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Women Cinemakers meets

Isabel Bonafe Lives and works in London, United Kingdom

Orpheus lost his beloved because he looked at her when she was at the limit of Hade. He saw the abyss of the image. It is this dialogue with the image; it is this abyss that caused the birth of de-cartography. My practice addresses the condition of ubiquity and flux of the imagery with which we interact in contemporary life, and how the algorithmic materiality of these images makes us experience the fluidity of time and space. This chaotic archive of fractured images, which seem to be leftovers of things that once were something, shapes -or creates- our memories. All this makes me think about the nature of the image anew and interrogate the experience of looking. De-cartography takes us to the roots of my current practice, so as to understand my interest in shattering the cinematic frame, creating tactile images that explore the boundaries between the image and the object.

An interview by Francis L. Quettier and Dora S. Tennant womencinemaker@berlin.com

Hello Isabel and welcome to WomenCinemakers: we would like to introduce you to our readers with a couple of questions regarding your background. After having degreed from the Seville College of the Arts, you moved to London to join the MA of Fine Art program at the prestigious Central Saint Martins: how did these experiences influenced your artistic evolution? In particular, how does your cultural substratum due to the relationship between your Spanish

roots and your current life in the United Kingdom direct the direction of your artistic research? Although I have experienced a cultural impact when I moved to London, there are some aspects of my background that still fuel my practice. I would highlight my way of looking at photography through an academic approach related to painting and drawing, in the sense of the relationship between the artist, the object of representation and the final image. These practices instilled in me the habit of paying attention to things to represent because they require time to build up an image. I was taught to go beyond the surface to reach the essence of things and how to materialise it.

Profile for WomenCinemakers

Women CineMakers, Special Edition  

Women CineMakers, Special Edition  

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