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Draw your disease We want to see things from a child’s perspective 3333 Burnet Avenue, MLC 9012 Cincinnati, Ohio 45229-3026

Is your child battling a chronic condition or overcoming an illness? We would like your child to describe it in a drawing.

Boy with headache, by Will Leach, age 5

Have your child draw how he pictures the disease and send in the artwork with a bit of an explanation about your family’s experience.

own and think about Send your art to Young and Healthy, Marketing & Communications, ing hidden dangers Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45229. Or email it to youngandhealthy@cchmc.org advice from

Please include your child’s name, age, school, grade and contact information, along with a brief explanation of your experience. We will post a gallery on our Cincinnati Children’s Facebook page.

wa , m d • h e at h e r m i t t i g a , m d p r i n g d a l e - m a s o n p e d i at r i c s

munity Pediatricians Affiliated TheChildren’s deadline is Aug. 1, 2012. with Cincinnati cincinnatichildrensblog.org Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center @cincychildrens youtube.com/cincinnatichildrens

Slow down and think about avoiding hidden dangers advice from

pa r u l b awa , m d • h e at h e r m i t t i g a , m d f r o m s p r i n g d a l e - m a s o n p e d i at r i c s

Community Pediatricians Affiliated with Cincinnati Children’s

young and healthy S U M M E R 2 0 12

Families return to Cincinnati Children’s to share their stories. See Page 4.

Summer Safety The doctors’ orders Story on Page 1

Ask the Pediatrician The skinny on skin Story on Page 2 Jenna and Jake Danneman are just one of Cincinnati Children’s stories of hope.


Slow down and think about avoiding hidden dangers advice from

parul bawa, md • heather mittiga, md from springdale-mason pediatrics Community pediatricians affiliated with Cincinnati Children’s

Most accidents that land families in the emergency room each summer are preventable, say doctors at Cincinnati Children’s and the American Academy of Pediatrics. 1 Fireworks look fun, but even sparklers

can reach temperatures exceeding 1000 degrees F. Enjoy fireworks by attending a show run by professionals.

2 Playgrounds are great, but beware of

hidden dangers: Hot slides may burn legs, and open S hooks or protruding bolts suggest poor maintenance.

3 Bike riding is a wonderful family activity. Don’t forget a bike helmet for every member of the family, to prevent head and face injuries. Be sure the helmet fits correctly and has a label indicating that it meets safety standards. 

4 Vacations and amusement parks are

mainstays of summer fun. Review what your children should do if they become separated from you. Be sure your kids know your cell phone number. 

5 All-terrain vehicles (ATVs) look fun, but

children younger than 16 should not be allowed to drive or ride on them. 30 percent of all ATV-related deaths and hospital visits involve children.

6 Inflatable pools are a popular way to cool

off in your own backyard. But beware: These pools are especially dangerous to kids younger than 5. Never leave children unattended by a pool, no matter

the size, not even for a minute. Drownings can occur in only a few inches of water.

7 Backyard trampolines seem like a

great way to get kids active outdoors, but they are simply too dangerous. In the United States each year, there are nearly 100,000 trampoline injuries. 

8 Lawn-mower accidents frequently

lead to summer injuries. The safest bet is to keep children out of the yard while you are operating a lawn mower. Never let a child be a passenger on a ride-on mower. Children need to be at least 12 before they are old enough to operate a mower themselves.

9 Life jackets are key if your family

plans to boat, canoe, jet ski or simply play near lakes and rivers this summer. Make sure your child wears a comfortable life jacket that fits snugly. Encourage your child to keep a life jacket on by wearing one yourself.

10 Scooters and skateboards are fun

as kids get older, but make sure they are never ridden near moving traffic. Most accidents are because of falls, so ensure your child or teen always rides with a helmet and protective gear to minimize the chance of injury.


Ask the Pediatrician Q.

A.

ScienceSnapshots

What do you recommend in terms of sunscreen for kids? And what’s your advice for choosing bug spray? Sunscreen is essential for keeping skin safe from ultraviolet (UV) light, which can cause skin damage.

Protecting young skin has long-lasting effects: Good practices now can prevent skin cancer later in life. Some medications, such as acne medicines, make skin especially sensitive. SPF 15 or higher: Sunscreen should have a sun-protection factor (SPF) of at least 15 and be used for children 6 months of age and older. Look for a “broad spectrum” sunscreen, the kind that protects against both UVA (aging rays) and UVB (burning rays). Sunscreen is most effective when used 15 to 30 minutes prior to sun exposure. Apply it generously, and reapply every 2 hours. Zinc oxide is effective on areas especially sensitive to burns, like the face. Try to stay away from the sun in the middle of the day when rays are most damaging. Protective clothing, such as shirts with built-in sun protection, or hats, can help. Remember sunglasses for eye protection. Since water and sand reflect sunlight, consider surf shirts for the beach or pool.

Keep bugs at bay: Insect bites can be more than just itchy. They can spread disease. Avoid areas where insects gather. Wearing long sleeves and pants can help protect you from bug bites. You may want to consider a bug spray.

They offer real benefit in tough times

Experts give edge to ‘reduced glycemic load’

We all know that friendship is priceless. Now, the positive power of your child’s BFF can be measured by science.

After comparing three common diets for obese children, scientists say children are most likely to stick with the “reduced glycemic load” approach.

The study found that children with best friends around had lower cortisol levels in their saliva versus those who faced stressful events alone.

Use sprays sparingly because of the potential for toxicity. Lightly spray exposed skin and do not reapply. Avoid spraying on the face. Wash spray off your body and clothing after use.

Have fun outdoors this summer and remember that prevention is best when it comes to burns and bites.

Best diet for obese kids?

A recent study of 5th and 6th graders, published in Developmental Psychology, reports that the presence of a best friend directly protects a child from the stresses of negative experiences, such as getting in trouble with a teacher or having an argument with a classmate.

The American Academy of Pediatrics considers bug spray containing DEET the most effective repellent against biting insects and says it is safe for children 2 months of age and older. However, concentrations of no more than 30 percent DEET should be used for children.

Avoid sunscreens containing DEET because reapplication can lead to too much DEET exposure. Alternatives include: Picardin (less toxic but also less effective), Permethrin sprays (only for use on clothing) and essential oils (also less effective).

Best friends good for health

In time, high cortisol levels can lead to immune suppression, decreased bone formation and other changes. Sarah Selickman Heidt, MD, a community pediatrician affiliated with Cincinnati Children’s, practices at Pediatric Associates of Mt. Carmel. She is president of the Cincinnati Pediatric Society.

If you have a question for the pediatrician, email youngandhealthy@cchmc.org

NewsBriefs

Unlike portion-control diets, this approach focuses less on calorie counting. It allows certain generous portions of “unrestricted” carbs, such as fruit, vegetables and 100-percent whole grains. This less restrictive way of eating, says Shelley Kirk, PhD, RD, of Cincinnati Children’s, may make it easier for families to follow a healthy food plan for the long term. Study results appear in the Journal of Pediatrics. Kirk recommends The Family G.I. Diet, by Rick Gallop, and other books in The G.I. Diet series as good resources for nutritional advice and recipes.

Learning to make the right food choices is more important than counting calories, experts say.

ResearchStudies Research studies help us learn more about medical conditions and come up with better treatments. Ultimately, studies help us find cures for diseases. Learn how you can help by joining a research study.

Tell Me a Story

GO ONLINE to www.cincinnatichildrens.org/story to watch our series of patient stories. If you have a story to share, email us at tellmeastory@cchmc.org

Autism and social life What: Researchers want to learn more about the social lives of kids with autism spectrum disorders.

New research building going up We are adding a 15-story research building to the main campus at Cincinnati Children’s. The $180 million expansion, expected by summer 2015, will allow our scientists to continue to make new discoveries, find cures and deliver the best care for kids.

Parents find answers here

Competitive spirit unbroken

Girls just wanna have fun

Chase Tieber was born in 2009 with a brachial plexus injury. His parents were worried. Would he be healthy? Would he ever be able to throw a football? With the right surgery and therapy, the answer is yes on both counts.

Zoe Bruce, a competitive gymnast, was practicing on the high bars two years ago when she fell, breaking and dislocating both elbows. Today, her competitive spirit is unbroken. She says her injury made her stronger.

Nurses at Cincinnati Children’s know something that helps LeCarol Batson get through each of her blood draws. LeCarol, who has sickle cell disease, loves to sing her way past the pain. Her caregivers even sing along.

2

www.cincinnatichildrens.org/youngandhealthy

Advisers: Chris Peltier, MD, and Zeina Samaan, MD Editorial Consultant: Sarah Selickman, MD Managing Editor: Tanya Bricking Leach | Designer: Kacie Snyder To Subscribe: Sign up at www.cincinnatichildrens.org/subscribe

young and healthy

Volume 25, Issue 2

©2012 Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center 3810 0612 124000

Pay: Families will receive a $20 gift card for completing surveys during the 60- to 90-minute visit. Details: Contact Carrie Thomas at carrie.thomas@cchmc.org or 513-803-3580.

Pediatric Primary Care moving

Teen sleep study

The Pediatric Primary Care Center, in Location A on the main campus at Cincinnati Children’s, is moving in mid-July. The center will move across the street to the second floor of the 3430 Burnet Ave. building.

What: The study will explore how teenagers are affected

Save the date for the Walk Mark your calendars. The next Cincinnati Walks for Kids event will be Saturday, Oct. 20 at Coney Island.

Our latest U.S. News rankings Young and Healthy is published by Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center and The Cincinnati Pediatric Society. Produced by the Department of Marketing and Communications, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, MLC 9012, 3333 Burnet Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45229-3026 or call 513-636-4420.

Who: Kids ages 10 to 17 who have been diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders, are verbal and have fluent language skills and have a parent available to participate.

Go to www.cincinnatichildrens.org to see our latest U.S. News rankings.

by not getting enough sleep.

Sleep study for kids with epilepsy

Who: Healthy 14- to 16-year-olds who do not drink a lot of caffeine (no more than two soft drinks or one coffee per day) may be eligible to participate.

What: Scientists want to know whether giving a dietary supplement to children with epilepsy will improve their sleep and provide better seizure control.

When: Study visits will take place Aug. 6 to 25.

Who: Children ages 6 to 11 who have seizures may be eligible to participate.

Pay: Families will be paid up to $225 for time and travel. Details: Contact Julie Field at julie.field@cchmc.org or 513-636-5360.

Pay: Families will receive up to $750 for time and travel. Details: Contact Twila Rogers at twila.rogers@cchmc.org or 513-636-0599.

young and healthy |

SUMMER 2012

3


look at me now

n’s, At Ci nc in na ti Ch ild re We m en d he ar ts .

w e fix sm ile s.

The Oster felds Maryn Osterfeld was diagnosed with hip dysplasia at 9 months old and needed surgery. Just when she should have been learning to crawl or walk, she had to spend months in a spica cast, then a hip brace. Now 2 years old, those days are a distant memory. She wears a brace only when she sleeps. “She can crawl, walk, run and just learned to jump,” says her mom, Mara.

We repa ir br ains . We fig ht infe ctions . ave. We he lp fa milie s be br ro ng . We he lp ki ds gr ow st ch an ce s. We gi ve th em se co nd n th ey sa y, An d w e ce le br at e w he

“L o ok at me no w.”

Several months ago, we asked families to send in photographs from their experiences at Cincinnati Children’s so we could look back at their medical journeys. More than 100 families sent in snapshots. We invited 14 families back to tell us about how far they’ve come. These are their stories.

Th e McL an es

four months early. She 2 pounds when she arrived Lilly McL ane weighe d less than el per fora tion . Her first ati Chi ldre n’s to rep air a bow nee ded surg ery at Cin cinn r mon ths at Cin cinn ati still too big for her. Afte r fou diap ers wer e doll -sized and 3 years old. “The nurses enough to go home. She’s now Children’s, she grew strong could stay strong for our ds of encouragement so we and other staf f always had wor some of the nurses. ley, who still stays in touch with tiny girl,” says her mother, Ash

The Buffi ngton s

Jaelynn Buffington was born in 2010 with a bilateral complete cleft lip and palate. She had to be fed with a syringe for her first month of life. Specialist s at Cincinnati Children’s performed surgeries and fixed her smile. Her mother, Crysta, says it’s nothing short of “amazing.”

T h e K ro ge rs

rgery, they were ck ne eded skull su ’s nd out their son Za fou er og Kr a cin ris Cin nati Children When David and Ma me. Specialists at sa the be er ev ve lop pr op erl y. ere d if life would d eye mu sc les de scare d. They wond lp Za ck ’s sk ull an he to s rie re. rge su le care he received he pe rfo rm ed mu ltip just fine, thanks to ing do d an old ars Today, Zack is 8 ye

The Cur tis Fam ily Harrison Curtis was born on March 6, 2008. A routine ultrasound had warned that he had a heart condition. On March 9, Harrison underwent a nine-hour surgery to repair his heart. He spent a month at Cincinnati Children’s recovering. His two older brothers were not allowed in the hospita l room during his recover y, so the hospital’s Child Life specialists arrange d for them to meet their new brother via webcam. “Today, Harrison is doing great and is under the continued care of the kind people at the Heart Institute at Cincinnati Children’s,” says his mom,

The Stout s

Peyton Stout was born two months early with such severe complications that doctors told his parents he would not survive. After three months of specialized care at Cincinnati Children’s, Peyton beat the odds. He has been diagnosed with a mild case of cerebral palsy, but he is a thriving 5-year-old. “He walks with assistance and talks non-stop,” says his mom, Katie. “Thank you to all of the wonderful doctors, nurses and therapists at Cincinnati Children’s.”

>>>

Allisha.

4

www.cincinnatichildrens.org/youngandhealthy

young and healthy |

SUMMER 2012

5


Th e Robe rt s Fa m ily

T h e D an n em an s

When Holly Dannema n was pre gnant with her sec ond set of twins, a routine ultraso und revealed complications. One twi n, Jake, had devel op ed a ne ar-fat al co nd itio n. At 29 weeks, he require d immediate surgery to save his life . Twin Jenna wa s alo ng for the rid e. Ho lly, an em erg en cy me dic ine physi cia n, says no amount of me dical training could have prepared her and her hu sb an d, Jim , for the fam ily’s me dical journey. Nine years later, Jake is an ath lete. Jen na is a scholar and a dancer. They’re the mid dle ch ildr en in a pa ck of six kid s. “N ot a day go es by tha t I don’t think of how ble ssed we are,” their mother says.

T h e H a a r m e y e rs ry in August 2010 to remove a

had brain surge ly Austin Ha armeyer after Austin sudden ctors discovered it Do . ma rno e ve tur ca brainstem . His “before” pic e at 13 months old sid ht rig his of e e bandag lost the us they removed the after surgery, when d loves to an was from the day old ars hat.” He’s now 3 ye g cin “ra his d . lle that they ca ys his mom, Paula was very risky,” sa ry rge su he “T . mb run and cli is doing great.” report that Austin “But I am happy to

Jane Roberts spent her first year in and out of Cincinnati Children’s for hear t surgeries to correct a series of congenital hear t

defe cts. “Being told she probably wouldn’t survive was devastating,” says her mom, Andrea. “Seeing her pull through four open-heart surgeries, months of hospital

stays and year s of therapy was ama zing.” Today, she is 9 year s old and perfectly healthy. As a third-grader, she had the reading level and comprehension of a ninthgrader. The family’s “before” picture is of Jane connected to lots of tubes and monitors. Today, her family can hug her

The Clay tors His parents thought Austin Claytor just had a cough when they took him to the doctor in 2009. It turned out to be a staph infection that nearly wiped out his airway and lungs. Doctors placed him on an artificial lung machine. There were moments when his family wondere d if he would ever recover. But he pulled through. He had to relearn how to walk and talk, but today he is getting ready for junior high. He loves hunting and fishing and is back to playing sports again. “We really don’t notice much difference in him,” says his dad, Otis, “other than he is super strong.”

The Daisey Family

T h e Per ez Fam ily

n Perez In Januar y 20 07, Eva geries had the last of four sur ing any to keep him from hav ltiple more ear infe ctions. Mu d his infe ctions had impaire spe ech hearing, and he had a allowe d delay. The surgeries ical child, him to hear like a typ m the and he graduate d fro m two gra pro y rap the spe ech a great years ago. At 12, he has ll and is vocabulary, hears we team. captain of his baseball Cincinnati, “Nothing compares in vice we or any where, to the ser en’s,” had at Cincinnati Childr Today, says his mom, Laura. glad to Evan is 11 years old and be healthy.

much more easily.

The Pott ebau ms

Katelyn n Pottebaum’s arrival eight weeks early was fraught with complic ations. Katelyn n’s underdeveloped lungs made it hard for her to absorb oxygen, and caregive rs at her birth hospita l said there was nothing else they could do. But to everyon e’s amazem ent, Katelyn n held on. Nurses at Cincinn ati Children’s slowly weaned her off oxygen so she could breathe on her own, and before long, she was able to go home. “The exit from the hospita l was bittersweet,” says her mother, Christin a. “We are forever indebte d to every single person who came into contact with Katelynn. I swore at that moment we’d never forget Children’s and what they did for us.”

Chase Daisey was a healthy 1-year-old when he was admitted to the hospital after battling a fever for several days. An infection that had started in his throat turned into an abscess and infected his lymph nodes. He needed two surgeries and a two-week stay at the hospital. “I remember wondering how we ended up there,” says his mom, Julie. “But we knew we were in the right place. The healing that happens inside these walls is powerful. The people are amazing. We will never forget our time here and those who touched our lives.”

The Bircks Anna Birck was born in December 2002 with a congenital diaphragmatic hernia, a life-threatening birth defect that causes respiratory distress. She had surgery at Cincinnati Children’s three days after birth. “We brought her home on Christmas Eve, the best gift we could have wished for that Christmas,” says her mom, Jane. Anna is now a happy, healthy 9-year-old.

Scan to watch our “Look at Me Now” Video.


Draw your disease We want to see things from a child’s perspective 3333 Burnet Avenue, MLC 9012 Cincinnati, Ohio 45229-3026

Is your child battling a chronic condition or overcoming an illness? We would like your child to describe it in a drawing.

Boy with headache, by Will Leach, age 5

Have your child draw how he pictures the disease and send in the artwork with a bit of an explanation about your family’s experience.

own and think about Send your art to Young and Healthy, Marketing & Communications, ing hidden dangers Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45229. Or email it to youngandhealthy@cchmc.org advice from

Please include your child’s name, age, school, grade and contact information, along with a brief explanation of your experience. We will post a gallery on our Cincinnati Children’s Facebook page.

wa , m d • h e at h e r m i t t i g a , m d p r i n g d a l e - m a s o n p e d i at r i c s

munity Pediatricians Affiliated TheChildren’s deadline is Aug. 1, 2012. with Cincinnati cincinnatichildrensblog.org Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center @cincychildrens youtube.com/cincinnatichildrens

Slow down and think about avoiding hidden dangers advice from

pa r u l b awa , m d • h e at h e r m i t t i g a , m d f r o m s p r i n g d a l e - m a s o n p e d i at r i c s

Community Pediatricians Affiliated with Cincinnati Children’s

young and healthy S U M M E R 2 0 12

Families return to Cincinnati Children’s to share their stories. See Page 4.

Summer Safety The doctors’ orders Story on Page 1

Ask the Pediatrician The skinny on skin Story on Page 2 Jenna and Jake Danneman are just one of Cincinnati Children’s stories of hope.


Young and Healthy - Summer 2012