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WWW.THEALCHEMISTWEEKLY.COM • VOLUME 4 NUMBER 173:42 • APRIL 26, 2011

When betting tourism dollars, bet orange and black.

Symposium | p. 2 Clay play | p. 12 PLUS Alchy Picks | p. 8

CoRVaLLiS OR BuST

City gives tourism bureau 300K and cuts festival funding P. 6 | by cindy dauer


SYMPOSIUM

a person derives their intelligence and that electrical impulses come from your heart— the actual organ—that others can feel. “The shift is about to hit the fan.” That’s the subtitle of Shadyac’s documentary. Darwin says only the fit survive. Who then, are the fittest in America? It seems to me they are the ones with the most stuff. We will cheat, kill, or steal from any that are weaker than us, in the name of surviving. It’s in the name of capitalism. It’s in the name of greed. However, we weren’t born that way. As portrayed in the film: a lion will kill for food—but it won’t kill the entire herd; a tree will take nutrients from the soil—but only what it needs. Why then do we measure the fittest in terms of wealth?

BUMP

2 | Symposium 5 | Photo of the week

8 | Alchy Picks

VERDICT

Amateur prose, poetry and fiction still has a home.

It’s the calendar of all things Albany, Corvallis, Lebanon, and Philomath.

L I T E R AT I

14 | Poems by Marine Ernst Zoa

FUN BITS

I am...thinking

Stuff you can take to the bathroom with you.

Journalists call them features; we say it’s the word.

4 | Weekly Horoscope

6 | Corvallis or bust 12 | Clay Play

11 | Crossword

Editorial Editor: Courtney Clenney Staff Writers: Courtney Clenney, Noah Stroup, Stanley Tollett Bump Editor: Noah Stroup

The Alchemist Weekly is published by: CorvAlcheMedia LLC PO Box 1591 Corvallis, OR 97339 541.224.6873

Art Art Directors: Courtney Clenney, Noah Stroup Layout Editor Andrea Fideler Cover Photo by Noah Stroup

As a publication, our goal is to facilitate greater understanding and appreciation for the diverse social and cultural groups found in the area. In doing so, we hope to create a greater sense of community between Oregon State University and Corvallis, between Albany and Corvallis, and between Philomath, Lebanon and Corvallis/Albany. The Alchemist recognizes the various interests of these groups and is dedicated to being as fluid as the community it serves.

Contributors: Brandon Cook, Coyote Kate, Cindy Dauer, Cynthia Spencer, Michael Thomas, Lisa Wells

Advertising Director of Marketing Stanley Tollett Account Executive Noah Stroup

Alchemist Mission

*The Alchemist is available to you for free. Please limit yourself to one copy. If your picture is in it, you are welcome to take enough copies for your family. PREVIOUS ISSUES: Subject to availability, back issues can be purchased by mail for $5. Send your request with specific issue date to PO Box 1591, Corvallis, OR 97339 and include a check or money order payable to The Alchemist.

Business Publisher Noah Stroup

CONTACT US:

The Alchemist Weekly welcomes freelance submissions. .

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letters news submissions editor calendar ads

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I was driving down the road the other day, in my vehicle that is almost paid for, and I thought to myself, ‘what would it feel like to only have to pay for what I needed in that instance.’ No car payment, no credit cards, no contracts, no mortgages—freedom from greed. Then I saw this film, and learned about Shadyac. He’s a guy that, according to America’s definition of fit, is right up there with a triathlete because of his monetary wealth. However, he chooses to live in a trailer park, flies coach, rides a bicycle to work and teaches at a college even though he could be making millions on blockbuster movies. People are good. There can be faith in humanity. -Courtney Clenney courtney@thealchemistweekly.com

What’s your favorite flavor of Oregon Trail’s Party Pig?

All content copyright 2011 The Alchemist Weekly

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I don’t go flat!

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“Please just trust me and go see it. Just the excerpts I saw completely flipped my mood today and convinced me of a big change of direction I have already started implementing…” Through that text message I could almost hear the dire in my friend’s voice. If that wasn’t enough, she continued with, “don’t cheat yourself.” Man, this must be one helluva movie. “I Am” is the name of it, I had never heard of it, and my friend—she’s never seen it. Her pleas were coming off the tail-end of seeing an interview with the documentary’s director and writer, Tom Shadyac, maybe you’ve heard of him—“Ace Ventura: Pet Detective”—yeah, he directed that movie. He seeks to answer two questions: What is wrong with the world? How do we fix it? But, I want to know this: Do you believe people are innately good or inherently evil? I have always thought people are good, deep down, in their hearts. Life circumstances have forced me to understand people are not always defined by their actions, no matter how terrible they are. Science says otherwise. Science says our actions are a series of neurological impulses controlled and derived from our brains (in my very simplistic way of understanding), and that all our intelligence originates in our brain. What if that’s a lie? As Shadyac explores in “I Am,” there is now evidence supporting the idea that the heart may actually be where

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5 | Bookworm

“It was a revelation to me that for tens of thousands of years, indigenous cultures taught a very different story about our inherent goodness,” Shadyac marvels. “Now, following this ancient wisdom, science is discovering a plethora of evidence about our hardwiring for connection and compassion, from the Vagus Nerve which releases oxytocin at simply witnessing a compassionate act, to the Mirror Neuron which causes us to literally feel another person’s pain. Darwin himself, who was misunderstood to believe exclusively in our competitiveness, actually noted that humankind’s real power comes in their ability to perform complex tasks together, to sympathize and cooperate.” – From iamthedoc.com/thefilm.

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We be the judge, you be the jury... you trust us right?

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Opinions and Editorials, be they ours or yours, this is where they be.

Photo courtesy of iamthedoc.com

Albany ● Corvallis ● Lebanon ● Philomath VOLUME 4 NUMBER 173:42 ● APRIL 26, 2011

VOICE

VOICE

Adopt your returnable/refillable pig at Oregon Trail Brewing, First Alternative Co-Op and Market of Choice Oregon Trail Brewing • 341 SW 2nd St • 541-758-3527


ASK THE YOGINI

CORVALLIS VANITIES

April Gardening Illustrations courtesy of Lisa Wells

Dear Yogini: It’s spring and I’m excited to get back in the garden. How do keep my back from hurting after a long day of planting and pulling weeds? -It’s Spring!

Dear Spring:

In my neighborhood, gardening is a favorite pastime. It takes a big toll on bodies emerging from winter hibernation. I watch my neighbors groan as they unwind from pulling weeds, and I listen to them complain of sore backs, knees and shoulders every spring. Squatting, lifting, carrying and digging require a strong physical foundation. Adding some good basic stretches to your gardening routine, and a few regularly practiced strengthening moves, will go along way toward supporting your body through the gardening season. The Yogini’s general stretching advice is to stretch often and deeply! Stretch before you begin gardening. Take frequent breaks while you are gardening; and stretch again when you are done. The toll of repetitive movements and long sustained positions are hard on the body. Here are some simple movements that can help keep you out of pain.

Chest Expansion: In a simple standing posture, interlace your fingers behind your back. Engage your abdominal muscles and press your belly closer to your spine. As you inhale lift your arms away from your back, stretch your chest open and breath into your upper lungs. Hold the stretch for 30 seconds or longer.

Side Stretch: Remain standing, reach your arms up and interlace your fingers. Find a strong foundational support by pressing your belly toward your spine. Hold your upward reach for 5 to 6 breaths and then begin to stretch from side to side. When you stretch to the right focus on opening the left side of your waist and torso. When you stretch to the left focus on opening your right side. This movement is harder than it sounds. You’ll want to stretch back and forth 4 to 5 times and then rest for a moment before continuing.

Deep Back Stretch: From standing, come into a partial squat by bringing your knees forward just beyond your toes and sticking your bum out behind you. Reach your arms upward as you did for side stretch. Press your belly toward your spine and let your spine arch forward while dropping your head between your arms. Then stretch from side to side,

arching forward and to the right and then forward and to the left. You’ll extend and stretch into the back of your waist as well as into your low back. You’ll want to repeat this a few times on each side. Warrior I: Step into a long stride, right foot 2 to 3 feet in front of your left foot. Bend your right knee over your right ankle. Interlace your hands behind your back and stretch as you did in Chest Expansion. Hold the pose for 5 breath cycles then change sides.

Wide legged forward bend: Take a broad stance, feet 3 to 4 feet apart. Engage your belly muscles and hinge forward at your hips to bring your hands to the ground in front of you. If this is too big a stretch, you can use a bench or a table to support your upper body. Take long deep breaths and as you let your spine and hamstrings slowly release. Hold for 1 to 2 minutes. Heal-toe your feet closer together before you return to standing.

Cat/Cow: This can be done on hands and knees or while standing using a chair for support under your hands. In either case, you begin with your back flat like a tabletop and your belly lifted to support it. On each exhale strongly lift your belly while your dropping your head and tailbone toward the floor (cat stretch); on each inhale lift your tailbone and your heart while stretching the front of your spine. Repeat 10 to 20 times. Did you notice that I reminded you to engage your belly muscles strongly with each and every exercise? Strong abdominal muscles provide a strong functional support for all your daily activities. You want to engage your abs when you are gardening as well, particularly anytime you shovel, lift, carry or dig. The more you practice this while you are exercising, the more it becomes habit when you work. This is a great short yoga sequence for everyone, and especially for gardeners and weekend warriors headed out to enjoy spring sports. Please check with your doctor before beginning any exercise routine, particularly if you are recovering from an injury or have other medical concerns. Namaste, -The Yogini, Lisa Wells

You can find Lisa at Live Well Studio 971 NW Spruce, Corvallis An extended video version of this sequence is available at livewellstudio.com/blog Send questions to yogini@thealchemistweekly.com

The thoughts, views, and opinions expressed in Voice are of their authors and do not necessarily represent the thoughts, views, or opinions of CorvAlcheMedia, LLC. WWW.THEALCHEMISTWEEKLY.COM • APRIL 26, 2011 • 3


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Aries (March 21-April 19): Promises are a continuous condition of the heart. With promises we generate love, blessings and growth. The trust of someone’s love is what we live for, like the Earth’s promise to regenerate. Particular levels of promise extend to every one we meet. I promise to smile at you when I pass, open the door, let you go first in line, help you carry that package and let you know that you are here on this Earth with me, and I see you. Focus on Promise Aries. Taurus (April 20-May 20): The flying,

freaky, free-meal ticket-takers are back. Call the black forms, when gathered, a wake, committee or venue; the bald-headed vultures have culminated their annual spring migration. That ugly, wrinkled skin keeps their faces clean. Their digestive tracts contains bile strong enough to allow them to eat carcasses maimed by anthrax, Botulinum toxin, and other assorted lethal diseases. With urine that kills bacteria hanging to their legs from cadaver diving, they are the ultimate carcass-eating machine. Wellplaced vomit keeps other predators at bay. Their naturally evolved detachment is what you will need in the coming week, Taurus. Vulturize.

Gemini (May 21-June 20): Practice the old art of darning because some of the edges of your weaved world flit their ends in the wind, frayed. Those sideline strings are important Gemini. They make up the fabric of who you are. So gather your specialty needles and sew them back together. The pattern may not look the same, as the stitching will come from your re-framed heart. Cancer ( June 21-July 22): Bright, yellow fields of mustard stand ready to harvest in valley fields. Their uses range from medicinal hot mustard plasters to relieve lung congestion (an art we’ve nearly lost) to mustard gas used in wars. Mustard evokes potential, Cancer. You are the catalyst if you remember this: “Energy, like the biblical grain of the mustard seed, will move mountains,” Hosea Ballou (preacher 1771-1852).

Leo ( July 23-Aug. 22): Use the Vestal Virgins as your guide this week. Slow your hurried heart and tend to your sacred fires. This will allow you to remain flexible and to become the Mother of Invention. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): How many different songs, notes, melodies, tunes are sung by the wooing birds now? Mellow is your mantra for the week Virgo. Whether you listen to the awakening outdoors or turn up the stereo inside—chill. That ol’ Shakespeare got it right again--“If music be the food of love, play on.” Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): April shines with potential and takes it back, leaving humans in the lurch of flexibility. A situation may be making you sick—that’s how sensitive you are to your environment. Process your emotions so that you’ll stay healthy. Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Scenario: An osprey dives into the river, grabs a salmon thinking dinner will be an easy catch. However, the fish, too large to launch out the water, causes a great dilemma for the osprey. Talons, caught in the flesh, refuse to work their way out. The bird--forced to swim and drifts with the fish over the dam down the river. Know your limits Scorpio, and how to get out of situations where your motivations have placed you in precarious situations. Retract naturally. Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Sag, you need friends right now, but make sure you are leaning on the right ones. Author Charlotte Bronte (1816-1855) wrote, “If we would build on a sure foundation in friendship, we must love friends for their sake rather than for our own.”

JACKSON STREET YOUTH SHELTER NOW HIRING! We are looking for: Part Time Overnight Case Worker This person would get paid between $9/hr to $10.25/hr working shifts 12a-8a Friday-Sunday. Part Time Case Worker This person would get paid between $8.50/hr to $9.50/hr and will be working 2-3 permanent 8 hour shifts per week. On-Call Case Worker This person would get paid between $8.50/hr to $9/hr and will need to cover shifts. The wage will be determined on education, experience, and your commitment to JSYSI and the Corvallis Community. To apply please do a resume, cover letter, have at least 3 references or reference letters, and copies of your current First Aid/CPR/Food Handlers certifications. The application can be sent by email or you can hand it in, in person. Please contact KendraSue Phillips-Neal, Shelter Director @ sheltermanager@jsysi.org or 541-754-2404

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Copious conceptions abound in Spring as the rebirth of the Earth is in full motion. Robins rush, squirrels scamper, and bees buzz. In the midst of changes occurring on the biological level, you may be feeling the ups and downs of it all. Keep focused on the moments of pure conception, inception, and reception.

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Aquarius ( Jan. 20-Feb.18): Manifest

with the May Queen and King whose celebration is May 1 or Beltaine. Perform a rite of fertility to enhance all that you do. Dance around a fire, holding hands with yourself or others, and sing praises to the act of enrichment. Be the forest and the trees.

WRAPS

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20): The ancient Roman Goddess of fruit Pomona earned her status by knowledge of fruit-bearing trees. As caretaker of the orchards she held out on her countless suitors knowing that her life was too busy. Voila! Along comes a partner who shared her love, could add to her plethora of knowledge, and together they keep watch over the crops. Pisces, count your resources. They are greater than money.

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4 • APRIL 26, 2011 • WWW.THEALCHEMISTWEEKLY.COM

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Thursday, April 28th

Wild Hog in the Woods Friday, April 29th

Tyler Fortier Saturday, April 30th

Paul Peterson Blues

PHoto of the week

Sunday, May 1st

Blues Jam

This photo was taken by David Seltzer on April 16, 2011. The violin is functioning as window ar t for downtown Corvallis and can be seen on Second St. You could be chosen for Photo of the Week by submitting to our flickr group: www.flickr.com/groups/thealchemistweekly.

Bookworm by MICHAEL THOMAS

"Jimmy Corrigan, The Smartest Kid On Earth" (2000) by: Chris Ware One of the finest works in the graphic medium, “Jimmy Corrigan, the Smartest Kid on Earth” (2000) is a tragicomic leviathan that explores the fallacies of parenthood, the family contumely, dreams and cognitive imagery, and the comforts of illusion. Partly autobiographical, the protagonist of Jimmy Corrigan is a humorless middle-aged man whose inability to form relationships of any kind has left him in a state of societal exile. It is in this condition that Jimmy receives a letter from his estranged father and decides to fly out to Michigan and meet him for the first time. A second narrative thread follows Jimmy’s grandfather, James Corrigan, growing up under the rule of a menacing patriarch in Chicago in the late nineteenth century. Both story lines are exemplary in showing the escapism of

the adolescent mind when forced to exist in unpleasant conditions: Jimmy fantasizes of fulfilling relationships with women, and of familial intimacy, while in life he cannot hold a conversation with a woman—save his own mother—without stuttering or breaking off into detached thoughts; James uses the construction grounds of the World’s Colombian Exposition as a kind of playground to escape the harassment of his father, and later his schoolmates. Both stories are also enticing in the way that they communicate the manifestation of a person’s anxieties and desires into dreams. Author Chris Ware is talented at portraying both the subtleties and patent exaggerations that our dreams present us with: in one dream Jimmy brutally stabs his unknown father to death, in another he dreams himself encased in a metal shell, wandering his surroundings indomitably. The dream sequences are also powerful for their comic absurdity as well as the substance of their identity. For many readers, there will be familiarity here. While

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VERDICT keeping the many elements of Jimmy Corrigan in constant rotation Chris Ware also inserts a number of leitmotifs into his book—including a failed super-hero, peaches, and a miniature horse—and uses them to various ends in both narratives. Ware has been praised for his abilities as a storyteller and an artist and the scenes that occur at Chicago’s fair, the fabled White City, are so full of color and grandeur that they appear more breathtaking in his text than in the actual photographs that survive into modernity, no small feat seeing as the fair was described as a wonder of the world at the time. Ware’s duplication had to be the result of intense, painstaking study. It pays off; it is a spectacle to behold. Judging by his Acme Novelty Library and various sketchbooks, Ware’s insecurities and sense of dislocation inform the characters of his book making it realistic while warmly accentuating the novels’ moments of sadness and joy. Jimmy Corrigan restored my faith in graphic novels.

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WWW.THEALCHEMISTWEEKLY.COM • APRIL 26, 2011 • 5


WORD

CoRVaLLiS OR BuST

City gives tourism bureau 300k and cuts festival funding by cindy dauer

F

or the first time in nearly 20 years, the two major art festivals in Corvallis will not receive financial support from the city. The result of a policy change, the festivals will no longer be able to apply for economic development grants. The elimination of the grant program sets a precedent in city policy, one that hasn’t been changed in over two decades. Before now, local organizations - like the festivals, the Downtown Corvallis Association, the Chamber Coalition, and others - could apply for economic development grants. Those organizations which could prove they promote economic development and sustainability have in recent years been granted anywhere from $4,000 to $75,000 annually. Last year, $221,089 in city economic development grants was distributed to nine organizations. But this year the city eliminated those grants and created a commission. The commission of nine mayoral-appointees will review city economic development policy and make recommendations for reform. Their recommendation will include how to spend $485,000 for economic development next year. While technically there is $485,000 on the table, $405,000 in earmarks is proposed for marketing, staffing, and tourism. The majority of that ($335,000) is going to Visit Corvallis, a non-profit business league the city contracts for tourism-related services. By law, the city has to fund tourism with revenue from its room tax, a nine percent tax added to the cost of staying overnight in Corvallis. State law requires Corvallis to spend 30 percent of the revenue generated from that tax on tourism (the rate differs in other cities according to the formula adopted in 2003). Since the law passed, Visit Corvallis has

received all of the city’s compulsory tourism funding. So while the city can drop its economic development grant program (also funded with room tax), it can’t drop tourism. This leaves the festivals and other organizations, besides Visit Corvallis, without city funds. City staff acknowledges that the law does not necessarily require tourism money to go to Visit Corvallis. “We don’t have to contract with a specific agency, but it [the 30 percent] does need to be provided for tourism-related services,” Ken Gibb, Corvallis Community Development Director, told the newly formed Economic Development Commission in March. In its annual report, Visit Corvallis reported more than $365,000 in expenditures last year. Nearly 65 percent ($237,376) of its total expenses were for personnel and administration. That supports 3.75 fulltime positions. The remaining $100,000 in expenditures Visit Corvallis reported were classified as marketing, including roughly $30,000 for advertisements, $25,000 for sales contracts, and $15,000 for shipping. According to its contract with the city, Visit Corvallis must work toward attracting a variety of tourists to the area. That ranges from convention groups to leisure travelers. The goal is to attract more tourists to stimulate the economy and increase the tax revenue. A major focus at Visit Corvallis is recruiting large events and conferences

6 • APRIL 26, 2011 • WWW.THEALCHEMISTWEEKLY.COM

which bring high volumes of people into the city at one time. In the last year, Visit Corvallis reported that it assisted in bringing 19 events and meetings to Corvallis. That includes the 2011 Willamette Volleyball Classic, the 2012 and 2013 Governor’s Conference on Tourism (neither of which Visit Corvallis was able to secure), and the Corvallis United Soccer Tournament, among others. Visit Corvallis reported its efforts created a $2.4 million impact, with 40 percent of that coming from big ticket items like $507,000 for the two Governor’s Conferences (which won’t actually be coming to Corvallis) and $455,000 for the Oregon State University volleyball tournament. In addition to conferences, Visit Corvallis tries to attract specific types of tourists ranging from cultural heritage seekers to wine drinkers. To reach potential visitors Visit Corvallis runs a website (visitcorvallis. com), uses social media accounts (like Facebook and Twitter), and places ads in local and regional media. Visit Corvallis also creates a visitor’s guide which it distributes statewide and runs a visitor’s center where five volunteers help regularly in addition to

staff. Last June, the city renewed its contract with Visit Corvallis, extending it to 2013. The contract is based on the city’s former economic development policy, the one which changed in December and led to the elimination of the grants. That policy no longer explicitly states that 30 percent of the room tax revenue is dedicated to Visit Corvallis. The contract also states that the organization must maintain its status as a 501(c) (3) not-for-profit corporation. It’s actually a 501 (c)(6) non-profit business league, according to John Hope-Johnstone. The most recent contract guarantees Visit Corvallis $308,425 for 2010/2011, and states funding for subsequent years will be determined by the council’s policy (again the same policy that was recently changed). Besides Visit Corvallis, which still appears to have a dedicated funding source, there is a glimmer of hope for some of the other organizations that previously received city grants. Nearly all of those organizations - except the festivals and Corvallis Knights baseball - have been invited to present information about their organization to the Graph by Cindy Dauer


Economic Development Commission. The commission could still potentially recommend funding for those groups. However, the festivals, which have been reclassified from general economic development to strictly tourism activities, will not get that chance. Instead, festival directors were told by city staff to seek financial support from Visit Corvallis, not from the city. Visit Corvallis has agreed to dedicate $13,900 of the estimated $325,000 that it is scheduled to receive next year for marketing da Vinci Days and Fall Festival. That amount represents $8,000 less than the city granted to the two festivals last year. As of April 22, the city had yet to formally acknowledge the financial agreement between the festivals and Visit Corvallis. Not only have the festivals historically received money from the city, Visit Corvallis has a long history of city funding as well. In 1981, the city first decided to use room tax revenue to fund tourism-related services, according to City Finance Director Nancy Brewer. The next year, the Corvallis Convention and Visitor’s Bureau was created as part of the Chamber of Commerce, John Hope-Johnstone said. Then, in 1995, the city created a dedicated funding source for the CCVB. It agreed to give at least $215,000 to the organization annually. On top of that, the CCVB was able to apply for additional grant money from the city. In 1997, the group broke out from the

chamber and became a 501 (c)(6) organization with its own board, according to Hope-Johnstone. After the CCVB changed its name to Corvallis Tourism in 2003, a new state law took effect. The law did three things. First, it added a one percent statewide room tax. Second, it fixed tourism spending as a percentage of the room tax collected that year. Finally, the law stated that if the city raises its room tax, 70 percent of new revenue has to go toward funding tourism activities. That meant the city, which was giving Corvallis Tourism 30 percent of the room tax revenue at the time, was locked in at that percentage and must provide that as the minimum funding for tourism-related services every year. Other cities in Oregon fund a visitor’s center and tourism bureau with room tax revenue. Like Corvallis, those cities have also used room tax revenue to support economic development activities, festivals, and events. Bend gives 30 percent of its revenue to Visit Bend, a tourism-promotion organization formerly known as the Bend Visitor’s and Convention Bureau. In 2007, Bend also reported giving 24 percent of its room tax revenue to the Bend Film Festival, eight percent to the Bend Downtowners Association, and one percent to the Nature of Words literary festival. The remainder went to the general fund. Ashland will give 15 percent its room tax revenue this year to the Visitor’s and Convention Bureau run by its Chamber of

Commerce. Another eight percent will go to economic development activities, six percent to the Oregon Shakespeare Festival, and 30 percent to small grants and public art. The remainder will go to other projects and the general fund. In the past, the City of Seaside has given 20 percent of its room tax revenue to its visitor’s bureau, 56 percent to the Seaside Convention Center for operation and expansion, two percent to maintaining the promenade, and the remainder to the general fund for public safety and public works. In Corvallis, last year the room tax generated more than $1 million. Of that, about 55 percent was used for “economic development activities” including the 30 percent for tourism-related services given to Visit Corvallis. The other 25 percent for economic development was granted in different amounts to nine orga-

Visitor’s guide cover courtesy of Visit Corvallis

nizations. The remainder went to the general fund. When it comes to tourism, there are other organizations that bring in visitors in addition to Visit Corvallis. Oregon State University continues to draw overnight visitors, including sports fans, academic conference attendees, prospective students, and Beaver continued on page 15

WWW.THEALCHEMISTWEEKLY.COM • APRIL 26, 2011 • 7


ALCHY PICKS

[week of April 26th]

Tuesday | April 26th | 7:00 pm OSU Memorial Union Rm 213 SOCIAL SCIENCE OF SCIENCE

Have you ever wanted to know what a scientist’s love life was like... I mean really like, down to the intimate details? I know I have. That question keeps me up more nights than I care to mention. Science can be fun, and even funny, as we were shown by “Bill Nye the Science Guy” in the nineties. In my book, he was just an imitator. Long before Bill Nye was the only person who will live on in my memory as “the man who made science kick ass”: Mr. Wizard. People from my generation will remember Mr. Wizard, aka Don Herbert, as the man who broke the stigma of guys in white lab coats and black-framed glasses as the only face of science to countless kids in the ‘80s. Instead, it was for guys in sweater vests and young kids of varying racial and ethnic backgrounds to mess around with in backyards and kitchens, make huge messes and learn some pretty awesome things about science in the process. In retrospect, what Mr. Wizard showed me was that science is accessible to anyone who can see it for what it is: a sometimes complex, but ultimately exciting search for truth and understanding in the universe. He also made clear that in approaching science, you have to connect with the scientist. You must know what types of characters are doing all this complex stuff because they are, in my opinion, a misunderstood breed. Your opportunity to take a humorous ride into the realm of beakers, Bunsen burners and the men and women who operate them is at hand. The OSU Memorial Union is hosting a lecture series by Joe Cain, the 2011 Horning Visiting Scholar at OSU titled, “Seeing Science Sideways: A Historian’s Humorous Take on the Lives of Scientists.” Outside of the typical lecture setting, the three-part series covers the social lives, romantic habits and home lives of scientists. The first lecture, Jokes and Pranks, starts Tuesday, April 26th at 4 pm in room 213 at the OSU MU. The following lectures, covering the romantic and home lives of scientists, take place on Thursday the 28th and Friday the 29th respectively at 4 pm. The event is free and is should be hilarious, so do a little experimentation yourself and check it out. ~Stanley Tollett

Wednesday | April 26th | 9 pm Cloud 9 in Corvallis I PITY THOU FOOL

some drunken southern platitude on its face. On closer examination, Twain reveals a truth about human nature and life that would leave even the most buttoned-up Oxford scholar utterly speechless and perhaps feeling a bit foolish. In that moment, Samuel will look down from Heaven, and smile. Emily Dickinson once said, “A word is dead when it is said, some say. I say it just begins to live that day.” The same could be said for dead writers, but that would make for a weird sentence. ‘A writer is dead when he is dead’ is nonsensical, but I trust you to get the point. Once a writer shuffles off this mortal coil and is no longer amongst the living, her words become finite, and anything with a limited supply becomes immediately more important and sought after. In economics, it’s called “scarcity” and people buy shit because it’s scarce even when they don’t need it. What’s important here is that writers die, but their words and wisdom are immortal. They mean different things from generation to generation. Nothing beats that moment when a young turkey in some bar quotes an author, only to be one-upped by an old codger furthering the conversation with an obscure and well-timed intonation by the same author. It’s when the dust settles that the two find themselves in that special place that exists only when people search for answers to life’s big questions and find solace in famous dead authors who searched for the same. That moment of kinship and humility in the face of the human condition’s awful beauty is going to occur at a specific time and place for a change, so you don’t have to wait for serendipity to strike. Just stroll down to Cloud 9 on Wednesday, April 27th at 9 pm. You can buy some guy dressed up like Twain a bourbon and for one night, you might live a pitiless existence amongst the living dead. ~ Stanley Tollett

Friday | April 29th | 7:00 pm Rhythm and Brews in Albany POETRY IN NOTION

A poetry trend is starting to take hold in the Mid-Willamette Valley. Everywhere you turn these days, someone is speaking with dynamic inflection about the government or love or sex or trends, and people are listening. This rapid rise in the poetic events “trend” is something that until just now,

“Pity is for the living, envy is for the dead.” - Mark Twain Although that quote may seem a bit melancholy, it represents Twain’s classic wit and charm. His writing is best distilled down to a sharp, biting truth that echoes 8 • APRIL 26, 2011 • WWW.THEALCHEMISTWEEKLY.COM

I hadn’t noticed. As sure as the sky is gray and lacking in any depth or contrast, there will be at least one of you who will be woefully offended that I dare refer to it as a trend. You might even tell me your grandfather’s grandmother was, in fact, the progenitor of public poetry readings on the West Coast. Since last Autumn, there’s been an obvious and sharp up-tick in all things poetryrelated. Ask any writer you meet and they will surely admit at some point, that yes... they too dabble in poetry of some form. Like the great top shelf vodka trend of the late 90’s, everyone has his or her frosted bottle. From slam poetry to open mics, to the great and wildly popular Poetics, or in this case “Poetry and Music to Inspire,” poetry is everywhere. I, for one, am elated. Who cares if it’s a trend, or if every coffee shop and bar owner within 1000 miles is thinking, “You know what would sell more whiskey? Poetry readings!” The important thing is that poetry is being written and shared through spoken word. Inspiration, wherever you find it, is still inspiration. Poetry is wonderful; it’s the purest literary expression of life. With structural constraints removed, the author can freely express their innermost thoughts. And if there are two things that always get my blood flowing, it’s freedom and writing. Hot damn! We’re alive and yelling at the top of our lungs, “Hallelujah! I can’t pay my rent, but I’m in love!” or, “Pocket dogs in purses terrify me and I don’t know why, but that’s okay!” What? That’s poetry baby, and it’s connecting people through gatherings like “Poetry and Music to Inspire.” Be there, this Friday, April 29th at 7:00 pm, at Rhythm and Brews. ~Stanley Tollett

Friday - Sunday | April 29th to May 1st | All Day Prindel Creek Farms RING AROUND THE ROSIE

May Day, dear reader, is fast approaching. The 19th annual May Day Celebration will take place at Prindel Creek Farms Friday April 29th through Sunday the 1st of May. This year the May Pole celebration will take place on Sunday on May 1st ( I know, right?). This ceremony will cap off two nights of UNBELIEVABLE music lineups, filled to the brim with local music talent. Saturday night Sar Shalom precedes Space Neighbors – a show many Corvallian musician has waited for and encour-

aged since their inception. Friday Is Lost Tortoise, audiophilia and Inebriated Species. This is the gathering where local musicians put on a great party and find a great excuse to let loose. It is $10/person or $20/ car – no limit). Once inside find a campsite and make new friends. NO DOGS NO DOGS NO DOGS. Seriously. If you plan on coming, you are encouraged to stay the night as it is a drive and trust me, you won’t want to leave. There will be a community kitchen, electricity running water and maybe hot showers !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! This will be the first year vendors are on site including a massage tent (WooHoo). You can find more info about the venue and directions at www.prindelcreekfarm.com and a more detailed lineup, discussions about rideshares etc on Facebook search : Mayday Family. ~Ella Marie Canus

Saturday | April 30th | 11 pm Lucky Larry’s Lounge GET READY TO JELL-OOOOO!

You step forward to the call of your character’s name for the night, to the face melting sound of “Kickstart my heart.” Into the bright white lights, you stand next to a child’s inflatable pool. A pool filled with a gleaming, green gelatinous substance. You can almost smell pine-sol lime; memories of an early strep throat treat fill your mind briefly. You glance across the sea of green, to your opponent, a girl of similar build wearing more spandex & make-up than Nikki Sixx. She’s sizing you up; the sound of the minions crowded around the pool rises. You take one last deep breath before you step one foot into the cold, slippery pool full of jello. You can feel it squish between your toes; your muscles tense as you stop your feet from slipping out from under you. You crack your neck; flex your biceps for the adoring crowd. It’s go time. Crouching down, waiting for the bell, smirking at the painted face in front of you, plotting your takedown. All bets are off as the bell sounds and you lunge forward, hoping your choice of costume does not betray you. If this scene is your dream come true, find your way to Lucky Larrys Lounge, 1295 S Commercial Way, in Albany for a Jell-O Wrestling fundraiser for the Sick Town Derby Dames. The Dames take on the Rocket Queen Cupcake Army. Admission is $6 at the door or $5 with a nonperishable item for the Linn Benton Food Share. ~The Queen


tuesday26 Corvallis

livemusic

SUNNYSIDE UP CAFÉ Celtic Jam, 7:00 pm, FREE [LISTEN/PLAY]

Albany

sing&dance

Put on your 3D goggles. ...only works with LSD

RILEY'S BAR & GRILL Cutting Edge Productions presents Throwback Thursday with DJ Tray, FREE [DANCE]

Corvallis

ELKS LODGE Beginner Line Dance 7:00 pm, $3 [DANCE] IMPULSE BAR Cuban Salsa 7:30 pm FREE [DANCE] PEACOCK BAR & GRILL Main Stage: Karaoke with Sqwig-e-okie, 9:00 pm, FREE [SING] UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST FELLOWSHIP Fellowship Community Choir rehearsals, 7:00 pm, $50 for 12 week term [SING]

Lebanon

MERLIN'S BAR & GRILL Karaoke, 9:00 pm [SING]

Halsey

WOODY'S BAR & GRILL “Terry-oke” Karaoke with Terry Geil, 9:00 pm, FREE [SING]

Corvallis

stuff

APPLEBEE'S National Trivia Association Night, 9:00 pm, FREE ENOTECA WINE BAR Girls night out! Knit night, 7:00 pm [SHE'S CRAFTY] OSU MU ROOM 213 “Seeing Science Sideways,” studying jokes and pranks by Joe Cain, 4:00 pm, FREE [LECTURE] WINESTYLES Spring Trivia League Starts Tonight! [TRIVIA]

wednesday27 Corvallis

livemusic

FARMER’S MARKET John Twist, 9:30 am, FREE [ACOUSTIC]

Tangent

DIXIE CREEK SALOON Blues Jam with Wild Bill, 7:00 pm [BLUES]

Albany

sing&dance

Eagles Lodge Albany Senior Dance, 1:30 - 3:30 pm, $3 [DANCE]

Corvallis

APPLEBEE’S DJ Stoltz Dance Party, 9:00 pm, FREE [DANCE] PETER GYSEGEM’S STUDIO Argentine tango classes, 7:15 pm, $5 [DANCE] PEACOCK BAR & GRILL Main Stage: Karaoke, 9:00 pm, FREE [SING]; On the Top: Western Wed 9:00 pm, [DANCE]

Lebanon

MERLIN'S BAR & GRILL Karaoke, 9:00 pm [SING]

Corvallis

stuff

CLOUD 9 Dead Writers Showcase,” 9:00 pm, FREE [CLASSIC OPEN MIC] ENOTECA WINE BAR J. Scott Cellars Wine Tasting, 7:00 pm, $10 [WINE TIME] FIRST STREET DOWNTOWN Corvallis Farmer’s Market, 9:00 am – 1:00 pm, FREE [MARKET] OSU LASELLS STEWART Visual Artist Shimon Attie, 6:00 pm reception, 7:00 pm lecture, FREE [ARTIST]

Philomath

PHILOMATH COMMUNITY LIBRARY “Once, in the Time of Trolls,” Cheldelin Drama, 3:30 pm, FREE [STAGE]

WWW.THEALCHEMISTWEEKLY.COM • APRIL 26, 2011 • 9


thursday28

livemusic

Albany

CALAPOOIA BREWING Wild Hog in the Woods, 7:00 pm, FREE [STRINGBAND]

Corvallis

BOMBS AWAY CAFÉ Bush Pilots, 9:00 pm, FREE [BLUEGRASS] FIREWORKS Performers Spotlight Series hosted by Gabriel Surley, 8:00 pm [SHOWCASE]

Lebanon

DOWNTOWN DOG Country Jam, 6:00 pm, FREE [COUNTRY] PEACOCK BAR & GRILL EAST Blues Jam, 7:00 pm, FREE [BLUES]

sing&dance

Albany

EAGLES LODGE Line dance, 7:00 pm, $4 [DANCE]

Corvallis

PEACOCK BAR & GRILL Main Stage: Karaoke, 9:00 pm [SING]; On the Top: DJ Mike, 9:00 pm [DANCE]

Lebanon

MERLIN'S BAR & GRILL Karaoke, 9:00 pm [SING]

stuff

Albany

LBCC NORTH SANTIAM HALL 207 “The Great Equalizer” author Rick Borsten, 3:00 pm, FREE [READING] LBCC COMMONS “Bears Around the World,” Benefiting LBCC Education Fund, 4:30 pm, $10 [BENEFIT]

Corvallis

BOMBS AWAY CAFÉ Hopworks Brewery Tasting, 8:00 pm [BEER ME] BOYS AND GIRLS CLUB Celebrate Kids 2011 Fundraising Breakfast, 7:00 - 8:30 am [BENEFIT] ENOTECA WINE BAR Chocolate Truffle Thursdays, 6:00 pm, FREE [YUMMERS] FIRST ALT COOP NORTH Wine Tasting, 5:00 pm [BEER ME] LIVE WELL STUDIO Free Teen Yoga by Reach Out Yoga, 4:00 pm, FREE [YOGA] OSU LASELLS STEWART OSU Dancing with the Stars, 7:30 pm, $10 [DANCE] OSU MU ROOM 213 “Seeing Science Sideways,” collaborations with intimate partners by Joe Cain, 4:00 pm, FREE [LECTURE] WINESTYLES Winter’s Hill Winery Tasting, 5:30 pm, $7 [WINE ME]

Accomodations for disabilities may be made by calling 541.737.1369

friday29

livemusic

ALBANY

CALAPOOIA BREWING Tyler Fortier, 8:00 pm, FREE [FOLK ROCK] LBCC PERFORMANCE CENTER Gary Ruppert concert for Arts Special Events Fund, 7:30 pm, FREE [JAZZ PIANO]

Corvallis

BEANERY ON 2ND Dave Rogers, 8:00 pm, FREE [ACOUSTIC] BOMBS AWAY CAFÉ Loaded for Bear, 10:00 pm, FREE [ATMOSPHEROCK] FIREWORKS Coin of the Realm Orchestra with Fiddle Champion Zach Konowalchuk, 8:00 pm [FOLK]

Lebanon

DOWNTOWN DOG D.C. Blues, 6:00 pm, FREE [BLUES]

Albany

sing&dance

RILEY'S BAR & GRILL Cutting Edge Production presents Ladies Night with Dj Tray, FREE [DANCE]

[ATMOSPHEROCK]

Corvallis

Friday | APRIL 29th | 10:00 pm

CLOUD 9 Riot in the Clouds, 10:00 pm, FREE [DJ CHI DULY] CORVALLIS SENIOR CENTER Friday Night Dance by The Syncopators, 7:00 pm, $4 [DANCE] PEACOCK BAR & GRILL Main Stage: Karaoke, 9:00 pm [SING]; On the Top: DJ Heartburn, 9:00 pm [DANCE] OSU GILL COLISEUM 75th Annual All University Sing, 7:00 pm, $30 [SING]

Bombs Away Cafe

Halsey

Contributed Photos

Lebanon

Loaded for Bear

WOODY'S BAR & GRILL “Terry-oke” karaoke with Terry Geil, 9:00 pm, FREE [SING] DUFFY'S IRISH PUB Karaoke, 10:00 pm, FREE [SING] MERLIN'S BAR & GRILL Karaoke, 9:00 pm [SING]

Albany

ALBANY CIVIC THEATRE “The Miracle Worker,” 8:00 pm, $11 [STAGE] RHYTHM AND BREWS “Poetry and Music to Inspire,” 7:00 pm, FREE [SHOWCASE]

Corvallis

[FOLK ROCK]

Friday | APRIL 29th | 9:00 pm

Tyler Fortier Calapooing Brew ing

10 • APRIL 26, 2011 • WWW.THEALCHEMISTWEEKLY.COM

ASHBROOK THEATRE “Alice in Wonderland,” 7:00 pm, $7 [STAGE] BENTON PUBLIC LIBRARY “Once, in the Time of Trolls,” Cheldelin Drama, 4:00 pm, FREE [STAGE] CRESCENT VALLEY HS “The Brothers Grimm Spectaculathon,” 7:00 pm, $10 [STAGE] FIRST ALT COOP SOUTH Wine tasting, 5:00 pm [WINE ME] OSU MU ROOM 213 “Seeing Science Sideways,” institutions by Joe Cain, 4:00 pm, FREE [LECTURE] OSU WALDO HALL “Collaborative Writing,” with Liz Delf and John Parmigiani, 12:00 pm, FREE [LECTURE] OSU WITHYCOMBE HALL STAGE The Fainting Beaver Follies! 7:30 pm, $12 [VAUDEVILLE] WINESTYLES Friday Flights, 5:00 pm [WINE ME]

stuff


La Revolucion Albany

livemusic

CALAPOOIA BREWING Paul Peterson Blues, 8:00 pm, FREE [BLUES] FARMER’S MARKET Chris Estes, 9:30 am, FREE [ACOUSTIC]

Corvallis

ARTS CENTER RiverRocks, 7:00 pm, $5 [FOLK] BEANERY ON 2nd Mobius K, 8:00 pm, FREE [ROCK] BOMBS AWAY CAFÉ audiophilia, 9:00 pm, $5 [JAM ROCK] CLOUD 9 Xenat-Ra, 10:00 pm [NU-JAZZ] ENOTECA WINE BAR Jeff Lesmeister, 7:00 pm, FREE FARMER’S MARKET Tom Chase & Steve Sever, 9:30 am, FREE [ACOUSTIC] FIREWORKS Karl Smiley, 8:00 pm [BLUES]

Albany

sing&dance

RILEY'S BAR & GRILL Cutting Edge Production presents DJ Tray, FREE [DANCE]

Corvallis

CORVALLIS DANCE CENTER CENTER Beginning Ballroom Lessons, 3:00 pm, Intermediate West Coast Swing Lessons, 4:00 pm, Beginning West Coast Swing, 6:00 pm [DANCE] PEACOCK BAR & GRILL On the Top: DJ Heartburn, 9:00 pm [DANCE]

Lebanon

DUFFY'S IRISH PUB Karaoke, 10:00 pm, FREE [SING] MERLIN'S BAR & GRILL Karaoke, 9:00 pm [SING]

stuff

Albany

CITY HALL Albany Farmer’s Market, 9:00 am – 1:00 pm, FREE [MARKET] DOWNTOWN ALBANY Procession of the Species Parade, FREE [PARADE]

Corvallis

BOMBS AWAY CAFÉ OSU Graphic Design Benefit Art Show, 7:30 pm, $5 [ART] CRESCENT VALLEY HS “The Brothers Grimm Spectaculathon,” 7:00 pm, $10 [STAGE] DOWNTOWN FIRST ST Corvallis Farmer’s Market, 9:00 am to 1:00 pm, FREE [MARKET] Corvallis Artisan’s Market, 9:00 am – 2:00 pm [CRAFTS] ENOTECA WINE BAR Saketini Saturdays, 3:00 pm [SAKE-TO-ME] GARLAND NURSERY Hanging Baskets, 11:00 am, FREE [GARDEN] OSU MAGRUDER HALL OSU Pet Day, 10:00 am – 4:00 pm, FREE [PETS] OSU WITHYCOMBE HALL STAGE The Fainting Beaver Follies! 7:30 pm, $12 [STAGE]

Inkwell Crosswords by Ben Tausig

saturday30

Across 1. Glasses, casually 6. Number of remaining dodo birds 10. Talked beyond one’s expertise, as it were 14. Prepare for a swing 15. Trampling pair 16. Nestle candy with caramel 17. Fencer’s defense 18. Vaseline? 20. Place with trails 22. Command to a pesky sibling 23. Future MBA’s course 24. Like hand-drawn circles, often 26. Sea World attraction 28. “Just What I Needed” band 30. “Discretion is the better part of ___” 32. Wombs 33. Some modern wall hangings 36. Org. targeted by the 2011 GOP budget proposal 37. Pests in a priest’s closet? 39. Move quickly 40. “Apocalypse Now” setting, briefly 41. Lincoln log structure? 42. Fly out of the helicopter, say 44. Like some old basketball hoops 46. Arctic seabirds 47. Plant that poisons livestock 50. Euphemism for political distortion 52. Some luxury wheels 53. Final book of the Old Testament 56. Sound from a leaking keg? 59. Plants with soothing goop inside 60. “Regrettably ...” 61. Not interested in anymore 62. Gp. co-founded by W.E.B. Du Bois and Mary White Ovington, among others 63. Bassist Mike of the Minutemen 64. Have a bawl? 65. Fleeces

Down 1. NASCAR additives 2. Orgasm, for one 3. Mollusc about which something isn’t quite right? 4. Liqueur in a Blue Sapphire 5. ___ Gyra 6. Author …mile 7. Prefix with skeleton 8. Make intimidating noises before a drag race 9. Maximum liquid volume per traveler allowed by the TSA 10. Pippi Longstocking feature 11. Chicago Symphony conductor Georg 12. The King 13. Accomplish, biblically 19. Colorful photograph subject 21. Sinus infection treater: Abbr. 24. Taken back to court 25. Continental dividers 26. Broiling device

WILLAMETTE SPEEDWAY Dirt Car Super Late Models, Modified, Sportsman, Classic, 6:00 pm, $14 [RACE DAY]

sunday01 Albany

livemusic

CALAPOOIA BREWING Blues Jam, 4:00 pm, FREE [BLUES] NOVAK'S HUNGARIAN RESTAURANT Strings of Time, 6:00 pm, FREE [FOLK]

Corvallis

FIREWORKS Mark Growden Singing Workshop & Performance with Jameson Clay, 8:00 pm, $25 [AMERICANA] OSU LA SELLS STEWART Corvallis Youth Symphony Spring Concert, 7:30 pm, $10.50 [CLASSICAL]

Tangent

DIXIE CREEK SALOON Acoustic Jam, 7:00 pm, Bluegrass Jam, 7:00 pm, FREE [iPlay]

Corvallis

To be considered for a calendar listing, notice of events must be received in writing by noon on Tuesday, two weeks before publication. Send to calendar@thealchemistweekly.com. For photo consideration please attach high resolution images with proper photo credit.

sing&dance

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Lebanon Corvallis

9 5

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PEACOCK BAR & GRILL Main Stage: Karaoke with Sqwig-e-okie, 9:00 pm [SING] MERLIN'S BAR & GRILL Karaoke, 9:00 pm [SING]

7

Contributed Photo

stuff

BENTON COUNTY FAIRGROUND 45th Annual Auto Swap & Sale, 7:00 am – 4:00 pm [AUTO] CORVALLIS COMMUNITY ACUPUNTURE Free Acupuncture Day, 12:00 pm – 2:00 pm. FREE [I’M STUCK ON YOU] ENOTECA WINE BAR Saketini Sunday, 3:00 pm [DRINK] OSU WITHYCOMBE HALL STAGE The Fainting Beaver Follies! 7:30 pm, $12 [STAGE]

monday02

Corvallis

stuff

ENOTECA WINE BAR Non-Profit Monday: Parent Enhancement Program [BENEFIT] FIREWORKS Southtown Talent Search: The Acoustic Showdown, 9:00 pm [LISTEN/PLAY] INTERSECTOR WORKSPACE 37 Cents Artists and Musicians Community Group Meeting, 6:00 pm [COLLECTIVE] OSU LASELLS STEWART CENTER Holocaust Memorial Week Speaker Mark Wygoda, “Fighting Back Against the Nazis: The Story of Comandate Erico,” 7:30 pm, FREE [LECTURE] PEACOCK BAR & GRILL Main Stage: Karaoke with Sqwig-e-okie, 9:00 pm [SING] PAPA’S PIZZA Support a Child Fighting Cancer in our Community, all day [BENEFIT]

Lebanon

MERLIN'S BAR AND GRILL Karaoke, FREE [SING]

[AMERICANA]

Sunday | May 1st | 8:00 pm

Mark Growden Fireworks

WWW.THEALCHEMISTWEEKLY.COM • APRIL 26, 2011 • 11

sudoku-puzzles.net

Lebanon

27. ___ Nui (Easter Island) 29. Noted space telescope 31. Klansman’s expectation 33. Slogan for a fossil fuel company trying to be different? 34. Vaporub magnate Joshua 35. Parts of a gig 38. Dave’s program, with “The” 43. Lightning-fast Basque game 44. What the weary get, it’s said 45. Org. targeted by the 2011 GOP budget proposal 47. 1980s-’90s Bochco series 48. Florida horse-breeding city 49. “Rumba king” Xavier 51. Over-the-counter emergency contraceptive 53. New-car sticker letters 54. Lower level of hell? 55. Wireless sources: Abbr. 57. Cash’s “___ Been Everywhere” 58. “Do you understand now?”


WORD

Fleischman Art: Rolling Hills (above) Photo by Rhoda Fleischman Ting-Tang (far left) Photo by Rhoda Fleischman

CLAY PLAY

The Best in Show Booth (left) Photo by Courtney Frisse Fleischman with her winning sculpture (below) Photo courtesy of Clay Fest

Words by Cynthia Spencer

I

n sport we are familiar with the trophies, awards, titles and championships that athletes win. In the art world, while there may be fewer awards, a local artist, Rhoda Fleischman, has recently received her Heisman. Fleischman has won Juror’s Choice and Juror’s Awards at The Arts Center’s All Around Oregon and Willamette Valley Juried Shows, Best Booth Awards at the Oregon Potters Association’s Ceramic Showcase (held in Portland) and Local Clay’s Clay Fest Show (in Eugene). The award for which she is most proud was for her “TingTang” sculpture, and it won Best in Show at Clay Fest last October. Her potter peers voted for the award.

Fleischman has been an artist for four decades—most of them working as a production potter. She started taking classes in high school where she learned all the facets of production, from glaze mixing through firing the high school studio kilns. She kept making pots throughout college, borrowing firing space from a neighbor until she could earn enough to build her own studio. After one year at the Saturday Market in Portland, she went on to do shows and fairs earning a self-sustaining living from the clay. Along the way, she has sold thousands of pots, sets of dishes, tea sets, coffee mugs and more. A few years ago a pottery workshop with Ruthanne Tudball caused the serious pro-

duction potter to make big changes. Tudball emphasized playing in the studio and her soda fired surfaces made each piece seem to dance. In soda firing, the surface of the pottery is decorated by adding soda to the kiln during the firing.

“I knew it was time for a change,” says Fleischman. “I was looking for inspiration and a way to get back to that original love of pottery I first had.” She took six-months off from production pottery, filled her time with painting as well as playing in her garden and studio.

During her time off, Fleischman took the time to think about making work that could be something more than the beautifully glazed, balanced work she already made. “Unless it’s a mug or vase most pottery pieces end up on a shelf needing to be dusted,” she said. “What if a piece could be puzzle, or a play thing for adults that could take many forms? Why do kids get to be the only ones to play?” Fleischman began working on a series of thrown, ceramic, puzzle-piece shapes and took them to shows. She invited the public to play with them. It was sometimes difficult to get this interaction going, but she persisted with the idea. One day it all came together, much like a puzzle. Fleischman’s farm, The Cozy Rose, is located just outside Brownsville, Ore., which was one of the earliest white settlements in the Oregon Territory. Many Oregon Trail

12 • APRIL 26, 2011 • WWW.THEALCHEMISTWEEKLY.COM

wagons and gold rushers went through their valley and a stage stop was just down the road from their property. Their farm came with a variety of old, rusty, wagon-wheel parts, circa the 1800s, and other interesting artifacts. She had always pondered new uses for these metal pieces, as they had developed lovely patinas. One of the large wagon wheel rims was perfect for the frame of her puzzle pieces, giving them a human scale and balance. The slightly off-center oval and stone base heightens an overall feeling of movement, strengthening the piece. Fleishman is also pleased the containment actually seems to invite more people to interact with the pieces. Furthermore, the soda firing invites her to loosen her decoration techniques. To add some color and variation, Fleischman applies liquid clay slips to pieces using an extra flexible drywall spatula. This prevents too much fussy precision painting while adding texture and depth.

“It’s good to work with abandon and then follow a path long enough to see where it goes,” says Fleischman. “It felt good having this work come together and I was so very excited and happy to be recognized for it.” The name of her Best in Show winning “Ting-Tang” came from chanting aloud a mix of children’s games like tiddlywinks and tinker toys. Like a child dancing through a room singing, “ting-tang, wallawalla, bing-bang,” Fleischman let herself play.

ARTIST BIO: Rhoda Fleischman joins 20 other area potters at the largest all pottery show in the nation April 29, 30 & May 1 at the Oregon Potters Association’s Ceramic Showcase, held at the Oregon Convention Center, Portland, Oregon. You’ll not only get to see Rhoda’s award winning booth and pottery, but also the work of 200 other potters. There are artist demos, places where kids and adults both can play in clay, and informative specialty displays. Another local and award winning connection: the woodfired vase on this year’s Ceramic Showcase Poster was done by another local artist, Sam Hoffman, who was Ceramic Showcase’s Best in Show winner in 2010. 25672 Gap Road Brownsville, OR 97327 541-466-5635 flashpointartworks@gmail.com http://flashworkartworks.com


SHREDS OF WISDOM Substitution Theory

I’ve been working in music since I was 16. An important part of the music biz is being able to substitute for other musicians. When someone asks you to do a live performance with their band as a substitute, or a non-permanent performer, they are asking you to fit a mold they’ve already established by their current player or their collective vision from a recording. Put your excellence hat on, dress up in a fashion that fits their visual presentation and kick ass on stage. My first sub gig was playing in a group called Left Turn at Venus. The band was a psychedelic grunge band. I was a metal kid. Their guitarist quit and they had a 45-minute set in the bay area that week. Band member Marcus and I hammered out eight songs in two evenings. I arrived at rehearsal and I was ready to rock. We plowed through the set and I made no mistakes. The band was extremely happy with my professionalism, even though I was only 18. They were all in their mid-20s. Two days later, the show went off without a hitch. However, I really had to swallow my pride before the show because they dressed very differently from my “jeans and a t-shirt” look and I was required to look as psychedelic as possible. It was a sacrifice needed to make the live performance convincing. I’ve also hired several people to come in and sub for a member of my band that was sick or quit. Most recently I hired a substitute because one of my band members broke his wrist. “Call Farley, he broke his wrist on the mountain,” the text said. The bass player Jon-Michael Farley (aka Duff McFarley) from Appetite for Deception, my Guns n Roses tribute band, had a nasty spill snowboarding on Mt. Hood and cracked a bone on his left hand. My drummer and I went into network mode and called several people. Within 24 hours, we had a bass player named Jeff Buehner (The Dragonflies/The Russian Brides) running with the songs. We had organized a “hits

only” set, sent it to him Monday afternoon and he worked until 2 am Tuesday morning—after working a full day at a regular job. We met at his house Wednesday night, I brought him a couple of disks and 10 neatly handwritten charts to make sure he had everything. I got out my proverbial scalpel and dissected these songs, making sure no detail was overlooked. Within 10 days, we played a gig with 25 songs. It was an amazing live performance. A huge group of our regular audience was in attendance and they were all extremely impressed with Jeff and the band. A sub is not the only person that has to work hard, the band does too. You must be prepared to have more rehearsals and bleed a little if you’re going to attempt such a feat. It’s a big risk to bring in an outsider. Chemistry and personalities play a big part in this. You have to be able to recreate a vibe that gets the message of the music across to the audience. Teamwork is the only way this can be accomplished. As a sub, one has to be flexible, extremely confident and diligent. Once you commit, you can’t quit. A sure-fire way to shoot your reputation in the foot is to quit the day before the show. The reasons don’t matter. As for the band hiring the sub, be prepared with everything: charts, CD’s and rehearsals. Go to the sub’s house and work out parts on their turf if you can, then bring them into rehearsal. I’ve found this to be a great way to build confidence for the “new guy.” Then at the end of the gig, hand him an envelope with the promised payment in cash. No one cares if the door didn’t bring in enough money to pay. If you promised the guy/girl 200 bucks for services rendered, and the band brings in a total of $300 in ticket sales and merchandise sales, that means that the band keeps $100 to split. Look at it this way; you paid $200 to have your band’s vision continue in the face of adversity. Also, make sure you plan out your finances a little better and have the confidence to make a counter offer if $200 is out of your budget. The show must go on. Sometimes there aren’t the resources in your network, or the time to learn the songs. But, it never hurts to give it your all and make the best of an uncomfortable situation. If you don’t have the resources in your network, you’d better get crackin.’ The music biz pauses for no one.

Winner of the 2011 “People’s Choice Award” KLCC Microbrew Festival in Eugene, OR

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Get your day Thank you for started right supporting a healthy planet. at the Co-op! South Store: Breakfast Bar $7.99/lb both stores: Hot Organic Oatmeal $1.59

-Brandon Cook www.brandoncookmusic.com www.myspace.com/stateofbalance

Corvallis Community Acupuncture Sliding Scale $15-$35 2151 NW Fillmore Ave 541-753-8000

www.corvalliscommunityacupuncture.com WWW.THEALCHEMISTWEEKLY.COM • APRIL 26, 2011 • 13


LITERATI Poems by Marnie Ernst Zoa If You Could If you could, baby really would you If they gave you every penny, mamma could you Or would you just find another way To turn around and walk away Turn your back on your dreams Sell you short for another day If you could, baby really would you If I wrapped myself around you, mamma could you Or would you just close your eyes and refuse to see You’ve got everything inside you naturally You are that one you’d hoped to be You just need a change of scenery If you could, baby really would you If I picked you up and took you, mamma could you Fly away on wings of dreams or Would you drift away on tearful streams Would you see the love swimming in my eyes Or mistake it for a sea of lies If you could, baby really would you If you knew all the reasons, mamma could you Give up, give in, give away your shot to win Would you give me the chance to show you the stars If I gave you the moon, would you believe that it’s ours Baby would you, mamma could you

The Day is as I Courageous is the dawn To meet us with such furry Knowing we intend to devour her And as quickly we crave another Meek is the night to creep so Skulking forth to take us Deep into her bosom     Where we get lost for a time Might I be the dawn Fearless of what faces me With strength and faith I stand Open arms against the unknown Or will the night be my reflection As I cast my shadow slowly Upon the future quietly lurking I pounce upon my prey In truth, the day is as I Varied as the clouds that pass And steady in the knowing That nothing is as it seems

14 • APRIL 26, 2011 • WWW.THEALCHEMISTWEEKLY.COM


WORD

CONTINUED FROM P. 7

Visitor’s guide cover courtesy of Visit Corvallis

Still, as of now, all mandated tourism spending is scheduled to go to Visit Corvallis. That leaves the festivals and Corvallis Knights cut off from direct financial support from the city. As for the reasoning behind the recent economic development policy change, Councilor Dan Brown explained his perspective on the matter to members of the Economic Development Commission. “I think there was general agreement, certainly on the council, that the process wasn’t working,” Brown said, specifically addressing the grants. “There were no goals that directed the allocation of funds, and people felt uncomfortable with what they saw their money spent on. And so, the city council deliberately left that out of the revised economic development policies.” As the city continues to tighten its belt, and certain organizations can no longer apply for economic development grants, it is unclear what funding will be made available again for these groups, if any.

parents. The Corvallis Knights, a wood-bat baseball league for college-eligible players, bring in players and fans in the summer. Also, local festivals attract some visitors from out of town.

honey

let's go out

Corvallis

Aqua Seafood Restaurant & Bar 151 NW Monroe Ave. 541.752.0262

Albany

Albany Civic Theater

500 SW 2nd St 541.753.7442

Alleyoop Lounge

101 NW Jackson Ave. 541.757.0694

111 First Ave. SW 541.928.4603 901 Pacific Blvd 541.941.0977

Bogey’s Bar & Grill

129 W 1st Ave. 541.929.8900

Calapooia Brewing

140 Hill St. NE 541.928.1931

Cappies Brewhouse

211 1st Ave W 541.926.1710

Cascade Grill

110 Opal St. NW 541.926.3388

Chasers Bar & Grill

2300 Northeast Front Ave. 541.926.2739

GameTime Sports Bar & Grill 2211 Waverly Dr. SE 541.981.2376

Humpty’s Dump Bar & Grill

916 Old Salem Rd NE 541.926.3111

JP’s Restaurant & Lounge

220 2nd Ave. 541.926.5546

Sales • Service • Rentals

137 SW Third Street, Corvallis • (541) 754-6098

The Women’s Boutique rated 1 by The Alchemist Readers #

Revolve your Spring Wardrobe with Second Glance & The Annex Main Store The Annex 312 SW 3rd Street, Corvallis 214 SW Jefferson, Corvallis Mon – Sat 10 – 6 Mon – Sat 11 – 6 Sun 12 – 5 Sun 12 – 5 www.glanceagain.com Both locations accepting spring consignments daily, no appointment necessary.

Bombs Away Café 2527 NW Monroe Ave. 541.757.7221

China Delight Restaurant 325 NW 2nd St. 541.753.3753

Clodfelter’s Cloud 9

Front Street Bar

Thank you for naming us your Favorite Musical Instrument Store!

300 SW Jefferson Ave. 541.758.2077

Dixie Creek Saloon

5420 Pacific Blvd. 541.903.0034

1110 NW Van Buren Corvallis, OR 541.754.4257

Block 15

1501 NW Monroe Ave. 541.758.4452

Favorite Mistake Sports Bar

DISC SKATE GLASS

Big River Restaurant & Bar

435 SE 2nd Ave 541928.9634 32994 Hwy 99E, Tangent, OR 541.926.2767

Independently Owned since 2006

The Beanery on 2nd

Lariat Lounge 901 Pacific Blvd SE 541.928.2606

Linger Longer Tavern

145 SW Main St. 541.926.2174

Lucky Larrys Lounge 1296 S Commercial Way SE 541.928.3654

Riley’s Billiards Bar & Grill 124 Broadalbin St SW 541.926.2838

Wilhelm’s Spirits & Eatery 1520 Pacific Blvd SE 541.926.7001

126 SW 1st St. 541.753.9900

Crowbar

214 SW 2nd St. 541.753.7373

Murphy’s Tavern

2740 SW 3rd St. 541.738. 7600

Papa’s Pizza

1030 S.W. Third St. 541.757.2727

Peacock Bar & Grill

125 SW 2nd St. 541.754.8522

Squirrel’s

100 SW 2nd St. 541.753.8057

Sunnyside Up Café

116 NW 3rd St 541.758.3353

Suds & Suds

1045 NW Kings Blvd. 541.758.5200

Troubadour

521 SW 2nd St. 541.752.7720

Tyee Wine Cellars 26335 Greenberry Rd. 541.753.8754

Wanted Saloon 140 NW 3rd St.

WineStyles

2333 N.W. Kings Blvd. 541.738.9463

Lebanon

Darrell’s Restaurant & Lounge

Artisian’s Well Lounge

DEL Alma

Cornerstone Café & Pub

2200 NW 9th St. 541.752.6364 136 SW Washington Ave, Ste. 102 - 541.753.2222

Downward Dog

130 SW 1st St. 541.753.9900

Enoteca Wine Bar

136 SW Washington Ave. 541.758.9095

Fireworks Restaurant & Bar 1115 SE 3rd 541.754.6958

Flat Tail Pub

202 SW 1st St. 541.758.2219

Greenberry Store & Tavern

29974 HWY 99W 541.752.3796

Harrison Bar & Grill 550 NW Harrison Blvd. 541.754.1017

Impulse

2250 South Main Rd. 541.451.3900

180 S 5th St. 541.847.6262

Duffy’s Irish Pub 679 South Main St. 541.259.2906

Fire Pit Lounge

2230 South Santiam Hwy 541.451.2010

GameTime Sports Bar & Grill

3130 South Santiam Hwy 541.570.1537

Merlin’s Bar & Grill 25 W. Sherman St. 541.258.6205

Peacock Bar & Grill East

76 E. Sherman St. 541.451.2027

Sports Shack & Deli

1250 Grant St. 541.259.0800

Philomath

1425 NW Monroe Ave. 541.230.1114

High 5 Sports Bar & Grill

La Bamba Mix Night Club

Meet’n Place Tavern

126 SW 4th St. 541.207.3593

Luc

134 SW 4th St. 541.753.4171

1644 Main St.-541.929.7529 1150 Mian St. 541.929.3130

Wine Vault

1301 Main St. 541.929.8496

Wing Sing Restaurant & Lounge 658 Main St. 541.929.6255

WWW.THEALCHEMISTWEEKLY.COM • APRIL 26, 2011 • 15


Corvallis Brewing Supply and Block 15 Brewing present THE 2011 ALE-CHEMIST HOME BREW CHALLENGE For more details go to Corvallis Brewing Supply and ask for Lickspigot

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