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201 3

ANNUAL REPORT


TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S

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1

Message from our CEO and Chairman

PREDICT 7

Recognizing Thought Markers: Predicting Who Will Move from Thoughts of Suicide to Action

11

Making an Impact: A Warrior’s Fight to Save Lives

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Cutting to the Bone: Perplexing Infection Prompts Breakthrough Research

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PREVENT 19

Counting the Weeks: New Efforts to Prevent Preterm Birth and Infant Mortality

27

Making an Impact: The Partnership of Donors Fuels Better Research, Better Care

29

Introducing the Health Network by Cincinnati Children’s

3

PR E VA I L 33

Winning the Battle: Superior Outcomes for Children Fighting Liver Cancer

37

Making an Impact: Tennis for Charity — Western & Southern Open

4

PA RT NER 43

Donor Recognition

is a cancer survivor. For her

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Our Leaders

story, turn to page 33.

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Financial Report

C O V E R | Eleanor, age 12,

201 3

ANNUAL REPORT


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PREDICT PREVENT

DEAR FRIENDS,

Cincinnati community gathered for our annual Cincinnati Walks for Kids. The walk is one of our favorite events of the year.

It is always both a celebration of community partnership and a poignant reminder of the way Cincinnati Children’s touches the lives of children and

AT A G L AN CE

$950,000 +

their families. This year’s walk had the biggest turnout ever. Some families walked in gratitude

Thanks to more than 9,500

for a child who is now healthy, thanks to care at Cincinnati Children’s. Others

participants and generous

participated because their children are undergoing months or years of treatment.

sponsors, the 2013 Cincinnati

Still others walked in memory of a child who didn’t make it — finding solace by

Walks for Kids raised over

raising funds for research that might prevent other families from suffering such

$950,000 — an all time high.

a terrible loss. Side-by-side with them were friends, neighbors, hospital employees, and teams from businesses and community organizations.

LEFT

|

(L–R)

Riley,

We love being part of this event, where we see thousands of patient families

Teagan and Zhania took

and supporters in one place. It’s humbling. It’s inspiring. Every participant has

part in the opening

a story, a reason for being there. Their stories fuel our passion to pursue Cincinnati

ceremony of the 2013

Children’s vision to be the leader in improving child health.

Cincinnati Walks for Kids.

One way we improve health outcomes is by offering specialized services for children fighting complex diseases. Our Liver Tumor Program, featured in this report, is one of many such programs. It is achieving superior outcomes, making it possible for children to prevail over a rare type of liver cancer.

PARTNER

thinking back to this past weekend, when the

P R E VA I L

As we write this letter in early October, we’re


4

ABOVE

| Tom Cody (left),

Research discoveries with the potential to improve child health are another path

chairman of the Board of

to achieving our vision. This report highlights two innovative studies. Research

Trustees, and Michael Fisher

by Peggy Hostetter, MD, will help doctors predict which children are at risk for

(second from right), president

a rare and life-threatening complication of a common bone infection. Work by

and CEO, visit with friends in

John Pestian, PhD, will help emergency room staff identify children at risk for

the community at the 2013

attempting suicide. These new predictive tools will allow doctors to intervene

Cincinnati Walks for Kids.

sooner and more effectively, saving lives. Over the last year, we’ve focused more and more on the word “health” in our vision

1

statement. Our vision and the changing environment in which hospitals operate today challenge us to think more creatively than ever about our responsibility to keep kids healthy. That challenge led to several exciting initiatives featured in this report. You’ll read about the Health Network by Cincinnati Children’s, a newly launched network of hospital and community partners working together with families to improve the health of children in our region. And we are very proud to be playing a leadership role in promising new community and statewide efforts to prevent premature birth, the number one cause of infant mortality. Of course, we can’t do any of this alone. To the friends who walked with us last weekend, or supported us through charitable gifts during the year, thank you for sharing the passion for improving child health. Together we are making a difference today... and tomorrow.

JOSSEY AGE 11

Ran in the Warrior Run


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PREVENT

PREVENT

PREDICTING WHO WILL MOVE FROM THOUGHTS OF SUICIDE TO ACTION

Department at Cincinnati Children’s is busy. In one exam room, there might be a 12-year-old who fell off his bike and broke his arm.

AGE 17

Carlos came close to killing himself when he was 8, 11 and 14. He kept

AT A G L AN CE

14

In another, a toddler suffering an

safe to send the child home with

asthma attack. In a third, a cancer

medicine or a referral for counseling?

patient who spiked a fever. MINUTES

No blood tests or MRI scans can Countless health issues bring

help them make this decision.

these suicide attempts a secret until a

Every 14 minutes, someone

children and teens to the Emergency

year ago, when Cathy Strunk, MSN, RN,

in the US dies of suicide.

Department (ED) at our Burnet

They make the judgment — as they

of the Surviving the Teens ® program,

Cincinnati Children’s

and Liberty campuses.

have for generations — based on the

spoke at his school and encouraged

researchers are developing

kids to talk with their parents. He did.

a more accurate tool for

A surprising number of these

living situation; the child’s responses

predicting suicide and

children are there for a mental health

to questions that help them assess the

saving lives.

evaluation — more than 5,000 last year

child’s state of mind; and their own

with depression by talking, going to

alone. As many as 2,000 children a year

instinct from years of experience.

faith-based counseling, writing and

are brought to the ED because they’re

exercising. He loves to dance, lift

thinking about committing suicide.

Today, Carlos is learning to cope

child’s history, behavior and current

While there have been enormous strides in developing more advanced,

weights and run.

Every day, the clinicians who evaluate

sensitive diagnostic tools for

Carlos and his family are committed

these patients must make a decision:

medical illness, there have been no

to sharing their story to help others

What is the likelihood this child will

comparable advances in diagnosis

by raising awareness about

attempt suicide? Should the child

of mental illness. “We need better

depression and suicide.

be admitted to the hospital, or is it

tools to help us screen patients more

PARTNER

PARTNER

Monday or Thursday. As always, the Emergency

P R E VA I L

P R E VA I L

Imagine a typical day — it might be any

CARLOS

PREDICT

PREDICT

RECOGNIZING THOUGHT MARKERS


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model was right nearly 80 percent

Predicting from structured data

and Adolescent Psychiatry at Cincinnati Children’s. “Enhancing our

of the time.

is one thing. Identifying and predicting an emotion is another,

ability to detect kids at risk of suicide would save lives.” TO SENTIMENT

Computational Medicine Center at Cincinnati Children’s, is taking

Encouraged by this promising

For the community of linguists

a new approach that may provide a groundbreaking advance.

result, the research team took the

and computer scientists interested

next step: sentiment analysis. With

in sentiment analysis, a database

Dr. Pestian and his team are creating innovative computer software that

funding from the National Institutes

of 1,300 suicide notes was an

listens to patients and hears things the clinicians may not. The software

of Health, Dr. Pestian sponsored

extraordinary resource. Twenty-four

is designed to help clinicians predict patients’ risk of committing suicide

an international competition for

teams around the world competed

with greater accuracy than ever before.

scientists who specialize in natural

to develop the most accurate

language processing to create

algorithms for classifying emotions

LETTERS LEFT BEHIND

computer algorithms to classify

found in text. The winning entry

Dr. Pestian’s specialty is machine learning: teaching computers to think. He’s

emotions in suicide notes.

was developed by Microsoft Asia’s

cause of death among 15-25 year olds in the US.

research lab. Work continues to

teaching them to think about the likelihood that a patient will die of suicide. Anyone who uses Google sees

refine and improve the algorithms.

He and his team have collected more than 1,300 notes from people who

natural language processing at work,

In addition to linguistic structure

B E L O W | 1 Clinical counselor

died by suicide. He mined these suicide letters for cues computers can

Dr. Pestian explains. You start typing

and sentiment, Dr. Pestian

Nicole Piersma, LPCC, evaluates

be taught to recognize and interpret. First, he had the notes scanned and

a word, and the rest of it pops up.

is incorporating data from sound

a young patient in the

transcribed. Then each note was painstakingly annotated by at least three

The software predicts the word you

waves and silences, from facial

Emergency Department.

volunteer readers. The 160 volunteers were surviving family members of

intend to write. Or perhaps you

expressions and genetics — giving

individuals who had taken their own lives. “Their courage was admirable,

search Amazon for a songwriter’s

the computer more ways to learn

2

even when it led to churning such deep emotional waters,” Dr. Pestian says.

recent release. Next thing you know,

what we do when we’re getting

machine learning: teaching

Google Music has a playlist.

ready to commit suicide.

computers to think.

The readers were asked to identify emotions expressed in the letters — “THEIR COURAGE

abuse, anger, blame, fear, guilt, hopelessness, sorrow, forgiveness, happiness,

WA S A D M I R A B L E ,

peacefulness, hopefulness, love, pride, thankfulness, as well as instructions

EVEN WHEN IT LED

and information.

TO C H U R N I N G S U C H DEEP EMOTIONAL

Dr. Pestian and his team then created algorithms to teach the computer how

WAT E R S . ”

to find predictive thought markers in this large set of data. The computer doesn’t interpret the words, as a human listener does, but finds meaningful

JOHN PESTIAN, PHD

patterns in sentence structure and clusters of words.

Director, Computational Medicine Center

PARTNER

Suicide is the third leading

Now a research team led by John Pestian, PhD, director of the

P R E VA I L

3

far more challenging problem.

PREVENT

MOVING FROM STRUCTUR E

NUMBER

PREDICT

accurately,” says Michael Sorter, MD, director of the Division of Child

To test whether his computer model could accurately recognize thought markers for suicide, Dr. Pestian conducted a series of experiments. For the first, in 2005, he used 33 real suicide notes and 33 simulated notes. He asked 43 mental health workers, including seasoned professionals and psychiatry trainees, to read the notes and identify which were real. On average, they were right about 55 percent of the time. His computer

Dr. Pestian’s specialty is


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PREDICT

VA L I DAT I NG T H ROUGH CL I N IC A L T R I A L S

The accuracy of Dr. Pestian’s approach is being tested and validated through clinical trials involving real patients in four different emergency

PREVENT

room settings. In the first small trial at Cincinnati Children’s, suicidal and control group

PERCENT

recorded and transcribed. The computer model was then put to the test. It was able to accurately assign the responses to the right group — suicidal or non-suicidal — at least 93 percent of the time.

PARTNER

The computer model accurately

P R E VA I L

93

patients were asked several open-ended questions. Their responses were

recognized responses as suicidal or non-suicidal at least 93

Dr. Pestian has now begun a larger trial that will involve 500 adults and

percent of the time.

children at hospitals in Cincinnati, Appalachia and Canada. He looks forward to the day when staff in emergency rooms and psychiatric hospitals will have a reliable new diagnostic tool at their side to help them evaluate patients at risk for committing suicide — and above all,

MAKING AN IMPACT

to save lives.

A WA R R I O R ’ S F I G H T T O S AV E L I V E S

VIRTUAL HUMAN

Nancy Eigel-Miller didn’t see it

about it means people don’t realize

Can a virtual human become an auxiliary resource to the staff in an emergency

coming. No one did, really. Her

there is help — that things can

room? Would patients be comfortable, open and honest talking to an avatar?

husband, Jim, was a larger-than-life

get better.”

The mere idea of talking to a computer may sound like science fiction, but it’s real.

personality with a booming laugh and a soft spot for corny jokes. He

True to this belief, Nancy talks

Dr. Pestian’s team and research collaborators at sites across the country are

A B O V E | 1 The race begins

was deeply devoted to his family

openly and honestly about her

taking artificial intelligence to the next level. They’re creating avatars — virtual

at the 2013 Warrior Run.

and committed to his community —

husband’s suicide. Looking back,

coaching track, soccer and swim

she can now see little signs that her

teams for teens. So when he left

husband was suffering. At the time,

the Warrior Run to honor her

work early one day in 2008, drove

though, she didn’t know that his

Among the benefits Dr. Pestian foresees: computer avatars could expand staff

husband, start people talking

two hours to Chillicothe and died

weight loss and trouble sleeping

resources in communities where mental health expertise isn’t available. The

about suicide, and support

by suicide, it shook Nancy and their

were warning signs of depression,

appearance of the avatars could be adjusted to look like whomever the patient

Cincinnati Children’s Surviving

daughters to the core.

or where they could lead.

prefers to talk to — male or female, a friend the patient’s own age or race, a

the Teens program.

humans — that can move realistically, listen attentively, make conversation and analyze input faster than any human.

2

Nancy Eigel-Miller established

“The thing is, you have to talk about

Not long after Jim’s death, his friends

it,” says Nancy. “No one wants to

organized The Jim Miller Memorial

talk about suicide or depression, but

Mile walk in his memory. The event

We’ve seen what virtual humans can do in movies. Now Dr. Pestian and other

if you don’t talk about it, you can’t

soon expanded into the Warrior Run:

scientists envision a new, innovative application for clinical care. And believe

remove the stigma or teach people

The Race for Life — an annual 5K run,

it or not, it’s not in a time and galaxy far away. It’s just over the horizon.

what signs to look for. Not talking

one-mile walk and family festival.

grandmother figure. “We can make it anything that will help the patient tell us more,” Dr. Pestian says.


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PREDICT

Nancy and her family started the Warrior Run because they not only wanted a way to honor Jim’s memory, but they wanted to start people talking about depression and suicide. Proceeds from the run benefit Cincinnati Children’s

C U T T I N G TO T H E B O N E

PREVENT

Surviving the Teens ® program — a suicide prevention program.

PERPLEXING INFECTION PROMPTS Developed by Cathy Strunk, MSN, RN, Surviving the Teens has three

BREAKTHROUGH RESEARCH

parents and educators recognize the stressors, warning signs, symptoms and

After five years, the Warrior

at-risk behaviors that signal depression or suicide risk in teens. In short, the

Run has raised nearly $100,000

program works to help adults and teens predict potential suicides and stop

for Surviving the Teens.

them before they happen.

for school staff and community members. Each component helps teens,

It’s a mission that is close to Nancy’s heart. “People often ask why we chose Surviving the Teens, when Jim was an adult.” She pauses. “Jim devoted his life to kids, personally and professionally. It’s only fitting that a run in his memory would help kids understand, predict and avoid the very thing that

It should have been routine. The

PARTNER

$100,000

P R E VA I L

components: student training, a parent program and a gatekeeper program

child had a serious bone infection, but a common one: osteomyelitis. A bacterium we all carry on our skin, Staph aureus, had entered his body.

took his life.” After five years, the run has raised nearly $100,000 for Surviving the Teens. And Cincinnati Children’s plans to expand the program’s reach even further through a train-the-trainer initiative that will help school staff educate others,

AT A G L AN CE

It went to a bone in his leg and set off a

transferred to the pediatric intensive

nasty infection. It was painful enough

care unit.

to bring him to the emergency room.

reaching even more teens.

When he should have been back to

Most cases of osteomyelitis

We knew exactly what to do.

school and playing with his friends,

Last year, the Warrior Run drew 1,200 participants from all over the

respond to routine treatment.

city. People come for the run and to enjoy the family-focused activities

Some don’t. Research at Cincinnati

surrounding the event, but many are there because they, too, have been

Children’s explains why some

He’d have to spend a few days in the

a raging infection that had spread

affected by suicide. They’re looking to connect and talk about their

children develop a massive,

hospital. We’d attack the infection

through his body.

experiences, to tell their stories in the hopes that it will stop other

life-threatening infection.

with intravenous (IV) antibiotics

families from going through the same loss. To Nancy, it’s the most fitting tribute she can think of for her husband.

he was fighting for his life against

that would get the medicine into his

Cases like this are rare, representing

bloodstream fast. After that blast of

about 5 percent of all osteomyelitis

medicine, he’d be able to go home.

cases seen at Cincinnati Children’s.

He’d complete another four to six weeks of treatment with IV and oral

Peggy Hostetter, MD, director of the

antibiotics at home. And that would

Division of Infectious Diseases wanted

be that. He’d be fine.

to understand why an infection that is easily controlled in most patients takes

It didn’t work that way.

such an unusual and dangerous turn in some children.

About the time he should have been packing up to go home, he was being

Her research results shed new light


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Four families agreed to provide

John Harley, MD, director of the

blood samples from the child and

Center for Autoimmune Genomics

both parents so Dr. Hostetter could

and Etiology. He suggested — in

study their DNA. She hoped to find

analysis available to researchers

the language of genomic scientists —

gene variants that could explain

whole exome sequencing of trios.

what happened to these children.

at Cincinnati Children’s, it’s

That meant, look at the part of the

She did.

With the computer power and expert bioinformatic

millions or billions of bits of data.

genes that contributes to making proteins — the exon. Map out the

“As a fetus develops, its DNA replicates

precise order (sequence) of the four

very rapidly,” Dr. Hostetter explains.

molecules that make up the genetic

“Mutations occur. Every one of us has

code of each exon. Do this for all

about 25,000 variants.” These genetic

23,000 genes for each child and each

changes occur in the child and are not

child’s parents (the trio).

inherited from the parents. For the

PARTNER

possible to do studies involving

P R E VA I L

colleague at Cincinnati Children’s,

PREVENT

FINDING THE CULPR IT

PREDICT

She turned for advice to a research

most part, they don’t cause harm.

on the genetics that impact the course of osteomyelitis — and may allow us to predict which patients are at risk for massive infection and need unusually

And once you have all that information,

aggressive care right from the start.

hunt for genetic variants.

Dr. Hostetter was looking for harmful variants, changes that would damage

“WE NEVER WOULD

Dr. Hostetter is convinced that the high volume of patients at Cincinnati

With the computer power and expert

normal functioning of protein in skin,

B E L O W | Dr. Hostetter

Children’s, one of the largest pediatric hospitals in the country, reveals

bioinformatic analysis available to

bone or the immune system. “In each

checks the extent of a

a problem that might not be noticed at smaller hospitals, where doctors

researchers at Cincinnati Children’s,

of the kids we studied, we found a

patient’s bone infection

may not see this rare complication, or not see enough cases to recognize

it’s possible to do studies involving

variant that made a lot of sense,” she

with radiologist Daniel

and study it.

millions or billions of bits of data.

says. Using a prediction program, she

Podberesky, MD.

“Even if I saw one such child at a smaller institution, I wouldn’t see others,”

H AV E B E E N A B L E

she says. “I would think, ‘This is a weird accident. Something’s the matter

TO GET TO FIRST

here.’ But I wouldn’t be able to figure it out.”

BASE IF THE FA M I L I E S H A D N ’ T

HUNTING FOR THE EXPLANATION

BEEN WILLING TO

Dr. Hostetter started by studying information about seven children. She found

GIVE US DNA.”

no pattern. There were boys and girls. They ranged from 2 to 16 years old. They were not related. There was no underlying medical condition. They had all been

PEGGY HOSTETTER, MD

healthy before this bone infection. Some had methicillin sensitive Staph aureus;

Director, Division of

others had methicillin resistant Staph aureus. No one in their families had ever

Infectious Diseases

required hospitalization. There were no mistakes in their care. The children had been correctly diagnosed and had been given the appropriate treatment. So, she reasoned, there must be a genetic mutation in the child. How to find it?


16

ABOVE

|

Logan, age 7, and

found that the variants “were predicted to be highly damaging, in the

Brett, age 14, both have chronic

sense that the protein wouldn’t be able to work right.” Because of these

osteomyelitis from a Staph

harmful genetic variants, the Staph aureus bacteria was able to enter the

infection that developed after

body more easily and infect the bone. The variants also explain why the

an injury. They are being treated

bone couldn’t contain the infection, allowing it to spread throughout

with long-term intravenous and

the body.

oral antibiotics. Dr. Hostetter’s research explains why in rare

PR EDICT AND PR EVENT

cases, this common bone infection

Dr. Hostetter hopes to use this discovery to improve care for future patients,

progresses to an overwhelming, life-threatening infection.

“because this extreme infection is a nasty surprise when it happens. It’s a nasty surprise from the doctor’s standpoint. Imagine how the parents feel.” The next phase of her research is to create a gene chip that can test for these damaging mutations.

2

Dr. Hostetter envisions the day when a simple test would identify children at risk for overwhelming Staphylococcal infection as soon as they enter the hospital, before they go into a downward spiral. Those children would receive much more aggressive care, including extremely high-dose bactericidal antibiotics and perhaps orthopaedic surgery to remove the original site of the infection to minimize the chances of spread. Preventing the nightmare scenario that puts some children in the ICU with a life-threatening infection would be a distinctive contribution from Cincinnati Children’s.

A LY S S A BO R N AT 30 WE E KS


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and emotional toll, the financial costs are astronomical. Medical

NEW EFFORTS TO PREVENT PRETERM

times as costly as the care for

B I R T H A N D I N FA N T M O R TA L I T Y

full-term babies.

The newborn, weighing a mere 2 pounds, is not much bigger than the doctor’s hand.

Prematurity and infant mortality are complex problems across the country, but they’re an especially vexing problem in our own backyard. In fact, a 2008 report from the March of Dimes found that Cincinnati had the fourth highest citywide infant mortality rate in the country. And despite efforts by Cincinnati Children’s and other organizations,

D’ONNA AGE 1

Born 14 weeks too soon, the baby is AT A G L AN CE

not ready to face the world outside her mother’s womb. She’s very sick.

As 1-year-old D’onna grows and develops, her mother enjoys learning parenting skills and health

9.2

we have not made enough progress. According to data from the Ohio Department of Health, in 2011,

1,000

tips at the monthly support group

In the room, the lights are dimmed

9.2 of every 1,000 babies in Hamilton

to create a soothing atmosphere, but

County died before their first

emotions are charged. Complications

birthday, exceeding the national

meetings of Moms on a Mission

9.2 of every 1,000 babies in

of preterm birth are the leading cause

average of 6.05 deaths. In the city

in Avondale, a service of Every

Hamilton County die before

of infant mortality. Keeping this baby

of Cincinnati, more than 13 of every

Child Succeeds. Now Cincinnati

their first birthday, an infant

alive will be a struggle.

1,000 died — and in some low income

Children’s, Every Child Succeeds,

mortality rate 50 percent

TriHealth and community partners

higher than the national

The care team will use every resource

are joining forces to prevent

average. Cincinnati Children’s

of medicine and technology in the

preterm birth and infant mortality

and partners across the

intensive care nursery. For the parents

by launching new, more intensive

community are determined

and grandparents, there will be tears

prematurity and infant mortality,”

efforts to reach moms and their

to change the outcome.

and prayers, hope and fear. The baby

explains James Greenberg, MD,

will have to be a fighter.

co-director of the Perinatal Institute

babies in Avondale and other

neighborhoods, the infant mortality rate was even higher. “A host of factors contribute to

at Cincinnati Children’s. “It takes

high-risk neighborhoods.

Sadly, this infant’s story is not

a long time to change this. It’s a

unique. Too many babies are born

real marathon.”

prematurely, and too many die.

PARTNER

PARTNER

a tiny baby in an incubator.

RUNNING A MAR ATHON

P R E VA I L

P R E VA I L

Doctors and nurses surround

care for preemies is 10 to 50

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PREVENT

COUNTING THE WEEKS

PREDICT

PREDICT

And beyond the terrible personal


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PREDICT

2013 may be a turning point in the race. A new level of collaboration, investment and creativity is being applied to an old, intractable problem. Local and national partners are entrusting Cincinnati Children’s with

PREVENT

significant new resources to help move the dial. F I N DI NG I N NOVAT I V E A N S W E R S

P R E VA I L

Cincinnati Children’s is the coordinating center for three separate but complementary initiatives that aim to reduce preterm birth and infant mortality. Over $15 million in new funding is being infused into

PARTNER

these initiatives. Like a braid made of strands that cross, these efforts each address a different aspect of the problem and collectively create a new whole.

W E ’ R E L A U N C H I N G

on-the-ground efforts in two low-income

neighborhoods with especially high rates of prematurity and infant mortality. Improvements achieved from this work will be spread across

StartStrong is about understanding the barriers that keep women from getting

A B O V E | Anita Brentley, MEd,

the community.

prenatal care, and learning how to best deliver care and social support to

MPH, is the community engagement

women in high-risk communities.

manager of the Avondale/Every

 BIRTH

HOSPITALS

across Hamilton County are collaborating

Child Succeeds partnership.

instead of competing, putting new energy behind efforts to build a

Cincinnati Children’s, Every Child Succeeds and TriHealth joined together

countywide infrastructure for reducing infant mortality.

in 2013 to launch StartStrong. “It will be transformative,” says Judith Van Ginkel, PhD, president of Every Child Succeeds. “It’s being developed hand-in-

C I N C I N N A T I C H I L D R E N ’ S

is leading an innovative collaboration

hand with moms, whose voices and needs are the driving force in the program.”

of major pediatric research centers across Ohio. The research will reveal

EVERY CHILD SUCCEEDS

Every Child Succeeds (ECS),

new information about the genetic and sociobiological factors that

StartStrong is made possible by a generous $3.2 million grant to Cincinnati

a home visiting program for at-risk,

determine the start of labor.

Children’s from Bethesda Inc., parent company for the TriHealth hospital

first-time mothers, has a proven

CONTRIBUTE TO

system, which includes Good Samaritan Hospital, an active partner in the

track record lowering rates of

P R E M AT U R I T Y.

work. Cincinnati Children’s will contribute another $1 million and will raise

prematurity and infant mortality

an additional $1 million through philanthropy, bringing the funding for this

among participating families. In

project to more than $5 million.

2006, ECS launched an intensive

“A H O S T O F FA C T O R S

I T TA K E S A LO N G TIME TO CHANGE

TA R G E T I N G H I G H - R I S K N E I G H B O R H O O D S

THIS. IT’S A REAL

What does the healthcare system look like through the eyes of a young,

M A R AT H O N .”

low-income, single woman who thinks she’s pregnant?

JAMES GREENBERG, MD

Is seeing the OB/GYN a top priority? Do her friends and family encourage

Co-director, Perinatal Institute

her to make an appointment? Does she have a doctor she knows and

Avondale/ ECS partnership that

The program will focus first on women in Avondale and later expand to

provides a strong foundation for

Price Hill. The two neighborhoods have especially high rates of premature

new, expanded work.

births and infant mortality.

trusts? Money for the visit? Transportation to get there? Is she facing more immediate challenges — social isolation, depression, domestic violence, a chaotic or unsafe living situation — that distract her from focusing on the health of her unborn baby?

BIG GAINS FROM SMALL STRIDES

“The babies who are at greatest risk of dying are the ones who are born earliest — the tiny, tiny babies,” says Dr. Greenberg. “If we can shift the gestational age even a week, it will make a big difference.”


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PREDICT

StartStrong and Cradle

PREVENT

Cincinnati give our community

P R E VA I L

a mechanism to design and implement a more effective

PARTNER

system of care for mothers and babies.

A B O V E | 1 Isis, age 2, was

Babies born at 26 weeks do measurably better than babies born at 25 weeks.

population health, “but we also need to learn from the women we serve.

born seven weeks early. Her

Those born at 27 weeks do better than those born at 26 weeks. “In that part

We’ll be doing a lot of listening. We want to better understand how women

CAU S E S O F I N FANT D E ATH

mother now helps other women

of the gestational age range, we can make big gains with what seem like

interact with the healthcare system and what barriers they face, so we can

Infant mortality is defined as death

in Avondale by serving as a

relatively small shifts,” Dr. Greenberg explains.

develop a system that works for them.”

before the baby’s first birthday.

To have the biggest impact, StartStrong will focus on women at highest risk

With its focus on women at highest risk in two specific neighborhoods and

Complications of preterm birth are

for preterm birth. Some methods that will be tested:

its commitment to testing ideas and measuring results, StartStrong brings

the leading cause of infant mortality.

community liaison for Moms on a Mission.

2

new rigor to our community’s fight against prematurity and infant mortality.

A planning meeting of the

StartStrong program leaders: (L-R)

James Greenberg, MD,

on the proven services of the Every Child Succeeds program.

  E X P A N D

OTHER CAUSES

Be available to all pregnant women, not just first-time mothers. Provide

Judith Van Ginkel, PhD, and

more frequent home visits. Involve more women in moms’ support group

Robert Kahn, MD.

meetings throughout the pregnancy and for the baby’s first six months.  E N G A G E

women in prenatal care as soon as they make any contact with

Maternal complications

BUILDING A COUNTYWIDE INFRASTRUCTURE As StartStrong progresses, a new Hamilton County collaborative will be a

the healthcare system. If the woman comes to the doctor for a pregnancy

resource for spreading the most successful practices to other neighborhoods.

test, offer a same-day prenatal appointment.

Cradle Cincinnati was developed by Cincinnati Children’s and the University of Cincinnati Medical Center in partnership with city and county leaders.

  P R O V I D E

OB/GYNs with a screening tool to help them identify

women at highest risk for premature birth. For those women, provide a

In June 2013, the participants signed a first-of-its-kind memorandum

nurse case manager to stay in touch, answer questions, reschedule missed

of understanding agreeing to work together to combat infant mortality.

appointments, coordinate care, and link the women to a medical home and

Hamilton County Commissioner Todd Portune described the agreement

to community resources.

as “an historic event in regional collaboration.”

“There’s evidence that these methods will be effective,” says Robert Kahn,

Partners in Cradle Cincinnati include UC Health, TriHealth, Mercy Health,

MD, MPH, who leads several Cincinnati Children’s initiatives to improve

The Christ Hospital, Cincinnati Children’s, the Hamilton County and city

Birth defects Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) Accidental injury


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of Cincinnati health departments, the University of Cincinnati College of Nursing, and the Center for Closing the Health Gap. Initial funding comes from UC Health.

PREVENT

This unusual partnership includes the major healthcare touch points for pregnant women and their babies — the hospitals where women give birth;

P R E VA I L

the public health and hospital-based clinics where many women receive care; and the emergency rooms and newborn nurseries.

PARTNER

“Hospitals feel a mandate for change,” says Ryan Adcock, program director of Cradle Cincinnati, “and the collaboration provides an unprecedented opportunity to identify care delivery and social support models that work best.” “Consistent, reliable data is crucial in moving forward,” says Dr. Greenberg. “For the first time, we’ll have a countywide system: uniform definitions, uniform data collection, uniform data reporting, and uniform metrics for measuring success.”

$10

A B O V E | Louis Muglia, MD,

PhD, is director of the Center

MILLION

FIVE R E S E ARCH TH E M E S O F TH E O H IO CO LL ABO R ATIVE

And as evidence confirms the most successful approaches, there will be

for Prevention of Preterm Birth

a system for spreading best practices.

at Cincinnati Children’s and

EVOLUTION OF HUMAN PREGNANCY

$10 million from the March of

principal investigator of the

Will create an encyclopedia of reproduction, with information about

Dimes to support a statewide

Ohio Collaborative.

every gene in the human genome and its relationship to reproduction

Cincinnati Children’s received

research collaborative.

70 +

P A R T N E R I N G T O A D VA N C E K N O W L E D G E

and pregnancy outcomes.

StartStrong and Cradle Cincinnati provide a new mechanism to design

G E N E TIC S O F U N IQ U E H U MAN P O P U L ATIO N S

and implement a more effective system of care for mothers and babies

Studying families with a history of repeated premature births for no

in our community.

identifiable reason to pinpoint genes that contribute to preterm births.

and hospitals in Cincinnati,

Cincinnati Children’s is also leading a large-scale, statewide research collaborative

M O L E C U L A R D E V E LO P M E N TA L B I O LO GY O F P R E G N A N C Y

Cleveland and Columbus.

seeking new knowledge to improve health outcomes for newborns.

Will harness discoveries from the collaborative to build animal models

SCIENTISTS

The research collaborative involves over 70 investigators at universities

for research on genes that appear to contribute to premature birth.

Funded by a $10 million grant from the national March of Dimes, the Ohio Collaborative involves over 70 investigators at universities and hospitals in

PROGESTERONE SIGNALING IN PREGNANCY

Cincinnati, Cleveland and Columbus.

MAINTENANCE AND PRETERM BIRTH

Studying how the hormone progesterone works to maintain pregnancy. U NSOLV ED M YST ER I E S

“There are many things we don’t understand about pregnancy and preterm

SOCIOBIOLOGY OF RACIAL DISPARITIES IN PRETERM BIRTH

labor,” says Louis Muglia, MD, PhD, director of the Center for Prevention

African-American women have a very high rate of preterm birth, yet

of Preterm Birth at Cincinnati Children’s and leader of the Ohio Collaborative.

women of Somali ancestry have a very low rate. This study of Ohio’s

Why is the risk of prematurity twice as high for African-American women

Somali community could contribute important information about

as for women of European ancestry, regardless of their age, education or

environmental and racial disparities in preterm birth.


26

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we have a phenomenal opportunity

disparity? Why are stress, poor

to have enormous impact.”

PREDICT

income? What causes this racial nutrition and exposure to smoke

PREVENT

associated with prematurity?

MIDCOURSE IN THE M AR ATHON

“Being exposed to stress doesn’t

As promising as the research is, it

Muglia. “And lack of prenatal care

destination. At the midcourse in the

doesn’t start it, either. These risk

marathon, Cincinnati Children’s is

factors have to initiate an underlying

partnering with community agencies,

physical response that causes labor

donors and others to build a better

to happen.”

care delivery system to improve

PARTNER

will take time. It’s a long race to the

P R E VA I L

magically start labor,” says Dr.

newborn health now. We don’t yet understand the path-

O H IO CO LL ABO R ATIVE

ways that are affected by genetic and

As Dr. Muglia puts it, “We need to

environmental factors. Now, new

act now using the knowledge we have,

tools are being brought to bear on

and we need to discover more. The

A B O V E | 1 In the NICU,

MAKING AN IMPACT

these mysteries.

problem of preterm birth is too big

Jeremy, born prematurely,

not to do both.”

has progressed to bottle feeds.

T H E PA R T N E R S H I P O F D O N O R S FUELS BETTER RESEARCH, BETTER CARE

PAR TICI PATI N G S ITE S

Advances in genomics and CI N CI N NATI

computational biology give today’s

2

Cincinnati Children’s

researchers an unprecedented

South, MD, MPH, is using the

University of Cincinnati

opportunity to study the genetics

world’s first infant-sized MRI

and sociobiology of prematurity.

in our newborn ICU to study

Andrew South, MD, MPH, wears

rate — and infants who survive

COLUMBUS

And in an unusually collaborative

necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC).

two hats, professionally speaking.

can have ongoing complications,

Nationwide Children’s

effort, the Ohio initiative will utilize

As a physician in the newborn

including intestinal disorders and

The Ohio State University

the strengths of major research

intensive care unit (NICU) at

developmental delays. What’s

centers across the state.

Cincinnati Children’s, he provides

more, because it predominantly

medical care and treatment to the

affects premature and medically

sickest, most fragile babies in the

fragile infants, it is a difficult

Neonatologist Andrew

University Hospitals

The investigations are organized into

40

MetroHealth System

five themes, with researchers at each

Necrotizing enterocolitis has

Greater Cincinnati region. As a

disease to study and, as a result,

Case Western Reserve University

institution working on each of

a 40 percent fatality rate.

researcher, he works to learn more

very little is known about NEC.

about necrotizing enterocolitis

Even diagnosing the disease and

(NEC) — one of the most common

predicting its severity are difficult.

CLEVELAND

the projects.

PERCENT

“I believe that over the next five to 10

and deadly ailments affecting the

years we’re going to make discoveries

premature babies he cares for

That’s why, when Cincinnati

that will change the way we think

every day.

Children’s developed the world’s first infant-sized magnetic resonance

about pregnancy and preterm birth,” says Dr. Muglia. “We have the ability

Occurring in approximately 10

imaging (MRI) machine, Dr. South

now to ask questions in ways we

percent of very low birth weight

immediately saw its potential for

couldn’t have five years ago. I think

infants, NEC has a 40 percent fatality

research on NEC. Located within


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PREDICT

the NICU, this revolutionary MRI is designed and sized specifically to safely image the most fragile infants while keeping them close to the critical equipment and care professionals they need. No longer do sick babies need For both clinical and research applications, this unique MRI is nothing short of transformational.

PREVENT

to be transported from the NICU to an MRI elsewhere in the medical center.

“The NICU MRI gives us a tool we’ve never had before — one that can help us lay a baseline for normal development and help us spot abnormal astounding,” says Dr. South. Thanks to the generosity of an anonymous donor, Dr. South was able to initiate the world’s first MRI research project on NEC not long after the

Our strategic plan challenges Cincinnati Children’s to measurably improve the health of local children.

infant-sized MRI was up and running. In fact, the research this technology enables is so new, researchers using it often are not eligible for funding from traditional sources, such as the National Institutes of Health. “Traditional funders typically want to support research that’s seen some

Leading large-scale efforts to reduce

It’s a re-imagined system designed

prematurity and infant mortality is

not just to respond when children

one of the ways we’re doing this.

are ill but to proactively promote

success already. Yet funding is vital to get new approaches — like our NEC

health and wellness for each child

studies — off the ground. We were fortunate to have a family willing to step

Another is by creating the Health

in and help us fund this study from the beginning,” Dr. South explains.

Network by Cincinnati Children’s

enrolled in the network.

to improve the health of children in

It’s an approach that will meet

Even more remarkable, this family’s generosity isn’t borne of a personal

our region who are insured through

the dual goals of improving child

experience as a patient family in the NICU. It was sparked by a family

Medicaid — a large population

health while reducing healthcare

members’ experience volunteering to care for fragile babies.

that includes both low income

costs, says Camille Graham, MD,

and chronically ill children.

interim co-medical director of

“FUNDING IS

CAMILLE GRAHAM, MD

V I TA L TO G E T N E W

“Using the MRI to study these babies and NEC could lead to a profound

APPROACHES OFF

transformation of our understanding of gastrointestinal development.”

THE GROUND. WE

Dr. South pauses. “It will help us diagnose NEC earlier, start treatment

the Health Network officially began

HOME BASE

W E R E F O R T U N AT E

sooner, save more lives, and get babies home safely with their families—

on July 1, 2013.

The redesigned system starts by

T O H AV E A F A M I LY

where they belong.”

the network.

Interim co-medical director, the Health Network

After more than a year of preparation,

linking children to a medical R E-IMAGINING THE SYSTEM

home — a home base responsible

For the family whose gift supports Dr. South’s work, that’s the most

Traditionally, hospitals define their

for coordinating care. The medical

important reason of all. They understand that groundbreaking care starts

responsibility as taking care of

home may be in a hospital-based

ANDREW SOUTH, MD, MPH

with cutting-edge research. And, thanks to their help, Dr. South and his

patients who walk through their

primary care clinic or a community-

Assistant Professor,

team may one day see a newborn ICU with fewer cases of NEC and babies

doors. If you’re sick or hurt, hospital

based practice.

Division of Neonatology

who leave for home sooner than ever before.

staff is there 24 hours a day to

WILLING TO STEP I N A N D H E L P. ”

and Pulmonary Biology

provide expert care.

Doctors, nurses and social workers in the medical home pay special

The Health Network is different.

attention to children at risk of

PARTNER

development more quickly. The potential for discovery with the MRI is

P R E VA I L

INTRODUCING THE H E A LT H N E T W O R K B Y C I N C I N N AT I C H I L D R E N ’ S


30

A B O V E | Camille Graham,

falling through the cracks, and to patients with ongoing medical issues. Care

MD, says that the Health

coordinators may reach out to the family with reminders to keep the child

Network’s approach will

on track with checkups and vaccinations, follow-up on missed appointments,

RILEY

meet the dual goals of

offer education to help parents better manage their child’s chronic medical

AGE 3

improving child health while

condition, and connect the family to needed services.

Cancer survivor

reducing healthcare costs. BETTER HEA LTH, LOW ER COST

The Health Network’s intensive focus on prevention, communication and care coordination is an approach that promises to keep kids healthier and, by doing that, to reduce healthcare costs. Both halves of the equation — better health, lower costs — are consistent with Cincinnati Children’s vision to be the leader in improving child health, as well as with the goals of healthcare reform in our state and the nation.

3


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2

a comprehensive liver tumor care team that included experts in cancer, liver

SUPERIOR OUTCOMES FOR CHILDREN

and a support team that helped her

FIGHTING LIVER CANCER

parents get through the scariest time

disease and transplant surgery —

Eleanor’s 3-year-old well-child terrifying in a moment. There was a mass in her belly. She needed a blood test and scan right away.

enough about them,” Amy Sues says, listing the doctors and surgeons, the care coordinator who guided her, the chaplain who comforted her, and the child life specialists who made sure Eleanor had fun, even while going through chemotherapy and transplant surgery. Nine years later, Eleanor has prevailed over cancer.

ELEANOR AGE 12

“Her dad and I were in shock,” Amy AT A G L AN CE

Sues recalls. “We had no idea. There

COMMITMENT TO

were no symptoms. When they sent

SPECIALIZED PROGR AMS

When she was 3, Eleanor was

Our specialized Liver Tumor

us to an oncologist, we kept asking

There are perhaps 150 to 200 new

diagnosed with a cancerous liver

Program offers hope to

ourselves: What’s going on? Could

cases of hepatoblastoma a year in

tumor and underwent intensive

children with hepatoblastoma,

this be cancer? It couldn’t be.”

the US. In about 40 patients a year,

chemotherapy and a liver

a rare cancer that strikes

transplant. Today this long-term

young children.

the best or only option for a cure is It was.

liver transplantation.

Eleanor was diagnosed with

Not every children’s hospital has

hepatoblastoma, a cancerous tumor

the multidisciplinary expertise and

in her liver. It’s a rare cancer that

institutional commitment to build

strikes young children, typically 3

a program targeting a disease so rare

and under.

and complex.

Fortunately for Eleanor, one of the

In fact, the wide range of highly

nation’s best centers for treatment

specialized programs at Cincinnati

of hepatoblastoma was just an

Children’s is one of the reasons

hour’s drive from her home in

we are consistently ranked among

Springfield, Ohio.

the nation’s top pediatric hospitals.

survivor is an active pre-teen, with a love for art and archery.

PARTNER

PARTNER

checkup went from routine to

“We met amazing people. I can’t say

P R E VA I L

P R E VA I L

of their lives.

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PREVENT

W I N N I N G T H E B AT T L E

PREDICT

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At Cincinnati Children’s she found


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PREDICT

The specialized Liver Tumor Program was built on a strong foundation, says oncologist James Geller, MD, medical director of the program.

PREVENT

Our Pediatric Liver Care Center provided a model for an integrated approach. Since the center was established in 1985, gastroenterologists and surgeons have worked together as an unusually cohesive team to improve

P R E VA I L

coordination of care. For the Liver Tumor Program, the core team evolved to include oncologists,

PARTNER

pathologists and radiologists, as well as gastroenterologists and surgeons. Communication and collaboration are hallmarks of their approach to care. The wide-ranging expertise at Cincinnati Children’s was another critical element in building the program. Our pediatric surgeons have extensive experience with liver surgery and transplants in very young children. Our interventional radiologists are skilled in advanced procedures that target therapy directly to the tumor. Our oncologists are national leaders in

I like data. I liked the approach, and agreed that transplant was the best

A B O V E | 1 Gastroenterologist

offering new therapies for difficult-to-treat cancers.

option for Eleanor, and we needed to move forward.” Eleanor’s name was

Kathleen Campbell, MD, consults

immediately placed on the transplant list and she began the first of seven

with transplant surgeon Greg

rounds of chemotherapy.

Tiao, MD.

The team’s approach is to attack the tumor and any micro-metastatic disease

2

aggressively. They start treatment immediately, keep it going right up to

moment to play with a 3-year-

The Liver Tumor Program’s reputation for expert care and superior outcomes

surgery, and resume chemotherapy as soon as possible after surgery, typically

old cancer patient, Carson,

has grown rapidly in the last five years. Today, it annually serves 10 percent

within two to three weeks. Eleanor had four rounds of chemotherapy before

during a clinic visit.

of all children in the US with hepatoblastoma.

surgery and three rounds with another type of chemotherapy after.

P R O G R A M D R AW S

TO PR E VA I L , BE AG GR E S S I V E

At first, Eleanor’s cancer responded to the treatments. Blood tests showed

ON THE WIDE-

A simple philosophy underlies the approach to care: The single biggest risk

the cancer markers were down. But on Halloween, when she was in the

RECOGNIZED FOR

RANGING EXPERTISE

to the child’s life is the cancer. Attack it aggressively.

hospital for another treatment, there was an alarming change. The numbers

EXCELLENCE

were suddenly up, spiraling out of control. She needed a new liver soon.

Cincinnati Children’s ranked

“The Liver Tumor Program is a coalescence of all these strengths,” says Dr. Geller noting that the Cancer and Blood Diseases Institute at Cincinnati Children’s offers many other highly sophisticated and coordinated programs.

James Geller, MD, takes a

THE LIVER TUMOR

AT C I N C I N N AT I CHILDREN’S.

The team works collaboratively to ensure that children referred to the program are seen and evaluated quickly, so treatment can start right away.

JAMES GELLER, MD

number one for cancer care

Eleanor enjoyed herself at the hospital’s Halloween party, and then the

and number three overall among

family drove home, anxiously waiting for word that an organ was available.

the 10 Honor Roll hospitals in

Medical Director, Liver

Eleanor’s family experienced that commitment to starting treatment as soon

Due to the urgency, her name had moved to the top of the list of children

U.S. News & World Report’s 2013

Tumor Program

as possible. “Those first days were a whirlwind of tests,” Amy Sues recalls. A self-

waiting for transplant organs. Amazingly, the call came the next day.

survey of best children’s hospitals.

described “take charge kind of mom,” she wanted information to understand and feel confident she was choosing the right path for her daughter. “It was a balance between wanting to act quickly and not wanting to make a hasty decision,” she says. “The team was very responsive. They shared the data.

Our gastroenterology program

Their bags already packed and ready, they rushed back to Cincinnati, and

was ranked number three, with

early the next morning, Eleanor was in the operating room, getting a new

the liver transplantation service

liver. She came through the operation well and recovered quickly. “There

being rated superior.

was much to be thankful for that Thanksgiving,” her mother says.


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PREDICT

COMMUNICATE WELL

While her parents learned about immunosuppressants and life after a transplant, Eleanor went on with three more rounds of chemotherapy.

PREVENT

Because the Liver Tumor Program’s treatment approach is so aggressive, it requires careful, coordinated care — daily communication.

P R E VA I L

“I think one of the reasons our outcomes are so good is because we work so well together,” says gastroenterologist Kathleen Campbell, MD, medical

PARTNER

director of the Liver Transplant Program. Dr. Geller confers with transplant surgeon Greg Tiao, MD, daily. Following a liver transplant, care management passes to one of the transplant program’s gastroenterologists, but “the children are getting chemotherapy, so oncology stays involved,” Dr. Campbell explains. “We continue to partner, working together over the long haul for those kids.” A B O V E | The “Tennis Twins,”

MAKING AN IMPACT

T E N N I S F O R C H A R I T Y— WESTERN & SOUTHERN OPEN

LOOKING AHEAD

Frequent communication enables the specialists from different disciplines to

Bob and Mike Bryan, were

Members of the Liver Tumor

focus together on all the medical issues and side effects of treatment that may

among the players in town for

Program are the oncology,

occur, and to provide both aggressive and individualized care.

the Western & Southern Open

surgery and radiology leaders

who took time to visit patients

of US and European studies

OUTSTANDING OUTCOMES

at Cincinnati Children’s.

testing new drugs for

From 2000 to 2012, the Liver Tumor Program treated 25 children with

(L-R)

Bob Bryan, Brooke

In Cincinnati, professional tennis

TFC board chair Ken Berry has

treating hepatoblastoma.

hepatoblastoma with a combination of chemotherapy and liver transplant.

McCollum, Abigail Spears,

is more than a spectator sport. It’s

been there from the beginning.

The outcomes are outstanding. All 25 children are alive. Only one had a

Mike Bryan, Raquel Kop-Jones.

an important source of support for

Like many of the hundreds of

Cincinnati Children’s.

tournament volunteers, Ken

recurrence of the cancer, and with surgery and additional chemotherapy, the child achieved a cure. All have good liver function.

was drawn to the Open because Tennis for Charity, Inc. (TFC) is

of its partnership with the

the charitable arm of the Western

medical center. “I have been a

& Southern Open held here in

volunteer with the Western &

Tennis for Charity has donated

Cincinnati. TFC gives back to the

Southern Open for 30 years, and

more than $7 million to the cancer

hosting city by donating a portion

the affiliation with Cincinnati

program at Cincinnati Children’s.

of the Open’s proceeds to local

Children’s is my motivation,” he

annual visits to the Pediatric Liver Care Center and the Cancer Survivor

organizations. Over the last 30

says. “I owe a personal debt of

Center. But the disease doesn’t define her. Today she’s an active sixth grader

years, TFC has donated more than

gratitude for what they did for

and a Girl Scout. She loves art and has discovered she has a passion and

$7 million to advance the innovative

one of my children. There isn’t a

talent for archery.

research and clinical care that the

parent in Cincinnati who hasn’t

Cancer and Blood Diseases Institute

benefited, or knows someone who

at Cincinnati Children’s provides to

has benefited, from Cincinnati

families here in Cincinnati, across the

Children’s expertise.”

These superior outcomes support the team’s belief that post-transplant chemotherapy and careful, individualized attention are key to prevailing over hepatoblastoma. Eleanor is one of the survivors. She returns to Cincinnati Children’s for

$7

MILLION

country and around the world.


38

With Cincinnati Children’s cancer program ranked the best in the nation by U.S. News & World Report in 2013, Tennis for Charity was eager to continue its support. This year, the organization made a $100,000 gift to our Cancer Survivor Center — a first-of-its-kind program, established here more than 25 years ago. As medical advances help improve cancer survival rates, the need for long-term care and research to improve outcomes also grows. The effects of disease and treatment on the body can create later health problems, including an increased risk for heart, lung and kidney disease, intellectual challenges, fertility issues or secondary cancers. The Cancer Survivor Center provides lifelong care to pediatric cancer survivors and uses findings from its leading-edge research to improve the treatments of tomorrow. “The Tennis for Charity board strongly believes in the work that Cincinnati Children’s is doing, and we want to do whatever we can to make sure that success continues,” says Elaine Bruening, CEO of the Western & Southern Open.

BECKHAM

In addition to its financial support, the Western & Southern Open also

AGE 7

“IT’S A SOBERING

brings smiles to the faces of the children and families who come to us

Cancer survivor

EXPERIENCE FOR

for hope and healing. Each year, players from the Open pay a visit to

T H E P L AY E R S , A N D

Cincinnati Children’s.

A REMINDER TO A P P R E C I AT E A L L

“The players love coming in to see the kids,” Elaine says. “They know that

T H AT T H E Y H AV E —

their visit can offer an hour or two of distraction for kids who are facing

WHETHER THEY ARE

incredible challenges. It’s a sobering experience for the players, and a

RANKED 1 OR 101.”

reminder to appreciate all that they have — whether they are ranked 1 or 101.”

ELAINE BRUENING

CEO, Western & Southern Open

Among the players who visited patients this year were the “Tennis Twins”— Bob and Mike Bryan, the top-ranked doubles players and 2012 Olympic gold medalists. Cincinnati and the Western & Southern Open hold a special place in their hearts. “Cincinnati is where we got our feet wet on tour,” Bob says. “We’re very proud of what the tournament’s doing for the kids here at Cincinnati Children’s and all over the world.” Older brother (by two minutes) Mike agrees. “We love coming here to Cincinnati. The Western & Southern is like the fifth Grand Slam,” he says. “But we’re also proud to be part of how the tournament is supporting this hospital.”

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M A K I N G A N I M PAC T

P R E VA I L

P R E VA I L

As a nonprofit hospital and research

PARTNER

PARTNER

center, Cincinnati Children’s relies on friends like you to provide hope and healing to the children and families entrusted to our care. Your partnership provides seed money to develop new programs and services. Your support improves the quality, safety and reliability of pediatric healthcare. Your investment provides funding for innovative research to prevent disease, advance treatments and improve the lives of children in Cincinnati, across the nation and around the world. We are profoundly grateful to those who have chosen to partner with Cincinnati Children’s. Together, we can advance discovery, save lives and leave a lasting legacy to children. Together, we can change the outcome.

NOTE

Unless otherwise noted, this report lists all donors who gave $1,000 or more in fiscal year 2013 (July 1, 2012 through June 30, 2013).

TEAGAN AGE 3

Patient of the Cincinnati Center for Eosinophilic Disorders and Cincinnati Children’s Champion


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PREDICT

|

DONOR RECOGNITION

P R E VA I L

FISCAL YEAR

PREVENT

G I F T S T O C I N C I N N AT I CHILDREN’S J U LY 1 , 2 0 1 2 –J U N E 3 0 , 2 0 1 3

LIFETIME GIVING SOCIETIES to Cincinnati Children’s totaling $1 million – $4.9 million, and $5 million+, respectively. Their partnerships are vital to our success — and play an important role in our recognition as a leader in

$ 35, 3 0 7, 6 62

pediatric health. Countless lives have been saved due to the passion of donors who support world-class

TOTA L

research and safe, reliable, family-centered care.

Autism Speaks

Cystic Fibrosis Foundation

Dr. and Mrs. Richard G. Azizkhan

William Belmont Backs and Louise

Charles H. Dater Foundation

Mrs. Lela C. Brown

Boomer Esiason Foundation

Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals

Bethesda Inc.

James M. Ewell Charitable

Cincinnati Children’s Employees

Patricia Heekin Briggs

The Convalescent Hospital for Children

Buckeye Foundation

Fifth Third Bank and

PATI E NT CAR E AN D S U P P O R T

The Cooperative Society

Mr. and Mrs. David G. Bunning

Provides expert family-centered care and support services

Junior Co-Operative Society

Robert Rogan Burchenal Foundation

Henry and Elaine Fischer

to the children and families entrusted to our care.

Kindervelt of Children’s Hospital

Mr. and Mrs. Michael Cambron

Michael and Suzette Fisher

Estate of Dorothy S. Campbell

Mrs. Barbara J. Fitch

William Cooper Procter

CancerFree KIDS Pediatric

The Flaherty Family

Estate of Ralph J. Stolle

Fondation Leducq

COMMUNITY OUTREACH AND PREVENTION

Toyota

Mr. and Mrs. Lee A. Carter

Food Allergy Initiative

Supports research-based programs and partnerships that

Western & Southern Open

The Children’s Heart Association

Mr. Robert B. Gardner*

Children’s Tumor Foundation

Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation

Cincinnati Bell, Inc.

General Electric Evendale Employees’

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas G. Cody Sr.

Mr. Reed L. Coen

Emma Margaret Goldman Trust

1883 SOCIETY

17%

$5,808,440

CUMULATIVE

$ 5M +

UNRESTRICTED

Supports the most pressing needs of the medical center.

26 %

$ 9 ,1 1 7, 9 5 5

26 %

$9,286,797

Medical Center

promote health and help prevent illness and injury. SABIN SOCIETY CUMULATIVE

31%

$1M – $4.99M

$11,094,470

Cancer Research

Remainder Trust Fifth Third Foundation

Community Service Fund

RESEARCH

Dr. and Mrs. Ira A. Abrahamson Jr.

Dr. Robin T. Cotton and

Estate of Irving Goldman

Advances groundbreaking discoveries to improve treatments and

Ms. Jean L. Abrahamson

Mr. and Mrs. Scott J. Hamlin

American Heart Association

Dr. and Mrs. Alvin H. Crawford

The Health Foundation of

AGE 3

Anonymous (11)

Crohn’s & Colitis

At the cancer

Association of Volunteers

Marjory J. Johnson Trust

survivor picnic

Arthritis Foundation

CURED

AASHI

provide new hope for kids in our community and around the world.

($ M) 0

Nuxoll-Backs Trust

(National Headquarters)

2

4

6

8

10

12

Estate of Ruth A. Atlas

Ms. Cynthia M. Fitton

Foundation of America

Greater Cincinnati

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Ms. Lyn M. Jones

PARTNER

The generous supporters who make up the Sabin Society and the 1883 Society have made gifts


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45

Ida C. Kayser Trust

The Procter & Gamble Fund

Mrs. Mary Lou Tecklenburg

CURED

Division of Pathology,

Robert T. Keeler Foundation

Estate of Lova D. Riekert*

Speedway, LLC

Mr. and Mrs. T. Michael Zicarelli

CVS Caremark Corporation

Dorothy M. M. Kersten Trust

Dr. George Rieveschl Jr.*

St. Baldrick’s Foundation

Cystic Fibrosis Foundation

The Perinatal Institute

Kohl’s Department Stores

Dr. Jack Rubinstein Foundation for

Joseph S. Stern Jr.*

CO R P O R ATI O N S ,

Planned Gift Accounts,

Leukemia and Lymphoma Society —

The Sunshine Charitable Foundation

FO U N DATI O N S A N D

Cystic Fibrosis Foundation

John J. & Mary R. Schiff Foundation

Mrs. Mary Lou Tecklenburg

OTHER NONPROFITS

Therapeutics, Inc.

Dr. Jack Rubinstein Foundation for

The H.B., E.W., and F.R. Luther

Robert C. Schiff*

Mr. G. Richard Thomas

Charles H. Dater Foundation

The Robert C. and Adele R. Schiff

Walmart/Sam’s Club Associates

Adolescent Health Center of

Dental Care Foundation,

Department of Rheumatology,

Ruth Lyons Children’s Fund

March of Dimes Foundation

Estate of Leroy E. Schilling*

Louise A. Williams Trust

Rita Allen Foundation

Fifth Third Bank and

The Simons Foundation

Marriott International

Roger P. Schlemmer*

Estate of Louise S. Wilshire*

American Society of Clinical

Speedway, LLC

Dr. and Mrs. Lester W. Martin

Charlotte R. Schmidlapp Fund

Mr. and Mrs. T. Michael Zicarelli

The Gerber Foundation

St. Baldrick’s Foundation

Mr.* and Mrs. Manuel D. Mayerson

Jacob G. Schmidlapp Trusts

Anesthesia Patient Safety Foundation

Hope on Wheels Hyundai Dealers

Department of Surgical Services,

Dr. and Mrs. Robert L. McLaurin

Marge & Charles J. Schott Foundation

Arthritis Foundation

Department of Immunobiology,

Dr. and Mrs. Nelson Melampy

Dr. and Mrs. Curtis A. Sheldon

Autism Speaks

Toyota

The Oxley Foundation

Michael M. Shoemaker Trust

CancerFree KIDS Pediatric

Josh Cares

Helen G., Henry F. & Louise

Joe and Susan Pichler

Estate of Louis M. Sloan

Kohl’s Department Stores

The Children’s Heart Association

Leukemia Research Foundation

United Way of Greater Cincinnati

Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals

The H.B., E.W., and F.R. Luther

Walmart Foundation

The Cincinnati-Northern Kentucky

Western & Southern Open

March of Dimes Foundation

Division of Urology,

The Convalescent Hospital

March of Dimes of Ohio

Masimo Foundation

Southern Ohio Charitable Foundation

Developmental Disorders

Family Foundation, Inc.

Leukemia Foundation

and Customers

Greater Cincinnati

Oncology (CCF)

Cancer Research

Honda Dealers

THE LEADERSHIP CIRCLE

DSM Downs LLC in honor of

Cincinnati Children’s is able to change the outcome for families because of

Crohn’s & Colitis

our long-standing partnership with donors. We are happy to welcome our donors

The Ficks Family Foundation

into our newly created annual Leadership Circle. Here we recognize the patients,

Henry and Elaine Fischer

families, staff, friends, companies and community organizations who have

Michael and Suzette Fisher

made gifts of $1,000 and more in fiscal year 2013. From Friends to Circle of

The Flaherty Family

Champions, each and every donor makes a difference in the lives of the families

Gordon John Gilliam

we serve. Thank you for your support of Cincinnati Children’s.

The Greater Cincinnati Foundation

G. Richard Thomas

for Children

Foundation of America

(Greater Cincinnati Chapter)

Cincinnati Children’s Fifth Third Foundation

Cincinnati Children’s

Charitable Foundation

Cincinnati Children’s

Cincinnati Children’s Developmental Disorders Cincinnati Children’s

Cincinnati Children’s

Tuechter Dornette Foundation

Cincinnati Children’s

NFL Charities

Mr. Timothy D. Hildebrand The Kulkarni Family CIRCLE OF CHAMPIONS

Nancy* and Joe Brant

Mrs. Roberta E. Larrick

$100,00 0 +

Mrs. Lela C. Brown

Dr. and Mrs. Robert L. McLaurin

INDIVIDUALS AND

Buckeye Foundation

Joe and Susan Pichler

FA M I LY F O U N DAT I O N S

Mr. and Mrs. David G. Bunning

Neena Rao Charitable Corporation

Mr. and Mrs. Michael S. Cambron

Mr. and Mrs. Andrew S. Ritch

Anonymous (4)

Mr. and Mrs. David J. Cassady

Dr. and Mrs. James A. Schiff

GRANT

The John A. and

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas G. Cody Sr.

John J. & Mary R. Schiff Foundation

AGE 18

Marion Dale Combs

The Robert C. and Adele R. Schiff

At the cancer survivor picnic

Audrey J. Dick*

Marlene L. Boll Foundation

Family Foundation, Inc.

PARTNER

The Sunshine Charitable Foundation

P R E VA I L

Hannah Jo Smith Research for

PREVENT

Mr. and Mrs. Geoffrey Place

PREDICT

Ohio National Financial Services

Josh Cares


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47

Jovante Woods Foundation

$50,000 – $99,999

The Andrew Jergens Foundation

YOT Full Circle Foundation

INDIVIDUALS AND

The Lalor Foundation

The Craig Young Family Foundation

FA M I LY F O U N DAT I O N S

Markey Cancer Foundation

MAKING AN IMPACT

Anonymous (2)

Muscular Dystrophy Association, Inc.

FO U N DATI O N S A N D

Mr. and Mrs. Andrew L. Berman

Department of Plastic Surgery,

OTHER NONPROFITS

There’s nothing more important to Toyota than insuring all families

Mr. and Mrs. Lee A. Carter

travel safely. So they partnered with Cincinnati Children’s to establish

Dr. and Mrs. David L. Goldfarb

PNC Foundation

The ALS Association

a multigenerational program that focuses on the importance of car seats,

The Farmer Family Foundation

Ride Cincinnati Foundation

American College of Rheumatology

Toyota has committed

educating families about the dangers of texting and driving, as well as safe

Fidelity Investments Charitable

The TeamConnor Cancer Foundation

an additional $6 million to

behaviors for adults.

Thrasher Research Fund

American Orthopaedic

Mr. and Mrs. Scott J. Hamlin

Turner Construction Company

Together, we created Buckle Up For Life — a program that stresses the

Jewish Federation of Cincinnati

United Way of Greater Cincinnati

Anonymous

importance of buckling up every time you get in the car and providing parents

Johnson Charitable Gift Fund

with instruction on how to properly install and use car seats. The six-week

Andrea, Alex & Aaron Levenson

CIRCLE OF COUR AGE

The Hartmann-Ryan Team at

Participating families in one pilot

course meets families where they are and addresses the cultural, financial and

Liam’s Lighthouse Foundation

$25,000 – $49,999

city are now buckling up their

educational obstacles that prevent at-risk families from buckling up their

Mr. and Mrs. Timothy L. Mathile

INDIVIDUALS AND

Children’s Leukemia

children 92 percent of the time.

kids. At the culmination of the course, families are eligible to receive new car

Hannah Jo Smith Research for

FA M I LY F O U N DAT I O N S

seats, car seat installation from a certified child passenger safety technician

and instructions on how to properly install them.

Mrs. Mary L. Strutz

Annie Wallingford Anderson

Costco Wholesale

The Sutphin Family Foundation

Foundation

CURE CMD

Nancy and David Wolf

Elizabeth Mendenhall

Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.

Fanconi Anemia Research Fund, Inc.

TOYOTA

$6

MILLION

expand Buckle Up for Life.

92

PERCENT

Buckle Up For Life is working. After participating in the program, families

Gift Fund

Buckle Up For Life has been so successful that Toyota is eager to see it

Research & Education Society for Sports

Auction to Benefit Project SEARCH

Leukemia Foundation

in one pilot city reported they were buckling up their children 92 percent of the time, compared with just 32 percent prior to the course.

Cincinnati Children’s

Cassidy Turley Research Association

Cincinnati Bell Technology Solutions

Anderson Foundation

CO R P O R ATI O N S ,

Mr. James M. Anderson and

Fort Washington Investment

FO U N DATI O N S A N D

OTHER NONPROFITS

Anonymous (5)

Fosdick and Hilmer, Inc.

Ms. Gladys R. Glassmeyer

General Electric Evendale Employees’

grow. The corporation recently committed to an additional $6 million

Reverend Marjorie C. Anderson

Advisors, Inc.

gift to expand the program, and its impact, to even more cities across the

American Association for

Mr. and Mrs. Richard L. Hildbold

country. Phoenix, Memphis and Long Island City will join San Antonio,

Mr. and Mrs. Terence L. Horan

The Health Foundation of

A B O V E | Buckle Up for

Houston, Los Angeles, Orange County, Las Vegas, Chicago, Philadelphia

American Association for the Study of

Mr. and Mrs. David C. Horn

Life provides parents with

and Cincinnati as Buckle Up For Life cities.

Mick and Melissa Kowitz

HORAN

American College of Medical

Insuring The Children

Mrs. Nancy M. Miller

Macy’s Inc.

instruction on how to install and use car seats.

“This increased funding will allow us to continue our expansion into new

Cancer Research Liver Diseases Genetics Foundation

Family Foundation

Community Service Fund Greater Cincinnati

cities while also providing online child passenger safety resources for anyone,

American Lung Association

Jeffrey Modell Foundation

Mitsubishi Electric America

anywhere,” says Latondra Newton, Chief Corporate Social Responsibility

(Headquarters)

Namaste Foundation

Foundation

Officer at Toyota Motor North America, Inc. “The Buckle Up For Life

Children’s National Medical Center

Mr. and Mrs. James D. Pistole

The Nelson Stark Company

program will help make sure that parents are doing the right things for

Children’s Tumor Foundation

Pray~Hope~Believe Foundation

Ohio Credit Union League

their children every time they put them in a vehicle . . . whether or not

Fifth Third Asset Management, Inc.

Mrs. Trudy Rauh

Orthopaedic Research &

it’s a Toyota.”

FirstGroup America

Robert Rogan Burchenal Foundation

John Hauck Foundation

JS Turner Family Foundation

Petal-with-Pete Foundation

Education Foundation

PARTNER

CO R P O R ATI O N S ,

P R E VA I L

Messer Construction Company

PREVENT

Histiocytosis Association of America

PREDICT

CIRCLE OF PROMISE


48

49

Remke Markets

Beth and Louis Guttman

Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP

Kim and Gary Heiman

Mr. and Mrs. Eric L. Smidt

EMC Corporation

Jackson Gabriel Silver Foundation

Dr. Ardythe L. Morrow and

University of Cincinnati

Jack J. Smith Jr. Charitable Trust

Endocrine Fellows Foundation

State Farm Insurance

Mr. and Mrs. Gary L. Heiman

Ms. Elizabeth A. Stautberg

Epic Systems Corporation

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph P. Hayden III

CIRCLE OF CARE

The Reuben Herzfeld Fund of

Dr. Joseph T. Stegmaier and

Ferguson Enterprises, Inc.

THP Limited, Inc.

Dr. Cheryl L. Hoying and

$10,000 – $ 2 4 ,9 9 9

Gabrielle’s Angel Foundation for

Truist

INDIVIDUALS AND

Foundation

Mr. and Mrs. Harold W. Still

Union Savings and Guardian

Mr. and Mrs. Dett P. Hunter

FA M I LY F O U N DAT I O N S

Mr. and Mrs. Michael A. Hirschfeld

Mr. and Mrs. Robert B. Stein Jr.

GBBN Architects

Don and Judy Jaquet

Mr. and Mrs. Gary T. Huffman

Mr. and Mrs. Peter S. Strange

GE Aviation

Voalte, Inc.

Ms. Patricia A. Johnson and

American Endowment Foundation

Marianne and Donald James

Mr. and Mrs. Bernard P. Suer

General Electric Foundation

Wellington Foundation

Amgis Foundation

Mr. and Mrs. Richard H. Kantor

The Richard H. Sutphin

Give with Liberty Matching

The Anning Family

Walter and Olivia Kiebach Charitable

Mr. and Mrs. Terry L. Tranter

Charitable Foundation

Family Foundation

The Greater Cincinnati

Foundation Trust

Mrs. Barbara R. Sporck-Stegmaier

Family Foundation

Cancer Research

Companies Foundation

Savings Bank

Mr. Kenneth R. Haag

Mr. Joseph L. Hoying

Mr. Aaron Hempfling

Marguerite Rooke Johnston & PA RT NER

Great Clips, Inc.

$5,000 – $9,999

Mr. and Mrs. David L. Joyce

Gifts Program

Rita C. & John R. Currell Fund

Mr. and Mrs. Robert D.H. Anning

Ellen and Mark Knue

Dr. and Mrs. Daniel von Allmen

Hatton Foundation

INDIVIDUALS AND

Dr. Robert S. Kahn and

Anonymous (3)

The Ronald Kuntz Family

Ms. Beth O. Wade and

Hearts Are Trump

FA M I LY F O U N DAT I O N S

Dr. and Mrs. Richard G. Azizkhan

Mr. and Mrs. John T. Lawrence III

Huntington National Bank

Dr. Diane S. Babcock

LKC Foundation

Mrs. Mauri Willis

Mr. and Mrs. James K. Baker

Ms. Dee A. Martin

Mr. and Mrs. Arnold R. Barnett

Mr. and Mrs. Michael S. McGraw

Ted and Kim Beach

Mr. Gary A. Glynn

Dr. Jessica A. Kahn

Marie C. Katzenstein*

Huron Consulting Group Inc.

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel M. Allen

Tom and Patti Keckeis

International House of Pancakes

Mr. and Mrs. William M. Kent

CO R P O R ATI O N S ,

Kind Cuts for Kids

Helen T. Andrews Foundation

Mr. and Mrs. Daniel E. Kincaid

Mr. and Mrs. Mitchell S. Meyers

FO U N DATI O N S A N D

The Frank J. Kloenne and

Dr. and Mrs. Ellis Arjmand

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas E. Kinman

Mr. Leonard H. Berenfield

James and Mary Miller

OTHER NONPROFITS

Dr. and Mrs. Mark C. Ault

Mr. and Mrs. David Kissell

Mr. and Mrs. Brian K. Bourgraf

Mrs. Mildred M. Niehaus

Kroger Company

Elana Brophy Memorial Foundation

Mr. and Mrs. Daniel P. Klare

Mr. and Mrs. Elroy E. Bourgraf Sr.

Ms. Gail Norris

Academic Pediatric Association

R.G. McGraw Insurance Agency, Inc.

The Bursk Family

Edward T. and Blanche C. Korten

Bourgraf Family Foundation

Nina and Edward Paul

The Allstate Foundation

Liberty Mutual Foundation

Mr. Jonathan J. Calderas and

Mr. and Mrs. Robert William

Jane and Rob Portman

The American Academy of Child

Linbeck Group LLC

Arthur and Elizabeth Kuhn Fund

Mr. William Purdy

George and Margaret McLane

Robin T. Cotton and Cynthia Fitton

Ada D. Kuhn*

Dr. Janet A. Borcherding

Mr. and Mrs. Andrew B. Quinn

American Financial Group, Inc.

Foundation

June Craynon and John Craynon

Dr. C. Dean Kurth

Mr. and Mrs. William C. Bray

Renaissance Charitable

Anonymous

McLane Food Service Inc. #153

Mr. Thomas J. Danis

The LaRosa Family

Dr. Nathaniel A. Chuang and

Bahl & Gaynor Investment

Medtronic Foundation

The Dayton Foundation

Ms. Kathleen R. Larson

Mr. and Mrs. Gerald J. Robinson

Mitch’s Mission

Dr. Dennis Drotar and

Mr. and Mrs. Robert D. Lindner Jr.

Clack Foundation, Inc.

The Robison Family Foundation

Bear Necessities Pediatric

National Hemophilia Foundation

Mr. and Mrs. Millard H. Mack

Dr. and Mrs. Brian D. Coley

Ms. Jeanne M. Rosario and Mr.

Ohio Casualty Foundation

Mr. David A. Eddy and

Anne S. and James J. McGraw Jr.

Dr. and Mrs. Alvin H. Crawford

Matthew D. Baroch

Belterra Casino Resort & Spa

Ohio River Valley Combined

Blanche M. and Herbert A. Metzger

Dayton Jewish Federation

Dr. Frederick C. and

Carpet Cushions & Supplies, Inc.

Elizabeth Nichols Forker Fund

Foundation

Central Parking Corporation

The Peck Hannaford & Briggs Co.

Ms. Jane E. Garvey and

Dr. Lili H. Miles and

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. DiMarco

Ms. Donna L. Schiff

Chico’s FAS, Inc.

PEDCO E & A Services, Inc.

Mr. Dee Ellingwood and

Dr. and Mrs. Robert C. Schiff Jr.

Circle K Stores, Inc.

PricewaterhouseCoopers

Ms. Shelly Shor Gerson

Mr. Glenn Miller

Alan and Cheryl Schriber

Cisco Systems, Inc.

The Private Client Reserve at

Mr. and Mrs. Karl J. Gieseke

Ms. Anne K. Morton

Forker-Smith Foundation

Mr. and Mrs. Michael J. Sepela

Cleft Palate Foundation

Mrs. Jocelyn H. Glass

Olivia J. Murray Foundation

Mr. and Mrs. Walter C. Frank

Rudolph and Marie Simich

Crown Productions, Inc.

RCF Group

Robert Gould Foundation

Mr. and Mrs. Suresh Nirody

Mr. and Mrs. Jack W. Geiger

Dairy Queen Corporation

RE/MAX

Dr. and Mrs. James M. Greenberg

Mr. and Mrs. Richard D. Oliver

Vanessa and Olivier Gillier

Skyler Foundation

Blackmore III

Dr. Jeannie S. Huang

Ms. Kaycee McGinley

Foundation Inc.

Mrs. Susan H. Ryckman

Family Foundation

and Adolescent Psychiatry

Counsel, Inc. Cancer Foundation

Jacqueline D. Kloenne Foundation

Federal Campaign

U.S. Bank

Alpaugh Foundation

Dr. Corinne Lehmann

Dr. Peggy A. Crawford Dr. Nancy K. Eddy

Mr. John E. Lanier

Charitable Fund

Memorial Fund Dr. Michael V. Miles

PARTNER

dunnhumbyUSA

P R E VA I L

Mr. and Mrs. Ali Smajkiewicz

PREVENT

Mr. and Mrs. James J. Gusweiler

PREDICT

Steinert US, Inc.


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51

Ventress Family Foundation

AK Steel Foundation

Cardinal Solutions

Williams Foundation

Mr. and Mrs. John J. Locaputo

Mr. and Mrs. Brett Schappacher

Marilyn and Thomas Zemboch

American Board of Internal Medicine

JP Morgan Chase & Co.

Xavier University

Mr. and Mrs. Michael E. Martin

Ameritas

Children’s Tumor Foundation

Mr. and Mrs. Roger J. Schorr

Dr. and Mrs. James J. McCarthy

The Archiable Electric Company

Cincinnati Bell, Inc.

SPONSOR

Mr. Powell McHenry

Mr. and Mrs. John W. Steinman III

FO U N DATI O N S A N D

AtCor Medical, Inc.

CM Personnel Services, Inc.

$2,500 – $4,999

Mr. and Mrs. Maxim I. Meyers

The Robert and Christine Steinmann

OTHER NONPROFITS

Avaya, Inc.

Cotswold Foundation

INDIVIDUALS AND

Mr. and Mrs. James F. Orr

Bernstein Allergy Group, Inc.

Deloitte

FA M I LY F O U N DAT I O N S

Oxford Community Foundation

Family Foundation

Mrs. Dorothy M. Pandorf

American Holistic Nurses Association

The Cambridge Charitable Foundation

Dinsmore & Shohl LLP

Max Richard Thornsbury Foundation

Anonymous

Canadian Institute for

First American Financial

Anonymous (2)

The Richard and Dorothy

Mr. Jason Tonich

AFLAC

Corporation

Ms. Brenda K. Bingaman

First Watch Restaurants, Inc.

Mr. Erik Bjerke

Dr. John P. Perentesis and

The General Mills Foundation

Mr. and Mrs. William B. Brown Jr.

Genesys Telecommunications

Mr. James Bush

Mr. and Mrs. Kevin E. Quill

Laboratories, Inc.

Mr. and Mrs. Bret A. Caller

Mr. William R. Remke

Gilead Sciences, Inc.

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel M. Cassidy III

The Gabrielle B. Reynolds Foundation

Greater Cincinnati Automobile

Mr. and Mrs. James M. Coombe

Mr. and Mrs. Louis A. Riccio

The Schiff family has a longstanding commitment to local philanthropy.

Drs. Sandra and Jay Degen

Ms. Brandy Rorabacher

Through the Robert and Adele Schiff Family Foundation, they have made

The Highfield Foundation

Mr. and Mrs. William O. DeWitt Jr.

Rose Family Fund

an impressive impact on education and children’s health issues. As a two-

HKS

Mr. Howard D. Elliot

Ms. Barbara Ruehlman

time cancer survivor, Beth Schiff, and her husband Jim, were eager to support

J. II Fire Systems, Inc.

Mr. and Mrs. Wayne I. Fanta

Mr. and Mrs. James A. Saporito

the Cancer Survivor Center at Cincinnati Children’s through a gift to the

Raymond James & Associates, Inc.

Dr. and Mrs. Michael K. Farrell

Mr. William Saxton and

Cincinnati Cancer Center.

Kicks for Kids

Mr. and Mrs. William A. Fisher

Kokosing Construction Company, Inc.

Kate Furlong and Jim Walker

Mr. and Mrs. Alan M. Schell

MAKING AN IMPACT

SCHIFF F A M I LY

Advanced Research

A two-time cancer survivor

Dealers Association, Inc.

Pandorf Foundation Dr. Stella M. Davies

Mrs. Courtney Campbell-Saxton

and her family contribute to

Beth survived a battle with Hodgkin’s lymphoma when she was 17 years old.

Ligocyte Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

Beth Joanna Habbert Memorial Fund

Dr. David P. Schor and

support research and help

As a pediatric cancer survivor, Beth was eligible to be treated in the Cancer

Live Nation Worldwide, Inc.

John and Carrie Hayden

others fighting cancer.

Survivor Center at Cincinnati Children’s. “It was one of the most amazing

LJS Partners LLC

Ms. Molli Schuler

experiences. I was surrounded by an enclave of medical professionals who

Lonestar Steakhouse

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas R. Hayden

Schwab Charitable Fund

had a complete understanding of my medical experiences and health

Lundbeck Inc.

Mr. Michael J. Hoogeveen

Mr. and Mrs. Curtis L. Sellers

issues,” Beth shares.

Marriott International

Dr. Margaret K. Hostetter

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph C. Seta

Maxwell C. Weaver Foundation

Mr. and Mrs. Brian R. Jacob

Ms. Amy Settlemyre

It’s that complete understanding that helped guide Beth’s treatment during

Mercedes-Benz of Fort Mitchell

Mr. Robert G. Jones

Mr. and Mrs. Jay D. Shaw

her bout with breast cancer, which many pediatric Hodgkin’s survivors face.

Morris Furniture Co., Inc.

Mr. and Mrs. Terry S. Karageorges

Mr. David S. Smith

Pomeroy

Dr. and Mrs. Frederick W. Koch

Dr. Parke G. and

The Scoliosis Foundation

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas B. Koenig

of work being done by Cincinnati Children’s,” Beth says. “So much progress

Sharefax Credit Union, Inc.

Karen and Jay Kratz

Dr. and Mrs. Arnold W. Strauss

has been made in curing and treating pediatric cancers, but there is so much

Thermo Fisher Scientific

Dr. Ann W. Kummer and

Mr. Daryl Strother

more work that needs to be done. It’s an honor and a privilege to support

The Towerbrook Foundation

Mr. and Mrs. Gary Sullivan

the important research at Cincinnati Children’s.”

TriHealth Corporate Offices

Denise and John Kuprionis

Dr. Junichi E. Tamai and

TriVersity Construction

Ms. Amy L. Lanham-Bailey

United Dairy Farmers

Mrs. Ruthi Levering

Bruce S. and Caroline C. Taylor Fund

Vanguard Charitable

Dr. Philip and Barbara Lichtenstein

Mr. and Mrs. Michael D. Valentine

“As a longtime survivor, I feel so fortunate to be the beneficiary of the type

Endowment Program

Family Foundation

Mr. John R. Kummer

Ms. Susan M. Elek

Dorothy M. Smith Foundation

Dr. Tanya E. Froehlich

PARTNER

Mrs. Caroline F. Sutphin

P R E VA I L

CO R P O R ATI O N S ,

PREVENT

Mrs. Mary Jane Schubert

PREDICT

Mr. and Mrs. Walter G. Sall


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53

Every Child Succeeds,

R.S.V.P. Home Care, Inc.

Mr. and Mrs. Andrew A. Webster

RoundTower Technologies, Inc.

Mr. and Mrs. David A. Weiper

Ezis & Blume, DDS, LLC

Ruttle Design Group, Inc.

Mr. and Mrs. Ted Wertz

Frost Brown Todd, LLC

The Success Group, LTD.

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. White

General Electric United Way Campaign

Symantec Corporation

Dr. and Mrs. Jeffrey A. Whitsett

Graydon Head & Ritchey, LLP

Thompson Hine LLP

Mr. Brian R. Wildman

Carol and Ralph V. Haile Jr.,

Time Warner Cable

Wong Family Foundation

Total Quality Logistics

Mr. and Mrs. Gary W. Wright

Hartke Hanks

Two Smiles One Hope Foundation

CAROLINE

The Zaring Family Foundation

Hispanics Avanzando Hispanics

UBS Financial Services, Inc.

AGE 11

Mr. and Mrs. Allen G. Zaring III

Megan Hoogeveen

Warren County Career Center

Ran in the Warrior Run

Young Professionals,

Cincinnati Children’s

Cincinnati Children’s

IBM Corporation

FO U N DATI O N S A N D

Interim HealthCare of Cincinnati, Inc.

OTHER NONPROFITS

International Business Machine

FOUNDER

International Paper Foundation

$1,883 – $2,499

Al Neyer, Inc. Foundation

Jostin Construction, Inc.

INDIVIDUALS AND

Ms. Joyce J. Keeshin

CO R P O R ATI O N S ,

Dr. Maria H. Alonso

Anonymous

Keating, Muething & Klekamp, PLL

FA M I LY F O U N DAT I O N S

Mr. Chris D. Lah

FO U N DATI O N S A N D

Mr. Mohammad Alotaibi

Mr. Edgar E. Loyd

OTHER NONPROFITS

Anonymous (2)

ATM Solutions, Inc.

KiZAN Technologies LLC

Bank of America Matching Gifts

KLH Engineers, Inc.

Dr. Raouf S. Amin and

Mr. and Mrs. Clayton L. Mathile

The Bistro Group

Kolar Design

Mr. and Mrs. Joshua K. Mayers

Ace Hardware Foundation

Dr. Lesley L. Breech and

Bricker & Eckler, LLP

Lone Star Steakhouse & Saloon

Dr. Wynndel P. Baldock and

Dr. Jaclyn W. McAlees and

American Lung Association of the

Bruegger’s Enterprises, Inc.

The Lubrizol Foundation

Mr. and Mrs. Michael L. Bauer

Catholic Healthcare Partners

Mason, Schilling & Mason CO., LPA

Bruce Family Foundation

Mr. and Mrs. David L. Moody

Cafco

Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. Baverman Jr.

Dempster Family Foundation

Maxim Healthcare Services, Inc.

The Butler-Reid, Washington

Dr. and Mrs. Louis J. Muglia

Cincinnati Wholesale Ice Cream, Inc.

Mrs. Cindi Bedinghaus

cHc Manufacturing, Inc.

The Mead Foundation

Ms. Laura C. Nixon

Delta Community Credit Union

Mr. and Mrs. Richard J. Beiting

Ferguson Enterprises’ Chipping

Meijer

Mr. and Mrs. A. Cris Collinsworth

Mr. Matthew R. Patrick

Fink Foundation

Mr. and Mrs. Stephen J. Beiting

National Christian Foundation

Mr. Tim Cornelius

Dr. and Mrs. Robert C. Pence

General Electric Credit Union

Mrs. Lois G. Benjamin

The Cincinnati Reds

Netscout Systems

Mr. and Mrs. Dannah J. Crosby

Mr. and Mrs. Frank M. Radaszewski

IBM Employee Services Center

Mr. Chris Bergs

Cintas Corporation

Nikon Instruments Inc.

Mrs. Katharine M. Davis

Mr. Raja Ram

Katz, Teller, Brant & Hild

Mrs. Arlene Bertellotti

Cintas Document Management

Office of Disability

Mr. Louis C. Graeter II

Dr. Janet B. Reid and

Money Mailer, LLC

Dr. and Mrs. Jorge A. Bezerra

The Columbus Foundation

Mr. Thomas W. Griffiths

Nutricia North America, Inc.

Mr. Travis S. Bible

Controlled Credit Corp.

Ollie’s Bargain Outlet

The Reverend Dr. Daniel H.

Dr. and Mrs. J. Robb Reinshagen

Prestige Technical Services, Inc.

Mr. Carl M. Bimel Jr.

CO-OP Financial Services

ORACLE

Grossoehme and The Reverend

Richard D. Reis Family Foundation

S3C, Inc.

Mr. and Mrs. Troy A. Blackburn

Corporex Companies, Inc.

Department of Pediatric Surgery,

Mr. and Mrs. Brad A. Rife

CTS Telecommunications

Cincinnati Children’s

Mr. and Mrs. Aaron Harang

Reuben B. Robertson Foundation

FRIEND

Ms. Susan Boresow

Cystic Fibrosis Foundation

Perfetti Van Melle USA Inc.

Mr. and Mrs. Gary B. Hayes

Mr. and Mrs. William E. Rutz

$1,000 – $1,882

Mr. Jon Bormet

Pete Gaietto & Associates, Inc.

Mrs. June Hoffman

Dr. and Mrs. S. Andrew Spooner

INDIVIDUALS AND

Mr. and Mrs. George R. Bradley III

DNK Architects, Inc.

Primrose School

Arlyn T. Johnson*

Mrs. Verna L. Taylor

FA M I LY F O U N DAT I O N S

Mr. and Mrs. Richard D. Branson

Duke Energy

Franchising Company

Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey J. Johnson

Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Thomson III

Eaton Corporation

The Procter & Gamble Fund

Mr. and Mrs. David J. Josephic

Mr. and Mrs. John Waltz

In For Children

(Greater Cincinnati Chapter)

Employment Policy

Dr. Amal H. Assa’ad Mrs. Elisabeth E. Baldock

Family Fund

Henrietta H. Grossoehme

Mr. Marcus McAlees

Dr. Calvin W. Washington

Mr. and Mrs. James Barter

Midland States

Dr. Jack B. Basil

Mr. and Mrs. James M. Blanton

Mrs. Eleanor J. Brenan Mr. and Mrs. Douglas F. Agricola Dr. and Mrs. Alessandro de Alarcon

Mr. and Mrs. James G. Briggs Jr.

PARTNER

CO R P O R ATI O N S ,

P R E VA I L

Memorial Foundation

PREVENT

U.S. Bank Foundation

PREDICT

Mr. Jeffery A. Vaughn


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Mr. and Mrs. Frederick H. Gribbell

Dr. and Mrs. Alan H. Jobe

Mr. and Mrs. James W. Brown

Ms. Barbara Campbell

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas P. Collins

Mr. and Mrs. Scott M. Dimond

Ms. Dulcey Griffith

Dr. Kaalan Johnson

Mr. and Mrs. Michael Brown

Mr. and Mrs. Michael J. Cebo

Julie Corwin

Richard and Susan Dineen

Mrs. Elizabeth Lovett Grover

Mr. and Mrs. Tony L. Johnston

Dr. Rebeccah L. Brown and

Dr. and Mrs. Daniel I. Choo

Lewis and Marjorie

Mr. and Mrs. Robert B. Dinn

Mr. Joel Grubbs

Mr. Robert A. Johnston

Mr. and Mrs. Steven A. Cirino

Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Donelan Jr.

Ms. Julien R. Guttman

Dr. and Mrs. Blaise V. Jones

Dr. Pamela I. Brown

Dr. Douglas F. Clapp

Dr. Bernard Dardzinski

Dr. Lorah D. Dorn

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas N. Haas

The Juilfs Foundation

Mr. Paul H. Brown

Mr. and Mrs. James W. Cochran

Mr. Jon Dareff

Mr. Kenneth C. Dunn and

Mr. and Mrs. Michael J. Habel

Dr. Karen A. Kalinyak and

Daniel and Emily Brummett

Mr. Reed L. Coen

Mr. and Mrs. Terry L. Davies

Mr. Joseph W. Hagin II

Stephen and Diedra Burns

Dr. Mitchell B. Cohen and

Mr. and Mrs. Randall L. Delk

Mr. and Mrs. Barry N. Ehrnschwender

Hainline Family Foundation

Ms. Judith M. Kalpin and

Mr. and Mrs. Frank D. Buttari

Janice and Dan Demmerle

Mr. and Mrs. Richard H. Elder

Dr. and Mrs. Franklin Handel

Mr. and Mrs. Michael A. Elkus

Mrs. Michele Hanson

Dr. Tina Kaminsky

Gene and Neddie Mae Elkus

Dr. John Harley

Milton Kantor*

Robert & Helen Harmony Fund

Mr. and Mrs. J. David Karam

Mr. Stanley Ellington

Dr. and Mrs. Andrew V. Kayes

Mr. and Mrs. David W. Ellis III

Mr. and Mrs. Matthew T. Hartlage

Ms. Lisa A. Keegan

Dr. and Mrs. Ravindhra G. Elluru

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. Hartlage

Mr. Paul A. Kelly

Terry and Virginia Tranter came to support Cincinnati Children’s through

Mr. Gilbert Embry

Mr. and Mrs. John Hartz

Mr. Kenneth Kemen

an extraordinary set of circumstances. Five years ago, Terry was in the

Mr. and Mrs. Eric Erpenbeck

Mr. and Mrs. Timothy J. Hastings

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas W. Kemp

security line at the San Francisco International Airport when he began to feel

Mr. and Mrs. Richard T. Farmer

Mr. Jeffrey D. Hayes

Ms. Vasiliki Keramida

dizzy. Within seconds, he was in sudden cardiac arrest. Fortunately for Mr.

Ms. Jena Feichtner

Mr. and Mrs. Paul L. Helpling

Mr. and Mrs. John A. Kerechek

Tranter, the person behind him was Cincinnati Children’s anesthesiologist

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas B. Feldmann

Adrienne Henize

Mr. and Mrs. Roy C. Kiessling

Nancy Hagerman, MD, who immediately began CPR and assisted two other

Mr. Dale Ferris

Mr. and Mrs. Daniel F. Henke

Mr. and Mrs. Steven C. Kimball

bystanders in using the airport’s wall-mounted portable defibrillator —

Mr. and Mrs. David L. Fisher

The Mark P. Herschede Foundation

Mr. Dennis W. King and

saving Terry’s life.

Mr. Robert Flaig

Mr. and Mrs. Theodore F. Herschede

Mr. and Mrs. Jeremy D. Focht

Dr. Andrew D. Hershey and

Mr. and Mrs. William B. King II Mr. and Mrs. David A. Kitzmiller

Mr. Dan O. Jones

MAKING AN IMPACT

TERRY TRANTER

$30,000

Dr. Morissa Cohen

Daniel Foundation

To thank the stranger who saved

Dr. Melodie G. Blacklidge

Family Foundation

For Needy Children

Dr. Gurjit Khurana Hershey

Mr. Joseph G. Martin Mr. John N. O’Brien

Dr. Eileen C. King

his life, Terry Tranter has given

He wanted to thank the stranger who saved his life, and after a little digging,

Mr. and Mrs. William W. Ford III

nearly $30,000 for life support

Terry was able to uncover the identity of his guardian angel. “When I found

Mr. and Mrs. Stephen F. Frey

The Herzog-Beckman Foundation

Mr. and Mrs. Paul C. Koch

training programs.

Dr. Hagerman, I was impressed that she worked for a nonprofit with a great

Dr. and Mrs. Harry F. Fry

Dr. Robert B. Hinton and

Mr. and Mrs. Louis Koenig

mission, and the more I learned about Cincinnati Children’s, the more

Mr. and Mrs. Christopher S. Frye

Mr. and Mrs. Chase M. Kohn

impressed I became.”

Dr. and Mrs. Rodney P. Geier

The Homan Foundation

Dr. Catherine L. Krawczeski and

Dr. Judith B. Van Ginkel

Mr. and Mrs. Roger L. Howe

To show his gratitude to Dr. Hagerman, Terry has donated nearly $30,000

Mrs. Deane B. Godfrey

Mr. and Mrs. Harlyn J. Hubers

Mr. and Mrs. David J. Krier

to support the Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) and the Pediatric

Mr. and Mrs. Robert A. Goering

Mr. Raymond A. Hummel

Mr. and Mrs. Gerard Kroger

Advanced Life Support (PALS) programs at Cincinnati Children’s —

Rick and Kimberly Goins

Mr. and Mrs. Brett T. Hungerford

Mr. Henry R. Kruspe

programs that train people to step in and change the outcome in situations

Mrs. Amanda J. Goldsmith

Dr. Stacey Huppert

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph F. Lapinsky

just like Terry’s.

Mrs. Irene E. Goodale

Mr. and Mrs. Dave A. Igel

Mr. and Mrs. Simati L. Laupola

Mr. and Mrs. Glen Gordon

Ms. Tracy Inman

Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. Lavender

“I have two framed pictures of Dr. Hagerman — one at home and one at

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas W. Gougeon

Mr. David Jackson

Mr. Ernest Lawhorn

work. Every time I see them, I am reminded that the only reason I am able

Mr. and Mrs. Bradley M. Govert

Ms. Margaret Jacobs

Mrs. Carolyn Lear

to be where I am today, or any day, is because of Dr. Hagerman. I will never

The Charles M. Grant Foundation

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Jarnicki

Mr. and Mrs. Daniel W. LeBlond

forget her gift of life.”

Dr. and Mrs. John H. Greinwald Jr.

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph A. Jernigan

Mrs. Ruth Lebow

Dr. Andrea C. Hinton

Mr. Richard A. Krawczeski

PARTNER

Dr. and Mrs. Scott E. Dillingham

P R E VA I L

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth I. Cohen

PREVENT

Mrs. Tiffanne Campbell

PREDICT

Mr. James M. Brown


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57

Mr. and Mrs. Paul A. O’Neill

Mr. and Mrs. James E. Schwab

Mr. Gregory L. Lewton

Mrs. Christine Opdycke

Mr. and Mrs. Gary R. Scott

Mr. Terrence Loftus

Mr. and Mrs. Mark Owen

Mr. James L. Scott

Dr. Jennifer M. Loggie

Dr. Shobana Pandian and

Ms. Jenn Mobilio Sennett

Mr. and Mrs. Bruce C. Long

Mr. and Mrs. Alan L. Shaffer

Elizabeth and Wayne Luessen

The Honorable and

Laura M. Shamp

Dr. Maurizio Macaluso

Mr. John M. Shepherd

Mr. and Mrs. David B. Malik

Mr. and Mrs. Ronald A. Panioto Jr.

Mr. Andrew M. Shott and

CARSON

Mr. and Mrs. Greg Martin

Paul and Roberta Pappenheimer

AGE 3

Mr. David Martin

Mr. Jatin Patel

Mr. and Mrs. William Shurman

Playing during a visit

Mr. and Mrs. Howard A. Mayers

Mr. and Mrs. Allen Paxson

Mr. and Mrs. Mike Shutt

to the cancer clinic

Dr. and Mrs. David C. Mayhaus

Dr. and Mrs. William S. Pease

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph M. Sims

Ms. Kristin L. McAllister

Mr. John C. Peebles

Mr. and Mrs. James A. Sluzewski

Ms. Debee McAteer

Mrs. Vivian Planck

Mr. James R. Smale and

Mr. and Mrs. Randall M. McCorkle

Dr. Sheldon Polonsky

Mr. and Mrs. Mark B. McDonald

Ms. Leonora J. Polonsky

Mr. James C. Spaeth and

Mr. Robert W. McDonald

Mr. Jay R. Purdy

Ms. Vicki M. McIver

Drs. John and Judy Racadio

Daniel H. McKinney*

Dr. Sally R. Shott

Mrs. Marcia M. Spaeth

Mr. Wilby S. Tolson Jr.

Mr. and Mrs. Timothy T. Wooer

Carmike Cinemas, Inc.

Paul and Karen Sparling

Mr. James N. Trumble II

Linda Workman, RN, PhD

CDW Corporation

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur J. Raible Jr.

Mr. and Mrs. James W. Sowar Jr.

Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Turner Jr.

Dr. Stavra Xanthakos and

Champion Window Mfg. & Supply

Ms. Sharon M. McLeod

Mr. and Mrs. Stephen A. Ramseur

Mr. and Mrs. Russell L. Speed

Mr. and Mrs. Jonathan M. Ullner

Charles Schwab Foundation

Professor and Mrs. Arthur F.

Mr. and Mrs. Robert D. Rands

Mr. and Mrs. Frederick S. Spohr

Carl S. and Stephanie M. Vorhoff

Dr. and Mrs. Richard A. Yauss

Cincinnati Buick LMA Group

Dr. and Mrs. Stephen M. Rauh

Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey S. Springer

Mr. and Mrs. Christopher and

Mr. and Mrs. Robert S. Yeakle

Cincinnati Financial Corporation

Mr. Besse Medical

Ms. Lori H. Reinhart

Mr. Christopher Stahl

Ms. Mary J. Megginson

Mr. Ken Richardson

Lori J. Stark

Mr. and Mrs. Jason A. Walker

CO R P O R ATI O N S ,

Cronin Ford/Kia

Mr. R. Scott Mezger

J. Erin Riehle

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth W. Stecher

Mr. and Mrs. William H. Ward

FO U N DATI O N S A N D

Custom Glass & Glazing, LLC

OTHER NONPROFITS

Cytek Development Inc.

McMahon III

Dr. Helmut Roehrig

Kathleen Vuturo

Mr. and Mrs. Edward J. Millar

Mr. Ken Riffe

Mr. and Mrs. Laurence R. Steenberg

Dr. Gary D. Webb

Mr. Kelly T. Miller

Mr. and Mrs. Danny L. Roark

Mr. and Mrs. Joe Steinert

The Weichert Kranbuhl

Abby and Jake Mitchell

Ms. Terri A. Roberts

Mr. and Mrs. Bertram H. Steinhard

Dr. and Mrs. Michael L. Mucenski

Mr. and Mrs. Robert T. Roeder

Mr. and Mrs. James A. Steinke

Dr. and Mrs. Stephen E. Muething

Mr. and Mrs. John W. Rogers

Dr. and Mrs. Charles M. Myer III

Family Foundation

Cincinnati Precision Instruments, Inc.

DeBra-Kuempel Abbott Laboratories

Destination Imagination

Mr. Richard A. Weiland

AGAPE Instruments Service, Inc.

Dr. Pepper Snapple Group

Mr. and Mrs. William J. Strasser

Dr. and Mrs. Derek Wheeler

Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation

Duke Energy Matching Gifts Program

Mr. and Mrs. Christopher M. Rowane

Gary and Myrna Stuart

Mrs. Joyce R. Wilhelm

American Modern Insurance Group

Eleven Management, LLC

Mr. and Mrs. John C. Myers

Mrs. Susan Rutkowski

Mr. and Mrs. Allen L. Stuempel

Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey Willett

American Scaffolding, Inc.

Enterprise Holdings Foundation

Mr. and Mrs. Bernard A. Nagengast

Dr. Michael J. and

Ms. Kathleen M. Sullivan

Dr. and Mrs. J. Paul Willging

America’s Charities

Enterprise Rent-A-Car

Mr. Jason W. Napora and

Mr. and Mrs. Brian Sullivan

Mr. and Mrs. Wayne A. Williams

Ashley Ward, Inc.

EXLService Holdings, Inc.

Dr. and Mrs. Howard M. Saal

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas T. Terp

Dr. and Mrs. Stephen Wilson

Association for Research

Family Achievement Center, Inc.

Mr. and Mrs. Jerry T. Nash

Mr. and Mrs. Anthony C. Saladonis

Mr. G. Richard Thomas

Mr. and Mrs. Michael R. Witte

FASCOR

National Philanthropic Trust

Mr. Robert Santangelo

Mr. James W. Thompson

Dr. and Mrs. Eric P. Wittkugel

Bayer Becker

Fiehrer Buick GMC

Mr. and Mrs. Andy Newton

Ms. Mary A. Schell

Dr. Nathan Timm and

Ms. Virginia G. Wittmer

Best Buy Children’s Foundation

Foxx Construction, LLC

Mr. Mark Newton

Mrs. Judith M. Scherer

Mr. and Mrs. William F. Woeste Jr.

BHDP Architecture

Gas America Charitable Foundation

Ms. Debbie H. Ogden

Mr. and Mrs. Alan G. Schmidt

Dr. and Mrs. Thomas U. Todd

Ms. Sally Woliver

Borcherding Buick GMC

GHG Timing, LLC

Mr. and Mrs. Gregory W. Olson

Mr. and Mrs. Stephen J. Schmitz

Mr. and Mrs. Robert T. Tomlinson

Wood-Byer Foundation

Buffalo Wild Wings

Goering & Goering Attorneys at Law

Ms. Alison Momeyer

Dr. Meilan M. Rutter

Mrs. Joan E. Schraml

Dr. Kimberly Daly

in Otolaryngology

PARTNER

Ms. Martha A. Kelly

P R E VA I L

Mrs. Ronald A. Panioto

PREVENT

Dr. Joseph Eapen

PREDICT

Mr. and Mrs. John W. Leikhim


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59

Dr. and Mrs. Charles Deitschel Jr.

Mr. Robert B. Friedman

Grifols Therapeutics, Inc.

Mom Brand Sales

Rod-Techs, Inc.

Mr. and Mrs. Elroy E. Bourgraf Sr.

Dr. Alexander M. Della Bella

Dr. and Mrs. William M. Fye

Hart Productions, Inc.

Money Mailer, LLC

Ronald McDonald House Charities

Mr. and Mrs. Harry L. Bradbury

Barbara Dellerman*

Ms. Alice M. Geier

Haworth Inc.

Morgan Stanley Smith Barney Global

Schneider’s Scrap Metal, Inc.

Joe and Nancy* Brant

Dr. and Mrs. Thomas G. DeWitt

Mrs. Susanne E. Geier

Hill-Rom Holdings, Inc.

Impact Funding Trust, Inc

Semler Industries, Inc.

Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence W. Bratburd

Mr. and Mrs. William O. DeWitt Jr.

Dr. John A. Gennantonio and

Department of Home Care Pharmacy,

Mueller Roofing Distributors, Inc.

Smith Appraisal Service

Mrs. Mary E. Briggs

Audrey J. Dick*

Neyer Properties Inc.

StarShine Hospice Advisory Board,

Mrs. Lela C. Brown

Ms. Lynne Downs

Dr. and Mrs. Roger G. Giesel

Human Arc Corporation

Northgate Chrysler, Dodge, Jeep

Mr. Peter W. Bushelman

Mrs. Linda Drasnin

Gordon John Gilliam

InterAct for Change

Northgate Ford/Northgate Lincoln

Sweeney Associates Agency

Mr. and Mrs. Michael S. Cambron

Ms. Jane R. Dummer

Ms. Gladys R. Glassmeyer

Johnson Investment Counsel, Inc.

Dennis Ott Builders, Inc.

Tactical Advantage Group, LLC

Mr. and Mrs. Lee A. Carter

Mr. and Mrs. Todd M. Duncan

Mrs. Dolores S. Goldfinger

Johnstone Supply/Controls Center, Inc.

Paragon Financial Group

Terracon Consultants

Mr. and Mrs. David J. Cassady

Ms. Donna S. Eby

Mr. Wayne C. Gover

JTM Provisions Co. Inc

Partec North America, Inc.

Tri State Bleeding Disorder

Ms. Michelle B. Christian

Dr. and Mrs. Franklin J. Edge

Dr. and Mrs. Gregory A. Grabowski

Key Foundation Matching Gifts

Performance Automotive Network

Foundation

Dr. Douglas F. Clapp

Joan T. Ehas*

Mr. and Mrs. Alfred P. Hallam

Leesman Lighting

Perry Interiors, Inc.

U.S. Bank

Mr. and Mrs. James W. Cochran

Ms. Anna M. Elsasser

Mrs. Margaret H. Hamer

Lehn Painting, Inc.

Quality Magnetite, LLC

U.S. Charitable Gift Trust

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas G. Cody Sr.

Ms. Gladys R. Elsasser

Mr. and Mrs. Scott J. Hamlin

Macy’s Foundation

RED212

UCB, Inc.

Mr. Reed L. Coen

Mr. and Mrs. Mark G. Essig

Mrs. Marilyn H. Harra

Market Precision Inc.

Reece-Campbell Inc.

United Way of Greater Stark County

Mrs. Charlene F. Combs

Mr. and Mrs. David Falk

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas P. Hatala

Matrix Companies

Regency Realty Group, Inc.

Vistage

Marion Dale Combs

Dr. and Mrs. Michael K. Farrell

Mr. and Mrs. John W. Hayden

MC Mobility Systems, Inc.

August A. Rendigs Jr. Foundation

Willie’s Lakeview, Inc.

Mr. and Mrs. Michael A. Conner

Ms. Terri J. Feie

Dr. and Mrs. Richard B. Heyman

Medical Recovery Systems

Reid Rizzo Foundation

Mrs. Lois A. Cooper

Mr. Michael D. Finch

Mr. and Mrs. Richard L. Hildbold

The Mended Hearts, Inc.

Resource International

Robin T. Cotton and Cynthia Fitton

Michael and Suzette Fisher

Mr. Timothy D. Hildebrand

Dr. and Mrs. Alvin H. Crawford

Mrs. Barbara J. Fitch

Ms. Kathleen L. Hill

Mrs. Geraldine Crawford

Mr. and Mrs. Sheldon R. Flowers

Mrs. Barbara Hoekenga

Dr. and Mrs. Stephen R. Daniels

Mr. and Mrs. Walter C. Frank

Mr. and Mrs. Wallace R. Holzman Jr.

Mrs. Barbara R. DeGarmo

Mr. and Mrs. William A. Friedlander

Ms. Shawn Hooper

Cincinnati Children’s

Cincinnati Children’s

WILLIAM COOPER PROCTER LEGACY SOCIETY The William Cooper Procter Legacy Society recognizes and honors friends of Cincinnati Children’s who inform us that they have included the medical center in their will, estate plan or other deferred gift arrangement. Named in memory of Colonel Procter, whose visionary gift established our research endowment, this society acknowledges these generous individuals who have chosen to leave a legacy to improve children’s lives for generations to come.

Dr. and Mrs. Ira A. Abrahamson Jr.

Mr. and Mrs. Robert D.H. Anning

Mr. and Mrs. Ronald W. Beshear

Ms. Jean L. Abrahamson

Anonymous (15)

Dr. Francis M. Biro and

Dr. and Mrs. Richard I. Abrahamson

Ms. Carole J. Arend

Dr. Ann L. Akeson

Dr. and Mrs. Bruce J. Aronow

David D. Black*

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel M. Allen

Dr. and Mrs. Richard G. Azizkhan

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas C. Blinn

Mr. Robert A. Anderle

Dr. Diane S. Babcock

Mrs. Beatrice Bluestein

ISIS

Mr. James M. Anderson and

Dr. Earladeen D. Badger

Mr. and Mrs. Donald R. Blum

AGE 2

Dr. Corning Benton*

Drs. Thomas F. and Barbara W. Boat

Born seven weeks early

Reverend Marjorie C. Anderson

Ms. Nancy L. Bloemer

Dr. Margretta E. Gennantonio

PARTNER

Dr. Janet A. Borcherding

P R E VA I L

Rite Aid Corporation

PREVENT

Merck Company Foundation

PREDICT

The Gorilla Glue Company


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61

Mr. and Mrs. Robert B. Raines

Dr. and Mrs. Richard J. Stevenson

Mr. and Mrs. Jason Humphreys

Mrs. Olga D. Kanuschak

Mrs. Roberta E. Larrick

Mr. George B. Lott and

Mr. and Mrs. Louis Rauh

Mr. and Mrs. Charles N. Stix

Dr. and Mrs. Joe F. Inman

Molly E. Kaplan*

Ms. Kathleen R. Larson

Dr. and Mrs. Stephen M. Rauh

Ms. Kathleen J. Stotler

Ms. Barbara A. Jackson

Dr. and Mrs. Emanuel Kauder

Dr. and Mrs. Robert J. Lerer

Mr. and Mrs. Ronald W. Lyons

Dr. and Mrs. J. Mark Reed

Dr. C. Frederic Strife and

Dr. Richard L. Jackson and

Mr. Aloysius F. Keller

Dr. and Mrs. James L. Lessard

Mr. and Mrs. Millard H. Mack

Dr. and Mrs. David M. Rider

Dr. and Mrs. Thomas R. Kimball

Dr. Joseph E. Levinson and

Dr. Harold K. Marder and

Reverend Mr. Luis O. Riva Saleta

Dr. and Mrs. David M. Sullivan

Mrs. Betty K. Johnson

Mr. Allen J. King

Andrew F. Robbins Sr.*

Mr. G. Richard Thomas

Ms. Lyn M. Jones

Mrs. Margaret W. Kite

Dr. Philip and Barbara Lichtenstein

Dr. and Mrs. James M. Marrs

Dr. and Mrs. Jeffrey Robbins

Mr. James L. Thompson

Mrs. Mildred A. Jones

Mr. and Mrs. Ronald A. Koetters

Dr. John R. Liu and

Dr. and Mrs. Lester W. Martin

Robert Rogan Burchenal

Mr. and Mrs. Paul H. Tobias

Ms. Margaret H. Jung

Mrs. Gladys M. Kurtz

Mr. and Mrs. Dale L. McGirr

Foundation

Dr. Joseph C. Todd

Mr. and Mrs. Michael S. McGraw

Mr. and Mrs. Gerald J. Robinson

Dr. and Mrs. Thomas U. Todd

Dr. and Mrs. Robert L. McLaurin

Mrs. Phyllis M. Romanow

Dr. and Mrs. Randolph T. Travis

Dr. J. Scott McMurray

Ms. Andrea T. Rosenthal

Mr. and Mrs. Ronald E. Vankalker

Dr. and Mrs. Nelson Melampy

Mrs. Ruth F. Rosevear*

Dr. and Mrs. Jeffrey J. Wacksman

Reverend and Mrs. Roger L. Meredith

Dr. Robert R. Ross

Mrs. Saundra E. Walker

Dr. and Mrs. Richard A. Meyer

Mr. and Mrs. Snowden M. Rowe

Dr. Brad W. Warner and

G. Richard “Dick” Thomas is a Cincinnati native, local businessman and generous

Michael J. Middleton*

Mr. and Mrs. Michael P. Russell

philanthropist who has always had a strong commitment to supporting his

Dr. Lili H. Miles

Dr. Frederick C. and

Dr. Richard B. Warriner III

community. When his granddaughter, Emily, was born with Down syndrome

Mr. John N. Miller

Mr. and Mrs. Todd Washburn

in 1995, Dick and his wife, Jane, turned to the experts here at Cincinnati

Ms. Judith E. Miller

Ms. Arlene J. Sansone

Mr. Dustin J. Waters

Children’s to improve the outcome for not only his family, but for all families

Glenn and Carol Montague

Mr. and Mrs. Robert B. Sathe

Mr. and Mrs. Barry S. Weinstein

who have a child with Down syndrome.

Dr. Anthony J. Mortelliti and

Ms. Donna L. Schiff

Mr. Harvey M. Weitkamp

Dr. and Mrs. Robert C. Schiff Jr.

Dr. and Mrs. Thomas R. Welch

Dr. Judith A. Harmony

MAKING AN IMPACT

DSM DOWNS

$600,000

Dr. Sophia M. Levinson

Ms. Kari A. Jodal

Ms. Barbara N. Wurth

Dr. Jewel D. Slesnick

Dr. Gisella Mortelliti

Mrs. Susan H. Ryckman

Dr. Janet L. Strife

Dr. Barbara B. Warner

In 1995, Dick and Jane gave the initial donation to create the Emily Ann Hayes

Mrs. Marjorie Motch

Roger P. Schlemmer*

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Wert

The Thomas family has

Down Syndrome Research Fund. The fund has fueled important research on

Dr. and Mrs. Charles M. Myer III

Mr. and Mrs. Robert F. Schmidt

Dr. Clark D. West

committed an additional

the effects of Down syndrome. However, research is just a piece of the puzzle, so

Mrs. Gayle R. Nesselhuf

Dr. Rosemary E. Schmidt and

Mrs. Patricia P. Whitaker

$600,000 to expand

the Thomas family partnered with Cincinnati Children’s once again to establish

Mr. and Mrs. Joel L. Newberg

Dr. and Mrs. Jeffrey A. Whitsett

services for children

the Jane and Richard Thomas Center for Down Syndrome. This center provides

Dan and Kris Neyer Family

Ms. C. Jean Schroer

Dr. and Mrs. J. Paul Willging

with Down syndrome.

a wide range of medical care, therapeutic services and support to children with

Virginia L. Niemeyer

Mrs. Mary Jane Schubert

Dr. and Mrs. Robert W. Wilmott

Down syndrome, coordinated through a single, comprehensive program.

Mr. Paul L. Niklas

Mr. and Mrs. Phil F. Schultz

Sharon A. Wing

Mr. and Mrs. Richard H. Okenfuss

Dr. William J. Scott Jr.

Dr. and Mrs. Gordon W. Womack

The next generation of the Thomas family is continuing their parents’ legacy in

Dr. Sonya G. Oppenheimer

Kenneth and Lois Sears

Mrs. Jean E. Wommack

making a significant impact for the Down syndrome community. Through their

Mr. Maurice E. Oshry

Mr. and Mrs. David B. Sharrock

Mr. and Mrs. J.R. and Linda Wood

family foundation, DSM Downs, the Thomas children — Sally Thomas Hayes,

Mr. Bruce A. Pavlech

Dr. and Mrs. Curtis A. Sheldon

Mrs. Joan R. Wood

Margo Thomas Steinbaugh and David Thomas — recently made an additional

Mr. and Mrs. Charles H. Pease

Mrs. Kathleen A. Sherlock

Mr. and Mrs. Robert C. Woodiwiss

$600,000 commitment to expand the services the Thomas Center provides.

Kroger Pettengill*

Mr. Andrew M. Shott and

Dr. and Mrs. Frank C. Woodside III

Ruth B. Phillips

Ms. Lynne T. Wu

Dr. Steven M. Pilipovich

Ms. Miriam R. Siegel

more that needs to be done in the areas of research and treatment for those

Mr. and Mrs. James D. Pistole

Dr. and Mrs. Hugh C. Smith Jr.

with Down syndrome,” Sally, Emily’s mother, says. “Supporting the Thomas

Mr. and Mrs. Geoffrey Place

Dr. James F. Steiner

Center will help make those advances.”

Mr. and Mrs. John J. Planes Jr.

Mrs. Mary Stern

“While so much has been achieved since Emily was born, there is still so much

Mr. Robert C. Kanter

Dr. Sally R. Shott

Mr. and Mrs. John P. Zanotti

PARTNER

Dr. Jennifer M. Loggie

P R E VA I L

Dr. Beatrice C. Lampkin

PREVENT

Dr. Mark A. Kahn

PREDICT

Mr. and Mrs. Terence L. Horan


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Gerald Dingledine

Harold D. Melvin

Throughout our history, Cincinnati Children’s has benefited from thoughtful friends who have provided

Amber V. Semler

Rowan Dinn

Harold L. Melvin

for the future needs of the medical center. With grateful appreciation, we honor the memory of these

Mr. Brayden S. Shindler

Richard Dooley

Julia G. Melvin

donors who provided a gift during the past year through their estate plan.

Mr. G. Richard Thomas

Dr. Harold Downing

James W. Moore

Mr. Max D. Torem

Bennett Drach

Mary Susan Moyer

Ms. Kelly Ulrey

Dorothy M. Effler

Janie Newton

Betty H. Palmer Charitable

Owen Vonderhaar

John Fariello

Dr. Robert W. Niehaus

Estate of Helen M. Hurm

Dr. Ann Weichert

Doug Feld

Richard A. Pandorf

Mary S. Belville Trust

Estate of Molly E. Kaplan

Estate of Dr. Joseph Rauh

Mr. Owen West-Poley

Gerald J. Ficks Jr.

Kroger Pettengill

Estate of Everett C. Branaman

Estate of Marie Katzenstein

Charles W. Scott Trust

Marie Foppe

Dr. Joseph L. Rauh

Estate of Helen M. Branaman

Ida C. Kayser Trust

Michael M. Shoemaker Trust

Ezra J. Forbes

Walter Ruddy

Estate of Raymond Buse III

Robert A. and Marian K. Kennedy

Estate of Carol Ann Sulau

Dr. David N. Glass

Mary J. Rumpke

Estate of Madge Chidlaw

Estate of Nelson T. Wethington

Neil A. Armstrong

Joseph M. Gruber

Ruth Ruscher

Katherine E. Cooke Trust

Dorothy M. M. Kersten Trust

Louise A. Williams Trust

Regan Leigh Arnold

Sydney L. Hartz

Steven M. Scherer

Estate of Audrey J. Dick

Estate of Sarah M. Kienzle

Bernal R. Woodward Trust

Ryan Aschenbach

Jennifer Holotko

Dr. William K. Schubert

The Edward and Edna Frances T.

Estate of Dr. Serene C. Low

Estate of Marian A. Zimmerman

Merideth Baum

Addison G. Hornstein

Sylvia Schwab

Otto Luedeking Trust

Jake Miller Brannon

Sara Hudson

Daniel A. Sehlhorst

Estate of Jacob Gerlach

Estate of Alice E. McIntosh

Nancy F. Brant

Elizabeth M. Igel

Paul D. Seiter

Estate of Arie J. Geurtz

Estate of Mary P. Melvin

Elana R. Brophy

Leo G. Johnson

Amy J. Smith

Jean and Robert Hake Charitable Trust

Estate of Gene A. Mitchusson

Steven A. Cirino II

Samuel J. Johnson

Mr. Henry and Iris Spira

Estate of Joseph W. Heideman Jr.

Marion H. Morrison Trust

Bruce W. Cochran

Alice T. Kruspe

William B. Switzer

Ryan Coffey

Regina Levenson

Tobin Talbert

Katharine Pierson Cooke

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas M.

Tommy Van Hamilton

Hannah Davidson

McCaffrey

Jonah C. Varney

Esther R. Dine

Carol L. McKenzie

Candace Virgin

Louise Nuxoll-Backs Trust

Everlien Charitable Trust

Charitable Trust

Lead Trust

TRIBUTE GIFTS

Master Manish Eapen

When donors make a gift in honor or memory of a loved one, our

Mr. and Mrs. Michael A. Fisher

patients benefit from their generosity. We thank the families and

Mr. and Mrs. Wayne C. Gilsdorf

friends of the following individuals, who have had $1,000 or more

Mr. Henry Hamblen

donated in their name.

Ms. Eleanor R. Hartlage

IN MEMORY OF

Ms. Emily A. Hayes Bailey A. Hemingway IN HONOR OF

Dr. Robin T. Cotton and

Mr. Henry W. Kastner

Dr. Helen Kranbuhl

Ms. Cynthia M. Fitton

Ms. Breanna M. Barber

Carter John Davis

Ms. Kathryn Leikhim

Mr. and Mrs. Lee E. Bartels

Mr. Colin E. Davis

Dr. and Mrs. Marc A. Levitt

Mr. Matthew K. Bormet

Dr. and Mrs. Prasad Devarajan

Mr. Aidan Milmoe

BECKHAM

William Breidenstein

Ms. Isabella R. Dickman

Mr. and Mrs. Ryan Nystrom

AGE 7

Nathaniel Brown

Mr. and Mrs. William H. Drackett

Mr. Samuel Santangelo

Cancer survivor and

Ms. Maya Collins

Ms. Bernadette Dunklin

Mr. Liam P. Sayre

Cincinnati Children’s Champion

PARTNER

Juliet C. Muller Helmsworth Trust

P R E VA I L

William Belmont Backs and

PREVENT

Mrs. Catherine A. Schneider

PREDICT

E S TAT E S A N D T R U S T S


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JUNIOR CO-OPER ATIVE SOCIETY

S P E C I A L E V E N T S A N D C O M M U N I T Y O R G A N I Z AT I O N S

United by a common interest in supporting the

GIFT

$305,450 P R E S I D E N T Kathy Cassady

Special events bring people together to benefit our young patients, while building awareness of the medical

medical center, Cincinnati Children’s auxiliaries have

center and children’s health issues. Cincinnati Children’s thanks each and every volunteer and supporter who

information about our auxiliaries, or if you wish to join

Established in 1910, the Junior Co-Operative Society

in their important work, please call 513-636-0293.

operates and staffs the Gift Shops at Cincinnati

or more are listed here.

are filled with a wonderful selection of toys, games, cards

$250,000 +

$10,000 – $24,999

Loop for Lana — Elana Brophy

Memorial Foundation

and books to lift the spirits of hospitalized children. All

$548,000 P R E S I D E N T Nancy Sorg

proceeds from the Gift Shops are donated to the medical

Cincinnati Walks for Kids

Auto Expo 2013

Olivia J. Murray Foundation

center. Their dedicated volunteers live by their motto,

Celestial Ball

Champions Fore Cincinnati Children’s

“the more you shop, the more we give.”

Sophie’s Angel Run, Inc.

Ferguson Enterprises’ Chipping in

Neurosurgery Chiari Carnival

Quad State Pediatric

GIFT

Our first auxiliary, the Cooperative Society has served

Hearts are Trump

Hope Swings Eternal —

The Plaid Open

Memorial Cancer Research

The Spirit Of Cincinnatus

Lakota East National Honor Society

St. Ursula Academy Orange and

Passport to Forever

Ruth Lyons Children’s Fund

Mitch’s Mission

Max Richard Thornsbury Foundation

The Association of Volunteers has supported the

Tee Off for Project SEARCH —

Rotary Foundation of Cincinnati

Trans-Siberian Orchestra

Convalescent Hospital for Children, an affiliate of

StarShine Hospice Cornhole Classic

Walk for EB

Cincinnati Children’s for 130 years. In addition to

$100,000 – $249,999

financial contributions, members of the Cooperative Society also give generously of their time. Members

ASSOCIATION OF VOLUNTEERS

volunteer for the Division of Child Life and Recreational

GIFT

Therapy, the Mayerson Center for Safe and Healthy

PRESIDENT

$37,195 Jeane Elliott

Children, and the sewing room.

Golf Outing

Fifth Third Bank Golf Outing

K I N DERV ELT OF CH I LDR EN ’S

funds, the association sponsors the Cincinnati Arts

HOSPITAL MEDICAL CENTER

& Antiques Festival each year. This four-day antique

$480,000

CITY PRESIDENT

Charlotte McBrayer

$50,000 – $99,999

Lip Dub Benefiting Spina Bifida

Tri-State Society of Healthcare

show, held in October, is one of the largest and finest

Sample, Savor & Support

in the country.

StarShine Hospice Golf Classic

Our largest fundraising auxiliary, Kindervelt is widely

Crown Productions, Inc.

Dentistry Education

White Flag Football Game (2012)

Rusty Ball

Cincinnati Children’s, for more than 40 years. To raise

GIFT

for Children’s

Golf Outing

Engineers Charity Golf Outing

Win a Wine Cellar

St. Ursula Academy Orange and White

$5,000 – $9,999

Flag Football Game (2013)

Becca’s 3rd Annual Legendary

$25,000 – $49,999

recognized as one of Greater Cincinnati’s outstanding

$2,500 – $4,999

Run for a Cure

Alexandria County Market —

Cincy-Cinco Latino Festival Circus Mojo with Jerry Springer

volunteer organizations. With nearly 1,000 members in

FU N N Y COMPA NIE CLOW NS

Annual Golf Outing Benefiting the

groups around the region, linked by a citywide board

GIFT

$12,569 P R E S I D E N T Donald Bachmann

Center for Infants and Children

Bengals Intrasquad Scrimmage

For the Love of Doug

Liam Nolen Bradley

Foster Care Donations

Bluegrass for Babies

Kendall’s 3rd Annual EB Walk

of trustees, Kindervelt truly lives its mission to “have fun while raising funds” for the patients and families of

with Special Needs

County Market Days

Memorial Golf Outing

Cincinnati Children’s. In its more than 40-year history,

Since 1983, the Funny Companie Clowns have been

Cincinnati Dance Marathon

Catholic Kolping Society/Seth Stevens

Lakota Optimist Club of West Chester

the women of Kindervelt have contributed over $16

delighting children and adults throughout the community,

Children’s Charitable Care

Lebanon Lodge #26F. & A.M.

million to the medical center.

while raising money for Cincinnati Children’s. The

Chase Bank

25-member volunteer auxiliary performs at holiday parties,

Katie Linz Foundation

Chipping in for Children

Loveland Fraternal Order of Eagles

company picnics, birthday parties and festivals, and has

Miami University Dance Marathon

Han’s White Tiger Tae Kwon Do

raised nearly $200,000 for the medical center.

Pray~Hope~Believe 5k Walk/Run

Break-a-Thon

McNick for Cerebral Palsy —

Steinert US, Inc. Golf Outing

Kicks for Kids 16th Annual

The Warrior Run: The Race for Life

Rob’s Kids

Golf Outing

Memorial Soccer Tournament

RGI River Run

Golf Outing 3006 Christmas in July McNicholas High School

PARTNER

THE COOPER ATIVE SOCIETY

P R E VA I L

Children’s Burnet and Liberty campuses. The Gift Shops

PREVENT

gave time, talent and resources for an event that benefited the medical center. Those events that raised $1,000

been essential to our success. If you would like more

PREDICT

AUXILIARIES


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Cincinnati Friends of Charity

Peyton’s Kidney

Southern Ohio Loggers Chapter

Cincy Kids 4 Kids

Pulling for the Kids

Community Christian Academy

Ronald McDonald House

Warren County Career Center

Destination Imagination

S3C Golf Outing 2012

Torch Relay

Boogy-ing for Babies

Charities of Greater Cincinnati

PREVENT

Auctioneer Program

PREDICT

Songs of Hope

S3C Golf Outing 2013

High School — DECA

Gold Wing X Toy Ride

Saint Susanna Parish

Xavier University 2012 Baseball

Green Crest Golf Club

St. John the Baptist School

C AT R I C E

Sycamore Presbyterian Church

AGE 11

Healthworks! Race

Amanda Thomson Charity

Family has been touched

Jane’s Saddlebag 1st Annual

by suicide

Villa Madonna Academy

Golf Outing

$1,000 – $ 2 ,4 9 9

Christmas Walk

Wine Festival

Piano Recital

Acoustic Night at Scotty’s

Kiwanis Club of

Viper Club of America

Arts and Crafts for Amy

Kenwood-Silverton-Madeira

White Elephant Auction in

Beck Family Foundation

Madeira City School District

Family and Friends of Mia Bowser

The Melting Pot of Cincinnati

Willie’s Hidden Valley

Cincinnati Children’s Young

The Moms Club of West Chester

Xavier University Dance Marathon

Professionals Cans for a Cause with MadTree Brewing

Memory of Paul Seiter The Alvin H. Crawford Chair of

The Marjory J. Johnson Chair of

The Luther Foundation Research

Mother of Mercy High School

Chair of Pediatric

The Robert L. Creedon Chair of

The Marjory J. Johnson Chair of

Pulmonary Medicine

Vascular Tumor

The Lester W. Martin Chair of

Translational Research

“Cat Attack”

Pediatric Spine Surgery

Pediatric Hematology/Oncology

Cheviot Lodge No. 755

Our Lady of Grace

Our Lady of Lourdes School

The Division of Critical Care

The Neil D. Johnson Chair of

The Robert and Sarah McLaurin

The EMSC Chair for Pediatric

Chair of Pediatric

The Rob and Jessica Kahn Chair of

Neurosurgery Research

The Gunnar Esiason/Cincinnati Bell

The C. Nelson Melampy Chair of

The Samuel and Molly Kaplan Chair of

The A. Graeme Mitchell Chair of

Knights of Pythias

Pediatric Dentistry Medicine Chair ER Medicine Chair of Life Sciences Research

Radiology Informatics General and Community Pediatrics

Pediatric Anesthesiology

CHAIRS AND FELLOWSHIPS

The Thomas Boat Chair of

The James M. Ewell Chair of

We are grateful to the individuals, families, corporations and foundations

The Dorothy M.M. Kersten Chair of

that had the vision to establish permanent endowment accounts to benefit

The Kevin E. Bove Chair of

The David G. and Priscilla R. Gamble

The M. Susan Moyer Chair of Pediatric

the children and families we serve. Their investment in the future of the

The Kindervelt Chair of Pediatric

medical center provides ongoing support for salaries, equipment and

The Hubert and Dorothy Campbell

The Division of Pediatric

The Robert Myers and Mary

laboratory costs that are necessary to create new knowledge to advance

The Deb Kleisinger Chair of

and improve child health.

The Lee Ault Carter Chair of

The David N. Glass Chair of

The Othilda Krug Chair of

The Sonya Oppenheimer Chair of

Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics

CHAIRS

Pulmonary Medicine Pediatric Pathology Chair of Pediatric Pulmonology Pediatric Ethics

Pediatric Research Chair of Neonatology Gastroenterology Chair Pediatric Rheumatology

Pediatric Cardiology

Pediatric Surgery

Pediatric Gastroenterology Pulmonary Biology

Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Colgate Shoemaker Chair of Pediatric Endocrinology

Novel Cancer Treatment

Division of Cellular and Molecular

The Emma Margaret and Irving

The William F. and Rebecca A.

The Beatrice C. Lampkin Chair of

Balistreri Chair of

The Clark-Helmsworth Chair of

Ophthalmology

The Division of Pathology Chair

The Carolyn Hamlin Chair of

The Beatrice C. Lampkin Chair of

Pathology Development Chair

The Aaron W. Perlman Chair of

The Division of Allergy and

Pediatric Hepatology

Immunology Chair Pediatric Cardiothoracic Surgery

Goldman Chair of Pediatric

Cancer Biology Pediatric Hematology/Oncology

The William S. Ball Chair of

The Robin T. Cotton Research

The Richard and Geralyn Azizkhan

The Marjory J. Johnson

The Joseph E. Levinson Chair of

The Corning Benton Chair of

The Alvin H. Crawford Chair of

Chair of Brain Tumor

Translational Pulmonary

Translational Research

Immunology Chair Chair of Pediatric Surgery

Radiology Research Radiology Education

Chair of Pediatric Otolaryngology Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgery

Otology Research

Child Psychiatry

Human Genetics

Pediatric Rheumatology

Pediatric Rehabilitative Medicine Science Chair

PARTNER

Florence Lodge 33

P R E VA I L

William Henry Harrison


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The William K. Schubert Chair of

The Carl Weihl Chair of General and

The Junior Co-Operative Society

The Edward F. Scully Fellowship in

The Josef F. Warkany Fellowship in

Fellowship in Pediatric

Chair of Pediatrics

Pediatric Research

Community Pediatrics

The Curtis Sheldon and Jeffrey

The Clark D. West Chair of

Chair of Adolescent Medicine

Wacksman Chair of

The Pauline and Lawson Reed Chair of

Pediatric Urology

Pediatric Infectious Diseases

The Frederic and Carolyn Silverman

The Charles H. Sloan Sr., Olive

Chair in Research

The Jeff Robbins Chair

The Lena K. Suter Fellowship in

The Frank C. Woodside and

The Ida C. Kayser Fellowship in

Dinsmore & Shohl Fellowship

The Louise M. Williams Chair of

The Reginald C. Tsang

The Edward L. Pratt Fellowship in

Pediatric Nephrology Pediatric Nephrology

Chair of Pediatric Radiology

Infectious Diseases

Pediatric Pulmonology Pediatric Medicine and Nutrition

Genetic Diseases

in Epidemiology and Biostatistics

Fellowship in Neonatology and Pulmonary Biology

P R E VA I L

The George Rieveschl, Jr.

Human Genetics

FELLOWSHIPS

Louise Sloan, and Charles H. Sloan Jr. Chair of General

The Richard Akeson Fellowship in

Chair of Pediatric Developmental

Pediatric Research

Molecular Biology

Disorders and Intellectual

The StarShine Chair

The William George Bauer

Disabilities

The Ralph J. Stolle Chair of

Fellowship in Pediatric

GIFTS IN KIND

Drawing Dreams Foundation

We thank the following individuals, corporations and organizations that

dunnhumbyUSA

The Richard Ruddy and Barbara

Wriston-Ruddy Chair of Pediatric

The Janet L. Strife Chair of

The Mary Louise Burton Fellowship in

helped ease the stress of our patients and families with their donations of

Entertainment Promotions

toys, services and other non-cash gifts, valued at $1,000 or more.

Mr. Andrew Farrell

Emergency Medicine Research

Pediatric Immunology

PARTNER

The Thelma and Jack Rubinstein

Radiology Quality and Safety

Hematology/Oncology Pediatric Gastroenterology

The Frederick C. Ryckman Chair of

The Division of Pediatric

The Ruth Knittel Dietz Perinatal

FCHS

Dr. and Mrs. James Fitzpatrick

Pediatric Surgery

Surgery Research Chair

Research Institute Fellowship

The Albert B. Sabin Chair of

The Tecklenburg Family Chair of

The Katharine S. and Gerald J. Ficks

Mr. and Mrs. Jeremy Adler

Campbell County FOP Lodge 10

Mr. and Mrs. Jeremy D. Focht

Mr. and Mrs. Justin K. Akin

Cengage Learning

Mr. Grant Forster

Pediatric Infectious Diseases

Pediatric Literacy

Fellowship in Neonatology

The Schlemmer Family Chair of

The Transplant Hepatology Chair

The Andrew Jergens Foundation

Alpha Delta State, Delta Kappa

Chica Bands, LLC

Gatlinburg Convention

The Katherine Stewart Waters Chair of

The Child Life Council

Experimental Hematology and

Endocrinology

Alyssa’s Coloring for a Cause

Chili’s Bar and Grill

GE Aviation

The Junior Co-Operative Society

Amazon.com

Cincinnati Carvers Guild

Girl Scout Troop #42599

Fellowship in Pediatric Diabetes

Ameda

Cincinnati Cyclones

Good360

Anonymous

The Cincinnati Reds

GPW & Associates

Mr. and Mrs. Nicholas D. Arbino

Cincinnati Woodworkers Club

Happy Blankie, LLC

Arnold Printing Company

Cincy Kids 4 Kids

Jeffrey Thomas Hayden Foundation

Ms. April Baker

Cintas Corporation

Ms. Patty Henry

Barnes & Noble

Cisco Systems, Inc.

Mr. and Mrs. Gerald L. Heringer

Mr. and Mrs. Arnold R. Barnett

Mr. and Mrs. Paul D. Clawson

Ms. Connie Hernandez

Mr. and Mrs. Mark C. Bell

Coca-Cola Refreshments

Ms. Beth Hueber

Bennett’s Beavers

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas G. Cody Sr.

IKEA West Chester

Mr. and Mrs. Mark M. Berger

Coney Island

John W. Reiley Elementary School

Mr. R. Scott Boll

Mrs. Barbara W. Cook

Mr. Christian Johnson

Books for Cure

Covidien

Kai’s Love Hats

Books-A-Million

Crayons to Computers

Keegan’s Spirit Foundation

LOGAN

Mr. and Mrs. Hollis J. Bottleson

Andy and Jordan Dalton Foundation

Kenton Elementary School

AGE 7

Breads of the World, LLC

Dave and Buster’s Inc.

Kids Wish Network

Being treated for

Mr. and Mrs. Dennis Browning

Deloitte

Kings Mills Elementary School

bone infection

Caitlin’s Smiles

Mr. Jason Dickman

Kirlin’s Hallmark

Pediatric Research

The Jacob G. Schmidlapp Chair of

Pediatric Hematology/Oncology

Cancer Biology

Fellowship in Pediatric

PREVENT

The Louise W. and Joseph L. Rauh

Pediatric Endocrinology

PREDICT

The B.K. Rachford

Gamma Society International

and Visitors Bureau


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Mr. and Mrs. Douglas M. Ventura

Mr. and Mrs. Kevin Klein

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph C. Seta

Village Care Center

Kroger Company

Sharefax Credit Union, Inc.

Mr. and Mrs. Daniel J. Vonderhaar

Creating Smiles for Kids—

Ms. Debbie Sharp

Mrs. Joni Wainwright

Mr. and Mrs. Rodney Ladrigan

Ms. Jan M. Shroy and

Wall Pops

Mr. Jahad Washington

and Family

Mr. Michael A. Conroy

White’s Tower Elementary School

Linden Elementary School

Mr. Ken Smith

Mr. and Mrs. James Wineinger

Locust Corner Elementary School

Society of American Magicians

Wyoming Middle School

Loveland Fraternal Order

Ms. Doris E. Sockman

Young Presidents Organization Inc,

Sodexo

Macy’s Foundation

St. Ursula Villa Kindergarten

Youth Engaged for Successful Lives

Main Street Market

Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino

Dr. Mark C. Steinhoff

Mr. Scott R. Meister

Mr. John Stephenson

Messer Construction Company

Team Anna Banana

Mom’s Club of Liberty Township

Mr. and Mrs. Scott Tippets

Money Mailer

United Food and Commercial

Mr. Chase J. Morrison

Workers Local 75

Mrs. Pauline A. Murrie

Women’s Network

Nehemiah Manufacturing

University of Cincinnati

of Eagles 3006

PARTNER

Skyline Chili of Middletown

P R E VA I L

Liberty Mutual Insurance

PREVENT

Greg and Valerie Schube

PREDICT

Kirstin’s Kloset

Cincinnati Chapter

and 1st Grade Daisy Troop *Deceased

Company, LLC

Newport Aquarium Oasis Golf Course The Ohio State University

NOTE

As a nonprofit hospital and research center, we are grateful for all gifts

College of Veterinary Medicine

Ms. Catherine A. O’Toole

made to Cincinnati Children’s. Unless otherwise noted, this report lists

Pillows of Hope —

all donors who gave $1,000 or more in fiscal year 2013 (July 1, 2012 through

June 30, 2013). We have made every effort to be accurate and complete

Ms. Katie E. Dickert

Ms. Kelly Prindle

with this listing. Should you find an error or omission, please call the

Quilts for Kids, Inc.

Department of Development at 513-636-6378.

Mr. Ryan N. Ramer Rapidfire Entertainment Jessie Rees Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Eugene K. Reis The Richter & Phillips Company Rob’s Kids The Alicia Rose “Victorious” Foundation Ms. Elaine Sachetti

JEREMY

Mr. and Mrs. Edgar A. Sandoval

BO R N AT 24 WE E KS


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TRUSTEES EMERITI

William M. Kent SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT

Ralph Burchenal

Gary “Doc” Huffman, Co-chair

Barbara J. Fitch

Kit Andrews

Kroger Pettengill

Uma R. Kotagal, MD

Thomas Brennaman

Geoffrey Place

SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT

Thomas G. Cody, Esq.

M. Denise Kuprionis, Esq.

Alvin Crawford, MD

Thomas G. Cody, Esq.

Peggy Mathile

Barbara Fitch

Michael Fisher

CHAIRMAN

Jane Portman

Beth Guttman

PRESIDENT AND CHIEF

John Steinman

Michael Hirschfeld, Esq.

EXECUTIVE OFFICER

Michael Fisher

Arnold W. Strauss, MD

Patrick Lafley

PRESIDENT AND CHIEF

Pamela Terp

Jon Lawhead

Richard G. Azizkhan, MD

EXECUTIVE OFFICER

Felicia Williams

Peggy Mathile

SURGEON-IN-CHIEF

Craig Young

Phyllis McCallum

Vicki L. Davies TREASURER

TRUSTEES EX OFFICIO

SENIOR MANAGEMENT

Charles Dean Kurth, MD ANESTHESIOLOGIST- IN - CHIE F

Mark Mumford CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

and Senior Vice President, Finance

Frederick Ryckman, MD

Michael McGraw

Elisabeth Baldock, PhD

SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT

Jane Portman

SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT

Medical Operations

J. Scott Robertson

Human Resources

Elizabeth A. Stautberg, Esq.

Rt. Reverend Thomas Breidenthal

Liza Smitherman

S ECR E TARY

THE EPISCOPAL DIOCESE

Peter Strange

Brian D. Coley, MD

SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT

OF SOUTHERN OHIO

Allen Zaring IV

RADIOLOGIST-IN- CHIEF

Development

S. Kay Geiger

PHYSICIAN AMBASSADORS

Dwight E. Ellingwood

Elizabeth A. Stautberg, Esq.

SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT

GENERAL COUNSEL AND

Planning and Business Development

SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT

NOTE

James A. Saporito

BOARD OF TRUSTEES

as of June 30, 2013.

Sharry Addison

PRESIDENT

Robert D. H. Anning

Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky PNC

John P. Perentesis, MD, FAAP

Carol Armstrong

Financial Services Group

Robert S. Kahn, MD, MPH

Richard G. Azizkhan, MD

Legal and Public Affairs

Michael K. Farrell, MD

Lynwood Battle

Gary “Doc” Huffman

Michael S. Cambron

PRESIDENT AND CEO

Willie F. Carden Jr.

Ohio National Financial Services

AUXILI AR IES

CH I E F - O F -STAF F

Arnold W. Strauss, MD PHYSICIAN-IN-CHIEF;

Nancy Sorg

Scott J. Hamlin

CHAIR

Lee A. Carter

PRESIDENT

CH I E F O P E R ATI N G O FFICE R

Department of Pediatrics,

Thomas G. Cody, Esq.

The Cooperative Society

David Dougherty

University of Cincinnati;

Cheryl Hoying, PhD, RN

DIRECTOR

Nancy Krieger-Eddy, PhD

Kathy Cassady

SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT

Cincinnati Children’s

Michael Fisher

PRESIDENT

Department of Patient Services

Research Foundation

Vallie Geier

Junior Co-Operative Society

Louis D. George

Marianne F. James

Beth Guttman

Charlotte “Char” McBrayer

SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT

Michael Hirschfeld, Esq.

PRESIDENT

Information Services, and

Mark Jahnke, Esq.

Kindervelt

Chief Information Officer

PARTNER

Joyce J. Keeshin

OFFICERS OF THE BOAR D

Lists reflect leadership

Quality, Safety and Transformation

P R E VA I L

Bret Caller

Infrastructure and Operations

PREVENT

OUR LEADERS

S. Kay Geiger, Co-chair

PREDICT

FOUNDATION BOARD


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PREDICT

MEAGAN

Cash and Equivalents

$249,190

$169,667

Marketable Securities

259,916

258,903

223,850

214,355

Patient Accounts Receivable, Net of Allowances

AGE 14

for Uncollectible Amounts

Ran in the Warrior Run

Other Current Assets

132,255

126,599

CURRENT ASSETS

865,211

769,524

908,535

840,978

Funds Held in Trust

62,803

3,678

Other Long-term Assets

65,873

81,324

1,111,650

937,327

$3,014,072

$2,632,831

$239,891

$227,089

26,995

20,365

266,886

247,454

Long-term Debt

494,274

467,223

Other Long-term Liabilities

286,807

441,819

1,047,967

1,156,496

Unrestricted Net Assets

710,714

397,514

Property and Equipment, Net of Accumulated Depreciation

FINANCIAL REPORT

Interest in Net Assets of Supporting Organizations TOTAL ASSETS

F I S C A L Y E A R | J U LY 1 , 2 0 1 2 –J U N E 3 0 , 2 0 1 3

(Dollars In Thousands)

O P E R AT I N G R E V E N U E S A N D E X P E N S E S

O P E R ATI N G REVENUES

Net Hospital Patient Services Revenue

FY 2013

$1,332,851

FY 2012

$1,245,557

Professional Services Revenue

263,380

252,401

Research Grants

157,693

149,858

Other Operating Revenue

177,581

162,987

1,931,505

1,810,803

TOTAL OPER ATING R EVENUES

O P E R ATI N G

Salaries and Benefits

EXPENSES

LIABILITIES

LIABILITIES

AND NET

Accounts Payable and Accrued Expenses

ASSETS

Current Portion of Long-term Debt CURRENT LIABILITIES

1,162,116

1,072,522

Services, Supplies and Other

491,944

474,033

Depreciation

110,378

119,574

14,247

15,926

1,778,685

1,682,055

Temporarily Restricted Net Assets

170,437

156,702

$152,820

$128,748

Permanently Restricted Net Assets

1,084,954

922,119

1,966,105

1,476,335

$3,014,072

$2,632,831

Interest TOTAL OPER ATING EXPENSES AVA I L A BL E TO R E I N V E S T I N T H E M I S S ION

TOTAL LIABILITIES

NET ASSETS

TOTAL NET ASSETS TOTAL LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS

PARTNER

FY 2012

P R E VA I L

ASSETS

FY 2013

PREVENT

CONDENSED BALANCE SHEET


76

S TAT I S T I C A L H I G H L I G H T S

PATI E NTS

FY 2013

FY 2012

FY 2011

FY 2010

FY 2009

30,804

30,579

30,951

32,981

31,217

Average Length of Stay (days)

4.8

4.7

4.4

4.1

4.4

Emergency Department Visits

127,376

124,274

121,875

125,130

114,985

1,161,009

1,144,858

1,087,260

1,078,798

1,003,079

Admissions (includes short stay)

Patient Encounters

PRODUCTION CREDITS

PRODUCED BY

Department of Marketing and Communications Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Jane Garvey, Vice President

O UTPATI E NT

Primary

78,905

65,347

65,446

65,915

60,243

VISITS

Specialty

828,743

832,317

797,280

793,814

735,926

63,403

65,247

29,868

28,374

29,635

6,237

6,365

6,141

5,667

5,667

Test Referral Center SURGICAL

Inpatient

PROCEDURES

Outpatient

25,951

27,094

26,168

25,492

24,669

Surgical Hours

45,655

44,240

42,874

40,825

39,462

WRITER / PROJECT DIRECTOR

Beatrice Katz

DESIGN

Real Art

DONOR RECOGNITION PEOPLE

Active Medical Staff

1,493

1,572

1,516

1,498

1,442

Total Employees

13,852

12,932

12,654

12,368

11,666

Full-time Equivalents

11,799

10,976

10,781

10,455

9,871

Jenn Sennett Kim Burdett

PHOTOGR APHY

Ryan Kurtz Additional photos from the Cincinnati Children’s archive

PRINTING

Wendling Printing Company

Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, a 501 (c3) nonprofit organization, is a teaching affiliate of the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine. The medical center is accredited by The Joint Commission; Commission on the Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities; and the Association for the Accreditation of Human Research Protection Programs, Inc. We have been awarded Magnet recognition from the American Nurses Credentialing Center for quality patient care and nursing excellence. Our pediatric residency training program is approved by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. Cincinnati Children’s affirmatively seeks to attract to its staff appropriately qualified persons of diverse backgrounds. The medical center does not discriminate against any employee or applicant based on race, color, creed, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity/expression, ancestry, national origin, age, disability, political affiliation or

OWEN AGE 9

At the cancer survivor picnic

status as a disabled veteran or veteran of the Vietnam conflict.

Cincinnati Children’s ranked third among all pediatric hospitals in the 2013 U.S. News & World Report survey of best children’s hospitals.

©2013 Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center


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Cincinnati Children’s 2013 Annual Report