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It's more tingly than hot.

www.thealchemistweekly.com VOLUME 4 NUMBER 159:28• JANUARY 18 - JANUARY 24, 2011

[Firebug infestations by Cindy Dauer p. 5]


voice

SYMPOSIUM symposium

Albany● Corvallis● Lebanon● Philomath VOLUME 4 NUMBER 159:28, JANUARY 18-JANUARY 24, 2011

VOICE

O pi n i on s a n d Editor ia ls , b e t h e y ours or yours , t h i s i s wh e re th e y be.

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Dirtstir

V ERDIC T

4

We ’ l l b e t h e judge. You be th e jur y...you t r us t us r ig h t?

Bookworm

WORD

J o u r n a l i st s c a l l th e m f e a tu re s; we say it ’s th e word.

5 12 8

Firebug infestation Speak up for carts

B U MP

I t ’s t h e c alendar of al l t h i n g s A l b any, Cor va l lis , L e b a n on , a n d P h ilom a th .

Crossword

LITERATI

Am a t e u r p ro se, poetr y and fi c t i on st i l l h a s a h om e.

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I Am

Editorial

Editors Courtney Clenney, Stanley Tollett Staff Writers Courtney Clenney, Noah Stroup, Stanley Tollett Bump Editor Courtney Clenney Contributors Cindy Dauer, Dirtstir, Jimbo Ivy, Joel Rea, Michael Thomas

Art

Art Director Freddy Ruiz Layout Editor Courtney Clenney Cover design by: Noah Stroup

Advertising

Account Executive Noah Stroup

Business

Publisher Noah Stroup The Alchemist Weekly is published by: CorvAlcheMedia LLC PO Box 1591 Corvallis, OR 97339 Alchemist Mission

As a publication, our goal is to facilitate greater understanding and appreciation for the diverse social and cultural groups found in the area. In doing so, we hope to create a greater sense of community between Oregon State University and Corvallis, between Albany and Corvallis, and between Philomath, Lebanon and Corvallis-Albany. The Alchemist recognizes the various interests of these groups and is dedicated to being as fluid as the community it serves. The Alchemist is available to you for free. Please limit yourself to one copy. If your picture is in it, you are welcome to take enough copies for your family. Subject to availability, back issues can be purchased by mail for $5. Send your request with specific issue date to PO Box 1591, Corvallis, OR 97339 and include a check or money order payable to The Alchemist.

Last week's puzzle solutions

CONTACT US: 541.224.6873 The Alchemist Weekly welcomes freelance submissions. Manuscripts will be returned if you include a self-addressed, stamped envelope. letters@thealchemistweekly.com, news@thealchemistweekly.com, submissions@thealchemistweekly.com, editor@thealchemistweekly.com calendar@thealchemistweekly.com, ads@thealchemistweekly.com

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JANUARY 18-JANUARY 24, 2011

• THE

Revolution is Fun, and Good For You

Tired of the status quo? Do you ever think of your life as a meaningless repetition of meaningless acts, all so that you can make the rent and pay for food and family? Do you, at any time, believe that the government, local, national, and the state at large do not have your best interests in mind when going about their business of representing you? Well, if the answer to any to any of these questions is “Yes,” then I’ve got the answer for you! It’s an All-American tradition that some of you may have forgotten about. In fact, it’s what our entire little baby country was completely based on, it’s just gathered some dust over time. I’m talking about REVOLUTION! People my age are often caught lamenting the sixties, ‘Man I wish I would have been around during the 60’s. That would have been totally awesome...’ I’m sure some of these daydreamers are pining for the free love, abundance of legal and comparatively harmless drug experimentation, and great rock and roll. But many others, whether they realize it or not romanticize the sixties because of the revolutionary zeitgeist. Young people during that time actually believed, in their hearts and souls, that they could actually affect change in their world. They didn’t want their parent’s world. They wanted something new and in their eyes something far better. They came pretty damn close to realizing it too. How do I know? Because so many of the people that espoused those ideas were directly targeted by our government. In fact, many of the leaders of the “New Left” were killed. Whether that was done by the same people that were tapping their phones and infiltrating their organizations and busting them with nightsticks is a question for another piece, but they were killed and the movement somehow ended. Today, I don’t think people realize how extremely close things all over the world came to actually changing. The governments that were in power at the time certainly realized it. What can the modern day revolutionary do? Well, it seems to me that revolutionary movements today are lacking a certain edge. They usually take the form of underground street art, slow food,

avant-garde stuff. That’s all cool, but it seems like its going to take a little more than an organic garden to bring it all down. I know, I know. You’ve got a family and a comfortable job. You’re invested in the current system up to your eyelids. The whole college/job/kids/vacations/ retirement thing is in fact a very noble existence. I’m not f***ing with you. I really do believe that. I know what it feels like to look over at your sleeping partner and lazily shut your eyes again and smell that co-mingled “us,” knowing that all those long hours listening to Bob talk about his fantasy football league over terrible coffee is TOTALLY worth it. Because what is life about, happiness and goodness. How well we loved during our brief time on this Earth. But.... I still hear it in my ears constantly that things are screwed up. Our country, politics, society. Why are kids snorting bath salts and forcing head shops to ban synthetic marijuana? What causes a young person to want to get out of their minds in our society? Is there a change needed? Perhaps it’s about exploration and dissatisfaction with the world around them. They see their entire lives planned out in front of them. They are all expected to go to college, get a degree and marry. Buy a home in the suburbs, possibly have children and live a slightly better facsimile of their parent’s life. I don’t know about you, but when I know how the movie is going to end, it takes something away from the viewing. It makes viewing the film almost pointless. This is the world in which we live. We all know our place, and we all know what is expected of us. We know exactly how our “movie” is going to end. And, that makes some of us feel somewhat trapped. So, if you ever wanted to do something radical, something inspired, something that will provide great kicks and a life filled with excitement, joy, and passion, then stop seeing revolution as something that died in the late sixties. Go to www.crimethinc.com. Oh, and if anyone contacts you about doing something radical...it’s the FBI. -Stanley Tollett think@thealchemistweekly.com

ALCHEMIST WEEKLY• WWW.THEALCHEMISTWEEKLY.COM


voice

D I Rstir T

Blowout Blow off

About two months ago I wrote about our government conducting an investigation, and predicted the culprits would be absolved of any wrongdoing. The National Commission on the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and Offshore Drilling recently released  their report.  It’s only 398 pages, and  the last 75 pages are endnotes and appendices.  Admittedly, I only read enough to realize there were no revelations for the masses. It’s broken into three parts (“Path to...”, Explosion...” and “Lessons Learned”). What I did read further reinforced my disgust with all involved, corporate and government players alike. The report states the obvious by calling the causes, “systemic”, and emphasizing the need for government and industry reform to halt likely recurrence if current practices continue.  Also, that the money saving decisions made by BP, Transocean, and Halliburton increased risk, stopping short of saying the shortcuts caused the failure. Hence my disgust. The report determined, “...government regulators lacked the authority, the necessary resources, and the technical expertise to prevent,” the blowout. That little phrase, “...lacked the authority,”? The consumer/taxpayer is already footing the bill through government funded cleanup efforts and increased fuel prices, and our government admits it’s inability to provide, maintain and enforce responsible industry regulation. And all of it will be quietly forgotten.  

EduTech

I had trouble with math starting in middle school, carrying into college. An influencing factor in my chosen degrees was the amount of math I would have to take. I’m better now.  I’m no Einstein, but I can handle arithmetic and some algebra and geometry stuff. I use these tricks in daily life, like when I  actually use a form and book to figure my taxes or pay my bills without using “automatic withdrawal” or other software to balance my ledger. I read well, and enjoy it. I can read digital and print media. I can even produce digital and print media. I have a library card, and I use it. I can write quite legibly in print and cursive. In my public school experience, I saw the passing of the slide rule as the TI-35 became the tool de jour. Commodore 64’s and Apples replaced legal pads with 6.5” floppy discs. The recorded music and film of my youth could be recreated without electronic devices, though automatic players for both existed. My, how far we have come. Many of the wonders of technology have truly made life better for most on the planet, but many are horrific. My music collection will now fit inside something the size of a pack of juicy-fruit, my

library is the size of a single book, and everything I’ve ever written can fit on a 3x5 card. Our continually increasing dependence on these technologies and the abandonment of others may make these wonderful horrors our downfall. Our State Superintendant of Schools has determined writing and spelling skills subordinate to computer use, allowing a computer and spell check to take a writing test. Canby, with grants and private money, has provided every third grader in the district with an iPad Touch. The programmable calculator is seemingly innocuous compared to these other invasive species, but all of them will choke out the skills once present with their miasma. Education will come to be dominated by these technologies. Teachers can be replaced, easily 100 iPads for the price of an experienced teacher’s salary for one year.  Shoot.  We could dispose of all teachers, and have children learn from of a computer at home!  You think this addiction won’t rapidly spread?  Take the iPads away from the Canby kids when they enter fourth grade and see what happens. Like drugs, Canby got dosed for free.  They’re gonna have to hustle for the next fix. When the kids gotta have the buzz, or proponents could prostitute themselves we could get rid of some teachers...Wait. Deja vu! With all reading, writing, and arithmetic skills being supplanted by these technologies, one’s knowledge and skills evaporate with flick of a switch, the pulling of a plug, or the detonation of a weapon capable of delivering a sizable electromagnetic pulse. Have you ever tried to write your loved one’s name  in the sand with a laptop?  

C O RVAvanities LLIS

History Present

I’ve been concerned with the Benton County Historical Society’s plan to sell a major portion of a downtown property. Bothered by what I thought was not mine to bother with, I learned that years ago the city gave BCHS $140,000, and based on a levy from the mid-’90’s modified by Measures 47/50 the county provides roughly $250,000/year to BCHS  for museum operation. I feel some ownership. Selling the property whose  ownership by  the museum may have  promoted funding, public  or private, shouldn’t happen. I am waiting to hear back from BCHS regarding how much the storage facility built in Philomath cost, how much is owed, and how much money is currently available or earmarked for new museum construction and operation.  A  quarter million  doesn’t sound like much to run this operation on, but I have no idea what funds they receive through grants

continued on page 15

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• THE

The thoughts, views, and opinions expressed in Voice are of their authors and do not necessarily represent the thoughts, views or opinions of CorvAlcheMedia, LLC.

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ALCHEMIST WEEKLY• JANUARY 18-JANUARY 24, 2011 Phone number: 541.981.2364

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verdict

So you know: Favorite Thai Restaurant: The Woodsman

Bookworm

Runner Up for Favorite Local Celebrity:

The Last of the Just

Jacquizz Rodgers

by Andre Schwartz-Bart (1959)

Favorite White Wine: Belle Vallee We apologize for our typos!

MERLIN’S MERLIN’S BAR BAR AND AND GRILL GRILL 25 W Sherman St • Lebanon, OR

Karaoke

Weeknights

Steak Night Thursday

5:00 5:00 -- 9:00 9:00 pm pm

Blues Jam Sunday

6:00 6:00 pm pm -- 10:00 10:00 pm pm

Glass Engine

www.merlinsbarandgrill.com

SAT. JAN. 21st - 22nd 9:00 9:00 pm pm

Lumos Wine Tasting | Jan. 19, 7pm Saké Tasting | Jan. 26 , 7pm 136 SW Washington | Corvallis | 541-758-9095

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Tyee Winery | Feb. 2, 7pm

JANUARY 18-JANUARY 24, 2011

• THE

by Michael Thomas The Last of the Just (1959), by: Andre Schwartz-Bart With the opening line, “Our eyes register the light of dead stars,” (3), Andre SchwartzBart impresses upon the reader of his novel, The Last of the Just (1959), the importance of reflection and the futility of turning from it. A holocaust survivor and French Resistance fighter, Schwartz-Bart survived Nazi occupation but lost his family to the regime. After the war he tried his hand at several professions, and it was as a factotum that he became interested in literature. Influenced by Dostoevsky, his own autobiography, and the Diaspora of his people in Europe, he wrote The Last of the Just, his first and best novel. In the book, Schwartz-Bart takes a known Jewish myth—that of the Lamed Vav; the thirty six just men who, by their lives, keep the world in balance and whose deaths would throw it into chaos—and traces its genealogy from a time of legends into modernity, beginning with the historical massacre of Jews in the city of York in 1185. From here we follow the Levy men through the centuries as they face exile and martyrdom. Ernie Levy is the heir to his family’s sacred burden and he is only a boy when the Nazis come to power. Schwartz-Bart’s work manages to make its misery significant regardless of the reader’s ethnicity, and likewise subjects us to shock, horror, outrage, and the briefest respites of humor and human dignity in turn. Impeccably crafted and with so many scenes of beautiful grief (a passion play whereby a few German kids force Ernie to ‘play the Jew’ at Jesus’ crucifixion comes to mind), The Last of the Just is always genuine in its pain,

and never feels forced. Ernie Levy, who is described in characteristics befitting a bird throughout the book, is manifested by the dove, an animal of historical Semitic significance representing sacrifice, forfeiture. Their symbolic unity can be seen in Ernie’s physique and in certain events in the book. In his youth, Ernie attempts to take his own life by jumping out of a window—an event that could be interpreted as failed flight— and when he is finally put to death, he ascends as smoke over the concentration camp and is carried off in the air. Earlier, when he tries to understand the oppression he faces by becoming it and forcing it onto other living things, he attacks a field swarming with insects. The story closes with a Jewish prayer interspersed with the names of concentration camps. Its effect, how it’s put together, is crushing. Never for me has the conclusion of a book been so striking in its finality; so haunting, so deafening. Because of the ache that it stirs in you, the tears it loosens, The Last of the Just is the masterwork of Western European Literature in the last century. Its composition and effect are truly astounding. The Last of the Just was the recipient of France’s Prix de Goncourt.

ALCHEMIST WEEKLY• WWW.THEALCHEMISTWEEKLY.COM


word

Firebug infestation

Series of arsons have torched 12 vacant structures in Albany, one fire spread to occupied home.

A

group of children gets off a school bus and fans out into the Willamette neighborhood of Albany near Bowman Park. It’s a drizzly Friday afternoon, and the children quickly scamper home. Some walk in a small group, others walk alone. Most of them are wearing blue jeans and winter coats, carrying backpacks. One girl has a rainbow scarf tied around her neck. As these children go about their way, ready for the weekend, they seemingly pay no attention to the crime scene at the end of the block that is barricaded from the indy auer street with a sheet of plywood. Lodged between two red brick columns, the plywood is plastered with ‘no trespassing’ signs and blocks the entrance to a residential lot. It was put there to keep people from exploring the ashy remains of a crime that took place there on November 26. Beyond the barricade lies the charred remains of a house, blackened, broken, and gutted. Singed insulation and other debris clutters the yard, a reminder of the flames that lit up the night sky when the house burned on the day after Thanksgiving. This shell of a house on Front Street is one of a dozen structures in Albany and Linn County that, since October 22, an arsonist has intentionally set ablaze, destroying more than $2 million worth of property to date. All of the structures targeted – including nine single family dwellings, a duplex, a restaurant, and a storage trailer – were vacant when they went up in flames. While the fires have been set in structures that were at the time unoccupied, one such fire spread to a neighboring house on November 14. There, two adults, a young child, two dogs, and two tortoises were evacuated safely. Both structures at that site sustained considerable damage. That brings the total number of structures affected by arson in recent months to thirteen. It all started with a vacant house on Geary Street across from the Heritage Mall. The alarm sounded at 11:28 p.m. on October 22 and firefighters had the blaze under control within a half hour. Since then, more arson incidents have spread flames throughout Albany, leaving few neighborhoods untouched. Each incident has affected a different property owner; no two have been the same,

C D

Photo by Cindy Dauer

and the locations of the fires seem to form a scatter plot on the map of the city and nearby county. The most prominent structure burned in this string of arsons is the former China #1 Buffet, a 10,000 square foot commercial building on Pacific Boulevard valued at $700,000, according to fire reports. The arsons are occurring at night, with fire alarms coming in between around 11:30 p.m. and 6:00 a.m. In some reports, fire responders noted that they found evidence of break-ins at the vacant buildings. The only exception is the most recent fire on December 28. It was reported at 12:54 p.m. that a storage trailer on the lot of Ace Auto Sales was burned. The fire was already extinguished when firefighters arrived on the scene. It is being ruled arson. Since the end of 2010, the fire sirens have been quiet when it comes to arson in Albany and Linn County. But damage has already been done. Three firefighters have been injured while working to control the arson burns, two sustained minor injuries and another was taken to the hospital for medical treatment for injuries sustained in the line of duty. Investigators on the case are not yet saying whether they have a profile of a suspect or a motive for the arsons. They are also not saying whether they believe it is one individual or several individuals that are starting the fires. What officials will reveal is some of the more common motives for arson. Those include vandalism, excitement, revenge, crime concealment, profit, and political extremism, according to Deputy Fire Marshal Don Schlies with the Albany Fire Department. While officials remain tight-lipped about the ongoing investigation, three arrests have been made in connection with the fires. A 21-year-old Albany resident was the first suspect arrested. He was found in the vicinity of two arson burns – 6th Street on November 3 and Walnut Street on November 14. He was questioned by police at both sites before being picked up at 3 a.m. on

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City of Albany

ALCHEMIST WEEKLY• JANUARY 18-JANUARY 24, 2011

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word November 15, according to a press release issued by the Albany Police Department. The suspect was charged with three counts of arson in the first degree and was lodged at the Linn County Jail until December 7. He was released after a Linn County Grand Jury met to review evidence in the case and did not indict him. A second suspect, a 32-year-old man described as an Albany-area transient, was arrested on December 21, according to Captain Eric D. Carter with the Albany Police Department. This suspect is currently being held in the Linn County Jail and is charged with two counts of burglary in the second degree, one count of arson in the second degree, possession of less than an ounce of marijuana, and failing to register as a sex offender. His next hearing is scheduled for 8:30 a.m. on January 31, according to officials at the Linn County Jail. On January 13, a third suspect was arrested in connection with the fires, according to the Albany Democrat-Herald. Additional information about this arrest was not available at press time. After the first two suspects were nabbed, the fires did not stop. Vacant homes burned while both sat in custody. In response to the ongoing fires, the City of Albany launched an awareness campaign, enlisting community members to be on

the lookout for suspicious activity, identify vacant homes, and help secure potential arson targets in their neighborhood. Neighborhood Watch groups are on high alert, posters have been disseminated to businesses and organizations around Albany, and meetings have been held by the police and fire departments in an attempt to keep the community informed. Contributing to the problem is the number of homes that are in foreclosure and have been abandoned by the owners or are now owned by out of state banks, Schlies said. According to a press release from the City of Albany, around 85 homes in the city have been confirmed as vacant. More than half of those have been “secured” (boarded up in an attempt to prevent unlawful entry), and the rest are being evaluated and property owners contacted.

City of Albany

Map by Cindy Dauer

October 22 1240 SE Geary St. October 25 2219 SE Jackson St. November 3 129 SE 6TH St. November 6 918 NE Water Ave. November 14 720 and 732 SW Walnut St. November 15 2211 SE Jefferson Court November 18 6061 SE Columbus St. November 26 1205 NE Front St. December 3 320 NE Denver St. December 5 2732 SE Pacific Blvd. December 23 116 NE 13th Ave. December 28 1361 Timber St. SE 6

The locations of the fires seem to form a scatter plot on the map of the city and nearby county.

JANUARY 18-JANUARY 24, 2011

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ALCHEMIST WEEKLY• WWW.THEALCHEMISTWEEKLY.COM


word The city maintains a web site, albanyarsoninvestigation.com, and investigators are offering a $5,000 reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of any individual responsible for the arsons. Police have received about 50 tips from the community regarding suspicious behavior potentially related to arson, according to the city. On a chilly Tuesday afternoon in the new year, sleet falls on another house that was intentionally burned. Yellow fire tape still marks the crime scene as a white blanket of frozen raindrops begins to accumulate on the ground near the blackened heap of lumber that was formerly a house on Denver Street. Just around the corner from the wreckage on Front Street, this house was burned one week later on December 3. The roof of this structure caved in and white paint is still visible on the porch slats, nearly swallowed by a sea of gray and black. It too is on a quiet dead-end street where people now go about their day in the face of a crime scene. Despite the chilly weather, a postman - wearing shorts - walks from house to house, delivering mail. Next door, a man emerges from his home, gets into his white pickup truck, starts it up, and drives away. As of this writing, the City of Albany hasn’t seen an intentional fire set in several weeks, but nobody knows if this is the end of the arsons.

City of Albany

Photo by Cindy Dauer

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ALCHEMIST WEEKLY• JANUARY 18-JANUARY 24, 2011

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bump

wednesday

tuesday

18 Corvallis

sing

Peacock Bar & Grill Karaoke, 9:00 pm, FREE On the Top: DJ Big Cheese, 9:00 pm FREE Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Corvallis 2945 NW Circle Blvd. Corvallis Community Choir rehearsals 7 pm, $50

Lebanon

Merlin’s Bar & Grill Karaoke Nightly

Corvallis

lecture

OSU Memorial Union "Last Lecture" by Dr. Joseph Orozco 6 pm, part of OSU's Martin Luther King, Jr. celebration, FREE OSU Memorial Union Ruth Koenig: "The Shared Vision: Working for Civil Rights in Our Time" 6 pm, part of OSU's Martin Luther King, Jr. celebration

eclectic

Corvallis

Enoteca Wine Bar Girls night out! Knit night [CRAFT] 7:00 pm OSU Memorial Union "Expressions Through Art" [EXHIBIT] 6 pm, part of OSU's Martin Luther King, Jr. celebration, FREE OSU Memorial Union & Pan-Afrikan Sankofa Room "An Evening of Song and Poetry" [OPEN MIC] 7 pm, part of OSU's Martin Luther King, Jr. celebration WineStyles 22333 NW Kings Blvd. Tuesday Night Trivia (Winter League) [FUN] 6 pm

Corvallis

dance

Corvallis Elks Lodge 1400 NW 9th St. Beginner Line Dance 7:00 pm, $3 Impulse Bar & Grill 1425 NW Monroe Ave. Cuban Salsa 7:30 pm, FREE OSU Women’s Building Room 112 Salsa Dancing 8:00 pm

Lebanon

Cascade Performing Arts Center 800 Harrison St. Beginner Adult Ballet Classes 7:30-8:30 pm, $5

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live music

eat/drink

Corvallis

Corvallis

Albany

Lebanon

Enoteca Wine Bar Wine Tasting 7 pm, $10

Lebanon

First United Methodist Church 1165 NW Monroe Ave. Craig Hansen [ORGAN] 12:15 pm Peacock Bar & Grill East The Brand [BLUES] 7 pm, every other Wednesday

Albany

dance

Cloud 9 126 SW 1st St. Beer & Blog 5 pm

sing

Exit 9 129 First Ave. W Karaoke Merlin’s Bar & Grill Karaoke Nightly

Contributed Photo

Albany Eagles Lodge 127 Broadalbin St Albany Senior Dance 1:30-3:30 pm, $3 Riley’s Billiards Bar and Grill Pure Country Night - Country Dancing with DJ 9:00pm

Corvallis

live music

Old World Deli 341 SW Second St. Belly Dance 8 pm

Corvallis

Sunnyside Up Café 116 NW 3rd St. Celtic Jam [CELTIC] 7 pm, FREE

Peter Gysegem’s Studio Argentine Tango Classes 7:15 pm, $5 peter@gysegem.com

Corvallis

lecture

Corvallis-Benton County Public Library 645 NW Monroe Ave. Pat Ormsbee: "Bats and Native Willamette Valley Habitat" 7 pm, part of the Living with Nature lecture series

201

Intersector Workspace 129 NW Fourth St., 2nd floor The Human Workshop: Just what exactly is the true function of a human? 7 pm Multicultural Literacy Center 128 SW Ninth St. Monica Brown: "The Promise and Potential of Latino/a Children's Literature" 7 pm, part of OSU's Martin Luther King, Jr. celebration

FAV FAVO

CORVALLIS Bombs Away Cafe

Curtis Monette & Friends [CURTRONICA] Thursday, 9 pm

THUR

JAN

8:30p

SATU

JAN 10p

8

JANUARY 18-JANUARY 24, 2011

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ALCHEMIST WEEKLY• WWW.THEALCHEMISTWEEKLY.COM


bump

thursday

20

live music

Albany

Calapooia Brewing Rough Jazz [JAZZ] 7 pm

Corvallis

Bombs Away Cafe Curtis Monette & Friends [CURTRONICA] 9 pm OSU LaSells Stewart Center Chamber Music Corvallis: Calefax Reed Quintet [CLASSICAL] 7:30 pm, $22 advance, $25 door. Tickets at Grass Roots Books & Music or Sid Stevens Jewelers Papa's Pizza Parlor 1030 SW Thrid St. Northwest Banjo Band [BANJO] 6:30 pm

eat/drink

Corvallis

Enoteca Wine Bar Chocolate Truffle Happy Hour FREE Truffles 6-8 pm First Alternative Co-Op North 2855 NW Grant Ave. Beer tasting, 5-7 pm WineStyles 2333 NW Kings Blvd. Wine tasting: "Wednesday night" wines 5:30, $5

11 Alchemist Winner:

FAVORITE MUSIC VENUE FAVORITE APPETIZER VORITE PLACE TO SPEND $10 ORITE PLACE TO GET PICKED UP

WHO OWNS THE CO-OP? Albany

YOU DO!

dance

Albany Eagles Lodge 127 Broadalbin St. NW Line dance, couples dance lessons, & open dancing, 7 pm, $4

First Alternative

CO-OP

Riley's Bar & Grill Throwback Thursday w/ DJ Tray, 9 pm, FREE

Corvallis

Corvallis High School, Main Stage Theater 1400 NW Buchanan Ave. "Ailey II" Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater 7 pm, $27-$48 Peacock Bar & Grill Karaoke, 9:00 pm On the top DJ Mike, 9 pm, $2

Corvallis

ED T O

eclectic

V GROCERY STORE

OSU Memorial Union & Pan-Afrikan Sankofa Room "Little Town of Bethlehem" [FILM] 7 pm, part of OSU's Martin Luther King, Jr. celebration, FREE

Corvallis

lecture

OSU Memorial Union Journey Room Brian DeLay: "Indians and the U.S.Mexican War" 4 pm, part of the 2010-11 American Culture & Politics speaker series

ALCH 1/6 PAGE - 2.84" x 7"

OSU LeSalls Stewart Center Alice Aycock: "Islands Never Found" 6 pm, public reception, 7 pm, lecture OSU Owen Hall, Rm. 102 Ronald M. Green: "Trashing the Future" 7 pm, part of OSU's Ideas Matter 2011 series

Lebanon

sing

Merlin’s Bar & Grill Karaoke Nightly

CORVALLIS FireWorks

Laura Ivancie [FOLK JAZZ] Saturday, 8 pm

ALCH 1/6 PAGE - 5.6

D E T

VO PLACE FOR A QUICK BITE

Contributed Photo

– LIVE MUSIC THIS WEEK –

RSDAY

N 20

p | FREE CURTIS MONETTE & FRIENDS

FRIDAY

JAN 21

connecting good food & good people since 1970!

10p | $5 CICADA OMEGA

URDAY

N 22 | FREE

LOVE LOUNGERS + NOTES FROM UNDERGROUND

2527 NW Monroe

South Corvallis

CORVALLIS OSU LaSells Stewart Center

Chamber Music Corvallis: Calefax Reed Quintet [CLASSICAL] Thursday, 7:30 pm, $22 advance, $25 door. Tickets at Grass Roots Books & Music or Sid Stevens Jewelers

Corvallis, OR 541.757.7221 bombsawaycafe.com

Contributed Photo

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1007 SE 3rd St (541)753-3115 Open Daily 7-9

North Corvallis NW 29th & Grant (541)452-3115 Open Daily 7-9

www.firstalt.coop

ALCHEMIST WEEKLY• JANUARY 18-JANUARY 24, 2011

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bump

friday

live music

Corvallis

Corvallis

Borders 777 NW Ninth St. Halie Loren [INDIE JAZZ POP] 7 pm

Albany

The Beanery on 2nd Mike Jones [ACOUSTIC] 8 pm

Bombs Away Café Cicada Omega [BLUES] 10 pm, $5 Cloud 9 Pine Language, Jack Ruby Presents, & Cave Country [FOLK/PSYCHOBILLY/ REGIONAL MEXICAN] 10 pm LBCC Benton Center student lounge 757 NW Polk Ave. Marquette Gumbo [ACOUSTIC] 12 pm, part of the Benton Center Acoustic Showcase. OSU Memorial Union Lounge Eliot Grass Due [CLASSICAL] part of Music a La Carte, 12 pm, FREE FireWorks Al Rivers [BLUES] 8 pm Squirrel's Tavern Wild Hog in the Woods [STRINGBAND] 5 pm, National Squirrel Appreciation Day

sing

Peacock Bar and Grill Karaoke, 9 pm On the Top: DJ Alex, 9 pm

stage

Albany Civic Theater 111 First Ave. SW "Terry Pratchett's Wyrd Sisters" 8 pm, $8-$11

Corvallis

Crescent Valley High School 4444 NW Highland Dr. "A Midsummer Night's Dream" Crescent Valley High School Drama Department 7 pm, $6-$8

Albany

dance

Riley’s Bar and Grill Ladies Night with DJ Tray 9 pm, FREE

Corvallis

Corvallis Senior Center 2601 NW Taylor Ave. Friday night dancers, live music by The Syncopators, 7 pm, $2-$4, first three Fridays

eat/drink

Corvallis

Photo by Todd Kulesza

First Alternative Co-Op South 1007 SE Third St. Wine tasting, 5-7 pm WineStyles 2333 NW Kings Blvd. Friday Night Flights 5-8 pm

Corvallis

eclectic

OSU The Valley Library David Vann: "Caribou Island" [READING] 7:30 pm Squirrel's Tavern National Squirrel Appreciation Day [FUNDRAISER] 5 pm, 3rd annual fundraiser for Chintimini Wildlife Center

Philomath

Philomath High School 2054 Applegate St. Philomath Shining Stars speghetti feed fundraiser 4 pm, $3-$5

CORVALLIS Interzone

NO/HO/MO, Stage Bitten, & Angries [PUNK/ROCK] Saturday, 7 pm, $3

Merlin's Bar & Grill Glass Engine [ROCK] 9 pm

live music

Corvallis

Rhythm & Brews Cafe 229 Third Ave. SW Lucky Pups [JAZZ] 7 pm

Lebanon

Corvallis

Belle Vallee Cellars 151 NW Monroe Ave. Ralph Penunuri [ACOUSTIC] 5 pm, FREE Bombs Away Cafe The Love Loungers & Notes from Underground [HIP/HOP] 10 pm, FREE

JANUARY 18-JANUARY 24, 2011

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Lebanon

sing

Merlin’s Bar & Grill Karaoke Nightly

Albany

dance

FireWorks Laura Ivancie [FOLK JAZZ] 8 pm

Odd Fellows Hall 223 SW Second St. Planet Boogie freestyle dance 7:30 pm, $10 donation

Lebanon Coffeehouse & Eatery 661 Main Street Live Music 6:30pm Merlin's Bar & Grill Glass Engine [ROCK] 9 pm

Contributed Photo

Lebanon Coffeehouse & Eatery 661 Main Street Saturday Afternoon Free Movie [SEE] 2pm – 4pm

Riley’s Billiards Bar and Grill DJ Tray spins 9 pm, FREE

Lebanon

Matthew Price [ACOUSTIC] Saturday, 8 pm

Enoteca Wine Bar Halie Loren [CD RELEASE] ?? pm

Cloud 9 The Vicious Kisses, Barry Walker & the Tanks [INDIE ROCK] 10 pm

Interzone NO/HO/MO, Stage Bitten, & Angries [PUNK/ROCK] 7 pm, $3

ALBANY Calapooia Brewing

eclectic

Albany

Calapooia Brewing Matthew Price [ACOUSTIC] 8 pm

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saturday

Lebanon

Corvallis

Albany

stage

Albany Civic Theater 111 First Ave. SW "Terry Pratchett's Wyrd Sisters" 8 pm, $8-$11

Corvallis

Crescent Valley High School 4444 NW Highland Dr. "A Midsummer Night's Dream" Crescent Valley High School Drama Department 2 pm & 7 pm, $6-$8

ALCHEMIST WEEKLY• WWW.THEALCHEMISTWEEKLY.COM


bump

It's an everyday thing Albany LBCC North Santiam Gallery 6500 Pacific Blvd. SW Carol Hausser, Cynthia Herron, and Beverly Soasey [EXHIBIT] through February 25 LBCC South Santiam Gallery 6500 Pacific Blvd. SW Susie Morrill, "Portraits in Place" [EXHIBIT] through January 28

Corvallis OSU Memorial Union, Concourse Gallery Mass of Glass II: Reflections of the OSU Craft Center’s Glass Programs [EXHIBIT] through February 1 OSU Memorial Union, display wall “Sign the Pledge” [SIGN] 10 am-3 pm, January 12- January 19, part of OSU’s Martin Luther King, Jr. celebration OSU Fairbanks Gallery Shelley Jordon, “Materfamilias” [EXHIBIT] through February 2 OSU Guistina Gallery "Russian Exhibit" [EXHIBIT] through February 11

Culinary Week These local restaurants are offering signature plates for $10:

More is Less Across 1. What 22-, 35-, and 47-Across cease to be, if you subtract an “s” from their ends 9. He hosted “The Tonight Show” longer than all its other hosts combined 15. So to speak 16. Working without human input 17. Settles a score 18. Enter into Google Maps, say 19. First word of several Irish airlines 20. Call ___ day (quit) 21. Frau Farbissina’s husband 22. Spa offering that’s not quite godlike? 26. “La Dolce ___” 27. Kentucky ___ (pre-Derby race) 28. “Mad Men” subject, casually 31. Amy Poehler hosted its first episode this season 32. Some printers, for short 35. Cut-throat stockbroker’s skill? 40. VH1 personalities 41. Snow Leopard, e.g. 42. Groomed 43. Skater’s prop 45. A long, long time 47. Tuba for beginners? 52. Warning before flooring it 53. Terms of ___ 54. Lambda followers 57. Puzzle 58. Butchered, say 61. Cry “uncle” 62. Ice climber’s hazard 63. Quick tennis competition 64. Gab Down 1. Viking story 2. “No more explanation needed” 3. Gunpowder ingredient, to a Brit 4. Pontiac sports cars 5. Notoriously terrible director Boll

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6. Joseph Gordon-___ 7. Daughter of preacher and civil rights activist C.L. Franklin 8. Related to nephrology 9. Telemarket, in a way 10. Inuit jacket 11. They set out to cross the line 12. Slick 13. Super Bowl XXV MVP Anderson 14. Carols 23. Fanatical 24. 2005 film about krump dancing 25. “___ Cassius has a lean and hungry look” (Shak.) 28. Environmentally irresponsible off-roader 29. Winner of the first slam dunk contest 30. Common undergrad degrees 31. Instrument with a solo during “Maneater” 32. Clothing line? 33. Sony subway distraction: Abbr. 34. Old label for Sonic Youth 36. Ruling 37. Keith Olbermann’s old network 38. Big-box in which I get extremely tired 39. Untouchable Eliot 43. Crests 44. Social breakdown 45. Screwy 46. German girl locked in a forest cage 47. What busy people are on 48. 1998 De Niro thriller set in France 49. 1993 Ethan Hawke film about cannibalism 50. Oft-knocked-off brand 51. Big hit 55. Latin bear 56. Editor’s word in the margins 59. Rte. that runs diagonally, in D.C. 60. MoveOn.org, e.g.

live music

Alma●FireWorks●Le Bistro

Lebanon

●Luc●Magenta●Riverfront

Corvallis

v

Calapooia Brewing Blues Jam 4:00 pm

FireWorks Sid Rosen & Friends [WOLD FOLK FUSION] 8 pm

Lebanon To be considered for a calendar listings, notice of events must be received in writing by noon on Tuesday, two weeks before publication. Send to editor@thealchemistweekly.com. Photographs should be clearly labeled and will be returned if accompanied by a self addressed, stamped envelope.

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Merlin’s Bar & Grill Blues/Rock Jam 6 pm

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Enoteca Wine Bar Book Group [READ] 7 pm

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Merlin’s Bar & Grill Karaoke Nightly

Albany

stage

CORVALLIS FireWorks

Sid Rosen & Friends [WORLD FOLK FUSION] Sunday, 8 pm

Albany Civic Theater 111 First Ave. SW "Terry Pratchett's Wyrd Sisters" 2:30 pm, $8-$11

monday

Tangent

Dixie Creek Saloon Open Acoustic Jam 6 pm

9

eclectic

Novak’s Hungarian Restaurant 2306 Heritage Way SE Strings of Time [MELODIC JAZZ] 6:00 pm, FREE

●Terzo

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Difficulty: Medium

Contributed Photo

Corvallis

●Big River●Cloud 9●del

www.sudoku-puzzles.net

sunday

Albany

●101 Eat & Drink●Aqua

Inkwell Crosswords by Ben Tausig

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live music

Corvallis

FireWorks Southtown Open Mic Talent Search 8 pm

Lebanon

sing

Merlin’s Bar & Grill Karaoke Nightly

Corvallis

dance

OSU Women's Building, Rm 116 OSU West Coast Swing Club First Winter Term Dance 7 pm lessons, 8 pm open dance, $3 students, $5 community

ALCHEMIST WEEKLY• JANUARY 18-JANUARY 24, 2011

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word

Speak now! Or forever hold your 10-piece

Fate of Corvallis food carts to be decided February 15

A

s the debate over the future of mobile food carts in downtown Corvallis moves from the streets and cafes to a Downtown Commission meeting scheduled for February 15th, one voice from our community has fallen silent. Jessica Keagle, owner of the downtown Corvallis food cart, Ital Kitchen, has been forced to close up shop and seek friendlier streets. This is primarily due to the fact that, under current law, food carts in Corvallis can imbo vy only operate for 45 days during a calendar year. “We were in a position where we couldn’t just hope that it was going to be okay, we couldn’t count on it to change, so we decided to cut our losses,” Keagle says. Like most other businesses in Corvallis, the economy has not been kind to food carts, but in combination with limitations on how often they could be open, the current recession proved lethal for Ital Kitchen, which closed earlier this winter. “I mean, if you can only be out there, making money, for not even two months, what do you do? It makes it really hard to establish a quality business with only 45 days to do it per year,” Keagle says. As if a bad economy and legal restrictions on her business weren’t enough, Keagle saw a business community that had previously welcomed food carts as another facet of downtown life turn ugly and begin to lash out. “I started getting harassed by some people supposedly supporting local businesses. Pretty severely, actually,” Keagle says regarding the sudden change in the downtown atmosphere. At one point while she was working alone, a man approached the Ital Kitchen cart and began shouting at her, claiming that her cart was in violation of the 45 day limit, that she had no right to be there. In addition, he said that her “piece of shit” cart was bringing down the value of his nearby restaurant. Keagle was frightened by the incident, but remains defiant about her business, “I don’t know if you’ve seen the Ital Kitchen food cart, but it’s one of the nicest kitchens I’ve ever worked in.” Keagle said. Despite being advised by friends and other cart owners to call the police and report the harassment, Keagle didn’t, fearing that doing so would only make the situation worse. When asked about the future of her business outside of Corvallis, Keagle was unsure about her prospects. “We started the Ital Kitchen and put everything we had into it…and then literally went flat broke trying to make it work there [in Corvallis],”

J I

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she says. Keagle is considering moving Ital Kitchen to Portland, which is nationally recognized for its love of food carts, but as she is currently homeless and unemployed, a result of the past year’s financial woes, the future of the Ital Kitchen is unknown. “Until we get stable, we’re just looking for work here in Portland,” she says. Despite the loss of Jessica Keagle and her Ital Kitchen, there are still voices in Corvallis fighting for the food cart cause, and chief among those voices are Michelle and Francois Du Lys, owners of Creperie Du Lys. Michelle is one of the people responsible for the creation of the Corvallis Food Cart Alliance and argues that in the current economy food carts represent a great opportunity for small entrepreneurs, but only if the 45 day limit is removed. “Food carts are an investment for the cart owner, ranging from $10,000 to $27,000 just for the cart. Who would invest that much money if they can only be open for 45 days? In fact a loan officer at OSU Federal told me [the limit] would inhibit getting my loan to start a business in Corvallis. In this economy there is little opportunity, or money, for start ups, but food carts and farmers markets offer economic opportunity at a lower risk,” Du Lys said. Michelle and Francois currently sell their crepes at the Corvallis Farmer’s Market four hours per weekend, a few months out of the year and pay a temporary restaurant license fee several times over the course of a season to do so. The amount they pay in licensing fees is comparable to the amount paid by small sit-down restaurants, yet the Du Lys can only sell their crepes on the weekends, for a limited time. She questions, “If we just keep selling at the Farmers Market how will our business ever grow? If we can only be open 45 days a year how will our business ever grow?” If the Du Lys added a mobile food cart that could sell their crepes year round, it would allow their business to go from a seasonal application toward a stable, long term business. The only thing standing in their way is the current 45-day law. Much like Jessica Keagle and other food cart owners, the Du Lys have heard grumbling that permanent food carts would have a negative impact on the downtown business community. The primary complaints seem to be that permanent food carts would detract from the existing local businesses’ customer base and would be unsightly. However, “I have the support of several restaurant owners who feel a food cart has a different target market. I like to think of it as fast food, that is slow food. Our cart uses local ingredients and products, as much as possible,” Du Lys says proudly. On the other hand, Du Lys does agree

JANUARY 18-JANUARY 24, 2011

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that standards should be enforced for anyone wishing to start a food cart, in order to reflect the pride and quality that all Corvallis businesses should aspire towards. “I believe the number of carts per lot should be limited. Property owners should consider an application process for carts; appearance, sanitation, and preference to local Linn/Benton area cart owners should be considered,” Du Lys says. Aside from providing good, Corvallisgrown food on the go, Du Lys argues that the permanent food carts would fill a niche that is lacking in the current downtown area: late night food for weekend bar patrons. The Du Lys plan to have their Creperie open after the bars close on Thursday through Saturday nights, providing a local, healthier alternative to the fast food chains that late night revelers usually frequent. The Downtown Commission Food Cart Committee is currently judging interest in permanent mobile food carts via an on-

line survey at www.surveymonkey.com/s/ foodcartsurvey, and Sarah Johnson of the City Planning office is accepting written comments or concerns at sarah.johnson@ ci.corvallis.or.us. All comments and the results of the online survey will be discussed at a public information meeting on February 15, 2011 at 5:00 pm in the Downtown Fire Hall meeting room, where members of the public are invited to voice their opinion about the challenges and opportunities that may be present surrounding this issue. The committee will examine the results from the survey and the public meeting and make a recommendation to a full Downtown Commission regarding potential changes to the Land Development Code for food cart operations. Those suggestions will then be forwarded to the City Council, who will ultimately decide whether or not to support the recommendations regarding the future of mobile food carts in Corvallis.

Get noticed, and advertise your business. ads@thealchemistweekly.com

ALCHEMIST WEEKLY• WWW.THEALCHEMISTWEEKLY.COM


O ' P I Npints ING

Liquid Light On Christmas Eve a surprise from Japan came to me as a special delivery via the mailman. A pretty boss picture book on the subject of sake by a Japanese photographer, Satoshi Kenzi.  It was explained to me by someone who knows Satoshi and the Nishida Shuzou Kura - the visual subject of my new book - that several decades ago Satoshi lost his complete life work and cameras to a car theft.  Devastated, Satoshi drank himself into a drunken sake stupor.  Years later, he pulled himself together and presented the world with a gorgeous book documenting the day-in-the life of a sake brewery.  Although the text is in Japanese and I have to forget my Western ways to follow the book “back-to-front,” the sequential process plied-out through the pages gives a pretty good look at the intricacies of sake production.  As a current, non-practicing, photographer, I can appreciate the passion put into the presentation. As a student of sake I can certainly appreciate the fine detail, demonstrated in my new book, that a master sake brewer puts into the painstaking process of making such divine elixirs! I commonly receive comments about sake (first of all, it is pronounced saw-KAH and not  saw-KEY!) that just don’t compute.  Many old timers, who spent time in Asia during world wars, will comment on sake’s harshness and its ability to wreck havoc on ones mental stability.  Do you really think the Japanese were handing out their best sake to GI Joe? Yeah, right, just like the French were welcoming the Germans with Grand Cru!  Also, on the home front during WWII we were having life-style cutbacks, such as “Meatless Mondays,” as a means of securing enough food for Our Boys overseas;  certainly Asians were in a similar precarious situation of food procurement vs. sake production. There are other factors to take into consideration, for gut-rot sake of days passed, such as the fortification of sake with really awful spirits, and the fact that the sake we know today is nowhere similar to the sake produced even 60 years ago.  The modern age of mechanical industrialization has done a great deal for improvement of sake quality and appreciation.  In fact, Daigingo, considered the most elegant form of sake could not exist prior to the end of WWII.  The confusing reports I receive about sake continue with people who

never spent a world war in Asia, but have frequented many state side sushi bars where low-grade-by-the-glass warm sake is presented without fanfare. While sake can be enjoyed chilled or warm, it is typical for low-grade sake to be served in restaurants and in order to mask the low-grade sake off-flavors, it is presented warm.  So, yes, single dimensional, boozy, box sake is nothing to get your rooster crowing about and if this is your sole experience with sake, well, then it is time for you to think out-side-of-the-sake-box! So, what is it about premium sake that I like so much?  Elegance.  Clarity.  Nuance.  Definitive. To be understood, let me reiterate that it is “premium” sake that I enjoy so much and like that book that needs to be read backwards, “premium” has a different nuance compared to our infamous American “premium” beers!  Premium sake is made with rice that has had the outer coating of the grain--lipids and proteins that cause off-flavors--polished away to reveal an inner core of starch. This starch is converted to simple sugars and those sugars converted to alcohol in what is called a multiple-parallel fermentation process.  This slow conversion involves a mold -koji- that converts the starch to sugar so that the yeast can convert the sugars to alcohol.  This is unlike beer or wine fermentation where the yeast has all of the needed sugars at hand at the start of fermentation. Traditionally, the brewing of sake is done in the winter, after the fall’s rice harvest, and when the ferment and aging of the sake can take place during cooler months.  Along with Japan’s pure water sources (the majority of sake breweries are located at the source of a spring), centuries of cultivating preferred rice varieties and a culture peculiar to ritual and the importance of sake to rituals has produced a plethora of very fine sake that are difficult, challenging and impossible to “dislike.” Besides, how could anyone find offense  with something called “Waundering Poet,” “Divine Droplets,” “Moon Upon The Water,” “Bride of the Fox,” “Tears of Dawn,’’ “Star Filled Sky,” “Origins of Purity,” or “Dreamy Clouds?” Next week I’ll describe some of the different styles of sake and a primer on how it’s actually brewed. -Joel Rea (Corvallis Brewing Supply owner) joel@lickspigot.com

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Ladies, wear form-fitting attire and high heels. Gentlemen, business casual.

Accommodations for disabilities may be made by calling 541-737-1369

ALCHEMIST WEEKLY• JANUARY 18-JANUARY 24, 2011

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The Alchemist

Weekly Horoscope

by Coyote Kate

LIVE MUSIC Thursday Jan 20th Rough Jazz

Saturday Jan 22nd Matthew Price

Sunday Jan 23rd Blues Jam

140 NE Hill St. Albany, OR 541.928.1931

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Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Tight rope walkers, flying ballerinas, and under water welders are comfortable with living on the edge. Confidence only comes with practice, Goat. Toss your cap of insecurity to the wind and watch it fly away. And when you’ve achieved edgy proficiency, look forward, guided by that sage, Immanuel Kant, who stated: “Science is organized knowledge. Wisdom is organized life.”

Aries (March 21-April 19): A large, bald eagle perched in an old elm tree in our valley wilderness caught my eye so I stopped my car and quietly emerged. Naïve, I was surprised at its cacophonous existence— machinery wailings of the interstate, etc. and yet this superb bird roosted silently watching me. The eagle’s world includes valley raucousness--they more adapted to it than I. Aries, I suggest that you adapt to the discord that comes with the changing of seasons by designing your own version of eagle ear muffs. Taurus (April 20-May 20): In the dead of winter, violets bloom on my step. Under a fallen oak leaf, a primrose lends it color out to the universe. How can a blossom as fragile as human skin survive in winter’s hold? If you look, Bull, you will see leaves feeding the Earth, river’s exhaling ice, and hear skies groaning and pelting rain and hail, and feel weak warmth, stark cold, or the etching wind. You will want to escape, but the darkness has a beauty that is one-half of a journey. Embrace the darkness like it was a lost lover from another time. It is.

Gemini (May 21-June 20): A fire storm has the capacity to create a tornado as well as a fire cloud which can transform into a thunderstorm. Twin, charge your doppelganger. Think of how much energy would leech into the cosmos--preferably in the form of collaborative ideas. Remember, “Man’s mind, once stretched by a new idea, never regains its original dimensions” —Oliver Wendell Holmes. Light it up. Cancer ( June 21-July 22): Moon Child, across the valley, a plethora of ice crystals caresses the plants, trees, and pathways, including that infamous, from the gloaming-frozen fog.  Carl Sandburg said, “The fog comes in on little cat’s feet. It sits looking over harbor and city on silent haunches and then moves on.” Each form of winter water emulates DNA. This fluctuating energy will serve you well in the coming week depending on your attitude. Make room for the ice in your life, heeding my mother’s advice, “Don’t inhale the pogonip too long. It’ll cut your lungs.”  

JANUARY 18-JANUARY 24, 2011

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Leo ( July 23-Aug. 22): Mae West, a Leo born in 1893, had a few things to say about sex. Make these your mantra, Lion. The Chase: “Don’t keep a man guessing too long, he’s sure to find the answer somewhere else.” “I speak two languages—Body and English.” “I’m a woman of very few words, but lots of action.” “The score never interested me, only the game.” The Act: “A hard man is good to find.” “An ounce of performance is worth pounds of promises.” “Anything worth doing is worth doing slowly.” “Give a man a free hand and he'll run it all over you.” “I never loved another person the way I loved myself.” “I've been things and seen places.” “Sex is emotion in motion.” “Ten men waiting for me at the door? Send one of them home, I'm tired.” Philosophy: “You only live once, but if you do it right, once is enough.”

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Manatees, Whip-poor-will birds, and the common black bird, all have unusual niches. Manatees survive in brackish rivers, close to oceans. Whip-poor-wills’ eggs are cleverly hatched under the light of the full moon, jump starting nestlings via increased light for nocturnal feeding. These ‘goat-milkers’ are collectively known as an ‘invisibility’ or a seek. Evolving valley blackbirds dart in and out of high-speed traffic for spilled grain seeds. This makes them masters of contortion on the highways. Your niche, Virgo, becoming apparent in the next week, will be as unique and tested as these animalia compadres. Focus on your inherent practicality, diligence and intellect. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): You may feel like Pink Floyd, the Chilean flamingo, who after escaping from Salt Lake City’s Tracy Aviary, wintered over at the Great Salt Lake in Utah. Alone, he survived on the brine shrimp prevalent in this salty sea. Officials considered bringing in more flamingos to start a tourist attraction, but nixed the idea agreeing it could disturb local habitat. You may feel like Pink Floyd Flamingo right now, Libra, alone, well-fed, yet out of your natural element. The saltiness of this dead sea serves a purpose. Soon, you will know the reason.  

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): The cosmic doorway opened on Jan. 4th with the partial solar eclipse. If you saw a glimpse of something chaotic filtering or even beaming through that portal, how did it make you feel? Did you accept it for what it was, a signifier of change, or did you block it out by walking in boots of guilt? Lose the leather and discover the ecstasy of something like a magic carpet ride. The new means of travel will allow you to do what you love, unconditionally, and live in your own truth. Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Sagittarian Yakima Canutt (1895-1996), one of the best American rodeo riders, morphed his career to become the number-one Ace of stunt men. After suffering from years of body-breaking action shots, he developed safer ways to perform stunts for movies. In doing so, he became a world-renown expert. If you’ve ever wanted to do one of his perfected crupper jumps by leaping like a frog over the rump of a horse and landing in the saddle, then adopt a savvy ‘Yak’ approach. He directed many stars including the likes of John Wayne who fashioned his cowboy composure on the personal characteristics of this innovative man. Horse savvy means studying your subject closely, repeatedly trying new things, and maintaining dedication to the project until it reaches perfection. ‘Yak’ it out, Sag.    Aquarius ( Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Arnold Palmer said, “Winning isn’t everything, but wanting it is.” Desire can be the strongest ally for that internal dialogue that keeps running through your watery mind, Aquarius. Like a child who finds joy in something for the first time, let desire flow through your veins and loins until it culminates into something tangible. Desire is a victory in itself.   Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20): Immune to venomous snakebite, the marsupial opossum, a.k.a. ‘white beast,’ apparently take the longest to decompose as road kill. Are they playing opossum about being dead? Self-willingness only travels so far. Pisces, if you exist in a place that only gives you two lanes of escape, move on. And give a positive thought or two to the road kill as you pass by.

ALCHEMIST WEEKLY• WWW.THEALCHEMISTWEEKLY.COM


literati

I Am By Kiler Davenport

Albany

Albany Civic Theater

I am not yet I am I am here yet I am not You will always see me as I was before I am only an after effect a process One part of the whole one piece of the puzzle

111 First Ave. SW 541.928.4603

Aqua Seafood Restaurant & Bar

Alleyoop Lounge

151 NW Monroe Ave. 541.752.0262

Bogey’s Bar & Grill

The Beanery on 2nd

Calapooia Brewing

Big River Restaurant & Bar

901 Pacific Blvd 541.941.0977 129 W 1st Ave. 541.929.8900

I am as elusive as the truth Built upon this rock of self imposed reality Trapped inside of the inside of the inside Carried upon particles vibrating, pulsing, darting, changing Always the same, always different

Corvallis

140 Hill St. NE 541.928.1931

Cappies Brewhouse

211 1st Ave W 541.926.1710

500 SW 2nd St 541.753.7442 101 NW Jackson Ave. 541.757.0694

Block 15

300 SW Jefferson Ave. 541.758.2077

I ride upon the elusive carriage of light Sub-microscopic pancakes that can travel light years in seconds I am but the manifestation, the outgrowth The figment of your imagination

Cascade Grill

435 SE 2nd Ave 541928.9634

2527 NW Monroe Ave. 541.757.7221

I am past, present, and future I am darkness I am the void, the eternal emptiness The sound of many, the voice of one

Dixie Creek Saloon

China Delight Restaurant

110 Opal St. NW 541.926.3388

Chasers Bar & Grill

32994 Hwy 99E, Tangent, OR 541.926.2767

Favorite Mistake Sports Bar

Language cannot express me I cannot and will not be described or contained I am the master of all The voice of many

You are the answer to the question The final answer, the one, the I am

Sitbackdownorgetout!

The holiday season brought to my attention what I have found to be quite a common public event. Oh, excuse me...are you folks leaving or did your party just stand up from the table so you could make more noise and block the aisles/areas between tables? What did your group forget to say to each other that require you to spend ten minutes trying to figure out how to say goodbye? Was it the blood rushing to your brain when you stood? Not bitter, humored. Like watching a three-year-old with  a Playskool tool bench keep hitting themselves in the forehead  with their plastic hammer every time they take a backswing

trying to drive their plastic nails. The group stands and loiters while strangers try to maneuver around the group that confusedly, obliviously wobbles and flexes around their table until the group maybe recognizes its work is done and  drags itself  as a (slow moving, maybe zombified) body from the premises. I’m humored because I have inactively and unwillingly participated in these events, usually staying seated until I see someone moving for the door, or standing  to shepherd people towards the exit or lead the way.  Baaaaa!  Also because when I was little, like four years old, I had a real hammer bounce back and smack my forehead. What I remember is the lost ability to say or recall anything of...  -tjC dirtstirreply@gmail.com

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126 SW 1st St. 541.753.9900 214 SW 2nd St. 541.753.7373

Enoteca Wine Bar

220 2nd Ave. 541.926.5546

1115 SE 3rd 541.754.6958

Lariat Lounge

Flat Tail Pub

Linger Longer Tavern

Greenberry Store & Tavern

Lucky Larrys Lounge

Harrison Bar & Grill

124 Broadalbin St SW 541.926.2838

Wilhelm’s Spirits & Eatery 1520 Pacific Blvd SE 541.926.7001

Peacock Bar & Grill

125 SW 2nd St. 541.754.8522

Squirrel’s

100 SW 2nd St. 541.753.8057

Sunnyside Up Café

116 NW 3rd St 541.758.3353

Suds & Suds

1045 NW Kings Blvd. 541.758.5200

Troubadour

521 SW 2nd St. 541.752.7720

Tyee Wine Cellars 26335 Greenberry Rd. 541.753.8754

Wanted Saloon 140 NW 3rd St.

WineStyles

2333 N.W. Kings Blvd. 541.738.9463

Lebanon

Cornerstone Café & Pub

130 SW 1st St. 541.753.9900

Fireworks Restaurant & Bar

Riley’s Billiards Bar & Grill

1030 S.W. Third St. 541.757.2727

Downward Dog

2200 NW 9th St. 541.752.6364

JP’s Restaurant & Lounge

1296 S Commercial Way SE 541.928.3654

Papa’s Pizza

Artisian’s Well Lounge

136 SW Washington Ave. 541.758.9095

145 SW Main St. 541.926.2174

2740 SW 3rd St. 541.738. 7600

Darrell’s Restaurant & Lounge

916 Old Salem Rd NE 541.926.3111

901 Pacific Blvd SE 541.928.2606

dirtstir cont'd and donations throughout the year. I’ll let you know what I find out.

Crowbar

Humpty’s Dump Bar & Grill

The one pursued the pursuer The one found never lost

1501 NW Monroe Ave. 541.758.4452

Front Street Bar

2211 Waverly Dr. SE 541.981.2376

To know one is to know the other To know the other is to know all

Clodfelter’s Cloud 9

GameTime Sports Bar & Grill

The observed and the observer forever linked Forever bound together in whirling, ecstatic motion

325 NW 2nd St. 541.753.3753

5420 Pacific Blvd. 541.903.0034

2300 Northeast Front Ave. 541.926.2739

How can the clay know the master The machine the maker They are one in the same

Bombs Away Café

Murphy’s Tavern

202 SW 1st St. 541.758.2219

29974 HWY 99W 541.752.3796

2250 South Main Rd. 541.451.3900

180 S 5th St. 541.847.6262

Duffy’s Irish Pub 679 South Main St. 541.259.2906

Fire Pit Lounge

2230 South Santiam Hwy 541.451.2010

GameTime Sports Bar & Grill

3130 South Santiam Hwy 541.570.1537

Merlin’s Bar & Grill 541.258.6205

550 NW Harrison Blvd. 541.754.1017

Peacock Bar & Grill East

Impulse

Sports Shack & Deli

1425 NW Monroe Ave. 541.230.1114

La Bamba Mix Night Club

126 SW 4th St. 541.207.3593

Loca Luna

136 SW Washington Ave, Ste. 102 - 541.753.2222

Luc

134 SW 4th St. 541.753.4171

76 E. Sherman St. 541.451.2027 1250 Grant St. 541.259.0800

Philomath

High 5 Sports Bar & Grill 1644 Main St.-541.929.7529

Meet’n Place Tavern

1150 Mian St. 541.929.3130

Wine Vault

1301 Main St. 541.929.8496

Wing Sing Restaurant & Lounge 658 Main St. 541.929.6255

ALCHEMIST WEEKLY• JANUARY 18-JANUARY 24, 2011

15


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