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February 2011 www.valleyparentmagazine.com

Happy Valentine’s Day

Date Night Fun ideas for you and your Valentine

Music

Learning early in the valley

s I y l h o W ho ? c t s n e Pr orta p m I

Education

Mid-year tune-up time

The Valley’s Biggest Family Events Calendar


Birthday Bapapaloo Dr. Seuss & You! Celebrate Dr. Seuss with us day March 6 Seussational activites for Sun Ages 3-6 that promote early 3:00-5:00pm. math and literacy skills. Bring the family. Bring a Who. Don’t miss this party; whatever you do! Get in the thingamigger. It’ll take you away to a place where you learn and learning is play. Bring a wocket in your pocket, but leave your wallet at home – this community event is free and fun for all! This party is big! It won’t be small!

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Experience 2 Valley Parent, February 2011

Oh the places you’ll go…

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Central Valley Christian School Call or visit us today! 541-928-7820 • www.cvcs.edu


Inside

Vol.10, No.2 February 2011

Commentary Preschool; Decisions & Cookies

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Okay, so here’s the thing, I don’t really remember most of it, or even much of it — but preschool certainly did impact me — or at least that is what my Mom says. My deepest reflection on

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the period, however, involves my momentous

Valentine’s Fun

first encounter with Fudgetown cookies —

Date night ideas for all sorts of interests.

significant, right? Things is, as fuzzy as my memory is about this time in my life, my Mom assures me that this is

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Why Preschool Is Important

when I first encountered numbers and letters and so forth — and that the learning environment I

Research links future success to these early learning experiences.

was in did, in fact, make a difference. Memory of one’s early childhood being as fuzzy as it seems to be, it can feel counterintuitive to

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think just how important it is in our development

Mid-Year Educational Tune-ups

— but study after study makes it clear, the early years are a crucial period — and preschool does

Is your child’s education still on track?

make a difference. This month begins a series of stories involving preschool; its importance and, ultimately finding the right one for your particular little charge.

Valentine’s Day

Education

Single Parenting

Happenings & Reviews

How To Find A Qualified Babysitter Help finding someone trustworthy to watch your little one . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

Music And Character Early learning means lifelong skills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

Parenting Through A Divorce Keeping kids out of the middle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

HomeTown Highlights The new and ongoing happenings in our community . . 11

Kids’ View “What does love mean to you and what is your favorite way to express love?” . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

When The School Calls Stop bad behavior before it gets out of control . . . . . . . . . 10

Parent V a l l e y

Linn & Benton Counties Box 796, Corvallis, OR 97339 Phone: 541-758-7848

E-mail: valleyparent@hotmail.com Website: www.valleyparentmagazine.com

Calendar A list of fun and informative activities for kids and adults . . . . 13

In my experience, now as a parent, the decisions surrounding preschool are amongst the most important, I read book after book before I settled on what would be best for each of my kids. And, years later I can tell you it was time well spent — I can see the difference in my kids — of course, what they mostly remember are the cookies.

Publisher/Editor

Cover Design

Steven J. Schultz

Ralph Penunuri

Calendar Editor

Contributors:

Tashia Hoekstra

Nanette Dupuy

Design Director

Cindy Dauer

Bobbi Dickerson

Matt Neely

Advertising/Design

Shelley Cordier Emily Perkins

Angela Dusenberry Katie Kelly

February 2011, Valley Parent

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VP

Valentine’s Day

Fun Date Night Ideas

M

ost couples realize the importance of regular date nights, but coming up something creative and affordable to do can get challenging. The following is a compilation of local ideas that go beyond the typical dinner-and-a-movie date and reach for an unforgettable evening. For the romantic couple: • Take a drive to one of the local covered bridges…aka kissing bridges. Visit http:// www.gorp.com/weekend-guide/travel-tascenic-drives-albany-oregon-sidwcmdev_ 052654.html for directions. • Visit the carousel located at the Salem waterfront, and then take a scenic boat tour aboard the Willamette Queen. Schedules and pricing can be found at http://www.willamettequeen.com/ schedule.html, or call (503) 371-1103. • Pack a picnic of your favorite sparkling beverage, cheese and bread, and head over to Newport to watch the sunset. • Surprise your sweetheart with a couple’s massage.

• Try a theme date from www. bestdatenightideas.com. For the athletic or adventurous couple: • Take a scenic hike together. This website has a long list of local hikes: http://www. localhikes.com/MSA/MSA_1890. aspParks. • Visit Silver Falls and pretend to be tourists. Take pictures and enjoy the beauty. • Go to a local park and play Frisbee golf or tennis. • Try rock climbing together at the OSU Indoor Rock Climbing Center. • Go to a ballroom dance. Classes are available through CJ http://cjsdance.com). The OSU ballroom dance club hosts a free dance at the beginning of each term. (http://oregonstate.edu/groups/ballroom/) For the studious couple: • Browse magazines while sipping tea or coffee at Borders Bookstore in Corvallis.

• Try Geocaching, a new type of treasure hunt using a GPS device. This website has all of the details: http://www.geocaching. com/. For the artsy couple: • Catch a play featuring local performers at the Albany Civic Theater, or through OSU or Linn Benton’s Performing Arts programs. • Create your own art together at Surefire Design on 2nd Avenue in Albany, or at the Pottery Place on Madison Avenue in Corvallis.

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Valentine’s Day

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How to Find A Qualified Babysitter A fter three trips to the restroom with my preschooler and having to scoop the baby’s jar of baby food off the floor—all the while trying to enjoy my Cannelloni Frutti Di Mare with my one free hand—I decided perhaps it was time for us to find a babysitter. For those who do not have family living close by, finding a trustworthy babysitter can be a daunting task. Thankfully, there are professionals nearby who are willing to help. Nathan Keffer, Youth Services Coordinator for the Oregon Pacific Chapter of the Red Cross, says parents should be looking for a someone who “is mature and responsible enough to care for themselves, as well as a child.� Because the state of Oregon does not have any specific laws regarding a babysitting age, he recommends parents depend on a child’s maturity. “Twelve is a good age to start,� he says, “but it depends more on a child’s maturity, not

their actual age.� According to Keffer, a teen who has completed his babysitting course covering safety issues, preventing injuries and illnesses, basic child care, first aid, decision-making skills, and age-appropriate behavior and play, is a good option. Collegeage students, while a little more expensive, are another option many parents prefer. Linn Benton Community College’s Family Connections is a great source for parenting help, including referrals for child care providers. They have a helpful handout detailing all of the important information you should leave for your sitter, including a medical release. Call (541) 917-4899 for details. Creative Babysitting Options • Try a babysitting trade. One couple goes out after putting their kids to bed, while the other couple splits up, one at each home, to watch two sets of sleeping kids. The next week you trade. This also

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works when the kids are older and you can just leave the kids at one house or the other. • The Little Gym of Corvallis has parent survival nights the second Friday and the fourth Saturday of the month. Members pay $25 for the first child and $10 for the second child. Non-members pay $30 and $12. Register early to ensure your child’s slot. (541) 753-0950. • Wacky Indoor Bounce in Corvallis offers date night babysitting for $15 per child. Call (541) 757-6512 for details. • The Albany Boys and Girls Club is open until 7 p.m. Monday through Thursday and until 6 p.m. on Fridays. They have a gym, art room, technology room, education center, and they help with homework. The fee is only $25 per school year for kids grades K-12. And who knows, if you particularly like one of their staff members, you might be able to “pick up a babysitter for the weekend,â€? says Amy Langdon, Resource Development Director for the Albany Boys and Girls Club.

Kids’ View What does love mean to you and what is your favorite way to express love? Esperanza 7 years old “I love someone and they love me too and then you’re happy together. I like to hug my family!�

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Adult • Family • Teen • Children February 2011, Valley Parent

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Single Parenting

Parenting Through A Divorce F

ebruary is the month of roses, chocolate, and crowded candle-lit restaurants. But the Valentine’s holiday may be a hardcandy-heart pill to swallow if you are involved in any stage of a divorce, especially as a parent. “Divorce sets up an impossible task for parents,” says Kevin Riley, a clinical social worker based in Corvallis. Keeping a cool head during a divorce can be like attempting a rational discussion while riding a loop-de-loop roller coaster. When there’s a child on the coaster with you, everything is more treacherous. “In a divorce,” says Riley, “you’re taking a kid’s world and throwing it in the air.” Christopher Elgin, who provides individual, family, and relationship counseling in Albany agrees: “What’s most valuable to them has been lost, and that’s an understatement.” “It may seem obvious, but when you’re in the depths of the process, you forget that the divorce for the parents is going to be completely different then it is for the kids.” points out Thomas Garza, an established mediator in Albany, “It becomes about respect for each party (in an attempt) to do what’s right for the children.”   Watching a previously consistent part of a kid’s life dissolve brings up basic questions of

survival and loyalty. “The kids don’t know if they are going to be taken care of,” says Riley, “and on a different level it’s a question of selfesteem; they may wonder if they will still be loved.” A trap that many parents fall into is thinking that kids feel the same dislike for the other parent. Garza points out that the opposite is true: “Kids have a separate relationship that needs to stay intact.”  The challenge is to “recognize that kids love each of you, and no matter what you’re feeling, the kids don’t need to be involved in that.” No one expects parents to be superhuman. And no one expects you to go it alone. Elgin

recommends counseling. Or if you have an objective friend, use that friend. “Just don’t talk to your kids about your divorce,” he stresses. Don’t kid yourself into thinking you can be objective. “It’s almost impossible when you’re in the thick of it, and divorce is the thick of it.” “But keep communication open with your children,” says Riley. “If they have a question, answer it clearly and without judgment.” If little Jimmy comes home from your spouse’s place and announces, “Mommy let me watch a horror movie.” Take a breath, find your zen, and try your darnedest to not attack the other parent. Keep the line of communication open. Wait until Junior has gone to bed, then give Mom a call. “Consistent rules are important,” continues Riley, “Try and set up a time each month to speak to the other spouse specifically about the kids. Keep them at the forefront.” But it comes down to a family’s unique situation. “There is no set answer,” reminds Garza. “No two divorces are alike. Just make sure you are spending time with the children, whatever that means.”   So this February what that may mean is sending a cheesy Valentine’s mini-card to that little person you love, and that can be an important thing too.

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Early Years

Music And Life Skills A

t some point, many of us have a vision for ourselves or our child that involves the playing of a musical instrument, be it a vibrant and beautiful piano piece or the rich harmonies of a string ensemble or even the writing of a song for a first love. The reality is that we don’t have to wait to reap the rewards of musical study; the benefits of learning music begin immediately. As the Suzuki (music) website explains: “The skills which are developed while learning an instrument—concentration, coordination, memory, long attention span, respect for other people, taking turns, and working together in a group—are all skills that are valuable for any person.� So what are the musical training options in the mid-valley? What instrument should you choose? Should you use an independent instructor or group training? Where can you find a good teacher? First, consider your child’s developmental needs when choosing musical training. Though there are exceptions, many kids aren’t ready for the

rigors of daily practice until they are over seven years old. A great option for parents of preschool-age children is Kindermusik. With classes that start shortly after the child is born and continue to age 7, it takes an eclectic and developmentally appropriate approach to music education. Sue Harden of Corvallis Kindermusik says: “It’s physical, emotional, spiritual and cognitive, but to the outside viewer—it’s fun! Research shows that music stimulates every portion of the human brain. Kindermusik differs from other programs because it focuses on the process rather than performance. “Prodigies are rare,� says Hardin. “We want to develop musical children, not necessarily child musicians.� The Suzuki approach is another way for very young children to learn various musical instruments. In the beginning, learning music by ear is emphasized over reading musical notation. This follows Suzuki’s theory of language acquisition, where a child learns to speak before learning to read. Related to this, memorization of all solo

VP

s n io t p O y e ll a V id Great M repertoire is expected. How young a child can be when they start depends on the child—Janet Throop (a veteran Suzuki teacher) will take 4 year olds—but she screens them to determine if they are ready. Once your child reaches school age, there are even more options, both inside and outside the schools. In Corvallis, the Corvallis Youth Symphony Association provides direction and support for the Elementary Strings program offered in all of the 509J elementary schools. This group-lesson-based program offers twiceweekly instruction. Local private schools, such as Waldorf, Ashbrook and Santiam Christian, also have band or strings programs. Ultimately, your child’s interests may guide you toward a particular instrument. In addition to offering a complete line of instruments to rent and buy, Gracewinds Music in Corvallis keeps a list of local teachers categorized by instrument. Shop around for a teacher or situation that suits you and your budding musician. Once you have chosen a path, be patient and understand that most of the benefits come from the process of learning rather than the end result. Matt Neely is a parent, music teacher and freelance writer.

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Education

Why Preschool Is Important P reschool is one of the foundational tools of early learning. It provides children with the social and early academic skills necessary for future success. The most exciting part about being a preschool teacher is helping children on their journey of discovery. Karen Madsen-Barton, Director of Sunborn Children’s House in Albany, points out that a rich learning environment benefits children. This becomes particularly important starting at about age two and a half. Research done by Pediatric Neuropsychologist Steve Hughes and others supports the important connection between brain development and a quality preschool environment. Preschool’s benefits are foundational. It’s the “bridge builder stage of development to create the foundation for future learning,” states Madsen-Barton. “A well designed learning environment with a working community of children facilitated by a qualified adult, introduces children not only to social structure at an early age, but also exposes them to language, beautiful art, music, and nature.” Everyday in my preschool I observe child development first-hand. Child development

8 Valley Parent, February 2011

specialists call the period from birth to three the “window of opportunity,” because of the millions of brain connections being made at this stage of development--and every new experience enhances this process. A good preschool curriculum guides children in exploring the world around them. It includes sensory activities, imaginary play, fine and gross motor activities, as well as art and music. By discovering how the sun causes

shadows, how it feels to dig in a garden and eat things they have grown, as well as the names of the shapes and colors of the things they see around them, children embark on a journey of discovery—and learning. Cynthia Roelofs, Principal of Ashbrook Independent School in Corvallis, adds that Preschool isn’t so much about academics as it is “about socialization and the ability to get along in a group and solve problems.” At Ashbrook, the focus is on social development skills, e.g., reading social cues, sharing, and having a voice in a group, that children need for academic success in Kindergarten and beyond. The final tool that Preschool provides is the idea that it takes a village to raise a child. “By adding another adult who really cares for a child, it helps to widen their world just a little beyond the family and is so advantageous in so many ways,” says Roelofs. “It sets them up for future success.” Angela Dusenberry operates A Quiver Full Preschool and is the author of a book series for “tween” girls. www.angeladusenberry.com.


Education

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Mid-Year Education Tune-Ups T ime to take your child in for a midyear tune up. Check the mileage on his light-up sneakers. Does the timing belt on her jeans still fit? How’s the ignition and start-up time after the alarm goes off? Of course your child is not the family car, but he can still benefit from a diagnostic check once in while to make sure everything is running smoothly. By now, the reality of early mornings, homework, and hours in the classroom has set in, and some students need an extra push to stay on track. “Third quarter is always the hardest,” says Mathew Moule, a seventh-grade science teacher. “It might be a difference in hormones, but they aren’t as excited. They’re just trying to wade through.” To combat the third-quarter dip, Moule tries to make things interesting, avoid busy work and keep kids on task as much as possible. Yet with a class load of 180 students, he won’t be able to monitor everyone.   This is where involved parents have an opportunity to motivate kids at home. Check in with your kids, find out what they currently are learning in school and see if there are any activities in the area that would create a realworld connection with the subject matter.

Kathryn Ciechanowski, a mom and assistant professor in the College of Education at OSU, plans small trips every month to keep her children looking forward to something. Recent trips include: the Children’s Museum in Portland, the ballet in Eugene, the Oregon garden in Silverton and tide pools at the coast. These real world adventures are fun, energizing, and encourage her kids to put forth their best effort at school. After the forays, “My kids are ready to go back to school,” says Ciechanowski. “They are able to share stories of their adventures with their teacher

Soar Come Us! With

and friends.” Also, set high—yet reachable—expectations, so that your kids feel motivated to succeed. Praise them when they meet their goals, and be aware of unnecessary criticism. “I show them their growth,” says Carol Nesmith, a 3rd/4th grade teacher. “I remind them of what we’re doing and how far we’ve come as a class.”     Ciechanowski also encourages getting involved at school in creative ways. Donate art materials, work with the school librarian to get children’s authors and other speakers, or just bringing in snacks, “Children love to share with their class because it makes them feel special and it gives them something unique and exciting to look forward.”  It is about breaking up the routine and getting the kids excited to go to school. When the question is: How do you keep your kids motivated this time of year? “It all comes back to yourself,” says Susan Wright at Home School House. “How do I keep myself motivated and on task?”  To answer that question, schedule your own mid-year tune-up.

Parents!!

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Katie Kelly is a freelance writer from Corvallis

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VP

Teens

O

nce you get over the initial shock — hearing that your child has been caught misbehaving at school — it’s time to take action. In addition to facing the consequences laid out by the school, there should be some repercussions at home too. The way you handle this situation could be the difference between nipping the problem in the bud and seeing behavior problems escalate. There are a broad range of school-related behavioral offenses. Issues with tardiness, skipping, and chronic absences are related to attendance. Other infractions include inappropriate language or dress (also known as a “wardrobe violation”), disruption, disrespect, harassment, and fighting. Be sure you are clear about the incident your child was involved in before you approach him. You may need to talk further with teachers and administrators to ensure you know the details of the situation.

When The School Calls Prevention If you haven’t got that call yet, or your child rarely gets in trouble at school, you can keep it that way by being proactive. Review the school’s student handbook with your child. These books often include information about school policies, rules, and potential consequences for infractions. Talk with your child about consequences at home too. Have her generate fair punishment ideas for when rules are broken.

First time Offenders When your child gets in trouble for the first time, try not to overreact. Take into account the type of infraction and talk calmly with your child. Get her side of the story. Discuss with your child what he could do differently next time. Review the consequences he will receive at school and at home. Encourage your child to tell you when something has happened at school, so you are not surprised by a phone call. If she is upfront about the incident, you could reduce some of the consequences. Repeat Offenders Now it’s time to follow through and really

send a clear message that the behavior she is exhibiting is unacceptable. You not only need to take away privileges, but assign extra responsibilities. Depending on your child, the consequences you choose could be dramatically different. Placing limits on screen time – computer, TV and texting – or music listening is a good start. Adding responsibilities like chores around the house, filling out a daily planner, or writing letters to teachers or staff involved in the conflict, is another option. Be firm. Once you outline consequences you must see them through. If you back off, your child will get the message that you don’t really care. Follow it with clear ways your child can earn back his rights and reduce his extra work load. Communicate with the teachers and create a weekly grade or behavior chart that they can fill out. You know your child best and can adjust the standards based on the type of behavior infraction he has made. At this point, you also need to have a serious conversation with your child about the reason these behaviors are persisting. Is it a cry for help or just a phase? At this level, small things like schedule changes, conferences with

teachers, and talks with other parents may help resolve the issues at hand.

Chronic Offenders It’s time to talk to the school councilor and set up a functional behavior assessment, also called an FBA. At FBA, the councilor, an administrator, teachers, behavioral specialist, parents or guardians, and the student get together to examine the types of behaviors that are occurring, along with the possible cause of those behaviors. The group looks at the student’s triggers, set ups, and desired outcomes. Through this process, all the partners involved work together to help the student troubleshoot the source of the problem and devise solutions to diffuse them in the future. As a parent, if your student is struggling with severe behavior problems at school, you might want to seek outside counseling. This can help your adolescent cope with any difficult feeling he may be experiencing. Ask a school councilor or administrators for more information about this option. Cindy Dauer has taught Middle School in Harrisburg and is a freelance writer.

Needing More HOPE for 2011? We’re bringing Hope to Life Every Day! • Uplifting Music & Conversation • Safe for little ears • Family focused events and information

Everyone needs more hope in the coming year. Listen Today at 107.9 FM or online at www.hope1079.com 10 Valley Parent, February 2011


HomeTown Highlights

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Spend The Day Racing & Playing With Your Family Party With A Purpose & Savor The Chocolate

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un, eat and play in support of the children of the Parent Enhancement Program in Corvallis at the Crazy Eight 5K/10K and Play-a-Thon on Feb. 26 at the Benton County Fairgrounds in Corvallis. This annual fundraiser is an opportunity for families and individuals to participate in a run/walk, meet the OSU Women’s

Volleyball team, eat, play, even get a massage, but most of all, have fun! The 5K is stroller friendly; loop it and make it a 10K. Register to participate in the 5K or 10K; play-a-thon is free with race registration. Cost without race registration entry is $5 per person or $10 for a family in play-a-thon area. Day of race registration begins at 9 a.m. with the races starting at 10 a.m. Play-a-thon runs from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. For information, call (541) 758-8292. Visit http://www.pep.peak.org/Play_A_Thon.html for online registration form.

Cupid’s Cowboy Challenge

C

upid’s arrow strikes the hearts of Rodeo fans for this year’s Cupid Cowboy Challenge Rough Stock Rodeo at Linn County Fair & Expo Center on Feb. 12. Rough rodeo means lots of bucking and no roping. This year’s events will include bareback riding, men’s and women’s barrel racing, bronc and bull riding. For the little ones, there will be mutton bustin’. This event is open to children in the audience from age 3 to 50 pounds, sign-ups will

be done before the rodeo begins. Participants should bring their own bike helmet, if possible. Doors open at 6:30. The animals will enter the arena at 7:30 p.m. at 3700 Knox Butte Rd., Albany. Tickets available at local feed and supply stores for $12 advance/$15 at the door. Children under 6 free. Call (541) 895-5335 or visit www. wildwestventsinc.com for more information.

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rom 6 to 10 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 26, The Chocolate Fantasy & Art Auction will create a sensation on the Club Level at Reser Stadium. This annual event is the biggest fund-raiser of the year for The Arts Center in downtown Corvallis. Delight your senses with chocolate created by local bakers, while you enjoy the Gypsy jazz sounds of Portland’s Swing Papillon, a band that puts fuel in the fire of the classic hot club tunes of the 30’s and 40’s. All the food and fun helps support

incredible programs such as ArtsCare and Globetrotters. ArtsCare places artists in health care environments to work with patients and staff members; Globetrotters creatively educates the younger generation about cultures around the world, helping today’s youth to be educated, stimulated and inspired. Pick up tickets at The Arts Center, or pay over the phone for Will Call. Call The Arts Center at (541) 754-1551 forPerforming information LBCC ArtsorDepartment Pr TH visit http://theartscenter.net/events/chocolatefantasy/.

36 ANNUAL CHILDREN’S PLAY PRODU

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“Nick Tickle, Fairytale Detective,” a comedy about fairytale detective Nick Tickle, written by author Steph DeFerie and directed by Dan Stone, will be on stage at the Russell Tripp Performance Center in Albany on Feb. 20 and 26. Nick Tickle gets caught-up in trying to save the future of fairytales. When story props come up missing, Granny can’t tell her fairytales, so she calls on Nick and some cleaver audience participation to find the “Mysterious Figure”

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and help solve the STEPH case. Directed by Public performances are at 3 p.m. Admission is $9 for adults and $6 for children under 18. Tickets may be purchased at the Russell Tripp Performance Center Box Office, by phone, (541) 917-4531, * ASL or at the door two hours prior to performance.

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6500 Pacific Blvd. SW., Alban The Russell Tripp Performance C in Takena Hall

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LBCC is an equal opportunity educator and employer. P questions about or requests for special needs & accomm contact the Disability Coordinator at LBCC, RCH-105, Blvd. SW, Albany, Oregon 97321, Phone 541-917-4690 Telecommunications Relay TTD at 1-800-735-2900 or 1Contact should be made 72 hours or more in advance

1/8 page ad for LBCC 2.39 x 5.6 (Parent Linn & Bent

February 2011, Valley Parent

11


VP

HomeTown Highlights

Take the Time to Tell a Tale or Two Albany Civic Theater Presents “The 25th

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rab a seat and open your ears and mind! The Ninth Annual Tcha Tee Man Wi storytelling festival is returning to Corvallis on March 4th through 6th. Tcha Tee Man Wi means “Place Where Spirit Dwells” in Calapooian and is the original name for what is now called Mary’s Peak. Storytelling is an ancient art form used to pass culture and information through the generations. The practice has undergone a revival in the United States and is being recognized for its entertainment, as well as for its cultural value. A celebration for adults and children, this storytelling festival is the sharing of stories in performances, and the sharing of telling

techniques in workshops. Storytelling is done in tales, anecdotes, yarns, fables, myths, firstperson accounts, legends and oral histories that share an appreciation of diverse cultures, eras and traditions. Performances and workshops start at 7 p.m. Friday and continue through the weekend. Storytellers this year include Antonio Rocha, whose “stories challenge the imagination in an exciting new way. His storytelling is energetic, educational and entertaining!” Alton TakiyamaChung, who enjoys telling true stories of Japanese-Americans during WWII, will breathe life into traditional Asian folktales with sensitivity and deep connection, as well as touch into the fire of ancient Hawaiian legends and tell them with passion and respect. Everyone is welcome to these free performances and workshops. For information about the Tcha Tee Man Wi Storytelling Festival and schedule, call Corvallis-Benton Public Library at (541) 7666794 or visit www.tchateemanwistorytelling. com.

L

Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee”

-A-U-G-H-S are found as life’s lessons are learned at the Annual Spelling Bee in Putnam County. Six young people in the throes of puberty, overseen by grown-ups who barely managed to escape childhood themselves, learn that winning isn’t everything and that losing doesn’t necessarily make you a loser. This hilarious musical tale of overachievers’ angst chronicles the experience of adolescent outsiders vying for the spelling championship of a lifetime. It’s about the unlikeliest heroes: a quirky yet charming cast of outsiders for whom a spelling bee is one place

where they can stand out and fit in at the same time. And if you missed your chance to shine in the spelling bee wars of your childhood, take heart: Before each performance, a number of volunteers will be recruited to appear onstage as guest spellers! Directed by Mat Genuser, performances are at Albany Civic Theater, 111 First Ave. SW, on Feb 18, 19, 24 to 26, as well as Mar. 3 to 6 and Mar 10-12. Friday and Saturday shows start at 8 p.m.; Sunday matinees are at 2:30 p.m. Call (541) 967-8140 or visit www.albanycivic. org for ticket information.

Free Teen Yoga At Live Well Studio

E

ight figures sit cross-legged on yoga mats in a brightly lit studio: backs straight, eyes closed, breathing easily. One person has a butterfly stick-on tattoo on her neck. Her neighbor wears zany knee-high socks next to a girl in neon pink shorts and high school logos. Every Thursday, Live Well Yoga Studio offers its services to teenagers for free. “This is an affirming environment,” says co-owner Lisa Wells. “We let teens know that their bodies are a great place to be, to take care of it and be proud of it.” Ellen Luhn Buford, sporting the butterfly tattoo, offers another reason, “I went to a yoga class with my dad, and everyone was 20 years older — I just fell asleep.” Lisa started Reach Out Yoga in 2007 to help at-risk children and young adults in the community. “There isn’t a single teen that isn’t

at risk,” she says. In the midst of puberty, peer pressure, and “what are you going to be when you grow up?,” teens can feel overwhelmed and over-stressed. Yoga at Live Well offers teens an opportunity to re-focus and feel empowered about who they are. “It’s great for athletes as well,” Lisa advises. “Yoga prevents injury, and improves strength and flexibility.” In the class, a teen cracks-up as she stumbles from a contorted “eagle” pose. The solemn room fills with laughter and the instructor smiles warmly as all hands sweep up to the sky and then down into a playful, grateful bow. Live Well Studio offers their free teen yoga class every Thursday at 4pm. Located at 971 NW Spruce Ave. , Corvallis. (541) 231-6091 livewellstudio.com

Dentistry:

Science meeting Art

Yes, we have a name to live up to, though really it is a promise.

More than this, are our personal beliefs about what dentistry should be.

Original

Healthy. Green. Nuturing. • Baby Carriers • Cloth Diapers • Nursing Wear

Wee Bunz for Baby

2064 NW Fillmore Ave. Corvallis, tel: (541) 740-7849 12 Valley Parent, February 2011

Joseph Pham, DDS

Stimulated by the continually growing pool of knowledge dentistry offers, Dr. Pham also takes time to volunteer with NW Medical Teams.

Yan Huang, DDS

Involved in the arts, Dr. Huang appreciates the intricacy and detail that is the craft of dentistry.

1/8

Accepting New Patients

810 Walnut Street SW Albany • 928-1635


VP

Calendar

February 2011 Tuesday 1

Postpartum Support Class. Samaritan Medical & Diagnostic Center, 400 NW Hickory St., Albany. 1st Floor Conference Room. First and Third Tuesday. No need to register. 6 p.m. Free. New Mothers, supportive partners (spouse, mother, sister, friend) and your new baby are welcome and encouraged to attend. Call (541) 812-4301 for info.

Wednesday 2

Expectant Parent Class. Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center, Suite 100, Samaritan Pediatrics, 3600 NW Samaritan Dr., Corvallis. First Wednesdays, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Free. Are you expecting a new baby and have questions about proper care? Learn about newborn care and talk with a pediatrician. (541) 768-4900. La Leche League of Corvallis. First Congregational Church, 4515 SW West Hills Rd., Corvallis. 10 a.m. Breastfeeding information and support for expectant and breastfeeding mothers. Babies’ welcome. Lending library, pamphlets, books and baby slings for sale. Open to the public, no admission. For information or for breastfeeding help anytime call (541) 766-0055 or visit www.llli.org.

Thurday 3

Postpartum Support Class. Samaritan Medical & Diagnostic Center, 400 NW Hickory St., Albany. 1st Floor Conference Room. First and Third Tuesday. No need to register. 6 p.m.. Free. New Mothers, supportive partners (spouse, mother, sister, friend) and your new baby are welcome and encouraged to attend. Call (541) 812-4301 for information. Yarn Yoga. Creative Crafts, 934 NW Kings Blvd., Corvallis. 5-7 p.m. Have fun getting together with people who have similar interests. Just relax and create! Bring a current project or start a new one. Kids 8 and up welcome. For information call (541) 753-7316.

Friday 4

“Art” Black Box theatre, Corvallis High School, 1400 NW Buchanan Ave., Corvallis. By Yasmina Reza, translated by Christopher Hampton. A comedy about art and friendship. Feb. 4, 5, 11, and 12th evening performance 8 p.m.; Feb. 6 matinee 2:30 p.m. Adult $19/Seniors and Students $16. Marc’s best friend, the burgeoning art aficionado Serge, has just bought a very expensive painting. It’s about five feet by four, all white with white diagonal lines. To Marc, the painting is a joke, but Serge insists Marc doesn’t have the proper standard to judge the work. Another friend, Ivan, though burdened by his own problems, allows himself to be pulled into this disagreement. Lines are drawn and old friends square off, even putting at risk their friendships. A battle apparently over artistic merit and modernism shields a hilarious exploration of the value of friendship and the paths of reconciliation. For informa-

Healthy Wholesome Fun for Everyone!

tion please visit http://www.willamettestage.org. Chocolate Dance. Albany Timber Twirlers square dancing club, first and fifth Friday of each month. IOOF Hall, 738 E. Fifth Ave. 7:3010:30 p.m. (541) 974-4978 or www.angelfire.com/sd2/timbertwirlers. “Fresh” presented by the 7th Annual Eco-Film Festival. Doors open 7 p.m. and films begin 7:30 p.m., Odd Fellows Hall, 223 SW 2nd St., Corvallis. Free, $5 donations are welcomed and/or canned goods for the Corvallis Food Bank. New thinking about what we’re eating. Celebrates the farmers, thinkers and business people across America who are re-inventing our food system. Forging healthier, sustainable alternatives, they offer a practical vision for a future of our food and our planet. Call Brooke Morris (541) 753-9211 or visit www.corvallisenvironmentalcenter.org for information. Furniture Share Quarterly Benefit Sale. 155 SE Lilly Ave., Corvallis. (located in the Bertsch/Allied Moving and Storage Warehouse) Fri and Sat. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Lots of furniture/appliances and misc. for sale. Funds received directly support client services for those in need. For information, contact Michelle or Wendee at (541) 754-9511. “Music a la Carte: OSU Trumpet Choir.” Memorial Union Lounge, 26th and Jefferson Way, Corvallis. 12 p.m. Free lunchtime concert, bring your lunch and enjoy. For information call (541) 737-4061. “The Little Polar Bear.” Children’s Film Festival = Parent’s Night Out. Oddfellows Hall, 223 SW 2nd St., Corvallis. $10 per child. Ages 3-11. 6-9 p.m. A look at arctic animals and how overfishing can impact ecosystems. Fun nature-based films played along with art, games and hands on activities. To register call (541) 753-9211 or visit www. corvallisenvironmentalcenter.org.

Saturday 5

Build It Yourself Project. Home Depot, 3500 Spicer Dr. SE, Albany, and 1780 NE Four Acre Pl., Corvallis. First Saturdays, 9 a.m. Free. For kids ages 5-12. The project leader provides all the tools and materials and will help build a project. Parents welcome to stay. Each participant will receive a Home Depot apron and, upon project completion, a pin and certificate. Albany, (541) 812-0808; Corvallis, (541) 758-9303. Children’s Performing Art Series “Stellaluna” presented by Tears of Joy Theatre. Linn Benton Community College, 6500 SW Pacific Blvd, Albany. Free. 10-12 a.m. Founded in 1971, Tears of Joy Puppet Theatre has been recognized as one of the nation’s outstanding puppet theatres. Their mission is to produce, develop, and present puppet theatre that celebrates diversity and enrich the lives of children through experience, creativity and performance arts. For information call (541) 917-7777 or visit www.cityofalbany.net. Chinese New Year Celebration. A.C. Gilbert’s Discovery Village, 116 Marion St. NE, Salem. 1-4 p.m. Free with Museum admission; General (ages 3-59) $6, $3 Toddlers, $4.50 Seniors (60+), Children under 1 free. Celebrate the year of the rabbit with us! Enjoy traditional crafts, foods and activities from the Chinese culture. For information visit www.acgilbert.org or call (503) 371-3631. Corvallis Indoor Winter Market. Gueber Hall, Benton County

Fairgrounds, 110 SW 53rd St., Corvallis. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Offers locally produced items including organically grown produce, meats, eggs, cheeses, artisan breads and baked goods, fresh flowers and nursery products. Local artisans also provide crafted soaps, candles and more. For information visit http://facebook.com/Corvallis.Indoor.Winter. Market or email corvallisindoorwintermarket@gmail.com. Family Climb Time. Indoor Climbing Center, 425 SW 26th St., Corvallis. Sat and Sun, 1-5 p.m. Cost is $3 per child, $6 per adult with a two kids per parent limit; parents who are RecSports members bring only their current OSU ID to get in. Parents/guardians must sponsor and belay the child at all times. http://oregonstate.edu/recsports/ or call (541) 737-1595 for information. Mary’s Peak Orchid Society Annual Show and Sale. Garland’s Nursery, 5470 NE Hwy 20, Corvallis. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Displays, cultural advice, orchid repotting (for a fee) For info. call (541) 753-6601. Oregon Crafted Studio Tours. Member galleries and studios in Benton, Lane, Linn and Lincoln counties will be open to the public 10 a.m.-4 p.m. the first Saturday and Sunday of each month. A guidebook is available for purchase. Visit www.oregoncrafted.org for details. Storytime@Borders. Borders Books, 777 NW 9th, Corvallis. 11 a.m. Free. All ages. (541) 738-0580. “Art” See 2/4. Furniture Share Quarterly Benefit Sale. See 2/4.

Sunday 6

International Dance. Chintimini Senior Center, 2601 NW Tyler Ave., Corvallis. 7-9 p.m. First and Third Sundays. $2.50 adults, $1.25 children. Learn international dances in a relaxed and social atmosphere. All levels of dancing ability welcome. (541) 753-7638. Pokemon League. The Elks Club at Grant Ave. and 9th St. in Corvallis. Meets each Sunday 2-4 p.m. Free. Play the card game, trade; earn promo cards, fun tournaments. Ages 5 to Adult. Beginners’ welcome. Bring your own deck. (541) 753-1978. “Art” See 2/4. Family Climb Time. See 2/5. Oregon Crafted Studio Tours. See 2/5.

Monday 7

Chess Club. Albany Public Library, main branch, 1390 Waverly Dr. SE, Albany. Pizza provided. 6-8 p.m. first Mondays. Free. All ages. (541) 917-7580. The Great Parental Escape – Part Deux. Wacky Indoor Bounce, 4th St (Across from the MAC Store), Corvallis. 5:30-8:30 p.m. Sponsored by Christ Nordyke, State Farm. Free babysitting, fun and dinner for the kids. A Date Night away from the kids right just in time for Valentine’s Day. Donations are accepted and will be matched dollar for dollar by Chris Nordyke State Farm, with 100% of proceeds going to the Boys and Girls Club of Corvallis. Please rsvp at www.facebook.com/event. php?eid=14035859691172.

Tuesday 8

Caring Choices: “What to Do When an Aging Loved One Needs Care.” Benton Hospice Service, Conference Room, 2350 NW Professional Dr., Corvallis. Noon-1 p.m., Free. Transitions Coordinator Bob Daley and Social Worker Angela Fendley, both Benton Hospice Service staff members, will discuss options, resources, and other information you may need when deciding how to provide care to an aging loved one. For information call (541) 757-9616 or visit www.bentonhospice.org. Wellness workshop “Pregnancy and Kids Health.” Synergea Chiropractic, 111 N 20th St, Philomath. 6:30-7:30 p.m. Free, refreshments served and children are welcome. Find out how spinal balance and proper neurological function to support pregnancy, fetal development, and promote effective labor and delivery. Also review research related to ear infections, colds, sore throats, asthma, colic and other childhood illnesses, along with the studies that demonstrate the ineffectiveness of medical and pharmaceutical treatments. For information and to register call (541) 207-1087.

Wednesday 9

Albany Fitwalkers. Villas of Courtyard Villa, 1929 Grand Prairie Rd. SE., Albany. 7 p.m. Second Wednesday. This group sponsors walking events and presents walks around the community. Their motto is “walk for the health of it.” For information contact Rozy Weatherby at (541) 926-7890 or e-mail her at wrozy@yahoo.com. Chamber Music Corvallis: the Auryn String Quartet. LaSells Stewart Center, 875 SW 26th St, Corvallis. 7:30 p.m. Advance Tickets $22/$25 at the door, OSU Students $5, K-12 Students, Free. The Auryn Quartet, from Germany, is one of the premier string quartets in the world. They will play Beethoven Quartet Op. 18 No. 4; Mozart Quartet K 465 Dissonant and Brahms Quartet Op. 50 No. 1. For information call (541) 737-4061 or visit www.violins.org. Hey! Look Us Over maternity program. Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center, 3600 NW Samaritan Dr., Corvallis. Second Wednesdays, 7-9 p.m. Free. Expectant parents will tour the Center for Women and Families and meet the delivery staff. Call (541) 768-4752. OSUsed Day Store. Oregon State University, 644 SW 13th St., Corvallis. Noon-3 p.m. Buy quality used surplus equipment. Check out www.surplus.oregonstate.edu. (541) 737-3102.

Thursday 10

La Leche League of Lebanon Meetings. Lebanon Community Hospital, 525 N. Santiam Hwy., Lebanon on the Second Thursday of the month at 6 pm. Breastfeeding information and support for expectant and breastfeeding mothers and fathers. Babies’ welcome. Open to the public, no admission. For information or for breastfeeding help anytime call (541) 766-0055 or visit www.llli.org. Open Studio at The Art Center. 700 SW Madison St., Corvallis.

Calendar

continued on page 14

LBCC Performing Arts Department Presents its

36TH ANNUAL CHILDREN’S PLAY PRODUCTION

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• Spring Swimming Lessons • Parent-Tot classes • Linn County’s only warm water therapy pool - 92% • Recreational and lap swims – see lebanonpool.org for info! • Facility Rental for Parties is Available

Sunday February 20 & Saturday February 26* (&''š)f$c$

* ASL Interpreted performance and proceeds of this performance benefit the Performing Arts Foundation Scholarships.

6500 Pacific Blvd. SW., Albany The Russell Tripp Performance Center in Takena Hall

$9 Adults, $7 Children under 18

Lebanon Community Pool

1800 South Fifth St. • Lebanon, OR (541) 451-8551 or (541) 259-SWIM email: lebanonpool@yahoo.com website: www.lebanonpool.org

541-917-4531 www.linnbenton.edu/go/tickets LBCC is an equal opportunity educator and employer. Persons having questions about or requests for special needs & accommodations should contact the Disability Coordinator at LBCC, RCH-105, 6500 Pacific Blvd. SW, Albany, Oregon 97321, Phone 541-917-4690 or via Oregon Telecommunications Relay TTD at 1-800-735-2900 or 1-800-735-1232. Contact should be made 72 hours or more in advance of the event.

February 2011, Valley Parent 13 1/8 page ad for LBCC 2.39 x 5.6 (Parent Linn & Benton Counties Maga


Library Story Times Albany Public Library, Main Monday: Wednesday: Thursday: Saturday:

7 pm with puppet show 10:30 am with puppet show 10:30 am with puppet show 10:30 am

Albany Public Library, Downtown Monday:

10:30 am with puppet show

Philomath Public Library Tuesday: Wednesday:

Philomath Bedtime Story Time, 7 pm, all ages  Philomath Story Time, 10 am, 3-5 years old

Corvallis Public Library Monday: Tuesday: Wednesday: Thursday: 1st Saturday:

Bedtime Story Time, 7 pm, all ages  Toddler Story Time, 10 am, 18-36 months old Infant Story Time, 10 am, Birth-18 months old Preschool Story Time, 10 am, 3-5 years old 11 am, 0-36 months old with dads

Calendar

continued from page 13

10 a.m.-1 p.m., $10. All ages’ welcome. Join teaching artist, Diana Ryan for an open studio experience for homeschool/unschool families. Participants have access to a full clay and mixed media room. Weekly projects announced. Caregivers free. Call Chris Neely at (541) 754-1551 for information. Rubber Stamp Club for Children. Corvallis. 6:30-7:30 p.m. Free. Learn the art of rubber-stamping while making cool projects. Call Michelle, (541) 231-8418, for location. Yarn Yoga. See 2/3.

Friday 11

Emerald City Jazz Kings: Night and Day. LaSells Stewart Center, 875 SW 26th St., Corvallis. Adult $20/Youth $9. Performance 7:30 p.m. The Emerald City Jazz Kings continue their “Three Little Words” series as Steve and the Jazz Kings 9 are joined by Michael Stone and Julie Alsin for an evening in the heavens as they explore how American Songbook composers dealt with the effects of natural phenomena on romance. For information call (541) 687-6526 or (541) 737-4061. “Ferngully.” Children’s Film Festival = Parent’s Night Out. Oddfellows Hall, 223 SW 2nd St., Corvallis. $10 per child. Ages 3-11. 6-9 p.m. Close up view of the Rainforest Ecosystem. Explore the canopy, resources and diversity. Fun nature-based films played along with art, games and hands on activities. To register call (541) 753-9211 or visit www.corvallisenvironmentalcenter.org. Linn County Kennel Club All Breed Dog Show. 3700 Knox Butte Rd., Albany. Feb 11-12, 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Parking $5 for the day. Over 1800 dogs from most of the 173 AKC recognized breeds are entered. Come watch as dogs compete for points towards their championship and a chance to compete for “Best in Show.” Fun for the whole family, visit http:/linncountykc.tovik.com/lckc/dogshow.htm. or call (503) 394-3693 for information. “Music a la Carte: The Portland Guitar Duo.” Memorial Union Lounge, 26th and Jefferson Way, Corvallis. 12 p.m. Featuring James Manuele and Foti Lycouridis. Free lunchtime concert, bring your lunch and enjoy. For information call (541) 737-4061. Parent Survival Night. The Little Gym of Corvallis, 958 NW Circle Blvd., Suite A. 6-9 p.m. $25 for members, $30 non-members with additional children being $10 and $12. Designed to give parents the opportunity to enjoy three hours of quality time while the children burn energy. Children must be 3 years old and toilet independent. Call to register, (541) 753-0950. “Riverwebs” presented by the 7th Annual Eco-Film Festival. Doors open 7 p.m. and films begin 7:30 p.m., Odd Fellows Hall, 223 SW 2nd St., Corvallis. Free, donations are welcomed $5 and/or canned goods for the Corvallis Food Bank. A true story of life, death, science, and streams. Q & A with local filmmaker Jeremy Monroe. Call Brooke Morris (541) 753-9211 or visit www.corvallisenvironmentalcenter.org. “Tim Burr,” by Ed Loy Book Signing. 2450 14th Ave SE, Albany. Noon-1 p.m. Albany author Ed Loy will give a talk about the now defunct Albany Timber Carnival and sign copies of this new book, which chronicles the historic event. Sponsored by Friends of the Albany Public Library. Call (541) 926-5686 for information. “Art” See 2/4.

Saturday 12

Audubon 2nd Saturday Field Trip. Benton Center, 757 NW Polk, Corvallis. 7:30 a.m. Free. The Saturday field trips are especially interesting for beginning birders and birders new to Oregon’s mid-valley area. We spend a lot of time identifying local birds by sight and song. We visit the valley National Wildlife Refuges ~ Finley, Baskett Slough, and Ankeny, as well as other birding areas locally. For information call (541) 753-1978 or email richarmstrong@comcast.net. Cupid’s Cowboy Challenge. Linn County Fair & Expo Center, 3700 Knox Butte Rd., Albany. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. and animals enter arena 7:30 – 10 p.m. Tickets available at local feed and supply stores $12 advance/$15 at the door. Children under 6 free. Rough rodeo means lots of bucking and no roping. Rodeo events include bareback riding, men’s and women’s barrel racing and more. Call (541) 895-5335 or visit www.

14 Valley Parent, February 2011

wildwestventsinc.com for information. Insights into Gardening. LaSells Stewart Center, 875 SW 26th St., Corvallis. $25. This year’s event will include an amazing collection of speakers and a wide variety of topics. Some of the many subjects will include natural water features, building a mini-greenhouse and exotic insects. For information please call (541) 766-6750. “Art” See 2/4. Corvallis Indoor Winter Market. See 2/5. Family Climb Time. See 2/5. Linn County Kennel Club All Breed Dog Show. See 2/11. Storytime@Borders. See 2/5.

Sunday 13

McKenzie Cascade Dog Fanciers, Inc. Dog show. Linn County Fair & Expo Center, 3700 Knox Butte Rd., Albany. Parking $5 for the day. 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Come watch as dogs compete for points towards their championship and a chance to compete for “Best in Show.” Fun for the whole family, for information please call (541) 484-7350. Family Climb Time. See 2/5. Pokemon League. See 2/6.

Monday 14

Mommy & Me Valentine Tea. A.C. Gilbert’s Discovery Village, 116 Marion St. NE, Salem. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. $3 per family for members/$5 per family non-member (does not include admission). Registration required. Bring your little sweetheart for a tea party at the children’s museum. Finish off your “date” with a craft activity for two. For information visit www.acgilbert.org or call (503) 371-3631. McKenzie Cascade Dog Fanciers, Inc. Dog show. See 2/13.

Tuesday 15

A.C. Gilbert’s Birthday. A.C. Gilbert’s Discovery Village, 116 Marion St. NE, Salem. 1 p.m. — until the cake’s gone! A.C. Gilbert will turn 126. Join us for cake, and then learn about the “Man Who Saved Christmas” by walking through Imagination Station, our interactive exhibit about the life and inventions of our namesake. Free with Museum admission; General (ages 3-59) $6/$3 Toddlers, $4.50 Seniors (60+), Children under 1 free. For information visit www.acgilbert.org or call (503) 371-3631. Postpartum Support Class. See 2/1.

Wednesday 16

OSUsed Day Store. See 2/9.

Thursday 17

2011 Philomath Samaritan Awards. Philomath Scout Lodge, 660 Clemens Mill Rd., Philomath. 6:30 p.m., Free. The Philomath Area Chamber of Commerce takes great pleasure in hosting this awards ceremony to honor the volunteers who have been selected by their specific organizations. For information call (541) 929-2454. “World Wood Products Markets: How Do they Impact Oregon” Starker Lecture Series. OSU Campus, 107 Richardson Hall, Corvallis. 3:30-5 p.m. Open to the public and free. A lecture by Paul Owen, President, Vanport International, Portland. The theme of this year’s lecture series acknowledges the important role that Oregon’s forests play in addressing global forestry issues, and increasingly important context that the world sets for how forestry is practiced in Oregon. For info. visit starkerlectures.forestry.oregonstate.edu or call (541) 737-1591. Open Studio at The Art Center. See 2/10. Postpartum Support Class. See 2/3. Yarn Yoga. See 2/3.

Friday 18

“The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee,” Albany Civic Theater, 111 First Ave. SW. Directed by Mat Genuser. Friday and Saturday 8 p.m. Sunday matinee 2:30 p.m. Cost, $8-$11. Six young people in the throes of puberty, overseen by grown-ups who barely managed to escape childhood themselves, learn that winning isn’t everything and that losing doesn’t necessarily make you a loser. This musical tale of overachievers’ angst chronicles the experience of adolescent outsiders vying for the spelling championship of a lifetime. Call (541) 967-8140 or visit www. albanycivic.org for ticket information. “Music a la Carte: Icicle Creek Piano Trio.” Memorial Union Lounge, 26th and Jefferson Way, Corvallis. 12 p.m. Free lunchtime concert, bring your lunch and enjoy. For info. call (541) 737-4061. Song for the Blue Ocean: Science, Arts, and Ethics. LaSells Stewart Center, 875 SW 26th St, Corvallis. Free. Public symposium, will bring together up-to-the-minute science, ethical inquiry, and the literary and musical arts to celebrate the seas, consider their future, and renew our commitment to protect them. For information call (541) 737-2402.

Saturday 19

“A Sea Change” presented by the 7th Annual Eco-Film Festival. Doors open 7 p.m. and films begin 7:30 p.m., LaSells Stewart Center, 875 SW 26th St, Corvallis. Free, donations are welcomed $5 and/or canned goods for the Corvallis Food Bank. The journey of a retired history teacher on his quest to discover what is happening to the world’s oceans. Q &A with film makers, Barbara Ettinger and Sven Huseby. Call Brooke Morris (541) 753-9211 or visit www.corvallisenvironmentalcenter.org for information. Between the Cracks Forum 2011. The Arts Center, 700 SW Madison Ave., Corvallis. Hans Fjellstad (Los Angeles, CA) will have a documentary/electronics theme. The series will investigate many different aspects of music and technology and offer opportunities for dialogue with musicians, artists and writers. Free to college and high school students, $5-$10 sliding scale admission for all others. For more information visit theartscenter.net/events. For information on this performer please visit http://www.hansfjellestad.com/bio/. Sizzlin’ Sauce. A.C. Gilbert’s Discovery Village, 116 Marion St. NE, Salem. Feb 19-21. This three-day science festival sizzles with exciting demonstrations, experiments and a Periodic Table scavenger hunt. All ages are invited to participate in an egg-drop competition, concoct “instant snow” and “elephant toothpaste” in our chemistry lab, meet and greet insects from the OSU Bug Zoo and partake in science performances and activities both at the museum and at select locations in downtown Salem. On-site activities are free with museum admission. To see the full schedule of events, visit www.acgilbert.org/sizzlin.htm or call (503) 371-3631.

Corvallis Indoor Winter Market. See 2/5. Family Climb Time. See 2/5. Storytime@Borders. See 2/5. “The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee,” See 2/18.

novices). Come experience winter in the forest with us. For information call (541) 367-5168. “The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee,” See 2/18.

Sunday 20

Children’s Performing Art Series “Eric Ode – Musician.” Linn Benton Community College, 6500 SW Pacific Blvd, Albany. Free. 10-12 a.m. An award winning songwriter and children’s author, Eric provides high participation music and poetry designed to teach, engage, and entertain children and families. For information call (541) 917-7777 or visit www. cityofalbany.net. Chocolate Fantasy & Art Auction. The Arts Center, 700 SW Madison Ave., Corvallis. 6 p.m.-10 p.m. Advanced tickets (recommended) Members $45/Non-Members $50. At the door Members $50/Non-Members $55. Your participation in Chocolate Fantasy, our biggest fund-raiser of the year, supports all of the programs of The Arts Center [Education, Exhibitions, ArtsCare, ArtShop]. Pat yourself on the back as you enjoy the chocolate, the music, and a glass of wine… and keep bidding on the incredible range of local arts and business donations. For information visit http://theartscenter.net/events/chocolate-fantasy/. Crazy Eight 5k/10k and Play-a-thon. Benton County Fairgrounds, 110 SW 53rd, Corvallis. Registration 9 a.m.; Race 10 a.m.; Play-a-thon 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Individual $10-15, Families $20-25. Parent Enhancement Program’s Annual fundraiser, 5k/10k run/walk, volleyball clinic featuring OSU Women’s Volleyball Team, food, and fun family activities. Stroller friendly courses. Call (541) 758-8292 or go to www.pep.peak.org for information or to pre-registration. “Comedy of Errors,” by William Shakespeare. See 2/25. Corvallis Indoor Winter Market. See 2/5. Family Climb Time. See 2/5. Parent Survival Night. See 2/11. Storytime@Borders. See 2/5. “The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee,” See 2/18. “Nick Tickle, Fairytale Detective.” See 2/20.

7th Annual Bridal Show. 139 Main St., Lebanon. Noon-5 p.m. Visit with local wedding professionals at Lebanon’s Great Little Bridal Show to help make your special day perfect! Free admission and door prizes. For information call (541) 259-4255. 2010-2011 Steinway Piano Concert Series presents Stephen Beus, a 2006 winner of the Gina Bachauer International Piano Competition. All concerts begin at 4 p.m. in the Austin Auditorium at LaSells Stewart Center, 27th & Western Blvd., on the OSU Campus. Not recommended for children under eight. Youth ages eight through 18 and OSU students may pick up free admission tickets at the LaSells Stewart Center box office before the concert. The box office will open at 3 p.m. and the auditorium will open for seating at 3:30 p.m. Individual concert tickets $20 in advance (open seating), $25 at the door. They are available now at Gracewinds Music, Grass Roots Books & Music, Beard’s Framing and Rice’s Pharmacy in Corvallis. Tickets can also be purchased on line at http://ticketsoregon.com. For information call 541-752-2361. “Nick Tickle, Fairytale Detective,” a comedy from author of the popular Once Upon a Wolf, Steph DeFerie. Russell Tripp Performance Center, Linn Benton Community College, 6500 Pacific Blvd. SW, Albany, OR. Feb. 20 and Sat. Feb 26, performances at 3 p.m. $9 Adult/$7 Children under age 18. Directed by Dan Stone. Granny can’t tell her favorite fairy tales because someone really cruel and evil is stealing all the props! Bread crumbs, magic beans, a basket of goodies, a glass slipper – all missing! The future of fairy tales is at stake and it’s up to the title character to set things right. There’s plenty of audience participation and lots of laughs for junior detectives. Tickets available at the Russell Tripp Performance Center Box Office or by phone (541) 917-4531 and at the door two hours prior to performance time. International Brotherhood of Magicians. Albany. 2 p.m. Third Sundays. All ages. A social club dedicated to advancing the art of magic performance, interest, and fellowship. Call (541) 752-3900 for location; magictuba@proaxis.com, www.ring238.org. Family Climb Time. See 2/5. International Dance. See 2/6. Pokemon League. See 2/6. Sizzlin’ Sauce. See 2/19.

Monday 21

“In Pursuit of a Dream.” Film. 321 Second Ave SW, Albany. 1-4 p.m. Albany Regional Museum will present the Oregon-California Trail Association film, an award winning documentary about 24 students on the Oregon Trail, at the Pix Theater. Call (541) 967-7122 or visit www. armuseum.com for information. Sizzlin’ Sauce. See 2/19.

Tuesday 22

All About breast-feeding. Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center, 3600 NW Samaritan Drive, Corvallis. Fourth Tuesdays, 7-9 p.m. Free. Learn how breast-feeding can reduce a baby’s chances of getting diarrhea and respiratory and ear infections. It gives baby an increased immunity against other diseases as well. Call (541) 768-5244 for info.

Wednesday 23

“Twilight of the Gods” Corvallis-OSU Symphony. LaSells Stewart Center, 875 SW 26th St., Corvallis. Performance 7:30 p.m. Wagner: Ride of the Valkyries. Prokofiev: Piano Concerto No. 2. Stephen Beus, piano, Marlan Carlson, Music Director. Individual tickets $15-$30 and can be purchased online at http://ticketsoregon.com. Tickets are also sold at the La Sells Stewart Center Box Office one hour prior to concert. For information call (541) 758-6822. OSUsed Day Store. See 2/9.

Thursday 24

“The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee,” Special Performance. Albany Civic Theater, 111 First Ave. SW 8 p.m. Cost, $8-$11. (See 2/18 for plot line.) This performance is a special benefit for the Albany Kiwanis, which uses the proceeds for projects at ACT. Tickets are available only from Sid Steven’s Jewelers, and at the door when seats remain. Call (541) 967-8140 for information. Open Studio at The Art Center. See 2/10. Yarn Yoga. See 2/3.

Friday 25

“Addicted to Plastic” presented by the 7th Annual Eco-Film Festival. Doors open 7 p.m. and films begin 7:30 p.m., Odd Fellows Hall, 223 SW 2nd St., Corvallis. Free, donations are welcomed $5 and/or canned goods for the Corvallis Food Bank. Reveals the history and worldwide scope of plastics pollution, investigates its toxicity and solutions. Plus the short film, “Life Between the Tides: Shore Crabs” with Q & A by local filmmaker Kate Hickok Feldman. Call Brooke Morris (541) 753-9211 or visit www.corvallisenvironmentalcenter.org for information. “Antbully.” Children’s Film Festival = Parent’s Night Out. Avery House Nature Center, 1200 SW Avery Park Dr., Corvallis. $10 per child. Ages 311. 6 – 9 p.m. A view into the life of insects colonies and the underground world. Handle live insects and play metamorphosis games. To register call (541) 753-9211 or visit www.corvallisenvironmentalcenter.org. “Comedy of Errors,” by William Shakespeare. Majestic Theatre, Corvallis. Directed by Robert Leff. Fri. and Sat. 7:30 p.m., Sun. 2:30 p.m. Tickets $12 Adults/$10 Students/Seniors. Before our story begins, two sets of twin baby boys were separated in a shipwreck. Years later, half of the pairs arrive in a big city searching the world for their long lost brothers. Little do they know, their twins are respected citizens in a last century neighborhood. What follows in Shakespeare’s popular comedy of mix-ups, madness, and mirth featuring an old man in search of his sons, an unhappy wife, angry merchants, a quack doctor, an abbess, and a lady of the evening. “There is something in the wind.” For info. please call the Majestic Theatre Box Office at (541) 738-7469. Winter on the Wagon Road. Sweet Home Ranger District Office, 4431 Hwy 20, Sweet Home. Cross country ski trip of 3-4 miles. Moderate (no

Saturday 26

Sunday 27 “Comedy of Errors,” by William Shakespeare. See 2/25. Family Climb Time. See 2/5. Pokemon League. See 2/6. “The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee,” See 2/18.

Monday 28

Mothers of Preschoolers. 1910 Grand Prairie Road, SE, Albany. 9:3011:30 a.m. Free childcare. Support and encourage each other as we talk about menu planning, budgeting and coupon clipping. Refreshments, door prizes and crafts. Call Lori at (541) 730-0486. Oregon State High School Band Festival. LaSells Stewart Center, 875 SW 26th St., Corvallis. All day high school band festival hosted by OSU. For information please call (541) 737-4061. Oregon State University Wind Ensemble and Wind Symphony. LaSells Stewart Center, 875 SW 26th St., Corvallis. Performance 7:30 p.m. $10 at the door; OSU students/staff free. Classical Concert. For information please call (541) 737-4061.

Tuesday, March 1

OSU Jazz Ensemble. LaSells Stewart Center, 875 SW 26th St., Corvallis. Performance 7:30 p.m. Tickets $10 available in advance at Gracewinds Music and at the door. OSU Students/staff, faculty free with ID card. For information please call (541) 754-1551.

Wednesday, March 2

Expectant Parent Class. See 2/2. La Leche League of Corvallis. See 2/2. OSUsed Day Store. See 2/9.

Thursday, March 3

“Comedy of Errors,” See 2/25. Open Studio at the Art Center. See 2/10. Postpartum Support Class. See 2/3. “The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee,” See 2/18.

Friday, March 4

9th Annual Tcha Tee Man Wi Storytelling Festival. Tcha Tee Man Wi means “Place Where Spirit Dwells” in Calapooian and is the original name for what is now called Mary’s Peak. Storytelling is an ancient art form used to pass culture and information through the generations. Storytelling is done in tales, anecdotes, yarns, fables, myths, first-person accounts, legends and oral histories that share an appreciation of diverse cultures, eras and traditions. All ages’ welcome. This free festival is held at various locations around Corvallis and Albany. Please check the website www.tchateemanwistorytelling.com for the schedule and details for each performance. “Growing Zion’s Pride” Dinner & Dessert Auction Fundraiser. Zion Lutheran School, 2800 NW Tyler, Corvallis. 6-9 p.m., Tickets Advance $10/$15 at the door. Annual auction fundraiser to support the activities and ministry of our nonprofit school. This event will feature live music, food by Valley Catering and both silent & oral auctions. Childcare provided. For information call (541) 753-7503. Flashlight Dance. Albany Timber Twirlers square dancing club, first and fifth Friday of each month. IOOF Hall, 738 E. Fifth Ave. 7:30-10:30 p.m. (541) 974-4978 or www.angelfire.com/sd2/timbertwirlers. “Comedy of Errors,” by William Shakespeare. See 3/3. “The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee,” See 2/18.

FREE: Your Event in Our Calendar

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Valley Parent Magazine  

February 2011

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