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Cine

FASHION/ART/DESIGN HORACE MANN SCHOOL vol. 4 no. 2 Winter 2013

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A note from the editors...

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elcome to CineFAD, the movie and fashion issue! It’s a first time collaboration between Horace Mann’s movie publication, Cinemann, and fashion art and design publication FAD. It is not uncommon for fashion publications to pull inspiration from film but Cinefad is unique. These two magazines have been created combining two distinct creative forces providing a unique fresh perspective on both fashion and film. This issues combines extemsive write ups of all the year had to offer so far in the film world as well as photoshoots demonstrating film techniques from the past. We hope you appreciate the collaboration and effort that went into every page. This issue also includes a preview for FAD’s up-

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coming fashion show fundraiser. We are very excited for the show and look forward to seeing you all there. The Oscars always bring a full on collision between the movie industry and the fashion world. With the Oscars on the horizon, both the movie and the fashion world are buzzing with glamour. So grab grab an issue of CineFAD and some popcorn and enjoy the excitment. We can’t wait to hear all about what you thought about the movies and gowns!

Matthew Taub & Victoria McKaba Paige Burris & Veronica Williamson


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Oscars

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Movie Previews

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Style Icons: Taking Cues From Old Hollywood

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Shoot: In the Bleak Mid-Winter

Shoot: FAD Fashion Show Preview

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DIY

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Reviews: Doctor Who and Skyfall Edward Carroll Interview Technilogicality Fashionable Movies Explained The Art of Directing Daniel Day-Lewis

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Shoot: the Watches of the Night

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Cover: Photo by Gina Yu ‘14. Model Kiki Heintz ‘13. Back cover: Lillian Bassman and Theres Alexanderson. Digital Editing by Gina Yu ‘14, Alexandra Vogelsang ‘14, Noah Margulis ’13, and Veronica Williamson ‘13. Hair, makeup and styling by FAD Staff.

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behind the scenes

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Cine Staff... Editors-in-Chief Paige Burris + Veronica Williamson Creative Director Noah Margulis Managing Editor Anna Carroll Faculty Advisor Ms. Hines Features Editors Emma Garcia ShaKea Alston

Photographers Hannah Ades Florence Ngala Gabrielle Reid Jackson Siegal Veronica Williamson Assistant Editors Julia Pretsfelder Michelle Kim Alexandra Vogelsang Edie Comas

Editors-in-Chief Victoria McKaba + Matthew Taub Staff Writers Charles Scherr Cora Bae Emma Garcia Josh Arnon Ross Karetsky Savannah Smith Sophie Dizengoff

Managing Editor Charlotte Frankel Daniel Ehrlich Faculty Advisor Dr. Kassel

Beauty Editor Rachel Buissereth Production Manager Gina Yu

previous issues at issuu.com/fadmag

We would like to thank Ms. Hines, Dr. Kassel, Dr. Kelly, Ms. Rubirosa, Mr. Do, Mr. Logan, Ms. Busby, Ms. Cassino, Dr. Delanty, and Dr. Schiller for their continuous support in the creation of FAD!

PLEASE NOTE: As a policy, FAD never digitally alters photos to change a model’s fundamental appearance.


reviews The American Doctor Who Revivial Josh Arnon ‘14

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he British science fiction show Doctor Who is nothing new. It started in 1963 and from then on became part of British popular culture, very similarly to how Star Trek did in America. The show had a very successful run until 1989, when it stopped due to decreasing viewership and popularity. After unsuccessfully attempting to return through a 1996 television movie, the show finally revived itself in 2005 and continues its successful run now. So why did the show start becoming popular in America only in the last few years? After all, according to the Guinness Book of World Records, it is both the longest running and most successful science fiction TV series of all time. In order to understand the show’s sudden burst in popularity in the US, one needs to look deeper at the show and its history. It is hard to explain the genius that is Doctor Who in words without making it sound incredibly stupid. At its core, Who is about the adventures of an ancient alien known only as the Doctor

who travels through time and space in a TARDIS, which stands for Time And Relative Dimension in Space, usually with a female human companion. It sounds fun, so why was it not popular in this country until recently? Probably because it was so weird – in its original run, the show had many parts to each arc, low-budget special effects and quirky British humor. But since its 2005 revival, it has placed more focus on each episode, used more advanced effects and scenery and, perhaps most importantly, put emphasis on the emotional relationships between characters. Instead of an unrelatable Doctor settling intergalactic disputes in a foreign, strangely alien way, now the show’s characters and their interactions feel very human. The main reason why Doctor Who is now so popular – some even say mainstream – in America is because its revived series is, paradoxically, the story of the travels of an alien and his companion in a time machine, a story that could not be more human.

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Skyfall Savannah Smith ‘13

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n addition to the Aston Martins and martinis, the dapper suit on Bond and the spectacular dress on his infamous girl-of-the-moment supply the viewer with the quintessentially British sense of high class and luxury that is commonplace in any Bond film. For 2012’s Skyfall, the latest Bond movie that celebrates the series’ 50th anniversary, Jany Temime, the mastermind behind the costumes from Harry Potter films, took on the job of creating a classy and upper-crust wardrobe for Bond. When it came to his suits, Daniel Craig, the actor playing the renowned Bond, was quite specific. Temime knew that Craig’s ideal suit would be “slimfit, tailored [and] very near the body.” As she put it, “[He] wanted a suit you could forget - a suit that wasn’t on top of his body, but moving with his body.” Another article of clothing Craig was very particular about the scarf at the end of the film for the scene back home; according to Temime, he wanted to show the human side of Bond, and that every once and while “even Bond needed some sort of protection.” It was clear that Tom Ford was the only man for such demands. The result was a striking wardrobe that both fulfilled and filled out the inner characteristics of the infamous British spy. Of course, it wouldn’t be a bond film with out the classic Bond girl, stunning and impeccably dressed. From the very first shot of Severine, played by Berenice Marlohe, Skyfall’s Bond girl, the care and attention taken to create her unreservedly glamorous wardrobe is clear. The dress that she wears in the Casino scene took six months to make, featuring 60,000 Swarovski crystals, each one applied by hand. To top off the clothes, Marlohe’s nails were adorned 7

with two nail colors from the new OPI Skyfall collection designed for the film; “Skyfall” on top and “GoldenEye” on the bottom. Major style in this film was not simply reserved to the leading roles. Two other impeccably dressed characters were Javier Bardem’s character, Silva, and Ben Whishaw’s character, Q. Bardem. Silva, a classic villain clearly off his hinges, appears flamboyantly dressed with pops of colors and bold prints from worldrenowned brands. His most striking look is a Prada print shirt worn in the early scenes, which Temime built the rest of his wardrobe around. According to Temime, the brand was selected not only for its extravagant use of color and pattern, but also because “Silva is slightly nouveau riche, and wanted to show that he did his best to impress Bond.” For Q (played by Ben Whishaw), the young, nerdy computer genius that works with Bond, Temime chose modish, nerdy, and expensive clothing unrecognizable to the everyday eye. To create the complete nerd look, Temime began by giving Q a pair of glasses paired with classic young student apparel, such as the duffle jacket he wears in his first appearance. Not surprisingly, even the least fashion concerned characters in the film were dressed to the nine’s. From the beautiful yet cunning dame to the unpretentious nerd sidekick, each character’s outfit was defining Wof the film. The elaborately planned costumes in Skyfall put a finishing touch on the glamour and prestige that reigns true in all previous bond films.

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interviews

How did you get into architecture? As a youngster I became interested in watching buildings get built, around 8 years old is my first recollection of watching steel being erected. From there I started taking any classes that related to architecture and engineering.  Sometime around the 8th grade I took a course on architecture and knew that was my calling.  The rest is history.  Do you have any advice for aspiring architects?    Read and draw... Particularly philosophy, history and literature to understand the context in which we live and in which architecture is created.  Freehand drawing to to develop an understanding of proportion and beauty....these will serve you well when you finally get the boards! What’s the coolest project you’ve done?    Probably the Wexner center at Ohio state university working with Peter 8

Eisenman when I first graduated from Harvard. Peter is known as one of the most forward thinking architects in the world and the project was a performing arts center at the university. Do you have any funny anecdotes? Once when I was a student in college I was presenting a project to a jury.  A jury is a collection of professors who critique your work.  I had worked very hard and was quite proud of the project.  At the end a visiting critique, who renowned for being very hard on aspiring architects, told me in no uncertain that I should drop architecture as   quickly as possible and find a profession that I was more suited to.  Thankfully I had thick skin and ignored his advice! The great debate: are buildings works of art or only functional? Not all buildings are works of art.  Art

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and by extension architecture requires intentionality to be created. It must aspire to some higher value. This does not mean that architecture and function are independent.  Quite the contrary it is the fusion of function and intentionality that defines architecture.  So while functionality can exist without architecture architecture cannot exit with functionality.  Today if we can create a building that functions and provokes thought then we are nearing one idea of how we create architecture.  The aesthetic is important as well but the critique of modern society trumps all as the ultimate goal of architecture.  A work of art that is pertinent today and yet still transcends the moment to provokes thought at a different moment in time. What do you draw inspiration from? Much of my work revolves around contrasting old and new or intervening in the urban fabric.  Of course each project is different.  In some cases it is

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Edward Carroll

Anna Carroll ‘13 sits down with architect Edward Carroll (they may or may not be related.)

important the project works well with it’s neighbors, it fits in. At other times it is that contrast the is needed to draw attention to the work. I guess I would consider myself a contextualist, both as a designer and as a person living in the modern world.  Our thoughts are defined by our experiences and the places in which we live and visit and are expressed in the architecture.and you’re reeling and you want to see what the reaction is.You want to smile and say, ‘Isn’t it great,’ at the same time you want to be humble. So there’s a mixed feeling that you have when you’re doing the shows.” Are there any architects you are particulary inspired by? Peter Eisenman, Le Corbusier Mies Van Der Rohe What’s the hardest part of designing a building? Keeping the artistic vision while you solve

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all sorts of very practical issues. Building design and the construction of buildings has become a very complicated process from getting city approvals to making sure the building doesn’t leak.  These are always competing with the design vision.  It’s hard work but fun to get them to all work together. You designed a Jimmy Choo store, was there any difference in designing this than say a hotel? What was it like to design the space?   Actually we did a restoration of an historic storefront and Jimmy Choos’ designers did the store.  Ironically designing buildings is now very separate from designing the interiors of a project.  Often times they will be two different architects or designers.  The biggest difference is the scale of the work.  With interior work a person relates to individual elements directly, like a counter detail.  In building design it is much more about the larger image and spatial experience.

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” “ It is the fusion of function and intentionality that defines Warchitecture.

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features

TECHNOLOGICALITY Isabelle Devereaux

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ver the past 50 years, as technology has been on the rise, film and video have been trickling into art. We’re used to separation: seeing film in a movie theater, videos on Youtube, and art in a museum, but artists are now combining film with traditional media to create a single work. As video becomes more accessible and further embedded in our culture, will we see more technology integrated into art. Nam June Paik (1932-2006) is a pioneer of multimedia art. He created many pieces centered around television – using it as both a physical component of his work and a means for displaying film. Paik’s “Electronic Superhighway” (1995) (on exhibit at the Smithsonian American Art Museum), is a blatant assertion about the influence of the media on American culture. The work maps the United States across 336 televisions. Each state is outlined in neon lights, and TVs within the same state borders simultaneously repeat the same few seconds of video. Pail borrowed clips from famous movies like The Wizard of Oz (Kansas), Meet Me in St. Louis (Missouri) and Oklahoma! (take a guess), but made most of the other clips himself. California’s representative clip, for example, contains footage of the Golden Gate Bridge and from an OJ Simpson 80’s workout tape. Paik’s message is blunt: representation 10

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through the media is limited. His viewers are invited to criticize widely accepted portraits drawn by the media after looking through this limited lens. Contemporary artist Paul Pfeiffer (b. 1966) (whose work is often displayed at the Paula Cooper Gallery in Manhattan) brings together cinema and sculpture in his piece “Dutch Interior” (2001). The work features Pfeiffer’s favorite clip from the 1979 horror flick The Amityville Horror. The view from the top of an ordinary suburban staircase and a mysterious rattling chandelier are projected onto a screen, and as you move closer, you will notice a small hole in the screen. Peering through the hole, you’ll see Pfeiffer’s diorama of the same stairway. His imitation is much smaller, but more importantly, it faces the other way, allowing you to see the staircase from the perspective of someone looking up it. Pfeiffer has literally poked a hole in a movie, but instead of weakening the experience, the hole acts as a window, connecting fantasy and reality. He is able to puncture the world of the movie, something fictional, with a real, physical mark. He encourages you see two opposite but parallel perspectives at the same time. If you’re interested in of video usage in art, check out Miranda July, Peter Campus, and Bill Viola!

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Stop MOTION

Maddie Bender ‘16

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nimated filmography has relied on stop motion filming since its earliest days. The technique can be seen in older films such as the original Star Wars Trilogy and the Academy Awardwinning Wallace and Gromit series, but has more recently appeared in films like Fantastic Mr. Fox and Coraline. The illustration of a horse in motion (below) dates back to 1878 confirming that the technology has been employed for well over a century. Stop motion filming is surprisingly not the product of video recording, but of photography and can be used to simulate the movement

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of inanimate objects (such as Wallace and Gromit’s clay structures) or computer generated images (like those in Star Wars.) The stop motion photographer takes multiple photos of each object or image before slightly altering its location or position for the next shot.The progression must flow and be believable. The trick? The photographer shoots thousands, even millions of frames over the course of the full movement. Films seamlessly integrate live-action video segments with these photographed stop motion animations to create a finished mixture of photography and cinematography.

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features

In vogue

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n honor of Vogue Magazine’s 120th Anniversary, HBO aired an hour-long documentary film entitled, In Vogue: The Editor’s Eye by Fenton Bailey and Randy Barbato. The documentary enchants the viewer with guest appearances from the fashion editors, editors-in-chief, and creative directors starting from 1932, when the first colored photograph was printed, to the present day, where Lady Gaga was magnified across the September cover. The film heavily incorporates appearances from various fashion editors beginning with Babs Simpson who discusses the intensity of the photos printed right after World War II. She showed images of sadness during the war, as well as, an image of a woman with her scarf flying in the wind representing newfound freedom, after the

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Jillian Adler ‘16

war. She also makes an appearance in the movie to discuss one of Vogue’s more current magazine issues, such as the one featuring Lady Gaga on the cover. At 99 years old, Babs straightforwardly remarks on the cover saying, “Well, I don’t think it’s sexy at all.” We also get to take a look at the visionary behind the photographs, Grace Coddington. She tells of the many ups and downs that Vogue has encountered. For instance during an Alice In Wonderland themed photo shoot, the model was intended to climb through a mirror heading into Wonderland; however, the ruffles on the front of the dress were hidden along the way. As a simple solution, Grace asked the designer, “Can we put the dress on back to front?” After hearing all the different editors in their interviews, the viewer

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could conclude that the overarching theme of Vogue magazine is to cross boundaries. Vogue was the first magazine to show woman staging desire as opposed to constantly being the object of desire, and this was a huge boundary-cross during the time. Each editor Vogue has had loves invoking thought, into the readers, through breaching normalcy and creating muse. Throughout each era, Vogue has had controversial topics on newsstands as the editors along with the entire magazine team carefully choose what issues will be covered in that volume. Nevertheless, whether one issue venerates working women in the 1970s or another highlights grunge clothing as the new trend in the 1990s, Vogue magazine will continue to make heads turn.

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Costume shop

Nicole Sheldon ‘15

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nce you enter the Horace Mann Costume Shop, you’ll be overwhelmed by hundreds of intricate costumes, ranging from lavish Dolce and Gabbana suits to sports jackets to 18th century trousers and so much more! Even though its one of the most interesting places at HM, not many people stumble upon it because of its location in the basement of Tillinghast. It is in this room that many of the extraordinary characters that capture our attentions on stage come to life. Horace Mann Theater Company (HMTC) Co-President Emma Maltby said, “I think my favorite costume that I’ve ever worn was the one I got to wear for the opening scene of Guys and Dolls which was a beautifully cut 50s dress.” Boxes hold the basics like t-shirts and jeans, but

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some of them also hold crazy jewelry, hats wigs, and scarves.Another fun part of the shop is a nook filled with shoes and a colorful array of fabrics. Even though the costume shop is already stocked full of amazing clothing, some costumes call for specific tailoring and a unique look, and Guest Costume Designers Wendy Kahn and Stewart Lee are up to the challenge. Maltby also said “The costume shop has basically any type of clothing you could possibly need or want. If you just look at the clothing it’s kind of astounding what we have.” Overall, the costume shop is an amazing collection of Horace Mann Theater over the ages, with hundreds of unique outfits from every era. And if you’re lucky, you’ll get to visit this hidden treasure sometime!

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features fashionable movieS

explained

Allison Chang ‘14

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ashion and film have always been intrinsically linked. Celebrated fashion designers create wardrobes for movies, stylish costumes introduce the latest trends to the masses and silver screen starlets double as sartorial icons. Whether the clothes inspire the flicks or vice versa, Hollywood and haute couture are media for expressing each other. When the words “fashionable” and “movie” are placed adjacent, one’s thoughts naturally jump to Breakfast at Tiffany’s (1961). The film was based on a novella by the ostentatious Truman Capote, and Parisian couturier Hubert de Givenchy designed the costumes. Audrey Hepburn had been in other stylish films in the past, including Sabrina (1954) and Funny Face (1957), but Breakfast cemented her as a fashion idol. In that same echelon is Grace Kelly, later Princess of Monaco and Hermès bag namesake, who first appeared in Hitchcock classics like Dial M for Murder and Rear Window (both 1954). If you want to make an iconic fashion flick, having a famous designer on board helps: Yves Saint Laurent clothed Catherine Deneuve for Belle de Jour (1967), Giorgio Armani tailored Richard Gere’s suits for American Gigolo (1980),

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and Miuccia Prada made Carey Mulligan’s drop-waist dresses for her role as Daisy Buchanan in The Great Gatsby, due this May. Some films have become classics over time because their costumes represent the zeitgeist of the period and serve as sources of sartorial inspiration for the present day. James Dean’s red windbreaker in Rebel Without a Cause (1955) embodies the vitality and rebellious attitude of teenagers in the ‘50s. Jane Birkin, another Hermès bag inspiration, dons London’s latest mod styles in Blow-Up (1966). Thirteen-yearold Jodie Foster sports typical ‘70s clothes (crop tops, daisy-dukes, wide-brimmed hats, and platform shoes) for her breakout role in Taxi Driver (1976). Flashdance (1983) has Jennifer Beals in a torn sweatshirt and leg warmers, while Wall Street (1987) shows a different (yet equally loud) side of the ‘80s through Michael Douglas’s polka-dotted tie and striped suspenders. Alicia Silverstone struts around Beverly Hills in a yellow plaid blazer and miniskirt in Clueless (1995). These kinds of movies are gold mines for the fashion sect drawing creativity from decades past. Other cinematic works have stylistic impact because of their roles as period pieces or because of their

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surreal, otherworldly perspectives. No monarchial-era film is complete without elaborate baroque gowns fit for queens. Seamless bodysuits and sleek silhouettes evoke a sense of a century to come. Sofia Coppola took artistic license when directing her avant-garde interpretation of late eighteenth century royalty in Marie Antoinette (2006); the risk was rewarded with an Oscar for Costume Design. Stanley Kubrick’s iconic 2001: A Space Odyssey’s (1968) futuristically minimalist costumes and sets seem just as modern today. Sharp-shouldered jackets, inspired by those in Ridley Scott’s Blade Runner (1982), became a staple of ‘80s business wear and recently made a comeback, appearing prominently in every Balmain collection from 2009 and 2010. Film and fashion both rose to distinction in the twentieth century and are two of the most celebrated art forms of our time, so it makes sense that they would be so connected. Visually arresting costumes can make a movie memorable, and in turn a chic film can lead someone to completely reevaluate his or her view on personal style. Either way you look at it, going to the movies can often be a very stylish experience.

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THE ART OF DIRECTING Jorge Colmenares ‘15

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n the 2013 Academy Awards Nomination announcement, the incumbent Oscar host Seth MacFarlane introduced the nominees for Best Director as “five people who are the very best at sitting in a chair, watching other people make a movie.” Regardless, the movies of 2012 brought forth some of the best work by directors in recent history, causing even more anticipation for the directing awards in this year’s film awards season. In the 2013 Golden Globes, Ben Affleck, director of Argo, won Best Director, beating famous names such as Steven Spielberg, Kathryn Bigelow and Quentin Tarantino. The result surprised many because Ben Affleck was not even nominated for an Oscar in directing. As the Academy Awards approach, let’s look farther into this stunning art.

how successful a movie is depends largely on the director’s skills as a collaborator and visionary. This theory seems to hold water since in the last 25 years, twenty movies that won the Academy Award for Best Director went on to win the Academy Award for Best Picture. In an interview about directing Lincoln, Steven Spielberg explains a directing method he used during filming in which he would only call the actors by their characters’ names in order to get the actors to feel more grounded in their roles. In Argo, Ben Affleck goes out of his way to present the tensions that existed between Iran and the United States during the ‘80s. Affleck even included a comic strip in the beginning of the movie that clearly explained and defined the problems that existed. The result was successful: the audience understood the great tension that existed, which contributed to the overall intensity of the movie. In many ways, the image of an authoritative figure sitting in a folding chair, yelling commands does not aptly illustrate directors and their arduous task of creating a relatable yet at the same time transcendent masterpiece.

“ ” Five people who are the very best at sitting in a chair, watching other people make a movie.

A common image of a director is one of a man sitting in his folding chair, yelling “ACTION” into a loudspeaker. However, in actuality, a director does much more than what meets the eye. With any film, you can think of the director as the quarterback—the leader—who is able to take a script and translate it into a full-blown production. Much of a director’s job involves talking and collaborating with producers, writers, cinematographers, production and costume designers, editors and actors. Working with so many people, as anyone can imagine, requires a vast amount of patience and poise. This collaboration is then translated into a set, costumes, blocking and notes for actors, special effects, stunts, hundreds of different camera shots, etc. As a result, the extent to which

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features

Gossip Girl: A Lasting IMpression Andie Fialkoff ‘15

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ust as school started in September of 2007 a new show hit the airwaves and captured the attention of fashionistas everywhere. Yes, I am talking about Gossip Girl, which recently aired its series finale on December 17th. For five years Gossip Girl has not only provided an entertaining escape from homework, but it has also established a powerful presence in the fashion world. As we have watched the characters grow from prep school students on the Upper East Side to young adults, we have also seen their styles evolve. The single-sex school uniforms

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were worn for the majority of seasons one and two, but always had a twist unique to each character. Not long after the pilot, Blair’s signature headbands, Chuck’s classic bowties, Serena’s perfectly messy ensembles, Nate’s dashing argyle vests, and Dan’s geeky but cool get-ups worked their way off screen and onto our friends. In fact, in 2008, The New York Times claimed that Gossip Girl was “the first [show] to have been conceived, in part, as a fashion marketing vehicle.” Needless to say, while Gossip Girl has finished up its series, its fashion will live on for years to come.

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ACTORS IN ART Lauren Kady ‘16

Gone are the days when royals and elite finance families monopolized the fashion and art worlds. Today celebrities, namely actors, are the reigning class of style setters. They hold coveted invitations to the Met Gala, they are the muses of all artists, and the canvases for rising designers. In these fields of art they amuse, inspire, and grab the world’s fullfledged attention. We all know by now that designers send clothing to actors, in hopes of getting their work photographed and in the spotlight. Young girls and women alike strive to look as “put together” and “fashionable” as these starlets on the carpet. They define, break, and twist trends, which then becomes the mold in which we, ordinary citizens watching these celebs on the screen, try to fit. Actors have long been the subjects of photographer’s pictures. Thick books of “behind the scenes” or “red carpet” celebrity shots decorate shelves and coffee tables. The beautifully airbrushed shots of celebrities dripping in diamonds and swathed in silk spice up our otherwise 17

ordinary and comparatively dull homes. Our society’s interest in actor’s lives has fueled a market for these sorts of things. Think: Andy Warhol’s famous Marilyn Monroe prints are widely recognized by nearly everyone. Their bright colors and original concept made them a hit when they appeared in the modern art realm. Copies line the streets of Time Square, which makes owning them accessible to the majorities, while the real works are housed in museums like the MoMA and homes of upper class. Actors and other people in the film industry have built notable art collections of their own. Steve Martin, Brad and Angelina, and Steven Spielberg, are a few of the many celebrities who are patrons of the arts. They display the pieces of Norman Rockwell, Pablo Picasso, and Banksy—esteemed artists, whose works are some of the most desired in the world. These stars have carved out niches for themselves in art auction houses and famous art collection exhibits at museums.

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Some actors also have a hidden passion for creating their own art. First recognized for their cinematic roles, people like Jane Seymour, Tony Curtis, and James Franco are now recognized for their painting skills. They are just a few of the many celebrities who have turned their hobby into a business, holding exhibitions and selling their own pieces to the public. Actors are a symbol of wealth and sophistication through the pure recognition that movies have given them. Our society thrives on entertainment, which the film industry provides an abundance of, and this gives these stars the power and money to enter into the art world. Whether as collectors or creators, actors are invading all the different mediums of artistry. To read more about this turn the page and read some actor profiles.

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features

Here’s To You, Mr. President Thomas Meerschwam a takes a look at the varied and dedicated career of 2013 Oscar Nominee, Daniel Day-Lewis.

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f the many film actors working in the United States, there is just one who approaches his roles with absolute, total dedication and immersion: Daniel Day-Lewis (my number one favorite actor of all time, hands down, no question about it, no ifs, ands, or buts). Since he appeared as Cecil Vyse in A Room with a View (1985), he has adopted a strict interpretation of the method-acting style, where, on and off the screen, he demands to live in the circumstances and perspectives of his character. His major acting breakthrough occurred in 1989, when he portrayed the handicapped Christy Brown in My Left Foot. So dedicated to his role was Day-Lewis that not only did he visit the Sandymount School Clinic in Dublin multiple times to meet and befriend the mentally ill, but he also confined himself to a wheelchair at all times, having to be moved around the set by the disgruntled

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crew. He is even said to have broken two ribs in the process, due to the constantly hunched-over position he forced himself into. Despite the physical taxation on his body, Day-Lewis earned his first Academy Award for Best Actor for his performance. Then came a second major film for Day-Lewis, Martin Scorsese’s Gangs of New York (2002), in which he played the terrifying Bill the Butcher, leader of a gang of American “natives” who fiercely opposed the growing Irish presence in New York. As an aside, I must say that this performance was by far the most intense, convincing and masterful performance by a film actor that I have ever seen. Day-Lewis’ accent, mannerisms, expressions and actions seemed frighteningly natural, and to me he was the most chilling, intimidating villain that could ever be brought alive on screen. Every minute he was on screen I was frightened down to my socks by his

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unpredictability and ruthlessness. Simply put, the fear factor, on a scale of one to one hundred, was about one million. The next major performance that Day-Lewis gave was as Daniel Plainview, a powerful yet psychotic oil tycoon with a rollercoaster temper, in There Will Be Blood (2007). What was fascinating to see was how Daniel Day-Lewis was portraying another American, but in a completely different way. There were subtleties in his gestures, vocal intensity and posture that completely distinguished this part from his New York gangster role from five years earlier. And then we have Lincoln, his latest film, in which he portrays the calm, collected yet stern sixteenth president of the United States. Here we see a masterful storyteller with a honeyed voice trying to deal with conflicting interests: the termination of the Civil War and the passing of the Thirteenth Amendment. His performance has already

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won him more than thirty awards, including a Golden Globe and a Screen Actors Guild award, with a possible third Academy Award coming in late February. Were he to win this award, he would surpass actors such as Marlon Brando, Jack Nicholson, Tom Hanks and Dustin Hoffman as the actor with most Best Actor awards of all time . Daniel Day-Lewis is one of those rare actors whose technique is so convincing and nuanced that it is usually used exclusively in theatre. When DayLewis uses his method acting technique to create his characters, a long and intense personal process, his characters become so real that, between movies, he becomes almost impossible to recognize due to the range of personalities he adopts. It is this fact that I find most incredible.

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features Fashion and Advertising

Winter Willoughby-Spera ‘16 and Michelle Kim ‘14

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orget those over-exposed, colorenhanced posters that barely reveal the main product of the company or label. In this day and age, fashion houses seem to present more and more teasers for ad campaigns in fresher, newer, and more outlandish ways to simply draw in the viewer and potential consumer. How the designers use film to enhance their products differs each season and predicting these themes is nearly impossible. Some of the subjects in these ads have almost nothing to do with the garments as well. Fashion houses seem to stress creating evocations and far-fetched connections when advertising their products in a manner that is much more artistic than an infomercial-like, simple shot of its newest handbag as the main frame How these ads are created is left up to the designer and director. After a designer has toiled over a collection, he or she presents the work to a certain director who then conducts the set tone for the commercials. Whereas most designers want their work fully appreciated and venerated in a way to focus on the merchandise itself, others seem to take different routes such as telling a story in their advertisements.

Still from 4x3.1

Take the brand Maiyet, for example, whose distinct roots arose as an idea “to use the power of the market to allocate capital to peace.” The fashion brand produces cultured and unexpected pieces from craftsmen all over the world such as Nairobi, Kenya and West Java, Indonesia, and its short film, directed by Cary Fukunaga, also leaves a lasting, unconventional narrative on the viewer. For the brand’s resort ‘13 collection, Fukunaga directed Sleepwalking in the Rift, which is more of a story than an

Still from Sleepwalking in the Rift

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advertisement. The frame passes through dim horizons along the Kenyan shrub and shaken puffs of dirt as two lovers speak in the background. The man says, “I enjoy my work. I like it here, it’s my life,” through scenes of the two riding horseback in the foliage. The true splendor of the film is in the soft images, not in Maiyet’s clothing at all. While the light, calfskin leather coats and sheer white tops are from the resort ‘13 collection, they are not the main feature in the film. The ethereal beauty of Kenya takes the show and emphasizes what Maiyet established itself for, accentuating and supporting artisanal work around the world. It is a film that allows the viewer to immerse oneself in the rustic culture and natural beauty of the landscape rather than look at a static, obviously rehearsed, and artificially reproduced advertisement. Through four collaborative films made by Phillip Lim and Lane Crawford called “4x3.1,” Lim was able to extend his artistic talent to bring together both fashion and film. Each film explores the dynamic and lively cities of Beijing,

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Hong Kong, New York, and Paris through the eyes of the Phillip Lim woman. The cities are filmed in a dreamlike and stunning light that is elusive and intriguing. The several angles of a city are compared to the several angles of a woman in order to capture each location’s distinctive energy. Although the settings are different, the Lim 3.1 white trench coat remains constant throughout all films. In a recent interview, Lim stated the he choose the trench coat because it is a “timeless element” as well as possessing a “mysterious aura.” The collection is conveyed as a balance between the lightness of the clothing and the confidence of the woman. The feeling from the cinematography, however, creates the story that forms the multi-faceted Phillip Lim woman. The Hong Kong and Beijing films reflect a romantic dreaminess and longing, the New York film reveals a desire to escape the packed and fastpaced city and find solitude and tranquility, and the Paris film shows a sense of adventure and curiosity. Ultimately, Philip Lim used a trench coat, a city, and a model to demonstrate his entire design aesthetic and prove his outstanding skill as a director and designer in a series of four short films. Christian Dior’s “Secret Garden – Versailles” film by Inez and Vinoodh reflects the label’s keen advertising strategy while upholding the feminine motif of the famed label. The

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film juxtaposes the prominent house of Dior to the luxurious Palace of Versailles, suggesting Dior’s “status” in the fashion hierarchy: at the top, just as the palace was home to absolute monarch Louis XIV. As the film implies Dior’s complete dominance in the fashion world, the sense of power and control is balanced by gracefulness, fragility, and subtlety. The viewer is immediately captivated by the elusive Palace of Versailles and its enchanting “Secret Garden.” The film effectively captures this fairytale-like feeling by the delicate yet beaming light casted in every scene, creating a dazed and illusory sensation. The film revolves around a Dior model, as we follow her through the interminable intertwined paths of the wondrous gardens and the interconnected endless empty salons, shot slowly as if a dream. The filmography casts an alluring and intriguing light upon the delicate and fanciful Dior clothing of the model. However, the presence of power is haunting throughout the film. The comparisons of Dior to the Palace of Versailles are induced as the film switches from color to black-and-white continuously to Depeche Mode’s incredibly catchy, “Enjoy the Silence.” As a result, Dior produced a film that effectively reflected their label by using a unique and specific song, setting, and story.

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who should win

- Danny Erlich ‘14

Award:

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Who Will Win Who Should Win

Best Picture

Argo

Zero Dark Thirty

Best Actor

Daniel Day Lewis

Daniel Day-Lewis

Best Actress

Jennifer Lawrence

Jennifer Lawrence

Best Supporting Actor

Tommy Lee Jones

Tommy Lee Jones

Best Supporting Actress

Anne Hathaway

Anne Hathaway

Best Director

Steven Spielberg

Ang Lee

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Best Picture- Zero Dark Thirty Argo and Zero Dark Thirty are both thrillers regarding events in contemporary history, and of the two, Zero Dark Thirty simply does a better job at telling an incredible story. Not only that, but it also does so without creating an entirely fictional climax like Argo. It is a more relevant film in that the events portrayed had a greater effect on the everyday lives of Americans, and Kathryn Bigelow succeeds in creating the more electrifying film of the two. Zero Dark Thirty is an incredible, thoughtprovoking procedural that deserves to win the Best Picture Oscar.

Best Director- Ang Lee No one is denying that Steven Spielberg is a great filmmaker or that he put together a phenomenal film. However, there is nothing particularly innovative or new about what Spielberg brings to the table in his direction of Lincoln.Ang Lee, on the other hand, has received innumerable raves for his immersive visual work in Life of Pi. Ang Lee pushed the envelope of what filmmaking can do, and it is for this reason that he deserves the Oscar for Best Director.

Best Actor- Daniel Day-Lewis Joaquin Phoenix was great in The Master, and he would definitely be deserving of the Oscar for Best Actor if he hadn’t had the misfortune of having his film released the same year as a movie starring Daniel Day-Lewis. The notoriously dedicated Day-Lewis seems to win an Oscar almost every time he appears on camera, and for good reason: he is one of the greatest actors of his generation. It is a testament to his talent that his portrayal of Abraham Lincoln will be seen as the best male performance of the year despite it not even necessarily being the best performance of his career.

I’m hesitant to say Jennifer Lawrence should win an Oscar this early in her career when she is almost guaranteed to star in films far better than Silver Linings Playbook in the future. That said, Lawrence really did a great job playing a role that didn’t necessarily require such a good performance. She is also the logical choice here in a weak field- her competition consists of a nine year-old, an elderly French woman who is hardly a household name in America, Jessica Chastain’s turn in a plot-driven movie, and Naomi Watts’ role in a film that I doubt even most Academy members have seen.

Best Supporting ActorTommy Lee Jones This category is chock full of legendary award show vets such as Robert De Niro and Philip Seymour Hoffman, and yet, it is still lacking in particularly noteworthy feats of acting prowess.That said,Tommy Lee Jones is the clear frontrunner for his amusing portrayal of Thaddeus Stevens in Lincoln. It also doesn’t hurt Tommy’s chances that the Academy appears to be eager to hand out as many awards to his film as possible.

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Best Actress- Jennifer Lawrence

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Best Supporting ActressAnne Hathaway This one is pretty obvious; the Academy practically owes Anne Hathaway a trophy after snubbing her in 2008 in the Best Actress category, and among the slim pickings here, (honestly, did anyone even notice Jacki Weaver among all the great performances in Silver Linings Playbook?), she is the only true standout. Expect this to be the only major award that will be won by Les Misérables.

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upcoming movies Upcoming Movies: Spring 2013 Sophie Dizengoff ‘14

filmmusicreporter

Beautiful Creatures Based on the New York Times bestselling book, Beautiful Creatures is a young adult fantasy story similar to Twilight and Harry Potter. Beautiful Creatures is the first book of the Caster Chronicles series. The story centers around magical, witch-like beings called casters, who at sixteen are either claimed for the light or the dark (good or evil). The movie stars Emmy Rossum who also starred in Phantom of the Opera and my favorite Showtime series Shameless. Other stars include Academy Award-winner Emma Thompson, Academy Award-nominee Viola Davis and newcomer Alice Englert. This movie looks like it will capture Twi-hard audiences everywhere. Forbidden love, good and evil, magic, and Emmy Rossum- I’m in!

Release Date: February 13, 2013 Sophie Says: Definitely Going

Oz The Great and Powerful This movie, a prequel to the famous tale we all know and love, tells the unknown story of how the great wizard came to be. The highly traditional Judy Garland version of the beloved Wizard of Oz should not be compared to this modern prequel, as one is not meant to challenge the other. Modern graphics and technology seem to make Oz the Great and Powerful come to life. Starring James Franco, Mila Kunis and Michelle Williams and directed by Sam Raimi, director of the Spider-Man trilogy, the movie has a Tim Burton feel and contains a new twist to an old story. This movie seeks to attract audiences similar to those who saw Burton’s 2010 Alice in Wonderland, a movie of similar formula: old story, new twist. Alice in Wonderland grossed over 1 billion dollars worldwide. So unsurprisingly this movie has high hopes of a successful box office considering its 200 million dollar budget.

Release Date: March 8, 2013 Sophie Says: Definitely Going

digitalspy

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The Place Beyond the Pines Entertainment Weekly put it best by calling it “a riveting crime drama.” Ryan Gosling, Bradley Cooper, Eva Mende and Rose Byrne each play characters who learn about family, life, choices and consequences. I would compare it with Ben Affleck’s The Town or almost any Mark Wahlberg movie, i.e. Contraband. Gosling plays a motorcycle stunt rider/criminal who comes face to face with a cop-turned-politician played by Cooper. Although it has received fairly good reviews, you should only see this movie if you know what you’re getting into. If this is your genre, you’ll love it. If it’s not, don’t go into it expecting to be amazed.

Release Date: March 29, 2013 Sophie Says: Maybe Going

wallpict

Safe Haven The Valentine’s Day set up! Every year there is a movie that you are supposed to go see on Valentine’s Day, the story line specifically plotted for romance, and the release date perfectly strategized for a February 14th crowd. 2012’s entry was The Vow – who wouldn’t go see Channing Tatum and Rachel McAdams depict the heart wrenching true story of a “once in a lifetime love, that finds a second chance?” 2010’s was Valentine’s Day. So here it is…2013 brings yet another Nicholas Sparks love story to the big screen. You’re guaranteed to cry, smile and see a whole lot of teenage girls in the theater. Despite the odd pairing of Julianne Hough and Josh Duhamel, we love them both individually and can’t wait to see their surprising love come together on screen.

Release Date: February 14, 2013 (shocking) Sophie Says: Probably Going indiewire

The Incredible Burt Wonderstone This movie has an intriguing number of stars in it for the type of movie it is. While I know Jim Carrey and Steve Carell are comedians, there is an unlikely cast of characters joining the two, some of which includes Steve Buscemi, Olivia Wilde, Alan Arkin and James Gandolfini. With the whole plot centered around middle-aged magicians and Carrey’s character described as “David Blaine and Criss Angel’s child” how good could this movie possibly be? Star power only goes so far. 40% of viewers who saw Movie 43, a movie with double the star power, gave it a thumb’s down. However, Movie 43 still has weeks to go in the box office and Carrey’s latest film Mr. Popper’s Penguins grossed an overwhelming 187 million dollars, so the truth is you never know.

buzzsugar

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Release Date: March 15, 2013 Sophie Says: Not Going

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profiles Style icons don’ t always originate in the fashion world - in fact many come from outside it. In particular they originate on screens of all kinds as we watch movies and tv shows.

Marilyn Monroe

Eden Davis ‘16

A

s we marked the 50th anniversary of Marilyn Monroe’s death we celebrated her enduring legacy as an icon of our culture. In 1962 the blonde bombshell died of an overdose at the young age of 36 with almost 30 movies completed and countless dreams and opportunities unrealized. With a flawless, radiant smile, and a contagious laugh, she was the star that never grew old. Every young girl wanted to be like her. Every old woman wished she had had her life. And countless upcoming stars try to relive her glamour only to disappear the next day. But Marilyn outlived them all with her bleached blonde locks, scarlet pout, and hourglass figure. And when we passed her 86th birthday this June, the attention to the blueeyed beauty only intensified. Her styles were numerous, varied, and often daring. When going out for a night in the city she would wear a hot pink fitted strapless gown like that in the unforgettable scene of Gentlemen Prefer Blondes designed by William Travilla. While away from the spotlight she obscured her hair under a scarf pairing it with jeans and a short fitted sweater like the Marilyn in the Misfits. But later she started gravitating toward

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flirtatious silk shirts matched with ladylike suits, and in the late sixties she shifted to the less fitted dresses of Pucci and Jax. Even in her bed head, tousled curls, and puffy eyes she embodied the sensuality that every woman wanted to accomplish. With her meticulous eye for fashion and perfection she was daring. Going beyond what the public expected and then exceeding that just a little bit more. In 1955 came the most unforgettable moment of Monroe’s life: In Seven Year Itch her white pleated gown designed by William Travilla unexpectedly flew up when a gust of air caused the dress to blow up in the middle of the NYC subway. Monroe was known to work with costume designers. Everything she wore had her own personal twist so that when Monroe struck a pose no one paid attention to the designer label she was wearing. Marilyn Monroe taught us many things, perhaps most importantly, the joy of dressing… If that joy is indeed dressing up in a classy black dress, shocking the public in a see-through sequin dress, or wearing nothing but Chanel No. 5.

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James Dean

Andie Fialkoff ‘15

J

ames Dean grew up in rural Indiana far from the world of movies and fashion. Upon moving to his aunt and uncle’s farm, the young Dean discovered his passion for film and promptly dropped out of college to pursue his acting career. Like all struggling actors, Dean initially found gigs to be few and far between. Giving up hope of pursuing a career in Hollywood, the young actor relocated to New York. Dean’s career took off soon after he was accepted into the prestigious “Actors Studio” where he refined his craft. From there, Dean starred in blockbuster films such as Rebel Without a Cause (1955), East of Eden (1955), and Giant (1956). Dean’s cool, slick characters’ styles carried over into his personal fashion identity. Dean’s first major role as a young outcast in East of Eden unlocked the door to stardom. As Jim Stark, the troublesome teenager in Rebel Without a Cause, James Dean

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took on the cool, careless persona with which many identify him today. His classic ensemble (both on screen and off), a white t-shirt and jeans partnered with a leather jacket and cigarette, became a major style of the time. While it might not seem out of the ordinary in the current world of fashion, this carefree, rebellious look was revolutionary and set the stage for a new era of fashion. Dean is also credited with popularizing the vest after wearing it while portraying Jett, a rich Texan, in the movie Giant. Dean’s sudden rise to fame and fortune allowed him to indulge in his favorite hobbies. His fast lifestyle attracted him to fast cars but he soon met his fate when his habit of racing caught up to him. The fatal crash occurred in September of 1955. Although Dean lived a short life, and led an even shorter career, his legacy of embodying the essence of cool still lives on.

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profiles

Audrey Hepburn Eden David ‘16

W

ith her Wayfarer sunglasses, pearls, and little black dress, Audrey Hepburn’s legacy as a style icon as endured. Many have tried to recapture her clean style like Hubert de Givenchy, Salvatore Ferragamo, and Isaac Mizrhai; even celebrities of our time like Victoria Beckham, the Olsen twins, and even Jonny Depp. When Audrey Hepburn looked in the mirror she didn’t see what the public saw, instead she saw a “ funny looking” woman… Just another skinny broad.” But she captivated the public from her first appearance in Princess Anne in Roman Holiday, to Breakfast at Tiffany’s, where her little black Givenchy dress and pearl choker became iconic. This Givenchy dress has lived in the memories of many fans and eventually was auctioned off for 467, 200 Euros. She was very different from the curvy Marilyn Monroe or Lauren Bacall. All the top designers especially Hubert de Givenchy enjoyed to dress the slim and petite Audrey. He created the wardrobe for many of her films, including Breakfast

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at Tiffany’s, Funny Face, and How to Steal a Million. In addition to the infamous LBD (little black dress), Audrey also introduced capris to the masses of viewers in films like Funny Face and Sabrina. Audrey was especially fond of turtlenecks and fitted trench coats and she rarely wore bright colors or bold prints. Instead, she kept things low key using accessories, like wide belts and colored scarves, to liven up a simple dress. Audrey Hepburn was multi-faceted, a dancer, an actor, and a humanitarian doing work for UNICEF. She went on many field missions to imporerished countries as a relief worker. She was a determined and perseverant woman, starting as an unknown actor in England to an Academy Award Nominee, she had all the characteristics necessary to be one of the most beautiful women of the 20th century both inside and out.

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- Eden David ‘16

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T

imelessly elegant and poised, Grace Kelly’s effortless beauty and style is iconic. Kelly was born in 1929 and grew up surrounded by both fashion and the arts; Kelly and her sisters often modeled for social events in their community, and two of Kelly’s uncles were involved in acting, directing, and screenwriting in Vaudeville. As a teen Grace Kelly preformed in her Catholic school’s productions and after a harsh rejection from college, Kelly, to the dismay of her parents, decided to pursue acting. After she was admitted to American Academy of Dramatic Arts in New York City, Kelly began her acting and modeling careers to pay the bills. The struggling actress signed onto countless TV shows and Broadway plays before director John Ford finally picked her up. She first appeared on the big screen in Mogambo and soon snatched up a Golden globe for best supporting actress. From there on, Kelly’s career skyrocketed as she landed role after role and collected many awards from her innumerable nominations. She starred in Dial M for Murder, High Society, and To Catch a Thief, to name a few. Her classic, effortless 50’s style was elegant on and off screen. She perfected countless trends: the coiffed hair, simple sweaters, shirtwaist dresses, fitted jackets, big skirts, and beautiful evening gowns. These signature pieces served as inspiration to many including Tommy Hilfiger, Hermes, and even stylists who dress today’s current movie stars. Her career ended abruptly when she announced her engagement to the Prince of Monaco, but she remained a style icon. Even Grace Kelly’s wedding dress served as inspiration to later wedding gowns. In the end, Kelly went from movie royalty to real royalty, all while maintaining her stance and position as a worldwide fashion icon.

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Grace Kelly

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-Andie Failkoff ‘15

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The Bleak Midwinter FAD brightens up the winter days with lively and enchanting beauty looks inspired by spring Photography: Veronica Williamson ‘13 Beauty: Shakea Alston ‘13 Models: Roya Moussapour ‘13 and Diva Gattani ‘13


hT aelB etniwdiM syad retniw eht pu snethgirb DAF ytuaeb gnitnahcne dna ylevil htiw gnirps yb deripsni skool :yhpargotohP 31‘ nosmailliW acinoreV :ytuaeB 31‘ notslA aekahS :sledoM 31‘ inattaG aviD dna 31‘ ruopassuoM ayoR 31

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“What good is the warmth of summer,

without the cold of winter to give it sweetness.”

- John Steinbeck


eht si doog tahW“ ,remmus fo htmraw

dloc eht tuohtiw ot retniw fo ”.ssenteews ti evig

kcebnietS nhoJ -

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Model Samantha Leftt ‘15 in dress by Alexandra Vogelsang ‘14 Photograph by Florence Ngala ‘13


Handle Wi t h

Model Kylie Logan ‘14 in top by Alexandra Vogelsang ‘14 Photograph by Hannah Ades ‘14

Care


Model Samantha Leftt in dress by Noah Margulis Photograph by Florence Ngala ‘13


Model Kylie Logan ‘14 in top and skirt by Alexandra Vogelsang ‘14 and Veronica Williamson ‘13 Model Samantha Leftt ‘15 in dress by Noah Margulis ‘13 Photograph by Florence Ngala ‘13


Model Samantha Leftt ‘15 in dress by Alexandra Vogelsang ‘14 Photograph by Hannah Ades ‘14


Model Kylie Logan ‘14 in gown by Lucy Golub ‘15 and Noah Margulis ‘13 Photograph by Florence Ngala ‘13


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In The Film Noir epitomizes the crossover between movies, glamourous fashion, and artful shots.

Wat c h e s of the Here CineFAD staff evoke the mystery and intrigue found in this popular genre of film.

Night


P h o t o g r a p h e rs V e r o n i ca W i l l i a m s o n ' 1 3 Gabrielle Reid '13 Gina Yu '14

M o d e ls Chiara Heintz '13 Izzy Friesner '15 Grant Rosen '13 I sa a c G r a fs t e i n ' 1 5 Jackie GoodMan '14 D r e w M c ca n n ' 1 3


Stylists Noah Margulis '13 Pa i g e B u r r i s ' 1 3

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Beauty Rachel Buissereth '13 A l e x V o g e lsa n g ' 1 4 S h a k e a a ls t o n ' 1 3

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Newsworthy Nails

you'll ne e

d;

-Rubbing Alcohol -Newspaper -White Nail Polish -Clear Nail Polish

step_1 Paint nails with two coats of white polish and wait for it to dry.

step_5 Paint on a clear top coat to seal in the ink.

step_2 Set up a small dish with rubbing alcohol.

step_3 Rip off a small piece of newspaper and soak it in the rubbing alcohol for fie seconds.

step_4 Place soaked newspaper on your nail and hold it still for 10-15 seconds before removing the paper. Repeat steps 2-3 on each nail.

and you're done! __jillian lowey


FAD Fa s

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to benefi

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raiser ildren’s Friday, Aid Soc iety Februar Studen y 8th at t-Made 6:30 Fashion S t The Ch

how * F ood * R

affles *

$10 Stu

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5 Adults

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FAD Fa s

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to benefi t The Ch

ow Fun d

raiser ildren’s Friday, Aid Soc iety Februar Studen y 8th at t-Made 6:30 Fashion S how * F ood * R

affles *

$10 Stu

Speake

dents/$1

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CineFAD  

Welcome to CineFAD, Cinemann's collaboration with FAD, Horace Mann's fashion, art, and design magazine.