armysteade Richard Brayshawe Margaret Iveson widow Thomas Carre and Robert Saylebanke or any of their assigns And excepting also unto the said Nicholas his heirs and assigns one thousand one acre and thirty poles of land meadow and pasture parcel of the manor or Lordship of Langcliffe aforesaid now being in the several tenures or occupations of the said Nicholas Darcy Lawrence Swayneson John Kidde John Armysteade Richard Brayshawe Margaret Iveson Thomas Carre and Robert Saylebanke or of their assigns And excepting also all the royalties liberties and franchises of the same excepted messuages and of the said one thousand one acre and thirty poles of land And the said Nicholas Darcy for the consideration aforesaid doth clearly and absolutely bargain and sell unto the said NF CS JC NC LL AB JW WL and WB their heirs and assigns for ever All the estate right title interest use possession reversion remainder claim and demand of him the said Nicholas Darcy of in and to all and singular the above bargained premises and any part and parcel thereof (except before excepted) To have and to hold the said manor and all and singular other the premises with the appurtenances (except before excepted) unto the said RF CS JC RC LL AB JS WL and WB their heirs and assigns to the only use and behoof of the said RF CS JC RC LL AB JS WL and WB their heirs and assigns for ever And the said Nicholas Darcy for himself his heirs executors and administrators covenant and grant to and with the said RF CS JC RC LL AB JS WL and WB their heirs and assigns by these presents in manner and form following That is to say that he the said Nicholas in the day of the date hereof is lawfully seized of all and singular the premises with their and every of their appurtenances of an estate of inheritance in fee simple And further that the premises before by these presents mentioned or intended to be bargained or sold and any part and parcel thereof with their appurtenances in the day of the date hereof are and be and do shall from henceforth forever continue and be unto them the said RF CS JC RC LL AB JS WL and WB their heirs and assigns and to every of them free and clear and freely and clearly acquitted exonerated and discharged or other wise by him the said Nicholas Darcy his heirs executors administrators or assigns within convenient time after reasonable request to him or them or any of them to be made saved and kept harmless from time to time of and from all and all manner of former bargains former sales gifts grants alienations forfeitures cause and causes of forfeitures estates leases jointures dowers feoffments wills statutes merchant and of the staple recognizances judgements condemnations executions acts arrerages of rents fees annuities conditions forfeitures escheats issues fines and amercements leases 'suster le maynes inquis[it]ions' injunctions payments and of and from all other titles things troubles and incumbrances whatsoever had made committed knowledged or done by the said Sir Arthur Darcy knight deceased and by him the said Nicholas or by either of them or by any other person or persons having or lawfully claiming any estate right title or interest in or to the premises or any part or parcel thereof by from or under them or either of them or any of the brethren of the said Nicholas Darcy The rents and suits from henceforth to be due and payable to the Lord or Lords of the fee or fees thereof for and in respect of his and their seignorie or seignories and the tenor of the said premises and all fines called postes fines and other things which shall or may grow due and be payable by or upon this present bargain sale and assurance And also demise and lease bearing date the ninth day of February in the seven and twentieth year of the Queen’s majesties reign that now is made unto one Henry Billingsley citizen and Alderman of London of the said manor of Langcliffe among other things for the term of five hundred years yet enduring without impeachment of waste for the yearly rent of one peppercorn only excepted and foreprised And furthermore the said Nicholas Darcy for himself his heirs executors and administrators and every


of them covenant and grant to and with the said RF CS JC RC LL AB JS WL and WB and any of them their and any of their heirs executors and administrators That the said RF CS JC RC LL AB JS WL and WB their heirs and assigns to the only proper use and behoof of them the said RF CS JC RC LL AB JS WL and WB their heirs and assigns for ever shall or lawfully may from henceforth for ever according to the purposes and true meaning of these presents have hold occupy and enjoy all and singular the said messuages lands tenements hereditaments and other the premises before by these presents mentioned and intended to be bargained and sold and every part and parcel thereof with all and every their right members and appurtenances without any let suit eviction or disturbance of him the said Nicholas Darcy his heirs or assigns or of any other person or persons lawfully claiming by through or under the name right or title of the said Nicholas Darcy and Sir Arthur Darcy or either of them or any of the brethren of the same Nicholas And furthermore that he the said Nicholas Darcy and his heirs shall and will at all times hereafter and from time to time for and during the term and space of five years next ensuing the date hereof upon the reasonable request and at the only costs and charges in the law of them the said RF CS JC RC LL AB JS WL and WB or some of them their or some of their heirs or assigns do make knowledge suffer and cause to be done made knowledged and suffered all and any such act and acts things demise and demises and other assurances and conveyances in the law whatsoever with like warranty as aforesaid as by the said RF CS JC RC LL AB JS WL and WB their heirs and assigns or some of them or by their or some of their counsel learned in the law shall be reasonably demised advised or required for the further better and more perfect assurance surety sure making and conveying of all and singular the premises before by these presents mentioned and intended to be bargained and sold with their appurtenances and every part and parcel thereof to be had and conveyed unto the said RF CS JC RC LL AB JS WL and WB their heirs and assigns forevermore in manner and form aforesaid be it by fine feoffment [or recovery] with single voucher or double vouchers over after the course of common recoveries in each case for assurance used deed or deeds enrolled the enrollment of these presents release or confirmation with warranty against him the said Nicholas Darcy and his heirs and all his brethren and against all other persons lawfully claiming by or under him or them or any of them or by all and any of the ways or means aforesaid and not otherwise so as they or any of them be not hereby compelled to travel any further than the cities of London or Westminster for the doing making or passing of the said assurances or any of them In Witness whereof the parties aforesaid to these present Indentures interchangeably have set their hands and seals the day and year first above written

Et memorandum qd die et anno suprascript prefat Nichus Darcye Armiger venit coram dicta dna Regina in Cancellaria sua et recogn.. Indenturam predictam ac omnia et singula in eadem contant et specificat in forma supradicta Ill x die Decembris Anno predicto Sale of the Manor No. 6 Darcy/Billingsley/Somerscales/Armystead 29th November 1591 PRO C54 / 1419 CP 3572 Northallerton PC/LAC 13 MIC 1874 This indenture made the nyne and twentith daye of November in the foure and thirtith yeare of the raigne of oure sovraigne lady Elizabeth by the grace of god Queene of Englande France and Ireland defender of the faith between Nicholas Darcye of London Esquire and Henry Billingsley citizen and Alderman of London of the one partie And Henry Somerscales of Stockdale in the parrish of Gigleswicke in the countie of yorke gentleman Richarde Somerscales of Settell in the same parrishe yoman Willm Armysteade and Christopher Armysteade of Stayneforth in the saide countie of yorke husbandmen of the other partie Witnesseth that whereas the saide Nicholas Darcye by his Indenture of lease bearinge date the nynthe daye of Februarye in the seaven and twentith yeare of the reigne of oure saide sovereigne ladye Queene Elizabeth for and uppon dyvers good and lawfull causes and considerations in the saide Indenture mentioned did demise grannte and to ferme lett unto the saide Henrye Billingsley by the name of Henry Billingsley citizen and haberdasher of London All those the mannors of Langcliff and Nappey with all and singuler their rightes members and appurtennences whatsoever in the saide countie of yorke And all and singuler messuages edifices buildings landes tenementes rents revercions suits courts leets liberties franchises proffits comodities and hereditaments whatsoever to the saide mannors of Langcliffe and Nappey or to either of them


belonginge or in any wise appteyninge or accepted reputed taken knowen used occupyed demysed or letten to or with the saide mannors or either of them or as parte parcell or member of them or of either of them And all and singuler other the messuages landes tenementes rents revercions suits proffits and hereditaments whatsoever of the saide Nicholas Darcye with all and singuler their appurtennts situate lyinge beinge cominge growinge or renewinge [of or] within the Townes parrishes hamletts and feilds of Langcliffe and Nappey afore aforesaide (sic) and in every or any of them in the saide countie of yorke And alsoe the revercion and revercions of all and singuler the premisses and all and singuler rents and proffits whatsoever incident unto the same revercion and revercions To have and to holde the same unto the saide Henry Billingsley his executors admynystrators and assignes from the daye of the date of the saide recited Indentures unto the ende and terme and for and duringe all the terme of fyve hundreth yeares from thence nexte followinge and fullie to be compleat and ended under the condition in the saide recited Indentures mentioned with dyvers other covenants matters agreements and thinges in the same recited Indenture mentioned as by the saide Indenture more at large appeareth And whereas the saide Nicholas Darcye for the further assurance of the saide mannor of Langcliffe and the better confirminge of thestate of the saide Henry Billingsley and his saide terme of yeares therein And uppon intent to extinguishe the condition conteyned in the saide recited Indenture of lease by his other deede or writinge under his hand and seale bearinge date the eight daye of August in the eight and twentith yere of the reigne of our saide sovereigne lady Queene Elizabeth for the consideration therein specifyed did approve ratifie and confirm unto the saide Henry Billingsley his executors admynystrators and assignes the saide Indenture of lease and the grannte thereby made of the saide mannors of Langcliff and Nappay together with all and singuler the messuages landes tenementes rents revercions hereditaments comodities and premisses by the saide Indenture of lease mentioned to be demysed with thappurtenances and all and every other thinge conteyned in the saide Indenture of lease and thestate right title interest and terme which the saide Henry Billingsley had to and in the saide mannors and premisses with their appurtenances and to and in every part thereof by force of the saide Indenture of lease To have and to holde the saide mannors messuages landes tenementes hereditaments and premisses by the saide Indenture of lease mentioned to be demised with thappurtenances unto the saide Henry Billingsley his executors admynystrators and assignes from the daye of the date of the saide recited Indenture of lease for and duringe all the residue of the saide terme of fyve hundreth yeares therein mentioned to be demised and then remayninge to come and unexpired withoute ympeachment for any manner of waste with further covenantes grannts agreements and thinges therein conteyned as by the saide laste recited deede more fully appeareth And Whereas alsoe the saide Nicholas Darcye by one recognizance of the nature of the statute staple bearinge date the nynetenth daye of November in the sixe and twentith yere of the raigne of our saide sovreigne lady Queene Elizabeth standeth bounden unto the saide Henry Billingsley in the some of one Thowsande poundes of lawfull money of Englande payeable as by the saide recognizance or statute more playnely maye appeare And whereas alsoe the saide Nicholas Darcye by one other recognizance of the nature of the statute staple bearinge date the fouretenth daye of August in the saide sixe and twentith yere of her highnes saide reigne standeth bounde unto the saide Henry Billingsley in the some of one Thowsande and two hundreth poundes of lawfull money of Englande payeable as by the saide recognizance or statute more playnely also maye appeare Nowe this Indenture witnesseth that they the saide Nicholas Darcye and Henry Billingsley as well for and in consideration of the some of one hundreth twentie eight poundes thirteene shillinges and foure pence of lawfull money of England to them the saide Nicholas Darcye and Henry Billingsley in hande before thensealinge and delivery of theis presents by the saide Henry Somerscales Richarde Somerscales Willm Armysteade and Christopher Armysteade well and truly contented satisfyed and payde whereof and wherewith the saide Nicholas Darcye and Henry Billingsley doe acknowledge and confesse them selfes and either of them to be well and truely contented satisfyed and payde And the saide Henry Somerscales Richarde Somerscales Willm Armysteade and Christopher Armysteade their heyres executors and admynystrators and every of them thereof and of every parcell thereof to be fully and clerely acquited executed and discharged forever by theis presents have demised bargayned solde assigned set over and confirmed And by theis presents doe clerely and absolutely demise bargaine sell assigne setover and confirme unto the saide Henry Somerscales and Richard Somerscales Willm Armysteade and Christopher Armysteade their executors admynystrators and assignes All that water corne mylne with thappurtenances called or knowne by the name of langcliff mylne sett and beinge in Langcliff aforesaide in the saide countie of yorke and the soyle and grounde whereuppon the same mylne is standinge or there withall heretofore used occupied or enioyed And the damme and water courses dryvinge the saide mylne or thereunto belonginge together with all the soken tolles moulver suite and fishinge to the mylne incident or appteyninge or to or with the same heretofore used taken or enioyed And alsoe that the litle grove or springe of woode called Langcliffe spring with thappurtenances beinge walled aboute conteyninge fyve acres more or lesse and the soyle and grounde thereof certen parcells plotts or leies of which grove or springe nowe are or lately were in the severall tenures or occupation of Lawrence Swayneson Anthonye Armysteade Willm Carre Margaret


Iveson wydowe Willm Kidd John Browne Thomas Kinge John Brayshawe and Richard Kidson or of theire assignee or assigns together with one litle close of pasture conteyninge one roode more or lesse adioyninge to the weste side of the saide grove or springe late in the tenure of Lawrence Swayneson and nowe in the occupation of the saide Henry Somerscales and Richard Somerscales And also all woodes underwoodes and trees growinge or beinge within the saide grove or springe and litle close aforesaide And alsoe one messuage with thappurtenances in Langcliffe aforesaide and all houses buildings gardens and crofts therewith used occupied or enioyed And Alsoe sixe acres and a halfe more or lesse of arrable lande and meadow within the feildes and territories of Langcliffe aforesaide nowe or late in the severall tenures of Thomas Kinge and Richarde Kinge And alsoe one acre of grounde lyinge in Langcliffe aforesaide and next adioyninge to the south side of the wall of the saide springe runninge and ascendinge from the yeate called lee yeate eastwarde which acre was lately mesured by one Willm Freman by the assignment of hym the saide Nicholas And alsoe sixteene acres one halfe acre halfe a roode and seaven polles of pasture accomptinge fyve ells and a halfe to every polle and one polle in breadth and fortie polles in lengthe to every roode beinge the thirde parte of fiftie acres of pasture in three partes to be devided lyinge and beinge in Langcliffe aforesaide in the saide countie of yorke which fiftie acres were lately mesured oute by the saide Willm Freman to be by hym the saide Nicholas bargayned and solde unto the saide Richard Somerscales and one Bryan Cookeson and Thomas Newhouse and the same fiftie acres are lyinge and beinge in the southmoste partes of Langcliffe more ascendinge from Langcliffe feilde walle called the Flatt heades wall towardes a place there called Carlae and from Carlae on the north side of the walle there to Warnedale heade and soe discendinge downewarde westwardes to a greate stone above the lambe fouldes and from thence to a wall called Stubbyn wall as the same fiftie acres were lately measured and set forth by hym the saide Willm Freeman for the saide Richarde Somerscales Bryan Cookeson and Thomas Newhouse And the saide Nicholas Darcye and Henry Billingsley for the consideration aforesaide doe clerely and absolutely bargayne and sell unto them the saide Henrye Somerscales Richarde Somerscales Willm Armysteade and Christopher Armysteade theire heires executors and assignes all woodes underwoodes and trees growinge or beinge in or uppon the premisses before by theis presents intended to be bargayned sould demised assigned or confirmed together with the revercion and revercions remaynder and remaynders of all and every the saide premisses and of every parte and parcell thereof before by theis presents mentioned to be bargayned and grannted over as aforesaide for the saide terme of fyve hundreth yeares And all rents issues and yearely profits whatsoever reserved uppon any demise lease or grannte made of the premisses or of any parte or parcell of the same together alsoe with all the whole estate right title interest use possession inheritance benefitt profit clayme and demand which they the saide Henry Billingsley and Nicholas Darcye or either of them their or either of their heires executors admynystrators or assignes at any tyme or tymes heretofore have had at this tyme have or otherwise shall maye or ought to have or to be entitled to have of in or to the saide messuages tenementes and premisses afore by theis presents mentioned to be demised bargayned solde assigned sett over or confirmed with their appurtenances or of in or to any parte or parcell of the same. To have and to holde the saide messuages tenementes mylne and all other the saide premisses before in and by theis presents bargayned alyened solde setover and assigned as aforesaide with all and singuler theire appurtenances unto the saide Henry Somerscales Richarde Somerscales Willm Armysteade and Christopher Armysteade their executors admynystrators and assignes from and ymediately after the makinge of theis presents for and duringe and unto the full ende and terme and duringe all the rest and residue of the saide terme of fyve hundreth yeares thereof grannted by the saide Nicholas Darcye unto the saide Henry Billingsley as aforesaide as yet are unexpired not ended or determyned withoute ympeachment of any manner of waste And alsoe in as full free large and ample manner and forme to all intents and purposes as they the saide Nicholas Darcye and Henry Billingsley or either of them have or of righte ought or are intytled to have the saide premisses or any parte thereof by any waye righte tytle or meanes whatsoever And the saide Nicholas Darcye for hym selfe his heyres executors and admynystrators and every of them doth covenante grannte conclude condiscende and fully agree to and with the saide Henry Somerscales Richarde Somerscales Willm Armysteade and Christopher Armysteade and every of them their (and) every of their executors admynystrators and assignes by theis presents That they the saide Henry Somerscales Richarde Somerscales Willm Armysteade and Christopher Armysteade their and every of their executors admynystrators and assignes and every of them shall and maye at all and every tyme and tymes hereafter duringe the continuance of the saide terme of fyve hundreth yeares soe before tyme grannted of the saide premisses as aforesaide lawfully quietly and peaceablie have holde occupie and enioye the saide premisses with their appurtenances and every parte and parcell thereof before in and by theis presents bargayned solde grannted over as aforesaide withoute any lett suite denyall troble vexation interruption eviction eiection or any other incumbrance whatsoever of hym the sayde Nicholas Darcye his heyres or assignes or of any other person or persons lawfully clayminge by or under his estate or title or by or under the title of Sir Arthure Darcye knight father of the saide Nicholas or any of the sonnes of the same Sir Arthure in anywise before(saide) by theis presentes mentioned to be bargayned solde and grannted over as aforesaide the daye of the date of theis presents are and soe from tyme to


tyme and at all and every tyme and tymes hereafter duringe the continuance of the saide terme of fyve hundreth yeares soe thereof grannted as aforesaide shall remaine continue and be unto them the saide Henry Somerscales Richarde Somerscales Willm Armysteade and Christopher Armysteade and every of them their and every of their executors admynystrators and assignes free and cleare and freely and clearely acquited exonerated and discharged or otherwise from tyme to tyme saved and kepte harmeles by the saide Nicholas Darcye his heires and assignes of and from all and all manner of former bargaynes former sales gifts grannts leases estates annuities fees joynters dowers fynes intailes accomptes condempnations iudgements extents executions rents rent charges rente sect arrerage of rents uses conditions forfeytures statutes and recognizances and from all other acte charges titles troubles incumbrances and demands whatsoever heretofore had made done knowledged or suffered or hereafter to be had made done knowledged or suffered of the saide premisses by the saide Nicholas Darcye or by the saide Sir Arthure Darcye knight or either of them or any clayminge by or under them or either of them of any of the sonnes of the saide Sir Arthure in any wise the rents and suits hereafter to be due to the chief lorde or lordes of the fee or fees therof and all leases made of the premisses to the saide Henry Somerscales Richarde Somerscales Willm Armysteade and Christopher Armysteade and every or any of them for terme of yeares not yet determyned And by vertue whereof they the saide Henry Somerscales Richarde Somerscales Willm Armysteade and Christopher Armysteade or any of them have or hath occupied and taken the profitts thereof And the saide firste recited Indentures of demise and lease and the saide statutes or recognizances soe had made or knowledged by the saide Nicholas of the saide premisses onely excepted and foreprised And further alsoe that he the saide Nicholas Darcye his heires and assignes and all and every other person and persons which nowe stande or are seized or which at any tyme hereafter shall stand continue or be seised of the saide premisses and lawfully clayminge by from or under the title of hym the saide Nicholas Darcye his heyres or assignes or from by [or] under the saide Sir Arthure Darcye for the tyme beinge as he they or any of them shalbe thereunto required by the saide Henry Somerscales Richarde Somerscales Willm Armysteade and Christopher Armysteade or any of them their or any of their executors admynystrators or assignes shall doe make knowledge suffer execute and accomplishe and cause to be made done knowledged suffered executed and accomplished all and every such further and other act and acts thinge and thinges demise and demises assurance and assurances of the saide premisses before in and by theis presents mentioned to be bargayned solde and assigned over as aforesaide (as) by them the saide Henry Somerscales Richarde Somerscales Willm Armysteade and Christopher Armysteade or any of them their or any of their heyres executors admynystrators or assignes or their or any of their learned counsell in the lawe shalbe reasonably devised advised required or counselled at the onley coste and charges in the law of them the saide Henry Somerscales Richarde Somerscales Willm Armysteade and Christopher Armysteade and every or any of them for the further better and more perfect assurance suerties suer makinge and assuringe of the saide premisses unto the saide Henry Somerscales Richarde Somerscales Willm Armysteade and Christopher Armysteade their executors admynystrators and assignes for the saide terme of fyve hundreth yeares And the saide Henry Billingsley for hym selfe his heyres executors admynystrators and assignes doth covenante grannte conclude condiscende and agree to and with the saide Henrye Somerscales Richarde Somerscales Willm Armysteade and Christopher Armysteade and every of them their and every of their executors admynystrators and assignes by theis presents That they the saide Henry Somerscales Richarde Somerscales Willm Armysteade and Christopher Armysteade and every of them their and every of their executors admynystrators and assignes shall and maye at all tymes hereafter duringe the continuance of the saide terme of fyve hundreth yeares soe grannted of the premisses as aforesaide lawfully peaceablie and quietly have holde occupie and enioye the saide premisses with thappurtenances and every parte and parcell thereof before in and by theis presents bargayned solde and grannted over as aforesaide withoute any execution uppon any statute or recognizance knowledged to the saide Henry Billingsley to be sued by the saide Henrye his heires executors admynystrators or assignes or any of them and withoute any other lett suite trouble denyall vexation interruption eviction eiection or any other incumbrance whatsoever of hym the saide Henry Billingsley his heires executors admynystrators or assignes or of any other person or persons lawfully havinge any estate or title in or to the premisses by from or under the same Henry Billingsley his heires or assignes or any of them And further alsoe that the saide premisses with all and singuler their appurtenances before in and by theis presents mentioned to be bargayned solde and grannted over as aforesaide the daye of the date of theis presents are and soe from tyme to tyme and at all and every tyme and tymes hereafter duringe the continuance of the saide terme of fyve hundreth yeares thereof grannted as aforesaide shall remayne continue and be unto the saide Henry Somerscales Richarde Somerscales Willm Armysteade and Christopher Armysteade and every of them their and every of their executors admynystrators and assignes free and cleare and freely and clearely acquited exonerated and discharged or otherwise from tyme to tyme within convenient tyme after notice and request thereof to be made and geven unto the saide Henry Billingsley his heyres executors or admynystrators saved and kepte harmeles of and from all and all manner of former and other bargaynes sales gifts grannts leases estates annuities fees ioynters accomptes condempnations judgements


executions rents arrerage of rents uses conditions forfeytures statutes and recognizances and of and from all other acts charges titles troubles incumbrances and demands whatsoever heretofore had made done or knowledged or hereafter to be had made done or knowledged by or unto the saide Henry Billingsley his heires executors admynystrators or assignes or by any other person or persons havinge any estate or interest by or under thestate title or interest of the saide Henry Billingsley in any wise The rents and suits heretofore due or hereafter to be due for the saide premisses to the cheife lorde or lordes of the fee or fees thereof only excepted and foreprised And the saide Henry Billingsley for hym selfe his heires executors and admynystrators doth further covenante and grannte to and with the saide Henry Somerscales Richarde Somerscales Willm Armysteade and Christopher Armysteade and every of them their and every of their heires executors and admynystrators that he the saide Henry Billingsley his heires executors admynystrators or assignes nor any of them shall not at any tyme or tymes hereafter by force of the severall recited statutes or recognizances or uppon any suite iudgement extent or execution thereuppon to be sued extende or cause to be extended the saide premisses before by theis presents mentioned to be bargayned solde and grannted over as aforesaide or any parte or parcell thereof nor otherwise by color or vertue of the same take any the rents issues or proffitts thereof nor otherwise interrupte or disturbe the possession of them the saide Henry Somerscales Richarde Somerscales Willm Armysteade and Christopher Armysteade or of any of them or of their or any of their heires executors admynystrators or assignes of in or to the premisses or any parte thereof in any wise In witnes whereof the parties aforesaide to theis presents Indentures interchangeablie have sett their handes and Seales the daye and the yeare firste above written Et memorandum qd die et anno suprascript prefat Nichus Darcye Armiger et Henricus Billingsley venerunt coram dicta dna Regina in Cancellaria sua et recognovei Indentur predict ac omnia et singula in eadem content et specificat in forma supradicta Ill xij die Decembris Anno predicto Sale of the Manor No. 7 29th November 1591 PRO C54 / 1419 CP 3572 Northallerton PC/LAC 13 MIC 1874 This Indenture made the nyne and twentyth daye of November in the foure and thirtith yere of the reigne of oure sovereigne ladye Elizabeth by the grace of god Quene of Englande France and Ireland defender of the faith Betwene Nicholas Darcye of Northampton in the countie of Northampton Esquire one of the sonnes of Sir Arthure Darcye knight deceased and Henry Billingsley citizen and Alderman of London of the one partie And William Carre John Brayshawe George Lawson Lawrence Iveson Thomas Preston Thomas Newhouse John Lupton and Bryan Cookeson of the parrishe of Giglesweke in the countie of yorke yomen of the other partie Witnesseth that Whereas the saide Nicholas Darcye by his Indenture of lease bearinge date the nynth daye of Februarye in the seaven and twentith yeare of the reigne of our saide sovereigne lady Quene Elizabeth for and uppon dyvers good and lawfull causes and consideration in the saide Indenture mentioned did demyse grannte and to ferme lett unto the saide Henry Billingsley by the name of Henry Billingsley citizen and haberdasher of London all those the mannors of Langcliffe and Nappey withall and singuler their rights members and appurtenances whatsoever in the saide countie of yorke And all and singuler messuages edifices buildings landes tenementes rents reversions suits courts leets libties franchises proffitts comodities and hereditaments whatsoever to the saide mannors of Langcliffe and Nappey or to either of them belonginge or in any wise apperteynge or accepted reputed taken knowne used occupyed demysed or letten to or with the saide mannors or either of them or as parte or member of them or either of them And all and singuler the messuages landes tenements rents revercions suites proffitts and hereditaments whatsoever of the saide Nicholas Darcye with all and singuler their appurtenances situate lyinge beinge cominge growinge or remaininge of or within the Townes parrishes hamletts and feilds of Langcliffe and Nappey aforesaide and in every or any of them in the saide countie of yorke And alsoe the reversion and reversions of all and singuler the premysses and all and singuler rents and proffitts whatsoever incident unto the same reversion and revercions To have and to holde the same unto the saide Henrye Billingsley his executors admynystrators and assignes from the daye of the date of the saide recited Indenture unto the end and terme and for and duringe all the terme of fyve hundreth yeres from thence nexte followinge and fully to be complett and ended under the condition in the saide recited Indenture mentioned with dyvers other covenants matters agreements and thinges in the same recited Indentures mentioned


as by the saide Indentures more at lardge appeareth And whereas the saide Nicholas Darcye for the further assurance of the saide mannor of Langcliffe and the better confirminge of thestate of the saide Henry Billingsley and his saide terme of yeares therein And uppon intent to extinguyshe the condition conteyned in the saide recited Indenture of lease by his other deed or writinge under his hande and seale bearinge date the eight daye of August in the eight and twentith yeare of the reigne of our saide sovereigne lady Queene Elizabeth for the consideration therein specifyed did approve ratifye and confirme unto the saide Henry Billingsley his executors admynystrators and assignes the saide Indenture of lease and the grannte thereby made of the saide mannors of Langcliffe and Nappey together with all and singuler the messuages landes tenements rentes revercions hereditaments comodities (and) premisses by the saide Indenture of lease mentioned to be demysed with thappurtenances and all and every other thinges conteyned in the saide Indenture of lease and thestate right title interest and terme which the saide Henry Billingsley had to and in the saide mannors and premysses with their appurtenances and to and in every parte thereof by force of the saide Indenture of lease To have and to hould the saide mannors messuages landes tenements hereditaments and premisses by the saide Indenture of lease mentioned to be demysed with thappurtenances unto the saide Henry Billingsley his executors admynystrators and assignes from the daye of the date of the saide recited Indenture of lease for and duringe all the residue of the saide terme of fyve hundreth yeares therein mentioned to be demysed and then remayninge to come and unexpyred withoute ympeachment of or for any manner of waste with further covenantes granntes agreements and thinges therein conteyned as by the saide laste recited deede more fully appeareth And whereas also the saide Nicholas Darcye by one recognizance of the nature of the statute staple bearinge date the nynetenth daye of November in the sixe and twentith yere of the raigne of oure saide sovereigne ladye Queene Elizabeth standeth bounden unto the saide Henrye Billingsley in the somme of one Thousand poundes of lawfull money of Englande payable as by the saide recognizance or statute more playnely maye appeare And whereas alsoe the saide Nicholas Darcye by one other recognizance of the nature of the statute staple bearinge date the fouretenth daye of Auguste in the saide sixe and twentith yeare of her highnes saide raigne standeth bounde unto the saide Henrye Billingsley in the somme of one Thowsand and two hundreth poundes of lawfull money of Englande payable as by the saide recognizance or statute more playnely alsoe maye appeare. Nowe this Indenture witnesseth that they the saide Nicholas Darcye and Henrye Billingsley as well for and in consideration of the some of one hundreth foure score foureteene poundes and seaven pence of lawfull money of Englande to them the saide Nicholas Darcye and Henry Billingsley in hand before thensealinge and deliveringe of theis presents by the saide William Carre John Brayshawe George Lawson Lawrence Iveson Thomas Preston Thomas Newhouse John Lupton and Bryan Cookeson well and trewly contented satisfyed and payde whereof and wherewith they the saide Nicholas Darcy and Henry Billingsley doe acknowledge and confesse them selves and either of them to be well and truely contented satisfyed and payde And all the other persons above named and every of them their and every of their heyres and executors clearelie acquited and discharged forever by theis presentes have demysed bargayned solde assigned sett over and confirmed And by theis presentes doe clearely and absolutely demyse bargayne sett assigne setover and confyrme unto the saide Willm Carre John Brayshawe George Lawson Lawrence Iveson Thomas Preston Thomas Newhouse John Lupton and Bryan Cookeson their heyres and assignes forever All those sixe messuages with their appurtenances nowe or late in the severall tenures or occupations of one Henry Thompson the saide William Carre John Brayshawe George Lawson William Iveson and Lawrence Iveson or of their assigne or assignes set lyinge and beinge in Langcliffe aforesaide in the saide countie of yorke And alsoe all howses buildinges yardes gardens and crofts to the saide messuages or any of them nowe belonginge or to or with the same or any of them nowe used occupyed or letten One little ould house in Langcliffe aforesaide and foure polles of grounde thereunto adioyninge late in the tenure of Hughe Kidd And alsoe two little closes of pasture called by the severall names of Thowker Heade and Holme close in Langcliffe aforesaide late in the tenure of Thomas Kinge and Richarde Kinge And alsoe threescore and seaven acres and foure and thirtie polles more or lesse of arrable lande and meadowe one halfe acre thereof called mealebanke reave (reane?) lyinge and beinge in the common feildes and territories of Langcliffe aforesaide nowe or late in the severall tenures or occupations of them the saide Willm Carre Thomas Preston Thomas Newhouse John Brayshawe George Lawson Lawrence Iveson John Armysteade William Iveson Thomas Kinge and Richard Kinge or of theire assigne or assignes And alsoe one grove of woode called Hawfeld in Langcliffe aforesaide conteyninge by estimation sixe acres and the soyle and grounde thereof and all woodes underwoodes and trees growinge or beinge in or uppon the same grove And alsoe one hundreth fortie two acres three roodes and thirtie and sixe polles of pasture lyinge and beinge within the saide lordshippe of langcliffe in the saide countie of yorke That is to wete Thirtie three acres one roode and Fouretene polles of pasture accomptinge fyve ells and a halfe to every polle in breadth and Fortie polles in lengthe to every roode beinge two partes of Fifty acres of pasture in three partes to be devided lyinge and beinge in langcliffe aforesaide in the saide countie of yorke which fifty acres were lately measured oute by one Willm Freeman to be by


hym the saide Nicholas Darcye bargayned and solde unto the saide Bryan Cookeson and Thomas Newhouse and to one Richarde Somerscales and the same Fifty acres are lyinge and beinge in the Southmoste parte of langcliffe more aforenamed from langcliffe feldes wall called the Flatt heades (...) towardes a place there called Carelae and from Carelae on the north syde of the wall there to Warnedale head and discending downe Warnedale weste wardes to a greate stone above the lambe foldes And from thence to a wall called stubbyn wall as the same fiftye acres were lately measured & sett forthe by hym the saide William Freeman for the saide Richarde Somerscales Bryan Cookeson and Thomas Newhouse And also sixe acres of pasture in langcliffe aforesaide lyinge on the backsyde of Warnedale knottes adioyninge to the yewe closeheade And alsoe thirtie and nyne acres one roode and twentie and one polles of pasture in langcliffe aforesaide lyinge on the northe syde of the Cowe close beginninge at the east ende of langcliffe Towne and ascendinge directlye to Turffmore yeate And from thence followinge the wall there to the Skarries And soe followinge the same wall on the east syde of the greate close called Cowsyde close to the syde of hensyde close And soe to the place assigned and mesured oute to the Tenantes of Wynskale and Cowsyde towardes the weste And alsoe threescore acres one roode and thirtene polles of pasture in langcliffe aforesaide next adioyninge and lyinge on the north syde of the saide Fifty acres All which acres of lande medowe and pasture shall conteyne the rate of Fyve elles and a halfe to every polle and one polle in breadth and Fortie polles in lengthe to every roode Together with the reversion and reversions remaynder and remaynders of all and every the saide premisses and of every parte and parcell thereof before by theis presentes mentioned to be bargayned and grannted over as aforesaide for the saide terme of fyve hundreth yeres And all rentes issues and yerely proffittes whatsoever reserved uppon any demyse lease or grannte made of the premisses or of any parte or parcell of the same Together alsoe with all the whole estate rightes titles interest uses possession inheritance benefitt profitt clayme and demand which they the saide Henry Billingsley and Nicholas Darcye or either of them their or either of their heyres executors admynystrators or assignes att any tyme or tymes heretofore have had at this tyme have or otherwise shall maye or ought to have or to be entytled to have of in or to the saide messuages tenementes premisses afore by theis presentes mentioned to be demysed bargayned solde assigned and set over or confirmed with their appurtenances or of in or to any parte or parcell of the same To have and to hould the same messuages tenementes and all other the premisses before in and by theis presentes bargayned alyned solde setover and assigned as aforesaide with all and singuler their appurtenances unto the saide William Carre John Brayshawe George lawson laurence Iveson Thomas Preston Thomas Newhouse John lupton and Bryan Cookeson their executors admynystrators and assignes from and ymediatly after the makinge of theis presentes for and duringe and unto the full end and terme and during all the reste and residue of the saide terme of Fyve hundreth yeres soe thereof grannted by the saide Nicholas Darcye unto the saide Henry Billingsley as aforesaide as yet are unexpired not ended or determyned withoute ympeachment of any manner of waste And alsoe in as full free lardge and ample manner and forme to all intentes and purposes as they the saide Nicholas Darcye and Henry Billingsley or either of them have or of right ought or are entytled to have the saide premisses or any parte thereof by any waye right tytle or meanes whatsoever And the saide Nicholad Darcye for hym selfe his heyres executors & admynystrators doth covenante grannte conclude condiscend and fully agree to and with the saide Willm Carre John Brayshawe George lawson lawrence Iveson Thomas Preston Thomas Newhowse John Lupton and Bryan Cookeson and every of them their and every of their executors admynystrators and assigns by theis presentes That they the saide William Carre John Brayshawe George lawson laurence Iveson Thomas Preston Thomas Newhouse John lupton and Bryan Cookeson theire and every of their executors admynystrators and assignes and every of them shall and maye at all and every tyme and tymes hereafter duringe the continuance of the saide terme of Fyve hundreth yeares soe before tyme grannted of the saide premisses as aforesaide lawfully quietly and peaceablie have holde occupie and enioye the saide premisses with thappurtenances and every parte and parcell thereof before in and by theis presentes bargayned solde and grannted over as aforesaide withoute any lett suite denyall trouble vexation interruption eviction eiection or any other incumbrance whatsoever of hym the saide Nicholas Darcye his heyres or assignes or of any other person or persons lawfullie clayminge by or under his estate or tytle or by or under the tytle of Sir Arthur Darcye knighte father of the saide Nicholas or any of the sonnes of the the same Sir Arthur in any wise And further alsoe that the saide premysses with all and singuler their appurtenances before in and by theis presentes mentioned to be bargayned solde and grannted over as aforesaide the daye of the date of theis presentes are and soe from tyme to tyme and at all and every tyme or tymes hereafter duringe the continuance of the saide terme of Fyve hundreth yeares soe thereof grannted as aforesaide shall remayne continue and be unto them the saide William Carre John Brayshawe George lawson laurence Iveson Thomas Preston Thomas Newhouse John lupton and Bryan Cookeson and every of them their and every of their executors admynystrators and assignes free and cleare and freely and clearly acquited exonerated and discharged or otherwise from tyme to tyme saved and kepte harmeles by the saide Nicholas Darcye his heyres and assignes of and from all and all manner of former bargaynes former sales guiftes granntes leases estates annuities fees ioynters dowers fynes intayles accomptes comdempnations


iudgementes extentes executions rentes rent chardges rentes secke arrerages of rentes uses conditions forfeytures statutes and recognizances and from all other actes thinges tytles troubles incumbrances and demandes whatsoever heretofore had made done knowledged or suffered or hereafter to be had made done knowledged or suffered of the saide premisses by the saide Nicholas Darcye or by the saide Sir Arthur Darcye knighte or either of them or any clayminge by or under them or either of them or any of the sonnes of the saide Sir Arthure in any wyse the rentes and suites hereafter to be due to the cheefe lorde or lordes or the fee or fees thereof and all leasses made of the premisses to the saide Willm Carre John Brayshawe George lawson lawrence Iveson Thomas Preston Thomas Newhouse John lupton and Bryan Cookeson and every or any of them for terme of Fyve hundred yeares not yet determyned And by vertue whereof they the saide William Carr John Brayshall George lawson laurence Iveson Thomas Preston Thomas Newhouse John lupton and Bryan Cookeson or any of them have or hath occupied and taken the proffitt thereof And the saide fyrste recyted Indentures of demyse and lease and the saide statute or recognizance soe had under or knowledged by the saide Nicholas of the saide premysses only excepted and foreprised And further alsoe that he the saide Nicholas Darcye his heires and assignes and all and every other person and persons which nowe stande or are seised or which at any tyme hereafter shall stande continue or be seised of the saide premisses and lawfully clayminge by from or under the title of hym the saide Nicholas Darcye his heyres or assignes or from by or under the saide Sir Arthure Darcie for the tyme beinge as he they or any of them shalbe thereunto required by the saide Willm John George laurence Thomas Thomas John and Bryan or any of them or any of their executors admynystrators or assignes shall doe make knowledge suffer execute and accomplishe and cause to be made done knowledged suffered executed and accomplished all and every such further and other act and actes thinge and thinges demise or demises assurance and assurances of the saide premisses before in and by theis presentes mentioned to be bargayned solde and assigned over as aforesaide as by them the saide William John George lawrence Thomas Thomas John and Bryan or any of them their heires executors admynystrators or assignes or their or any of their learned councell in the lawe shalbe reasonably devised advised required or compelled at the only coste and charges in the lawe of them the saide William John George lawrence Thomas Thomas John and Bryan and every or any of them for the further better and more perfect assurance suertie suremakinge and assuringe of the saide premisses unto the saide William Carr John Brayshall George lawson laurence Iveson Thomas Preston Thomas Newhouse John lupton and Bryan Cookeson theire executors admynystrators and assignes for the saide terme of Fyve hundreth yeres And the saide Henry Billingsley for hym selfe his heyres executors admynystrators and assignes doth covenante grannte conclude condiscend and agree to and with the saide William John George lawrence Thomas Thomas John and Bryan and every of them their and every of their executors admynystrators and assignes by theis presentes That they the saide Willm Carre John Brayshall George lawson lawrence Iveson Thomas Preston Thomas Newhouse John lupton and Bryan Cookeson and every of them their and every of their executors admynystrators and assignes shall and maye at all tymes hereafter duringe the continuance of the saide terme of fyve hundreth yeares soe grannted of the premisses as aforesaide lawfully peaceably and quietly have houlde occupye and enioye the saide premisses with thappurtenances and every parte and parcell thereof before in and by theis presentes bargayned solde and grannted over as aforesaide withoute any execution uppon any statute or recognizance knowledged to the saide Henry Billingsley to be sued by the said Henry his heyres executors admynystrators or assignes or any of them and without any other lett suite troubles denial vexation interruption eviction eiection or any other incumbrances whatsoever of hym the said Henry Billingsley his heires executors admynystrators or assignes or of any other person or persons lawfully having any estate or title in or to the premisses by from or under the said Henry Billingsley his heyres or assignes or any of them And further alsoe that the said premisses with all and singuler their appurtenance before in and by theis present mentioned to be bargained solde and granted over as aforesaid the daye of the date of these presentes are and doe from tyme to tyme and at all and any tyme and tymes hereafter duringe the continuance of the said tyme of fyve hundreth yeares thereof granted as aforesaid shall remayne continue and be unto the said Willm. Carre John Brayshaw George Lawson Lawrence Yveson Thomas Preston Thomas Newhouse John Lupton and Bryan Cookeson and every of them they and every of their executors admynystrators and assignes free and cleare and freely and clearly acquitted exonerated and discharged or otherwise from tyme to tyme within convenient tyme after notice and request thereof to be made and given unto the said Henry Billingsley his heyres executors or admynystrators saved and kept harmlesof and from all and all manner of former and other bargaynes sales gifts grants leases estates annuities fees ioyntures accomptes condempnacions iudgementes executions rentes arrerages of rentes uses conditions forfeytures statutes and recognizances and of and from all other actes charges titles troubles incumbrances and demandes whatsoever heretofore had made done or knowledged or hereafter to be had made done or knowledged by or unto the said Henry Billingsley his heyres executors admynystrators or assignes or by any other person or persons having any estate or interest by or under


the estate title or interest of the said Henry Billingsley in any wise the rentes and suites heretofore due or hereafter to be due for the said premisses to the cheefe Lorde or Lordes of the fee or fees thereof only excepted and foreprysed And the said Henry Billingsley for hym selfe his heyres executors and admynystrators doth further covenante and grante to and with the said Willm Carr John Brayshaw George Lawson Lawrence Iveson Thomas Preston Thomas Newhouse John Lupton and Bryan Cookeson and every of them they and every of their heyres executors and admynystrators that he the said Henry Billingsley his heyres executors and admynystrators or assignes nor any of them shall not at any tyme or tymes hereafter by force of the said denial recited statutes or recognizances or uppon any suite iudgement extente or execution thereuppon to be sued extended or cause to be extended the said premisses before by theis presente mentioned to be bargayned solde and granted over as aforesaid or any parte or parcell thereof nor otherwise by color or virtue of the same title any the rentes yssues or profittes thereof nor otherwise interrupte or disturb the possession of them the said William Carr John Brayshaw George Lawson Lawrence Iveson Thomas Preston Thomas Newhouse John Lupton and Bryan Cookeson or of any of them or of theire or anye of theire heyres executors admynystrators or assignes of in or to the premisses or any parte thereof in anywise In witnes whereof the parties aforesaid to theis presente Indentures interchangeablie have sett their handes and seales the daye and yeare firste above written Et memorandum qd die et anno suprascript prefati Nichus Darcy Armiger et Henricus Billingsley venerunt coram dicta dna Regina in Cancellaria sua et recognoverunt Indenturam predictam ac omnia et singula in eadem content et specificat in forma supradicta Ill xvij die FebruarijAnno predicto Langcliffe Wills Transcribed mainly from Borthwick Institute (University of York) microfilms and originals. Some are from the North Yorkshire County Record Office (ZX series) and the PCC (Documentsonline). Others are in private hands or from a few other sources such as the collection made by R.Postlethwaite held at Hudson History in Settle. The collection is probably near complete up to about 1700 and a small selection of 18th and 19thC wills has been added. Various other wills are included because of Langcliffe connections, particularly the Carr and Paley families. The transcriptions are not guaranteed error-free in reading or typing. The Latin text following some wills is the standard granting of Probate and is not transcribed since little if any extra information is found there. The wills are arranged alphabetically by family name and by year within each name (spelling varies). Use a Find or Search method to locate a will in the list. It would be appreciated that if the contents are used in any publication or website that due acknowledgement is made to the source and the transcribers. A few of these wills were transcribed by Sheila Gordon and extracts were made by Reg Postlethwaite, otherwise they have been photocopied and transcribed by M.J. and E.M. Slater. Mary Slater and Michael Slater July 2009 LIST OF WILLS IN DATE ORDER (modern year system) Carr Iveson Saylebanke Carr Foster Stachowse Armisteid Iveson Lawson Preston Foster

James Laurence James Thomas John Jennet Thomas Steven Thomas Edward William sr.

1518 1548 1548 1549 1554 1566 1570 1571 1574 1575 1577


Armetsteade Carre Carre Carre Carr Foster Iveson Kydd Browne Carr Carr Palay Carr Sigsweeke Armitstead Falthropp Foster Foster Carr Iveson Somerscales Carr Carr Carr Walker Brayshay Lawson Carr Browne Harrison Carr Foster Carr Foster Armitstead Carr Clapham Carr Carr Lucas Iveson Paycock Paley Johnson Carr Foster Dawson Geldard Hudson Carr Ridgey Redgey Dawson Wilson Carr Geldard

Cicellie Adam Roger Elizabeth William William William William John Richard Thomas John Roger Mathewe Richard William Giles Thomas Anne Richard Henry Hugh Thomas Robert Richard John Gregory Roger William Roberte Alan Richard Alice Thomas John Thomas Thomas James William Anne James Robert Thomas William William William Christopher Thomas Andrew Thomas Christopher William Christopher Richard Leonard Thomas

1578 1586 1586 1587 1587 1587 1589 1591 1591 1593 1596 1597 1597 1598 1603 1605 1602 1605 1607 1608 1609 1609 1611 1612 1613 1615 1615 1621 1621 1621 1626 1629 1634 1634 1638 1638 1647 1654 1661 1664 1665 1667 1669 1669 1674 1677 1682 1687 1688 1689 1690 1690 1693 1696 1696 1697


Clapham Huitson Lawson Jackes Paley Paley Paley Dawson Lawson Paley(Rev.) Paley (Canon) Paley

Thomas Richard Richard Richard William Thomas Mary William Richard William William Thos. Lawson

1698 (Oatson)1699 1699 1700 1722 1741 1758 1762 1766 1796 1804 1808

ARMITSTEAD THOMAS ARMISTEAD 1570/1 Borthwick vol 19 fol 166 In the name of god amen the fourthe day of mche Anno dm 1570 I thome Armistead of langcliffe wtin the pshe of gigleswicke secke in body and of good and pfecte Remembrance loved be allmyhtie god mayke this my last will and Testament in manr and forme followinge First I give and bequeathe my sowle to allmightie god and to all the glorious companye in heaven and my bodie to be buried in the pishe churche of gigleswicke Also I give for my mortuarie and other churche dewes all that ryght will Also I will that my wyffe shalbe best one duringe her widowheade and have her widowryghte of my farmeholde and goodes and after her widowheade I give the title and Tenant Ryghte of my tenemente unto Anthonye Armisteid my Sonne wt licence of the lorde Also I give to the said Anthonye my Sonne all my husbandrie geare wt timber and bordes after my wyffe widowheade and so muche graine as shall Sowe his farmeholde and he to be Contented wt this for his Childes porcon Also I give to my five (?) daughters that is not married ther childes porcons of goodes accordinge to the lawe Also I give to Thome foster my sonne in lawe my best Jackette and to xpofer hesledonne my other Jackette the rest of my parte of goodes my deptes and all other funerall expenses paide I give and bequeathe to my sons or daughters equallie amonges them and I make and constitute Cecilie my wyffe and anthonye Armisteid my Sonne my sole executors Theis witnesses Thomes Braischay Thom Sailbancke lawrence Carre and Thom foster wt others Latin text CICELLIE ARMETSTEAD 1578 Borthwick vol 22 fol 245 mf 933 In the name of god amen the xviij th daie of februarie anno dm 1578 I Cicellie Armetsteade late wiffe of Thoms Armetsteade of Lanckliffe in the pishe of giglesweke sicke in bodie but of good and pfect Remembrance praysed be god do make this my laste will and testament in manner & forme followinge Firste I bequithe my soule to almightie god my maker and savioure and my bodie to be buried in the churche yarde at Giglesweke Allso I bequithe for my mortuarie and other (and other) Churche dewes all that righte will Itm I bequithe and give all my goodes and Chattelles moveable and unmoveable my dettes and fun[er]all expences paide unto Elizabeth Armetstead and Jennet Armetstead my daughters in full dischardge of theire Childes porcons wch I was Chargdged wthall(?) and for theire better Furtherance I ordeine make and appoint the saide Elizabeth Armetsteade and Jennet Armetstead my saide daughteres my whole executors of this my laste will and testament These Wytnesses Thomas Brashay and John Browne Latin text RICHARD ARMISTEAD 1603 Borthwick vol 29 fol 408-9 mf 943


In the name of god Amen, The xvi th daie of februarie Anno dm 1603 I Richard Armitsteade of Langcliffe sicke in bodie, but of perfect memorie praised be Almightie god doe make this my last will and testament in manner and forme followinge First I geve and bequeath my soule to Almightie god, And my bodie to be buried at the discrecon of my frindes. Itm I will that my debtes be paied of my whole goodes. Itm. I will that Anne my wife shall have her lawfull thirdes of all my goodes, and also the third parte of my landes or tenementes duringe her naturall life. And therafter her death the saide third parte of my landes or tenementes to remayne againe wth the other two partes to my posteritie wch shall enioy the said landes or tenementes to a sonne or daughter for wheras my wife beinge now wth childe if god send her (a) sonne and that he doe live till he come to mans estate. Then my will is that he shall have and enioy my saide landes and tenementes and in regard thereof he shall paie to my two daughters Margrett and Agnes, and to either of them the some of x (li) and the same he shall paie to them upon they shall accomplish the full age of xxvi (tie) yeares. And my will and mind is that he shall enter to the benefitt of my landes or tenementes when he shall come to the age of xvj yeares, but if my sonne die before he doe come to age, or that god doe send my wife a daughter, then I will that my daughter Margrett shall have my landes or tenementes, and in regard thereof she shall paie to my younger daughter Agnes xx (li) when the saide Agnes shall accomplish the full age of one and twentie yeares, And I give my children their equall porcons of my goodes, And for the rest of my goodes not yett alreadie given I will that my wife and children have every one their equall porcons, And I will also that my father and mother shall have and enioy the third part of my tenementes duringe their lives naturall except one parcell of ground called gudgaine bankes, And of this my last will and testament I make Anne my wife my whole executor. Witnes of the same Richard Kidson Willm Browne Thomas Armitstead Thomas Kyd wth others Latin text JOHN ARMITSTEAD of Langcliffe October 1638 Will made 13 February 1636 Borthwick bundle October 1638/9 R. Postlethwaite 2nd set bachelor eldest son of Thomas Armitstead of Giggleswick deceased To be buried in the church or churchyard of Giggleswick. Whereas my late father Thomas Armitstead did by his last will bearing date 1st April 1632 give unto me one messuage or dwelling house in Giggleswick with all rights and appurtenances which my father held by lease for the residue of a term of 6000 years by indenture from Stephen Dockrey clerk and Jennett Dockrey widdow for the rent of 7s yearly payable to Rt. Hon. Francis Earl of Cumberland at Pentecost and Martinmas by equal portions as by indenture bearing date 27 June 1614; and whereas my late father did bequeath to me one close called the Broadhead of the rent of 12d held by lease of a residue of 6000 years by the grant of John Armistead his late father. ... my executor is to have the use of the same until such time as my brother William Armistead is 21 then to William and his heirs for the residue of the lease provided he discharge the following legacies at or before the tyme of his entry into the said premisses to Elizabeth, Anne and Marie my natural sisters £13 6s 8d each to Isabell and Hester Armitstead my half-sisters £6 13s 4d each to Katherin Carr my loving aunt £3 6s 8d to Richard Lawsonn 10s to Isabell Carr, Elizabeth Carr and Anne Carr to everie one 6s 8d to Katherine Paley my cozen 10s If William defaults on any of the above payments my executor may sell the premisses to anie other person whatsoever. All legacies are to be paid within the space of 2 years after my brother is 21 - if not all legacies are covered he may sell part or all of the premisses - if all premisses are sold and there is still insufficient money then the legacies are to be abated. If there is any surplus money then to my three sisters Elizabeth, Anne and Marie equally. My uncle Thomas Carr to be sole executor. witnesses Wm Carr Thomas Paley Rich. Coultonn Antho. Bainbrigge JOHN BRAYSHAY 1615 Borthwick vol 35 fol 123


In the name of God Amen the twelfte day of December in the year of our lord god one thousand six hundreth and fifteene I John Brayshay of Langclife in the countye of yorke yeoman sicke in bodye but of pfect memorie god be praysed therefore doe make and ordayne this my last will and testament in manner and forme followinge First I comend my Soule into the mercifull hands of Almightie god my maker and redeemer trustinge assuredlie throughe the merritts and pretios blood sheddinge of my alone Saviour and redeemer Jesus Christ to be mayd ptaker of eternal ioyes in heaven And for my bodye I will the same be buried at the discretion of my freinds Itm my will is and I give devise and bequeathe unto Richard Brayshay my eldest sonne and to his executors and assignes my frehold messuage and tenement with th'appurten'nces in Langclife afforesayd and all grounds and heriditaments which I hold by lease or leases for tearme or tearmes of yeres whatsoever within the mannor and Lordshippe of Langcliffe aforesayd and all my full and whole estate righte tytle interest tearme and tearmes of yeares of in and to the same premisses and of in and toe everie pte and pcell thereof and also all my writings escripts and evidences perteyneinge. The same provided alwayes and yet nevertheles upon condition that the sayd Richard his executors and assignes shall suffer Sybell my wife and her assignes to occupie and inioye all the same pmisses for the better maynetenance and releefe of her selfe and my children for seaven yeares now nexte comeing and alsoe that if my sayd wyfe doe live unto the end of the sayd seaven yeares when he the sayd Richard my sonne his executors administrators and assignes shall permitt and suffer the sayd Sibell my wife or her assignes to continew in the occupacion of the one halfe of my sayd tennement for soe many yeares after as she shall live and it is my will that my sayd sonne Richard shall enter to one halfe of my tenement at the Seaven yeares end and to the other halfe at my wives decease whensoever yt the same shall happen after the same seaven yeares ended and upon condicion alsoe that he the sayd Richard his executors or assignes shall give to everie of the rest of my children five pounds to be paid when they shall alle finalie accomplish there full ages of one and twentie yeres severallie but if anie of them come to that age before the end of seaven of yeares then to have that person payd at that tyme but not before And for my goods my will is that my debts and funerall expences first beinge payd the Residue shalbe devided into three equall portions whereof my wife to have a third pte and my younger children another pte and for the deades pte I give the same amongst my children Agnes, Thomas William and Robert equallye ammongest(them) but my sonne Richard to have noe pte of my goods because he shalbe already pferred by my tenement and it is my will that if anie of my younger children dye before they shall have received there five pounds before herein mencioned then it to goe to the survivor of them And I appoynt Sybill my sayd wife to be the sole executor of this my last will and testment These beinge witnesses Robert Moorhouse Thomas Carr William Lawson and John Lupton Latin text BROWNE JOHN BROWNE 1591/2 Borthwick vol 25 fol 1127 mf 937 In the name of god Amen the xx th day of June in the xxxiij yeare of the reigne of our sovgne Ladie Elizabeth by the grace of god quene of Englande France and Ireland defender of the faithe etc. 1591 John Browne of lanckcliffe of the pish of giglesweke and countye of yorke Sicke in bodie but of pfecte remembrance praysed be god abut the laste day of februarie last paste before the date hereof did make and sett downe this his laste will and testament nuncupative in manner and forme folwinge First he did commend his sowle into the mercifull handes of Jesus Christe by and throughe whose onely deathe and passion he did fully beleve to be an inheritor of the kingdome of god Also he did apointe his bodie to be buried in the churche yeard of giglesweeke And that his mortuarie and all other church dues should be paide Also he did by the same his will geve grant devise and bequeathe unto Willm Browne his eldest sonne his whole estate and righte of in and to his whole messuage and tenemente with apptennces in Lankliffe and the benifytte of all and everie bargan thereof made or framed and all somes of money by him alredie paid for or in respecte of the same Also he did apointe and yt was his will that the saide Willm Browne his sonne shoulde bringe uppe James his sonne and Alice his daughter till they and eyther of them should come to Lawfull age or mariaige or other wyse pferred And also that he should take into his handes all the goodes which he the said John then hade And for asuringe as the same his goodes were unto of a smalle value his will was and he did apointe the same William to sett forwarde twentie nobles to the use of the said Alice his daughter to be aplied (?) to her moste profytte And the same to be unto her in full satisfacon of her wholle childes pte and filiall porcon of his goodes Also he did apointe and yt was his will that the saide William his sonne should pay unto his brother James twentye nobles within sixe monethes nexte after that he shall accomplishe the age of Twentie and one yeares in full satisfacon of his wholl childes pte and porcon of his goodes Also to Thomas browne his sonne Twentie nobles at the end of his prentishipp


as his full porcon The residewe of his goodes not bequeathed and all other his goodes and chattells for the considracon aforesaide he did geve and bequeath unto the said William browne his sonne And did apointe and ordayne the said Willm browne his sonne his wholle executor And did require us the psonnes hereunder wrytten to cause this his will to be putt in wryttinge and to wytnes the same as his lawfull acte and laste will Thomas newhowse James Coakson with others Latin text WILLIAM BROWNE 1621 Borthwick vol 37 fol 31 mf 953 In the name of God Amen the thirtenth day of October in the yeare of our Lord god one thowsand six hundreth twentie and one I Willm Browne of Langcliffe in the countie of york yeoman sicke in bodie, but of pfect remembrance the Lord be praised therefore, doe make and ordaine this my last will and testament in manner and followinge (sic) Firste I comend my soule into the mercifull handes of Almightie god trustinge through the merittes and passion of my saviour Christ to be made ptaker of eternall life in heaven and my bodie to earthly buriall at the discrecon of my wife and freinds And as concerninge my moveable goodes my will is that my debtes be paid out of the whole, and the remainder to be devided into three partes, Whereof Jennett my wife to have one third parte accordinge to lawe and custome of the countie and one of the other tow(sic) partes I give to my sonne Adam so manie sheepe as will make those he hath alreadie to be tenne in number and I will that he shall have them kept in winter tyme yearely upon my tenemt at Langcliffe for eight yeares now next cominge, And for the residewe of my said moveable goodes my will is they shalbe equallie distributed amongst my younger Children unpferred Itm I give demise and bequeath unto my said sonne Adam Browne and his assignes one full third (in three partes to be devided) of all my messuages tenements landes meadowes pastures feedings comons comon of pasture and turbarie wth thapptennces in Langcliffe aforesaid now in the tenure and possession of me and my assignes and holden by lease or leases To have and to hould all that the said third pte of the said messuage tenement and pmisses with thaptennces to him the said Adam his executors administrators and assignes for and duringe all that residewe and remainder of five hundreth yeares which is yet to come and unspent of the lease or leases wherebie I did hold the same provided alwaies and yett nevertheless upon Condicon that he the said Adam his executors and assignes shall notwithstanding this my devise and gifte unto him pmitt and suffer the said Jennett my wife and her assignes to have hold enioy and take the profittes of all that the said third pte to her owne use and for and towards the better bringinge upp of my Children unpferred for and duringe the space and tearme of eight yeares next cominge after my decease. And alsoe my will is that she the said Jennett and her assignes shall likewise have hold enioye and take the profittes of the other tow partes of my said messuage tenement and pmisses with thapptennces for and duringe the tearme of thirtene yeares next after my decease for her owne use and for the better bringinge upp of my said Children unpferred and after the end and expiracon of the thirtene yeares then I give the one moyetie of the said tow partes to the said Jennet my wife and her assignes for and duringe all the residewe of the said tearme of five hundreth yeares which shall then be to come and unspent of my said lease or leases and the other moyetie of the same tow partes and all my estate interest and tearme of yeares therein I doe likewise give devise and bequeath to the said Jennett my wife and her assignes to the ende she shall sell the same and devide the money equallie amongst my said younger Children And yet nevertheless my desire is and my will alsoe that she shall leave her parte of my said lands and tenements after her decease to some of my Children which I have by her. Itm I give to Willm Lupton and Christofer Lupton and to Jaine Baildon my grandchildren everie of them a gimmer hogg Itm I will and desire my said wife to pay to my sonne Thomas five poundes in pte of his porcon within one yeare next after his yeares of apprenticeshippe shalbe enden And doe name and ordaine the said Jennett my wife to be my sole executrix of this my last will and testamt These being witnesses Thomas Sowden John Cookeson..... Iveson(?) and willm Lawsonn Latin text CARR JAMES CARR of Giggleswick 1518 Admon. Borthwick Craven DAB fol 83


d[omin]us Jacobus Carre de Gyggilswyk nup[er] decessit ..... ...... adm[ini]strandem bonor[um] .... defunct dpa.. no[m]i[n]at intest... .... deb Sir James Carr of Giggleswick late deceased

administration of goods named intestate debts

THOMAS CARR of Stackhouse Copy of Will of 1549 (not original) North Yorks County Archives ZXF 2/2/1 Hand copy made by unknown person in difficult handwriting Surtees Soc. 79, V Testamenta Eboracensia page 219 gives an extract ‘taken from a copy of original lent by Mr Wm Carr of Gomersal’ In Dei Nomine Amen The 20th day of July in the year of our Lord God 1549 I Thomas Car of Staykus in ye pysh of Gygleswick holl of mynd memory lowyd (?praised) be god mak this my last wyll and testament in manner and forme following Fyrst I beqwheit my soul to almighty God and to all the glorious company in heaven and my body to be beryd in ye church of Gygleswik Itm I beqwheit to ye hey alter for forgotyne tithes (?) viij d Itm for a mortuary yt (that?) at ryght wyll Itm to the pore mans box xii d Itm to every god chyld yt I have viij d Itm to Wyllm Car my godson a .....yt is father kepys Itm I wyll every prest beyn at my bereall and praying for my soulle and all crystyne soulls shall have iiij d a peysh (apiece) and theyr denar at Saylbank Clyffs (?) or in St Thomas chamer with ij or iij honest men with them yff they pleysh Itm to every scoler a peny and to every pore body of this Pysh a halfpenny loyff (loaf) Itm every brother chyld yt I have a lame (lamb) Itm Ranold Car my unkyll son a nold jakyt Itm to Margt ....... iiii d Itm to ye Wyff of Jhon (sic) Taylzor of Helder iiii d Itm to Rycd Browne and is Wyff a pekyl of maulte and xii d Itm to Rogr Staykhus yt is my godson a boshyll of maulte Itm to ye Wyff of John Swaynson iiii d Itm to Ricd Bell and is howshold iij sh and iiii d Itm to Jamys Swaynson iiii d and bowskyne dowbleys Itm to Thomas Cleteroy iiii d Itm to Rogr Brayshaw iiii d Itm to Hewe Care and is Wyff iiij d Itm to Janyt Tatane iiij d Itm to Anne Care iiij d Itm to hold Jacson Wyff of Settyll iiij d and to Jhon Jackson and is chyldren viii d and a yearde of whytt cloyt Itm to leaff Loysons iiij d Itm to Robert Armystead a yoe Itm to Jhon Tylener ij d Itm to Thomas Procter Wyff iiij d Itm to Robert Procter of Kiydenhead x sh and iiij d yt I lent him Itm to Ricd Lenyn and is wyff iiij d Itm to Georg Paley iiij d Item I wyll yt Chr Thornton and Adam my son shall have my brothers Chyldren and ye farmold at Langsthawe (Langshaw at Clapham) to ye terme of x yers be hended and they to leve yt according to my brothers wyll Itm to Agnes Armystead xx d Itm to Janyt Kyng xii d Itm I gyve and beqwheit to Adam Car my son all ye lands lying in hold Wenyngton Lawkland and within ye tonshepe of Gyglesweke a house in Settyl with ye appurtenances and other certain land within Settyl Felds Itm I give to my son Adam ye grayn House with ye lycence of ye Lord and other land in Settyl feld yt is ocupyd with ye sayd howse at this tyme And where I ye sayd Thomas by my ded sufficient in ye law beryng date ye xiii day of May anno tertio (?) Edwardi sexti (1549) have gyven and granted to my son Adam and is herys certain lands and ten .... as in ye same ded more pticulerly and planelie apperith I will yt my sayd gyft of ye sayd lands shall be good and effectual accordynge to ye tenor of the sayd dede by me gyven to my sayd son Adam And also I wyll yt where ye sayd ..... nowe in ye tenure of Georg Swaynson was purchased of on Jhon Swaynson by ye name of ye viii the pte of Knyght Stanforde above the towne for bycause there be diverse purchases of the same Knyht Stanford and so as occupied jointlye ... so be hereafter any pticion be made in and amongst ye sayd purchasers so yt ye sayd ten’t now in ye tenure of ye sayd Georg doo lyght in any other mans pte and any other lands ten’ts with ye appurtenances do lyght or be allotted to me and me and my heires for my pte Then I give and beqwheyt such lands and ten’ts to me and my heires allotted to my sayd son Adam and is heires for ever Item I give to Jamys Car a howse at Wold in Sawlton (Sutton?) with all ye appurtenances Thomas Browne howse Thomas Twysleton howse of Settyll and Staykus addyng (adjoining) whyce (which) is maystr xpor(Christopher) Chews I give them to Jamys myson (sic) or ye Gold yt shall be payd for them Itm I give to Jamys my son ye ten’t lying in Staykus with ye licence of ye Lord and when so ever he shall enter heyr to have ye crocke (?) heyr and lehyffe (?) ye .... theyr and I will ye yt mazer and iiij silver spons remayn heyr styll and Adam not to mellut (?) thyme and if Jamys will likyff a nark and a almerye then he shall have all other husbandry stoyffe yt is here with arks and almerye The resydue of my goods my detts payd and all other charges borne I give and beqwhyt to Kateryn my wyff and Adam my sone whom I make my holl executors Theys men beryn wytness Lourens Dowykyn of Twghyll Jhon Swaynson


xp ofr (Christopher) Tornton Roger Brayshawe Rogr Armystead Jhon Paley Jamys Armystead of Huntwhait Thomas Staykus and other men Jamys Staykus Notes appended mazer Whitaker History Craven note to p 435 ij d is 2d

viiij d is 8d

there have lived at Stackhouse Tho Carr 1490 supposed time of birth Jas Carr 1550 Tho Carr 1580 Jas Carr 1610 Jacob 1iAngliu 8o Iertie Rich Carr 1658 Tho Carr 1668 Will Carr 1678 died about 1762 Thos Carr 1712 born Wm Carr 1745 present Stackhouse family Thos Carr 1775 Rd Carr 1777 Ellen C 1779 Wm C 1781 ? C 1785 . ADAM CARRE of Grainhouse 1586 Borthwick Prob. reg. 23 fol. 380 In the name of god Amen the fourth daye of Februarie in the yeare of our Lord god one thousand five hundreth foure score and fyve in the 23rd yeare of the reigne of our sovraigne Ladie Elizabeth by the grace of god Quene of england France and Ireland defender of the faith etc. I Addame Carre of Grainehouse in Gigleswicke in the countie of yorke sick in bodie but of good and perfect remembrance praysed be god do make this my last will and testamente in manner and forme following First I bequeathe my soule to Jesus Christ my maker and redeemer and onlie saviour. And my bodie to be buried in the churche yard at Giggleswick. Item. I bequeathe for my mortuarie and church dues all that ryght will. Item. my will is that my wyfe shall the lease (?) my house duringe her widdowhood and to give her widdow righte of my tenement at graynehouse and the occupation of the third of her rights of my landes at graynhouse and in Giggleswicke. Item. I give unto Willm Carre my sonne and to his heirs and assynes for ever all my title and ryghte of the tenement at nether Hunthwaite which I take of Adame Armitstead by lycence of the lord he the said Willm. performed ….. covenants and things as of my ….. and ryght performed And I give also to the said Willm. Carre my sonne the title and tenante right of…. at….nether- Huntwait…six pence rent by lycence of the Lorde. Item. I give….Richard Carre my sonne the title and tenante righte of my tenement at Graynehouse of twelve shillings rente by lycence of the Lord to have and to hold to hym and his heirs and assygns for ever my wyfe widdowe righte thereupon onlie excepted [ and whereas I have a bargaine of…….. of certain ground called grene field with standage upon redemption at the promised daye of maye next after the date hereof I give the same bargaine wholly unto Addame Carre my sonne toward his mayntenance at the schole whether yt be the ground or the money for yt] And the same to be at the endorsement (judgement?) of Thomas Roger and Willm Carre my sonnes. And by them to be paid unto hym the said Addam as his need shalbe. Item. Yt is my wyll that Willm. and Richard my sonnes and Margaret my daughter shall contynue with my wyfe at the Graynhouse duringe the space of thre years next after the date hereof. And they to have meat drinke clothinge and lodginge during the same tyme And to occupie all my grounds………. at Settle Giggleswicke field Hunthwaite and …..garth as at the grainehouse during the said thre years And whatsoever remain they shall keep or gett thereupon in that tyme over and……..their maintenance my will is that my wyfe and Willm. my sonne shall have the same [ and that they shall bestowe of Addam Carre my sonne suche partes of yt as they shall thinke needful] And my will is that yf Willm. my sonne do marie his wyfe and children shalbe kepte with meate drinke and clothes during the said thre yeares endes. And at the thre yeares ende my will is that the said Willm. shall give his share at Huntwyate. Item. My will is that all my husbandrie geare shall contynue


together this thre yeares to occupie the grounds with all and at the said thre years endes the same to be equallie devided amonge my wyfe and Willm. and Richard my sonnes at the discretion of Thomas and Roger my sonnes and Robert Carre of Lanclyfe and yf my wyfe marrie or dye before the thre yeares endes then their portion of the husbandrie geare to remaine unto Willm. and Richard my sonnes equallie betwene them And whereas I have bore at great charges of Richard my sonne ……… in promisinge to hym the ……….garth and certaine grounde in Giggleswicke fields whereof I have lett hym in tenante at my charges my will is that he shall in consideration thereof pay unto Margaret my daughter before the daye of his marriage thre poundes sixe shillings and eyghte pence Item. I give unto the said Richard my sonne one great Arke………. called the meale arke to enter unto the same at the deathe of my wyfe or end of her widdowhood. And my will is he shall have no other portion of my goodes or chattalls And where also I have bore at great charges unto Roberte and James Carre my sonnes in keeping them at schole And I have bequested more of them than any of the rest of my children is licke to have, my will is and I charge them they or eyther of them shall not claime any portions of my goodes but hold them contented Item. I give to everie one of the children of Thomas and Roger my sonnes two shillings six pence Item. My will is that all my lawfull bargains shalbe performed And for Richard Somerscale my will is that my executoures shall perform his……… bargains during thre yeares nexte And also the said thre yeares endes Thomas my sonne to paye and discharge two parts And my wyfe the other third parte unto the said Richard Somskales his wyfe duringe their lyves And the longer lyve of them ……to their bargaine And my will is that my detts be paid of my whole goods and ……… that remains my legacies and…….. severall expenses paid I give the same wholie unto my wyfe and Willm. my sonne and Richard my sonne And I ordayne appoynt the said Anne my wyfe and my sole executrix of this my last will and testament This witnesses Thomas Carre and Roger Carre my sonnes Robert Carre of Lancklyfe and Robert Crake with others . Latin text Robert Crake married Jana Preston 1574/5 Anna f Robert bp 1575/6 Bridgeta f Robert bp 1577 Thomas f Robert 1583 buried 1585 Jana buried 1597 ROGER CARRE of Giggleswicke (and Grainhouse) 1586 Borthwick vol 23 fol 494 Probate Reg. and ZXF 2/2/2 (original) In the name of god Amen the xxvj day of Januaire a thousand fyve hundrethe eyghtie sixe And in the xxix th year of the reigne of our sovraigne Ladie Quene Elizabeth etc I Roger Carre of Giggleswicke within the countie of yorke yoman sicke in bodie but of good and perfect remembrance prayse be almyghtie god do make this my last will and testament in writinge in manner and forme followinge that is to say First I recommend my sole unto the mercyfull hands of Jesus Christ my onlie saviour and redeemer by the merittes of whose precious death and passion I hope for salvation and .....of everlasting joyes and felicities Besechinge him of his infinite goodness to have mercy upon me and to pardone and forgive me all my syns and offences which I have comitted against his divine maieste And I will my bodie to be buried in the church yard of Gigleswicke aforesaid And I will that my debts which I owe by lawe be trulie contented and paid And I bequeathe for my mortuarie and other churche dues all that Right will And I will that my wyfe shall have her Widdowe ryght of my goodes And my will is that my natural mother Anne Carre shall have her rent paid her for the tenement where I nowe dwell duringe her lyfe naturall yearlie as she hath heartofore had the same And I give grannt bequeathe and devyse all that my messuage farme or tenement with their appurtenances and everie parte and parcell thereof situate lyinge and beinge within the towne and territories of Gigleswicke aforesaid and also wher and………in my occupation or my assigne or assignes of the ancient annuall or yearlie rent of twentie shillings be yt more or less unto Thomas Carre my onlie sonne to have and to hold the same unto the said Thomas my sonne And to the heirs of his bodie lawfullie begotten and to be begotten for ever In consideracon whereof and wherefore my will is that the said Thomas Carre my sonne shall contente and paye or cause to be contented and paid unto the rest of my children the some of twentie five pounds of lawful English money equallie amongst them or otherwyse shall put in good and lawfull assurances to Thomas Hyne of Gigleswicke aforesaid Thomas Carre and William Carre my brothers or the survivor or survivors of them for the said payment of the said some of twentie five pounds before he the said Thomas my sonne shall enter unto the said tenement or any part or parcel thereof And then at the feast day of purification (?) of Marie the blessed virgine next after he the said Thomas my sonne hath paid the said some of five and twentie pounds or put in good assurance for the payment of the same as above said my will is that he the said Thomas my sonne shall enter unto the same messuage farme or


tenement with thappurtenances and evere part and parcel thereof and not before the widdow Ryght of the said Anne my mother allways excepted and to her………..duringe her naturall lyfe. And further my will is that the………….some so by hym the said Thomas my sonne paid or bound to be paid shalbe paid to everie one of my said children their equall portions thereof as they and everie of them shall accomplishe the full age of 21 years accordinge the condition of one obligation wherein the said Thomas Hyne Thomas Carre and William my brethren joyntlie and severallie bounde.in unto my executors admynistrators and assigns as by the same obligation bearing date the sixtenthe day of Januaire last past before the date hearof more at large appeareth And yf yt fortune the said Thomas my sonne to depte this lyfe without yssue of his bodie lawfully begotten then my will is And I give grannte bequeathe and devyse thabovesaid tenement with thappurtenances unto Katherine Carre my second daughter to have and to hold the same to the said Katherine my daughter And to the heirs of her bodie lawfully begotten for ever In consyderation whereof and wherefore my will is that she the said Katherine shall content and paye unto the rest of my said children within foure years next after she shall accomplish the full age of 21 yeares the some of fortie pounds of lawfull English monie equally to be devided amongst them or otherwyse shall put in good assurance unto the said Thomas Hyne Thomas and William Carre my brethren or the survivor or survivors of them three for the said payment of the same in manner and forme aforesaid And also shall enter unto the same in forme aforesaid and not before And yf the said Katherine dye without yssue of her bodie lawfully begotten then my will is And I give grannte bequeathe and devyse the foresaid tenement with thappurtenances to Anne Carre my eldest daughter to have and to hold the same to her the said Anne and to the heirs of her bodie lawfullie begotten and to be begotten for ever She the said Anne payinge the said some of fortie pounds to Katherine her syster should have done and in manner and forme aforesaid And also to enter unto the same tenement (?) in forme aforesaid and not otherwyse And for sacke of Anne her lawfull yssue then the said tenement with appurtenances to remaine and come to her next(?) syster and to the heirs of her bodie lawfullie begotten and to be begotten for ever And so forth successively to the rest of my children payinge the said some of fortie pounds in forme aforesaid And also to enter unto the same tenement in forme aforesaid and not before The rest of all my goods unbequeathed my debts paid of the whole and final expenses discharged I give and bequeathe the same unto my daughters equallie to be devided amongst them And I ordayne and make the said Elizabeth my wyfe my sole executrix of this my last will and testament And I appoynt Hughe Armytstead my uncle and the said Thomas Carre my brother supvis....of this my will trusting that they will see the same performed accordinge to my true meaning And thus havinge my whole faythe and full trust in Jesus Christ I make an end this beinge witnessed Richard Brayshaye Thomas Preston Richard Radclyf [Willm Carre Thomas Hyne] and Lyonel (?) Jenynge with others Latin text WILLIAM CARR of Grainhouse 1587 Borthwick vol. 23 fol. 837 In the name of god Amen the fyfth day of marche a thousand fyve hundrethe eyghtie seven I William Carre of the Graynhouse and of the parish of Giggleswicke beinge sicke in bodie but of perfect mynd do make this my last will and testament in manner and form following. First I commend my soule into the handes of almyghtie god my heavenlie father………..by his………..in Jesus Christ………Item my bodie to be buried at the……….of my………..Item I give…….my……..what is ryete(?) and ………Item I give to my mother Anne Carr thre partes of my landes at huthewhaite………for……….widdowhood Item I give to my wyfe Elizabeth……..five partes of my lands at hunthwaite aforesaid and the nether field…………the………of my………………presente (?) And the ryt after my……….duringe the………of my child yf yt please god yt lyve and………………..of my…….my will is that my said child shall have all my landes at Hunthwaite aforesaid and the……..to my said wyfe her……..accordinge And also…………to my mother as is aforesaid. And yf my child fortune to dye within her mynoritie then my will is that my wyfe shall have two partes of my land at Hunthwaite duringe her………widdowhood. And also I give the rest of my said lands and nether field to my brother Thomas Carre and Richard Carre equallie betwene them…….as is aforesaid to my mother…………and to my wyfe her third if my child lyve. And if it dye duringe her ………widdowhood. Also (?) if my child fortune to dye………my brother Richard Carr to come to my lands as is aforesaid. Then my will is my said brother Richard Carre shall paye to my said wyfe five (?) pounds and to my mother twentie shillings in consideration of the nether-field. Also I give the……….husbande geare which my father Adam Carre gave to me to my wyfe and my child. Item my will is that my mother shall……..to those of my wyfe at Hunthwaite the next yeare a……….they…fourtene bushels of ottes and halfe a quarter of barley. Also if my wyfe dye before my child accomplish his full majority (?) then my will is that


my said mother shall have the …………..my said child lands and goods. The rest of my goods my detts and…………paid I give to my wyfe Elizabeth and my child equallie to be devided betwene them. And of this my will I make my said wyfe Elizabethe sole executrix. This beinge witnessed Roger Carre Richard Lynfrey (?) Thomas Carre with others. Latin text ELIZABETH CARRE 1587 Borthwick vol 23 fol 492 In the name of god Amen the twentyth (?) day of Februaire one thousand five hundred and eighty six And in the xxix th year of the reigne of our sovarigne Ladie Elizabeth I Elizabeth Carre of Langclyfe within the county of Yorke spinster daughter of James Carre laite of Stackehouse being sick in bodie but of good and perf. Remembrance prayse be almygte god do make this my last will and testament in writinge in manner and forme followinge. That is to say First I recommend my Soul unto the masterful hande of Jesus Christ my onlie saviour and redeemer by the merit of whose precious death and passion I hope for salvation and life everlasting joyous and beseeching hym of his infinite goodness to have mercy upon me. And to pardon and forgive me all my syns and offences which I have committed againste his divine majesty. And I will my bodie to be buried in the churche yard of Gigleswicke. And I give to my mortuarie and church duties all that righte will. And I give grannte and bequeath to James Stackhous of Stackhouse his children wch he had wth my syster Anne to every one of them tene shillinge. And also I give grannt and bequethe to Willm Iveson his children wch he now hath by Margaret my syster to everye one of them tene shillings. And moreover I give grannte and bequeathe to everie one of my brother Thomas Carre his children the licke sum of tenne shillings. And further my will is that my executors hereafter named shall paye or cause to be paide the several sums abovesaid to everie one of the abovesaid children whome I am Aunt unto so soon as they shall accomplish the full age of twente and one yeares. Also I give grannt and bequeathe to Oliver Stackhouse somnne of Hughe Stackhouse of Lawckland the some of five (?) shillings to be paid to hym the said Oliver by my executors so soon as he shall accomplish the full age of twente and one years in manner and forme aforesaid. All the rest of my goods unbequeathed my dette beinge paid of the whole and funerall expenses discharged I give the same unto Willm Iveson my brother in law. And Roberte Carre my naturall brother equallie to be divided betwene them. And I ordayne and make the said Willm. Iveson my brother in Lawe And the said Roberte Carre my naturall brother my executor of this my last will and testament. And I appoynt John Armytstead and Anthonne Armytstead of the abovesaid Langclyfe supervisor of the same trusting that they will see the same performed according to my trust in Jesus Christ I make an end Thes beinge witnesses Richard Radclyfe of gigleswick John Armytstead Anthonie Armytstead Willm. Iveson and Jennings RICHARD CARR of Grainhouse 1593 Borthwick 25 1523 In the name of God amen the nynth day of Julia 1593 I Rychard Carre of Graynhous sick in bodye but in perfect remembrance prayse be god do make this my last will and testament in manner and forme following First I bequeath my sole to Jesus Christ my onlie Lord and saviour and my bodie to be buried in the church yarde of Gygleswyck and for my mortuarie and all other debts to be payd It is my will that my wife shall have the wombe Thomas Carr my brother And I appoint my brother Thomas Roger of Closehouse

of my

Thomas or his heirs

of my late

my younge child or children in her

Margaret my wife


Huggon House Thomas Carr of giggleswick

Richard Crake

R.Postlethwaite version my bodie to be buried in the church yearde of Gygleswyke. The tenants right of my tenement at Grynhoue or elsewhere unto Adam my sonn, but my wife is to have the occupation of my tenement during her widdowhood, and the governance of my children and their portions till my eldest sonne of lawful age. My debts to be paid of my whole goods: then my wife is to have her widdows part and the rest to my younge childe or children in her wombe yf God give them life and for lacke of them to my other son Adam. As touchinge such righte as I may have in the reversion of any lands or grounds which did belong to my brother William at Hinthhoyhe ? (Hunthwaite?) I give the same to Adam my son and his issue. Extra line: Lands at Sandisayke which did belong to my brother William to my sonn Adam. My mother shall have a third parte of the Graynhowe grasse garth and groundes during her widdowhood, and the bond made between my mother and me shall stand good so long as my mother and my wife can agree thereunto when they cannot agree then the husbandrie geare to be divided between them. If my children die withoute issue then the Grynhoue to my brother Thomas Carre and his heirs, reservinge half to my wife during her widdowhood; and in those circumstances Thomas or his heirs are to pay unto my sister Margaret 20 marks. The groundes in the Tutenfold I give to Thomas Carre of Gygleswycke my brothers sonne and he is to pay to my wife 5 marks within one year. My wife sole executrix. My brother Thomas Carre, Roger Carre of Close house; Xpofer Banke of Huggonhous and Thomas Carre of Gygleswycke to be supervisors. Witnesses Thomas Carre, Roger Carre, Xpofer Banke, Thomas Carre, John Foster, Robte Crake The wife is not named in the following probate details. THOMAS CARR of Langcliffe 1596 Borthwick vol 26 fol 513 In the name of God Amen the 20th(?) day of December 1596 I Thomas Carr of Langcliffe sick in body but of perfect remembrance (praised be god) do make this my last will and testament in manner and form following. First I bequeath and commend my soul to Jesus Christ my only and alone saviour and my body to be buried in the churchyard of the parish church of Giggleswick. And for my mortuary and all other church of and accustomed. Also my will is that my debts be paid of my whole goods and then my purse (?) to have her widow and my children their portions. I give and bequeath my messuage, my houses with the appurtenances thereto belonging whereof I am now possessed unto William my eldest son and to the issue of his body lawfully to be begotten. But and if it fortunes my said son to die without issue then I give and bequeath one said tenement and houses with the appurtenances unto my younger son Georg Carr and to the issue of his body lawfully to be begotten and for want of such issue of the said George then after his death I will that the same remain unto Margaret my daughter and to her issue lawfully to be begotten and for want of such issue of the said Margaret I give the same unto Leonard (?) Carr son of my brother William Carr to whom I am godfather after the death of the said Margaret and to the issue of his body lawfully to be begotten. And I will that Agnes my wife shall have the use and occupation of my said tenement and houses with appurtenances and also of all my goods until my eldest son William do come to the age of one and twenty years. And then I will that he will enter unto and have occupy possess and enjoy (?) thenceforth the said tenement and houses he the said William paying unto my son George the sum of six pounds and to my daughter Margaret other equal (?) of current and lawful money of England at or before his said entry to the same. But and if default be made herein by the said William for as he do not pay or cause to be paid the beforesaid several (?) sums unto my said son George and Margaret my said daughter when he the said William shall deem to 21 years (as is aforesaid) and before he do enter unto the occupation of half of the aforesaid tenement and houses then I will that my said son George and Margaret my said daughter shall enter unto have occupy and enjoy(?) the said half tenement and houses to their most perfect advantage for the space of one whole year then next following and so from year to year until the said William shall pay.


And my will is also And I give unto Agnes my said wife the half of my tenement and houses aforesaid with the appurtenances to have and to hold occupy and enjoy the same to her most perfect advantage for and during her widowhood. Also I give unto my son William Carr the best pair of bedstocks that I have in my house. And I will my wife shall have the use of the same for and during her widowhood. And I give also unto my said daughter Margaret one caldron and one Ark the best caldron and ark at the house. The rest of my goods so bequeathed my debts discharged and funeral expenses paid I give unto George my son and Margaret my daughter equally to be divided between them. And I ordain and appoint my said wife my sole executor. And I appoint also Henry Thompson and Geoffrey Atkinson desire me them to be witnesses hereof Henry Thompson Geoffrey Atkinson aforesaid and John Paley Latin ROGER CARR of Closehouse 1597 Borthwick v27, f117 In the name of God amen the ix th daie of Julie in the xxxix th yeare of the raigne of our most gracious sovraigne ladie Elizabeth by the grace of god also of England France and Ireland Queene defender of the faith 1597 I Roger Carr of Closehouse in the parishe of Giggleswicke and countie of yorke sicke in bodie but of perfecte remembrance praised be god do make thys my laste will and testament in manner and forme followinge First I commend my soule to Jesus Christ my only lord and alone saviour And my bodie to bee buried in the churchyarde of the parish church in Gigleswicke And for my mortuarie and other church dues whatsoever is of right due and………… I will that the same bee trulie paied Item I give to the poore in Gigleswick parish Thre shillings foure pence to bee distributed by my executors Item I do give to Roger Carre sonne of Allan Carr my sonne one greate Arke at the fier and in the house one gimbel and one hacke and the same to bee hirelooms at the house Item I give to Allan Carr my sonne all the hay growinge uppon the halfe of my tenemente which I own And also the one halfe of my corne growinge uppon the said tenemente and the other halfe of my corn I give to John Lawson (?) Iveson (?) to whom I am grandfather and I will that my said corne be equallie devided uppon the field by two………..Also I give to my sonne Allan all my husbandrie geare one saltinge cupp (?) and one high table in the fire house one (joined) bed stockes and one pair of bedstockes in the fire house and also shaires and tools belonginge to my house Item I give to John Taylor sonne of Thomas Tailor one yoake of oxen which are ………to bee to his onlie use for ever yf god do call mee at this time And I will that he paie for the ……..grassinge of the same oxen Item I give to Jane Proctor one black cowe (?coat) and one sheaf (?) of paper a yarde (?) to lye her clothes in Item I give to Allan Parker my new……. Item I give to Timothye one gimmer lamb Item I give to everie one of those children to whom I am grandfather a lamb and where my lambes will not……Item I give to Thomas Tailor my swine Item I give to my daughter Jenet (?) the best younge………of Beasts (?) (that ) I have Item I give to the wyfe of Robert Falthrop one old stocke of………….Item I give to my sonne Allans wyfe one other younge swarme of bees Item I give to my sonne Allan my saddle and……….Also………..and some……..goods of my children shalbe contented with these legacies aforesaid to them and theire husbands in consideration (?) and of anie…….they to have no benefitt of my will. All the rest of my goods moveable and imoveable my debts and funeral expences paied I give to Thomas Taylor Robert Falthrop and Robert Thornton to be equallie devided amongst them whome I make jointlie mye executors of this my last will and testament These witnesses Brian Cookson and Willm Newhowse Esq. Latin text ANNE CARR of Grainhouse (nee Armitstead) 1607 Borthwick vol. 30 fol. 549


In the name of god Amen the xix te day of December in the yeare of our Lord god 1607 I Anne Carr of Grainhouse in the County of york widdow late wife of Adam Carr deceased do make this my last will and testament in manner and forme following. First I commend my soule to almightie god and my bodie to christian buryall. Item my will is that my debts shall be paid out of my whole goodes. Item I give unto Adam Carr whom I am grandmother unto one great meale Arke one almory, two meat boardes, one dishboard one shelfe one chist two pair of bedstocks and also half a quarter of oates and all my husbandry geare And besides Item I give to Christopher Carr ten shillinge Item I give to my mayd Elizabethe Butterfeild iiij (?pence) pair of crockes (?), one red coat, two gray coates and the wintering of one……. Item I give to the five children of Elizabeth Carr every one ij (?pence) Item I give to my daughter Margrett two pair of bedstocks Item I give to the wife of Thomas Carr of Giggleswicke a …… of………. And for the rest of all my goodes I give them to Isabell and Anne Armitstead daughters of Roger Armitstead And I make and assign the said Roger Armitstead to be my sole executor witnesses whereof Barnard Browne John Foster Latin text HUGH CARR of Winskill bachelor 1609 Borthwick vol. 31 fol. 663 mf 946 In the name of God Amen the 24th day of March in the year of our Lord God 1609 I Hewghe Carr of Windskall within the parish of Giggleswick and county of York Bachelor sick in body but of perfect remembrance praised be god for the same do make this my last will and testament in manner and form following. First I commend my soul into the hands of Almighty god by whose majesty through the redemption of Jesus Christ my only saviour I believe to be saved and my body to be buried in the churchyard of Giggleswick. I will that my debts be paid of my whole goods and my funeral debts and expenses paid. Item first I give to my sister Katherine Jackson and to her children 40 shillings. Item I give to Thomas Fishe son of Jeffrey Fishe of Malham two and 40 shillings. Item I give to James Carr son of Thomas Carr Brasha 20 shillings. Item I give to William Carr brother to the said James Carr 13 s and 4d. Item I give to Roger Carr brother to the said William Carr 6s 8d. Item I give to my sister Elizabeth Tailor 10 shillings And to her daughter Margarett Tailor 10 shillings. And to Jane Bateman wife of William Bateman 10 shillings. Item I give to Agnes Cockell daughter of William Cockell 20 shillings. Item I give to Anne Armitstead daughter of Roger Armitstead of Rawthmell 12d. And the rest of my goods to be equally given and divided to and between Thomas Watkinson of Settle Thomas Tailor of Giggleswick and Jane Forster of Windskall wife of Henry Forster. I will and make Thomas Tailor my whole executor of this my last will and testament. Item I give to Richard Kydd and Elizabeth Kydd 10 shillings. Item my will and appoint that Thomas Tailor shall have the space of one whole year next after my decease to pay these legacies above set down. Witnesses Thomas Watkinson Henry Forster William Carr Latin text THOMAS CARR of Stackhouse 1611 Borthwick Admon. Craven DAB fol 58 [previous entry Septimo die mensis Decembris 1610 testi.......]

...... Johes Tophan Clericus decanus decanatus de Craven cert de probatione

Seventh day of the month of December 1610.... John Tophan cleric dean in the deanery of Craven established for proving testament ... Eisdem die et anno dictus Decanus cert se Com[m]ississe ad[ministrat]em bonorum que fuerunt Thome Carr nup[er] de Stackhouse Dioc Eborum defunct Elizabethe Carr eius relict prius iurat & Salvo & ex[ecu]t[ris] fuit Ju[ris] (?) ultra 40 L et dicta Elizabetha et al obligantur. Carr Comp ibii (sic) 1611


The same day and year of the said Dean established Commissioner for administrating the goods which had been those of Thomas of Stackhouse in the Diocese of York deceased, Elizabeth his widow formerly sworn witness and of good health and executrice was sworn above ÂŁ40 and the said Elizabeth et al to be bound. Carr Present (?) then 1611

ROBERT CARR of Stackhouse 1612 Borthwick vol. 32, fol. 594 In the name of god amen the seaven and twentieth day of Januarie in the yeare of our lord god one thousand six hundreth and twelve I Robert Carr of Stackhouse in the countie of yorke yeoman sicke in bodie but of good and perfect memorie god be praised therefore do make and ordaine this my last will and testament in manner and forme following First I comend and comit my soule into the mercifull hands of almightie god trusting through the merittes of Jesus christe to be made ptaker of life everlasting and for my bodie I will that the same be buried in the pish churchyard of Gigglesweeke at the discretion of my wife and freinds And whereas I have by my deed indented bearing date with this my present will given grannted assigned lettover.and confirmed unto Thomas Lawson and Richard Lawson of Langcliffe in the said countie yeomen and to theire heires and assignes for ever all my full and whole estate right title interest customarie estate clame of tennt right and demand whatsoever of and in that messuage and tennement with thappurtenances and all other lands tenements grounds commons and other things in Stackhouse as aforesaid which I did hold of our sovreigne Lord the kings majestie according to the custome of the mannor of Newbie whereof the said pmisses are pcell for and upon such considerations and for such intents as in the said deed are conteyned and expressed I do also by this my present last will and testament ratifie and confirme and approve the said deed and grannt thereby made and everie thing therein conteyned And for the money that shall grow due to myne executors and administrators or assigns upon saile of the premisses to be made by the said Thomas Lawson and Richard Lawson And likewise for all my other goods cattalls and creditts whatsoever my will is that my debts and funerall expenses being first deducted and paid out the rest be devided into three ptes whereof my will is that Jennett my wife shall have one pte to her owne sole use and out of the other two ptes my will is and I give demise and bequest unto Thomas Carr my eldest sonne tenne pounds And the residew I will shallbe equallie devided and distributed amongst all my children unpferred that is to say Thomas James Adam Beniamyne Agnes and Allice And if any one of my said children die in theire minorities then it is my will and I do herebie ordaine and demise that the portion and portions of them or any of them so dying shall remaine to the survivors of my said children before named and everie one of them to have an equall pte thereof And Moreover it is my will that Jennett my wife and her assignes shall and may have and enioy my said messuage and tennement with the appurtennces and take and receive all the issues and profitts thereof to her own use for and towards the better bringing upp of and pferment of my younger children unpferred untill such tyme as the said Thomas Lawsonn and Richard Lawson shall have made saile thereof And Lastlie I do herebie make and ordaine the said Jennett my wife to be the sole executrix of this my last will and testament Thos being witnesses (Thomas) James Carr John Stackhouse James Stackhouse and William Lawson Latin text ROGER CARR of Closehouse 1621 Borthwick vol. 36 fol. 634 In the name of god Amen the xix th daie of Julie in the (neententh?) year of the reigne of our Sovraigne lord James by the grace of god kinge of England France and Ireland defender of the fayth Anno Dni 1621 that I Roger Carr of Closhowse wthin the pish of Gyglesweeke and diocs of yeorke yeoman seek in the visitaconn (?) of allmightie god yeat now the ....god and pfect remembrance thanks be givene to this for the same do make this my last will and Testamt in manner and forme followinge, first I commend my Soule into the hands of allmightie god my maker and Creator and through the death and passion of his Sonne Christ Ihesue I do fullye trust to be saved and my bodye to be buryed in my pish Church of Gyglesweeke aforesayd when yt shall [please him to call me from there In primis I


give and bequeath unto Adam Carr my father the Some of twentie powndes of lawfull (English) monie whereof there is x li in the hands of Robt Coote of Giglesweeke and is due to be payed att the feast of St. Andrew the Apostle now next cominge and five pownds in the hands of my father in law Robt. Swaynsonne and is due to be payd att or uponne the Second daye of Februarie next Cominge and iiij li in the hands of John Foster of the feildyeat and is due to be payed att the feast of St. Andrew thApostle next Cominge after the makinge herof and my mind and will is that my father Alann Carr shall but take of Robt. Coote xxj s for use and interest of the sayd x li and but vj s viij d of John Foster for the use and interest of the (dewe?) Some of iiij li and the reste of the sayd interest unto Ann Carr my wife Itm I give unto my mann Robt. Payley my Cloak Itm I give and bequeath to eache childe that I am godfather unto the Some of iij s iiij d Itm I give to my brother in law Thomas Foster of Staynforth the Some of fortie shillings to be payd to him or his assignes wthin one yeare after my decease and lastlie all the rest of my goods movable and immovable whatsoever I give them to Ann Carr my wife wherof I do make her my whole executrix of this my last will and testamt she bringinge me honestly to the Church accordinge to my abilitie payinge and dischardginge all dues duties debts legacs wth funerall expences in such Sort and forme as the law requireth. Witnesses herof are theis Thomas Browne (others off the sheet) ALAN CARR of Closehouse 1626 Borthwick vol. 39 fol. 129 In the name of god Amen the foarth day of September Anno Dmi 1626 I Alan carr of Closehouse in the county of yorke yeoman sicke in body but of good and pfect memory (praised be God) do make this my last will and testament in manner and forme following. First I commend my soule into the mercifull hands of almighty god my master and redeemer trusting assuredly through the meritts of eternall blisse in heaven and I committ my body to the earth to be buried at the discretion of my friends. And for my goods I do dispose hereof as followeth, that is to say, I give to my sonne Lawrence Burton and Margarett his wife seaven powndes and my long cheste and the one of the doublers now in the same. Item I give to my sonnes Mr Richard Carr and Mr Robert Carr either of them twenty shillings. Item I give to Agnes Sownden servant to my sonne (in law) Willm Franckland Tenne shillings. Item I give to Anne Paler (?) my grandchilde twenty shillings. And the rest of all my goods viz. money, husbandry geare and householde stuffe I give to the said Willm Franckland my sonne in lawe desiring him out of the same to bring my body to decent buriall, as hee and my freinds in their discretion shall thinke fitting. And I nominate and appoint the said Willm to be sole executor of this my last will and testament these being witnesses Thomas Sowden Willm Lawson and Michael Lawson (NB wife Elizabeth died in 1622) ALICE CARR of Winskill spinster 1634 Borthwick vol. 42 fol. 352 mf 960 In the name of God Amen I Alice Carr of Winskall spinster sick of body but in good and perfect memory the Lord be praised for the same do make this my last will and testament in manner and form following. Imprimis I bequeath my soul to god by whose merits I hope to be saved and my body to the ground to be buried at the discretion of my well beloved friends. Item it is my will that my son James Carr have 40 shillings put forward till he come at age. Item I give to my brother Thomas Foster of Winskall my two best suits of clothes. Item I give to my sister Katherin Foster the rest of my clothes to dispose of as she thinks fitting. Item all the rest of my goods my debts paid my funeral expenses discharged I give to my foresaid brother Thomas Foster. And I make and ordain my said brother Thomas Foster executor of this my last will and testament Witness hereof Christopher Foster Latin text THOMAS CARR of Giggleswick 1638 In the name of God Amen the eleventh day of January 1638 of Thomas Carr of Gigelswick in the County of York sick in body but of and perfect memorey praise be God for the same Doe make this my last will and testament in


manner and forme following. First I give and bequeath my soul into the hands of Almighty God my heavenly maker and my body to be buried att the discretion of my executor and loving freinds. For my wordly goods my will is my debts be paid out of my whole . Also I give unto my sonne in Law Thomas Lawson my best cloak. Also I give unto his youngest sonne ten shillings. Also I give unto the other two children of Thomas Lawson Lawrence and An one little butt in Brackenber to enter unto the same at my decease provided always that if my grandchilde Thomas Carr when he shall accomplish the age of one and twenty yeares will give and pay unto them the said Lawrence and An to either of them ten shillings then my will is that he the said Thomas shall have the said butt. Also I give and bequeath unto my grandchildren William Carr son of Richard Carr and Jane Carr and Elizabeth Carr daughters of Roger Carr one p'cell of ground lying in far dalifax containing by estimation five roads (be it more or less) provided always and upon condition that if Thomas Carr sonn of Roger Carr when he shall accomplish the age of one and twenty years paie unto the said William Carr Jane Carr and Elizabeth Carr the somme of one and twenty pounds and ten shillings equally amongst them and for want of payment I give the said p'cell of ground to these my three grandchildren William Jane and Elizabeth. Also I give him towards this payment one other p'cell of ground lying on . Also I give him lying neare the on Gigelswickoutmoor. And if case the said William Jane or Elizabeth Carr or one of them die in their nonnage then my will is that shall be good and remaine to the survivor or survivors of them. Also my will is that my natural sonne Thomas Carr shall take the profits of that same p'cell of ground lying in far dalifax and shall put it to the use and behalf of William Carr son of Richard Carr towards his education and bringing upp untill such time as my grandchilde Thomas Carr hath accomplished the age of one and twenty yeares. Also I give unto Ricaed Carr my best sett of apparell. Also I give unto Christopher Brayshay a pair of clean britches, one pair of jerkins, one half As for the rest of my goods and leases not bequeathed I give unto my natural sonn Thomas Carr of Kirbie and I do make and appoint my natural son Thomas Carr (jur) to be sole executor of this last will and testament these being wittness. ???? Robert Thomas Lawsonn Thomas Carr I mke JAMES CARR OF STACKHOUSE 1654 died 10 Dec 1654 Borthwick reference folio 100, York Wills in London 1649-1660 PRO reference PROB 11/244 quire 100 In the name of God amen the fourth of December 1654 I James Carr of Stackhouse in the parish of Giggleswick county of York the unprofitable servant of God weak in body but strong in mind do willingly and with a firm hand which he of his fatherlie goodness gave unto me when he first fashioned me in my mother’s womb making me a ??? and a reasonable creature nothing doubting but that for his infinite ??? in the precious blood of his dearly beloved son Jesus Christ our only saviour and redeemer he will receive my soul unto his glory and place it in the company of the heavenly angels and blessed family and as concerning my body even with a good will and sure heart I give it over comending it to the earth whereof it came nothing doubting but according to the article of my faith at the great day of the general resurrection when we shall appear before the judgement seat of Christ I shall receave the same against the mighty power of god wherewith he is able to subdue all things to himself not a corruptible mortal weak and frail body as it is now, but as uncorruptible mortal strong and perfect body in all points likewise the glorious body of my Lord and saviour Jesus Christ. Imprimis first of all I give to my son Richard Carr this year rent Item to my son Robert Carr ten pounds Item to my son Francis Read ten pounds Item to my son John Tennant ten pounds Item to every child that I am grandfather to twenty shillings a piece Item to my grandchild George Read a bond of five pounds which is in the hands of Thomas Carr of Crenarig Item to my daughter Katherine a bedd coveringe Item to my grandchild Thomas Carr a long table which is in the bodystead of the house Item to my son Francis a bond of four pounds two shillings that is in the hands of Robert Barckley Item I give to my daughter Jane Carr twenty shillings Item I give to my grandchild John Carr thirty four shillings more towards buying apparel and sending him to London Item I give to my daughter Ellin one bedd of close and one chest standing in the parlour Item I do make my son Richard


Carr and my son Francis Read my executors of this my present will and testament to perform my legacies above mentioned and see my debts paid and funeral expenses performed And the remainder of my goods if there shall any remain to be equally divided betwixt them. In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand the fourth day of December 1654. James Carr his mark Witnesses James Stackhouse his mark Richard Berry Thomas Wilson his mark This will was proved at London before the judges for probate of wills and granting administrations the sixteenth day of August in the year of our Lord God one thousand six hundred fifty six by the oath of Francis Read one of the executors named in the last will and testament of the said deceased to whom administration was committed he being by commission first sworn truly to administer power being ??? to promise the like administration unto Richard Carr the other executor when he shall legally require the same. WILLIAM CARR yeoman 1661 Memorandum Borthwick vol 51 fol 485 Memorandum that William Carr of Langcliffe in the County of York yeoman being sick of the sickness whereof he died yet of perfect mind and memory, ........intention and purpose to make his last will and testament did about the middle of October in the year of our Lord 1661 say and declare these are the very like words in effect viz. I doe give to my daughter Mary one parcell of ground called Boone and to the issue of her body, And for want of further issue to redound to my two grand children Elizabeth and Agnes Carr, Provided notwithstanding that my said daughter Mary shall have liberty to sell the said premises, if at any time through want or necessity she be constrained so to doe. In the presence of Willm. Carr iun WILLIAM CARR of Langcliffe 1674 Borthwick vol 55 fol 277 (Te)stamentum Guliemi Carr ..............God Amen the eighteenth day of February in the yeare of the ...(sovre)igne Lord Charles the Second over England Scotland France...........the twenty Sixt And in the yeare of oure Lord God according .....(comp)utation of the Church of England one thousand Six hundred.............(th)ree I William Carr of Langclife in the county of Yorke merchant..............and weak of body but of good and perfect remembrance praysed bee god doe.....and ordain this my last will and testament in manner and forme following And...........of all I commend and commit my soule into the handes of allmighty God my maker and Jesus Christ his only sonn my redeemer By whose merrits bitter deathe and passion his glorious resurrection and assention I hope to have remission full and free prdon of all my Sinns and a glorious inheritance with the Saints for ever to dwell with Him the father and Holy Spirrit in life everlasting And as for my worldly Goods and temporall esstait I Give and bequeathe in manner following And first of All I Give and hereby confirme unto my younger sonn Thomas Carr his Executors administrators and assignes all those landes tennements and buildings onely mentioned and expressed in one Deed or Indenture of Lease by mee lately conveyed sealed and delivered to my sd sonn Thomas Carr for his better prferment in marriage upon confirmation of which conveyance I the sd William Carr am shortly to receive the some of one hundred pounds viz in or upon the first day of March next of all hereafter ensueing if pleas god I soe long live wch sd some when soon recd by mee or my Executors I hereby intend and appoynt the same to bee paid to Catherine Carr my daughtr within one yeare after her marriaige And I doe hereby appoynt my sd sonn Thomas Carr to pay out of his pte of my goods and Inventory to the sd Catherine beeside what I have heretofore given her the some of 20 pounds And now I hereby give and bequeathe unto Leonard Carr my eldest sonn my whole esstayt within the Towne and Township of Langclife now in my possession together with three partes of the milne called Langclife Milne The Turbary upon Cappanahill The new house and shop standing in Settle called Reeby(?) hous now in the possession of the said Leonard Carr my son with all and every of theire privilidges Hee the sd Leonard Carr his Executors or assignes paying unto Ann Carr my daughter the some of two hundred and fifty poundes in manner following that is to say one hundred poundes within eighteene monthes next after my deceas And fifty poundes yearly for three yeares after the marriaige of the sd Ann Carr my


daughter Item my will and mind is that my said sonn Leonard Carr shall pay out of his pte of my Goods and Inventory beside what I have heretofore given to the sd Ann the some of twenty pounds And if default shall bee maid by the said Leonard in payment of the sd somes to his sd sister Ann as above sd that it shall be lawful for the sd Ann to enter to all the landes in Langclife wch I have bought till the sd somes bee raised Item my will and mind is that my wife have out of my esstayt within Langclife beefore given to my sonn Leonard the some of twenty poundes yearly dureing her naturall life And the third of my goods according to the custome of the Province of Yorcke Item I give to my cozen Collonell Carr twenty pounds To my brother Tho: Carr other twenty pounds And to his sonn Tymothy twenty pounds And all the daughters hee haith att the time of my deathe ten shillings a pece unto Mary Carr my brother Lawrence daughter if then allso living att my deathe thirty shillings And I doe hereby nominate and appoynt Leonard Carr (jurat) and Thomas (jurat) my sonnes joynt Executors of this my last will and testament hereby revokeing all other formerly maid In witness whereof I have hereunto put my hand and sealed dated the day and yeare first above written. Wm (?) Carr Sealed ....sight and pr..... jurat mke John.......X...Chester ? jurat mke Elizabeth .. X

Lancaster

Testamentum..........Gulielmi Carr mercatoris de Langclife Februarj 18th 1673 [1674] THOMAS CARR of Giggleswick 1689 Borthwick Institute In the Name of God Amen this twenty sixth day of December in the year of our Lord God One thousand six hundred eighty nine I Thomas Carr the elder of Gigleswicke in the county of york yeom being somewhat Infirme in body but of good and perfect memory praised bee God for the same doe make and ordayne this my last Will and testamt in maner and forme following hereby revoking all former and other will and wills by mee heretofore made (That is to say) first and principally I comend and comitt my soule into the mercifull hands of Almighty God my maker assuredly – trusting that through the meritts and mediation of Jesus Christ my Saviour my Sinns shall bee forgiven And that my soule shall be made partaker of everlasting happiness in the Kingdome of heaven, And my body to bee buryed in the pish Church of Gigleswicke aforesaid at the discretion of my friends and executrix hereafter named And as to the temporall Estate with which it hath pleased God to blesse me I give and dispose as followeth And first my Will and mind is that all my just debts Legacyse and funerall expenses bee payd out of my whole estate I give unto Thomas Carr my grandchilde the sume of one hundred pounds to be payd him by my executrix hereafter named at such time (or within the space of three months after) as he shall attayne the age of twenty one years or marry he paying hee paying to my said executrix five pound yearly during her life naturall after hee receive the same, And after the decease of my said executrix, if shee depart this life before my said Grandchilde shall attayne the age of twenty one years or marry, then what Interest as can bee raised out of the said One hundred pound yearly untill hee attayne the said age of twenty one years or marry shall bee disposed of as followeth (viz ?) three pounds thereof yearly to bee payd to Ellen Hall my daughter and the remaynder thereof to Margaret Lund my daughter And if it happen that Thomas Carr my grandchilde shall depart this life before he attayne the said age of twenty one years or marry that then the same One hundred pounds shall be payd to the issue (if any happen to bee) of my late sonne Roger Carr decd (?) equally amongst them as hee shee or they shall attayne the severall age or ages of twenty one years or marry if my executrix bee then dead or within the space of three months after her (line inserted) decease and in case theyr happen noe Issue of my said sonne Roger to attayne the age of twenty one years or marry then the said hundred pound to goe equally amongst all my Grandchildren then living Item I give to Thomas Hall my sonne in Lawe forty pounds Provided allways and upon condicon that upon the receipt thereof hee give suficient security to my said executrix for the payment of two pounds yearly to her or her assigs during her naturall life And alsoe at the same time give suficient security for the payment of tenn pounds A peice to Alice Mary Jacob and Ellen Hall his children within the space of three months next after they shall respectively attayne theyr severall ages of twenty one


years or marry if my said executrix shall bee then dead or within the space of three months next after her deceease And in case any of them shall depart this life before they attayne theyr severall ages of twenty one years or marry that then his her or theyr Legacy or Legacys soe dying shall goe equally amongst such of them as shall attayne theyr severall and respective ages of twenty one years or marry Item I give to John Lund my Sonne in Law forty pounds pvided alsoe and upopn condicon that upon the receipt thereof hee give suficient security to my said executrix for the payment of two pounds yearly to her or her assigs during her naturall life And doe alsoe at the same time give suficient security for the paymt of forty pounds of Lawfull English money to such Issue of the said John Lund begotten or to bee begotten by him on the body of Margaret his now wife equally amongst them as they shall attayne theyr severall and respective ages of twenty one years or marry if my said executrix shall bee then dead or within the space of three months next after her deeease Item my will and minde is that in case my said Sonns in Law Thomas Hall and John Lund or either of them shall fayle in giving security as aforesaid that then my trustees hereafter named shall take and receive the said forty pound and forty pound or such of them as security is not given for to and for the uses before in these presents expressed and to and for none other use intent or purposes whatsoever Item I doe nominate desire and appoynt Thomas Carr of Stackhouse and Thomas Watkinson of Gigleswicke aforesaid trustees desiring them to doe theyr endeavours to see this my last will and testamt duely and truely pformed Item my will and minde is that my said trustees shall have all reasonable charges they or either of them shall bee anyway at or put to in managing this concerne payd them by my executrix Item I give to my said trustees twenty shillings A peice And Lastly I doe nominate constitute and appoynt Margaret Jurat my sole executrix of this my Last Will and testamt In Witnesse whereof I have hereunto sett my hand and seale the day and year first above written Seald Signd and published in the psence of us the Interliniacon in the twentith line being first made William Paley Matthew Watkinson Jurat Jo Richardson

Thomas Carr

Noverint universi per presentes Nos Margaretam Carr de Gigleswicke Diocesi Ebor. viduam et Thomam Hall, de Marton Diocesi ?? yeoman Tenari et firmiter obligari venerabili vire Richardo Sterne Armigero Artium Magistro seaccarii Reverendissimi in Christo patris et Domini Domini Thoma providencia nera divini Ebor, Archiepiscopi Anglia primatis et Metropolitani Commissario legitime Constituto in Quadringentis libris bone et legalis moneta Angliae Solvend eidem Thoma aut suo certo Atternat Executor Administrator sive Assignatis suis. Ad quam quidem solutionem bene et fideliter faciend. Obligamus Nos et utrum? nostrum per se pro toto et in solido Heredes? Executor et Administratores nostros firmiier per presentes. Sigillis nostris sigillat. Dat. decimo sexto die mensis February Anno Dom. Millesimo sexcentisimo octogesimo Nono Sigillat et deliberat in presentia Margret her Carr Matthew Watkinson Richard Pollard

marke Thomas Hall

The Condition of the Obligation is such that if the within bounden Margrett Carr Relict and sole executrix of the last will and testament of Thomas Carr, late of Giggleswicke of the diocesse of yorke deceased doe well, and truly execute and performe the said will And do pay his debts and legacies so far as his goods will extend and Law shall bind her if also she doe exhibbit into the Excheqer office at Yorke a true and perfect Inventary of all and singular the Good, Rights, Credits, Cartells, and Chattells, of the said deceased, and doe make a true and just Accompt of the same when she shall be thereunto lawfully called. And moreover if need require enter into further Bond with more sufficient suerties for performance of the premisses as the Judge of the said Court for the time being shall think requisite and needful. And lastly doe save defend and harmless keep the within named Commissary and all his Officers and Ministers against all persons by reason of the prtemisses. Then this present Obligation to be void and of none effect or else to remain and be in full force and vertue.


A true ? or ??? of all the goods and Chattells of Thomas Carr psinier of Giglesswek yeoman Latly Deceased by us whose naimes are heareunder written February the 3d – 1689 (our 1690) In primis for his purse and Aparill 1–0-0 for I?? for Alow 0 – 10 – 0 In the midell Chaimber apair of Bed Stockes and the Beding therein

£-s–d 2–0–0

0 – 10 – 0

all for in the saime roum there is too Chistts att 0–3–0 A Couberte and A presor in the house 0 – 6 – 8 One Longe seat in the House one Chair and stooles

0–3–8 0–0–8

The Pucher

0–2–8

The Panns

0–2–6

one Iron Baicking stone and A rainge wth kicon and Tonges One Barrall one stand and A baskitt wth other Small wood vesall In Bills and Bonds

0 – 10 – 0

0–2–6 210 –0 – 0

In Beif

0–3–0

In malt

0–4–0

Too paier of Sheets three pair of Pillowbears ________

0 – 10 – 0 0–1–6

219 – 10 –2 Tho Carr William Armistead Thomas Brayshaw Thomas Watkinson LEONARD CARR 1696 Borthwick Prerog. and Exchequer Courts Original Probate files mf 1706 Dec. 1696-Feb. 1696/7 William Carr and James King the executors to perform and execute last will and testament of Leonard Carr


In the name of god Amen I Leonard Carr of Langclife in the parish of Gigleswicke and county of Yorke gentleman, being sicke and weake of body: but of sound and perfect mind and memory praise bee to Almighty god for the same doe make and ordaine this my Last Will and Testament in manner and forme following. That is to say First and Principally I commend my Soule into the handes of Almighty god, Hoping through the meritts, death and passion of my saviour Jesus Christ to have full and free pardon and forgiveness of all my sinns and to Inheritt Everlasting Life And my body I committ to the Earth to be reverently buryed att the Discretion of my friends and Executors hereafter named, and as touching the disposition of all such temporal Estate as itt hath pleased Almighty god to bestowe upon mee I also give and dispose thereof as followeth: First my will and mind is that my debts and funerall expenses bee paid, and discharged out of my credits assets goods chattells and prsonall Estate by my Executors herein and hereafter mentioned; And also I doe give and bequeath unto my Uncle Thomas Carr of Little Osbourne in the Countye of Yorke the just sum of thirteene pounds of currant money of England, and to be paid him by my sd Executors within a yeare and day next after my decease: And I doe also hereby give and bequeath unto Martha my dear and loving wife /over and besides what is hereafter given and bequeathed her :/ the whole and just sume of ÂŁ20 of currant money of England to bee likewise paid her within one yeare and a day next after my decease And I doe allso give and bequeath unto James King of Skellands in the parish of Kirkeby in Malhamdale in the said countye of Yorke Gentleman and (_______) his wife both of them the whole and just sume of tene(?) pounds to be paid them within one yeare and a day next after my decease: And I doe alsoe give and bequeath unto Thomas King sonne of the said James King the whole and just sume of five pounds of currant money of England to bee likewise paid him within a year and a day next after my decease And I also give and bequeath unto Elizabeth King, Mary King and Ann King daughters of the said James King each of them the whole and just sum of fifty shillings /or as many of them as are living att the time of my decease;/ and to be paid to them and each of them within one year and a day next after my decease. And I doe alsoe give and bequeath unto John Paley of Langclife aforesaid the whole and just sume of five shillings to bee likewise paid him within one year and day next after my decease; and I doe alsoe give and bequeath unto Margarett now wife of Lawrence Swainson of Langclife aforesaid and Thomas Swainson sonne of the said Lawrence each of them the whole and just sume of tenne shillings of currant money and to be likewise paid within one yeare and a day next after my decease And alsoe I do give and bequeath unto William Carr sonne of Thomas Carr of Gigleswicke aforesaid my nephew all my messuages Lands tenements and hereditaments which I am now seized of in fee simple with all the heriditaments and appurtenances thereunto belonging : to hold to him his heires and assignes forever: Hee the said William Carr his heirs and assignes or some of them: yearely and every paying unto Thomas Carr his father his executors administrators or assignees or some of them: the whole and just sume of six poundes of currant money of England for and dureing the time and terme of his natural life; and also paying doeing and prforming unto Martha my said wife or her executors administrators or assignees the whole and just sume of fifteene poundes of currant money of England yearely and every yeare dureing the terme of her Natural Life: in full of her third part dower and widow right of my woll Estate in what place or places forever And if in case it should happen or fortune: to the said Martha my said wife that said summe of fifteene pounds in any yeare dureing the tearme of her naturall life bee arreare behind or unpaid in parts or in all, that then itt shall and may be lawfull to and for the said Martha my said wife to enter unto and upon the said premisses and to take and receive the yearly profitts thereof till the sd arreares bee paid and noe longer: nor noe otherwise: and alsoe my will and mind is; that att after my debts and funeral expenses and legacies are paid: the residue surplusage and remainder of my said prsonall Estate goods and chattells shall goe and fall to William Carr aforesaid my said nephew his Executors Administrators and assignes for ever: And Lastly Revokeing, Dis....ing,and makeingVoid all other and former wills by me made I doe hereby Constitute Ordain Nominate and appoint the said Wm Carr and James King Executors of this my last will and testament: and doe publish and declare this to be my last will and testament: In witnesse whereof I have hereunto putt my hand and Seale the Eight day of december anno domini 1696/ Leonard Carr sealed signed published and declared in the sight and presence of John Paley jurat Wiijh Carr Richd. Lawson jurat R? Rooke CODICIL Memor and that att before the above was published and declared I the sd Leonard Carr did by this my Codicill in writeing give and bequeath unto Elizabeth Road wife of Ambrose Road: of Gigleswicke the summe of twenty pounds:


and to Margarett Carr: daughter of my Brother Thomas Carr the summe of fifty shillings and.tenne shillings to Robert Hartley: my Nephew and ten shillings to Margarett Brayshaw of Stakehouse and to Agnes Cort my parish apprentice three pounds to be paid them within one whole year and day next after my decease. Writt under my hand and seale the day and yeare ........ Sealed signed published and declared to.................a codicile or...............annexed to the will in the sight and prsence of John Paley Wiijh Carr Richd. Lawson Ri. Rooke Leonard Carr A True and perfect Inventory of all the Goods Chattels and Credits of Mr Leonard Carr late of Langcliff deceased as they are Apprized by us whose names are underwriten this 18th day of December 1696 ÂŁ s d In primis his Apparell and money in his purse 5 0 0 Item one Horse and one Mare with sadle and furniture

7

Item three Cowes and one Calfe

0

11

Item in hay and strawe

0

0

2

0

13

4

Item one Arke with other Utensells standing in the Barn

1

0

0

Item one Chist with other things in the stable

0

2

6

Item in Ash and Oakewood Carts and wheeles and other husbandry geare

6

Item one Hogg

4

0

8

11

0

Item one Clock one Jack with tables and other furniture in the body of the house

4

12

Item in Booss

16

0

0

Item one Ark with Brass and breweinge vessels with things in the Kitchinge

3

Item one gimlin with Barrells and Basons and other things in the millhouse

0

11

8

2

0

1

Item in Tables and Chaires and other furniture in the Parlor

2

10

0

Item one table readinge desk and books in his Closset

1

6

0

Item one Cubbord with pewther and all other things in the Buttry

3

3

4

Item in plate

4

0

Item one pair of Bedstocks with Bedinge and all other furniture in the bedchamber ÂŁ Some

58

13

s

0

4

1

0

d

0

Item all the goods in the servants Chamber

2

0

0


Item all the goods in another Chamber

0

10

0

Item all the goods in the Maids Chamber

1

0

0

Item all the goods in his own Chamber

4

2

0

Item the goods in the great Chamber

1

2

0

Item all the goods in John Proctors (?)

0

Item in Linin

7

Item one parcel of slate

22

Debts owinge to the Deceased £ 330

1 0

Some

Some totall John Paley William Paley Richd. Lawson Tho. Swainson Leonard Carr

5

1

s

6 10

0 249

0

0 6

0

6

d

7

CLAPHAM THOMAS of Winskill 1647/8 Borthwick.,York Bundle Dec 1647/8 Transcribed by S.Gordon In the name of god amen I Thomas Clapham of Winskall sick of body, but of good & pfect memory praysed bee the lord, Imprimis I Bequeath my soule to god my maker, And I hope to be (saved) by the merits of Jesus Christ my saviour & redeemer, & my body to the erth Itt. I give to E(lizab)eth Lawson my Granddaughter daughter to (Richard) Lawson of Lankliffe vj (li?) Itt. I give to (Richard) Lawson my grandson & sonne to the (sayd) Richard Lawson xli Itt. I give unto Elizabeth Brayshey my grand daughter & daughter to Richard Brayshey of Cowside xl s. …en shee cometh to the age of one & twenty yeares & in the mene tyme to have xiid p … pound each yeare for the use Itt. I give unto my sonne Richard Clapham his children (that is to say) Thomas Elizabeth & Agnes iiili a peec when they come to Lawfull (y)eares, And to be payed in the mene tyme xiiid. per pound by the yeare Itt. I give to Isabell Lawson, Tomazyn Brashey my daughters, Ales Clapham my Doughter in Law xis. viiid., a peece, And I Apoynt Richard Clapham jurat my sonn Executor of this my last will & Testament Witness J..hn Foster jurat THOMAS CLAPHAM of Winskill 1647 W. Paley Baildon papers at Bradford City Archives WPB 20/44 transcript Extract Elizabeth Lawson my granddaughter and daughter of Richard Lawson of Lankliff vj li to Richard Lawson my grandson ix li to Elizabeth Brayshey my granddaughter and daughter of Richard Brayshey of Towside xl s when 21, xij d per year in the meantime to son Richard Clapham and his children Thomas, Elizabeth, and Agnes iij li apiece when of lawful years, xij d in the meantime per year. to Isabell Lawson Tomazin Brayshey my daughters and Ales Clapham my daughter in law vj s viij d apiece Appt. Richard Clapham my son Ex. Wit. Thos. Foster


York Unregistered wills Dec. 1647/8 Fuller transcript EMS from Bradford City Archives In the name of God amen I Thomas Clapham of Winskall seeke of body butt of good and perfect memory praysed bee the Lord Imprimis I bequeath my soule to god my maker And I hope to be saved by the merits of Jesus Christ my saviour and redeemer and my body to the earth Itt' I give to Elizabeth Lowson (sic) my granddaughter and daughter to Richard Lawson of Lankliff vj li Itt' I give to Richard Lawson my grandson and sonne to the sayed Richard Lawson lx li Itt' I give unto Elizabeth Brayshey my granddaughter and daughter to Richard Brayshey of Towside xl s when shee cometh to the age of one and twenty yeares and in the mene tyme to have xij d a pound every yeare for the use Itt' I give unto my sonn Richard Clapham his children (that is to say) Thomas Elizabeth and Agnas iij li a peece when they com to lawfull yeares And to be payed in the mene tyme xij d per pound by the yeare Itt' I give to Isabell Lawson Tomazin Brayshey my daughters and Ales Clapham my daughter in law vj s viij d a peece And I apoynt Richard Clapham Jurat my sonn executor of this my last will and testament Wittnes Tho. Foster Jurat (indorsed) Craven T. Tho. Clapham de Winskell cert. per Clapham 24 Dec 1647 Entred York unregistered wills Dec. 1647 CLAPHAM THOMAS 1698 Borthwick.York. vol.62 fol.106 Transcribed by S.Gordon In the name of God Amen the eleaventh day of June in the yeare of our Lord God 1698 I Thomas Clapham of Winscale in the pish of Giggleswick & County of Yorke being weak of body but of pfect memory praised be God do make this my last Will and Testament in manner and forme following viz: first and principally I commend my Soule into the hands of Almighty God who gave it, hoping thro the merritts and mediation of Jesus Christ my Saviour to obtaine remission of sins & everlasting life, my body to the Ground to be buried in decent and Christian manner at the discretion of my friends and Excs. as for my temporall Estate which I have not formerly disposed of I give & bequeath as followeth First I ‌.. that all my debts Legacies and funeral expences & other necessary Charges be paid out of the Creditts and money owing to me so far as it will extend & the rest to be paid out of my goods till all be fully satisfied Item I give unto my three Grandchildren Alice Thomas & Anthony Clapham each of them five shillings Itm I give to my Grandson Richard Wharfe the like sume of four shillings. And I give to my four daughters Isabell Anne Elizabeth & Alice all the rest of my goods after my sd. Debts Legacies and funeral expences be discharged of what kind or nature soever they be except one young Colt which I give to my two sons Richard & Thomas Clapham whom I likewise appoint Excs. of this my Last Will and Testamt. Revoking all others by me formerly made In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hands and Seale the day and year first above written – Thomas Clapham In the presence of Richard Lawson. Willim Clapham DAWSON CHRISTOPHER DAWSON nup. de Langcliffe (Late of Halton Gill) 1682 Borthwick vol 59 fol 311 In the name of god Amen the seaventh day of Aprill 1682 & in the four and thirtyth yeare of or sovarign Lord Charles ye second I Christopher Dawson of Langcliffe in the County of york yeoman beinge aged & infirme but of good & perfect remembrance make this my last will & testamt in manner & forme followinge. And first I comend my soul to almighty god my Creator, hopeing to be saved through the onely meritts of Jesus Christ my mercifull saviour. And my body I leave to be buryed att the discretion of my executor hereafter named, concerning the temporall estate which god of his mercy hath blessed me with I do thus order Imprimis I give unto my son Josias Dawson one close called Bluhaw within the Township of Langcliffe for the terme of fourscore yeares if he soe long live and after his decease I give the remainder of the terme I have in it to Christopher Dawson of Appletreeweeke my Grandson his exors admrs and assignes. It. I doe allow & my will is that my Grandson Willm Dawson of Haltongill shall duringe his life occupy one long table in his parlour and another in ye Bodysteade two great Arks in the Chamber over it, one cupboard in


the parlor & after his decease to them of his posterity as shall enjoy the estate. It. I give to Josias & Willm sons of my Grandson Christopher Dawson the sume of one hundred pounds (viz) to each of them fifty pounds & doe will yt the sd Christopher shall have the Interest of it till they doe each of them come att the age of one & twenty yeares towards their maintenance which sayd sume I will shall be payd to the sayd Christopher my Grandson or his exors adms or assignes within one whole yeare after my decease It. I give to my Grandson Willm Dawson the sume of fifty pounds & to his eldest son Christopher the sume of fifty pounds & doe will that the sd sumes shall be payd top the sd Willm his exors adms or assignes within one yeare after my decease & I will that he shall have the pfitts of his sons fifty pounds till his son come to the Age of twenty one yeares, And if the sd Christopher shall dye before he attayne yt age, then I will that William & Mary his Brother & Sister shall have the sd sume divided betwixt them equaly when each of them doe come to the yeares of one & twenty It. I give to my grandson Josias Dawson the sume of two Hundred & fifty pounds to be payd within one yeare after my decease, As also the sume of two Hundred & fifty pounds more if my executor observing his good Carryage shall thinke fitt otherwise my mind & will is that the sd last mentioned two Hundred & fifty pounds shall be disposed of to such of the rest of my Grand Children as my exor shall thinke fitt, provided yt the sd two Hundred & fifty pounds be really disposed of to the use of my sd Grandchildren or some of them It. I give to my Grandson Jonathan Dawson the sume of Three Hundred pounds when he shall attayne the age of twenty one yeares as alsoe the sume of two Hundred pounds more if my exor observing his good Carryage shall thinke fitt otherwise my minde is that the sayd last menconed two hundred pounds shall be disposed of to such of the rest of my Grandchildren as my exor in his discretion shall thinke fitt, provided that the sd share of two Hundred pounds be really disposed of to the use of my sd Grand Children or some of ym but if it happen that the sd Jonathan shall dye before he shall accomplish the age of one & twenty yeares my mind & will is that the sd three hundred pounds first before to Jonathan disposed & also the sd two hundred pounds last mencoed shall be divided amongst the rest of my Grand Children or such of them as my exor shall thinke fitt provided the whole sume be given amongst my sd Grandchildren It. I give to my Grandaughtr Anne Dawson the sume of two hundred pounds when she shall accomplish the age of one & twenty yeares and also the sume of one Hundred pounds more if my exor observing her good Carryage shall thinke fitt otherwise my mind is that the sd last menconed one hundred pounds shall be disposed of to such of the rest of my Grandchildren as my exor in his discretion shall thinke fitt provided that the sayd sume of one Hundred pounds last mencoed be really disposed of to the use of my sd Grand Children or some of them It. I give to my Grandaughtr Alice Dawson the sume of two hundred pounds when she shall accomplish the age of two & twenty yeares or be marryed whether shall happen sooner & also the sume of one Hundred pounds more if my exor observinge her good carryage shall thinke fitt, otherwise my mind is that the sayd last mencoed one Hundred pounds shall be disposed of to such of the rest of my Grand Children as my exor in his discretion shall thinke fitt provided that the sd sume of one Hundred pounds last mencond be really disposed of to the use of my sayd Grandchildren or some of them It. I give to my late wives son John Burkeson of Darnbrooke the sume of Tenne pounds to be pd within one yeare after my decease & also the sume of five pounds which I lent him for which I have his Bill. It. I give to my late wives Daughter Jane Hopkins the sume of Tenne pounds to be pd within one yeare after my decease And as for the rest of my personall estate I give it all to my exor herafter named And I doe hereby Constitute and appoint my son Josias (jur) Dawson the sole executor of this my last will & testamt In witnesse whereof I have hereunto put my hand and seale the day & yeare above written Witnesses hereof

Chr Dawson

Richard Lawson (Jur) Anthony Armitstead Lancelot Knowles (Jur)

CHRISTOPHER DAWSON 1693 Borthwick.York. Bundle May 1693 Transcribed by S.Gordon In the name of God Amen I Christopher Dawson of Lancliffe in the parish of Giggleswick in the County of Yorke Gentleman being infirme and sick in body but of sound minde and memory praised be God for the same Do hereby make my last Will and Testament in manner and forme following Imprimis my soul to God Almighty believing my salvation in the onely merits of my Redeemer Jesus Christ And as for my body I commit it to the Earth in hopes of a joyfull Resurrection to eternall life and to be buried by my Executors in trust hereafter named My dear Wife and


father Josias Dawson, in the parish Church of Giggleswick aforesaid And as to my temporall Estate which God of his mercy hath bestowed on me I dispose thereof as followeth, That is to say, I do appoint that all my debts and funeral expences be first paid out of all my goods Chattels and personall estate of what kinde or nature soever either consisting in Trusts or otherwise by my Execs. hereafter mencioned or some of them And afterwards the Legacies mencioned in a Codicill or Schedule hereunto annexed And I do hereby declare and appoint that the said Legacies by me hereby given and bequeathed as aforesaid be paid by my Executors or some of them within the space of one halfe year next after my decease And I do hereby constitute and appoint my dear wife Margaret jurat and father Josias jurat Dawson Executors of this my last Will and Testament in trust for and to the sole benefit of my son William Dawson until he shall accomplish his full age of seventeen years And after his attainment to such age I do constitute and appoint him my said son sole Executor of this my last Will and Testament And I do give devise and bequeath unto my said son William Dawson his Executors Administrs. and Assignes after all the said debts funeral expences and legacies paid as aforesaid All the residue of my goods Chattels and personall estate whatsoever either consisting in trusts or otherwise and in particular whereas by severall Deeds of grant and assignment severall and respective Leases and Rents were assigned and granted to severall trustees therein named for and during the residue of the severall and respective terms and leases for years then to come and now not expired of and out of severall Landes Tenements & hereditaments situate lying and being severally and respectively within Lancliffe Stainforth under Bargh and Giggleswicke in the said parish of Giggleswicke in the County of Yorke to the severall and respective trusts in the said Deeds severally and respectively mencioned Relating to and for the benefit of me the said Christopher Dawson my Executrs. Administr. & Assignes after the end & determinacion of severall other trusts therein limited and pre(sedent) to the said trusts relating to me as aforesaid As by the severall and respective Deeds of assignment and Grant reference thereunto being had may at large and fully appear I do hereby give and bequeath All the said trusts relating to and for the benefit of me the said Christopher Dawson as aforesaid unto my said son William his Executrs. Administ. and Assignes in as large ample and beneficiall manner matter and terme As I have interest or p(ow)er therein During all the residue of the said terms and leases for years in the said Landes tenements and hereditaments yet to come and expire And lastly I do hereof revoke all other Wills and Testaments whatsoever if any such were heretofore by me made – In witnesse whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal the twenty seventh day of March In the fifth year of the reigne of our soveraigne Lord and Lady King William and Queen Mary over England (etc) Anno Dom 1693 Sealed Signed Published and Declared to be the said Will and Testament of him the said Christopher Dawson In the sight and presence of us …these words (or schedule) interlined before us sealing and publishing …of Two lines latin Robt. Coates…. Richard Ellershaw Josias Dawson jurat R.Atkinson jurat A codicil or schedule of Legacies and Bequests made by me Christopher Dawson of Lancliffe Gentleman In pursuance of my last Will and Testament hereunto affixed Imprimis I do give and bequeath unto my wife Margaret Dawson all my household stuffe of what kinde or nature soever the same be now being and remaining in my now dwelling house at Lancliffe aforesaid for and during all the time that she the said Margaret shall and doth continue my Widow and no longer And at or upon the time of her marriage if such shall be I do give and bequeath all the aforesaid household stuffe unto my son William Dawson Item I do give & bequeath unto my said wife Margaret the Sume of one hundred pounds. Item I do give & bequeath unto Richard Ellershaw Clerke the sume of ten shillings and if he preach my funeral Sermon I do give him the sume of twenty shillings more Item I do give and bequeath unto mine uncle John Bank the sume of twenty shillings Item I do give unto Matthew Bank his son the sume of twenty shillings and do release unto him the said Matthew the sume of twenty shillings he is indebted unto me Item I do give unto Richard Atkinson the sume of twenty shillings. Item I do give unto James Iveson the sume of twenty shillings. Item I do give unto (every) hired Servant at my decease the sume of five shillings a piece. And I do hereby further declare that these Same Legacies be taken as pte of my said last Will and Testament And this to be codicil or schedule therein menconed As witnesse my hand and seal this twenty seventh day of March Anno Dom 1693 Witnesses heroff Richard Ellershaw Josias Dawson R.Atkinson


WILLIAM DAWSON 1762 Borthwick Probate Registry 106 pages 563-576 , mf 1019 This is a very long will with a codicil so transcription made only in part. Photocopies made of pages 563, 564, 565. Dawson: In the Name of God amen I William Dawson of Langcliffe Hall in the County of York Esquire being in perfect health of body and of sound mind memory and understanding praised be God for the same do for the setling of my temporal concerns make ordain publish and declare this my last will & Testament in manner following, that is to say, First it is my will and mind that all my just Debts owing by me at the time of my Death my Funeral expences probate of this my will and such charges loss and Expences as my Executors and Trustees hereafter named or any of them shall sustain expend or be put unto in and about the Execution of this my last will or by reason or means of their being my Executors and Trustees be paid of and discharged for ..... out of my personal Estate I give devise and bequeath unto John Alcock of Burnsall in the county of York Clerk and James Carr of Stackhouse in the said County Gentleman all that my Capital situate and being in Langcliffe aforesaid and commonly called or known by the name of (half a page unreadable on poor printout) of Stainforth under Bargh aforesaid and also one close or parcel of ground lying and being within the Township of Kirkby in Malhamdale in the said County of York and commonly called or known by the name of rough Close with the appurtenances thereunto belonging and also the moiety or half part of all & singular the Tythes or Tenths of all corn or grain yearly coming growing renewing or ..... or which shall or may hereaftercome grow renew and .... within the Township precincts or liberties of Settle in the said County of York and also Eighteen Beastgates or herbage or grassing for Eighteen made beast to go feed and depasture in upon & throughout all that stinted pasture belonging Settle aforesaid commonly called or known by the name of Scaleberr and the Ground and soil thereunto belonging and also seventy two Sheep Gates or herbage and Grassing for seventy two sheep to go feed and depasture upon and throughout all that stinted pasture belonging Settle aforesaid commonly called or known by the name of the Bankes and the Ground and soil thereunto belonging and also all and singular houses Edifices lands meadows pastures feedings closes Inclosures commons common of pasture and Turbary hedges Ditches walls fences trees woods underwoods ways waters watercourses rights liberties priviledges and appurtenances whatsoever unto the said several ....... ...... (line unreadable) or any of them or any part thereof belonging or in any wise appertaining whether the same be Freehold or Leashold To have and to hold all such part of the said premisses as are Freehold with their appurtenances from & imediately after my decease unto the said John Alcock and James Carr their heirs and assigns for ever and To have and to hold all such parts of the said premisses as are Leashold with their appurtenances unto the said John Alcock and James Carr their Executors administrators and assigns from and Immediately after my decease for and during all such term and terms number and numbers of years as shall be then therein or in any part thereof in being and unexpired To and for the several usese intents and purposes and upon under and subject to the trusts provisoes and limitations hereafter mentioned expressed and declared of and concerning the same that is to say upon Trust and to the intent and purpose that they the said John Alcock and James Carr and the survivor of them his heirs Executors administrators & assigns respectively shall stand and be seised and possessed thereof and of every part thereof from and immediately after my decease and do and shall by Grant Sale Lease or mortgage of all or any part of the said Freehold premisses for such term or number of years as they or he shall think convenient or all or any part of the said Leashold premisses for any term of number of years not exceeding the term that shall be therein being or by such grant sale Lease or mortgage of both the said Freehold and Leashold premisses and by with and out of the rents issues and profits of the said premisses so given and devised as aforesaid or by all and every or any part of the ways and means aforesaid Levy and raise the sum of one Thousand pounds of current British money to and for my son Ambrose Dawson which I do hereby give devise and bequeath unto him as and for his portion and in full satisfaction of a certain Bond or obligation bearing date the fifteenth day of October last past given by me unto my said son Ambrose Dawson of the penalty of two Thousand pounds with condition under written for payment of the sum of one Thousand pounds unto my said son Ambrose in my life time or securing the payment thereof by my Will Deed or Writing within Twelve months after my decease as is therein mentioned and also will require order and direct limit and appoint the said John Alcock and James Carr and the survivor of them his heirs Executors administrators and assigns to pay the said sum of one Thousand pounds so to be raised as aforesaid unto my said son Ambrose Dawson as he shall direct and appoint by Will deed or writing to be paid and from and after the raising and paying the said


sum of one thousand pounds as aforesaid it is my will and mind and I do hereby order and direct that the said John Alcock and James Carr and the survivor of them and his heirs shall stand and be seised of all such part of the said premisses as are Freehold with their appurtenances subject as aforesaid to and for the use and behoof of Christopher Dawson Eldest son of the said William Dawson ....... Further details: £2000 for children £600 of wife Elizabeth's portion younger son Henry and daughter Margaret £800 each One silver coffee pot to wife Elizabeth, silver teapot, 2 silver cannisters, 1 silver milk pott with all teaspoons, 4 table cloths, 4 napkins, 2 towels, all of huckaback with one pair of sheets, a new feather bed bolster and pillows all marked E.D. the bed and furniture thereto belonging in the great parlour chamber, 6 elm chairs with Bass bottoms in the Baslit room one yew Dressing Table in the best room one large Damask table cloth with a dozen napkins of the same marked W.E.D with one pair of sheets mark M.D. I also give unto my daughter a chest of yew drawers. Everything else to son Christopher - all the Langcliffe Hall if he live there at least two years within 6 weeks after my decease. Codicil on pages 561-576 made in 1761 James Carr of Bolton Abbey Gent. James Ellis and William Paley are new executors. WILLIAM FALTHROPP 1605 Borthwick v 29 f 647 In the name of god Amen the foure and twentieth day of May 1605 I Willm Falthropp of Winscale within the countie of yorke labourer sicke in bodie but of good and pfect remembrance laud and prase be given to almightie god do make this my last will and testament in manner and forme following that is to say First and principallie I comend my soule unto almightie god by the death of whose sonne Jesus Christ I hope to be saved an (sic) heire of evrlasting life and my bodie to be buried within the pish churchyard of Gigleswicke at the discrecon of my beloved freinds Itm I give to my sister Allice Foster and to her sonne Christopher my tennement at Winscale aforesaid so they discharge and pay the rent yearlie issueing out of the same being the some of fortie shillings to John Armytstead and Willm Armytstead of Rathmell or to their assignes and doing and discharging all other duties and services therinto belonging Itm I give to my brother Roger Faythroppe of Gigleswicke aforesaid the pcell of ground wch I bought of Thomas Cockett and Richard Foster of Staynforth to thuse of Edmond his sonne or of they the said Thomas and Richard Redeme the same according to a bargaine and covenant made betwixt them the said Thomas and Richard on thone ptie and me the said Willm one thother then I the said Richard (sic) do frelie give the money due to be paid received by me for the same to my said brother Roger to be received at such tymes as are lymitted for the same to the use and behoufe onlie of Edmond his sonne whereof five pounds shall be put forth as the first payment for his futur benefitt educacon and pferment Itm I give unto christopher the sonne of the said Roger Falthroppe one cow wch is now in thands and custodie of Thomas Carr of Gigleswicke aforesaid Itm I give and bequeath thre pounds to be paid (sic) daughters of Anthony kendall of Swinden Margerie and Elizabeth thre pounds to be paid by myne executors out of six pounds wch the said Anthony is indebted unto me And I give and bequeath the other thre pounds remayning in the hands of the said Anthony to his other two daughters after the recoverie of the same out of thands of ther said father further I give and bequeath unto my said brother Roger Falthroppe as a legacie out of my goods ppt Itm I give all the rest of my said goods and cattells after my debts paid and Funrall expences discharged unto my sister Allice eight children that is to say Christopher Marie Margaret Isabell Elizabeth Samuell and Anne and Willm equallie to be devided amongst them Itm I give to my said brother Roger my gray Jacket and my new lether dublet And for the rest of my appell I give them to my said sister Allice children at her dispose Itm I make and constitute my said brother Roger and Allice my sister Joynt executors of this my last will and testament Witnesses hereof Barnabie Foster Thomas Payley Thomas Carre and Elizabeth Kirkbie


Latin text

FOSTER JOHN FOSTER of Winskill 1554 Borthwick volume 14 Folio 25 In dei no(min)ie amen the 24th day of November in the year of our Lord God 1554 I John Foster of Winskill sick in body and of good and perfect memory loved be Almighty God make this my last will and testament in manner and form following First I bequeath my soul to Almighty God and to our Lady St Marie and to all the blessed company of heaven And my body to be buried in the church of Giggleswick and for my mortuary that at right will Item I give for forgotten tithes to the high altar 12d Item I give and bequeath to Thomas Foster my son my house that I dwell upon and used with the office by the licence of the Lord or owner thereof and all the husbandry gear that belongs to my house with the bedstocks belonging to the same this my give him for his child's portion Item I will that if the said Thomas die without issue lawfully begotten that I will that this bequest wholly to re-enter to William Foster my son Item I give and bequeath to William Foster my son the plains with -- -- rest of land that lies in Langcliffe field and a fourth (?) of Langcliffe mill with the licence of the Lord and this to be for his child's portion Item I will that if the said William die before he be in possession and die without of lawful issue begotten that I will that this bequest wholly to re-enter to James Foster my son Item I will that if the said James die without lawful issue begotten my will that this bequest to wholly to re-enter to Miles my son and so from one son to another according (to) my bequests Also my will is that if the said Thomas Foster my son die and the said William Foster to re-enter of his bequest I will then that William bequest shall re-enter to James my son Also I will that my wife shall be the last and she to order all that I am in possession of at the discretion of my witness during her widowhood And if she marry she to have her possession of my goods according as the law of the -- -- -- Also I give my parts of goods to (Cecilie) my wife and --- -- sons (?) that have none of the former bequests and to my daughters and that to be equally divided amongst them And The rest of my goods to be divided to Cecilie my wife and her daughters and to those sons that have none of the former bequests Also my will is that my debts and funeral expenses shall be paid of the whole goods and to this my last will I make Cecilie my wife and James Foster my son my full and sole executors to perform the same according to the true intent and meaning and to this my will I have set my hand as my -- -- before the witnesses Thomas Browne Thomas Somerschall John Wildman Richard Iveson Latin text WILLIAM FOSTER of Winskill 1577 Borthwick vol 21 fol 84 mf 932 In the name of God amen The sixth daye of Januarii 1577 I Willm Foster of Wynschall within the pishe of gigleswicke thelder secke in bodye but of good and pfyte Remembrance laud be almyghtie god my maker and redeemer maike this my last will and testament in maner and forme followinge First I gyve and bequethe my soull to almyghtie god and to Jesus christe his sonne and my bodye to be buried in the churche yard of gyglesweke and for my mortuarye all that Right will alsoe I gyve and bequithe to El[izabe]the my wyf all my wholle bargayne whiche I have of xofer foster and Thomas Foster my sonnes durynge her widdowhead and a mayer withe a whithe Raiche and her widdowe Ryght of my goodes also I will that xofer foster and Thomas foster my sonnes shall paye to theire brethren for there Tente Right of my Tenament accordynge to my promisse maid when Xofer foster my sonne was maryed Tenne pound amonge them all also I will that dorothie my daughter shall have a bedrowme withe xofer foster and Thomas foster my sonnes also I bequithe to all the Rest of my children ther childe porcon of my goodes accordinge to the lawe the Rest of al my goodes my debttes and all other dewtyes paid I gyve and bequithe to El[izabe]the my wyf and to my children equallie amonge them and I maike and constitute El[izabe]the my wyf my whole Executrix this wittnes Gylis foster Willm foster and xofer foster withe others


Latin text WILLIAM FOSTER of Winskill 1587 Borthwick vol 23 fol 236 mf 934 In the name of god amen the xiiij th day of october in the yeare of oure lord god a thowesand five hundreth eightie seaven I Willm Foster of Winskile in the pyshe of giggleswicke in the countie of york sick in bodye but of good and pfect remembrance praysed be god do make this my last will and testament in maner and forme followinge First I bequithe my soule to Jesus christ my maker and onlye savioure and my bodye to be buried in the churche yard at giggleswick and for my mortuarye and other churche dues all that right will Itm my Will is that my debts be paid of my whole goodes and the rest that remaneth my will is my Wiffe shall have her widoweright my children their porcons thereof Itm my will is that my wiffe shall have the occupacon of my ten[emen]t and rule of my children and the goodes and the goodes to bring them upp upon so longe as henrye foster of Rathmell & Myles foster (sic) of hesledon and xofer Lawson of malhame shall think mete and pfitable for my children And the monaies that can be made theare [from] the same to be devided amongst my children at the discretion of the Abovesaid Henrie foster Miles fawcett and xofer Lawson Itm my will is and I give and bequithe the Title & Tennt right of my whole tenementes and of my pt of Lancliffe mylne unto Thomas Foster my elder sone and to his lawfull issue and for lack of him and his lawefull issue I will the same shall remaine unto my next sone and his lawefull issue and so frome sone to sone and their lawfull issue to enter unto the same at suche tyme as thabovesaid henrye foster Miles fawcett and xofer Lawson and the survivores of them And which of them as shall refuse their order my will is they shall have no beny fitt of this my will so far as the lawe will allow The Residue of my pt of goodes not bequithed my funerall expenses and other lick thinges discharged ............. equallie to be devidede amongst them Itm I do ordayne and appointe Jennet my Wyfe my sole executrix and thabovesaid henrye foster Miles faucett and xofer Lawson sup[er]visors of this my last will and testament trustinge they will see the same pformed according to my true meanynge This beinge witnessed henrye foster Miles fawcet xofer....... Richard(?) frankland Robert.... Latin text GILES FOSTER of Winskill 1601/2 Borthwick vol 29 fol 404/5 mf 943 In dei noie Amen upon the fifth daie of March one thowsand sixe hundreth and two I Giles foster of Windscall wthin the parish of Gigleswick and Countie of Yorke sicke in my bodie but of perfect remembrance praised be god for the same doe make this my last will and testament in manner and forme followinge. First I comend my soule into the handes of Almightie god by whose mercie through the redemption in Jesus Christ my onelie saviour I beleeve to be saved And my bodie to be buried in the churchyarde of the parish of Gigleswicke Itm I will that my debtes be paied of my whole goodes Itm I geve to the poore of the parish of Gigleswicke five shillinges to be distributed at the discreton of the viccar of the church and others my frindes Itm I geve unto Thomas foster my sonne and Jane foster my daughter ther equall porcons of my goodes Itm. to Elias Deane sonne of Geffray Deane xx sh And I will that Thomas Kidd my sonne in lawe shall have the disposinge of the same xx sh for the sole (use?) of the saide Elias untill the saide Elias Deane shall accomplish the age of eighteene yeares Itm I geve to the saide Thomas Kidd my sonne in lawe xl sh and to his sonne Willm two ewes and to his daughter Alice other two ewes Itm I geve unto my sonne in lawe Willm Cockett xl sh and to his daughter Agnes two ewes Itm I geve to the daughter of John foster of Rawthmell to whome I am godfather twelve pence And for my parte of my goodes my debtes first beinge discharged my funerall expences paied and other the legacies and dues paied and donne I give the same unto my daughter Jane foster And for my sonne Richard foster of the Cittie of London Clothworker at the instance and desire of himselfe and other his frindes and myne towardes his preferment I gave before the date and makinge hereof satisfied and paied to him a certeyne some of money in full satisfacton and payment of his filliall parte and childes porcon of all my goodes cattells and chattels wch I thinke well bestowed upon him if he behave himselfe lovinge and frindlie to my wife and children and be a good husband to himselfe Itm. I ordeyne and appoint Margret my wife and Thomas foster my sonne ioynt executors of this my last will and testament And I desier my frindes Richard Foster younger Willm Cockett John Twisleton Hughe Carr and Thomas Kidd to be aydinge and assistinge unto executors in the due executon of this my will These beinge witnesses Thomas Kidd Willm Cockett Hughe Carr and Brian Bainbrigge Latin text


THOMAS FOSTER 1605 Borthwick admin mf 1156 Probate Act Book (no will or probate file, administration bond or inventory) ex Latin text On 14 July 1605, Christopher Shut, bachelor of Holy Theology and vicar of the church of Giggleswick, by virtue of the special commission granted to him, certified that he had granted administration of the goods of Thomas Foster of Winskell, deceased, to Margaret Foster, mother of the said deceased. An inventory of below ÂŁ40 was exhibited and a bond was entered.

The name Margaret is written over the name Anne crossed out. RICHARD FOSTER of Settle 1626 amended 1629 (Feoffee of Langcliffe and Winskill) Borthwick vol 40 fol 510 mf 957 In the name of God Amen the fyftenth day of February in the seconde yeare of the reaigne of our sovraigne lord Charles by the grace of god kinge of England France and Ireland defender of the fayth 1626 I Richard Foster of Settle in the prish of Gigleswicke and county of yorke husbandman beinge pfecte of health and memorie (thankes be to god for the same) and beinge desirous to sett all thinges in order and that I may thereby leave peace after my death doe make this my last will and testament in manner and forme followinge Imprimis I give and bequeath my soule to god my maker beinge assured of myne eternall salvation through the meryttes of Christ Jesus my saviour and my bodye to be buried in the church or churchyard at Gigleswicke aforesaid Item wheras I have grannted demysed bargayned assygned and sett over all that my messuage farme and tenement in Settle with all appurtenances pfyttes and comodyties therunto belonginge and also my full and whole estate right title interrest seavane of yeares use possession and partie (?) clame and demand therof wch I now hould under the right honorable Franncis Earle of Cumberland and Willm Inglebie knight of the yearly rente of twenty three shillinges Eleaven pence halfe penny unto Giles Foster of Barnacastle in the county of Dunelms (?) Clerke one of my naturall sonnes and to Hugh Lawson of the lodge in the prishe of Gigleswicke and county of yorke aforesaid (?) by deed indented beginninge (?) date the five and Twenty daye of may in the xxcj th yeare of the Raigne of our late soveraigne lord kinge James of famous memorie of England etc and of Scotland the seaven and fyftyth (?) etc(?) for divers ends reasons and uses therin mentoned now my will and mynd is that the said deede shall remayne and contynue and be in full power strength & vertue accordinge to the true intent purporte and meanyinge therof and to none other ends or uses wch said deede I hereby doe ratiffie allow and confirme unto them the said Gyles and Hughe but wheras I have therby inioyned them to paye unto Maude Browne Twenty six pounds thirtene shillinges and foure pence if it please god that I paye the said monie unto the said Maude before my death then my will is that the said Twenty six pounds thirtene shillinges and foure pence shall come agayne remayne and goe unto my said sonne Giles Foster and my son Robert Foster Equally betwixte them Item wheras at the marriage of my sonne thomas Foster I did passe an estate unto my said sonne Thomas by a deed of Feoffment unto the Feoffees in trust of all my grounds lands or tenements at Winskall by wch deeds my said sonne is inioyned to pay thirty pounds after my death unto my executors, and for non payment therof my said executors or those whom it shall be due unto or to enter unto peaseably hold and possesse the..... Pykedhill Close with a house therein standinge and a close called intacke and the ground or pasture gates in the browne bancke as by the said deed more at large it may appeare, now I give the said thirtye pounds unto mine executors and I hereby ratifie and confirme the said deed, and I will that it contynue in full force and vertue, Item whereas my sonne Thomas hath put me to dyvers charges since the makinge of the said deed my will is that the said estate and charges with him synce shalbe unto him for his full filliall & childes porcion Item my will is that my debts be paid and funerall expenses out of all my other gods & chattels wch beinge done I leave unto my wyffe if she be livinge the third pte of the reste of my said goods due unto her by lawe, but if it please god she dye before me, then I give the said third parte unto my fower daughters Agnes Wilkinson Hellinor (?) Lakeland Margrett Wilkinson and Bridgett Carr equally amongst them, Item I give a second third parte thereof unto Isabell Foster and Richard Foster children to my late sonne Adam Foster to be equally payd unto them when they sahll come to the full age of one and twenty yeares, Item out of the last third parte of my said goods, I give foure silver spoons unto my foure daughters, agnes, hellino(r), margarett and Bridgitt. Item I give unto every grandchild that I have an Ewe and a lambe at myd Aprill next after my decease. Item I give unto every one of my sonnes in law and daughters in law two shillings


sixpence Item I give unto my Kozen Henry Claphamson three shillings foure pence, Item I give to Anthonye Wilkinson my best suyte of appell Item I give to every one of my godchildren foure pence. Item the reste of my goods not formly given nor bequeathed I give equally betwixt my aforenamed sonne Gyles Foster and my sonne Robert Foster, and last of all I hereby revoke and frustrate all other former wills and Testaments, and I make and ordayne my said sonne Gyles Foster sole executor of this my last will and Testament and I intraet my forenamed frends henry Claphamson and henry Wilkinson to be supervisours thereof In witnesse whereof I the said Richard Foster have hereunto putt my hande and seale the daye and yeare first above rytten. Sealed signed and acknowledged in the presence of Henry Claphamson & Willm Robinson

Whereas I the abovenamed Richard Foster beinge now sycke but in pfecte memory thanks be to god have maid my last will and Testament as above specified I doe hereby ratiffie allowe and confirme the same (exceptinge some pticulers therof) wherof I hereby declare my true meanynge and my will is as followethe First that my said wyffe shall have the third pte of my goodes as formerlye I have bequeathed then unto her Item that every one of my grandchildren in stead of a Ewe and a lambe shall have three shillinges in money Item I give unto Abraham Tailor my late servant my seconde sewte of apparell Item I hereby Revoke the legacie above geven wch was the seconde third pte of my goodes unto Isabell Foster and Richard Foster children of my late sonne Addam Foster and my mynd and will is that all other legacies geven and bequeathed by this my will shall be payd out of two ptes of my goodes and the remainder to be equally devided unto and amongst my sonnes Thomas Gyles and Robert Anthony Wilkinson my daughters Ellinor Margarett and bridgitt and the above named Isabell Foster and Richard Foster the said children of my said late sonne Addam Foster And herby I intrust my sonne Giles Foster and Robert Foster to give and paye thirty pounds unto my said late sonne Adam's Children Isabell and Richard belowe named out of the prize or pfitts of my farme and tenement in Settle wch I have past unto them, and I doe herby so farr as I have power give the said thirtye poundes unto the said Isabell and Richard to be payd and remayne after other somes be payd out of the said farme unto my wyfe her sister Magdalyne and my daughters unto my said sonne Gyles Foster or his assignes for the use of the said Isabell and Richard and that my said sonne Giles or his assignes shall pay the said thirty pounds with the pfyttes that shall come therof after the recypt of the same unto the said Richard and Isabell equally betwixt them as and when they shall come to the full age of twenty foure yeares Item my will is that Anthony Wilkinson shall have, what I above gave unto his late wyff. In witnes whereof I have hereunto sett my hand and seale the nynth day of May in the fyfthe yeare of the Reaigne of our soverayne lord Charles by the grace of god of England etc kinge defender of the fayth etc Annodm 1629 Witnesses here of Henry Claphamson Thomas Newhouse Margrett Wilkinson & Isabell Foster etc Latin text FOSTER THOMAS of Langcliffe [undated] Borthwick v42 f328 Will proved 1634 In the name of God amen I Thomas Foster of Winskill sick in body in good and perfect memory, the lord’s name be praised for the same, do make and ordain this my last will and testament imprimis I bequeath my soul to God by whose merits I hope to be saved and my body to the earth to be buried at the discretion of my friends. Item my will is that my son William Foster enter and possess the ground that now I am possessed of at the end and expiration of six years to come paying out unto my other children Christopher, Elizabeth and Agnes viz. to my son Christopher ten pounds within one year after the entry onto it and six pounds the year following, viz three pounds to my daughter Elizabeth and three pounds to my daughter Agnes. And concerning my grounds in the meantime my will is that my son William be apparelled out of the profit that is raised thereof , my will is that my sister Agnes dwell in my house and have the benefit of my garden till May day next. I give unto my daughter Elizabeth one cow now in the hands of John *****, the use of my grounds for those six years to come my son William being apparelled with, the rest of my goods my debts paid, my funeral expenses discharged I give equally to be divided between my daughters Elizabeth and Agnes.


I ordain my son William executor and entreat my friends Roger Lawson and Thomas Chaphill supervisors of this my last will and testament. Witnesses: Thomas Foster and Christopher Foster.

Thomas son of William b Aug 1568 his sister Agnes b 1566 Margaret wife of Thomas died 1623 (may have married in Gisburn 1595) Thomas buried 1625 (he intimates that his son will be 21 in 6 years, so this is the right Thomas and the will is out of date order or was proved very late, i.e. when William grew up) 23.2.1599 18.3.1606 9.4.1609 9.2.1612

Agnes Thomae Isabella Thomae Willelmus Thomae Christoferus Thomae

WILLIAM FOSTER of Winskill and Langcliffe 1677/8 Borthwick vol 58 fol 568 mf 977 In the name of god Amen the seaventh day of February Anno dmi 1677 & in the thirtyth yeare of the Reigne of or (sic) Soveraigne lord Charles the second I william Foster of Langcliff in the County of yorke yeoman beinge in good and pfect remembrance make & ordaine this my last will & Testament in ye manner & forme followinge And first of all I commit & Commend my soul into the hands of Almighty god my Creator & by & through Jesus Xt my mercifull redeemer through whose merritts onely I hope to be saved & my body I leave to the earth to be buryed att ye discretion of my exor Concerninge ye disposition & orderinge of those Temporall things which god of his meere (?) mercy hath bestowed upon me Impr. I doe forgive to my son in law Josias Dawson the summe of one hundred pownds which he owes me upon bond It. I give to my Grandson willm Dawson the summe of one Hundred pownds. It. I give unto Josias & william sons of my Grandson Chr Dawson the summe of fifty pownds. It. I give to Chr & Mary son and dawghter of my Grandson William Dawson the summe of fifty pownds It. I give & bequeath all my messuages howses barnes buildings lands tenments & heriditamts with thappurtencs in Settle as also the summe of one Hundred pownds to my Grandson Josias Dawson and my mind & will is that he receive & take the moneys & pfitts of those lands within one yeare after my decease It. I give to my Grandson Jonathan Dawson the summe of foure hundred pownds when he shall accomplish the age of one & twenty yeares as alsoe the summe of one hundred pownds more if my executor observeinge his good carryage shall thinke fitt, otherwise my mind & will yt ye sayd one hundred pownds shall be disposed of to such of the rest of my Grandchildren as my executor in his discretion shall thinke meet pvided yt the sd one hundred pownds be really disposed of to the use of my sd Grandchildren or some of them but if it happen yt the sd Jonathan Dawson shall dye or depart this life before he shall accomplish the age of one & twenty yeares then my mind & will is yt the sd foure hundred pownds & ye one hundred pownds shall be devided amongst the rest of my Grandchildren or such of them as my executor shall thinke foitt pvided that the sd sumes be really disposed of to them my sd Grandchildren or some of them It. I give & bequeath the sume of six hundred pownds to my two Grandaughters Alice & Anne Dawson when they shall accomplish the age of one and twenty yeares which sd sume shall be pportiond and shared betwixt them accordinge to the discretion of my executor (viz (?)) yt each of them shall have such share or pte of ye sd six hundred pownds as my exor (observinge their good Carryage) shal thinke fitt pvided that the sd sume be really disposed of to them my sd Grandaughters but if it happen yt either the sd Anne or Alice Dawson shall dye before they shall accomplish the age of one & twenty yeares my mind & will is that the one halfe or Moyety of the six hundered pownds shall be devided amongst the rest of my Grandchildren accordinge to the discretion of my exor pvided that the sd Moyety of ye sd summe be really disposed of to them my sd Grandchildren It. I give to my late wifes Grandaughter Margarett Butterfeild the sume of twenty pownds And as for the rest of my psonall estate I give to my exor & I doe hereby Constitute & appoynt my son in law Josias Dawson the sole exor of this my last will & testamt In witnesse whereof I have hereunto put my hand & seale the day & yeare abovesd


Witnesses hereof Chr Dawson William Foster of Stainforth William Braddley (?)

William Foster

GELDARD

THOMAS GELDARD of Langcliffe 1687 Borthwick Vacancy wills June 1687 mf 902 A-K In the name of god Amen the 17th day of March and according to the computation of the church of England 1687 I Thomas Geldard of Langcliffe in the county of York cloth maker being at present sound in mind but not healthful of body and knowing the certainty of death and the uncertainty of the time and considering likewise that it is the duty of every good Christian to set his house in order before he die That posterity may enjoy the lands and goods of the deceased in peace and quietness do make and constitute this my last will and testament in manner and form as following. First and principally I commend my soul into the hands of Almighty god trusting through the merits of Jesus Christ my saviour to be made partaker of eternal bliss and my body I commit to the earth from whence it came to be buried in honest and Christian burial at the discretion of my executors and friends in hope of resurrection to eternal life and for my temporal estate I give and dispose thereof as follows Imprimis I give unto my second son James all my bought lands namely one croft joining to the east end of the town with two cattle gates in the over close. Item I give unto my said son the sum of ÂŁ16 ÂŁ10 whereof to be paid within one month after he be loose from his apprenticeship and the other six within three years after. Item I give unto my daughter Agnes four pounds to be paid within two years after my decease. Item I give unto my grandchild William Procter four pounds to be paid when he attains to the age of one and 20 years if he so long live but if be being not at the time living my will is that it be paid to her other issue male or female lawfully begotten of her body if she have any then living but for want of such issue my will and mind is that it returns to Agnes my daughter. Item I give to my eldest son Thomas all the rest of my lands houses household stuff and utensils of trade after my funeral charges and other debts be defrayed and I likewise make my said son Thomas sole executor of this my last will and testament Witness my hand Thomas Geldard in the presence of John Paley Richard Lawson

Bond Noverint universi per presentes nos Thomam Geldard de Langcliffe in Com Ebor pannarum et Richardum Lawson de Langcliffe predicti yeoman teneri et firmiter obligari ventibi vivo John Kirkam SJ per Decano eccliae Cathij ...............

Anglie; Solvend eidem Decani ... Ric.Carr Thomas Geldard Richard Lawson


The Condition of this obligation is such that if the within bounden Thomas Geldard do well and truly execute perform and keep the last will and testament of Thomas geldard of Langcliffe in the parish of Giggleswick and Diocese of York his late father deceased And do pay his debts and legacies so far as his goods will extend and law shall bind him if also he do exhibit into the Registers Office at York a true and perfect Inventory of all and singular the goods rights Credits Cattells and Chattells of the said deceased and do make a true and just accompt of the same when he shall be thereunto lawfully called. And moreover (if need require) enter into such further Bond with more sufficient sureties for performance of the premises which the Judge of the said Court for the time being shall think reasonable and needful And lastly do save defend and harmless keep the within named Dean and Chapter ....... and all other their Officers and ministers......... all persons by reason of the premises Then .......... void and of none effect or else to remain in full force....

An inventory of the goods credits and debts of Thomas Geldard clothier of Langcliff late deceased apprised by Richard Lawson Junior Anthony Armitstead John Paley Richard Lawson Junior all of Langcliffe the third and twentieth day of June Anno 1687 £ s d Impris his apparel with money in his purse 05 -04 -06 Item in cloth 07 -07 -00 It in woole 00 -18 -00 It 2 pair bedstockes 00 -10- 00 It two ruggs 00 - 18-00 It one fether bedd 01 - 00 -00 It 3 chaffe bedds 00 - 05- 00 It 4 blankets 2 coverlets 00 - 16-00 It 4 pillows 00 - 08 -00 It 3 sheets two pillow ...... 00 -15- 00 It 3 sheets more 00 - 05 -00 It seven cushons 00 -04- 00 It 2 chairs 00 - 04 -00 ? Itm one close press 01 -05-00 It 3 chists 01-04-00 It one litle table 00 -04-00 It one ...ang(?) of wheel timber 00-03-00 ? It in other peeces of wood 00 -03-00 It one stone trough 00 -04-00 It six sackes 00 -06-00 It 3 pannes 00 -10-00 Itm Brass and pewter 00 -12-00 Itm other od things about the hous 00 -15-00 It one pair of Loomes 3 pair of sheares with other things belonging to his trade 02 -05-00 Suma

£26 -12-00

Debts oweing to the deceased from all men

£3-07-00 ?

Debts which the deceased did owe To John Paley It to the towne in Comon stocke It in other debts to all persons It in funerall expenses and given to the poor

£12 -00 -00 ? 02 -04-04 03 -02-00 06 -00-00

Summa 23 -06-06


Richard Lawson sen Anthony Armitstead John Paley Richard Lawson jun THOMAS GELDARD 1697 Borthwick mf 1788 p962 Probate 1698 In the name of god Amen I Thomas Geldard of Langcliffe in the County of York Clothier being weakly of Body but of sound and perfect memory praised be god for the same do make this my last will and testament In manner and form following viz. first I bequeath my soul to god who gave it hoping through the merits and mediation of my saviour to obtain remission of sins and consequently everlasting life. And my body to the ground to be buried in decent and christian manner at the discretion of my friends and executrix. And for my temporal estate I give and dispose of As follows, first I give to Jane my wife (my debts and funeral expenses first paid) All my personal estate in what kind or nature soever it be. Item I give to Thomas my son and only child All my houses and lands whatsoever to enter to 2 parts of the same when he shall Attain the Age of one and twenty years And the other third part after Jane my said wife her decease. And my will and mind is that Jane my said wife shall receive and take all the profits of the said lands for and towards the education of my said son till he Attain the Age of one and twenty years. But if it happen that Jane my wife shall marry to another man then my will and mind is that my two Trustees whom I shall hereafter Appoint from and Immediately after my said son shall Attain the age of fourteen years shall enter unto and receive and take the rents Issues and profits of two parts of my said lands for and towards his better preferment in trade at his and their best discretion. And likewise my will and mind is that if my said son shall die before he Attain the age of one and twenty years that then my said wife shall receive and take all the rents Issues and profits of my said lands during the term of her natural life. And then After the death of my said son As Aforesaid then from and Immediately after the death of Jane my said wife I give unto James Geldard my brother All my houses and Lands Aforesaid paying unto the children of Agnes Pearte my sister or so many as shall be at that time living the sum of £20 within one year After he enter to the same. And if she be at the time living then to pay unto the said Agnes my sister the sum of 20 shillings …… during her life. And I do appoint Jane my said wife Executrix of this my last will and testament. And I do likewise Appoint Richard Lawson and James Geldard trustees to take care that this my will be rightly executed. In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand this 10th day of June Anno Domini 1697. Acknowledge and signed in the presence of us Richard Lawson jurat James Geldard jurat Thomas Geldard Bond and Obligation attached

A true and perfect Inventory of all the goods chattels and debts and credits of Thomas Geldard late of Langcliffe deceased as they are Apprized this 27th (?) day of February by us whose names are underwritten ll s d Imprimis his purse and Apparel 03 - 00 - 00 It 2 Cowes 05 - 00 - 00 It 26 yards of Cloth 03 - 00 - 00 It 40 yards of plain cloth and 1/2 thick 02 - 00 - 00 It 1 Cart 2 paire of wheeles 00 - 15 - 00 It in wood and 2 Ladders 00 - 08 - 00 It 1 paire of Looms with other utensills belonging Trade 02 - 10 - 00 It 1 Dresser pewter and other goods in the body of the House 01 - 19 - 00 It in wood vessel brass and other goods in the Kitching 01 - 15 - 00 It one Bed with furniture with other


goods in the Parlour It one Bedstead one Chist in the little chamber It in Goods in the house chamber It in goods in Parlour chamber It in Linnen It in meale Beefe and Bacon __________ 32 - 08 - 00

00 - 07 - 00 00 - 18 - 00 04 - 09 - 00 00 - 12 - 00 02 - 00 - 00

It debts owing to the Deceased Sum Tota

92 - 00 - 00 (not clear) 124 - 00 - 00

Debts which the Deceased did owe John Paley Richard Armitsted Richard Lawson James Geldard

03 - 15 - 00

70 - 00 - 00

ROBERT HARRISON 1621 / 2 Borthwick vol 36 fol 705 mf 953 Memorandum that upon the fower and twentieth day of ffebruary in the yeare of our Lord god one thousand sixe hundreth twenty one Robert Harrison late of Langcliffe in the parish of gigleswicke within the dioces of yorke did make and declare his last will and testament nuncupative as followeth first haveing comended his Soule to god and his body to christian buriall in hope of ioyfull resurection to eternall life then for his goods especiallie his tenement he did give so much of it to Jennet his wife during her widowhoad as by lawe should be due unto her and after-wards wholy to Redound and Come to Allice his daughter And for the rest of his goods he willed should be devided betwene Jennet his wife and Alice his daughter and he made the said Jennett his wife sole Executor of this his last will and testament These be my witnesses John Stackhowse and John Claphamson Latin text HUDSON ANDREW of Winskill 1688 Borthwick.,York. Vol.61 fol.59 Transcribed by S.Gordon In the name of God Amen, This twentieth day of July in the yeare our Lord Christ one thousand six hundred eighty eight I Andrew Hudson of Winskall in the pish of Gigleswick in the County of Yorke husbandman being weake and infirme in body but of good and perfect memory praised be God for the same doe make and ordaine this my last will and testament in manner and forme Following hereby revokeing all former and other will or wills by me heretofore made and first and principally, I Commend and Council my soule into the hands of Almighty God my maker assuredly trusting that in and through the merits and mediation of Jesus Christ my saviour my sins shall be forgiven And that my soule shall be made partaker of everlasting happiness in the Kingdome of heaven, And my body to be buried in the Parrish Church yard of Gigleswick aforesaid at the discretion of my friends & Executrix hereafter named; And as to the temporall estate wherewith it hath pleased God to bless me I give and dispose as Followeth; And First my will and minde is that my just debts and funeral expences thall be paid out of my whole goods, Cattells and Chattells; And as to the rest and residue thereof I give and bequeath the same unto Jaine Hudson my loveing wife; Item my will and minde is that she shall pay unto John Hudson my brother five shillings within the space of one yeare next after my decease as a legacy; Item I give unto the said John Hudson my brother my rideing Coate and my bootes; And Lastly I doe nominate constitute and appointe my said wife Jaine sole Executrix of this my last will and testament; In Wittness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seale the day and yeare first above written Andrew Hudson his marke sealed signed and published in the presence of us Antho: Armistead John Tayler James Tayler his marke


RICHARD HUITSON als OATSON Admon Craven 30th June 1699 Copied from original at Borthwick - Abstract Noverint …. Thomas Ridgey and Richard Lawson … decem et nono libris… Condition … Thomas Ridgey of Langcliffe … Richard Huitson Sig. et del. Jo. Horrocks Tho. Ridgey Richd Lawson An Inventory of the Lease: lands sometime belonging unto Richard Huitson als Oatson late of Langcliffe decd., made and apprized by us whose names are subscribed this nineteenth day of June in the year of Our Lord according to ye Computacon of ye Church of England One Thousand Six hundred Ninety Nine / 1699/ as followeth Imprimis one small parcell of arable Land called ye Pike £07 - 03s - 00 d It: Common of Pastur, lying & being on ye Daw-haw within ye Township of Langcliffe aforesaid £02 - 07s - 00 d ____________________ Totall £09 - 10s - 00 d Ri Acinson Richd Lawson Willm Bradley William Carr

IVESON LAWRENCE IVESON 1548 Borthwick vol. 13 fol. 426 mf 920

In the name of God amen the yere of oure lorde god a Thnd v (hundred) xlviij the xviij daie of Aprile I Lawrence yveson of Lanklif seke in bodie and hooll of mynde maikes my laste will as after followithe First I bequeathe my soule unto almightie god and my bodie to be buried within the churche yarde of Gigleswike Also I bequeath unto katerine my wif duringe her widweheade the title and tennte righte of my farmolde and after my wif I will that my farmolde shall remayne unto John my eldest sone and he to agre withe his children Willm and John for the title and tennte righte of the saide farmolde at sighte of fower frendes that is to saie James Iveson Richard Iveson John Sergant and Symon Iveson the which men I have in truste to order my wif and my children Also I will that my debtes be paid of my hooll goodes Also I bequeath the office of the kepinge of lankliffe mylne to one of my sones whiche of them as can please the farmers the best Also The residue of all my goodes my debts and funerall expenses paide I bequeathe unto katerine my wif and my children that is James Willm and John my sones an Elizabeth and Alice my daughters and if ............... be that my wif at anye tyme marrie Then my will is that she shall have her parte of goodes devided owte at sighte of the saide foure frendes and my children for to have their porcions devyded likewise at sighte of the forenaymed frendes Also I maike katerine my wif my hooll executerixe of this my laste will witnes herof James Iveson Richarde Iveson withe others Latin text


.................Johannes Lambert presbiteri .................

STEVEN IVESON 1571 Borthwick vol 19 fol 433 mf 930 In the name of God Amen the vj th day of Auguste anno die a thowsande fyve hundrethe seaventie one I Steven Iveson of langeclife syke in bodie and of good and pfyte remembrance loved be allmyghtie god maykes this my laste will and Testament in manner and forme followynge First I geve and bequythe my Soule to allmyghtie god and my bodie to be buried in the pishe churche yarde of Giglesweke Also I geve and bequythe for my mortuarie and other churche dewes all that right will Also I bequythe to Willm Iveson my sone my title and Tenante righte of my fermeholde he doinge his dewtie to the lorde and he to enter to the halfe at the nexte Candlmes and my wyfe florence and her ijo daughters to the other halfe duringe my wyfes widoweheade or to suche tyme as she haythe broughte the one of my daughters to succoore then my will is that willm my Sonne shall have two partes of my farmeholde and my wyfe the thirde parte duringe her wedowhead and after her wedowhead all to remeyne to my sonne Willm Also I will that my sonne Willm be obedient to his mother as a good childe aughte to Also I geve my wife her wedowe righte accordinge to the lawe Also I geve my children ther porcion that is Elizabethe Ellen and Margaret Also my will is that my debtes be paid of my hole goodes Also I geve unto my wyfe and Willm my sonne all my husbandrie geare to be occupied equallie betweene them bothe duringe my wyfe wedowheade and after her wedowheade all the husbandrie to remeyne unto Willm my sonne And my will is that to be for his childes porcion Also I geve to my godbarnes that is to say Robte Armesteade and Stephen Iveson eyther of them a gymer lambe and they to be sent forewarde to the children use and to Willm Foster and Willm Remington eyther of them iiij d Also I geve to Willm my sone my beste Jacket my beste hose my best dublet my beste shawle and my newe bowe Also I geve to James Iveson a newe Jacket a payre of hose a dublet a shawle and a paire of shooes Also I geve to Anthony Cokson a sherte Also I will that florence my wyfe shall pay halfe of the gressinge to the lorde and my sone Willm the other halfe the reste of my pte of goodes my debtes and all other ordinarie dewes paid I geve and bequythe unto my thre daughters Elizabeth Ellen, and Margaret equallie amonge them and I mayke and constitute my hole executors Florannce my wyfe and margaret Iveson my daughter Also I make Thomas Somerscales supvisor of this my will Thes witnes Roger Kide John Browne and Joh armested with others Latin text

WILLIAM IVESON 1589 Borthwick vol 24 fol 369-70 mf 934 In the name of god Amen the xix th daie of Julie 1589 I willm Iveson of Lanckliffe of the pish of gigleswicke in the countie of yorke sick in bodie but of pfect remembrance praised be god do make this my Laste will and testament in manner and forme followinge Firste I bequieth my soule to Jesus Christ my maker and onely saviour and my bodie to be buried in the churchyard where it shall please god ................. And for my mortuarie and other church duties all that righte will Also it is my will that my wief shall her widowe right of my goodes and my children ther porcon my debtes beinge first paide of the whole goodes Itm I give the title and tenant right of my ten[emen]t unto Stephane Iveson my sonne with the license of the lorde The resedewe of my goodes not bequiethed my debts and funerall expenses paied and discharged I give unto my wief and children equallie to be devyded amongste them And I ordeine and appointe the said margaret my wief my sole executrix of this my Laste will and testament Thes wittnesses Thomas Foster Willm Kidd John Kidd and John Armisted with others Latin text RICHARD IVESON 1608 Borthwick vol 30 fol 723 mf 945


In the name of god Amen the fowerteenth day of March in the yere of our lord 1608 I Richard Iveson of Langcliffe in the Countie of yorke husbandman sicke in bodie & whole in mynde doe make this my last will & testament in manner followinge Firste I give my soule to allmightie god & my bodie to be buried in the church yard of Gigleswicke at the discretion of my freindes Itm I give unto my sonne James Iveson & his assignes my house & garth & all my title interest & terme of yeres therin And for my goodes my will is that (that) they be devided into three ptes wherof my wife to have her thirdes accordinge to lawe & the other two ptes I give to my sonne James & my daughter Elizabeth equally And yf either of my children dye before they come to lawfull yeres or be married my will is that the porcon of him or her soe dyinge shall redownde to the survivour & I make Margaret my wife my whole executor These beinge witnesses William Browne Thomas Sigswicke Thomas Carre & Thomas Sowden William Iveson Latin text JAMES IVESON 1665 Borthwick Craven/Prog. probate file Feb 1665/6 died 12 April 1665 In the name of god amen I James Iveson of Langcliffe beinge sicke and weak of body butt of pfect memory praysed be god doe make this my last will and testament in manner and forme followinge First I bequeath my soule into ye hands of my maker wishinge through the meritts of Jesus Christ to be made partaker of Eternall happiness, and my body to be buried in ye Church yarde of Gigleswick att ye discretion of my freinds, And as to my Temporall goodes I give and bequeath as followethe First I give unto my sister Elizabeth Twentye shillinges to be paid within one halfe yeare after my decease alsoe I give unto Robert Kendall and Ann Kendall children of ye said Elizabeth my sister either of them Tenn shillings likewise to be paid within halfe A yeare after my decease I doe alsoe make my well beloved wife (Margaret Iveson) whole Executrix of this my last will and Testament In wittnesse whereof I have hereunto sett my hand ye seventh day of Aprill One Thousand sixe hundred sixtie five witnesses mke mke William (mark) Ridgey James (mark) Iveson John Paley Margaret Iveson and John Carr bound

RICHARD JACKES 1700 Craven admon. 17 July 1700 Borthwick copied from original Obligation Noverint …. Annath Jackes de Langcliffe … et Matthew Jackes de Setle …. septem libris … Condition … Ann: Jackes relict of Richard Jackes of Langcliffe lately deceased …. Sig …..del. Jo: Horrocks An Jackes Matthew Jackes

A true Inventory of all and Singular Goods Chattells and credits of Richard Jackes late of Langclife deceased made ye twenty fifth day of Aprill An:Dom: 1700 £ s d Imprimis, His purse and Apparrell 00 15 00 It: One Cubbard one Table 00 12 00 It: Chests 00 17 00 It: Bedstocks and Beding 00 10 00


It: 3 Boxes and two chaires It: Three Pewter doublets It: One Pot & 2 Panns It: Two Barrells & 1 Flasket(?) It: In Oat Meale It: In Houslement

00 02 06 00 03 04 00 05 02 00 02 03 00 05 10

Apprized by us William Carr Thomas Swanson

[This inventory is written in a more modern style of writing and wording. Seems to be in a standard format, no entry for oatmeal. No sum of money.]

WILLIAM JOHNSON 1669 Borthwick vol 59 fol 171 In the name of god Amen I William Johnson of Langcliffe beinge sicke in body butt of pfect memory (praised be god) doe make this my last will and testament in manner and forme followinge First I bequeath my soule into the hands of my blessed Redeemer trustinge through his meritts to be made ptaker of Eternall happinesse and my body to be buried att ye discretion of my wife As for my temporall goods I give and bequeath as followeth First I will yt my wife Ellin have the tuition of my daughter Jennett till she accomplish ye Age of twenty one years if ye said Jennett and ye said Ellin my wife can Agree to live together, butt if they cannott Agree then my said Jennett to chuse her gardian when she shall accomplish ye Age of ffourtene years And ye gardian to have all ye pfitts yt ffalls to my said daughter ffor ye maintenance of her till shee shall Accomplish ye Age of twenty one years And whereas I am owinge unto Robert Iveson ye summe of tenn pounds I will yt if my Executor hereafter named be nott Able to pay itt without sellinge lands I will yt these pcells be sould viz Peasber Rood yt I bought of William (?)Ridgey one garden that I bought of Robert Iveson Ane one Cow Ane ye Rest of my lands I give I give (sic) unto my daughter Jennett and to dispose of itt if whee come to Age if whe die before she come to Age haveinge noe Issue I give itt unto my brother James Children equally to be devided Also I will yt if my wife marry to be void and have noe pte of the pmisses As ffor my household goods I give unto my wife Ellin and my daughter Jennett equally after my funerall Expenses be paid out Lastly I nominate and appoint my said wife Ellin and my said daughter Jennett Executrixes of this my last will and testment In witness whereof I have hereunto putt my hand and seale the twentye ffiffth day of Aprill 1669

Wittnesses

Jurat Jurat

William Johnson

Richard Lawson Willm Carr John Paley

(overleaf) Craven T. Guilielmi Johnson nup de Langcliffe poice de Giglesweek deft. Respit ............ ..............Octobris 1681 Entred


WILLIAM KYDD 1591 Borthwick vol 25 fol 974 mf 937 (6?) In the name of god Amen the [twenty second day] of March in the yeare of our Lord god one thowsand fyve hundreth nyntie one I Willm Kydd of Lanclyffe sycke in bodye but of perfect memory praysed be Almightie god doe make this my last will and testamt in manner and forme followinge First I commend my soule into thandes of my heavenly father by whose mercyes through Jesus Christ I beleve to be saved and my body to be buryed at the discretion of my friendes Itm I geve for my mortuarie that which of right is due Also I geve to Elizabet my wife her thirdes of my goodes landes and tenementes according to Custom of the Countrey and as of right appertainnes unto her to have and geve to all my children being not maryed now sett forward to any say(?) of ...... out my goodes heretofore their dew portyons of goodes as in equytie appertains... Item Also whereas I have Bargayned and concluded wth mr Nicholas darcye for the purchase of my tenement and have paid him alredie sixteene poundes & rest Indebted yet thirtie two pound xx d which is to be paid uppon and at the sealinge myne assurance my will is And I do devyse that yf the said Nich Darcy or any other for him do Assure my said tenement to me or myne Assignes whether yt be by deed lease or other wyse that then my son Thomas shalbe myne Assigne And have ye said tenement to him and to the heires of his body Lawfully begotten for ever my wifes Lawfull thirdes received during her life And my will is that my said sonn Thomas shall paie in Consideracion theireof vj li xiij s iiij d to every one of my childrenne being nowe unmaryed Itm I geve the best fether bedd at my howse and my two pair of Lomes to my said sonne Thomas kydd in Consideracon of parte of his Childes portyon and my will is that he shalbe further considered at the sight of my frendes mr Shutt Lawrence Swaynson and James Bankes to whom I confer the ordering and setting downe of all thinges as shalbe thought good & trewe for the behoofe and Benefitt of my Children The rest of all my goodes not already geven and bequeathed I geve to my sonn Robert Kydd and my daughter maude kydde equallie to be devyded betweene them And of this my last will and testamt I make Elizabeth my wyfe and Thomas Kydd my sonn Execoutures These being wytnesses Richard kydson and mathew Sigsweek wth others Latin text {Mr Shutt was Vicar of Gigleswick }

LAWSON THOMAS LAWSON 1574 Borthwick vol 19 fol 707 In the name of God Amen the xxiiij th day of October a thowsand fyve hundrethe seventie foure I Thomas Lawson of Langclif within the pish of Giglesweke husbandman sicke in bodie but of good & pfyct memorie loved by allmyghtie god maykes this my laste will & testament in manner & forme folowinge fyrst I gyve & bequythe my sowle to allmightie god & to all the glorious company in heaven & my bodie to be buried in the pishe church yarde of Giglwsweke Also I bequythe for my mortuarie & other churche dewes all that right will Also I will that Elizabeth my wyfe shall have her widowrighte bothe of my goodes & farmeholde And I gyve unto my said wyfe a .... which of myne as she will choose Also I will that George Lawson my sone shall have for his title & tennante righte of my farmehold & his childes porcon of my goodes iij li vj s viij d in redie mony at that tyme as the righte honorable Erle of Cumberlande shalbe at full aige and demannde Gressom of hym Also I gyve to my fyve daughters & to everie one of them one Ewe schepe of the beste Also I will that xpofer Lawson my sone shall have his thirdes porcon of my goodes & the said goodes shalbe delyvered to Richarde lawson my sone & the said xpofer shalbe founde (?) of my farme olde Also I gyve unto Elizabethe deane a gymmer lambe The reste of my pte of goodes my dettes & other ordinarie feys paid & discharged I gyve & bequythe to Richarde Lawson my sone & his children And I mayke & constitute my


sone Richarde Lawson my hole executor Thes witnes Willm Bankes of Giglesweke Thomas kinge Giles (?) Cookeson & mathewe Sigisweke with others Latin text

GREGORY LAWSON 1615 Borthwick vol 34 fol 666 In the name of god Amen the Nyne and twentyth day of June in yeare of our lord god one thousand six hundred and fiftene I Gregory Lawson of Langcliffe in the county of yorke yeoman beinge at this instant of good and pfect memory god be praised therefor doe make and ordeyne this my last will and testament in manner and form followinge, first I comend my soul into the mercifull hands of almighty god trustinge and assuredly psuadding my self that through the merritts and precious blood shedinge of my sweete saviour and redeemer Christ Jesus I shall have full remission of all my sinnes and be made ptaker of life everlasting and for my bodie I comitt the same to the earth from whence it came to be buried within the pish Church of Gigleswicke in or for now as conveniently may be unto the place where I doe use to kneele and sitt on the sundaies and holidayes. Item I desire Mr Shute to preach at my buriall and for that his pains I give him five shillings. Item I doe hereby revocke all former wills by me made at any time before the day of the date hereof Item whereas I have by my deede in Wryting indented bearing date the six and twenteith day of the instant June, given granted assigned and set over unto Mathew Sigswicke of Langcliffe and Thomas Lawson of Airton late sonne of Roger Lawson of Knight Sanford and to theire executors and assignes all my Messuage Tenement and estate that I have (wthin)?) my lands or grounds whatsoever in langcliffe aforesaide to and such uses as are therein limitted and expressed I doe now hereby ratifie and refirme the sam deede to be good and effectuall in law to and for the sam use therein specified and declared. Item I give unto the poore people of the pish of Gigleswicke Twentie shillings to be distributed amongst them at the discretion of Mr Christopher Shute and churchwardens of this pish Item my will is and I ordaine that Thomas Palye son of John unto whom I have limitted my Tenament after my decease, shall give unto Robert Stalman my sisters sonne Twentie nobles, and unto Thomas Claphame sonne of the saide Christopher fortie shillings, to be paide unto them at the time of mariage of the Thomas and my will is that upon the payment of the saide some to the saide Robert Stalman he the saide Robert shall give release unto my executors of all such rights as hee might clame in any pte of my goods or other rights whatsoever, and shall alsoe release unto the saide Thomas Paley all the righ that he might claime in the Tenament and grounds orelse if he refuse soe to doe then to have noe benefite of the legacie And if this saide Thomas Paley shall refuse to paye the saide legacies, to the saide Robert Stalman, and Thomas Claphame, then my will is, that the said feoffees or freinds in trust and my executors shall pay the same out of the proffits and increase of my saide tenement Item my will is that the saide Thomas Paley shall be guided and governed by my executors hereafter named, and by my supvisors, and likewise that (t)he shall have the guideing, mannring, useing, and husbanding of my Tenament, for his behoofe, and towards his better bringing upp and pfermet if in case that hee be not married in my life times untill the second daye of februarie wch shall be in the yeare of our lord god one Thousand six hundreth Twentie and two Item I give unto unto (sic) the saide Thomas Paley my armour, That is to say, my talliver with the furniture thereto belonging, and all my husbandry geare. Item I give to Christopher Claphame and Thomas his sonne either of them Twentie shillings, and unto Thomas Paler of Gigleswicke Twentie shillings and unto Thomas Paler sonne of the saide Thomas Tenn shillings and unto Rober(t) Cookesonne fortie shillings Item I give unto Willm Lawson fortie shillings wch he owes me, and I give unto Henrie Lawson sonne of the saide Willm Tenn shillings. Item I give unto James Falthropp Twentie shillings wch he owes me. Item I give unto Margrett Iveson widdow Twentie Shillings if shee be living at my decease, or if shee be dead, then I give it to James her sonne Item I give to Anne Kiddson my maid servant Ten shillings. And for the residue of all my goods cattalls and other rights unbequeathed I give one halfe of them unto the saide Thomas Paley sonne of John. Provided alwaies and upon condicion that if the saide Thomas paley sonne of John dye before he be maried this his legacie shalbe voide and then I give the porcon of goods and cattalls to him limitted unto the executors and supervisors of this my will to be distributed according to theire discrecon amongst my kinfolke and freinds. And I give the other halfe unto Richar(d) Lawson and unto his wife and children equally amongst them. Item I give unto Thomas paley the sonne of John and to his heires and assignes forever my customarie estate in that pcell of grounde called Stackhouse holme uopn condicion that he shall give and pay to Thomas Lawson and Joh Lawson sonnes of Richard be paide the some of Eleaven pounds when he comes to age of Twentie one yeares or within a twelvemonth now after my decease or for want of payment thereof then I give tennt and customarie estate of the pcell of grounde to the saide Thomas Lawson and John Lawson and to theire


heires and assignes forever. And I doe appoynt and ordaine the saide Christopher Clapham Thomas Paler of Gigleswick and Richard Lawson to be joynt executors of this my last will and testament and I desire Rober falthropp and the saide Willm Lawson to be supervisors thereof and to assyst my executors with theire best directions and helpe. Witnesses hereof James Falthropp Thomas Lawson Willm Lawson and Mathew Sigswicke Latin text THOMAS LAWSON 1694 Craven Admon 15 February 1694 Borthwick copied from original Obligation Noverint… Richard Preston of Settle …. and Christopher Craven of Kildwick … sextem libris …. Condition of this obligation… Richard Preston of Settle …. Thomas Lawson late of Langcliffe, parish of Giggleswick … Sig …. Chro. Watkin Richard Pollard (?) R Preston Christ. Craven A true and p(er)fect Inventory of the goods and Chattells of Thomas Lawson late of Langclife deceased apprized by us whose names are hereunto subscribed this fourteenth day of January in the yeare of our Lord God 1694 Imprimis One old house and barne falled into decay and one little garden

£3 - 13s - 4d

Wiij Paley John Wildman Leo. Boilland Tho. Carr

RICHARD LAWSON of Langcliffe 1699 North Yorkshire County Record Office, Northallerton ZXC I 1/21/1 In the name of God amen the twenty fourth day of October in the yeare of our Lord according to the computation of the Church of England one thousand six hundred ninety nine I Richard Lawson of Langclife in the County of Yorke yeoman being infirme in body but of sound annd perfect memory praised be God for the same doe make this my last will and testament in manner and forme following that is to say first and chiefly commending my soule unto God almighty beleiveing my salvation in and through the sole mercy of my onely Redeemer Jesus Christ and commiting my body to the earth in hopes of a Joyful Resurrection unto Life eternall decently to be buryed in the parish Church of Gigelswicke after the manner of my ancesters of that worldly estate which God in mercy hath bestowed upon me I doe dispose as followeth Imprimis after payment of my just debts and funeral expences I doe give and bequeath unto my daughter Sarah one Chest of drawers bought by me at Leeds Item I doe give and bequeath unto my said Daughter Sarah the sums of fourscore pounds to be paid her by my executor when and if she doeth attaine her full age of twenty and four years Item I doe give and bequeath unto my Daughter Margrett the like sume of fourscore pounds to be paid her in like manner when and if she doe attaine her full age of twenty six years of age Item I doe give and bequeath unto my son Nathaniell the sum of fifteen pounds to be paid him when the said Nathaniell shall have fully attained the full age of twenty three years or at the end of three Months next following the determmination of his apprentishipp whether soever shall happen Item I doe give and bequeath unto my son Jonathan the sume of fifteen pounds to be paid him by my executor when and if he doe attaine his full age of twenty and three years Item I give and bequeath unto my son Richard Lawson his heires executors administrators and assignes as well all my freehold estate as alsoe my Lease Lands with all theire appurtinances set situate lying and


being within the Towns Townshipp and Teritoryes of Langcliffe aforesaid and Lastly hereby revoking all other and former wills if any such were by me heretofore made of this my last will and testament I doe nominate constitute and appoint my said son Richard Lawson sole executor In witness whereof I have unto theses presents bearing date the day and yeare first above written set my hand and seale Richard Lawson hand and seale sealed signed and published to be the last will and testament of the above named Testator Richard Lawson in the sight of us with those words whethersoever happens first interlined John Green his marke Thomas Paley Richard Atkinson

RICHARD LAWSON of Langcliffe 1766 Borthwick Prob. Reg. 111, 73 mf 1022 In the name of God Amen I Richard Lawson of Langcliffe within the parish of Giggleswick in the West Riding of the County of York gentleman do make and publish this my last will and Testament hereby revoking and making void all former Will or Wills at any time or times heretofore made. Declaring this only to be my last will and Testament and first my will and mind is that all such debts as I shall justly owe at the time of my decease together with my funeral expenses and the charges of proving this my will shall be first duly paid and satisfied by my executors as hereinafter named by and out of my personal estate. And after the payment thereof then I give and bequeath unto my grand daughter Elizabeth Roberts the sum of £100. I also give and bequeath unto my granddaughter Mary Roberts the sum of £100. I also give and bequeath unto my grandson Henry Roberts the sum of £100. And to my grandson Richard Paley the sum of £100. And to my grandson John Starkie the sum of £100 which said several legacies or sums of money I will order and direct shall be paid to the said several and respective legacies when they shall attain their several and respective ages of 21 years by my executrixes hereinafter named by and out of my personal estate. I also give and bequeath unto my daughter Mary Paley widow of George Paley of Langcliffe lately deceased the sum of £400 to be distributed by her amongst her children as she shall think most proper and convenient which said last mentioned legacy or sum of money I will order and direct shall be paid by my executrixes hereinafter named by and out of my personal estate within 12 months next after my decease. And whereas my son-in-law Robert Roberts stands justly and duly indebted unto me in several sums of money which I have for several years last past paid lent and advanced to and for him and his use amounting in the whole to the sum of £90 or thereabouts my will therefore is that in case he shall give no trouble or molestation to my executrixes hereinafter named in the execution and performance of this my last will and testament I do hereby remit and relieve unto him the said debt of £90 and that he shall not be answerable or accountable to my executrixes for the same. But in case he shall give any molestation or disturbance to them or either of them for or on account of any thing in this my will contained then I give and bequeath the same unto my executrixes to be paid and applied in part discharge of my just debts funeral expenses legacies and the charges of proving this my will. I further give and devise unto my two daughters Ann Lawson and Elizabeth Lawson all my freehold messuages lands tenements and hereditaments whatsoever situate standing lying and being within the parish of Giggleswick in the West Riding of the county of York or elsewhere with their and every of their appurtenances for and during and unto the full end and term of their joint natural lives and the life of the longer liver of them and after the death of the survivor of them then I give and devise the same unto my grandson Richard Lawson Starkie his heirs and assigns absolutely for ever. Item as to my messuage situate standing lying and being at Langcliffe the same being leasehold which I formerly purchased of Jane Hammond widow of John Hammond of Bradford I give bequeath and devise the same unto my daughters Ann Lawson and Elizabeth Lawson for and during the term of their joint natural lives and the life of the longer of them and after the death of the survivor of them then I give and devise and bequeath the same unto my grandson Richard Lawson Starkie his executors administrators and assigns for and during all such term of years as are therein granted and shall be to come and annex fired at the time of their decease under the rent therefore due and payable. Item I give devise and bequeath all the rest residue and remainder of my real and personal estate (not herein before given devised and bequeathed) unto my two daughters Ann Lawson and Elizabeth Lawson their heirs executors administrators and assigns for ever whom I appoint executrixes of this my last will and testament. In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal the third day of June in the year of our Lord 1766. Richard Lawson Signed sealed published and declared by the said Richard Lawson the above named testator as and for his last will and testament in the presence of us who at his request in his presence and in the presence of each other have subscribed our names as witnesses thereto the words third day of June being first interlined


John Cundall Jane Cundall John Knowles

ROWLAND LUCAS of Giggleswick 19 May 1647 R. Postlethwaite 2nd set Maister of Arts and schoolmaister To every one of the children of Annn and Isabell my naturall sisters ÂŁ5 each within one year of my decease. To every one of the children of Hugh Stackhouse my brother-in-law 50s each. Residue to Ann my wife - sole executrix. witnesses Brian Cookeson Hugh Stackhouse

ANN LUCAS 1664 / 5 Borthwick vol 50 fol 266 mf 969 In the name of God Amen the Eleaventh day of January in the yeare of or Lord god one thousand six hundred sixty ffoure; I Ann Lucas late of Gigleswicke and now of Langcliffe in the County of Yorke widdow being sickly and infirme in Body, but of good and pfect remembrance (praised be God) doe make this my last will and testament in manner followinge, revokeing hereby all Wills by me formerly made: And first I remitt and willingly resigne my Soule into the mercyful hands of Almighty God my maker and creator, trusting through his mercy and by the meritts of Jesus Christ my Redeemer to be saved, and to have pdon and remission of all my sinnes: And my body to the Earth whereof it was framed to be buryed att my parish Church of Gigleswicke in Christian manner att the discretion of my Executor and friends. And for my worldly and temporall goods and estate reall and personall,I doe give devise and dispose of the same as followeth, ffirst I will that my debts and funerall expenses be payd out of my whole goods. Item I give unto my son Lawrence Swainson and to his heires executors and assignes All my houses and grounds att Stackhouse with their appurtenances pcells of ye Mannor of Newby, and also those my Closes called Ravensber, and all my writeings concerning the same. Ite(m) I give to every one of the children of Mathew Evers(?) of the parish of Leeds tenn shillings a peace Ite(m) I give unto that child wherwith the said Mathew Evers wife was conceived and not delivered thereof att the time of the death of my late deceased husband Mr Rowland Lucas the summe of ffive pounds if the said child be now living and if the said child be deade, I will that the said ffive pounds shall be given and equally divided amongst the other children of the said Mathew, and I will that all the said legacies so hereby given to the said children shall be paid to their said ffather Mathew for his said children uses Ite(m) I give to every one of the children of Richard Turner of the parish of Leeds ten shillings apeece to be likewise payd to theirsaid ffather for their uses All which above said legacies and sum(m)es I doe give unto all the above said children for the love that I had unto my late deceased husband Mr Lucas and in remembrance of him Ite(m) I give to my brother Hugh Stackhouse his children ten pounds equally amongst them. Item I give to Tomazin Stackhouse ffive pounds to be payd when she attaines the age of xxi yeares, or before if shee be marryed before that she attaine that age, with the consents off my brother Hugh Stackhouse and of my Executors Ite(m) I give to Thomas Howson ten shillings and to Isabell Howson ten shillings; Ite(m) I give to James, Margaret and Ellen the son and daughters of my deceased brother Robert Stackhouse ffive shillings apeece, And to Valentine Robinson ffive shillings. Item I give to my sister in law Margaret Roome ten shillings Item I give to every one whom I stand as godmother twelve pound. Ite(m) I give to my sister Walker my gold Ring Ite(m) I give to Isabell Stackhouse my sister my best shifte. Also I give to my brother Walker ten shillings. All the remainder of my goods I give unto my son Lawrence Swainson and I doe make and nominate my said son Lawrence Swainson Jurat sole Executor of this my last will and testament In witness whereof I have hereunto put my hand and seale the day and yeare first above written. Thomas Paley Hugh Stackhouse Jurat Brian Cookeson Overleaf

her

X

Ann Lucas marke


Craven Anne Lucas nupr de Giggleswick def. ?? corte per Lancaster 20 Jany 1669 Entrd

PALEY JOHN PALEY 1597 Will of 29th November 1597, bd 16th December 1597 Borthwick 27, fol. 176 mf 940 In the name of God amen The xxix th day of November 1597 John Palay of Lancklife sicke in bodie but of pfect remembrance prased be God do make this my last will and testament in maner and forme following first I Comend my soule to Jesus Christ my onlie lord and savioure and my bodie to be buried in the Church yarde of the pish Church of Gigleswicke and for my mortuary and all Churches what of right is due and accustomed I will that the same be trulie paid Item I give to Thomas my sonne and to his issue lawfullie one close called Lees close lying betweene the grounds of Thomas Sowden and Richard Armistead and also a pcell of grounde called Pesber by afirmaton half and (sic) acre and one garden lying and being upon the northeside of Lanclife for ever and for wante of him and his issue then I give the same grounds unto Elizabeth Payley my supposed daughter and to her issue lawfull then I will the same shall reservatone (?) unto Margaret my wife for and during her pure Widdowhead And I also will that my wife have the use and occupacon of these grounds untill my said sonne Thomas come to the age of one and twentie yeares iff he live so long and yf she be able maintane him and yf she be not then I will that these grounds be sell and letten to the most profitt for his mayntennce And for my goods aswell moveable as unmoveable I will that my Children Thomas and the said Elizabeth shall have theire equall porcons thereof and my wife her Widdowright and for my pte of goods my debts first discharged of the whole goods my funerall expences paid and other dues done I give the same unto Elizabeth my said supposeddaughter and I give also unto Myles Nicholson Scholer two sheepe Item I ordayne and appointe Margaret my said wife and Elizabeth my said daughter my Joynt executors of this my will witnesses hereof John Palay and Richard Kidson Mathew Sigsweeke George Lawson and Thomas Siggeswicke....... Latin text A plausible but unproven family tree ? John Paley = Katherine

bd 1597

ux bd 1588

1591 =

Margaret Sigswicke

bp 1566 married Richard Iveson in 1599

Thomas bp 1586/7 (not yet 21 in 1597) Why is Elizabeth a supposed daughter? Maybe illegitimate and not registered?


Elizabeth Paley de Langcliffe bd 1604/5 THOMAS PALEY 1669/70 Borthwick Craven/Prog. vol.50 fol. 273 mf 969 In the Name of God Amen I Thomas Paley of Langclif being wake and sicke of body yet of good and pfect memory praised be God of Might and Mercy for ye same doe make and ordayne this my last will and Testament in manner and forme following First I give command and beequeathe my Soule in to the hands of my maker trusting therrough ye sole mercyes and merrits of Jesus Christ my Savioure to have remisson and forgivenes of my Sinns and by ye vertu of his Precious blod shed Reserrection and assention fully to injoy him in glory Commiting my body to ye Earthe from whence it came To bee buried att ye discretion of my freindes And for my Temporall esstayte I give and beequeathe in manner and forme following And first my mind and wish is first That my debts and accomptes and recknonings bee cleared my funerall expenses paide I Give and beequeathe unto my wife All my Goods moveable and Cattells Inward and Outward And I Give unto my Tow Sonns Thomas Paley and John Paley eyther of them forty poundes and to [meet al.....] And if it shall happen or soe pleas God that eyther of them shall dye beefore they receive or Give a discharge for ye same Then my mind and will is that it shall goe and redound to ye Survivor of them And I hereby appoynte Ann Paley (jurat) Sole Executor of this my Last will and Testament In witnes whereof I have hereunto put my hand and Seale this third day of January in ye yeare of oure Lord God one thowsand Six hundred Sixty and Nine Witnesses hereof Jurat John Paley m ed Thomas Kayley TK Tho. Constantine Leonard Carr WILLIAM PALEY of Settle 3rd Jan 1722 (Copy with C. Ellis) In the Name of God Amen the Third day of January in the yeare of our Lord One Thousand Seven hundred and Twenty Two I William Paley of Settle in the County of York Sadler being in good health and of perfect mind and memory praised be Almighty God for the same And calling to mind the incertainty of this mortall life do make constitute and declare in manner and form following revoking annulling and makeing voyd by these presents all and every Will and Wills whatsoever heretofore by me made either by words or in writeing declareing this onely to be my last Will and Testament First I comitt my Soule to Almighty God my maker trusting through his mercy and by his meritts and mediation of Jesus Christ my redeemer my sins will be pardoned And my body to be decently buryed att the discretion of by Executrix hereafter named And as for the Temporall estate w'h it hath pleased God to bestow upon me I give Devise and dispose of the same as followeth First my Will and mind is that my just debts and funerall expenses be payd and discharged out of my personall estate. Item my Will and mind is that my loving wife Mary and my neece Dorothy Lund shall have the remainder of my goods and personall estate equally betwixt them after my just debts and funerall expenses be discharged And I doe hereby nominate and appoynt my sd wife and my said Neece Dorothy Lund Joynt Executrixes of this my last Will and Testament hopeing they will see the same duely pformed In witness whereof I have hereunto sett my hand and seale the day and yeare first above written Seald signd and published by the sd William Paley to be his last Will and Testament in ye p'sence of Agnes Carr T. (?) Lawson Rogr Mitton

jurat....

Will: Paleye


................................................................ Plus supporting probate documents 23 Nov 1731 signed by Dorethy Lund Anthony Paleye T.(?) Lawson Rogr Mitton Plus inventory 23 Nov 1731 Impr His purse and Apparell Item In Bills notes and Booke debts 18 13 04 Item In Shopp goods and Old 06 05 00 Sadlerwares ________

2 10 00

1. 08 04 T. Lawson Anthony Paleye James Foster

________

THOMAS PALEY of Langcliffe 16 July 1741 B'd 29 Aug 1740 (Copy with C. Ellis) Reg'd Wakefield 3 Sept 1740, OO 40 58 [On 10 Sept 1740 Richard Lawson sworn as witness and George Paley as Sole Exec. before Mr John Alcock. Execution granted to George Paley 23 Sept 1740.] In the name of God Amen I Thomas Paley of Langcliff in the parish of Gigleswick and County of York Yeoman, being in a Tollerable State of Health and of Sound and disposeing mind and Memory (praised be God for the same) do make this my last Will and Testament the Sixteenth day of July in the year of our Lord one thousand Seven hundred and forty First and principally I recommend my Soul to Almighty God most humbly beseeching him to receive it to his Grace and Mercy and give ye Angels Charge over it that through the Merritts and intercession of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ I may obtain Remission of Sins and life Everlasting And my body to the Earth to be buried after a decent and Christian like manner and as to such Temporal Estate as it hath pleased God to bestow on me I give devise and dispose thereof as follows First my Mind and Will is that my Just Debts and funeral Expenses be paid by my Executor herein after named. Also I give and devise unto my dear and loveing wife Mary and her Assigns in lieu of her Dower or Third one Annuity or Yearly payment of Ten Pounds to be paid to her yearly and every year dureing her natural life on the Eleventh day of November and the twenty fifth day of March in Each Year by Equal proportions without any deduction or Abatement whatsoever for or in respect of any Taxes Assessments Levys charges or impositions whatsoever And if it shall happen that Either of the said half yearly payments of five pounds or any part thereof be behind or unpaid by the space of Twenty days next over or after either or any of the said Dayes or Times whereon the Same ought to be paid as aforesaid (being lawfully demanded) that then and from thenceforth it shall and may be lawfull to and for my said Wife to Enter unto and upon all and Singular my Messuages Lands Tenements and Hereditaments whatsoever and the same to have hold occupy possess and enjoy and the rents issues and profits thereof to perceive receive and take to her proper use and behoof until the said Annuity and all Arrears thereof be thereby or in some other manner fully Satisfied and paid Together also with all Costs and Charges attending such Entry and perception of the Rents Issues and profits aforesaid Also I give and devise unto my said Dear Wife the Ground Rooms in my Messuage or Tenement in Settle in the parish and County aforesaid previously belonging to Sclaytor [inserted] and also one half of the Garden belonging to the said Messuage and the use of the Well there for and dureing the Term of her natureal life Also I give and bequeath unto my son William the sum of thirty pounds of lawfull Money of great Britain to be paid with one years interest for the same at the End of twelve months after my Decease Also I give and bequeath unto my Son Thomas the Sum of fifty [altered from ?forty] four pounds of like lawfull money to be paid likewise with one years interest for the same at the End of twelve months after my decease Also I give and bequeath unto my Son John the Sum of one hundred and ninety pounds to be paid to him with one years Interest for the same at the End of twelve months after my decease Also I give and bequeath unto my Daughter Isabel the Sum of Fifty pounds of like Money to be paid with one years interest at the End of one whole year after my Decease Also I give and bequeath unto my Daughter Elizabeth the sum of one hundred and sixty pounds of like lawfull money to be paid to her with one years interest for


the Same at the End of one whole year after my Decease Also I give and bequeath to my Daughter Mary the sum of one hundred and Sixty pounds to be paid to her with one years interest at the End of Twelve Months after my decease Also I give and bequeath unto my said Son William one Silver Tankard and to my said Daughter Mary one Chest of Drawers Also I give to my said loving Wife Mary the use of one Widow Bed one Chest which was her fathers. Half a Dozen of Chairs one little Table and other necessarries to furnish a Room Such as she shall think most proper for her dureing the Term of her Natureal life Also I give and bequeath unto my said Dear Wife and my said three Daughters each of them one Silver Salt and one Silver Spoon Also I give and bequeath all my Linnen and Bedding unto my Son George and my said Sons Thomas and John and my said Daughters Elizabeth and Mary to be equally divided amongst them at the Discretion of my said Dear Wife Provided always that if my said Son John shall happen to depart this life before he attain the Age of Twenty one years leaving no issue my will and mind is that the legacy and legacys herein before devised to him shall go and be paid to and amongst all my Children which shall be then living Equally and share and share alike Also I give devise and bequeath unto my said Son George his Heirs Executors and Administrators All my Messuages Houses Lands Tenements and Heriditaments and all other my real and personal Estate whatsoever not herein before disposed of And I do likewise Constitute and appoint my said Son George Sole Executor of this my last Will and Testament and I do hereby revoke anull and make void all former Wills by me heretofor made In witness whereof I have hereunto Set my hand and Seal the day and year first abovewritten.

Signed Sealed published and declared by the Testor Thomas Paley Tho: Paley to be his last Will and Testament in the presence of us who in his presence and at his request subscribed our Names as Witnesses to ye ddue Execution thereof - the alterations above appearing in the eighteenth and twenty first lines being first made

Richd. Lawson Richd. Lawson jur. Chris. Picard

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Plus: Know all men by these presents..... George Paley

10 Sept 1740

The condition of this obligation..... George Paley Rich. Lawson 23 Sept 1740 MARY PALEY of Langcliffe (Copy with C. Ellis)

9 June 1758

Buried 22 Jan 1759

In the name of God Amen I Mary Paley of Langcliffe in the Conty of York Widow do make my last Will and testament in manner following First I give to my son John Paley five pounds to be paid by my Executor within one month after my decease I also give to my two sons George Paley and Thomas Paley all my household goods whatsoever and of what nature and kindsoever the same be except a Chest of Drawers which said Chest of Drawers I hereby give unto my daughter IsabelWife of John Brayshay All the rest residue and remainder of my personal estate and effects after payment of my just debts I give and devise unto my sons George Paley the Revd. Wm. Paley Thomas Paley and John Paley and to my daughters the said Isabel wife of the said John Brayshay and Elizabeth the Wife of John Proctor equally to be divided amongst them share and share alike Provided always and my will and mind is that the part of share of my said personal estate hereby given to the said Isabel the wife of the said John Brayshay shall be paid and applyed to and for the sole and seperate use of the said Isabel in such Manner as my Executor shall in his


discretion think fit and that the same or any part thereof shall not be paid to or be subject to the Controul of the said John Brayshay her husband Lastly I appoint my said son George Paley Executor of this my Will. In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal the Ninth day of June in the year of our Lord 1758 Signed sealed published and declared by the Testatrix as and for her last will and testament in the presence of us who in her presence and at her request subscribed our names as Witnesses thereto

T

Mary Paley her Mark

Tho: Gelderd Chris: Picard

Know all men by these presents that we George Paley of Langcliffe....Gentleman and John Brayshay of Malham in the Parish of KM...Gentleman..... 14th May 1759..... (Rev.) WILLIAM PALEY of Giggleswick 22 March 1796 (Copy with C. Ellis) I Willam Paley of Giggleswick in the County of York Clerk being of sound and disposing mind and memory do make my last Will and Testament in manner and form following / that is to say / I give Devise and Bequeath unto my Son William Paley All and every my Messuages Lands and Tenements situate lying and being in the parish of Giggleswick aforesaid or elswhere in whose occupation soever the same may be To hold such part thereof as are Freehold unto him my said son William Paley his Heirs and Assigns for ever and To hold such part thereof as are Leasehold unto him his Executors Administrators and Assigns for all such Terms as may be to come therein at the time of my Death I also Give and Bequeath unto my said son William Paley all and every my Household Goods and Furniture Plate Linnen ready Money Securities for Money and the Money owing thereon and all other my Substance Estate and Effects whatsoever and wheresoever chargeable nevertheless and I do hereby charge the said real and personal Estates Devised to my said Son with the payment of Nine Hundred and Fifty Pounds to my daughter Mary Paley, with the like sum of Nine Hundred and Fifty Pounds to my daughter Elizabeth Paley and with the Sum of Sixty Pounds to my daughter Agnes Paley / her Husband having already received from me Eight Hundred and Ninety Pounds / all which said several legacies or Sums of Money above mentioned I will and Direct shall be paid by my said Son at the Expiration of Six months next after my Decease with Interest for the same after the Rate of four per cent from the Day of my Death Provided always that in case either of my said daughters Mary or Elizabeth should Dye before me then and in such Event I give the legacy of such of them so Dying unto and equally amongst all my surviving Children share and share alike And I hereby direct that all my said four Children shall be equally entitled to the property now in my Brother in Law Thomas Claphams hands under a Deed of Settlement made previous to my marriage and I make constitute and appoint my said Son William Paley Sole Executor of this my Will hereby revoking all former Wills by me at any time heretofore made and I publish and declare this Sheet of Paper to be and contain my last Will and Testament this twenty second Day of March in the year of or Lord One Thousand Seven Hundred and Ninety six. Signed and Sealed by the said William Paley the Testator and by him published and Declared as and for his last Will and Testament W. Paley in the presence of us who in his presence and at his request have subscribed our names as Witnesses John Peart Nichs. Wood Margaret Moore ............................................................................................................


A Declaration instead of an Inventory of all the personal Effects of William Paley late of Giggleswick in the Diocese of York Clerk deceased which personal Effects I hereby declare did not amount to the Sum of 5000£ In Witness whereof I have hereunto set my Hand this 18th day of Octr. 1799 W. Paley

Canon WILLIAM PALEY 1804 [Copy of original full Will with C. Ellis} [Origin unknown - no stamp]

To wife Catherine, fields and closes in parish of St. Cuthbert, Carlisle, called Syle Close and Pavey Lands (conveyed by marriage settlement to WP - was property of CP). + £100 after decease + £200 by three months after decease + £313, her share of Hawkesdale Bridge Estate + £74, her share of a field in ?? + rents and unpaid rents of lands and houses of hers or her two aunts. + plate and furniture that was hers or her aunts + £80 Annuity, half-yearly payment, and arrangements for this Annuity. Funeral at the discretion of wife and expenses from the Estate. To daughter Jane £50 + interest, a present from Grandmother Paley. To son William £50. To son Edmund, annuity of £20, half-yearly, till youngest child 21 yrs. Then £400 gift "in consideration of his infirmity". To daughter Mary £300 + interest, left by late John Nicholson Esq. Plate, linen, books and wearing apparel (except already given to wife and in house in Giggleswick) to Children, as guardians direct. Re property in Giggleswick, leasehold and freehold - dwelling house and garden, orchard etc +2 closes (Fellins) + barn, cow house, given to William Clapham of Stackhouse and Rev. John Clapham Clerk of G'k. In Trust - if Mary or Elizabeth (sisters) wish to live there. They (sisters) to pay £30 annually to Executors, to be divided amongst children. Plate, linen etc in the house to be property of Sisters Mary and Eliz. But Chambers Dictionary now in library at Bishop Wearmouth to remain in house at G'k, as long as family there. Arrangement for selling house to sisters or if not wishing to live there, to unmarried daughters, rent to Trustees (+plate, linen etc.) After that, to sons in order of age. Other lands and tenements to Claphams - rents and profits to Paley children. After youngest child is 21 offer to sons in order of age, then daughters. If none want this - sell. Money to be divided amongst children. All the rest of personal Estate - pay just debts and annuities and codicil items. Rest divided - interest for for childrens' benefit at guardians' direction. £5 each of Mary's and Anne's portion to go to Edmund (while at Queens Coll. Oxford). Advance to any child for their advancing in the World, at request of guardians, before 22 yrs if necessary. When each child reaches 22 or marrying with consent of guardians - Executors to pay their just share.


W and J Clapham and John Peart to be Executors. Sisters Mary and Eliz. to be guardians of children, till 22 yrs., and executors if Claphams and Peart don't want that Office. Signed and sealed, 29 Feb 1804 John Fardell Junr (or jurat??) Geo Atkinson

John Fardell of Lincoln

Codicil 1 24 Apr 1805 To pay Mr Green of Donsley, County of Lincoln, ÂŁ315 board and instruction for son Edward, from personal Estate, not from Edward's share. Codicil 2

10 May 1805 Instructions re publication of sermons to be distributed gratis in parish.

Administration granted to Claphams and Peart.

THOMAS LAWSON PALEY of Langcliffe 6th Jan. 1808 (Copy with C. Ellis) Exec of the will of Thomas Paley late of Langcliffe and Giggleswick Gent. Dec'd was granted to George Paley, John Green Paley , the Revd. Thomas Paley Clk and Robert Payley MD his sons and joint Executors by Carr 26th July 1808.... This is the last Will and Testament of me Thomas Paley of Langcliffe in the parish of Giggleswick in the County of York Gentleman being of a sound and disposing Mind Memory and Understanding Whereby I dispose of All my Real and personal Estates in manner following (that is to say) I do hereby give devise and bequeath unto my Sons George Paley, John Green Paley, Thomas Paley and Robert Paley their Heirs Executors Administrators and Assigns All my Messuages lands Tenements Heriditaments Beastgates Sheepgates and Premises whatsoever belonging to me situate lying and being within Settle Giggleswick and Malham in the County of York together with all my Shares Right title and Interest of in and to the Foundery Buildings and premises at Bowling in the County of York In Trust to sell and dispose of the same Hereditaments and apply the Money arising therefrom and from my personal Estate hereinafter given and Bequeathed to them in the payment and discharge of all my just Debts which may be due upon any Mortgage Bond Note or otherwise as far as the same will extend, and if the same shall not be sufficient to discharge All my Debts then it is my Will and I do hereby order and direct that they my said Sons their Heirs Executors Administrators and Assigns shall have power and I do hereby fully authorize and impower them to raise the remainder of the Money by Sale or Mortgage of a competent part of my Messuages Lands Tenements Hereditaments and premises situate within Langcliffe aforesaid but if the same shall be more than sufficient to pay all my just Debts then I do hereby give and bequeath the residue of the Monies unto and equally amongst my said Sons George Paley, John Green Paley, Thomas Paley and Robert Paley their Executors and Administrators equally amongst them Share and Share alike And it is my Will and I do hereby order and direct that the Receipt and Receipts of my said Sons and the Survivors of them and the Heirs Executors and Administrators of such Survivor shall be a full and sufficient discharge to any purchaser or purchasers Mortgagee or Mortgagees of the said premises to al Intents and purposes whatsoever without their being obliged to see the application of the Monies or of any part thereof or answerable for the Misapplication thereof or of any part thereof. Also I do hereby give and Bequeath unto my Dear Wife Ann Paley for and during the Term of her natural Life if she shall so long continue my Widow One Annuity or clear yearly sum of One Hundred pounds of lawful English Money to be yearly issuing and payable unto her my said Wife out of and from all and singular my Messuages Lands Tenements Hereditaments and premises situate lying and being within the Township of Langcliffe aforesaid by two equal half yearly payments in every year, the first half yearly payment nevertheless to be made at the end of one month next after my decease without any deduction or abatement thereout for or by reason of any Taxes Charges or Impositions imposed or to be imposed by Authority of parliament or otherwise howsoever and unto the Executors and Administrators of my said Wife after her decease such a proportionate part of the said Annuity as the Time she shall live from the last Day of payment shall bear proportion to the whole year And it is my Will and I do hereby order and direct that she my said Wife shall take and accept of the said Annuity in lieu bar recompence and full satisfaction of all Dower and Thirds which she my said Wife can or may have or claim out of or in all or any part of my freehold Estates and that she my said Wife shall upon demand execute a Release of such her Dower and Thirds Also it is my Will and I do hereby order


and direct that if the said Annuity or yearly sum of One Hundred pounds or any part thereof shall be behind or unpaid by the space of Twenty Days next after the Times on which the same ought to be paid as aforesaid (being lawfully demanded) it shall and may be lawful to and for her my said Wife into and upon my said Messuages Lands Tenements Hereditaments and premises within Langcliffe aforesaid or any part thereof to enter and distrain and the Distress and Distresses then and there found to detain and keep or otherwise to sell and dispose of according to Law until she my said Wife shall be fully paid and satisfied the same Annuity with the Costs and Charges attending such Distress and Distresses And also it is my further Will that if in case the said Annuity or yearly sum of One Hundred pounds or any part thereof shall be behind or unpaid by the space of Forty Days next after either of the Times on which the same ought to be paid as aforesaid (altho no Demand has been made thereof) that then and so often it shall and ay be lawful to and for her my said Wife into and upon my said Messuages Lands Tenements Hereditaments and premises within Langcliffe aforesaid or any part or parts thereof to enter, and the Rents Issues and profits thereof to receive and take until she my said Wife shall be fully paid and satisfied the same Annuity together with the Costs Damages and Expences to be laid out or sustained by reason of the nonpayment thereof or of any part thereof. Also it is my Will that if in Case my said Wife shall happen to marry again then the said Annuity of One Hundred pounds shall cease and be no longer paid her and in such Case I only in lieu thereof Give and Bequeath unto her my said Wife One Annuity or clear Yearly Sum of Ten pounds to be paid unto her for Life out of my said premises within Langcliffe aforesaid and subject in manner as aforesaid I do hereby Give Devise and Bequeath unto my Relation William Paley of Carlisle in the County of Cumberland Esquire Barrister at Law his Heirs and Assigns All and singular my said Messuages Lands Tenements Hereditaments and premises whatsoever with their and every of their Appurtenances situate lying and being within the Township of Langcliffe aforesaid except as is hereinafter mentioned Upon the Trusts and to and for the Uses Intents and purposes and under and subject to the powers provisoes Conditions and Agreements hereinafter mentioned expressed and declared of and concerning the same (that is to say) As to for and concerning One undivided fourth part (the whole into four equal parts to be divided) of and in all and singular my said Messuages Lands Tenements Hereditaments and premises situate within Langcliffe aforesaid except as aforesaid To the Use of my said Son George Paley for and during the Term of his natural Life but so as my said said (sic) Son George Paley shall have no power or authority whatsoever to assign or dispose of the same or any part thereof to any person or persons upon any Account And from and after the Determination of that Estate To the Use of the said William Paley and his Heirs during the natural Life of the said George Paley In Trust nevertheless to support and preserve the contingent Uses and Estates hereinafter limited from being defeated or destroyed and for that purpose to make Entries and bring Actions as the same shall require Butnevertheless to permit and suffer the said George Paley only to receive and take to his and their own Use and Uses the Rents and profits of one undivided fourth part of the said Hereditaments during the Term of his Life And from and immediately after the decease of the said George Paley To the Use of all and every the Children of my said Son George Paley lawfully to be begotten equally to be divided between or among them if more than one Share and Share alike and to take as Tenants in Common and not as Joint Tenants and the several and respective Heirs of the Bodies of all and every such Child or Children lawfully issuing, and in Case and so often as any of such Child or Children shall happen to die without Issue of his or her Body or Bodies lawfully to be begotten then and so often as to the Share or part of him her or their so dying without such issue To the Use of the Survivors or others or other of them equally to be divided between or among them if more than one Share and Share alike as Tenants in Common and not as Joint Tenants and to the several and respective Heirs of the Body and Bodies of such Survivors or Survivor of them, and if all such Children but one shall happen to die without such Issue of their Bodies or Body, or if there shall be but one such Child To the Use and Behoof of such only surviving Child and the Heirs of his or her Body And as to for and concerning One other undivided fourth part (the whole into four equal parts to be divided).....To the Use of my said Son John Green Paley.....[as for George Paley] And ...one other undivided fourth part.....To the Use of my said Son Thomas Paley...[as above] And as to for and concerning The remaining fourth part .....To the Use of my said son Robert Paley [as above]. And it is my further Will and Mind and I do hereby order and direct that if any of my said Sons shall die without leaving any Issue lawfully begotten or if all the Children of any one or more of my said Sons shall die without Issue as aforesaid or leaving such, all of them shall die without leaving lawful Issue of their Bodies, That then the part or parts of him or them who shall die without leaving lawful Issue or whose children shall all of them die without such Issue of and in all and every the same Messuages Lands Tenements Hereditaments and premises in Langcliffe aforesaid shall from the respective Times of such several Events go and remain over to and for the Use and Benefit of the others equally or other of my said Sons and their respective Children in like sort manner and form as is hereinafter declared and directed concerning their respective original parts of all and every the same Hereditaments and premises provided always and it is my Will that if in Case my said Son George Paley shall at any Time during his Life be in such a Situation as to enable him to purchase his Brothers Life Estates and Interest in the Said


Hereditaments and premises within Langcliffe aforesaid and to give to his said Brothers respectively for the purchase of the same after the rate of Sixteen years purchase on the annual value thereof without incumbering my said Estate in Langcliffe aforesaid, that then and in such Case it is my Will and I do hereby order and direct my said three younger Sons to accept from their said Brother George after the rate of Sixteen Years purchase as aforesaid in full for their respective Life Estates and Interest in the said Hereditaments And in that Case only I do hereby revoke the devise hereinbefore in this my Will contained of my said Estate at Langcliffe aforesaid unto my said son George Paley and the Heirs of his Body lawfully to be begotten with full power in such case for him my said son George Paley to make a Settlement or Jointure on any Wife he may marry for her Life, so as he receives a portion with her or not less than three (five deleted) Thousand pounds And also in such case full power for him my said Son George to charge the said Hereditaments with the payment of any sum or Sums or Money to younger Children as my said Son George Paley shall direct so as the same do not exceed in the whole the Sum of Six Thousand pounds any Thing in the my Will contained to the contrary notwithstanding provided also that if my said Son George Paley shall not in his Life Time comply with the Terms in the said proviso mentioned that then and in such Case it shall and may be lawful to and for my said Son John Green Paley to purchase the same Hereditaments upon the like Terms and Conditions as my said Son George Paley might have done under the said proviso in ths my Will contained And in that Case I do hereby Give and Devise the same Hereditaments unto my said Son John Green Paley.........(as above, similarly Thomas Paley and Robert Paley) And I do hereby give and devise unto my said Wife the Messuage or Dwellinghouse in which I now reside at Langcliffe aforesaid with such outhouses Gardens and Appurtenances thereto belonging as the said William Paley shall judge and determine should be enjoyed therewith To hold the same unto my said Wife for and during the Term of her natural Life and from and immediately after her decease I give and devise the same unto the Said William Paley his Heirs and Assigns upon the Trusts and to and for the uses Intents and Purposes and under and subject to the Powers Provisos Conditions and Agreements as are hereinbefore expressed and declared respecting the other Part of my said Messuages L T H and Premises situate in Langcliffe aforesaid And also I give and bequeath unto my said Wife the Sue of, but not the disposing power over all my Furniture plate linen china and household goods for and during her natural Life and I do direct than (sic) an inventory thereof shall be taken immediately after my decease which shall be signed by her and by all or some or one of my said Sons And from and after her decease the said Furniture Plate Linen China and household Goods and all the rest residue and remainder of my personal Estate and Effects whatsoever and wheresoever I Give and Bequeath the same and every part thereof unto my said for sons GP JGP TP and RP their Executors and Administrators to be applied in the discharge of the Debts and Funeral Expences Also it is my Will and mind and I do hereby order and direct that in Case I shall in my Life Time advance or cause to be advanced to all or any of my Sons above the sum of One Thousand four Hundred pounds in the whole, that then and in such Case it is my Will that all or such of my Sons as may have received from me over and above that Sum whether the same shall appear to be owing to me or any Security or Securities, or the same shall appear to be owing to me from my Books shall Account and pay back to their other Brothers such Sum and Sums or Money as I may have advanced them respectively above that Sum and which shall be applied and reckoned as part of my personal Estate And I do hereby nominate constitute and appoint them my said four Sons GP JGP TP and RP joint Executors of this my last Will and Testament And it is my Will and I do hereby order and direct that in Case any Differences or Disputes shall arise among my said Sons touching the execution of this my Will or any Thing relating thereunto (which I hope will not be the Case)that then and so often as the same shall happen the same shall from Time to Time be referred to my said Relation William Paley his Heirs Executors or Administrators whose determination in the premises shall be binding and conclusive upon my said Sons respectively and their respective Heirs Executors and Administrators to all Intents and purposes And lastly I do hereby revoke all former and other Will and Wills by me at any time heretofore made and do declare this only to be my last will and Testament In Witness whereof I the said Thomas Paley the Testator have to this my last Will and Testament contained in eleven (ten deleted) sheets of paper Set my Hand and Seal, to wit, my Hand to the ten (nine deleted) first sheets and my hand and Seal to the Eleventh (tenth deleted) and last Sheet this sixth (twenty third deleted) Day of January (April deleted) ..in the Year of our Lord One Thousand eight Hundred and eight (sevendeleted). Signed, Sealed (etc.) Wm. Carr John Windsor John Carr

Thos. Paley

(Re-signed and witnessed after amendments made:-)


Tho Mason John Coles

John Sturges Jur't (or Jun'r?) of Bowling Iron Works Parish of Bradford

........................................................................................................................... I do hereby certify that on the 20th day of July 1808 George Paley of Langcliffe in the parish of Giggleswick in the Diocese of York Gentleman, John Green Paley of Bowling in the parish of Bradford in the said Diocese Gentleman, Thomas Paley of Lowth in the Diocese of Lincoln Clerk and Robert Paley of Halifax in the Diocese of York M.D. Sons and Joint Executors named in this the last Will and Testament of their Father Thomas Paley late of Langcliffe aforesaid Gentleman deceased were sworn well and truly to execute and perform the same and that the whole of the personal effects of the said deceased did not amount to the Sum of five thousand pounds Witness my hand W: Carr Surrogate Under 5000ÂŁ } Exchequer } ÂŁ60 Passed 26th July 1808 undr 5000L ROBERT PAYCOCK of Cowside 1667 Borthwick vol 49 fol 142 mf 968 Memorandum at or about 20th day of March 1667 Robert Paycocke of Cowsyde in ye pish of Gigleswicke and Dioces of York being somewhat sicke of bodie but of good and pfect memorie intending to make his last will and testament did dispose of his wordly (sic) estate as followeth Inpms I give unto Margaret my wife all my goods and lands whatsoever dureing her naturall life Ite(m) after her decease I give unto my sone Timothy one parcell of ground called Banck Ings another parcell of ground called Parracke with foure cattell gates in Gorrbeck to him and his heires for ever he paying thirtie pounds which I have formerly charged uppon ye same Item I give to my three Daughters Anne Mary and Elizabeth paycocke one parcell of ground called Myres and another parcell called brown banke to them and their heires for ever they paying 30 li (?) forth of the same to Henry Walker of Kirby Malhamdale Item my will is that my daughter Mary should have 4 ... more (?) than her other sisters because I borrowed formerly of her theis he uttered on 2.... psence of credible witnesses Jurat Thomas Pailay (Robt. Paycock nup. de Cowside 27 October 1668) EDWARD PRESTON of Cowside 1575 Borthwick vol 20 fol 45 mf 931 In the name of god amen the eight daye of maye in the yere of our lord god athousand fyve hundreth three score & fyften I edward preston of Cosheyde in the pishe of giglesweke sicke in bodie but of good & pfecte remembrance laude and prayse be to almightie god make this my laste will & testamente in manor & forme folowinge Firste I geve & bequeth my soule to almightie god & to all the glorious companie in heaven & my bodie to be buriede in the pishe churche yearde of gigleswecke Also I bequethe for my mortuarie & other Churche dewes all that right will Also I bequethe to Isabell my wife halfe of my goodes.....yf she be not with childe & yf she be withe childe she to have the thirde pte of my goodes and the thirde pte of my landes & yf my wife have no sonne but a daughter then I will that robert preston my Brother shall have the reste of my lande duringe his naturall lyfe & after his lyfe I geve my said land unto thomas preston sonne of Addam preston to thomas preston & Roger preston equallie betwext them so that they shall paye unto my daughter six pounds thertene shillinges foure pence yf I have one Also I bequethe to rychard Saylbanke one pr(?) of waine(?) Rayth Also I bequethe to roger Saylbanke my syster sonne a Jackit a doublet a layne yocke a heade shackell a Iron tynne a wayne head shackell & a trantre Also I geve to the poore folkes of gigleswecke pishe iij sh iiij d Also I geve my lease of Schayll lande liinge on Remynton more to my wife & Roberte preston my Brother duringe theire naturall lyves & after ther lyves I geve my said lease to Willm preston Sonne of


John preston of Calton Also I geve to my wife & to roberte preston my Brother my moitie whiche I have of one Wallys duringe his naturall lyfe whiche is twentie (sic) thertene shillinges foure pence Also I will that Roberte tompsonne shall have a lease for one & twentie yeres he payinge therfore three pounds Sixe shillinge eight pence & within a quarter of a houre (sic) after the said edwarde said that the said roberte cookesone should paye twentie pounde the reste of all my goodes my debttes & all other ordinares payde I geve unto Isabell my wife to my child yf she be with childe & to robert preston my brother & I make & constitute Isabell my wife & roberte preston my Brother my holle executors thes witnesses Rychard taylor Rychard saylbanke henrie paycoke henrie collare with others CHRISTOPHER RIDGEY 1690 Curat(i)o(n) Craven July 1690 Borthwick copied from original Curato de Anna Ridgey filia Chr. Ridgey Obligation Anne (wife of Christopher) both deceased Admon and inventory An Inventory of the goods and Cattalls of Christopher Redgey late of Lancliff deceased as they are Apprized and valued this twenty fourth day of Maij Anno Domini 1690: By us whose names are underwritten ÂŁ s d Imprimis his purse and Apparrell 00 15 00 Item Bedstocks and Bedding 03 00 06 Item three Chests one Ark one Box 01 00 00 Item three Tables 06 08 Item wood vessells 00 06 00 Item one yron pott with crooks three pands 00 08 00 Item in Pewter 00 15 00 Item two frying pans 00 01 00 Item two Chaires two stooles 00 02 00 Item one pair of briggs one pair of Tongs 00 01 00 Item one Smoothing yron 00 01 00 Item one parcell of Wood with some utensills of husbandry 01 07 06 Item Malt and Beans 00 13 04 Item three Sacks 00 05 00 Item six Cushions 00 02 00 Item one pair of Looms with materialls 01 03 04 Item three (sic) 07 00 00 Item five sheep 01 00 00 Item one horse 01 13 04 Item one Swine 00 06 08 Item in Turfes 00 02 00 Item in meal and Beefe 00 15 00 Summe is Spent at the funerall of the decaesed

21 04 04 02 00 10

Anthony Armitstead Hugh Corte William Carr Richard Lawson WILLIAM REDGEY 1690 Admon Craven July 1690 Borthwick copied from original


Obligation on brother Thomas Ridgey witness Rich. Lawson Inventory A true and perfect inventory of all the goods Cattells, Chattells Credits and debts of William Redgey late of Lancliff deceased as they are Apprized this twenty fourth day of Maij 1690: by us whose names are hereunder written ÂŁ s d Imprimis his purse and Apparrell 01 10 00 Item twenty five sheep 05 00 00 It one horse 02 00 00 It one Cart and wheeles 00 06 08 It one Ark and one Bed 01 00 00 It one chist and one Box 00 10 00 It in Malt 12 00 00 It one kiln hare with some small things 01 00 00 It debts oweing to the deceased 04 10 00 It one house and garth with halfe a Rood of Land 17 00 00 Summe 44 16 08 Debts which the deceased did owe Summe after deduction

15 16 08 26 00 08 (sum not correct)

Anthony Armitstead William Carr Hugh Doube/Coute (?) Rich. Lawson

JAMES SAYLEBANKE of Cowside 1548 Borthwick vol 13 fol 485 mf 920 In the name of God Amen the yere of oure lorde god a [thousand] v [hundred] xlviij the Seventhe day january I James Saylbanke of Cowsed seke in bodie and hooll of mynde thankes bee to god maike my laste will and testament as in forme followenge First I bequeathe my soule unto almightie god and my bodie to be buried in the church yarde of Giglesweke Also I bequeathe to the comon chiste iiij d Also I bequeathe .... and tennte righte of my farmolde unto mgarete my wif withe licence of the lord duringe her wid[ow]heade Also after my wif I bequeathe the title and tenmte righte of my farmold unto Richarde my eldest sone withe licence of the lorde Also I will that my detts be paide uppon my hooll goodes Also I will that Richarde my sone have all such goodes as is in the custodie of Thomas Saylbanke my brother of Lanklif and all my husbandrie geere belonginge.... housse and the forenaymed husbandrie gere to..... Also the residue of my goddes I will that they shalbe devyded to Margaret [my] wife and my children Richarde and Chr[ist]ofer my sones and Isabell and Alice my daughteres accordinge to righte and custome when tyme shall requier at sighte(?) of John paycoke Thomas Saylbanke my brother John Foster and Willm Wederheade(?) of Mallonghedale whome I leave in truste for my Wif and children Also I will that Chr[ist]ofer my sone shall have Richarde my eldest sone childes porcon of goodes for the title and agremente of my farmolde Also I will that my pairte of goodes my buriall expenses paid be devyded betwixte Isabel and Alice my daughters Also I make Margaret .... of this my laste will witnes herof John paycoke John Foster Thomas.... Latin text MATHEWE SIGSWEEKE 1598 Borthwick vol 27 fol 618 mf 940 In the name of god amen the xxi th day of february 1598 I Mathewe Sigsweeke of Lanclife sicke in bodie but of pfect remembrance praised be god do make this my last will and testament in manner and forme following First I comend my soule to Jesus Christ my onelie Lord and Saviour And my bodie to be buryed in the churchyard of the pish church in Giglesweeke Item I give, devise, bequeath, release, assigne, sett over, and confirme unto Thomas Sigsweeke my


sonne all my whole estate, right, tytle, interest, clayme and demannd wch I my Executors, Administrators or assignes ought or of right might or may have of in and to all my houses and groundes of what sorte or estaite.... the same be of lyeing and being in the towne feilds, and moores of Lancliffe togeather with all writinge eindent[ures] escriptes and muniments thereof and of evry pt and pcell thereof to have and to hold the same to himselfe his executors, administrators and assignes to his and there use and uses comodities profitt and advantage for ever my said sonne Thomas pmitting and suffering Anne my daughter to have, hold and enioye the chamber called the Shoppe wherein to sett her bed and her chist and also have halfe of that garden next ajoyning to the garden of Lawrence Swainson And also tenne pounds in money or money worth at the discretion of fower indifferent freinds and the same to be paid unto her my said daughter or her assignes within three yeares next after my death ensewing that is to say evry yeare during the said terme of the said three yeares, the just some of three pounds six shillings and eight pence and this I will she shall have if shee keepe herself unmaryed, but but (sic) if she marrie then I will that she hold herselfe contented onlie with the some of tenne pounds to be paid unto her in manner and forme before expressed and sett downe and also I give unto her my said daughter one chist, wch I bought of Christopher Browne wch said pmisses I will shall stand her in full recompence and satisfacion of her whole childs porcion of my goods Item I give to Bryan my sonne twentie shillings as last pt of payment of his porcion or childs pt of my goods he my said sonne Bryan sealing and delivering unto my executors a good lawfull and sufficient aquittance and release for all goods All the rest of my goods (my wife her widdowright referred unto her) I give to Thomas my said sonne whome I appoint executor of this my last will and testament Witnesses hereof John Paleye Richard Kidson Thomas Sowden Willm Browne and John Braisheye Latin text

HENRY SOMERSCALES 1609 Borthwick 31, fol 193 mfilm 945 In the name of god amen the fourtenth day of September in the yeare of our lord god one thousand six hundreth and nyne and in the seaventh yeare of the reigne of our most gracious sovragne lord James by the grace of god king of England France and Ireland and in the thre and fortieth yeare of his highnes reigne of Scotland defender of the faith I Henrie Somerscales of Langcliffe in the countie of yorke gent deceased (diseased) and sicke in bodie but of good and perfect remembrance praised be god do make this my last will and testament herebie revoking all former wills by me made and now therefore first I commend my soule into thands of almightie god trusting through the meritts and mercie of my sweet savioure christ to be made ptaker of eternal ioy in heaven desiringe him to pardon all my offences and for my bodie I will that the same to be buried in Giggleswicke churchyard in the place where my father was buried and a stone to be laid over us at the discrecon of my executors hereunder named Itm whereas god hath blessed me with one sonne and five daughters first as concerning my sonne If it may please the kings maiestie and the right honorable lord treasurer to grannt his wardship being but of a small messuage of the ancient rent of xxiiii (sh) unto his mother upon some reasonable composicon which I most humblie pray and beseach at theire gracious hands then my hartie desire is to have him brought upp in learning and if he be found capable of good literature and that his mynd be to goe to the universitie and to make learning his best preferment my desire is to have him mainteyned therein so farr as that I shall presentlie leave him shall extend and if that will not be sufficient I hope my wife together with my executors shall supplie his wants therein so long as need shall require and if so be that my Wife in some reasonable parte compass the wardshippe and government of her sonne then I comend her under god to the education (?) of his governing (?) humblie beseaching them to see him vertiouslie brought up in the feare of god to extend theire favourable kindnes towards him Furthermore if it please god my Wiffe gett the wardshipp as aforesaid and that my said sonne goe not forward in learning according to my harts desire then my mynd is to have him trained upp either in the lawes of this land or in some comendable trade of life at the discrecon of my freinds hereunder named And for his maintenance in any of these courses I leave unto him by this my last will one full third pte of all my messuage and lands at Stockdale And also whereas I have a rent charge of...............out of the messuage and tennement now in thoccupation of Hugh Iveson I give and bequeath the same unto my said sonne together with the benefitt of all such covenants as on the behalf of the said Hugh or to be pformed according to an Indenture of bargaine and lease made unto him of the said messuage and tennement with thappurtenances by me the said Henrie as by the same may appeare And whereas I have grannted and conveyed over my title (?) interest


and terme of yeares of and in one messuage and tennement with thappurtenances in Gargrave late in the possession of Thomas Thomlinson and of a cottage and two tofts with thappurtenances in gargrave Also (?) and certaine Comon or pasture ground upon Malhammoore to Thomas Prockter of Cowpcote (?) gentleman Arthure Somerscales clerke Robte Bankes gentleman and Thomas Preston of Appletreewicke younger and to theire assignes by my deed in writing bearing date with this my will my will is and I ordeyne that they the said Thomas Prockter Arthure Somerscales Robte Bankes and Thomas Preston whome I have chosen as freinds in trust for this purpose shall sell all the same premisses for and towards the payment of my debts and for and towards the payment of such porcons to my daughters as I do herebie lymitt (?) to them That is to say Anne Susan and Claramond each of them one hundreth pounds and to Jane an hundreth markes And if the money to be raised thereof together with such debts as are owing unto me and such money as wilbe raiesd of goods sold and to be sould will not satisfie the said debts and porcons afore mentioned then my will is that somme as shalbe awanting shalbe raised out of such lease bearing date also with these.........and I have grannted and made to my said freinds in trust of the third pte of Stockdale And also whereas I have leased to them my grounds in Langcliffe I will that the profitts of the same during the said lease being for twelve yeares shall at the discrecon of my said freinds be imployed towards the maintenance of my house at Langcliffe and of my children whilst they be......... and after the end of the said twelve yeares I bequeathe all my grounds in Langcliffe which I hould by lease or estate for yeares and all my title interest and estate therein to my said sonne Thomas and his assignes alwaies reserving a third pte thereof to Jennett my wife for the terme of fiftie one yeares if she so long live Itm whereas I have compounded with Lawrannce and Robte Swainson for my messugae or dwelling house and the howses garthes and grounds thereto belonging in Langcliffe whereof I have as yet no assurance I will the same may be assured (?) conveyed for the whole interest and terme therein to my said foure freinds in trust before named and to theire assignes And that the profitts of the same may be imployed for the twelve yeares towards the maintenance of my wife and children and that the remainder and residue (?) of the terme of yeares and estate afterwards shalbe conveyed over by my said freinds in trust to my said sonne Thomas Somerscales and to his heires and assignes So as the said Thomas Somerscales his heires and assignes do pay such somes of money to his sisters Bridgett and Anne and in such sorte as hereafter by this my last will I have lymitted (?) and eioined (?) him to pay reserving to my said wife a full third pte thereof for the terme of fiftie one yeares if she so long live Also whereas I have conveyed unto my daughter Bridgitt and to her heires and assignes for ever the advowsonne and ppituall presentation of the vicaradge of Gargrave I do hereby confirmwe her grannt thereof And also I do lymitt and bequeath unto her fortie pounds out of my said leases and grounds to be sould over and besides twentie pounds in goods which I have alreadie given and bequeathed unto her Itm my will is that my sonne Thomas when my said messuage with the appurtenances in Langcliffe shalbe assured to him as above shall pay and yeild to his said sister Bridgitt fortie pounds And to his sister Anne twentie pounds to better theire porcons therewith And if my said sonne Thomas die without issue before he come to age of one and twentie yeares or at any tyme afterwards Then I will that my said daughters each of them shall have an equall pte and porcon of land and in all my lands leases and as goods at the discrecon of myne executors and said freinds in trust And also my will is and I charge my said sonne Thomas that he do not sell any such lands or leases as by these presents (?) are bequeathed or as....... unto him to hinder and avoid the further pferment of his sisters which they might have if he should die without issue And whereas I have right and interest in the moitie or half of the rectorie or parsonage of Gigleswicke for sixe yeares or theireabouts the other moitie thereof and the....and inheritance afterwards being in Sir Richard Williamson knight I do by this my will earnestlie desire and pray that the said Sir Richard wilbe favorable and deale well with my executors in the enioying thereof for the good of my children wherein I trust he will use (?) a good conscience Itm I give to the poore of the pyh fortie shillings Itm I do herebie appoint and ordeyne my loving wife Jennett Somerscales my brother Mr Arthure Somerscales and said loving cosin Thomas Preston younger to be joint executors of this my last will and testament And I desire my good freinds Mr Christopher Shute John Catterrall esquire Mr Willm Catterrall his brother and my cosin Richard Frankland of Nealsing to be the...........thereof And to be aiding and assisting to my said executors for the better execution of this my will and for the better guiding and governing of my children and theire porcons And so commending my soule and bodie to gods mercie I have in testimony hereof set my hand and seale given the day and yeare first above written In the pnce of these witnesses hereunder named Anthony Prockter Lawrance Swainson Thomas Sowden Willm Browne Thomas Carr and Willm Lawsonn Memorandum That after this will whereunto this Codicil is annexed was made and sealed by the testator Henrie Somerscales the said Henrie Somerscales did by his owne words sett downe as follows...........whereas I have in this my will lymitted and sett downe that my said foure freinds in trust shall at thend of twelve yeares convey.........one estate of my said messuage or dwelling house and the howses garthes and grounds thereunto belonging in Langcliffe to my said sonne Thomas and his heires so as to pay to my said daughters Bridgitt and Anne Somerscales the said severall somes of fortie pounds and twentie pounds Provided yet alwaies and it is my will and true intent and meaning that if my said sonne Thomas shall refuse and not pay the said severall somes to my said


daughters in such sorte as by this my will is............of............of the said twelve yeares that then my said foure freinds in trust and theire assignes shall keepe my said messuage or dwelling house and the houses garthes and grounds with the appurtenances to the same belonging at Langcliffe aforesaid in theire owne possession untill such tyme as they have..............so much of the issues and profitts thereof as will pay the said severall somes of fortie pound and twentie pounds in forme aforesaid to the said daughters Bridgitt and Anne anything conteyned in this my will to the contrarie in any wise notwithstanding Latin text

JENNET STACHOWSE 1566 Borthwick vol 19 fol 438 In the name of god amen the xx day of Auguste in the yeare of oure lorde god a thousande fyve hundrethe thre score and sixe I Jennet Stachowse of Lancklif in Craven wthin the countie of Yorke singlewoman beynge of good and pfyct mynd and memorye thankes be gave to allmightie god maykethe and declarethe my testament and last will nuncupative in manner and forme followinge firste I bequythe my soule to allmyghtie god as mayker and Redeemer (and) my bodie to be buried wthin the pish churcheyarde whevr it shall please god to call upon me and I will that suche obsequies and funall services be doone and celebrated at my buriall.....and dothe stande wth the lawes of god and of the churche Also I give and bequythe unto Rowland Crashawe of Kirkebye in mallomdale all my goods and cattelles moveable and unmoveable wch I shall fortune to have at and in the day of my deathe my dettes and funall expences ass..ged and I ordaine constitute and mayke the same Rowland Crashawe my hole and full executor of.....testament and last will nuncupative Thes beinge witnesses Roger Kidde John P[ar]kynson....Atkinson Richarde Knowles and John Crashawe of Lancklife aforsaid sone of Roger Crashaye Latin text RICHARD WALKER 1613 Borthwick vol 33 fol 6 In the name of god Amen the xxjth day of June in the yeare of our Lord god 1613 I Richard Walker of Cowsyde within the pishe of Gigleswick in the county of york yoman sick in body but of good and pfecte memory god be praised therefore doe make and ordeyne this my last will and testamt in mannr and forme followinge First I comend my soule to Almightie god assuredly believinge throughe the meritts of Jesus Christ my savior to have full and free remission of all my synns and to be made prtaker of everlasting liefe and my body to be buryed within the pishe churchyard of Gigleswick aforesaid att the discretion of my loveing wief and frends Itm it is my will and I give devise and bequeath the use occupation and pfitt of the one halfe of that my messuage and tenemts with thappurtennces at Cowside aforesaid wch was my late father Henrie Paicocks and of all other my lands Tenemts and grounds (excepting the tenemt wch I lately bought of Michaell Sailbanck) unto Anne my now wiefe and to her assignes for the term of threscore yeares next after my decease if she soe long doe lyve And for the other halfe of my said messuage tenemt ....... wth thappurtennces (except beforexcepted) my will is also and I give devise and bequeath the use occupation and pfitts thereof to the said Anne my wiefe and her assignes for and towards the better prefermt and bringing up of my children preferred from the tyme of my decease untill such tyme as my youngest childe shall or should by course of yeares accomplishe the age of xxj th yeares yf she my said wiefe so long lyve and be not marryed againe after my decease But if my said wiefe dy or be marryed before my youngest childe shall accomplish the said age of xxj th yeares then I give devise and bequeath the pfitts that shall arise of that halfe of my said tenemt from thenceforth ......................children that shalbe .......to be imployed for and toward their better bringing up and pfermt, And for the ..... and residue of all the terme of yeares right tytle interest and estait that then besydes in and to the said tenemt wth thappurtennces (except before excepted) I give the same wholy wth all my deeds and evidences concerning the same unto Robert Walker my eldest sonne and to his Executors and assignes to enter to the same after the expiration of the termes before lymited sevrally and respectyvely soe alwayes and it is my will that my said sonne Robert his Executors or assignes shall pay in consideracon of the same the some of thirty pounds of lawfull Englishe mony to three of my younger sonnes that is to say Henry John and Richard or to the survivors of them evry one an equall pte wthin the space of one whole yeare next after my said sonne Robert hys Executors or assignes shall or may by vertue of this my will enter unto have & enioy the said..... Tenemt and pmisses wth


thappurtennces except before excepted) And for that my said sonne Robert do pay xx li to myne Executors upon reasonable demand after my decease and alsoe so that he doe give her securitie to save her harmles of one bond wch I lately enterd wth and for my said sonne to his Father in lawe mr John Anderton Also it is my will and I give devise and bequeath the use occupation and pfitts of that messuage and tenemt wth thappurtennces att Cowsyde afore said nowe in my occupation wch I lately bought of Michael Sailbanck unto my said sonne Robert and his assignes from the tyme of my decease untill my sayd youngest childe should or shall accomplishe the said age of xxj th yeares. And for the re.......remainder and residue of all the terme of yeares Right tytle interest and estait that I have besydes in and to the same messuage and tenemt lately Michaell Sailbancks with thappurtennces I give devise and bequeath the same wthall my wrytings escripts and evidences concerninge the same unto Michaell Walker my second sonne and to his Executors and assignes soe that he said Michaell his executors or assignes doe pay unto my foure daughters Agnes Elizabeth Margarett and Anne or to the survivors of them the some of xx li equall amongst them wthin one yeare next after my said younger sonne child accomplishe the said age of xxth and one yeares. Itm I give devise and bequeath unto Richard Walker my youngest sonne All that my ground wch I lately bought of Thomas Newhuis of Gigleswick and all my evidences concerning the same to enter unto the same when my said sonne Richard shall accomplishe thage of xxj yeares if he then lyvinge and from thenceforth to have hold and enioy the same to my said sonne Richard his Executors and assignes for and dureinge all such terme estait and interest as I have and as shalbe yt of then unexpyred by force of such conveyance and assurance as I hyld the same by And if my said sonne Richard dy before he accomplish the said age then I give the same all my estait interest and terme of yeares therein unto my sonne John and his assignes if he be then lyveinge or if he be then dead then to my other sonnes and to the survivors of them and their assignes Itm it is my will that my sister in lawe Elizabeth Peacock be kept relieved and mainteyned with sufficyent meat drinke apparell and other necessaries upon my tenemt wch was her Fathers at Cowside aforesaid and that my said sonne Robert his executors or assignes shall bere the whole charge of ther fyndinge and maintenance from and after such tyme as he the said Robt his executors or assignes shall or may by vertue of this my will enter unto and every the said whole tenemt wch was my said Father Henry Paicocks from thenceforth dureing her liefe naturall Alwayes pvyded that then he his executors or administrators shall not be charged to put the tenne pounds before lymited to my youngest sonne Richard untill the said Elizabeth Peacocke be dead any before mentioned notwthstanding. And as concerning my moveable goodes my will is that my debtes funrall expenses being first discharged and paid the residue be devided into three ptes And that my wiefe have one third pte thereof according to the lawe and custome of the country and my children to have another 1 pte and for my pte comonly called the dead pte I give the same to my said foure Daughters Agnes Elizabeth Margarett & Anne equally amongst them and if any of them dy in their minoritie or nonage then my will is that the pte or ptes of her or them so dyeing shall remaine to the survivors of them and and I make and ordeyne Anne Walker my said wiefe to be my sole Executrix of this my last will and testamt. And I desire Richard Foster of Winskall Roger Cooke of Stainforth Thomas Clapham of Winskall aforesaid and James Walker the younger of Austwick, to be the supvisors of the same Witnes hereof Robert Lakeland Richard Foster Thomas Clapham John....... et als Latin text RICHARD WILSON 1695/6 Borthwick mf 1701 In the name of God Amen the fifth day of September in the year of our Lord 1695 I Richard Wilson of Langcliffe in the county of York felmonger being infirm in body but of sound and perfect memory praised be God for the same do make this my last will and testament in manner and form following. That is to say believing my salvation in Jesus Christ my redeemer and in hopes of a joyful resurrection and I commit my body to the ground to be buried at the discretion of my executrix hereafter named. And for the disposal of my worldly goods and estate, wherewith it has pleased God to bless me of the same I do dispose as follows. Imprimis I will that my funeral expenses and just debts be well and truly paid and discharged by my executrix. Item I give and bequeath unto Anne Wilson my wife all that parcel of ground called Round Close and one cattlegate and calf gate in upon and throughout a stinted pasture commonly called Farr Moore with the appurtenances lying and being within the township of Selside in the said county of York, which said premises I lately purchased of Edmond Typlady of the said Selside. To have and to hold the said Round Close calf gate and cattlegate with the appurtenances unto the said Anne Wilson her heirs and assigns for ever according to the ancient and laudable custom of tenant-right had, used, and established within the Manor or Lordship of Newby. Item I give and devise unto the said Anne Wilson my wife all my leases for years of certain lands lying and being within the said Langcliffe together with all and singular houses, gardens and appurtenances whatsoever to them appertaining. To have and to hold the said leases for years and premises with


the appurtenances unto the said Anne Wilson her executors administrators and assigns for and during such term as yet is unspent in the premises. Item I give and bequeath unto the said Anne Wilson my wife all and singular other my goods, chattels, and personal estate. And lastly hereby revoking and absolutely disanulling all and every will and wills by me heretofore made, if any such were, I do of this my last will and testament nominate and constitute the said Anne Wilson my dear wife sole executrix. In witness whereof I the said Richard Wilson have hereunto set my hand and seal the day and year first above written. Sealed signed and published to be the last will and testament of the said Richard Wilson in the sight of us Henry Ellin his mark Christopher Johnson R. Atkinson Richard Wilson his mark Obligation January 9th 1695/6 An inventory of the goods and chattels which did belong and appertain to Richard Wilson of Langcliffe within the parish of Giggleswick lately deceased, as follows. ÂŁ s d Inpr. his purse & apparel 01 - 10 - 00 Item his houses & lands in Langcliffe 40 - 00 - 00 Ite one horse & one mare 03 - 00 - 00 Item foure cowes 10 - 00 - 00 Ite one why one stirke & one calfe 03 - 00 - 00 Ite one longe chist 00 - 06 - 08 Ite four other small chists 00 - 13 - 04 Ite three paire of bedstocks with bedding belonging 02 - 00 - 00 Item one cupboard 00 - 06 - 08 Ite two little tables 00 - 10 - 00 Item in brasse & pewther 01 - 10 - 00 Ite in wood vessell 00 - 10 - 00 Item chaires, and stooles 00 - 05 - 00 Ite in iron furniture 00 - 05 - 00 Item in meale, malt, beefe, & bacon 00 - 13 - 00 Ite two carts, & two paire of wheeles 01 - 00 - 00 Ite for other husbandry stuffe 00 - 06 - 08 Ite for goods in his shopp 03 - 00 - 00 Ite for corne & hay 03 - 00 - 00 Ite in lent money 20 - 00 - 00 Ite in several sumes in his debt booke 15 - 00 - 00 ÂŁ summa tot

106 - 16 - 4

Apprizers names Christopher Johnson Matthew Frankland Thomas Redshey his mark John Armitstead

s

d


The Land Farming In and Around Langcliffe In 1348, Edward the Third appointed agents to buy wool in Craven. They ‘took from Walter Bateman of Setle four stones of wool of the price of 9s 9d., and from Alan Tollere of Setill four stones of wool of the price 9s 9d’. Patent Rolls 12 June 1348. Alec and Robert Towler are breeding sheep and selling wool in Langcliffe today. Farming Alec keeps five hundred breeding sheep, plus lambs and twenty five breeding cows, plus calves. The sheep are Swaledales and the cattle Hereford Cross Cows. It’s hard work, it’s not a nine-to-five job, but it’s interesting. The younger generations of the family are preparing to follow on. This is the broad outline of his farming year: Walling and fencing all the year round – weather permitting Feeding cattle and sheep December to May Lambing in April and May, calving in May and June Making silage, dosing and hay in June and July Dosing and shearing in August Selling some lambs in September and October Selling calves in October and November Put rams to sheep and dose and dip in November James aged 9 I get up at seven to eight o’clock, have my breakfast, feed the dog, help Dad feed the hens and go down to the buildings . We feed the cows on The Heights. We feed the cows first then the sheep. I’ve got thirty four sheep. I do them on the quad bike. I help Dad with his sheep. He called one sheep Carla; it had curly horns. I do the East End sheep and the top of Big close. We have dinner at twelve o’clock. After dinner we do walling and mending fences. Mum works inside and makes the dinner. She looks after Philip who is one and a half. He sleeps half the morning. My brother Andrew is six – he comes with us sometimes. I have a friend, Jack, who lives on a farm and my Grandad lives at Limestone Farm. I like the farm because it has big buildings to play in and space for football. I like playing on the quad bike and riding my own motor bike – the engine’s 80cc – down the track. The track to the farm is one and a half miles long. I’m not allowed battery toys or remote controlled toys. We are not on mains electricity. The windmill generates electricity and we have a generator and heavy batteries.


Haytime and lambing are best. We mow the grass and make silo bales and put them in our building. Aunties and uncles and friends from around come and help. I like it afterwards when we all have a big meal – feeding the workers! Just before haymaking, we get everything out to check it. I get to look inside the machines. It’s nice and sunny and I like seeing all the tractors working at once. Before lambing, we get all the bits and build pens. I can use my new penknife to cut the string. We have one pen each with one sheep and its lambs in it. I like carting sheep in the trailer with the motorbike. If the new born lambs are really poorly we put them on a bag in the bottom of the oven – it’s only cool andleave the door open. It warms them up. It’s boring when it’s wet. I don’t like it much when it snows. It’s fun for a bit but there’s drifts. There’s really more snow up here.It stops you getting out and going to Karate – but it’s O K if I miss school! I think my favourite things are haymaking and feeding the sheep on my bike. I want to be a farmer – on this farm. I want my friend Jack to help. Jackie Towler, A Farmer’s Wife Today Married ten and a half years to Stephen, I moved to Middle House nine years ago. It’s totally different to living in a village; it’s very isolated and quite lonely at times with no next door neighbours to talk to. It’s lovely at Middle House when the weather’s nice. The winters haven’t been too bad in the last nine years but I always have a spare box of food for emergencies just in case we are snowed in for a few days. We still have no mains electricity at Middle House. We have a generator, battery electricity and a wind turbine. This means we can now have things like a fridge and microwave ,which wasn’t the case a few years ago when there was just the generator and candles. Living with a husband and three boys, I am a bit outnumbered and don’t often get to do ‘girly things’, like wearing a skirt ; and I can’t remember when I last wore high heel shoes. No, I’m afraid for the last nine years, it’s been jeans and wellies or ‘muck clothes’ as we call them. Farming is not a nine to five job, which has both good and bad points. It means, on the good side, that we are fairly flexible and as long as animals are fed and ,‘nothing’s taking any fault’ as Stephen puts it, we can have a few hours off. On the bad side, we can never just ‘take off’ and go away for a night or two without making a lot of arrangements for the farm animals to be fed and looked after. Lambing time is the hardest time, for the children especially, as there is simply no leisure time at all. It’s an early start and we’re out till dark most nights and lots of losing our tempers in between. We usually manage a holiday around the beginning of June to give the kids a bit of fun and then, usually, it’s straight back to haytime , siloing and clipping! Jackie Towler. In the Past Edith Carr describes one of the many tasks that had to be done by hand sixty years ago. "At Capon Hall we had 70 cows. Most of the milk, I made into butter. I put it into slate troughs. You had a skillet to scrape the cream off the top and into a pot.You let the other milk go through a hole and you fed that to the calves and pigs. I had an ‘end over end’ churn. It made twenty eight pounds of butter. Sometimes I had to churn twice in a day – it took some doing. You had to get your cream to a certain temperature. If the cream was cold, it wouldn’t ‘turn’. I set it to warm by the fire. While that was doing, you had to see to the scalding of your churn with lots of boiling water. You scalded your butter bowl and all your pats and all your slates. When the cream got nicely warm, you put it in your churn. If you were lucky it took about twenty five minutes. Sometimes, if it were cold, you could go on and on – it wouldn’t turn! You’d put a bit of boiling water in and then churn it the opposite way and then it might ‘gather’. Then it starts "bump,bump, bump" this big lump of butter. Then you let your buttermilk out of the churn. Then you have to wash the churn with three lots of water and turn the churn, letting the buttermilk out. Once again you scald your big board and immediately throw cold water on it to stop the butter sticking. You start working it and


turning it this way and that. All the buttermilk squeezes out and you can make the butter up into pounds. We sold our butter at Settle,it used to be one shilling and threepence a pound. It was really good!" Edith Carr Westside House Margaret Robinson remembers farming at Westside House in the late thirties and early forties. " My parents, William and Jane Hoyle, farmed at Westside House which is about three and a half miles above Langcliffe on Malham Moor. They had two farm men and a servant girl who all lived in at the farm. Everything was done by hand, like, milking the cows and cleaning the shippons out. In the winter the cows had to be let out to the water troughs and then all tied up again. Durung a snowstorm, a track had to be cut by shovels to get to the barns. Every morning and night the milk was brought into the kitchen and separated by a machine to take the cream from the milk. Once a week the cream was made into butter and taken to Settle market along with the eggs. Mother used to pick watercress at spring in the field and tie it in bunches to be sold at the greengrocer’s in Settle. The only transport was a horse and trap. Before motorised transport, all the coal was brought from Settle by horse and cart, hard going for the horses up Cow Close out of Langcliffe. During the winter nights everyone helped to peg rag rugs for the floors – all sitting round a big frame. There was great excitement when we got a wireless – mostly to listen to the news. At Christmas, we went round to neighbouring farms by horse and trap to play cards – coming home in the early hours of the morning. On Christmas Day, the Settle and Giggleswick band used to walk round the farms playing carols. The postman left the letters in a box in the wall about a mile from the farm. If he had any letters he would he would put up a piece of tin painted white on top of the wall and someone from the farm collected them. A whistle was blown to call everyone when meals were ready as no one had a watch in those days. We did not need a lot of shopping as we had our own bacon, eggs, milk, rabbits, butter and lard. The flour was bought in ten stone bags and yeast was bought for breadmaking. We had to walk three miles to Stainforth School – starting when we were five years old". Margaret Robinson A list of the Farms of Langcliffe – Past and Present Hope Hill, Pike Lane. Owned and worked by Jim Capstick until the early 1930’s then land rented to Lornie and Arthur Towler. Farmhouse occupied by Alec Capstick until sold as a private house. Paley’s Farm. Originally the Paley family farm, becoming part of the Langcliffe Hall estate in the mid/late 19th C. Rented and worked by L. and A. Towler until approximately 1950. They lived in the cottages known as Paley’s cottages behind the flagpole. Present Paley’s Farm built by Dawsons and farmed by Wm. (Billy) Towler until taken over by A.S.Towler, approximately 1980. Mount Pleasant. Originally the Lawson family farm. Owned by the Preston family until 1980. Farmed by Ray Parker until approximately 1900, then Jim Pratt 1915-1925. Succeeeded by Edward (Ted) Robinson until 1935 when Walter Clark took over, being followed by his son John R. Clark until he ceased in 1985. This was the last dairy farm in the village. Manor Farm. The family house was built in 1678 by Leonard Carr. The property passed from his nephew William Carr in 1747 and after various ownerships it passed to Thomas Paley, half in 1775 and the other half in 1783. After Thomas died the property passed to George, then John Green Paley, George Barber Paley, John and finally George Arthur Paley. Since about 1840 the farm was leased to tenants. In 1920 George Arthur Paley sold the farm and house to Henry Dugdale for £3250. The farm was run by Robert (Bob) Sutton 1900-1945, (who was married to Louie, Henry Dugdale’s daughter), then Norman Forster, father and son until 1962. They were followed by William Towler, then (Lord) John Towler until about 1980 when it became a private house. John Clark tells of trouble between his father and the Forsters: Clarks milked early, let their cows out and swept the lane clear. Forsters milked later and their cows had to go over the Village Green in front of Manor Farm and up the


lane to join Pike Lane and their fields. The lane by Clark’s was covered in cowclaps, which were not always cleaned up!!! Barrel Sykes Farm. In 1692 William Tailor of ‘Barrel Sikes’ is noted as entering Christ’s Colleg Cambridge on a scholarship from Gigghleswick School. Much later the farm was owned by Langcliffe Hall Estate. Alec Jackson, father and son to about 1948, then Fred Bullock to 1974. He was followed by Richard Pollard until 1983 when the land was rented off, partly to Richard Hargreaves of Horton and the house used as a private dwelling. Cowside Farm. Owned and farmed by the Hunter family from the 19th C to 1965 when on the death of the last farming Hunter it passed to Kenneth Robinson. Winskill Farms. In 1591 Nicholas Darcy and Henry Billingsley sold 7 messuages and land at Winskill and Cowside in the tenure of the Foster family (five of them), Christopher Lawson, Henry Paycocke and Michael Saylebanke. The farms consisted of High, Middle and Low Winskill. At the turn of the 20th C, High Winskill was farmed by Umph Hannam. At some point a cow caught anthrax and was eaten by the then farmer and his wife who both died and the farm was abandoned. Lower Winskill Farm. In the middle of the 19th C was farmed by the Twisleton family (of poetry fame). They were succeeded by Jim Lowther and the Sharpe family. When they failed it was bought along with the others by Ernest Forster of Stainforth and leased to his brother, N. Forster Senior (of Manor Farm). later a Middleton farmed here and on his leaving the land was leased off and the house used as a holiday cottage until the farm was taken in hand again by Ernest Forster’s grandson Thomas Lord. Middle Winskill Farm. Little is known at present of this farm. Hall Farm. Owned by Langcliffe Hall estate and now occupied by Mrs Hoggarth. Was farmed by the Jackman family around 1900 (see Middleton family). Acknowledgements John R. Clark, Dorothy Robinson, Doreen Welch Victoria Cave. SD 8384 6505 350,000,000 years ago. The cliff above the village of Langcliffe is composed of limestone, which was deposited 350,000,000 years ago. The Rev J E Field, an early Victoria Cave enthusiast, wrote an account of this geological event in his book, The Story of a Limestone Cave, 1876. In an ecstatic burst of purple prose he asks us to :‘Conceive the mighty caldron of this primeval chaos... foaming seas of molten and glowing minerals, are striving in one world - wide tumult to gain the mastery'. 'Down in the ocean bed a narrow aperture is cleft through the burning pavement by the contents of the subterranean furnace. A hissing lava stream is spirited upward from a vast depth below and rears its steaming summit above the waves'. Geologist Jo Light gives a more measured account of this event Limestone is the result of shelly debris being deposited on the floor of shallow tropical lagoons. This accumulation of debris continues over a long period and results in beds of limestone. Complex earth movements cause the limestone to be lifted above sea level and so become part of the landscape. The limestone surrounding Victoria Cave was formed in this way. Continental drift moved it into its present position. 120,000 years ago. If you look at the present cave and imagine a line drawn across from the screes on either side, you are presented with a much narrower opening that would have served very well as a lair for wild beasts. 120,000 years ago, in an interstadial period between ice advances, the climate was much warmer and the rolling landscape


stretching out before the cave was home to animals that we would now regard as exotic. At the entrance to the network of caves there were large deposits of hyena dung and evidence that the hyenas had scavenged on the abandoned prey of larger carnivores. In the lowest level of the cave were the bones of straight - tusked elephant, narrow - nosed rhinoceros, giant deer, red deer, oxen, bear and hippopotamus along with the bones of the hyenas, which had gorged on them. This Eden did not last. This period was an interglacial interlude and the ice returned. Imagine again this landscape locked in ice, only the top of Pen-y-Ghent is visible and the ice stretches to the Midlands. The climate eventually starts to change and the temperature rises a little. The ice starts to melt and huge glaciers grind their way from Cumbria down the North West to the sea. As they melt they deposit the great boulders known as erratics and scour out the valleys. Such a glacier grated past Victoria Cave filling its lower levels with debris. The hyenas' dustbin was hidden and wouldn't come to light for many years. The ice ebbed and flowed past the entrance to Victoria cave over the course of many years grinding up rocks and pushing the debris into the cave. The ebb and flow of this material created the laminated layers of clay on the cave floor. As the ice receded the cave became habitable again but the new tenants were creatures that could withstand the rigours of a near Arctic climate. Bears returned to the caves and herds of deer eked out an existence on the sparse vegetation. 12,000 Years Ago. When the ice finally retreated the landscape outside the cave resembled that of Siberia. It was a barren landscape with glacial rivers and lakes and scrubby vegetation. It was the habitat of grizzly bears, brown bears, foxes, badgers, reindeer, red deer, wild goats, pigs, horses and wild fowl. It was a good summer hunting ground for the new arrival - man. The hunter-gatherers were armed with harpoons and spears fashioned from antlers and stone. Their arrows were barbed with flint or chert. They lived in tents made of poles and hides or leanto shelters roughly constructed from materials around them. They may have taken temporary refuge in the cave in times of desperate need but it was a wet, dangerous and uncomfortable place. Through twelve millennia. The natural action of acid rainwater on the limestone covered the floor of the cave and its contents with flowstone. It also caused large blocks of limestone to fall from the roof so the evidence for the existence of these early inhabitants lay buried and blanketed until the arrival of the diggers. 162 Years Ago. The initial discovery of the cave in 1838 was made by Michael Horner,a local tinsmith and mechanic, while out rabbiting. I will let his grandson tell the story. 'Michael Horner was my Grandfather and I have often heard my aunt tell the story of how her father and two other young men went rabbiting above Langcliffe one Spring Morning 1838. They went to the Fox Holes, They had a dog that went into one hole and came out of the other. They thought it had got fast and so Michael Horner squeezed himself through the hole, which was only the size of a horse collar; he found a cave. For the next few weeks after, he explored the cave, finding, with other things, a bone brooch. These he gave to Joseph Jackson for whom he worked, when he told him about the cave and where it was'. Craven Herald. (There is still some dispute about the date of the discovery and Thomas C Lord, in his Biographical Sketch of Joseph Jackson, cites some good evidence for the date being 1837, the year of the accession of Queen Victoria). Joseph Jackson was a plumber and glazier who, at the age of twenty-one, was already running a successful business. He was an enterprising young man and won the contract for the glazing of the new church at Stainforth. Despite his heavy business commitments he developed a life long passion for the exploration of the cave. He returned to the cave many times and made further discoveries. 'The entrance was nearly filled up with rubbish, and overgrown with nettles. After removing these obstructions, I was obliged to lie down at full length to get in. The first appearance that struck me on entering was a large quantity of clay and earth, that seemed as if washed in from without, and presented to the view round pieces like balls of different sizes. Of this clay there must be several hundred wagon loads, but abounding more in the first than in the branch caves. In some parts a stalagmite crust has formed mixed with bones, broken pots etc. It was on this crust I


found the principal part of the coins, the other articles being mostly embedded in the clay. In the other cave very little has been found. When we get through the clay, which is very stiff and deep, we generally find the rock covered with bones, all broken and presenting the appearance of having been gnawed. The entrance into the inner cave has been walled up at the sides. In the inside were several large stones lying near the hole, any one of which would have completely blocked it up by merely turning the stone over. I pulled the wall down, and the aperture was now about a yard wide, and two feet high. On digging up the clay at about nine or ten inches deep, I found the original floor; it was hard and gravelly, and strewed with bones, broken pots and other objects. The roof of the cave was beautifully hung with stalactites in various fantastic forms and as white as snow. Jackson, after collecting a considerable number of finds from the cave, sought some expert guidance. He wrote to Charles Roach Smith, a noted Roman archaeologist, who edited Antiquarian Notes for the Gentleman's Magazine. Roach Smith's notes on the finds were read to the Society of Antiquaries in April 1840 but it was another thirty years before a funded excavation of the cave was organised. Jackson continued his own excavations during this time. His Romano-British finds included some fine decorative pieces but it was the discovery the jaw of a spotted hyena which excited the interest of Dean Buckland , Professor of Geology at Oxford University. Professor Buckland, the foremost authority on cave research at that time, travelled to Settle to see Jackson and examine the collection of finds. The site was now recognised as an important resource and Professor Mckenny Hughes set up The Settle Cave Exploration Committee in 1869. The subscription list, which was opened to raise the funding for a major excavation, includes the names of many noteworthy local families, academics and the aristocrats. Joseph Jackson, the Settle plumber was appointed as site superintendent. The British Association for the Advancement of Science supported the enterprise and between 1872 and 1879, R H Tiddeman of HM Geological Survey issued reports on the finds and their significance. Some interpretations were hotly disputed and caused serious rifts in the committee. The description of the ice ages and the consequent dating of some artefacts in the sedimentary layers raised an issue between Professor Boyd Dawkin and Tiddemann. Another 'bone of contention' was a human femur which was later identified as that of a bear. The desire to find evidence of human and ice age mammal co-existence seems sometimes to have clouded the objectivity of the scientific research. The massive amounts of clay that covered the lower levels of the cave made the excavation an expensive business and much painstaking work was needed to recover and identify the finds. There were periods of inactivity when funds ran out and the labourers who were laid off went haymaking. Throughout the seven years new appeals were launched to meet the main expenses of labour, tools, powder, candles, printing and photographic work.

Illustration of profile of cave.

The excavation yielded the following results. LOWER LEVEL about 120,000 years ago The bones of:Brown Bear, Spotted Hyena, Elephant, Rhinoceros, Hippopotamus, Giant Deer, Red Deer, a bovine, Lion UPPER LAYER about 12,000 years ago. The bones of:-


Badger, Horse, Reindeer, Pig, Goat, Sheep, Grizzly Bear, Brown Bear, Deer, Fox The bones of the domestic animals were heavily gnawed and suggested the presence of dogs and human settlers in the near neighbourhood. BRONZE AGE AND EARLY IRON AGE FINDS 3000 - 2600 years ago. Pottery sherds and decorated stones. ROMANO BRITISH LAYER. about 1500 years ago. The Romano British layer of the cave contained a large number of artefacts. Among them were:- over a hundred coins which had been minted between 83 BC and 346 AD . - brooches ( Trumpet, Head stud, Dragonesque, Disc and Annular). - bracelets of twisted wire. - rings, earrings and buckles. - a coin balance. -ivory and bone armlets, spindle whorls, needles, and tool handles. - curiously pierced bone spoons. - beads of amber and glass, bottles and flasks. - stone whetstones and burnishers. - many sherds of Roman pottery. 1880 - 2000 AD. Between 1937 and 1939, Tot Lord of Settle undertook further excavations and discovered a part of the spotted hyena bed. In 1977/78 Mr Alan King recovered a pennanular brooch and a single coin. In 1980 Dr Mel Gascoyne undertook the uranium series dating of the flowstone covering the bones from the lower cave. The date of 120.000 years ago was confirmed. In 1998 Martin J Dearne and Thomas C Lord published a review of the Romano-British artefacts. In the chapter on the Romano British usage of the cave Martin Dearne comments on the number and quality of the finds from Victoria Cave.He considers that large numbers of brooches and coins found in the cave are incompatible with a small rural settlement and suggests that there were commercial dealings with nearby garrisons. Where were these garrisons? Between AD 78 and AD 83 the Roman commander Julius Agricola subdued and garrisoned the north of England.During the course of the next century six forts were built within a 25 mile radius of the cave (Elslack, Bainbridge, Ribchester, Lancaster, Burrow in Lonsdale and Ilkley). Each fort carried a garrison of 500 men. The demographic and social effect of the imposition of 3000 men on a sparsely populated area must have been significant. Small settlements developed around the forts, (vici), and a villa was built at Gargrave, (10 miles SE). The local people were taxed in kind, the younger men recruited into the army and captured rebels worked as slaves.


Aerial photographs of the area reveal evidence of Roman activity above the cave and in the valley field systems between Langcliffe and Stainforth. Some Roman pottery was retrieved from the spoil heaps of the lime works by Tot Lord. The coins from the cave date from 83 BC to 350 AD and indicate a long period of sustained activity in the area. How was the cave used over this period? WORKSHOP ? The cave itself was not suitable as a workshop since it lacked natural light, was very wet and had little headroom. The plateau outside the cave, however, did show evidence of fires and could have been a seasonal outdoor workshop. This sort of workshop though was unlikely to produce the fine crafting found in the recovered brooches. STORE ? The wetness of the cave precludes the storing of foodstuffs. The distribution of the artefacts does not suggest a store nor the assemblage of pottery. Some of the pottery appeared to have been brought into the cave as sherds. SHRINE ? In A Review of Archaeological Work in the Caves of North - West England, Alan King makes a case for ritual use and the depositing of votive offerings in the local caves. Wells ,springs and grottos were holy places to the Celts. The inner cave with its stalactite formations, drip water pools and a large well would have appeared, especially by the light of a small lamp, to be a spiritual place. The access to it was difficult and demanded stamina and courage. Was the entry to the chamber an initiation rite? Were the brooches deposited in the pools as offerings to some unknown Romano - Celtic deity? Martin Dearne states that some of the objects in the cave, the brooches, the spoons and the toggles could have been votive offerings. There are pottery sherds with evidence of sooting after breaking. Were these improvised lamps ? There is a larger number than would be expected of mortaria, (bowls in which substances are ground and mixed), in the pottery finds. What substances were prepared in them? 300 years is a long time and the cave may have been used for all these activities. There are no witnesses other than the artefacts. The cave itself, now a gaping hole in the cliff, is silent save for the dripping of water. In 1995 Lancaster University undertook a survey of part of the cave which was being colonised by rabbits. There were no finds. Some dangerous blocks of stone were removed during the survey. Today, the cave and the land around it are in the care of the Yorkshire Dales National Park Authority. THE CAVE IS STILL DANGEROUS AND THERE ARE FREQUENT ROCKFALLS FROM THE ROOF AND THE CLIFF. PLEASE TAKE CARE. Acknowledgements BRAYSHAW COLLECTION, Barbara Gent, Giggleswick School. BROWN Geo H Victoria Cave 1903 DEARNE Martin J LORD Thomas C The Romano British Archaeology of Victoria Cave Settle. 1998 FIELD J E The Story of a Limestone Cave. 1876


KING A A Review of Archaeological Work in the Caves of North-West England 1974 Chapter 10 Ed A C Waltham. Newton Abbot. LORD Thomas C A Biographical Sketch of Joseph Jackson 1997 Lower Winskill Archaeology Centre. TIDDEMAN R H The reports of the committee‌. 1875 -1878 British Association for the Advancement of Science. WHITE Robert Yorkshire Dales 1997 English Heritage, B T Batsford Author Jean Lavelle


Church and Chapel The Church of St. John the Evangelist

The view from the Village Green

The Church entrance

Like its three sister churches of Settle, Rathmell and Stainforth, Langcliffe church, dedicated to St John the Evangelist, was created out of the ancient parish of Giggleswick. They were part of the mid-nineteenth century period of church building, and were all built between 1836 and 1851. Langcliffe is the youngest of the daughter churches, built on the site of the old tannery by money donated by John Green Paley of Harrogate, whose family had been connected with Langcliffe for more than three centuries, and with Giggleswick twice as long, and aided by a grant from the Ripon Diocesan Church Building Society. It had its foundation stone laid on the 27th December 1850, and the building was consecrated by the Bishop of Ripon, Dr Longley, on the 29th September 1851. Standing at the apex of the picturesque village green, it provides a pleasant backdrop to the village. It is a single aisled building in the Neo-Gothic style of architecture and comprises nave and porch, chancel and sanctuary, with a vestry off the chancel, and another off the nave, both on the north side of the building, which is built of stone, and its roof covered in grey slate. It is believed that the village of Langcliffe in Norman times stood a little to the north of its present site, in a field on the left of the lane leading to the old quarry and Winskill. The parish as we know it today had its roots in the Industrial Revolution at the end of the 18th century. The mill dates from 1770, and the terraced cottages dating from around the same time provided accommodation for the mill operatives and their families; the operatives having direct access to the mill through Low Fold, and down the narrow walled footpath, crossing over the Settle to Carlisle railway line by footbridge. The nation's increase in population motivated action in the middle of the 19th century. It was known as the "Oxford Movement", whose leaders were people like Keble, Pusey, and Newman. This together with the suppression of the Irish Bishoprics, and the Acts 1 and 2 Victoria, led to forbidding the holding of livings in plurality by the clergy. This all contributed to increased religious activity throughout the land, and created a greater awareness by the Church of England of its responsibilities to the people. Stained Glass: Much religious symbolism and religious teaching is contained in our stained glass; it replaces wall paintings which would have decorated all our ancient churches like Giggleswick and Horton-in-Ribblesdale at one time, and spoke to the majority of the parishioners who were illiterate. Stained glass has been around now for nearly a thousand years. It is almost certain that the earliest examples of stained glass were purely decorative, but they were soon telling the stories of Jesus, his mother and saints, as well as depicting many other biblical scenes. The stained glass in Langcliffe Church is no different; it is all either 19th or 20th century glass, and came from two London firms, Lavers, Barrant and West, and Powell's. The East Window has three lights: the left light, The Adoration of the Magi; the centre light, The Descent from the Cross; and the right-hand light, The Ascension. This window, and the two windows at the west end (filled with floral and geometric patterns), were given by Mrs and Miss Paley of London.


On the north side of the sanctuary, the window represents The Appearance of the Angel at the Sepulchre to the Women, with the words, "He is not here. He is risen." Above is the figure of Our Lord in Glory. The Window bears the inscription Maria Burrows Stackhouse. Obit 4th September 1872, Aetat 26. The window on the south side of the sanctuary contains a picture of the raising of Jairus's daughter with the inscription, "The maid is not dead, but sleepeth." It bears the dedication: 'To the glory of God, and in memory of Mary Elizabeth Christie who died 6th July 1869, aged 16 years'. Her mother, who bore the same name, wife of Lorenzo Christie, died the previous year on 14th May, aged 37 years, is commemorated in the next window on the south side of the chancel; the window depicts Saint Maria in the left light and Saint Joannes in the right. Above them are fragments of Christ on the Cross, but the central figure of Christ is missing. Within seven years of the Christie's arriving in Langcliffe, (when they brought people from north, south, east and west to work at the mill), they were struck by death. As a result, the father, Lorenzo Christie soon handed over the reigns to his son Hector, who did much to build up the community spirit in Langcliffe, also the neighbouring area. He was chairman of the committee which closed Giggleswick Church for a complete restoration. In 1906 he was responsible for building the organ here at St John's. Only one window on the south wall of the nave is filled with stained glass, it is the two light window nearest the lectern. The left light depicts the Nativity of Our Lord; the right, Christ holding a stave and the young John the Baptist dressed in camel hair clothing, with the wording, "The Word was made flesh and dwelt among us. "The Latin inscription reads, "Desideratissimis Frates Superstites." Its dedication reads, " To the Glory of God and in loving memory of Mary Kathleen Phillimore (only daughter of George Robinson of Overdale, Skipton-in-Craven, and wife of Commander V.E.B. Phillimore DSO, RN. Born 3rd November 1875), and of Francis Bertram Robinson (third son of George Robinson of Overdale, Skipton-in-Craven. Born 13th March 1880. Died at the Harbour Works at Para Brazil 28th September 1910)" This window was dedicated by their surviving brothers. There are two windows on the north side of the nave, each with two lights. The window nearest the west-end of the church portrays in its left-hand light, the Baptism of Our Lord, and in the right, Christ is calling the children, with the inscription, "Suffer the children to come unto me." Above the two lights are the words "Of such is the Kingdom of Heaven." The window nearest the pulpit depicts the appearance of Our Lord to St Mary Magdelene, with the words, "Mary Rabboni." Its dedication, "To the Glory of God and in memory of Travers McIntire, Vicar of this parish from 1864 to 1879. Died 5th September 1912; also his wife Sarah Anne. Died 24th June 1913. The two windows in the west wall are filled with floral and geometric patterns. In the sanctuary, the carved oak reredos has five canopies, the two left-hand panels contain "The Creed" and "The Lord's Prayer", the two right-hand panels, "The Ten Commandments"; all are framed in oak. The sanctuary furniture comprises two Sanctuary Chairs, Communion and Credence Tables, two Coffin Stools, and Altar Rail; all made of oak, as are the Choir Stalls and Priest's Stall. The oak lectern, carved as an eagle, (signifying the word of God flying closest to the Kingdom of Heaven), stands at the chancel steps; the chancel arch bears the words, "Let all the people praise thee 0 God, let all the people praise thee." The organ, on the north side of the chancel was erected in 1906. It has two manuals, cased in oak, and built by J.J. Binns of Leeds. Dedicated in 1906 by the Bishop of Ripon. The pulpit, with three arcades in stone, is handsomely carved with diaper work. Standing to the west of the south door is the grey stone font with oak canopy, it is octagonal and bears the four emblems of the Gospels; the winged man for Matthew, the winged lion for Mark, the winged ox for Luke, and the eagle for John. The inscription above the base reads,


"Aede quinta Parochia instructa Vicarius de Giggleswick Deo Gratias 1851" The words "aede quinta" alluding to the fact that this church makes the fifth house of prayer in Giggleswick. The church has an open timbered roof and two bells in the turret, which are open to the elements. The painting on the north wall (much in need of restoration) is painted in oils; it is a copy of the central panel of a triptych by the artist Pietro Perugino (1446-1524), which hangs in the National Gallery, London. It was placed there in memory of Jane Elizabeth Dawson. Born 1925, died in Amman 1954. Younger daughter of Geoffrey and Cecilia Dawson. There are two mural monuments on the south wall, one to Geoffrey Dawson, editor of The Times for twenty five years, and his wife Margaret Cecilia. The other is to Margaret Jane Dawson and her sister Katherine Elizabeth Perfect. A simple plaque, also on the south wall, reads, Annie Bradley, 1902-1988, benefactress of this church. The Priest's Board, which hangs on the north wall near the vestry door, lists the fifteen priests who have served this parish from 1851 to the present day. The Churchyard, much enhanced by the many beautiful trees that have lived and matured there over the years, gives a fine setting for the church, which like the building itself offers parishioners and visitors alike peace and tranquillity, as well as the opportunity for private prayer. At the rear of the church, on the north side, is a War Grave of the First World War, and at the east end of the building is the grave of John Green Paley, the benefactor of the church. Val Leigh Langcliffe Church Like its three sister churches of Settle, Rathmell and Stainforth, Langcliffe church, dedicated to St John the Evangelist, was created out of the ancient parish of Giggleswick. They were part of the mid-nineteenth century period of church building, and were all built between 1836 and 1851. Langcliffe is the youngest of the daughter churches, built on the site of the old tannery by money donated by John Green Paley of Harrogate, whose family had been connected with Langcliffe for more than three centuries, and with Giggleswick twice as long, and aided by a grant from the Ripon Diocesan Church Building Society. It had its foundation stone laid on the 27th December 1850, and the building was consecrated by the Bishop of Ripon, Dr Longley, on the 29th September 1851. Standing at the apex of the picturesque village green, it provides a pleasant backdrop to the village. It is a single aisled building in the Neo-Gothic style of architecture and comprises nave and porch, chancel and sanctuary, with a vestry off the chancel, and another off the nave, both on the north side of the building, which is built of stone, and its roof covered in grey slate. It is believed that the village of Langcliffe in Norman times stood a little to the north of its present site, in a field on the left of the lane leading to the old quarry and Winskill. The parish as we know it today had its roots in the Industrial Revolution at the end of the 18th century. The mill dates from 1770, and the terraced cottages dating from around the same time provided accommodation for the mill operatives and their families; the operatives having direct access to the mill through Low Fold, and down the narrow walled footpath, crossing over the Settle to Carlisle railway line by footbridge. The nation's increase in population motivated action in the middle of the 19th century. It was known as the "Oxford Movement", whose leaders were people like Keble, Pusey, and Newman. This together with the suppression of the Irish Bishoprics, and the Acts 1 and 2 Victoria, led to forbidding the holding of livings in plurality by the clergy. This all contributed to increased religious activity throughout the land, and created a greater awareness by the Church of England of its responsibilities to the people. Stained Glass: Much religious symbolism and religious teaching is contained in our stained glass; it replaces wall paintings which would have decorated all our ancient churches like Giggleswick and Horton-in-Ribblesdale at one time, and spoke to the majority of the parishioners who were illiterate. Stained glass has been around now for nearly a thousand years. It is almost certain that the earliest examples of stained glass were purely decorative, but they were soon telling the


stories of Jesus, his mother and saints, as well as depicting many other biblical scenes. The stained glass in Langcliffe Church is no different; it is all either 19th or 20th century glass, and came from two London firms, Lavers, Barrant and West, and Powell's. The East Window has three lights: the left light, The Adoration of the Magi; the centre light, The Descent from the Cross; and the right-hand light, The Ascension. This window, and the two windows at the west end (filled with floral and geometric patterns), were given by Mrs and Miss Paley of London. On the north side of the sanctuary, the window represents The Appearance of the Angel at the Sepulchre to the Women, with the words, "He is not here. He is risen." Above is the figure of Our Lord in Glory. The Window bears the inscription Maria Burrows Stackhouse. Obit 4th September 1872, Aetat 26. The window on the south side of the sanctuary contains a picture of the raising of Jairus's daughter with the inscription, "The maid is not dead, but sleepeth." It bears the dedication: 'To the glory of God, and in memory of Mary Elizabeth Christie who died 6th July 1869, aged 16 years'. Her mother, who bore the same name, wife of Lorenzo Christie, died the previous year on 14th May, aged 37 years, is commemorated in the next window on the south side of the chancel; the window depicts Saint Maria in the left light and Saint Joannes in the right. Above them are fragments of Christ on the Cross, but the central figure of Christ is missing. Within seven years of the Christie's arriving in Langcliffe, (when they brought people from north, south, east and west to work at the mill), they were struck by death. As a result, the father, Lorenzo Christie soon handed over the reigns to his son Hector, who did much to build up the community spirit in Langcliffe, also the neighbouring area. He was chairman of the committee which closed Giggleswick Church for a complete restoration. In 1906 he was responsible for building the organ here at St John's. Only one window on the south wall of the nave is filled with stained glass, it is the two light window nearest the lectern. The left light depicts the Nativity of Our Lord; the right, Christ holding a stave and the young John the Baptist dressed in camel hair clothing, with the wording, "The Word was made flesh and dwelt among us. "The Latin inscription reads, "Desideratissimis Frates Superstites." Its dedication reads, " To the Glory of God and in loving memory of Mary Kathleen Phillimore (only daughter of George Robinson of Overdale, Skipton-in-Craven, and wife of Commander V.E.B. Phillimore DSO, RN. Born 3rd November 1875), and of Francis Bertram Robinson (third son of George Robinson of Overdale, Skipton-in-Craven. Born 13th March 1880. Died at the Harbour Works at Para Brazil 28th September 1910)" This window was dedicated by their surviving brothers. There are two windows on the north side of the nave, each with two lights. The window nearest the west-end of the church portrays in its left-hand light, the Baptism of Our Lord, and in the right, Christ is calling the children, with the inscription, "Suffer the children to come unto me." Above the two lights are the words "Of such is the Kingdom of Heaven." The window nearest the pulpit depicts the appearance of Our Lord to St Mary Magdelene, with the words, "Mary Rabboni." Its dedication, "To the Glory of God and in memory of Travers McIntire, Vicar of this parish from 1864 to 1879. Died 5th September 1912; also his wife Sarah Anne. Died 24th June 1913. The two windows in the west wall are filled with floral and geometric patterns. In the sanctuary, the carved oak reredos has five canopies, the two left-hand panels contain "The Creed" and "The Lord's Prayer", the two right-hand panels, "The Ten Commandments"; all are framed in oak. The sanctuary furniture comprises two Sanctuary Chairs, Communion and Credence Tables, two Coffin Stools, and Altar Rail; all made of oak, as are the Choir Stalls and Priest's Stall. The oak lectern, carved as an eagle, (signifying the word of God flying closest to the Kingdom of Heaven), stands at the chancel steps; the chancel arch bears the words, "Let all the people praise thee 0 God, let all the people praise thee."


The organ, on the north side of the chancel was erected in 1906. It has two manuals, cased in oak, and built by J.J. Binns of Leeds. Dedicated in 1906 by the Bishop of Ripon. The pulpit, with three arcades in stone, is handsomely carved with diaper work. Standing to the west of the south door is the grey stone font with oak canopy, it is octagonal and bears the four emblems of the Gospels; the winged man for Matthew, the winged lion for Mark, the winged ox for Luke, and the eagle for John. The inscription above the base reads, "Aede quinta Parochia instructa Vicarius de Giggleswick Deo Gratias 1851" The words "aede quinta" alluding to the fact that this church makes the fifth house of prayer in Giggleswick. The church has an open timbered roof and two bells in the turret, which are open to the elements. The painting on the north wall (much in need of restoration) is painted in oils; it is a copy of the central panel of a triptych by the artist Pietro Perugino (1446-1524), which hangs in the National Gallery, London. It was placed there in memory of Jane Elizabeth Dawson. Born 1925, died in Amman 1954. Younger daughter of Geoffrey and Cecilia Dawson. There are two mural monuments on the south wall, one to Geoffrey Dawson, editor of The Times for twenty five years, and his wife Margaret Cecilia. The other is to Margaret Jane Dawson and her sister Katherine Elizabeth Perfect. A simple plaque, also on the south wall, reads, Annie Bradley, 1902-1988, benefactress of this church. The Priest's Board, which hangs on the north wall near the vestry door, lists the fifteen priests who have served this parish from 1851 to the present day. The Churchyard, much enhanced by the many beautiful trees that have lived and matured there over the years, gives a fine setting for the church, which like the building itself offers parishioners and visitors alike peace and tranquillity, as well as the opportunity for private prayer. At the rear of the church, on the north side, is a War Grave of the First World War, and at the east end of the building is the grave of John Green Paley, the benefactor of the church. Val Leigh


The Methodist Chapel The chapel was closed for services in 2001 and was sold for conversion into a private house in 2002.

Methodism in Langcliffe (From 'Souvenir Handbook of the Centenary of the Settle Wesleyan Circuit 1830-1930) "There can be little doubt," says Mr Walker in his account of Methodism in Langcliffe, " that the earliest Methodists in Langcliffe were those who had attended the services at Settle and joined the Society there". In 1795 it is computed that out of the 19 members of the Settle Society, three were from Langcliffe, but in 1802 such an advance had been made that there were two classes at Langcliffe. In 1803 there is a record of a preaching service there and, two years later, one at Winskill. In 1814, Langcliffe had become a separate Society, with 36 members, and the following year these had increased to 51. The Methodist Community The Methodist community grew and thrived through the next generations and in 1952, at the celebration of the centenary of the opening of the old chapel and school at Langcliffe, an article, "This Significant Century" which told the history of Methodism in Langcliffe, culminated in the following paragraph: "Methodism in Langcliffe has become firmly established through the passage of years. Today it is splendidly maintained by a loyal and zealous company of Methodists. The fellowship is deep and real, and great blessing is experienced in the Sunday Services and School, as well as in the Choir and Fellowship meetings. We praise God for all He has done throughout "This Significant Century" and "Trust him for all that’s to come". We ask you to pray for us in all the Centenary Celebrations." Memories of The Chapel and the Sunday School Irene Bowker, Bob Monk and Derek Soames who were members of this thriving community can remember the people who were instrumental to its success. "We had a lovely school superintendent called Mr Emmanuel Hayes. Everybody loved him and he had a wonderful choir – a choir of about thirty, at least. He was like Father Christmas with white whiskers and a white beard. He had a lovely smiling face and he was really good with children. I remember him saying in Sunday School, ’How many of you will help to keep the Chapel and Sunday School going when I’ve gone?’ A lot of hands went up but Bob and I, and a few others, are the only ones left ". Mr Hayes was knocked down by a bicycle and killed outside his own house. He was an overlooker at the mill. "George Hallam was a really remarkable chap. He had a stern face but he was very learned and could keep your


attention. Any murmuring was enough to get a tinkle from the little bell. We had two Sunday School sessions. The first one was at nine thirty for the tots". Edmond, Irene’s first husband, took the Sunday School and the choir. "At Sunday School, Miss Burrroughs, who was head teacher of Helwith Bridge School used to produce operettas. We rehearsed in the Sunday School but staged them in the Institute for two or three nights. We produced one every year. ‘The Royal Jester’ was the title of one. The concerts and ‘Men’s Efforts’ toured the district. They played for charity round their own circuit of Settle and Bentham and further afield, at Haslingden, Malham and Cumbria. Little socials with entertainment were so full that people had to sit on the window boxes. We were fortunate in always having a good organist and a really good choir. We had some exceptional singers, Mary Benson, Doris West and Rowena O’Neill. Mr Hayes started the choir and we always had a good choir leader. It was Mr Hayes who started the singing under the tree at Christmas. It’s been going as long as I can remember and I’m eighty four (Irene). We sang anthems, Handel’s ‘Messiah’, Steiner’s ‘Crucifixion’,’ All in the April Evening ‘and ‘ Manger to Cross’. We were always fortunate. Mr Hayes, Mr Allen, Edmond and Mr Bannister were all good choir leaders". School picnics "We used to go on Blua or right to the far end of Howson Lane (Pike Lane). We used to cart the tea up in back cans, ’Nearly scalding their backs! ´Two or three people carried baskets. We used to really look forward to the Sunday School party and really hoping to be old enough to go to the main party. We played games and we sang". Chapel and Church "We didn’t mix a lot in those days. We could be really good friends and then, if religion crept into the situation , even as children, footballing, ‘Oh, he’s a Churcher’, ‘Oh, he’s a Chapeller’. Some very good and deeply religious people wouldn’t have a good word for the vicar. It was bigotry really". There was a period when there was no Sunday School at the church and a lot of 'Church' children attended the Chapel Sunday School. Irene was baptised in the church, because, at the time of her birth, the chapel was not licensed. "In our younger days some people were very narrow-minded. Some of our local preachers were very narrow. It wasn’t always as loving as it should have been. Somebody, perhaps, would get into trouble and they were treated more like outcasts". "They didn’t allow dancing, we always played games, because dancing meant putting your arms around each other. No cards, whist or anything. The question of drinking remains". Irene was in the Sunday School , the choir and played the organ. Edmond, the Superintendent, was ten years older than her but ,’the music drew us together’. "I’d like the chapel to survive but quite truthfully, with only twelve members, I can’t see it. They’d need a big influx of Methodists! There’s nobody to play the organ except me. The majority of us are in our seventies and eighties. Speaking for myself, I could go to Church quite comfortably. My husband’s last Communion was in Langcliffe Church. I played for a lot of services there. I played at Christmas too".


Langcliffe - New Zealand In 1838 George Duxbury, a constable of Langcliffe, married Alice Yates of Giggleswick,; there were nine of a family, four sons and six daughters. The oldest son John worked for a grocer in Padiham and was a Sunday school secretary and teacher in Blackburn, where he was presented with an address dated August 18th 1862 (a fortnight before his 21stbirthday), which said 'he was departing to a far and distant land’. November 10th 1862 John Duxbury arrived at Port Chalmers New Zealand off the barque ‘Chili’, a 768 ton emigrant ship carrying 160 passengers. The report said ,’ a fast trip of 83 days’. John soon found out that there was no future in the Otago gold fields and settled for a plot of scrub land on the Banks Peninsula. He had to travel there on a coastal boat which dropped the emigrants off at their appointed plots which, we are told, consisted of about 20 acres but which were added to by working on the new road to Christchurch. The workers were paid in land and John’s little plot grew to be a sizeable farm and he named it Langcliffe. In the early days the growing of Cocksfoot grass was most profitable. The large seedhead provided seed to develop new pasture land where the scrub had been cleared so there was a good market for this. John, or as he is referred to in the accounts, ‘Grandpa’, used to say that he landed with just a bob and a penknife, but in fact all emigrants were required to have:2 blankets 6 sheets a coverlet 6 towels 3lbs soap Knife, fork ,spoon and a tin or pewter mug and plate. Each male had to have 6 shirts, 2pr shoes, 6pr hose and 2 complete sets of outer clothing. Each female had to have 2 shifts 2 pr stockings 2 gowns, 2 flannel petticoats and 2pr shoes. Each emigrant had to produce a clergyman’s certificate attesting him sober, industrious, honest and stating that he and his family were the most respectable of the parish. When they left England there was no earthly expectation whatever of earthly reunion, and frequently no land would be sighted until port was reached. John did return to Langcliffe , but not to stay, it was only a visit to buy stock, this time by steam, not sail (SS Athenic). Not only did he buy a good Ribblesdale bull from Winskill but he returned to New Zealand with a flush toilet said to be the first in that part of the world. There are no longer any Duxburys left here but the name Wm. Duxbury, (the youngest brother) is still to be seen on Sidwell’s shop door – my grandfather. Jim Nelson


Murder at the Bay Horse, Langcliffe In 1871, Christopher Wright was a beer keeper at the sign of the Bay Horse. He was 75 and had lost his right arm. He lived with his wife and two granddaughters, Agnes and Annie Atkinson. Agnes was a servant and Annie occasionally assisted in the beer house. On the eighth of January, some navvies from the Settle-Carlisle construction gangs were drinking in the beer house. Ellis Parker, (sometimes known as Nelson), arrived with his mate Tom. Ellis and Tom didn’t order any beer but got their drink from the others. It was a custom amongst the navvies to buy a quantity of ale and then pass round ‘a lot’, a small glass, which they filled from the big pot. They got ‘fresh’ but not drunk. At about eleven o’clock when the landlord called closing time, Ellis moved with the others to the door and let them all out except Tom. He closed the door and stood with his back to it. Then he and Tom moved into the house. Mrs Wright demanded to know what they were doing. She offered them sixpence if they would go. Ellis swore he would go, " as true as God in Heaven", but took the sixpence and still refused to go. He then demanded a gallon of ale and asked Kit or Agnes to fill it. They refused to do this and asked him to go repeatedly. Ellis and Tom stayed on. At about twelve o’clock, Annie Atkinson was sent to get a constable, Christopher Jackson. Unfortunately the constable had been moved to another post the previous week and Langcliffe was without a police officer. Agnes and Peter Smith, a friend of Agnes who had been waiting outside, went to Settle in search of a constable. They returned without finding one and joined Christopher, his wife, Annie and an Irish boy in the kitchen. Agnes told her grandmother that the police were coming. Ellis shouted, ‘"If three came I’d master them all" and " if six policemen came I’d punch their bloody brains out". Ellis then demanded some supper saying that he knew Mrs Wright had some cheese. He bolted the door and said he was ‘Champion of London ‘ and he would let them see who was landlord of the house. Christopher protested, "I will have my door open", and went to pull the bolt. His wife followed with a candle. Ellis pushed Christopher away and knocked Mrs Wright against a partition which cut her arm. Christopher again tried to pull the bolt but was knocked down onto the flagged floor He was kicked and punched repeatedly then dragged through the house and thrown down to the floor hitting his head on the long settle. His wife ran from the house but was brought back by Annie and Mr Smith. Christopher called ,"Lord have mercy on me, Agnes, you won’t see me killed". Agnes went to lift Christopher’s head and Ellis threatened to "dash her bloody brains out if she didn’t let him alone"; "let the old bugger suffer". Agnes and Mr Smith lifted Christopher and took him to his chair in the kitchen. He cried out and complained of the pain in his back. Ellis laughed and jeered, "he’s makin’ it", and put his arm in a sling to mock him. At four in the morning Christopher dragged himself to his bed. At five o’clock, Ellis and his mate left of their own accord. Dr Altham was called later in the day and tended Christopher until he died, almost a week later. According to the post mortem, the cause of death was injury to the brain and kidneys and general shock to the system. Ellis was apprehended by William Taylor, a police constable from Settle on the ninth of January. Agnes accompanied the constable and pointed out Ellis. Ellis was sleeping in a railway hut at Willywood. Ellis was wearing clogs with iron rims. Ellis claimed he had been in bed and then said ‘He struck me first’. The constable took Ellis to Christopher Wright’s house where Agnes and Annie identified him. He was then taken to the lock-up at Settle. After the inquest on the seventeenth of January, Ellis was charged with the murder and manslaughter of Christopher Wright. He said, " It’s a bad job". Ellis Parker appeared before the local magistrates, Mr John Birkbek and the Rev. H.J. Swale, on Tuesday the tenth of January. He was remanded until the following Monday. Christopher Wright died from his injuries on that Monday and Ellis Parker was then committed for trial at the West Riding Assizes. His case was heard at the West Riding Spring Assizes before Justice Brett. In his summing up the judge said, "the prisoner’s conduct was as great an outrage as I have heard for many years. I cannot sufficiently express the contempt I feel for the mode in which he (the prisoner) had behaved himself on that night. It has been asserted that


his conduct has been exaggerated, but having looked into the depositions I see no reason to think that was so. If he had used weapons, there could not be the least doubt but he would have been found guilty of a murder for which there would have been no forgiveness, and his life would have been forfeited. But because he had not used a weapon people thought it right not to charge him with murder." The sentence was "penal servitude for five years." The licence of the Bay Horse was revoked although one suspects that it continued to sell beer until the early years of this century when it was a shoe shop at the front and a selling–out shop at the back. It was referred to locally as the Pig and Whistle. The old Inn is now a private house. Author Mary Slater


Langcliffe Community Primary School

The School bell was re-installed in the original bell tower in 2000. The bell is dated 1838 and since 1951 when it fell down it was kept inside the school. The inscription reads: Rowland Ingram MA Eccles St Alcald Paroch XVII KAL NOV AD 1838

The school closed in 2007 as it had become economically unviable.


This Old House

Three old properties look out onto the Stocks Tree and fountain in the heart of the village of Langcliffe. The one now known as the Old Vicarage is well known to have been the home of the Paley family. Mount Pleasant Farm has a doorhead on which the initials LRM (for Richard Lawson and his wife Margaret) are accompanied by the date 1681. But the third building, Manor Farm, now divided into a house and cottage, is more discreet. Clearly old - mullioned windows and blocked in window surrounds can be seen as well as the more modern sashes - it is evident there is much history within it which is not apparent from the village centre. The house itself really faces west, away from the rest of the village. This frontage, or what remains of it between two later projecting extensions, shows the original windows of the 17th century building. The interior of the house has an inglenook fireplace, exposed beams (some decorated with a painted design) and carved pendant kingposts in the roof space. The doorhead datestone proclaims that the house was built in 1678 by CLI. Who were L and I C? What was their connection with the manor of Langcliffe that the property should become known as Manor Farm? The Giggleswick Parish Register transcripts for the appropriate period reveal the burial in 1692 of Isabella Carr, wife of Leonard Carr, gentleman, of Langcliffe. Leonard himself was buried in 1696. He is referred to in various documents as ‘Mr.’ and ‘gentleman’, indicating a relatively wealthy man. He must indeed have been of some standing to build a house with such splendid detailing, rather more than the ordinary yeoman farmer might aspire to. What follows is the story of the Carrs’ and others’ involvement with the property which came to be known as Manor Farm. It is a story which has ‘probables’ and ‘possibles’ due mainly to the numbers of people sharing similar names. There will be inaccuracies and omissions to be corrected, but the broad outline is clear (summarized in the Appendixbelow). A will of the period shows that Leonard was the son of William Carr of Langcliffe who died in 1674. There were three William Carrs in Langcliffe listed for the 1672 Hearth Tax (six years before the new house was built). Leonard’s elderly father was probably the wealthiest one, having three hearths, the others only one apiece. The Paleys and Armisteads also had three hearths but only Josias Dawson and Lawrence Swainson had more. In his will of 1673, William made provision for his other three children but to Leonard, his eldest son, he left his whole estate within Langcliffe, together with three parts of Langcliffe Mill and a turbary on Cappanahill, and he also left a new house and shop in Settle which Leonard was at the time occupying. William, Leonard’s father, was described in his will as a merchant, and in another document as a merchant adventurer (a member of a powerful trading organisation dealing mainly in cloth), and was obviously a man of substance. He was in fact a Newcastle Merchant Adventurer, and it appears that Leonard was admitted to the Association also, by patrimony, in 1670. Leonard was one of a large clan of Carrs. His greatgrandfather is likely to have been Thomas Carr who married Agnes Paley in 1581. Thomas may have acquired his property in Langcliffe as a result of the share-out of the manor after


1591. Sir Arthur Darcy had obtained the Manor of Langcliffe after the Dissolution of the Monasteries in 1536-9, and after it had been passed to members of his family, leased to Henry Billingsley (later Lord Mayor of London) and other complex transactions, former manorial tenants or their heirs gradually acquired their own property and land. James Carr of Stackhouse was the last survivor of a group of feoffees, or trustees, who bought Langcliffe manorial rights in 1591. So, by some route, the land on which stood the principal farm of the manor and the Mill had come into Carr possession. The 1670’s, ten years after the restoration of Charles II, were a time of increasing prosperity, when all over Craven there were new stone houses being erected in place of the old wattle, rubble and thatch structures, and when local fashion was to have decorated and dated doorheads to show a certain status. So having come into his Langcliffe inheritance, Leonard together with his wife Isabella built a handsomely detailed three-celled two-storeyed house befitting a gentleman farmer of excellent local standing, a merchant owning also property in Settle and a major share in the local mill, and a sometime member of the Giggleswick Select Vestry. The house comprised the housebody, parlour, kitchen, buttery and several other chambers including servants’ and maid’s chambers. The value of Leonard’s property in Langcliffe relative to others in the village may be judged by a valuation made in 1692. This placed Leonard (at £15.5.10) second only to Christopher Dawson (£16.16.8) and if the mill valuation is added, greater than Dawson. After Isabella’s death, Leonard married again in 1694, a Martha Steward of Badsworth, near Wakefield. It is likely that she was a house servant and he married her for care and respectability in old age, as he died two years later. His will makes provision for Martha, both a lump sum of £20 and £15 a year during her lifetime. There were other monetary bequests to family and friends including John Paley and the Swainsons. Even his parish apprentice Agnes Cort was remembered with a bequest of £3. No direct descendants are mentioned and his remaining estate and chattels were left to his nephew William Carr. A probate inventory of Leonard’s goods and chattels was made and gives a good idea of the rooms in the house and other buildings and their contents. This William Carr was the son of Leonard’s brother Thomas. William was a minor at the time of Leonard’s death, having been baptised in 1682. Thomas died probably in 1699 but the law required William to have two ‘tutors, curators or governors’ until his majority at 21 years of age (in 1703). In due course, in 1705, William married Gracia (Grace) Claphamson, and presumably they were resident at the farmhouse in Langcliffe. A daughter Catherine was born, followed by other daughters and sons including William the male heir, although it is difficult to say with certainty from the Parish Register how many children in total, as there were other William Carrs in Langcliffe, Giggleswick and Settle. In 1718 a trust settlement was made by William to secure the continued use of the house and land for his descendants – he conveyed the estate to two trustees who would hold it for his use while he lived, then to the use of his heirs. Provision was made for the house to be divided at its north end by construction of an ‘upright wall next the fire’, the smaller northern part to accommodate Grace in possible eventual widowhood. This is how Manor Farm is now divided into house and cottage. The land and buildings belonging to the farm were also to be apportioned between the two parts of the divided house. Deeds of the period show that William had other property interests in Settle. He also owned two further dwellinghouses in Langcliffe, occupied at various times by Robert Wilson, Henry Lawson, Roger Gorman and William Bradley. There was farm land attached to both the main house and these two other houses. During the late 1600’s and early 1700’s there were problems at the water corn mills in the area. Profits for the millers were down in the mid 1600’s because of the disturbed times and ownership changes. A group of four partners rented several mills in the area and closed Langcliffe mill so that local residents had to grind locally grown corn at the Settle mill where they also increased the multure, or toll payable to the miller. This was not to the liking of Samuel Watson at Knight Stainforth who in 1652 brought an action against William Carr, the owner of Langcliffe


Mill and the four tenants of the other Giggleswick parish mills. As Lord of the Manor of Knight Stainforth he claimed a quarter of the Langcliffe water corn mill (later known as Langcliffe Old Mill) sited near the Langcliffe/Stainforth boundary – perhaps this was the one part not left to Leonard in William Carr’s will of 1673. Anyway, Samuel Watson lost his case and was, due to "one Carr", imprisoned in York Castle where he famously became a Quaker. Difficulties continued as more grain was being carried to Settle from elsewhere and sold in the market – the milling of this was not tied to the Settle mill. Much, including barley for brewing, was being sent to Carr’s independent mill in Langcliffe and he encouraged this by ‘greasing palms’ in Settle. So in 1720/1, Benjamin Ferrand, who currently held the tenure of the Settle mills, brought an action against the Settle innkeepers who brewed their own beer and arranged their own barley milling. It isn't known what was the outcome of this, but in any case the writing was on the wall for the water corn mills locally with the new turnpike road facilitating transport of grain into the area in the mid-1700’s, followed by the industrial revolution. The early 1700’s were times of insecurity in trade and disastrous financial speculation, and with the troubles in corn milling as well, times were probably hard for William at this period; in fact he was getting into debt. One hopes that the William Carr of Giggleswick who in 1723 had a bastard child (Joshua, baptised at Linton) by Mary King and paid the overseer of the poor at Grassington for her confinement and upkeep was not the husband of Grace. If he were, it would be yet one further expense he had to face. He may still have been paying the annual amount due to Martha, Leonard’s widow. He may have been paying Giggleswick School fees for one or more sons. So in 1728 he, together with the co-owner Charles Nowell of Cappleside, a kinsman, sold Langcliffe Mill and about 1.5 acres of land by the mill, together with everything belonging to it, to Benjamin Ferrand, of St. Ives, Bingley, for £120. The tenant at the mill, John Fisher, was transferred to Ferrand. (Later, in 1792, Benjamin Ferrand, the son of the previous Benjamin, sold the site of the mill, by then being then referred to as ‘Langcliffe Old Mill’, and the 1.5 acres, as well as two further mills in Settle and Giggleswick, to William Sutcliffe of Settle, surgeon and apothecary and son of the well known local apothecary Abraham Sutcliffe, for £1,300, and in 1793, Robert Salmon of Hollingbourne, Kent, bought the site of the Langcliffe Old Mill for £400, and it began its new life as a paper mill). In 1729 a request for a legal opinion was made concerning William’s trust settlement arrangements, and it is stated that he had contracted many debts, his creditors were calling for their money, and he had prevailed upon Thomas King of Skellands, Kirkby Malham, and Charles Nowell to pay these on his behalf. He needed to provide security for this loan, which he had done with the two smaller Langcliffe properties. He then, in 1731, mortgaged his main farmhouse, its outbuildings and fields, to Richard Lawson. The mortgage was transferred in 1738 to Charles Nowell, and yet again in 1741 to John Cookson of Wakefield, a Doctor in Physick, probably a relative of the local Cookson family. A further deed of 1744 links the names of William and Grace Carr, Charles Nowell, John Cookson and others with that of ‘William Carr of Slaidburn, Clerk, only son and heir of the said William Carr’. This William, the son, was probably the William Carr who attended Giggleswick School and was admitted to Christ’s College, Cambridge, at the age of 19 in 1735, matriculating the next year and obtaining his BA in 1739/40. The Slaidburn Parish Register shows a Mr. William Carr, clerk, marrying Ann Blezard in 1748 (followed by the baptism of yet another William in 1749). He probably was not the Rev. William Carr who in 1740 was headmaster at Slaidburn Grammar School but was the curate noted in the Register in 1754. By 1747, William Carr, (Grace’s husband and father of William of Slaidburn), was no longer living in the main Langcliffe house, when all the Langcliffe properties and a turbary at Kirkby Malhamdale were signed over to John Cookson. A year later, Cookson sold them on to Daniel Taylor, also a Doctor of Physick, of Boar Lane, Leeds. Grace died in 1756 and her burial was recorded in the Giggleswick register. It must have been about this time or earlier that the cottage was divided off from the larger part of the farmhouse, and an extension built on to it to the west. It may well be that William and Grace had been living in this cottage for the last few years. A fireplace of early


eighteenth century style is found upstairs in the cottage extension, and an oven was built by the fireplace in the main house at this period. There is no record in the Giggleswick Parish Register of William’s burial. However, his and Grace’s son William moved on from Slaidburn to become Vicar of Mitton in 1760 and the church register there records the burial of a William Carr, Gentleman, in 1766. Records of later property transactions referred to below indicate that he finally relinquished contact with the Langcliffe lands at some time between 1764 and 1767. The Vicar himself died and was buried in Mitton in 1771, and his tombstone may be seen in All Hallows’ churchyard inscribed ‘His Abilities Integrity & Attention to the Duties of the Function entitle his Memory to the just Tribute of grateful Respect’. Presumably when he died his wife Ann (Blezard) left Mitton and returned to Slaidburn, where the death of an Ann Carr is recorded in 1775. On his marriage to Elizabeth Pease (a member of a prominent Leeds family) in 1751 Daniel Taylor made a trust settlement concerning his property including that in Langcliffe and Kirkby Malhamdale. (Elizabeth Taylor was recorded as being ‘in possession’ at some period before 1767). He died soon after, in 1753, and it appears that the property passed jointly to William Atkinson, clothdrawer, of Leeds, and Dr. Anthony Foster, an apothecary of Otley. In 1775 William Atkinson’s widow and daughter sold their half-share to Thomas Paley who was farming in Langcliffe Thomas was the brother of Richard Paley, soap-boiler, of Leeds, who later founded the Bowling Iron Works in Bradford. Then in 1783 the late Anthony Foster’s son-in-law William Robinson (surgeon and apothecary of Ripon) and two unmarried daughters sold their half-share to Thomas Paley. Thus the Langcliffe Carr property came into Paley ownership. Thomas (Lawson) Paley died in 1808 and his son George who succeeded to the Paley farm in Langcliffe died very shortly after. George’s brother John Green Paley then took over the farm. By 1841 he owned a large amount of the land in Langcliffe township as is shown in the Tithe documentation. The Tithe map for Langcliffe village centre shows what is now Manor Farm House and Cottage, Barn and yard as ‘house, barn, yard, etc.’, an area of 1 rood and 7 poles, and being John Green Paley’s, ‘in hand’. But he was a partner in the Bowling Iron Works and ultimately retired to Harrogate, and therefore became an absentee landlord, though still describing himself as ‘of Langcliffe’. His son, the Rev. George Barber Paley, and grandson, John Paley, lived in Suffolk, but similarly described themselves. A poster of 1842 advertised two farms to be let. In 1871, during George Barber’s ownership, the three largest farming tenants were William Marchbank, Christopher Jackson and Thomas Maudsley. By 1894, on the death of John Paley, there were two large tenants, Samuel Preston and Christopher Jackson, and details of their occupation were listed. Samuel Preston occupied many fields and a garden, together with a house, barn and outbuildings of 1 rood, 7 poles. Christopher Jackson occupied various fields, a house and paddock, garden, and site of buildings. Preston’s acreage was 505 acres, and Jackson’s, 341 acres. Previously, in the 1885 Register of Electors both these farmers had had the address ‘Paley’s Farm’ (each comprising land and a tenement). But Preston’s (previously Marchbank’s together with Maudsley’s) was the tenancy including what is now the Manor Farm house. Many of Preston’s fields listed by name correspond with the old Carr field names given in previous deeds. Some time in the early to mid-nineteenth century considerable work was done on the house. The east elevation to the Green was improved by the insertion of sash windows to the main house, and doors to both house and cottage. Some rebuilding to the south and east corner of the house is apparent. In 1878 work was done to the roof when, it is recorded, the date was written in some plaster. The second extension to the west side was probably made in the late nineteenth or early twentieth century. It would be interesting to know by and for whom these various works were done. John Paley left property in Bradford, Harrogate, Malham, Kirkby Malham and Langcliffe to his son George Arthur Paley. He was only twenty and still at Trinity College, Cambridge, at the time of his father’s death. The property was left in trust until 1900. Between then and 1921 George Arthur (by now living in South Africa) sold off various parts of the estate. In December 1920 the Manor Farm, named as such, was sold to Henry Dugdale of Cleatop Park for


£3,250, the sale including the farmhouse with cottage adjacent, (in the occupation of a sub-tenant), and all outhouses, buildings, barns, stables, farm, and inclosures, pasture, meadow and arable land then ‘in the joint occupation of the Purchaser and Robert John Sutton or their under tenants’ and two other cottages, the present Bow and Arrow Cottages, adjacent to Paley’s Farmhouse. There had been a tenancy agreement for Manor Farm between Paley and Dugdale/Sutton in 1912. Robert Sutton was married to Louie, Henry Dugdale’s daughter, and in 1936 ownership was transferred to Louie. Between 1945 and 1962 the property was farmed by Forsters and in 1962 Louie Sutton sold to William Towler. In 1964 he conveyed the farmhouse and yard to John and Mary Towler. The piece of land called the Croft was sold in 1966, a smaller barn in 1974 and the great barn in 1978, for houses. The original 17th century Manor Farm property with its barns, gardens, orchards, fields and mill was now reduced to what is now the house and cottage and the old foldyard to the west side. Two further conveyances find the old Carr ‘Manor Farm’ house today in two separate residential ownerships, but more than three hundred years on, still standing close to the Paley and Lawson homesteads, all three a testament to the confidence and foresight of those yeoman farmers. References: Atkinson, H.B. (1922). Giggleswick School Register 1499-1921. Northumberland Press. Brayshaw, T. and Robinson, R.M. (1932). History of the Ancient Parish of Giggleswick. Halton, London. Harrison, B. and Hutton, B. (1984). Vernacular Houses in North Yorkshire and Cleveland. John Donald, Edinburgh. Langcliffe Millennium Group. (2000). Langcliffe: Glimpses of a Dales Village. Hudson History, Settle. Parish Registers of Giggleswick, Vols. 1 and 2. (1984 and 1986). Edited by R.W. Hoyle. Yorkshire Archaeological Society. Peile, J. Biographical Register of Christ’s College, 1505-1905. (1910). Cambridge University Press. Raistrick, A. (1950). Quakers in Science and Industry. Bannisdale Press. Publications of the Surtees Society, Thoresby Society and Yorkshire Archaeological Society. Other sources include records in: Bradford Central Library; Leeds Central Library; Skipton Library; Clitheroe Library. North Yorkshire County Record Office, Northallerton. West Yorkshire Archive Service offices at Wakefield (including Deeds Registry), Leeds (Sheepscar and West Yorkshire Archaeological Society), and Bradford. Borthwick Institute of Historical Research, University of York. Appendix MANOR FARM HOUSE, Langcliffe

William Carr of Langcliffe (died 1674) Son Leonard married Isabel and built house in 1678 LEFT TO

(younger son Thomas )


Leonard's son William ( 1696) MORTGAGED TO 1. Richard Lawson (1731) 2. Charles Nowell (1738) 3. John Cookson (1741) SOLD TO Daniel Taylor (1748) LEFT TO William Atkinson and Anthony Foster (1753) LEFT TO Widow and Daughter of Wm. Atkinson SOLD (1775) and Son-in-Law and two Daughters of Anthony Foster SOLD (1783) BOTH TO Thomas Paley INHERITED BY SUCCESSIVE PALEYS UNTIL George Arthur Paley (1894) SOLD TO Henry Dugsdale (1920) then Recent ownerships

Mary Slater 2001


The War Memorial In 1920 the fountain was reconstructed as a War Memorial to the 11 soldiers from the village killed in the Great War

On Yorkshire day August 1st 1997

You were ‘never a Langcliffian ‘til you’d tumbled in’t fountain. It were slimey on’t side and you’d be leant over drinking out o’t spout –and in!

The War Memorial stands in the centre of the village. There was a fountain there in Victorian times of which the base was retained when it was decided to convert the fountain into a War Memorial after the First World War. The design of a fountain surmounted by a stone cross was chosen by the relatives of those to be commemorated. On Saturday 17th July 1920 there was a special ceremony for the Unveiling and Dedication of the Memorial Cross (see Appendix). The inscription reads : IN MEMORY OF THE MEN OF LANGCLIFFE WHO GAVE THEIR LIVES IN THE WAR 1914 - 1919 The names of eleven men are carved around the base of the cross. The names of the four men killed in the Second World War were not added until 1995. The problem had been that in the preceding decades, the farmers had brought their cows through the village and they used to stop and drink at the fountain. One of the mothers did not feel it was appropriate that her son's name should be inscribed above where the animals drank, so nothing was done until fifty years after the end of the war. On August 13th 1995 a service of commemoration was led by Canon Hudson to honour those who had died during the 1939 - 1946 conflict. It was attended by relatives of the men who were killed. Each year, on Remembrance Sunday, a special service is held at the War Memorial to remember the men from the village who gave their lives in both World Wars. Those commemorated are as follows: 1914 - 1919


CAPTAIN CLAUDE DENHAM BENNETT 2/6th Bn Duke of Wellington's (West Riding) Regiment Captain Bennett was the Headmaster of the village school. Originally from Skipton, he came to the school in 1911. In the three years before he joined up in September 1914, the entries in the school log book give glimpses of a very enlightened teacher. Each year the school was "thrown open" for an afternoon so that the parents could observe the children at their work with tea and biscuits supplied. He clearly wanted to broaden the horizons of his young pupils thirteen excursions are recorded including visits to Blackpool, Liverpool, Morecambe and two one-day trips to London. The itineraries are quite breathtaking and what wonderful pictures they conjure up. Several lantern lessons from different parts of the world are also recorded. All this came to an end when he received a commission as Lieutenant in the 2nd Division of the 6th West Riding Reserve Battalion of the Duke of Wellington's Regiment, rising quickly to the rank of captain and inspiring great devotion from his men. The role of the 2/6th Battalion initially was that of training and reinforcement, based mainly in Doncaster and it was not until February 5th 1917 that it embarked for France, subsequently taking part in the Battles of Arras and Bullecourt. Captain Bennett was wounded in May 1917 but had made a good recovery. He returned to the front at Lagnicourt on July 11th 1917 to command "B" company. They were occupying the reserve support trenches but were due to relieve the troops in the front line. On the night of 16/17th July, Captain Bennett had gone to company headquarters to arrange this when he was fatally wounded by an enemy sniper as he was leaving. He was thirty years old. On Monday 6th December 1915 he had been married to Doris Green at All Saints' Church in Preston. He is buried at Achiet-le-Grand Communal Cemetery Extension, France. Plot 1, Row K, Grave 9 SECOND LIEUTENANT VICTOR RUPERT ATKINSON 1/6th Bn Duke of Wellington's (West Riding) Regiment Lieutenant Atkinson was the only son of Dr and Mrs Atkinson who lived at Bowerley. He had been educated at Giggleswick School and was a member of the OTC there. On leaving school, he joined the Inns of Court OTC and after fifteen months training, he received his commission as Lieutenant in the 1st Division of the 6th Battalion of the Duke of Wellington's Regiment. He went out to France in April 1917. He was described as " a splendid officer, honest, straight and unassuming, good humoured and charming". He took part in the Battles of Ypres and Passchendaele. He returned home on leave for a week in October and then rejoined his company which was moved up into the front line at Passchendaele. Work had begun on a communication trench but, in the early morning of 23rd November, following some very heavy shelling, Lt. Atkinson was badly wounded and died a few hours later. He was twenty years old. The entry in the Parish magazine records that "the news of his death cast a gloom over the whole village where he had spent his whole life and had endeared himself to all by his charming personality." Lt. Atkinson is buried at Aeroplane Cemetery, Belgium. LANCE CORPORAL THOMAS MONK 1967 1/6th Bn Duke of Wellington's Regiment Lance Corporal Monk had lived in Chapel House but was living at Beecroft Cottages in Horton-in-Ribblesdale whilst working at the quarry there. He joined the Settle Territorials in September 1914 and, following training at Doncaster, went out with the 1st Division of the 6th Battalion of the Duke of Wellington's Regiment in April 1915. He was described as an excellent NCO and a very good fellow indeed, being extremely popular with his company. There followed action at Aubers, Albert and at the Battle of the Somme, where he was killed on the night of 15th September 1916 as his company was coming into the front line trenches near Martinsart Wood. The enemy made a bombing attack and he was hit in the head by shrapnel and died instantly. Lance Corporal Monk was aged twenty nine years, he had returned home on special leave a few weeks before he was killed and was married to Lilly Watson on 29th August 1916. He is buried at Blighty Valley Cemetery, France.


PRIVATE WALTER HARTLEY 265645 2nd Bn Duke of Wellington's Regiment Private Hartley lived in St John's Row. Prior to the war, he had been in service to Colonel Birkbeck. In September 1914 he joined up with the local Territorials and went to France in April 1915. Having been in the front line, Private Hartley's battalion was relieved and moved to a support area at Au-bon-Gite. On 2nd October 1917 they were again relieved and moved to Saragossa Camp. As the relief was being carried out, there was heavy firing from the enemy and Private Hartley was hit in the head and died later at the clearing station. He was twenty two years old and much esteemed by everyone. He is buried at Mendinghem Military Cemetery, Belgium. PRIVATE JOSEPH HIGGINSON G/14907 6th Bn Buffs (East Kent) Regiment Private Higginson joined the army in June 1916 and was sent to France the following September. He was killed in action on September 19th 1918 in his thirty sixth year. He has no known grave but is commemorated on the Vis-enArtois Memorial Panel No 3, between Arras and Cambrai. His parents were Joseph and Catherine Higginson and they lived in Institute House. PRIVATE JOHN WILLIAM HILTON 266726 1/6th Bn Duke of Wellington's Regiment Private Hilton was the grandson of Mrs Hilton of Langcliffe and it was she who had brought him up. He had worked at Langcliffe Mills before the war and was a member of the Church choir. He joined the army in May 1916 and sailed for France on Christmas Day of that year. His battalion saw action at Ypres, Broodseinde, Poelcappelle and Passchendaele. They had been in the front line in the St Jans Cappel area and were relieved on 18th April 1918, withdrawing to the Army Line. On the following day, Private Hilton was killed whilst carrying ammunition on what was described in the War Diary as a "quiet day". He is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Belgium. PRIVATE THOMAS HIGSON PERCY 1326 6th Bn Duke of Wellington's Regiment Private Percy, a quarryman before the war, was married to Lily Clarke, with a baby daughter, Irene. They lived at Holmehead. He joined the Territorials with the 6th Battalion West Riding Regiment in September 1914 and had been in training in Doncaster. He had gone to Bradford Infirmary for an operation, but died during it on 9th March 1915. He was twenty one. Because he died in England , Private Percy is the only one of the servicemen to be buried here in Langcliffe. His funeral took place on March 19th. The pall bearers were eight men from the 6th Battalion who were home on leave and the coffin was covered with the Union Jack with his cap and belt placed on top. His grave, with its familiar War Graves Commission design, is behind the church on the north side. PRIVATE ALBERT SMALES 2427728 1/5th Bn Duke of Wellington's Regiment Private Smales worked at the Craven Lime Works in Langcliffe before the war and lived at Ribblebank. Much respected by all who knew him, he joined the Duke of Wellington's Regiment in January 1916. On the evening of 2nd September, the battalion moved into the front line. Early the next morning began one of the big "pushes" of the Battle of the Somme. The German front line was bombarded by an intense artillery barrage for three minutes during which the infantry advanced. The attack failed and ended in confusion. There were 330 casualties and one of those lost was Private Smales. At first he was reported missing and his parents hoped he had been taken prisoner, but he was officially reported killed on the 3rd September 1916. He is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial in France.


PRIVATE ROBERT THOMPSON 16064 1st Bn. King's Own (Royal Lancaster Regiment) Private Thompson was well known in the district of Langcliffe and Settle. His sister lived at Ribblebank. He had served for several years in the Royal Lancaster Regiment, mostly in India, so with the outbreak of war, he rejoined his regiment. He would have seen action at the Battles of The Marne and The Aisne and the 1st Battle of Ypres. Private Thompson was killed in action in Ploegsteert Wood on March 27th 1915. He was twenty eight. He is buried at the Strand Military Cemetery, Comines-Warneton, Hainaut, Belgium. Grave Reference X.F.10. LANCE CORPORAL GEORGE H. VENN P/1755 Military Foot Police Lance Corporal Venn was born and grew up in Ribblebank. He was married to Maggie and they had two children and for three and a half years he served with the Clitheroe Police. Prior to that he had been a member of the West Riding Regiment and had represented his company on several occasions in firing for the Regimental Cup. He had also been selected to receive the Regimental Colours from King Edward VII. At the outbreak of war, he joined the Military Police and was for some months stationed at Aldershot before sailing for the Dardenelles. The ship collided with another and sank off Gallipoli on the 28th October 1915. Lance Corporal Venn was drowned. He was twenty six. Although commemorated on the war memorial as a private, he had been promoted to Lance Corporal. He is also commemorated on the Helles Memorial in Turkey, Panel 200 or 300. PRIVATE JOHN WEST 2606 1/6th Bn Duke of Wellington's Regiment Private West lived in St John's Row. He worked at the Langcliffe Paper Mill and was a popular young man - an enthusiastic player with the village football club and also a member of Langcliffe Brass Band. With the outbreak of war he joined the Duke of Wellington's Regiment and following training in Doncaster,was sent to the front in April 1915. The battalion fought at the Battle of Aubers on 9th May 1915. By December 1915, the men were well established in trench warfare. The day had been very wet but the night was bright. Despite this a good deal of wiring was done. Corkscrew iron stakes were used for the first time. There was intermittent rifle and machine gun fire on both sides. Private West was killed by a rifle bullet in his chest at 5.05 a.m on 16th December 1915. He was 23. He is buried at the Talana Farm Cemetery in Belgium. The Roll for 1939 - 1945 SERGEANT JOHN HEPTON HOCKING 4694312 1/7th Bn Duke of Wellington's Regiment Sergeant Hocking was the third child of a family of three boys and three girls who lived in the first cottage on the left in Howson Lane. He passed the scholarship to Giggleswick School, left at sixteen and went into banking. He worked at the Yeadon Branch of Barclays Bank. He joined the army and soon after D-Day was sent out to France where he saw a great deal of action before being wounded, returning to hospital in this country. He recovered and returned to active duty in September 1944 The battalion took part in the liberation of Roosendaal in Holland in October 1944. On 4th December the Dukes were positioned at Haalderen near Arnhem when they were attacked by three companies of the German 16th Parachute regiment with heavy Spandau and mortar fire. The fighting which followed was chaotic and went on throughout the night but eventually the enemy were repulsed and the position held. The 7th Battalion lost 31 men and one of these was Sergeant Hocking. He is buried at the Jonkerbos War Cemetery. He was twenty nine.


SERGEANT LESLIE BENSON 2/4th Bn Kings Own Yorkshire Light Infantry Sergeant Benson grew up at Willow Wood. He was the manager of the Co-op. at Settle. He loved walking over the hills and was a member of the choir of the Methodist Chapel in the village. He was also a member of Settle Badminton team. He and Clarice had been married for five years and they had a baby son. Sergeant Benson was called up and joined the King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry in 1940. He fought in the North African campaign, fighting through the Western Desert to Tunisia. His battalion took part in the invasion of Italy before being sent to the Middle East in March 1944. Sergeant Benson died of wounds on 30th April 1944. He is buried at Haifa. He was twenty nine. ABLE SEAMAN GEORGE AUSTIN GREEN C/JX 641790 Able Seaman Green lived in the house behind the "Pig and Whistle" and worked in Tatham's Grocers Shop in Settle (now the sports shop). He was on honeymoon with his wife, Barbara when he was recalled to Greenock and his ship. He was in H.M.Landing Ship 321 (used for landing tanks and known as "kipper boxes") when it sank and he was drowned in Subik Bay, Manila in the Philippines on 6th April 1946. He was twenty three. He is commemorated on the Chatham Naval Memorial, Panel 82, Column 2. CORPORAL ERIC WHAITES 4614968 1st Bn Gordon Highlanders Corporal Whaites was the son of John and Catherine Whaites and worked in the quarries, but with the outbreak of war, he had joined the Gordon Highlanders. His regiment had landed in Normandy in early June 1944. In the second week of July, Caen had been captured. By 14th August, the 1st Gordons were at St Sylvain. They continued to advance towards the Seine, crossing the River Dives on 17th August. The next objective was the River Vie. The river was being heavily shelled by the enemy and the road beyond was under machine fire. At 8 a.m. on the morning of Saturday 19th August, the 1st Gordons were able to cross the river without too much difficulty under the cover of a heavy mist. They soon found themselves under attack and fought their way through orchards at the foot of a slope, leading to a ridge called "Ben Lomond" which was their objective. By mid afternoon the battalion was firmly established on the ridge, but Corporal Whaites had been lost. He was 33 years old. He is buried at the Banneville-LaCampagne War Cemetry, Calvados in France, Plot 9, Row C, Grave 11. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS SOURCES Craven Roll of Honour, Craven Herald 1914-1918, Langcliffe Parish Magazines1914-1918, War Graves Commission, Duke of Wellington's Regiment War Diary and Archives, Langcliffe School Log Books, King's Own Royal Regiment, Lancaster Buffs Museum, Canterbury, King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry Office, Pontefract, The Gordon Highlanders Museum, Aberdeen. GRATEFUL THANKS TO THE FOLLOWING PEOPLE FOR THEIR HELP Barbara Gent of Giggleswick School Library, Hilary Foster of Langcliffe School, Hazel


Eddon of Skipton Library, Scott Flaving of The Duke of Wellington's Regiment, Derek Soames, Rita Ellerington, Ron Fenner, Mrs Tomlinson, Mrs Benson and Mrs Lister. Kate Croll APPENDIX Account from the Craven Herald in July 1920 LANGCLIFFE WAR MEMORIAL Cross Unveiled On Saturday the unveiling and dedication service in connection with the memorial cross at Langcliffe took place in fine weather, before a large gathering. The fountain in the centre of the village has been converted, the upper portion being taken away, and the cross inserted into the bottom basin. After the hymn "On the Resurrection morning," prayers were said by Rev. E.C.Charlesworth (Wesleyan minister). The unveiling ceremony was performed by Lieut.-Col. Bateman, D.S.O., colonel of the 6th Duke of Wellington's Regiment, who said they were there that day to perpetuate the memory of those who fell in the great war, and they had placed there a cross as a perpetual reminder of it. The world, it seemed, had not yet fully realised that peace, for which they had fought, and at the present time it seemed that we should not recognise the fullness of that peace for some years. The Vicar of Langcliffe, Rev. Mr James, read the lesson (Revelations xxi., 1-5). After the hymn "For all the saints," the dedication took place, and an inspiring address was given by Rev. A.P. Gower Rees, M.C., Vicar of Bolton, Bradford. Then followed the hymn "O God our help in ages past" and the "Last Post" was sounded by Mr A.T. Bilton. The Langcliffe Brass Band accompanied the hymns, which were sung by the united choirs of the Parish Church and the Wesleyan Church, conducted by Mr John Leaworthy. On one side of the cross are the words: "In memory of the men of Langcliffe who gave their lives in the great war, 1914-1919"; and on the other three sides are inscribed the following names:- Capt. C.D. Bennett, Lieut. R.V. Atkinson, Lance-Corpl. T. Monk, Pte. A. Smales, Pte. R. Thompson, Pte. G. Venn, Pte. J. West, Pte. W. Hartley, Pte. J. Higginson, Pte. W. Hilton, Pte. T.H. Percy. The arrangements for the service were in the hands of Messrs. H.M. Bannister and C. Rawsthorne. A large number of beautiful floral tributes were placed round the cross, amongst them being the following: "From the members of the Comrades' Club, Settle branch": "From the service men of Langcliffe, to the memory of our comrades who have not returned; they have fought the good fight, they have kept the faith and have finished their course": "In loving memory of our dear son Walter, from his father and mother": "In loving memory of dear uncle Walter, from his nephews James, Sam and Walter": "In loving memory of our dear brother Walter, from his sisters Lillie and Sissie": In loving memory of W. Hilton, from his grandmother and Jimmie": In loving memory of Pte. Thomas Percy, from his affectionate child and wife": "In Loving memory of Rupert, the flowers he loved,Bowerley": "In tenderest memory of Capt. Claude Bennett, Killed in action July 18th 1917, For God and Liberty, Annie and Eva": "In loving memory of our dear son and brother, Lance-Corpl. Thomas Monk, from mother, sisters, brother, Chapel House, Langcliffe, R.I.P.": "In loving memory of Capt. C.D. Bennett, from his friends": "In affectionate rememberance, from Elizabeth Bowerley": "In loving memory of Pte. Albert Smales, killed in action on the Somme 3rd September, 1916. At rest for all time": "In loving memory of Pte. John West, from home and Auntie".

Langcliffe History  

This publication provides a history of Langcliffe - a village in the Yorkshire Dales National Park. Including an early history, local famil...

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