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WESTERN HILLS PRESS

Your Community Press newspaper serving Addyston, Bridgetown, Cheviot, Cleves, Covedale, Dent, Green Township, Mack, Miami Township, North Bend, Westwood

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2012

75¢

BECAUSE COMMUNITY MATTERS

Cheviot considers city services fee Money to cover $600,000 deficit By Kurt Backscheider kbackscheider@communitypress.com

Cheviot officials are considering enacting a fee for city services to help meet a projected 2013 budget deficit. An ordinance to institute a city services fee was introduced at the city council meeting Tuesday, Dec. 4. A second reading of the ordinance is scheduled to take place at a special council meeting at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 11. The third and final reading is expected at the regular council meeting at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 18. Ward 2 Councilman Dennis Dinkelacker, chairman of coun-

cil’s finance committee, said a city services fee would help the city address an estimated $600,000 budget shortfall in 2013. The city sought a 4-mill operating levy on the November ballot that would have generated $440,000 annually for the city, but Dinkelacker voters rejected the measure. Dinkelacker said the elimination of the Ohio estate tax, a decrease in property values and increases in operating, fuel and insurance costs have all contributed to the impending deficit. He said the city already slashed $110,000 from the budget for the fourth quarter of 2012,

and council plans to make additional budget cuts for next year. “We’re still going to make budget cuts in all our departments,” he said. The proposed city services fee on the table now is a $12 monthly fee for Cheviot residents, Dinkelacker said. City Zech officials are still working to determine what the monthly fee should be for business owners and individuals who own multi-family residences. He said Cheviot charged a trash collection fee three years ago, which brought in $432,000 for the city, and the fee rates under this proposal are similar to those charged in 2009.

“We’re not trying to gouge anyone,” Dinkelacker said. “This is not a way for the city to take advantage of people. We have to come up with something to alleviate the economic situation until something else comes up, whether it be at the state or federal level.” Councilwoman Kathleen Zech, an at-large member of council, voted against enacting a city services fee. “I have to vote in line with my basic principles,” she said. “I don’t like fees, I think they are an unvoted tax.” Zech said she respects the opinions of the council members who support the ordinance because the city does need to close its deficit, but she prefers asking voters to consider another levy request in spring 2013 rather

than charging a fee. “I want to keep our city services. I’m very proud of our services and we have excellent services,” she said. “This isn’t an easy decision for me, but I just have a major objection to fees.” Dinkelacker said city officials never enjoy asking residents to pay more, but something has to give. Even if the city charges a fee, he said residents still will pay less for trash collection than they would if the service was outsourced to a private company. Zech said no matter what happens she’s confident the city will find a solution. “Cheviot will prevail,” she said. “We’ve made it through tough times before.”

Good Samaritan given honor of lighting nativity By Kurt Backscheider kbackscheider@communitypress.com

Matt Huesman said it was a privilege to be chosen to flip the switch to illuminate this year’s nativity scene in Cheviot. Huesman, who owns Maury’s Tiny Cove restaurant in Cheviot, kicked off the holiday season by lighting the nativity at the display’s dedication Sunday, Nov. 25. “It was a nice honor,” he said. Each year the Cheviot Westwood Community Association sponsors the nativity scene, which sits in front of the AutoZone on Harrison Avenue throughout the holidays. Mindy Sweeney, vice president of the community association, said the nativity scene is a tradition in Cheviot, and the community association likes to celebrate the illumination of the nativity at its dedication each year. In the past, she said the association has sponsored a poetry contest among area school children and bestowed the honor of turning on the lights to the contest winner. She said this year association members decided to go in a different direction and recognize a good samaritan from the West Side. Sweeney said they chose Huesman as this year’s good samaritan because he helped save a

man who was choking at his restaurant this past fall. She said Huesman sprang into action, and the manner in which he remained calm during the emergency situation played a large role in saving the man’s life. “People do good things all the time, but they often go unnoticed,” Sweeney said. “It’s not everyday you hear about someone who helped save another person’s life. We thought that was great, so we decided to honor Matt.” Huesman, who’s owned Maury’s for four years, said he initially told Sweeney to honor someone else when she called to let him know he was selected to light the nativity. “I didn’t think I was deserving of it,” he said. “I was just doing my job.” He said he was working in the restaurant’s kitchen when he heard that an 82-year-old man had been choking for several minutes. Having helped four other choking victims while working in restaurants throughout his career, Huesman said he ran into the dining room to administer the Heimlich maneuver to the guest. “He was gray. He was lifeless,” Huesman said. “I was very concerned. He was here with his family, and they were all in shock.” The Heimlich maneuver didn’t

Matt Huesman, owner of Maury’s Tiny Cove in Cheviot, had the honor of flipping the switch to illuminate this year’s Cheviot nativity scene. The Cheviot Westwood Community Association sponsors the nativity each year, and the organization chose Huesman to switch on the lights because he helped save a restaurant guest who was choking. KURT BACKSCHEIDER/THE COMMUNITY PRESS work, so he said he called 911. He said the dispatcher directed him to lie the man on the floor, turn his head and begin chest compressions until paramedics arrived. “The paramedics got here very quickly,” he said, noting the emergency responders were able to remove a large piece of food

PEARL HARBOR VICTIMS HONORED

STUDENTS HELP CLASSMATE

Fiften wreaths were used to remember those who died. Full story, B1

Taylor students raise money for new van. Full story, A2

from the man’s throat. “One of the paramedics told me he was impressed with my levelheadedness in the situation. He said if more people could react as calmly as I did, there would be more people saved.” Huesman said he was just happy the man was OK. He said the man was taken to the hospital to

Contact The Press

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be checked out, and later released in good condition. Sweeney said as part of being recognized as this year’s good samaritan, the community association also donated $250 in Huesman’s name to an organization of his choice. He chose the Cheviot Branch Library as the recipient. Vol. 85 No. 4 © 2012 The Community Press ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

See page A2 for additional information

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NEWS

A2 • WESTERN HILLS PRESS • DECEMBER 12, 2012

Taylor students hope to buy van through ‘Wheels for Allie’ By Kurt Backscheider kbackscheider@communitypress.com

Students at Taylor High School are pitching in to help one of their own. Through the Wheels for Alli campaign organized by the school’s Key Club, students are raising money to assist Taylor junior Alli Acey and her family. Acey has cerebral palsy and uses a motorized wheelchair to get around. Her family needs a new, dependable van equipped with a lift to transport Acey and her wheelchair, and Taylor students want to buy it for them. “The Key Club raises a lot of money each year to support a variety of outside organizations,” said Taylor counselor Katie Ryan, who serves as adviser of the Key Club. “The club decided instead of helping organizations outside of Taylor, let’s focus on addressing a need in our own Taylor family.” Ryan said Acey maintains a positive presence and her infectious smile lifts the spirits of everyone around her.

Taylor High School counselor Katie Ryan, right, Key Club adviser, is helping members raise money for junior Alli Acey’s family to buy a new van. KURT BACKSCHEIDER/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Acey and her mother, Sue, are active in Taylor’s Key Club and they spend countless hours helping others. Ryan said the students and staff at Taylor felt it was time to give back to this young woman. “Alli and her mom do everything they can to help others and extend kindness,” she said. “It’s now our turn to give back.” Members of the Key Club have organized sever-

al fundraisers to support the project and reach their goal. “I joined the Wheels for Alli campaign because I felt that this was an important project that was close to home, and with someone I have known my entire life,” said Taylor junior and Key Club member Luke Roberto. Taylor senior Sarah Russo, also a Key Club member, said Taylor is a small, close-knit school, and when students saw an opportunity to help a fellow Yellowjacket they jumped on it. “It is amazing to see Alli help out her community, but we decided it is time the community gave back to her,” Russo said. She said students formed The Hundred Club. One hundred students and faculty have each committed to raising $100 on their own time by April 1, she said. “The students are raising this money in all different kinds of ways,” Ryan said. The Key Club also has an online fund-raising web-

site at www.indiegogo.com , she said. People can search for Wheels for Alli and make a donation via credit card or PayPal. Ryan said the school is working with Fuller Ford and M.C. Mobility Systems to track down the perfect vehicle for the Acey family. They need to raise $28,000, and so far she said they’ve raised more than $10,000. “We’re about service, we’re about kindness and we’re about extending that to others,” Ryan said. “If we work together we can do this.” For more information, contact Ryan at kryan@trlsd.org or 4673200.

Index Calendar .............B2 Classifieds .............C Food ..................B3 Life ....................B1 Police ............... B11 Schools ..............A8 Sports ................A9 Viewpoints ........A12

HOLIDAY WINDOW DRESSINGS

Seton High School sophomores Gabby Hirlinger, Abbi Sandmann, Megan Awad and Katie Grace won first place for their design on the front window of Hart Pharmacy as part of Price Hill’s Holiday on the Hill window painting contest. Seton seniors Colleen O’Brien, Christy Rowland and Sydney Vollmer took second place for their design at The Women’s Connection. Seton seniors Rachel Stock, Laura Mersmann, Danielle Drinkuth and Abby Awad earned third place for their painting at Cincinnati Federal Savings and Loan. Seton juniors Elora Tonnia, Laura Wolter and Christine Anneken took fourth place for their painting at the Skyline Chili on Warsaw Avenue. KURT BACKSCHEIDER/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

WESTERN HILLS PRESS

Find news and information from your community on the Web Addyston • cincinnati.com/addyston Bridgetown • cincinnati.com/bridgetown Cheviot • cincinnati.com/cheviot Cleves • cincinnati.com/cleves Dent • cincinnati.com/dent Green Township • cincinnati.com/greentownship Hamilton County • cincinnati.com/hamiltoncounty Mack • cincinnati.com/mack North Bend • cincinnati.com/northbend Westwood • cincinnati.com/westwood

News

Marc Emral Senior Editor ...............853-6264, memral@communitypress.com Kurt Backscheider Reporter ............853-6260, kbackscheider@communitypress.com Monica Boylson Reporter ..............853-6265, mboylson@communitypress.com Melanie Laughman Sports Editor ......248-7573, mlaughman@communitypress.com Tom Skeen Sports Reporter .............576-8250, tskeen@communitypress.com Nick Dudukovich Sports Reporter .....248-7570, ndudukovich@communitypress.com

Advertising

Melissa Martin Territory Sales Manager ...............768-8357, mmartin@enquirer.com Lisa Lawrence Sales Manager.........................768-8338, llawrence@enquirer.com

Delivery

For customer service...................853-6263, 853-6277 Sharon Schachleiter Circulation Manager ..................853-6279, sschachleiter@communitypress.com Maribeth Wespesser District Manager .......................853-6286 Stephanie Siebert District Manager.......................853-6281

Classified

To place a Classified ad ................242-4000, www.communityclassified.com

To place an ad in Community Classified, call 242-4000.

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NEWS

DECEMBER 12, 2012 • WESTERN HILLS PRESS • A3

Employment offers wage, tuition reimbursement By Monica Boylson mboylson@communitypress.com

College of Mount St. Joseph freshman Matt Maurer participates in the Education At Work Program which offers a wage and tuition reimbursement for college students. THANKS TO JILL EICHHORN.

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“It’s an added incentive for students to maintain a higher grade-point average while earning real-life job skills that employers seek,” Aretz said. Maurer said he likes the flexibility of the job. “They really work around your school schedule and they try to get you ready to start your career,” he said. In the meantime, he said he’s happy to make money and pay for school. “It’s like any other job,” he said. “But it helps me pay for college. I’d recommend it to anyone.”

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Matt Maurer may seem like any other 19-year-old working his way through college but the College of Mount St. Joseph freshman is earning more than rent money. The Price Hill resident works as a customer service representative for Education At Work, which hires college students and offers to pay up to an additional $6,000 per year of college tuition based on the student’s GPA and course load. “My summer job had ended and I needed a new job for school,” Maurer said. “When I heard they offered tuition reimbursement, I was all over it.” The college teamed up with the company’s owner Dave Dougherty, former president and CEO for Convergy’s, to offer scholarships to Mount St. Joseph students and they recently announced that they will be opening a call center in Delhi Township. “We’ve been partners with (Education At Work) since day one,” Mount President Tony Aretz said. “We hope to open the center in Delhi next year and employ about 200 students.” Students who participate in the program can earn money for tuition every six months. Aretz said that students at the Mount must have a 3.0 GPA and be taking 12 credit hours to qualify for $3,000 every six months. Students who take fewer than 12 credit hours are still eligible for a reim-

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NEWS

A4 • WESTERN HILLS PRESS • DECEMBER 12, 2012

Photos with Santa helps food pantry By Amanda Hopkins westnews@communitypress.com

Taking a family photo with Santa could help stock a Westwood food pantry this holiday season. Spirit Video Productions is hosting several opportunities to meet Santa Claus and take photos. Ten percent of the proceeds will go to the Westfed Food Pantry at Grace Lutheran Church on Boudinot Avenue. Tom Broughton of Cheviot takes many of the photos. He said the pantry serves about 150 families and also provide toiletries and desserts. The pantry is stocked by

Greg Creech of Westwood waves to traffic along Harrison Avenue at the photos with Santa site. He is a volunteer with Westfed Food Pantry. AMANDA HOPKINS/FOR THE COMMUNITY PRESS

a partnership with Grace Lutheran, the Gamble-Nippert YMCA, Joy Communi-

ty Church, St. James Episcopal, Cheviot United Methodist, St. Catherine

and Westwood First Presbyterian. Broughton, whose son T.J. Broughton is president of Spirit Video Productions, said photos and memory cards are available for purchase at the visit with Santa. Customers can also reduce the prices of their photos by bringing in canned goods. For every canned good brought in, Broughton will reduce the price by 50 cents. “We want to load (Westfed Food Pantry) up with a bunch of food,” Broughton said. The main event to help the food pantry will be held Sunday, Dec. 16, from 1-4

p.m. at Grace Lutheran Church on Boudinot Avenue. Residents are invited to visit with Santa, take photos and bring canned goods directly to the food pantry. Greg Creech of Westwood is filling Santa’s boots for all photo opportunities. This is Creech’s first time in a Santa suit. He said it has been a great experience helping make others smile while in character as Santa and collecting food for needy families. “Having to stay jolly all the time has helped my attitude,” Creech said. Santa will be available for photos from 6-9 p.m. Dec. 13, and 17-20; 9 a.m.-1

p.m. Dec 15 and 21-23; 1-4 p.m. Dec. 9 at 3349 Harrison Ave. Public parking is available on North Bend Road near The Public House. Santa will also will be taking photos at Westfed Food Pantry 1-4 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 16. Westfed Food Pantry is at Grace Lutheran Church at 3628 Boudinot Ave. Cost is $12 for a 4-inch x 6-inch photo, $15 for a 5inch x 7-inch photos and $20 for memory card with all of the photos taken during the visit with Santa. To learn more about the photos with Santa or Spirit Video Productions, visit http://bit.ly/VQ3IJ7

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NEWS

DECEMBER 12, 2012 • WESTERN HILLS PRESS • A5

BRIEFLY Santa coming to North Bend

The village of North Bend is hosting a brunch with Santa Claus from 10 a.m. to noon Saturday, Dec. 15. Families and children are invited to join village officials and Santa for hot chocolate, doughnuts and a treat from the jolly old elf himself. Don’t forget to bring a camera and get a photograph with Santa. The event takes place at the Village of North Bend Council Hall, 21 Taylor Ave.

December graduation

The College of Mount St. Joseph will hold its firstever December commencement ceremony this year. This year’s ceremony will be 7 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 13, in the College Theatre, and 65 students will receive degrees. The students graduating are a mix of undergraduate and graduate students, and are receiving degrees from several academic divisions. Carrie K. Hayden will be featured as the commencement speaker. Hayden is the co-chairwoman of the Cincinnati Cancer Center Community Advisory Council and a member of the Associate Directors Committee of the Cincinnati Cancer Center. She was also only the second woman to serve as chair of the United Way of Greater Cincinnati Foundation Board. Her husband, John, served as a member of the college’s Board of Trustees

during the 1990s. They have served as chairs and co-chairs of Spring Jubilee, the Mount’s scholarship fundraiser. They live in Anderson Township. The Mount held a special December commencement ceremony in 2011 for a student whose mother was critically ill with cancer, and decided to offer the option this year to all eligible students.

Hall. Tickets for the concert are reserved seating and cost $7. For concert tickets, contact Mary Sunderhaus 251-3324. The Elder Glee Club and Seton Concert Choir are sponsoring a Christmas Concert Strolling Dinner 5:30-7:45 p.m. Dec. 15 (before the concert), and after the 3 p.m. concert until 7:30 p.m. Dec. 16. Cost is $20 per person. Refreshments include dinner by the bite, appetizers, desserts, beer and wine and specialty drinks. For information on the strolling dinner and to make reservations, contact Maria Allen at 922-2493.

Mercy concert

Mother of Mercy High School will hold its annual Christmas Concert at 7:30 p.m. Friday, Dec. 14, and Saturday, Dec. 15, in the school theater, 3036 Werk Road. Guests are invited to enjoy performances by Mercy’s freshman/sophomore and junior/senior choirs, Vocal Ensemble and Hand Bell Choir. This year’s theme is “A Christmas Auld Lang Syne.” Tickets will be on sale in Mercy’s Main Office the week of Dec. 10 and sold prior to each performance for $6. Mercy alumnae who graduated between 1987 and 2012 and were a part of Mercy’s Music Department are invited to come on stage for either performance and sing Merry Christmas With Love. Alumnae are asked to RSVP to Kim Zang, Mercy’s music director, at zang_k@motherofmercy.org.

Teens can make gifts at library

Green Township teenagers who need an inexpensive gift or want to make something cool for themselves can get creative at the Green Township branch library, 6525 Bridgetown Road. The library presents a teen program called Sew Fun Holiday Gifts. Participants can make no-sew crafts to give or keep. The program is open to those ages 12 to 18. There are openings for 25 participants. Call 369-6095 for more information.

Library hosts teen baking competition

Area teenagers can put their baking skills on display at the Covedale branch library, 4980 Glenway Ave. Teens are invited to prove their baking abilities could put the Keebler elves

Dinner and concert

The Seton-Elder Performing Arts Series Christmas Concert & Strolling Dinner will be 8 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 15, and 3 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 16, in the Seton High School Performance

to shame at the library’s No-bake Cookie Competition. The competition starts at 2 p.m. n Saturday, Dec. 15. For information, call 369-4460.

E-reader tryout

Thinking of buying an eReader or tablet for the book lover on your holiday shopping list? When it comes to picking the right device, the choices can be overwhelming. That’s why the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County presents an eReader “Petting Zoo” program, where you can try an iPad, Nook Tablet or Kindle Fire and learn about

downloadable books and music. Staff members will be available to answer questions at 7 p.m. Monday, Dec. 17, at the Green Township branch library, 6525 Bridgetown Road. Call 3696095 for information.

Looking for a job?

The Western Hills Job Search Satellite Group meets every Wednesday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the Westwood First Presbyterian Church, 3011 Harrison Ave. The group welcomes anyone in a job search to hear speakers and support each other in career transitions. Coffee and speakers are

scheduled every other week. Supportive relationships are built as participants improve marketing materials and job search skills. Schedule for December and January: » Dec. 19 - Susan McCord: Re-energize your job search through the holidays » Jan. 2 - Diane Kinsella: Emotional balance through the job search » Jan. 16 - Vickie Wolfe: Resume writing » Jan. 30 - Sunitha Narayanan: Branding yourself for the job search For information, call Judy Rahm, group leader, at 608-9359.

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NEWS

A6 • WESTERN HILLS PRESS • DECEMBER 12, 2012

Santa Claus helped North Bend officials get into the holiday spirit at the inaugural Light Up North Bend celebration. From left, are village officials and staff members Rick Schultz, Dave Moorman, Marilyn Kramer, Mayor Doug Sammons, Ron Nunnery, Santa, Fran Romweber, Ron Hartoin and Ed Sullivan. THANKS TO MARILYN KRAMER

North Bend illuminated

Light Up North Bend brought holiday merriment to the community and to all the travelers who use Three Rivers Parkway Friday, Nov. 23. The village’s beautification committee was happy to have this festive occasion to launch the first of its many endeavors to enhance

the village of North Bend. Mayor Doug Sammons illuminated the lights on an 8-feet-tall live Christmas tree amid caroling and the enjoyment of hot chocolate. While there was no evidence of Dasher and Dancer, Santa Claus did arrive on a Miami Township fire truck to hand out toys to

children in attendance. Special thanks to Tepe Landscaping for the live tree and Joe Cowan for providing holiday music. Thanks to Nick Gemmell of the Miami Township Fire Department and to the Cleves village for helping with the mechanics of the Christmas decorations.

F o r p e o pl e w h o w a n t t o h e a r b e t t e r .

North Bend Mayor Doug Sammons caught up with Santa Claus at the inaugural Light Up North Bend celebration. The event was organized by the village’s beautification committee. THANKS TO MARILYN KRAMER

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North Bend officials and community members gathered at the gateway of the village Friday, Nov. 23, to celebrate the holiday season and illuminate an 8-feet-tall Christmas tree during the inaugural Light Up North Bend. THANKS TO MARILYN KRAMER

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NEWS

DECEMBER 12, 2012 • WESTERN HILLS PRESS • A7

McAuley classes shop at Findlay Market

Twenty-four students in McAuley High School’s Creative Cooking and Contemporary Living classes recently visited historic Findlay Market. The objectives of the field trip were to learn about and see the advantages of buying local, learn about Over-the-Rhine’s

neighborhood history and experience unusual or exotic foods not found at most grocery stores. The students were greeted by Cheryl Eagleson, marketing director for the Corporation for Findlay Market. Eagleson talked to the students about the definition of a public

market, the architecture of the surrounding buildings and the history of Findlay Market. The rest of the learning activities included a scavenger hunt, shopping and window shopping at the various vendors, and purchasing food for lunch at the market.

Katie Weierman, right, learns about Himalayan salt from a worker at Colonel De Gourmet Herbs. PROVIDED.

Katie Calder, left, and Julia Fahey sample gelato from Dojo Gelato. PROVIDED.

Cheryl Eagleson, center, talks to the group of McAuley students. PROVIDED.

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SCHOOLS

A8 • WESTERN HILLS PRESS • DECEMBER 12, 2012

WESTERN HILLS

PRESS

Editor: Marc Emral, memral@communitypress.com, 578-1053

ACHIEVEMENTS | NEWS | ACTIVITIES | HONORS

CommunityPress.com

St. Martin ties in service through a shoe box

The month of October was rather busy for St. Martin of Tours community with the launching of a service project known as Operation Christmas Child. By partnering with churches worldwide, Operation Christmas Child strives to collect gift filled shoe boxes for the very young who reside in developing nations. This outreach, instituted by the Eighth

Grade Leadership Council, challenged the children to think globally with the power to respond locally, by sharing the gift of Christmas with children across the world. Nearly 350 boxes were filled by members of the St. Martin of Tours Family with school supplies, toys and hygiene items with an estimated value of $9,000. In

addition, many packages were woven with the Good News of Christ through photographs and special notes of love and joy. The closing of the Operation Christmas Child Project was marked with a liturgical celebration. Members of the Leadership Council placed every shoe box, radiating a message of love and goodness.

Participating in Operation Christmas Child were, from the left side at the bottom step and ending at the bottom right: Ellen Wolterman, Katelyn Rutherford, Cristina Bagley, Madeline Bagley, Becky Rutherford, Kevin Bonecutter, Noah Bonecutter, Julia Bueter, Laurie Huff (coordinator of Religious Education), Jordan De Noma, and Jordyn Gilday. THANKS TO LAURIE HUFF

HONOR ROLLS ST. XAVIER HIGH SCHOOL

The following students have earned honors for the first quarter of the 2012-2013 school year.

Freshmen

Mother of Mercy juniors, from left, Danielle Stahl, Tara Voegelpohl, Sara Heyd, Taylor Maas, Katie Wernke and Corey Specht show off their Mole Day T-shirts. PROVIDED

Mercy celebrates with chemists on Mole Day One hundred Mother of Mercy students packed the Bob Evans Restaurant in Western Hills to celebrate Mole Day on Oct. 23. Chemists and chemistry students throughout the world celebrate the mole, which is used to represent an extremely large quantity: 6.02 times 10 to the 23rd power objects. Chemists can calculate the mass of a mole of one element, and then for another element. When the two masses are mixed, chemists know that they are mixing the same number of atoms; one mole of each type of atom. To celebrate Mole Day, Mercy chemistry students met at 6:02 a.m. for breakfast. The celebration continued throughout the school day as students wore homemade T-shirts and hung posters alerting all students to Mole Day.

First honors: Hogan Armbruster, Jacob Barnes, Brenton Bender, Nicholas Bettner, Anthony Boeing, John Bubenhofer, Logan Burke, Corey Cooper, Alexander Deters, Ronald Fago, Scott Flynn, David Girmann II, Charles Hamad Jr., Daniel Hanson, Brady Hesse, David Homoelle, Brian Kemper, Daniel Klare, Brendan Link, Blake Litzinger, Nicholas Meyer, Chase Neville, Jared Patterson, Samuel Peter, Patrick Raneses, Austin Rieke, Jacob Robb, Justin Scott, Brandon Siefring, Luke Striebich, Michael Van Schoik, Austin Walter, Alex Weyler, Mark Weyler, David Wimmel Jr. and Maxwell Wimmel. Second honors: Franklin Auberger, Blake Bethel, Jesse Childress, Nicholas Crouch, Jacob Davis, Carlos Inigo De Veyra, Jacob Edwards, Benjamin Elsen, Grady Garvey, Luke Haffner, Daniel Helmrath, Michael Hirlinger, Mitchell Huesman, Nickolas Jung, William Jung, Erik Kroeger, Brian Louis, Joseph Ludmann, Martin Ludwig II, Jon Martin, Reed Mechley, Anthony Morgan II, Joseph Olding, Phuc Pham, Travis Rebsch, Sebastian Schmeusser, William Tolliver, Kurtis Wagner and Matthew Wittrock.

Sophomores

Mother of Mercy students await the opening of Bob Evans Restaurant on Oct, 23 to celebrate Mole Day at 6:02 a.m. PROVIDED

First honors: Michael Ashley, Justin Blake, Nicholas Boyle, Daniel Bussard Jr., Guido Discepoli, Charles Hollis, Howard Hughes III, Maxwell Kern, Brian Lambert, David Leisring, Luke Liesch, Mason Loth, Raymond Metzger, Nathan Moorman, Adam Norby, Cory Parks, Carter Raleigh, Kevin Re, Thomas Roth, Jacob Ruff, Andrew Schmidt, Nicholas Talbot, Kevin Unkrich, Andrew Wagner, Matthew Weber and Benjamin York. Second honors: Andrew Ahlers, John Bosse, Sean Brown, Rodney Burton, Brandon Copenhaver, Alexander Dahl, Michael Dechering, Jonathon Deifel, Alexander Dwyer, Samuel Garrity, Benjamin Glines, Griffin Hargis, Spencer Helwig, John Klare, Alexander Klawitter, Karl Luken, Daniel Luken, Andrew Mooney, Nicholaus Urbaetis and Michael Vitucci.

Juniors First honors: John Bender II, Ryan Budde, Kevin Deye, Joseph Dirr, Benjamin Egner, Jack Ellerhorst, Benjamin Fahey, William Grothaus, Nathan Haberthy, Matthew Hein, Timothy Kemper Jr., Benjamin Klare, Benjamin Kleeman, Jacob Murnan, Conner Murphy, Noah Olson, Kevin Polking, Brendan Reilly, Austin Sullivan, John Talbot, Kyle Wagner, Matthew Weiskittel, Matthew Whitacre, Ryan Yeazell and Jason Zheng. Second honors: Chad Archdeacon, Nicholas Betsch, Mason Brunst, Tyler Burkhart, Josue Carrero Acevedo, John D'Alessandro Jr., Keegan Doyle, Bryan Geoppinger, Matthew Hanson, Tyler Harley, Robert Hellmann III, Alex Helmers, Joseph Heyob, Glen Hird, Jonathon Jung, Kyle Jung, Nicholas Kelly, Joseph Kluener, David Kraemer, Kevin Kraemer, Matthew Kuhlmann, Michael Lanter, Matthew Locaputo, Andrew Martin, Thomas Millea, Bradley Osuna, Marvin Raneses, Benjamin Schmeusser, Zachary Schmucker, Joseph Schneider, Matthew Schramm, Bryce Schwierling, Nicholas Tensing, Rowan Villaver, Daniel Vitucci, Sean Walsh and Joel Zahneis.

Seniors First honors: Ryan Berning, Toebben Bolte, John Delisio, Jeffrey Ehrman, Adam Grace, Stephen Haffner, Ryan Helmers, Mark Jacob, Jonathan Kallschmidt, Grant Lynch, Jacob Maurer, Kevin McCarthy, Christopher Merz, Mark Meyer, Spencer Miller, Matthew Mooney, Michael Oevermeyer, Mark Panning, Edward Runkel, Andrew Schad, Jack Schanz, Ryan Schroeck, Michael Sohngen, Michael Spoelker, Kevin Talbot, De'Sean Weber, Jacob Weitzel and John York. Second honors: Patrick Armbruster, Dominic Bellissemo, Charles Bowman, Christopher Denney, William Deters, Brian Feist, Adam Greivenkamp, Kevin Grote, Brandon Hart, Michael Hautman, Brandon Herrmann, Christopher Hofmann, Joseph Huhn, Kevin Jones, Matthew Keller, Nicholas Locaputo, Andrew Price, Matthew Reagan, Mitchell Sander, Samuel Schultz, Michael Spohr, Christopher Stefanou, Alexander Veder and Samuel Weiskittel.

WOMEN OF DIVERSITY

One hundred Mother of Mercy students filled Bob Evans in Western Hills. The school holds its annual Mole Day celebration at the restaurant each year. PROVIDED

The 30th and newest extracurricular club at McAuley High School is Women of Diversity. The club was started by six students and is moderated by Laurel Chambers and Ted Ward. The purpose of this club is to promote awareness of different cultures, traditions and ethnicities. Some planned activities of this new endeavor include an international Christmas dinner, book discussions, guest speakers, dancing, making jewelry and other crafts, planning a Black History month activity and attending diversity events outside McAuley. Four of the new club’s student leaders are, from left, Brittany Stephens, Brielle Stephens, Alycia Cox and Tiffany Turley. PROVIDED.


SPORTS

DECEMBER 12, 2012 • WESTERN HILLS PRESS • A9

WESTERN HILLS

PRESS

Editor: Melanie Laughman, mlaughman@communitypress.com, 513-248-7573

HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | RECREATIONAL

CommunityPress.com

Panthers getting it right on the ice By Tom Skeen tskeen@communitypress.com

Things are starting to head in the right direction for the Elder High School hockey program and coach Joe Del Prince. In what is the third season as a varsity program, the Panthers sit at 2-5 on the young season and are coming off a 10-17-6 season a year ago after losing 27 games in the 2010-2011 season. “I think we are doing really good,” Del Prince said. “The players were great against some good competition in Columbus and down here… The injury bug bit us hard, but the other guys have played very good.” The team’s two wins have come against Perrysburg at the Dublin Chiller in their seasonopener, and Dublin Scioto in what was the Panthers’ first win over the program since they started playing them three seasons ago. “These are games we are losing 10-0 a couple years ago,” Del Prince said. “We are heading in the right direction, and I think we are going to have a really solid team this year.” Leading the Panthers early in the season is junior center A.J. Harvey. Through seven games he has 11 points and is coming off a season where he accounted for 65

percent of the Panthers’ points and was named first-team AllSouthwest Ohio High School Hockey League. “He’s been playing his whole life and is just a real talented kid,” his coach said. “He is just a real good player.” Harvey has three goals and an assist in the two Elder victories. Sticking with the offense, senior forward Nick Kollman has five goals on this young season and was named second-team AllSWOHSHL a season ago. Others expecting to have major contributions this season are senior team captain Dominic Marsala – who is injured but will return this season – Adam Sponaugle and Joel and Jason Martini. Perhaps the most vital part to the Panthers’ success this season will be the play of goalie Nick Spicker. His save percentage thus far is 93 percent and in a 3-0 loss to St. Xavier Dec. 2, he stopped 52 of 55 shots on goal. “He is the reason we don’t lose 10-0 anymore,” Del Prince said. “With the (defensemen injured) in front of him, it’s all on him. He loves it and is almost glad about it. He is the running back that wants 40 carries a game.” The Elder Christmas Tournament will be Dec. 26-28 at the Cincinnati Gardens.

PRESS PREPS HIGHLIGHTS By Tom Skeen tskeen@communitypress.com

Boys basketball

» Taylor picked up its first win by beating Oyler 49-47, Dec. 1. Senior Matthew Nash led with 19 points. Harrison defeated Taylor 4934, Dec. 4. Senior A.J. Urmston had 12 points. Reading narrowly defeated Taylor 35-33, Dec. 7. Urmston led with eight points. » Gamble earned its first win with a 51-39 victory over SCPA Dec. 3. Senior Christopher Martin led all scorers with 28 points. After being tied at 29 at the half, the Gators lost to Williamsburg 67-60, Dec. 5. Junior Kenney Mil led with 18 points. The Gators were outscored 3623 in the second half on their way to a 68-44 loss to Riverview East Dec. 7. Isaac Phillips led with 13 points. » Western Hills lost to Lakota East 69-59, Dec. 4. Kevin BraceyDavis had 21 points. » Elder dropped its season opener 70-62 to Princeton Dec. 4. Sophomore Brad Miller scored a team-high 23 points in his varsity debut. Elder won its first game over Purcell Marian 68-55, Dec. 7. Miller and Devin Pike led with 17 points. » Oak Hills dropped to 0-2 following a 54-39 loss to Fairfield Dec. 7. Ben Laumann led with nine points.

Girls basketball

» Oak Hills lost to Colerain 5341, Dec. 1. Macy MacArthur and Sydney Leitz had seven points. » Taylor hammered Oyler 5821, Dec.1to get its first win. Junior Allie Dolan led with 16 points. Taylor lost to Reading 57-25, Dec. 5. Junior Kalyn Schmitz led with six points. » After leading 30-24 at the half, Mercy outscored Colerain 29-14 in the second half on its way to a 59-38 victory Dec. 4. Senior Kelley Wiegman led with 19 points. Mercy dropped to 2-2 after a tough 62-59 double overtime loss to Ursuline Dec. 6. Senior Rebec-

ca Tumlin led with 18 points. » Seton took down Oak Hills 54-42, Dec. 4. The Saints held a one-point lead at the half, but blew the game open in the fourth quarter behind 21 points from senior Marisa Meyer. Senior Amanda Braun led the Lady Highlanders with 17 points. Mount Notre Dame defeated the Saints 57-43, Dec. 6. Meyer had 19 points. » Western Hills held a 30-13 lead at the half and went on to win 52-37 over Taft Dec. 4. Junior Kamya Thomas had 16 points.

Boys bowling

» La Salle beat Mt. Healthy Dec. 3, 2,630-2,161. Junior Will Mullen rolled a high series of 438. » Elder lost to GCL rival Moeller 2,627-2,477, Dec. 4. » Oak Hills lost to Fairfield 2,827-2,747, Dec. 6. Sophomore Brandon Combs led with a 460 series. » Taylor moved to 3-1 on the season after a 2,600-2,290 victory over McNicholas Dec. 7.

Girls bowling

» Mercy defeated GGCL rival McAuley 2,462-2,224, Dec. 4. Junior Sabrina Weibel rolled a 405 series to lead all bowlers.

Boys swimming

» Elder won its first meet of the season 83-72 over Princeton Dec. 1. Junior Josh Patty was victorious in both the 200-yard individual medley and 100 backstroke. » Sophomore Hunter Busken won the 200- and 500-yard freestyle events for Oak Hills as they cruised passed Colerain 87-9, Dec. 1. » St. Xavier won the Mason Invitational with 367 points over Mason (324) and 13 other schools. The Bombers accomplished the feat without winning a single individual event. » Taylor lost a close meet with Walnut Hills 61-53, Dec. 6. Wasserbauer won the 200 freestyle and the 100 backstroke events.

Girls swimming

» Colerain squeezed passed See HIGHLIGHTS, Page A10

Seton High School’s Emily Hayhow, along with Lindsey Niehaus, will look to lead the Saints and make a run toward the state meet in February. FILE ART

West Side swimmers splash into new season

By Tom Skeen

tskeen@communitypress.com

After graduating nine swimmers and divers from last year’s team, Elder swim coach John Book is expecting big things from senior Scott Maurer, who was a district qualifier on two relay teams as a firstyear swimmer last year. “Scott is quite a bit ahead of where he was at this point last year and should add a few individual events at districts this year,” Book said. Junior diver Mitch Godar is back after a record-setting and state-qualifying sophomore campaign. Diving coach Carrie Bushman told Book that Godar has added more difficult dives to his routine and has worked hard in the offseason. Junior Josh Patty is back after qualifying for districts as part of the 200-yard individual medley relay a season ago. “We’re seeing big improvements week over week and this group is working hard, so we’ll be fine come February,” Book said. La Salle coach Mike Lienhart enters a new season with a roster double the size of last year. And while the turnout may be greater, the Lancers won’t have much experience to fall back on. Instead, La Salle will have to fall back on swimmers who qualified for districts last winter as those student-athletes strive for more postseason success. On the diving board, the Lancers will rely on Jimmy McMahon, who nearly qualified for state. In races, Lancer seniors Jake Brabender and Blake Brauning, along with junior Julian Souder will look to build off their district appearances. The same could be said for sophomores Sam Redd and Drew Meister, who made an impressive run to districts during the first year of their prep careers. Mother of Mercy started the 2012-13 campaign off with a bang. They placed third at the Mason Invitational Dec. 1 and won at Oak Hills, which according to coach Kim Hogue, hasn’t happened in a “very long time.” Senior Rachael Hester – a state qualifier last season – won the 500-yard freestyle and 100yard breaststroke events at Mason and was named Female Swimmer of the Meet.

LaSalle’s Jimmy McMahon performs a dive during the Ohio Division I district boys diving at Miami University last season. McMahon just missed out qualifying for state a season ago. JEFF SWINGER/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

The season is off to a great start for the Oak Hills boys swim team. They defeated Colerain and La Salle in the first two meets of the season. Senior sprinter Curtis Robertson and Brian Locker, who competes in the 500-yard freestyle and 200 individual medley will lead the Highlanders this season. “They have been very solid all the way around,” coach Katie Hunter said. “They have been very good.” Two newcomers have impressed Hunter thus far. Jacob Savard and John Kearns are expected to contribute this season. “(Jacob) is already on some relays and is another good sprinter,” Hunter said. “(John) took a year off and has come back and impressed us. The Lady Highlanders are a different story. After graduating 12 seniors, Hunter has a very young team and will look to Hailey Ryan and her other three returners for

leadership. “We are kind of focusing on technique and rebuilding,” Hunter said. Seton will look for big contributions from senior Emily Hayhow and junior Lindsey Niehaus. In their victory over Princeton Dec. 1, Hayhow and Niehaus both won multiple races, while Niehaus won the 100 freestyle and backstroke in a loss to St. Ursula. After capturing their fourthstraight and 33rd overall state title a year ago, the St. Xavier AquaBombers are reloaded for another run at state in 2013. Their season got off on the right foot after winning the Mason Invitational Dec. 1. “The kids at Mason were remarkable,” coach Jim Brower said. “They showed a lot of spirit and grit. A lot of their swims in the finals were faster than (in the prelims).” Senior Ian Wooley is back after he finished as the state runSee SWIM, Page A11


SPORTS & RECREATION

A10 • WESTERN HILLS PRESS • DECEMBER 12, 2012

Lancer hockey optimistic for season By Nick Dudukovich

ndudukovich@communitypress.com

The La Salle High School hockey team skated into a new season looking to contend in the Cincinnati Amateur Hockey Association. The squad didn’t start the season the way it wanted with losses to Walnut Hills, Lakota East and Northern Kentucky, but head coach Ken Handley remains optimistic, thanks

to the squad’s work ethic. “…Everyone continues to work hard and we will get headed in the right direction in the very near future,” he said. With more depth, speed and size, the Lancers will try to build off last year’s 719-1 mark. The Lancers’ offense should get some strong play from senior center A.J. Mahon, who will share the attack with freshmen wingers Alex Smith and

Kevin Brown. Junior defender Garret Liette and sophomore Jake Ottaway will do their best to shore up the defense. Other returning starters, such as Justin Rost and goalie Devon Scheuermann, will also play key roles. The Lancers play most of their contests at Cincinnati Gardens and will play a holiday tournament at the Bond Hill venue Dec. 26-28.

La Salle freshman forward Kevin Browne and the Lancers compete in the Cincinnati Amateur Hockey Association. THANKS BARRETT COHEN OF THE LA SALLE BROADCASTING NETWORK

Highlights

Seton’s Tori Scholl tries to escape from Lindsey Eckstein and Olivia Kilgore of Oak Hills in the second half of the Saints’ victory. TOM

» Western Hills won the George Williams Invitational Dec. 1. The Mustangs were victorious in five weight classes, including Fred Nayou at 152 pounds. In a tri-match with Withrow and Norwood, the Mustangs defeated Norwood 4812 and lost to Withrow 39-20, Dec. 5. » Elder won its host duals meet Dec. 1 over Kettering Fairmont and four other schools. The Panthers were victorious over all five schools with their closest match being a 32-29 victory over Fairmont. » Oak Hills placed fifth at the Spartan Duals Dec. 1 at Roger Bacon.

Continued from Page A9

Oak Hills 54-46, Dec. 1. Sophomore Allie Robertson captured the 50- and 100yard freestyle events. » Seton defeated Princeton 127-107, Dec. 1. Senior Emily Hayhow and junior Lindsey Niehaus each won two events. The Saints lost to St. Ursula 104-66, Dec. 5. Niehaus won the 100 freestyle (55.98) and 100 backstroke (1:05.95) events. » Mercy placed third at the Mason Invitational Dec. 1. Rachel Hester won the 500 freestyle and 100-yard breaststroke events to earn the Most Outstanding Performer award. The Bobcats defeated Oak Hills 68.5-33.5, Dec. 4. In a rare occurrence, Allie Robertson of Oak Hills and Mercy’s Haley Baker tied for the 50-yard freestyle title with a time of 27.55. » Taylor lost to Walnut Hills 89-21, Dec. 6. Nolan won the 50-yard freestyle event with a time of 26.56.

SKEEN/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Saints top Highlanders Seton used a fourthquarter rally to beat Oak Hills 54-42, Dec. 4, as part of the “Highlanders Hoop for Ovarian Cancer” event at Oak Hills High School. Oak Hills paired with the Ovarian Cancer Alliance of Greater Cincinnati to raise awareness for the deadly disease, which can be caught in its early phases. The Lady Highlanders wore special teal/white jerseys for the event.

Wrestling

Seton senior Courtney Gleason looks for an open teammate as she is defended by Oak Hills’ Amanda Braun. Gleason finished five points in the Saints’ victory, while Braun led the Lady Highlanders with 17. TOM SKEEN/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Home for the Holidays

» Are you a parent of a college athlete? It’s time to brag. Thanks to such an overwhelming response to the holiday feature last year, the Western Hills Press again will present “Home for the holidays: Catching up with college athletes.”

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Parents of athletes who played in the college ranks during the 2012 calendar year can submit by email a few paragraphs and, if interested, a photo to share where they are, what they’re playing and how they did. Be sure to include the athlete’s name, parents’ names and the community newspaper they get at home. The submitted information will be compiled by newspaper and run the issue of Dec. 26-27 – just in time for people home from the holidays to catch up on their high school classmates, neighbors and friends. Basic guidelines: You can send links to college websites as background but not as the submission. Write the information as you’d want to see it in print. Send photos as a .jpg attachment to the email, not embedded in a Word document. Send the email to presspreps@gmail.com by Monday, Dec. 17. Questions can be directed to mlaughman@ communitypress.com or 248-7573.

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SPORTS & RECREATION

DECEMBER 12, 2012 • WESTERN HILLS PRESS • A11

Highlanders flipping into new season By Tom Skeen tskeen@communitypress.com

GREEN TWP. — Kristin Perica takes over an Oak Hills gymnastics program in just its second year of existence. Running out a young team with six freshmen or sophomores, team captains Sarah Arnold – the team’s only senior – and junior Michelle Bushle will be looked upon to lead and guide their teammates. Arnold was part of the squad last season, while Bushle brings gymnastics experience to the table but this is her first year with Oak Hills. Both gymnasts will compete in the all-around competition, which is a step up for Arnold after competing in just vault and beam as a junior. “We are looking for them to be strong all-arounders this year and be good leaders for the team,” Perica said. “(Sarah) is really step-

Swim Continued from Page A9

ner-up in the 100-yard butterfly last season. “To Ian’s credit he didn’t want to be runnerup,” Brower said. “So that is motivation for bigger and better things for him this season. The individual who won (state last season) is back so he has his hands full. He’s been looking really good in practice so

ping up this year as a senior competing in all the events.” Two others expected to contribute heavily are Keleigh Bowman and Hannah Masminster. Bowman is in her second year with the team and will be another all-around competitor for Perica, while Masminster will take to the vault, bars and the floor routine but her coach expects her to make the leap to all-around eventually. One of the more remarkable stories for the Lady Highlanders has been the journey of junior Destiny Genoe. Coming into the season with no gymnastics experience, she will start the season competing on bars, beam and the floor routine, which Perica finds to be an amazing feat. “She just picked up on things and is getting the skills to put into her routine,” her coach said. “(As-

sistant coach Lindsay Sprague) and I are really impressed with her. It’s great to just watch them grow as gymnasts. Someone like Destiny just picked up on things and has very good body awareness.” While not without any experience in the sport, freshman Sarah Voigt has surprised her coaches. It’s been quite a few years since the freshman took part in gymnastics; she is only competing on bars as of now, but Perica describes Voigt as a go-getter. “I would describe her as fearless,” Perica said. “We tell her to do something and she will get up and do it. It’s great because some girls get a little scared when asked to do things and Sarah will just get up and do it.” The Lady Highlanders started their season Dec. 8 at the Forest Hills Flip Fest meet at Anderson High School.

he’ll be in the mix.” Brower knows if his squad is going to make a run at state again they will need help from more than just the senior class. “The junior class, as freshmen, probably didn’t come in with a lot of credentials and we are starting to see them emerge,” he said. “They are the class that has to fill in (for those who graduated), so we are really impressed with their progress they’ve made as a group.”

The Taylor boys team will is led by Nick Wasserbauer, who in the Yellow Jackets’ season-opening loss to La Salle won the 200-yard individual medley and the 100 backstroke. Junior Shelby Nolan will be a big part of the girls team. She won the 200IM and 100 back in a loss to McAuley to start the season. Expect the 200-yard freestyle relay teams to make some noise for both the boys and girls as well. CE-0000536571

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VIEWPOINTS A12 • WESTERN HILLS PRESS • DECEMBER 12, 2012

Editor: Marc Emral, memral@communitypress.com, 853-6264

EDITORIALS | LETTERS | COLUMNS | CH@TROOM

WESTERN HILLS

PRESS

CommunityPress.com

You can help make Christmas special

The numbers released this fall were almost unimaginable: one in five children in our region is growing up in poverty. That is 167,000 children in poverty – enough to fill Paul Brown stadium two and half times. That disturbing statistic is not a bit surprising to St. Vincent de Paul volunteers. Last year, we visited the homes of neighbors in need more than 9,000 times in Hamilton County alone. We visit tiny apartments in inner city neighborhoods, humble homes in working class communities, trailer parks in rural areas, and, increasingly, homes in neighborhoods that might surprise you. Inside those homes we see human suffering at its most heart wrenching. When a family

slips into poverty, the pain is almost palpable. Our volunteers see adult men in tears, ashamed because they cannot feed Liz Carter COMMUNITY PRESS their families. We see mothers GUEST COLUMNIST worn down by worry over bills they cannot pay, middle-aged couples who can’t afford their insulin, and elderly people who keep the thermostat set at 62 degrees to lower their utility bill. Increasingly, though, the invisible and silent victims of these uncertain economic times are children. Inside homes all across our community, St. Vin-

cent de Paul volunteers see children who never know if there will be food for dinner on any given day. We see children who sleep on linoleum floors with only a thin blanket to keep them warm. We find children who move from school to school as their families seek stable housing – and there are few things as hard as being the new kid at school who also wears the same two outfits day after day. And yet, these very same children show remarkable courage and grace. There is the boy who goes to school hungry so that his little brothers and sister can eat. Or the big brother who gave his bed to his little brother. Or the little girl who asked for diapers for her baby brother instead of a Christmas gift. Our

volunteers are blessed each day to witness powerful lessons of love among the children that we, as a community, should be protecting and caring for. They are lessons that mean all the more during the Christmas season. For a child – any child – Christmas is truly a season of hope. There is something profoundly moving about providing a special gift to a child who still believes in Christmas miracles or food for a family that is struggling. Those are kind acts that live and grow in the heart of a child. It is a gift each of us can give. You can make this Christmas special for a family in need by: » Supporting “Food From the Heart” the next time you visit your local Kroger. Ask your

child to pick out their favorite non-perishable food and place it in the barrel at the door. Our neighborhood volunteers will gather the food and take it to a local family in need. » Making a donation in honor of a loved one to provide Christmas gifts to a child in need. A donation of just $50 will allow us to purchase new gifts to make a child’s Christmas brighter this year. » Visit our website, www.SVDPcincinnati.org, or call 513-421-HOPE to find out more about ways you can give the gift of hope this Christmas season.

Liz Carter is the executive director of the Society of St. Vincent de Paul – Cincinnati.

Learn about e-readers at your library Thinking of buying an e-reader or tablet for the book lover on your holiday shopping list? Now’s a great time to buy. Prices are dropping and lots of new devices have hit the market. Visit the library’s website at http://bit.ly/Rd5qXd for answers on which devices the library is compatible with, as well as links to various buying guides and comparisons of various models. If you would like a chance to get hands-on experience with these different devices, several libraries are hosting “e-reader petting zoos” where you can test drive several different devices. Locations and times include: Main Library, Dec. 15, and 22, 11 a.m.; Delhi Township Branch, Dec. 12, 7 p.m. and Green Township Branch, Dec.17, 7 p.m. The Cheviot library continues to offer a series of basic computer classes monthly. These include Introduction to Computers

parts 1 and 2, as well as Introduction to the Internet and Open Lab. If you are interested in more information or in regisJennifer M. tering, please Weikert COMMUNITY PRESS contact us at 369-6015. GUEST COLUMNIST For the third consecutive year, the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County was recognized by Library Journal as a Star Library and it’s all thanks to you. This prestigious national recognition is awarded to libraries that are most heavily used. A major goal of the ratings is to showcase U.S. public libraries whose levels of service delivery distinguish them among their peers. Ratings are determined by the number of per person library visits, items

borrowed, program attendance, and computer use. Our scores are then compared to 7,570 other public libraries across the country. While this Star designation is based on 2010 statistics, our library usage in 2012 will well exceed that record-breaking year. At the end of October 2012, area residents had borrowed more than 14.5 million books, magazines and other materials this year. Our computers are full every day with job seekers, students and children. More than 421,000 residents of all ages have attended free library programs during the first 10 months of this year – a double digit increase over the same period last year – and more than 38,000 residents participated in the 2012 Summer Reading Program. Our homework centers are constantly busy and visits to the library are at a record high at 7.1 million through

October. Amazingly, use of digital books, which residents download remotely, has grown 116 percent year to date. Our outreach services department continues to serve the homebound and elderly as well as provide book collections for area classrooms.

In short, your public library is needed and being used by you and other customers more than ever. Jennifer M. Weikert is the reference librarian at the Cheviot Branch Library, 3711 Robb Ave. Contact her at 513-369-6015.

ABOUT LETTERS AND COLUMNS We welcome your comments on editorials, columns, stories or other topics important to you in The Western Hills Press. Include your name, address and phone number(s) so we may verify your letter. Letters of 200 or fewer words and columns of 500 or fewer words have the best chance of being published. All submissions may be edited for length, accuracy and clarity. Deadline: Noon Friday E-mail: westernhills@communitypress.com Fax: 853-6220 U.S. mail: See box below Letters, columns and articles submitted to The Western Hills Press may be published or distributed in print, electronic or other forms.

Hermosa Park revisited The October issue of the Chirper, the official publication of the Price Hill Civic Club, documents the demise of the “old apartment building,” the Hermosa – “Plagued by crime it has come down to make room for new green space.” This majestic building, located at West Eight Street and Hermosa Jim Grawe Avenue, was a COMMUNITY PRESS throwback to GUEST COLUMNIST the neighborhood it was named after, Hermosa Park. An 1894 description of the neighborhood reads, “There are found here, in about equal numbers, the attractive cottage of the wage earner set in beautiful little garden plots and the more pretentious residents of the successful business man. But the pride of Hermosa Park is her new schoolhouse, built in 1886, its principal John H. Carson. The area is called Hermosa Park because of its near approach in beauty of scenery and surround-

ings to its renowned namesake in the Rocky Mountains, although the general public understand it to be a part of her parent suburb, Price Hill.” – Price Hill: Its Beauties and Advantages as a Place of Residence. This account of Hermosa Park’s heyday is quintessential West Side – a totally class-less neighborhood that included everyone. Where people of different backgrounds and incomes supported, and learned from, each other. Today however, the Price Hill Civic Club is celebrating the razing of the Hermosa as “An amazing victory for the neighborhood. Made possible by a group of determined West Price Hill residents.” Their message was loud and clear. “We don’t like our neighbors. We don’t want these low class apartment dwellers living in our middle class neighborhood!” So they huffed and puffed and blew their house down. Perhaps, through the years, in a more subtle way, the very wealthy were also made to feel uncomfortable. For evidence the “pretentious residents of the successful business man,” like

WESTERN HILLS

PRESS

A publication of

Lackman - the estate of George Remus - used to be a focal point of the Hermosa Park neighborhood. PROVIDED the lavish estate of George Remus, “King of the Bootleggers,” have also disappeared from the Hermosa Park landscape. I wonder, “Was the crime-plagued Remus home also the target of a vigilance committee? When evaluating the “taking back our neighborhood” strategy we should ask ourselves, “Was the neighborhood taken from us when Hermosa Park lost its identity to its big Price Hill brother? Had the neighborhood retained its Hermosa Park name

would it have rescued itself from decline?” Maybe I’m too much the cynic, or the sentimental optimist. But of this I am certain. The Mighty Hermosa was brought to its knees. But through the years the grand old apartment building has served us well. With its beautiful balconies and twin courtyard design it was a gift to those who lived there – and a gift to those who passed by it. On a personal note: To that area’s “West Price Hill” resi-

5556 Cheviot Road Cincinnati, Ohio 45247 phone: 923-3111 fax: 853-6220 email: westernhills@communitypress.com web site: www.communitypress.com

dents who say, “I live in Covedale.” Please stop it! You have your very own neighborhood. So dust it off and take it back. Honor the Hermosa Park legacy. Tell the world, “I live in Hermosa Park!” This would be the Hermosa’s final, and best gift, to the West Side. Jim Grawe is the co-founder of the Covedale Neighborhood Association. He grew up in Hermosa Park.

Western Hills Press Editor Marc Emral memral@communitypress.com, 853-6264 Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday See page A2 for additional contact information.


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2012

LIFE

WESTERN HILLS

PRESS

PEOPLE | IDEAS | RECIPES

Montgomery resident Larry Dupree plays taps on the Anderson Ferry. MONICA BOYLSON/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Ceremony honors victims of

PEARL HARBOR By Monica Boylson

mboylson@communitypress.com

Fifteen wreaths were tossed into the Ohio River in remembrance of those who died in the attack on Pearl Harbor, Dec. 7, 1941. The Chambers Hautman Budde American Legion Post 534 hosted the memorial ceremony on Dec. 2 at the Anderson Ferry to honor the fallen veterans. More than 20 veterans organizations participated. There was a 21 rifle salute and taps was played. “We hope it brings more attention to the sacrifices that our veterans made,” post commander Dwight Bledsoe said. The veterans have had a ceremony on the ferry for the nearly 60 years, vice commander Jim Sizemore said. “It’s something that I think needs to be done every year in honor of the people who lost their lives in Pearl Harbor” he said. Fifteen wreaths were tossed into the Ohio River in remembrance of those who died in the attack on Pearl Harbor, Dec. 7, 1941. The Chambers Hautman Budde American Legion Post 534 hosted the memorial ceremony on Dec. 2 at the Anderson Ferry to honor the fallen veterans. More than 20 veterans organizations participated. There was a 21 rifle salute and taps was played. Honor guards from more than 20 veterans groups stand at attention before boarding the Anderson Ferry. MONICA

American Legion Post 534 chaplain Don Abner reads a prayer for those who died in Pearl Harbor. MONICA BOYLSON/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

World War II and Korean War veteran Walt Miller, 86, walks onto the Anderson Ferry with a wreath to throw into the river in memory of those who died at Pearl Harbor. MONICA

BOYLSON/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

BOYLSON/THE COMMUNITY

Members of American Legion Post 534 give a 21 rifle salute.

PRESS

MONICA BOYLSON/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Army specialist James A. Sizemore, 27, Hawaii, throws a wreath into the Ohio River. MONICA BOYLSON/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Wreaths in memory of those who died in Pearl Harbor float in the Ohio River. MONICA BOYLSON/THE

Representatives from the Hamilton County Sheriff’s Department Pipes and Drums Corps play bagpipes during the Pearl Harbor memorial ceremony.

COMMUNITY PRESS

MONICA BOYLSON/THE COMMUNITY PRESS


B2 • WESTERN HILLS PRESS • DECEMBER 12, 2012

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD THURSDAY, DEC. 13

challenging cardiovascular and strength training exercises combined for total body workout. $7.50-$10. Presented by SpinFit LLC. 451-4920; www.spinfitcincinnati.com. Westwood. Beginners Ashtanga Class, 7-8 p.m., EarthConnection, 370 Neeb Road, Practice gentle progression of postures to ease into a fulfilling Ashtanga practice. $50 for 10 classes. Reservations required. Presented by Yoga by Marietta. 675-2725; www.yogabymarietta.com. Delhi Township. FitChixx, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Sayler Park Community Center, $45 per month. 205-9772; www.fitchixx.com. Sayler Park.

Auctions WooHoo Club Charity Quarter Auction, 7-9 p.m., St. Peter and St. Paul United Church of Christ, 3001 Queen City Ave., Cost is $1 a paddle or four paddles for $3, plus bidding tickets sold for 25 cents each. Auction items go for one to two tickets. Includes 15 vendors. $13. Presented by WooHoo Club. 460-6489. Westwood.

Exercise Classes Spintensity, 5:45-6:45 p.m., Western Sports Mall, 2323 Ferguson Road, Intense cycling class with boot camp intervals throughout. First class free. Ages 13 and up. $8.50-$10 per class. Presented by SpinFit LLC. 4514920. Westwood.

Health / Wellness Mobile Mammography Unit, 7 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Price Hill Health Center, 2136 W. Eighth St., Fifteen-minute screenings. Cost varies per insurance plan. Financial assistance available for qualified applicants. Appointment required. Presented by Mercy Health Partners. 6863300; www.e-mercy.com. Price Hill.

On Stage - Theater Cinderella, 8 p.m., Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, 4990 Glenway Ave., Timeless enchantment of magical fairy tale is all dressed as a Christmas fantasia, complete with the Prince’s Christmas Ball, Cinderella’s crystalline castle and a holiday romance that begins with a sparkling slipper. $23, $20 students and seniors. Presented by Cincinnati Landmark Productions. 241-6550; www.cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com. West Price Hill.

Senior Citizens Exercise to Music, 10-11 a.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, $1. Through Dec. 27. 385-3780. Green Township. Open Bridge, 12:15-3:15 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Free. 385-3780. Green Township.

FRIDAY, DEC. 14 Community Dance Butler Squares, 7:30-10 p.m., Miami Whitewater Township Firehouse, 6736 Ohio 128, Plus-level square dance club open to all experienced dancers. $5. Presented by Southwestern Ohio/Northern Kentucky Square Dancers Federation. 929-2427. Miamitown.

Exercise Classes FitChixx, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Sayler Park Community Center, 6720 Home City Ave., Full-body workout consisting of weights, cardio and core work. All ages and abilities welcome. $45 per month. Presented by FitChixx. 205-9772; www.fitchixx.com. Sayler Park.

Farmers Market Lettuce Eat Well Winter Farmers Market, 3-7 p.m., Cheviot United Methodist Church, 3820 Westwood Northern Blvd., Locally produced food items. Free. Presented by Lettuce Eat Well. 661-1792; www.lewfm.org. Cheviot.

On Stage - Theater The Man Who Came to Dinner, 8 p.m., Glenmore Playhouse, 3716 Glenmore Ave., A famous New York radio wit is invited to dine at the home of an Ohio businessman and his family. Before he enters the house, he slips on a patch of ice and injures his hip, precipitating a six-week confinement in the home of the hosts. $15. Presented by The Drama Workshop. 598-8303; www.thedramaworkshop.org. Cheviot. Cinderella, 8 p.m., Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, $23, $20 students and seniors. 241-6550; www.cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com. West Price Hill.

Senior Citizens Pinochle, Noon-4 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Through Dec. 28. 385-3780. Green Township. Arthritis Exercise, Noon-12:45 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Workout to videos geared to help lessen arthritis symptoms. For seniors. Free. 385-3780. Green Township. Taking Off Pounds Sensibly, 10-11 a.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Weight loss support and accountability. For seniors. $28 annual fee. 385-3780. Green Township.

SATURDAY, DEC. 15 Dining Events Elder & Seton Christmas

Senior Citizens

The Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, 4990 Glenway Ave., presents a special Christmas edition of Rodgers & Hammerstein’s “Cinderella” through Dec. 23. Show times are 8 p.m. Thursdays through Sundays, and Wednesday, Dec. 19, and 2 p.m. Sundays, and Saturdays, Dec. 15 and Dec. 22. Tickets are $23, $20 for seniors and students. For more information, visit www.cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com or call 241-6550. Members of the children’s ensemble for the show are, from front left, Maddie Land and Grace Balbo; second row, Emily Egner and Jordan Darnell; third row, C.J. Zimmer, Christopher Conway and Katelyn Moore, and at top is Maddi O’Connell. Concert Strolling Dinner, 5:30-7:45 p.m., Seton High School, 3901 Glenway Ave., Commons. Christmas concert is 8 p.m. Dinner by the bite, appetizers, desserts, beer, wine and specialty drinks plus raffles. See a Glee Club, freshman chorus or concert choir member for tickets as $10 per ticket goes directly to their trip account. Benefits Elder Glee Club and Seton Concert Choir. $20. 922-2493. West Price Hill.

Exercise Classes Gymbo’s Boot Camp, 10-11 a.m., Gymbo’s Personal Training and Fitness Center, 6037 Harrison Ave., Aerobic, resistance and plyometric training. All ages and fitness levels welcome. 5058283. Green Township.

Holiday - Christmas Easy-to-Make, Last Minute Gift Ideas, 12:30 p.m., Monfort Heights Branch Library, 3825 West Fork Road, A different and simple craft idea to take home. Learn to make homemade wrapping paper or gift bags, too. Free. Presented by Public Library of Cincinnati & Hamilton County. 369-4472; www.cincinnatilibrary.org. Monfort Heights.

On Stage - Student Theater Seton-Elder Performing Arts Series Christmas Concert, 8 p.m., Seton High School, 3901 Glenway Ave., Holiday music. $7. 251-3324; www.setoncincinnati.org. West Price Hill.

On Stage - Theater The Man Who Came to Dinner, 8 p.m., Glenmore Playhouse, $15. 598-8303; www.thedramaworkshop.org. Cheviot. Cinderella, 8 p.m., Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, $23, $20 students and seniors. 241-6550; www.cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com. West Price Hill.

SUNDAY, DEC. 16 Dining Events Elder & Seton Christmas Concert Strolling Dinner, 4-7:30 p.m., Seton High School, Christmas concert is 3 p.m., dinner begins immediately after. $20. 922-2493. West Price Hill.

On Stage - Student Theater Seton-Elder Performing Arts Series Christmas Concert, 3 p.m., Seton High School, $7. 251-3324; www.setoncincinnati.org. West Price Hill.

On Stage - Theater The Man Who Came to Dinner, 2 p.m., Glenmore Playhouse, $15. 598-8303; www.thedramaworkshop.org. Cheviot. Cinderella, 2 p.m., Covedale Center for the Performing Arts,

ABOUT CALENDAR To submit calendar items, go to www.cincinnati.com and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to life@communitypress.com along with event information. Items are printed on a spaceavailable basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to www.cincinnati.com and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page. $23, $20 students and seniors. 241-6550; www.cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com. West Price Hill.

MONDAY, DEC. 17 Community Dance Arabian (Belly) Dance, 6:307:30 p.m., Westwood Town Hall Recreation Center, 3017 Harrison Ave., Ballet/Piano room, second floor. Learn foundation steps common in Arab dances throughout Northern Africa and the Middle East. Taught by Irene Mirci in classic Egyptian style, also known as Dance Oriental. $40 for four classes. Registration required. 662-9109; cincyrec.org/ search/facility.aspx?id=40. Westwood.

Education Public Library’s eReader Petting Zoo, 7 p.m., Green Township Branch Library, 6525 Bridgetown Road, Try out an iPad, Nook Tablet and Kindle Fire and learn more about library’s downloadable books and music. Staff members answer questions. Ages 18 and up. Free. Presented by Public Library of Cincinnati & Hamilton County. 369-6095; www.cincinnatilibrary.org. Green Township.

Exercise Classes Zumba, 5:30-6:30 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Wear comfortable workout attire and gym shoes. Bring water. $5. Presented by Deb’s Fitness Party. 205-5064; www.debsfitnessparty.com. Green Township. Strengthening, Flexibility and Core Class, 1:30-2:30 p.m., Guenthner Physical Therapy, 5557 Cheviot Road, Enter at rear of building. Enhance flexibility and strengthen all major muscle groups and core using bands, balls and weights. $7. 923-1700; www.guenthnerpt.com. Monfort Heights. FitChixx, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Sayler Park Community Center, $45 per month. 205-9772; www.fitchixx.com. Sayler Park.

Senior Citizens Chair Volleyball, 10 a.m.-noon, Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, 385-3780. Green Township. Indoor Cornhole, 10 a.m.-noon, Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, 385-3780. Green Township. Pinochle, Noon-4 p.m., Green

Township Senior Center, 3853780. Green Township.

TUESDAY, DEC. 18 Music - Acoustic Bob Cushing, 8 p.m., Dew Drop Inn, 8956 Harrison Ave., 3531854. Cleves.

Senior Citizens Quilting, 9:30-11:30 a.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Make blankets to donate to Project Linus and Children’s Hospital. For seniors. 385-3780. Green Township. Exercise to Music, 10-11 a.m., Green Township Senior Center, $1. 385-3780. Green Township. Ceramics, 11:30 a.m.-3 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, 385-3780. Green Township. Stability Ball, 9:30-10 a.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Bring your own stability ball and work on strengthening your core. For seniors. 385-3780. Green Township. Euchre, 12:30-3:30 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Open game. For seniors. 385-3780. Green Township. Pattern Dancing, 1-2:30 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Learn line dancing and have fun while exercising. For seniors. Free. 385-3780. Green Township. Billiards, 1:30-3:30 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Free. 385-3780. Green Township.

WEDNESDAY, DEC. 19 Dance Classes Dance Class, 4:30-8:30 p.m., Douce Dance Studio, 3772 Shady Lane, Dance instructions. Ages 2 1/2-adult. Tap, ballet, jazz/hiphop, gymnastics, baton twirling. $25 monthly. Registration required. 941-0202. North Bend.

Exercise Classes Women and Weights, 5:15-6 p.m., Western Sports Mall, 2323 Ferguson Road, Program specifically designed for women. Maintain bone density, increase metabolism and discover health benefits of weight training. $7.50-$10. Presented by SpinFit LLC. 451-4920; www.spinfitcincinnati.com. Westwood. Power and Pump, 6-7 p.m., Western Sports Mall, 2323 Ferguson Road, Simple, yet

Pinochle, Noon-4 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3853780. Green Township. Vintage Artist, 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Place for artists to paint together. Beginners welcome. Bring own supplies. For seniors. Free. 385-3780. Green Township. Knitting and Crocheting, 10-11:30 a.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Knit or crochet blankets for Project Linus. Yarn provided. For seniors. Free. 385-3780. Green Township. Wood Carving, 1-3 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Carve with Greenwood Chippers. Many different techniques used: relief carvings, scroll saw, figurines. Bring own tools. For seniors. Free. 3853780. Green Township. Wii Bowling, 2-3:30 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Free. 385-3780. Green Township. Zumba Gold, 1-2 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Modified Zumba for seniors with standing and chair participation. For seniors. $3, $25 for 10 classes. Presented by Deb’s Fitness Party. 205-5064; www.debsfitnessparty.com. Green Township.

THURSDAY, DEC. 20 Exercise Classes Spintensity, 5:45-6:45 p.m., Western Sports Mall, $8.50-$10 per class. 451-4920. Westwood.

On Stage - Theater Cinderella, 8 p.m., Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, $23, $20 students and seniors. 241-6550; www.cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com. West Price Hill.

Senior Citizens Exercise to Music, 10-11 a.m., Green Township Senior Center, $1. 385-3780. Green Township. Open Bridge, 12:15-3:15 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, Free. 385-3780. Green Township.

FRIDAY, DEC. 21 Community Dance River Squares, 7:30-10 p.m., Miami Whitewater Township Firehouse, 6736 Ohio 128, Plus-level square dance and round dance club. $5. Presented by Southwestern Ohio/Northern Kentucky Square Dancers Federation. 929-2427. Miamitown.

Exercise Classes FitChixx, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Sayler Park Community Center, $45 per month. 205-9772; www.fitchixx.com. Sayler Park.

Farmers Market Lettuce Eat Well Winter Farmers Market, 3-7 p.m., Cheviot United Methodist Church, Free. 661-1792; www.lewfm.org. Cheviot.

On Stage - Theater Cinderella, 8 p.m., Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, $23, $20 students and seniors. 241-6550; www.cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com. West Price Hill.

Senior Citizens Pinochle, Noon-4 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 385-

3780. Green Township. Arthritis Exercise, Noon-12:45 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, Free. 385-3780. Green Township. Taking Off Pounds Sensibly, 10-11 a.m., Green Township Senior Center, $28 annual fee. 385-3780. Green Township.

SATURDAY, DEC. 22 Exercise Classes Gymbo’s Boot Camp, 10-11 a.m., Gymbo’s Personal Training and Fitness Center, 505-8283. Green Township.

Holiday - Christmas Easy-to-Make, Last Minute Gift Ideas, 12:30 p.m., Monfort Heights Branch Library, Free. 369-4472; www.cincinnatilibrary.org. Monfort Heights.

Music - Blues Chuck Brisbin & the Tuna Project, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Poppy’s Tavern, 5510 Rybolt Road, Free. 574-6333. Green Township.

On Stage - Theater Cinderella, 8 p.m., Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, $23, $20 students and seniors. 241-6550; www.cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com. West Price Hill.

SUNDAY, DEC. 23 On Stage - Theater Cinderella, 2 p.m., Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, $23, $20 students and seniors. 241-6550; www.cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com. West Price Hill.

MONDAY, DEC. 24 Exercise Classes Strengthening, Flexibility and Core Class, 1:30-2:30 p.m., Guenthner Physical Therapy, $7. 923-1700; www.guenthnerpt.com. Monfort Heights. FitChixx, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Sayler Park Community Center, $45 per month. 205-9772; www.fitchixx.com. Sayler Park.

Music - Religious Festival of Carols, 11 p.m., St. William Church, 4108 W. Eighth St., Choral and instrumental Christmas music performed by 30-voice choir and 15-piece instrumental ensemble. Followed by midnight Mass. Free. 921-0247; www.saintwilliam.com. West Price Hill.

Senior Citizens Pinochle, Noon-4 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3853780. Green Township.

WEDNESDAY, DEC. 26 Dance Classes Dance Class, 4:30-8:30 p.m., Douce Dance Studio, $25 monthly. Registration required. 941-0202. North Bend.

Exercise Classes Beginners Ashtanga Class, 7-8 p.m., EarthConnection, $50 for 10 classes. Reservations required. 675-2725; www.yogabymarietta.com. Delhi Township. FitChixx, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Sayler Park Community Center, $45 per month. 205-9772; www.fitchixx.com. Sayler Park.

Health / Wellness Mobile Mammography Unit, 7 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Dillard’s-Western Hills, 6290 Glenway Ave., Fifteen-minute screenings. Cost varies per insurance plan. Financial assistance available for qualified applicants. Appointment required. Presented by Jewish Hospital. 686-3300; www.e-mercy.com. Westwood.

Senior Citizens Pinochle, Noon-4 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3853780. Green Township. Vintage Artist, 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, Free. 385-3780. Green Township. Knitting and Crocheting, 10-11:30 a.m., Green Township Senior Center, Free. 385-3780. Green Township. Wood Carving, 1-3 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, Free. 385-3780. Green Township. Wii Bowling, 2-3:30 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, Free. 385-3780. Green Township. Zumba Gold, 1-2 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, $3, $25 for 10 classes. 205-5064; www.debsfitnessparty.com. Green Township.


LIFE

DECEMBER 12, 2012 • WESTERN HILLS PRESS • B3

Business helps Pink Ribbon Girls

More holiday recipes: Ruth Lyons’ coffecake and peppermint bark

Herrmann Services of Colerain Township has agreed to donate $10 to Pink Ribbon Girls of Cincinnati for every breast cancer awareness sign placed in yards around the Cincinnati area during October There were 250 signs placed and later this month, Herrmann Services will be writing a check for $2,500 to the organization. In addition to the donation, the Herrmann Services employees wore pink uniform shirts for the month of October to raise more awareness for breast cancer. “This year, we wanted to do some fundraising that our customers could get involved with, but they didn’t have to worry about raising the money themselves,” said Jason Herrmann, service manager at Herrmann Services. “Almost everyone has been touched in some way by breast cancer, so we felt this would be a great cause to help with in our community.” Kris Herrmann-Olding, finance manager at Herrmann Services said, “We selected Pink Ribbon Girls to be the benefactor because they are a local organization that helps people suffering from breast cancer with their daily needs. Research funding is important, but we wanted to help in a way that touched our community immediately.” Tracie Metzger, founder/director of Pink Ribbon Girls, expressed her appreciation. “Pink Ribbon Girls is honored to have such great local support from Herrmann Services,” Metzger said. “October is a month to create awareness about breast cancer and having the ability to impact the lives of women in your neighborhood makes a big difference in the fight against breast cancer. Pink Ribbon Girls provides personalized support to young women and their families throughout all phases of the breast cancer journey. We accomplish this through education, outreach and one-on-one support. Our vision is that no one travels this road alone.” For more information, go to http://bit.ly/32ARgK or http://bit.ly/UOgmK7.

It’s interesting how your requests coincide with current events. The Ruth Lyons Children’s Fund is in full swing and I’ve had several requests for her famous coffeecake. It’s a special way to honor this woman who has had such a positive impact on us.

Ruth Lyons’ coffeecake

I have a few versions of this recipe, but this is the one that’s supposed to be Ruth’s original. I’ve made this twice now, once following the recipe below and once making it with Rita 21⁄4 cups Heikenfeld flour, 11⁄2 RITA’S KITCHEN teaspoons cinnamon, 1⁄4 teaspoon salt, 1 ⁄2 cup oil, 2 teaspoons vanilla and no vinegar. (The vinegar is used to “sour” the milk, making it more like buttermilk). I made a thin icing to glaze it, as well. The difference between the two was slight. This is a straightforward, simple coffeecake. If you want a richer tasting one with a thicker cinnamon topping, I have my holiday overnight coffeecake on my blog. 1 cup sugar 1 cup brown sugar, dark

preferred 21⁄2 cups flour 1 teaspoon cinnamon 1 teaspoon nutmeg 1 teaspoon salt 3 ⁄4 cup oil 1 teaspoon vinegar 1 cup milk 1 egg, lightly beaten 1 teaspoon baking soda

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Mix the first six ingredients. Add oil and stir until crumbly. Reserve and set aside 3⁄4 cup for topping. Add vinegar to milk, then add to sugar mixture. Add egg and soda; mix well. Pour into a sprayed 13-inch by 9-inch pan. Sprinkle with topping. Bake 30 minutes.

Amish friendship bread/cake

Check out my blog for the starter and a good recipe.

My best clone of Williams-Sonoma peppermint bark You didn’t think I could let the holidays go by without sharing yet another version, did you? Some of you have had trouble in the past with the bark shattering/separating. That happens somewhat even with the purchased bark, but this recipe keeps that to a minimum, if at all. Out of all the recipes I’ve made for bark throughout the years, using different melting

One of these is Williams-Sonoma’s peppermint bark, one is Rita’s clone. Which do you think is which? THANKS TO RITA HEIKENFELD. methods and chocolates, I’ve come back to my classic way of teaching students. By the way, check out the photo. Can you tell which is mine and which is Williams-Sonoma’s? I used Kroger real semi-sweet and white chocolate morsels. 2 cups semi sweet chocolate chips, divided into 11⁄4 cup and 3⁄4 cup measures 11⁄2 teaspoons peppermint extract, divided into 1 teaspoon and 1⁄2 teaspoon measures 23⁄4 cups white chocolate chips, divided into 21⁄4 cup and 1⁄2 cup measures 1 ⁄4 cup crushed peppermint candy

Line a cookie sheet with one piece of foil, about 10 inches by 12 inches. Or do the same in a 13-inch by 9-inch pan. Put 11⁄4 cups semi-sweet chocolate in heat proof bowl. Set over a saucepan that has 1 inch of steaming water, making sure bowl

over chocolate layer and spread. Sprinkle with candy. If necessary, gently press into chocolate. Let set at room temperature until completely firm. Peel bark off foil and break into pieces. Store, covered, at room temperature up to a month or so. If it’s extremely warm in the house, store, covered, in refrigerator and bring to room temperature before eating.

Clarification for Moist & Flavorful Roast Beef technique The initial browning of the beef should be on top of the stove. Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educator and author. Email her at columns@communitypress.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Call 513-248-7130, ext. 356.

Spina bifida group moves in new direction tionship with the SBA. “We are sure there will be occasions when cooperation will benefit both organizations and our clients,” said Sonya Dreves, the coalition’s executive director. The coalition is en-

changes are mostly internal ones, the coalition’s clients, donors and volunteers might not even notice any differences, other than the organization’s new name and logo. The coalition expects to maintain a positive rela-

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Families participate in the annual Walk & Roll, a fund-raising event of the Spina Bifida Coalition of Cincinnati in September. THANKS TO BH PHOTOGRAPHY region,” said Justin Bifro, coalition chair. “We acknowledge that research continues to be vital to lessen the impact of spina bifida on future generations. But we think our organization is best suited to enhancing the lives of those affected by spina bifida today. “Our board is convinced that this is the right decision for our clients because it will keep our focus on providing high-quality services and programs to them,” he said. Programs and services of the coalition will not be impacted. Because the

couraging clients to continue supporting the national organization. More information about the new direction can be found at www.sbccincy.org/ newdirection; www.sbccincy.org or 513-923-1378.

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To increase its emphasis on providing services to people affected by spina bifida, the Spina Bifida Association of Cincinnati is becoming an independent organization serving 17 counties in Ohio, Indiana and Kentucky. The organization also has changed its name to the Spina Bifida Coalition of Cincinnati to make it clear that it is no longer affiliated with the national Spina Bifida Association. After careful consideration, the Spina Bifida Coalition of Cincinnati board decided to end its affiliation because the board of directors believes the mission of the national organization is no longer fully aligned with coalition’s mission. The coalition’s primary mission is to provide services to its clients. The national organization’s primary mission seems to be raising money to fund spina bifida research. “Our main focus will continue to be helping people born with spina bifida lead full, active lives in our

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does not touch water. (This is a makeshift double boiler). Heat should be turned to low. Stir until chocolate is just about melted, then remove bowl from pan and stir 3⁄4cup more in rest of semisweet chocolate, a bit at a time, until all is melted. If necessary, put the bowl back on the pan to help melt. If there’s any moisture on the bottom of the bowl, wipe it dry. Stir in 1 teaspoon of the extract and pour onto foil, spreading in even layer. Tap pan on counter to remove any air bubbles. Let sit at room temperature until just about set, anywhere from 15-20 minutes. When you press your finger into the chocolate a very slight indentation will remain. Put 21⁄4 cups white chocolate in clean bowl and repeat process for melting, stirring in remaining 1 ⁄2 cup chips after removing bowl from pan. Stir in 1 ⁄2 teaspoon extract. Pour


LIFE

B4 • WESTERN HILLS PRESS • DECEMBER 12, 2012

MSJ athletic hall of fame grows by 3 Three former athletes from the College of Mount St. Joseph were inducted into the college’s Athletic Hall of Fame recently. The program began with a reception at 5:30 p.m. followed by dinner and the program in the Fifth Third Bank Hall at the Mount. The evening was emceed by William J. Keating Jr., of Keating, Muething & Klekamp LLP. This was the third recognition ceremony honoring inductees since the athletic hall of fame debuted two years ago and the second for former Mount athletes. This year’s honorees were Jean Ann Doerger Tucker, former volleyball and basketball player; Joan Shadley Mazzaro-Epping, former volleyball and basketball player; and Peg Bradley-Doppes, former volleyball player. “When the Mount began offering athletics, it was an all-female college,” said Lisa Odenbeck, director of development. “These women, who were among the college’s first groups of athletes, really helped build the athletic program to what it has become today. This was our opportunity to thank them for laying the groundwork so other student-athletes could continue to build on their successes.” The alumnae being inducted will join six other members of the Mount’s Athletic Hall of Fame. “The number of athletic programs the Mount began with years ago has grown tremendously,” said Steve Radcliffe, athletic director. “Last year, we honored

Northern Kentucky Athletic Directors Hall of Fame, Notre Dame Academy’s Sports Hall of Fame and the Buddy LaRosa’s High School Sports Hall of Fame. She now lives in Lake Wylie, S.C.

Peg Bradley-Doppes ’79

Three former athletes from the College of Mount St. Joseph were inducted into the college’s Athletic Hall of Fame recently. From left are Peg Bradley-Doppes, Joan Shadley Mazzaro-Epping and Jean Ann Doerger Tucker. PROVIDED three women who were outstanding members of our athletic program. This year, we are proud to honor more of our standout players who left their mark on Mount athletics.”

Jean Ann Doerger Tucker ’71

Doerger Tucker was a strong competitor and leader, both on and off the court. She led the Mount’s volleyball team to win the first-ever Ohio Intercollegiate State Tournament in 1969, and was a part of the

team that played in the first volleyball national championship in Long Beach, Calif. She was also an exceptional and agile basketball player who assisted in leading the basketball team to the first Ohio Intercollegiate Tournament in 1971. After college, she taught physical education at Our Lady of Angels High School, where she also coached all of the interscholastic sports for six years. She continued to play competitive volleyball for many years. Today, she

teaches at Annunciation School in Clifton, where she enjoys helping to shape the lives of her young students.

Joan Shadley Mazzaro-Epping ’76

As a star volleyball and basketball player at the Mount, Mazzaro-Epping played on the state volleyball championship team in 1975, on two regional championship teams and competed in two national tournaments. In basketball, she led the team to titles in 1973 and 1976, and received the

MVP award twice. Throughout her 13 years at Notre Dame Academy in Northern Kentucky, she coached a variety of sports, and her teams won 12 regional volleyball championships, seven state volleyball championships and three runner-up titles. She was named Coach of the Year in volleyball, and Coach of the Year in 1983 and 1986 by The Kentuky Post, as well as the Northern Kentucky Golf Coach of the Year in 1982. She has been inducted into the

Bradley-Doppes has been involved in sports her entire life. She was a multisport athlete at St. Ursula Academy and went on to become a volleyball standout at the Mount. During her college career she garnered many honors, including honorable mention AllAmerica 1977-78, member of the OAISW All-Tournament Team, tournament MVP 1978-79 and a USVBA All-American. A 31-year veteran of collegiate sports, Bradley-Doppes has served as director of athletics at the University of North Carolina-Wilmington, women’s athletic director and head volleyball coach at the University of Michigan, and head volleyball coach at the University of North Carolina and Miami University. She was the youngest coach ever to reach 300 DI victories. Today, she is the vice chancellor for athletics, recreation and Ritchie Center Operations at the University of Denver. Her honors and awards include being named Athletic Director of the Year four times by NACDA, Alumni Career Achievement Award from the Mount in 1996 and the first person to be inducted into the Athletic Hall of Fame at St. Ursula Academy.

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LIFE

DECEMBER 12, 2012 • WESTERN HILLS PRESS • B5

Four join Mount board

At the dedication of the Father Raymond Kammerer Library & Learning Center at Chatfield College are, from left, Mark Schlachter, John Tafaro (Chatfield College president), Rosemary Schlachter, the Rev. Ray Kammerer, Auxiliary Bishop the Rev. Joseph Binzer. PROVIDED

West Side couple helps fund library Chatfield College in St. Martin, Ohio, dedicated the Father Raymond Kammerer Library & Learning Center during the college’s Homecoming Fall Festival. The library and learning center was made possible by donations from Mark and Rosemary Schlachter of Westenr Hills, Kammerer, and other contributors.

An extensive traveler, Kammerer has amassed a large collection of books and art that he has bequeathed to the College. He has graciously agreed to move some of this 6,000 volume book collection to the new library with the intention that the college receive the entire collection in the future. He also plans to have changing exhibitions of the arti-

facts collection so that current students, faculty, and staff can enjoy his art collection. “Both my collection of books and the artifact collection are possessions dear to my heart, and I am thankful for the generous gift from my sister and her husband that made it possible for my collections to be used and appreciated at Chat-

field College,” said Kammerer. Sister Lucia Castellini, congregational minister for the Ursulines of Brown County, gave a brief history about the library building and the Most Rev. Joseph Binzer, auiliary bishop of Cincinnati, performed a blessing ceremony, followed by a ceremonial ribbon cutting.

Woman’s Club hears of anti-aging, music The Cincinnati Woman’s Club offered members dual beauty-focused programming recently, with both morning and afternoon lectures that piqued

the interests of all who were lucky to participate. The Women’s Health and Wellness Class and the Science Circle co-sponsored a presentation by

At the Cincinnati Woman’s Club presentation last month were, from left, Jo Ann Ward of Western Hills, co-chairwoman of the Music Department; Cincinnati Chamber Orchestra Artistic Director Mischa Santora; Janet McDaniel of Mount Washington, chairman of the day; pianist Michael Chertock, pianist; and Rosemary Schlachter of Western Hills, co-chairwoman of the Music Department. PROVIDED

Mary Bergovic Johnson, principal scientist in Procter & Gamble’s Beauty and Grooming Department. She told her audience how “the science is compelling” in the development of innovative anti-aging technologies. As Bergovic Johnson is engaged in the design and clinical testing of advanced skin care products at P & G, she is one who would know. The Music Department program presented Cincinnati Chamber Orchestra Music Director Mischa Santora, who discussed “The Letters and Music of Robert and Clara Schumann.” He offered a view into the relationship of the brilliant, but troubled composer and his virtuoso wife. The lecture was enhanced by popular pianist Michael

Chertock, who treated The Woman’s Club audience to stirring performances of Robert Schumann’s compositions, which Clara had once performed. The Cincinnati Woman’s Club has focused on educating its members and working to make Greater Cincinnati a better place since 1894.

Four new members have join the board of trustees of the College of Mount St. Joseph. Catherine Kirby, SC, is a retired educator, having taught from fifth-grade through students earning their master’s degrees. She also served as assistant superintendent for high schools in the Archdiocese of Cincinnati, and has served her congregation of the Sisters of Charity as the education coordinator and as a member of the executive council. Kirby has also served as the chairwoman of Hollenbeck the education department at the Mount. She currently volunteers for Seton High School, Women’s Connection and Mother Margaret Hall. She lives in Western Hills. Martin F. Hollenbeck is the senior vice president and chief inRoss vestment officer of Cincinnati Financial Corp. and subsidiary operating companies, and president and chief operating officer of CFC Investment Co. He is a member of the CFA Institute and its Cincinnati chapter, and serves on the investment committee of the Franciscan Friars, Province of St.

John the Baptist. He lives in West Chester. John J. Young served as the president/CEO of the Freestore Foodbank from 2005 to 2012, and now serves on the board of the Freestore Foodbank as its CEO emeritus and chairs its Kirby Innovation Committee. He has also worked at Hamilton County Job and Family Services as welfare reform executive, and was responsible for community affairs. Young has served on many boards and committees, including the Southwest Young Ohio Workforce Investment Board, Leadership Cincinnati Alumni Board (as education committee chair) and the Cincinnati Association. He lives in Cincinnati. Janis Ross has worked for Procter & Gamble for 32 years, currently as the vice president in the global business services organization, and leads design, development, and management of capabilities to support human resources functions. She also has experience leading global organizations and has worked in both the United States and Germany. She lives in Villa Hills.

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LIFE

B6 • WESTERN HILLS PRESS • DECEMBER 12, 2012

Summerfair among best Magazine lists event in top 25 Summerfair Cincinnati, the Tristate’s premier fine arts and crafts fair and official kickoff to summer, was named as one the best fine art and design shows in the country by “Sunshine Artist” magazine. Summerfair 2011 ranked 23 out of 200 national shows. “This is such an honor for Summerfair to be recognized on a national level,” said Sharon Strubbe, executive director of Sum-

merfair Cincinnati. “So much work goes into the fair every year by our members and hundreds of dedicated volunteers. Our artists and their outstanding work make Summerfair such an honored tradition and experience in the Tristate. We truly can’t thank all of those involved enough for the tremendous outpouring of support this year.” “Sunshine Artist” is a national publication for fine art and craft show exhibitors, promoters and patrons. Each year, artists are

We Wish You A Joyous and Blessed Holiday Season.

asked to rank the top 200 art shows in the country based on best-selling and highest-grossing criterion. Almost 1,000 shows received votes, but only the top 200 make the list. For information regarding “Sunshine Artist” visit www.sunshineartist.com. In June of 2013, Summerfair, entering its 46th year, will feature more than 300 fine artists and craftspeople from around the country, exhibiting and selling works ranging from ceramics and sculptures to paintings and photography. In addition patrons can enjoy local and regional entertainers, a youth arts area and a variety of gourmet food vendors. Summerfair and Cincy Chic will present the Little Black Dress Event the opening Friday of the fair for the third straight year. The event features little black dresses from local boutiques paired with jewelry and accessories from 2013 Summerfair artists. For more information on Summerfair 2013, visit Summerfair Cincinnati online at www.summerfair.org or call the office at 531-0050.

CELEBRATORY MASS

The Bayley annual celebratory mass for members of the Mother Margaret George Memorial and Honor Society was held on the Bayley campus Sept. 20. Buddy LaRosa chats with Bishop the Rev. Joseph Binzer after mass. THANKS TO DEBORAH KOHL KREMER

HELPING OTHERS

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LIFE

DECEMBER 12, 2012 • WESTERN HILLS PRESS • B7

Ballet Theatre Midwest presents ‘The Nutcracker’

This year’s diamond jubilarians are, from Sisters Laetitia Slusser, Rose Patrice Beck, Joyce Richter and Therese Ann Reis; back Monica Ann Lucas, Joan Deiters, Jean Miller, Janice Ernst and Francis Clare Pavioni. Not in the photo is Teresa Atencio. PROVIDED

Sisters of Charity celebrate jubilees A total of 13 Sisters of Charity of Cincinnati are celebrating jubilees this year. They represent 750 years of service in the Cincinnati area, in dioceses throughout the United States and in Guatemala, Mexico and the West Indies. Diamond jubilarians, celebrating 60 years of commitment golden jubilarians, marking 50 years, were honored at a Mass at the Congregation’s Mount St. Joseph Motherhouse in Delhi Township This year’s Golden Jubi-

For more than a century, “The Nutcracker” has enchanted generations of audiences worldwide. In Cincinnati, families and friends can continue the holiday tradition by seeing Ballet Theatre Midwest’s “The Nutcracker,” Dec. 21-23, at the Walter C. Deye S.J. Performance Center at St. Xavier High School, 600 West North Bend Road. This classic production, adapted and choreographed by Ballet Theatre Midwest’s artistic director Daniel R. Simmons, features principal guest artists Martin Roosaare and Regina Dupont of the University of Cincinnati’s College-Conservatory of Music dance division, members of BTM’s Professional Performance Ensemble, and more than 75 students of the Ballet Theatre Midwest Academy. The curtain opens to a Christmas Eve party in a Victorian home where Herr Drosselmeyer, magician and toymaker, gives

This year’s golden jubilarians are, from left, Sisters Mary Bookser, Nancy Bramlage and Mary Ann Humbert. PROVIDED larians are Mary Bookser, Nancy Bramlage and Mary Ann Humbert. This year’s Diamond Jubilarians are Laetitia Slusser, Rose Patrice Beck,

Joyce Richter, Therese Ann Reis, Monica Ann Lucas, Joan Deiters, Jean Miller, Janice Ernst, Francis Clare Pavioni and Teresa Atencio.

Alfred & Loraine Relly

another nurse, visiting the shelters in West Chester and Rockford counties and over to Greenwich, Lonneman Conn. Their job was checking on the staff and nurses who have been working since before the storm hit. The storm brought down trees and power lines, causing thou-

sands to live without electricity and heat. “The people in the shelters are all ages and situations, many elderly and some people with psychological conditions,” Lonneman said. “Everyone who is normally vulnerable becomes even more so with a situation like this.” He spent the next several days helping in shelters in Manhattan and Brooklyn, which housed people of all races, ages and abilities.

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“Come Hear The Story of Jesus” 5421 Foley Rd. • 513-922-8363 Rev. Bob Overberg Sunday School..................................10:00a.m. Sunday Morning Worship ..................11:00a.m. Sunday Evening ..................................6:00p.m. Wednesday Evening Bible Study .........6:00p.m.

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Mr. & Mrs. Alfred Relly are celebrating their 70th wedding anniversary on 12-12-12. Alfred and Loraine have two daughters, Janet Neyer and Joyce (Eugene) DePue, four grandchildren and six great-grandchildren. Loraine retired from the Procter & Gamble Co., and Alfred retired from the Leggett & Platt Co. after 45 years of service.

PRESBYTERIAN OAK HILLS PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 6233 Werk Rd. (Enter off Werkridge) 922-5448 Rev. Jerry Hill 10:00 a.m Worship & Sunday School Nursery Care Avail.

Come and worship in a small casual church that emphasizes the fellowship and mission in the community and globally. www.oakhillspc.com

UNITED METHODIST CHEVIOT UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 3820 Westwood-Northern Blvd.

UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST St. Peter & St. Paul United Church of Christ

Kerry Wood, Senior Pastor Lois Schalk-Hartley, Associate Pastor

9:20 a.m. Traditional Worship 10:20 a.m. Sunday School for All Ages 11:20 a.m Contemporary Worship Service 662-2048 www.cheviotumc.org

3001 Queen City Ave. 513-661-3745 Rev. Martin Westermeyer, Pastor Bible Study: 9 am Worship & Church School: 10 am Dial-A-Devotion 426-8957 www.stpeterandstpaulucc.org

Important Christmas Questions Who was born? “He shall be great, and will be called the Son of the Highest” (Lu.2:32) “That Holy One who is born to you will be called the Son of God.” (Lu.2:35) “…and they shall call His name Immanuel, which is translated,‘God with us.’” (Matt.1:23) How was He born? “Behold, the virgin shall be with child, and bear a Son…” (Isa. 7:14; Matt.1:23) Where and when was He born? “But you, Bethlehem, in the land of Judah…out of you shall come a Ruler.” (Matt.2:6) “a decree went out from Caesar Augustus that all the world should be taxed…Joseph also went up from Galilee out of the city of Nazareth, into Judea, to the city of David, which is called Bethlehem…and she brought forth her firstborn Son, and wrapped Him in swaddling clothes and laid Him in a manger.” (Lu.2:1,4,7) “When the fullness of We at Bible time had come, God sent forth His Son, born of a woman.” (Gal.4:4) Chapel of Delhi Hills Why was He born? rejoice in the good news of a “She will bring forth a Son, and you shall call His name Jesus, Savior who came into the world for He will save His people from their sins.” (Matt.1:21) “The to save unworthy and guilty sinners Son of Man did not come into the world to be served, but such as ourselves. Together we gladly to serve and give His life a ransom for many.” (Matt.20:28) confess that salvation is by God’s grace What does this mean for sinners? alone, through the work of Christ alone “Behold, I bring you good tidings of great joy which will be to all and received by sinners by faith alone. We people. For there is born to you this day in the city of David a Savior who is Christ the Lord.” (Lu.2:11) “This is a faithful saying invite you to come and join us in our quest and worthy of all acceptance, that Christ Jesus came into the to know more of the unsearchable riches of world to save sinners of whom I am chief.” (1 Timothy 1:15) God’s grace in Jesus Christ.

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ment will have a Chinese Ribbon Dancer this year, and the Russian variation will feature a Russian Hoop Dancer. The company will present four public performances of The Nutcracker: 7 p.m. Friday, Dec. 21; 2 p.m.Saturday, Dec. 22; 7 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 22, and 2 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 23. Tickets are $20 for adults, $15 for children under 12 and senior citizens 65 and older. High school and college students with a valid student ID can purchase $12 tickets at the theater prior to Friday show time only. Group discounts for 10 or more people are available. Tickets can be purchased by calling BTM at 520-2334 or by visiting tinyurl.com/adofzvu.

UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

Mount professor helps at Hurricane Sandy relief Bill Lonneman, assistant professor of nursing at the College of Mount St. Joseph, spent a week in areas in New York City and Connecticut that were damaged by Hurricane Sandy. Lonneman is a volunteer nurse for the Red Cross and accepted a deployment to the disaster sites. Lonneman arrived Nov. 2 in White Plains, N.Y,. and was asked to be part of a “circuit riding” team with

Clara a toy nutcracker and Clara’s brother Alexander a toy tin soldier. Drosselmeyer summons to life the nutcracker and toy tin soldier, along with a beautiful ballerina doll. Both nutcracker and toy tin soldier fall desperately in love with her. After a battle between nutcracker and soldier, mice and militia, waltzing snowflakes sweep the audience to a magical Toy Kingdom. There, characters from around the world come to life – Dresden porcelain dolls, a 20foot long Chinese dragon, magic flowers of Holland, pirates of the Caribbean Sea, and Mother Ginger and her little Buffoons. New are a couple surprises. Simmons said the Chinese dragon divertisse-

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LIFE

B8 • WESTERN HILLS PRESS • DECEMBER 12, 2012

Beech Acres parenting center receives grant

The Hatton Foundation has awarded Beech Acres Parenting Center a $20,000 grant for Beech Acres’ unique strength-based and goal-oriented therapeutic mentoring program that nurtures success in some of Hamilton County’s youth at greatest risk for academic failure and delinquency. Beech Acres has an office on the West Side at 3325 Glenmore Ave. Beech Acres Therapeu-

tic Mentoring serves about 100 youth each year in Hamilton County who are ages 7 to 17, and who have a mental health diagnosis. Many of them are also involved in the child welfare, mental health or juvenile justice systems. Contracted therapeutic mentors are professionals who have had extensive experience supporting the positive growth of youth with multiple challenges.

One of the distinguishing factors of Beech Acres’ mentoring program is that mentors engage the child’s entire family (and school) in the plan. In addition to intensive one-on-one support, mentors strive to strengthen the social, emotional and educational skills of the child and his/ her family; improve relationships; and meet goals of the child’s specific diagnosis.

“Involving each mentee’s parents and siblings is really critical to us being able to nurture the success of a child who is at great risk of failure, yet contracts do not fund the added expenses of doing this,” said Patrick Nugent, Beech Acres vice president of development. “Grants and donations make our extra step possible. The Hatton Foundation grant allows us to make a real difference in

the lives of young people.” Beech Acres also received a $2,500 grant from the Cincinnati Rotary Foundation toward the Therapeutic Mentoring Program. Beech Acres Parenting Center supports parents and caregivers in the most challenging and important job of their lives: raising children today who are able to thrive tomorrow. With a mission of inspiring and

equipping today’s parents, families, and communities to raise capable, caring, contributing children, Beech Acres provided over 17,000 services for children, parents and educators across greater Cincinnati last year in homes, schools, and in the community to strengthen parenting and relationship capabilities. For more information, please visit www.beechacres.org.

Zonta Club installs officers and directors The Zonta Club of Cincinnati installed new directors and members at a recent dinner meeting. The Zonta Club of Cincinnati is located in District 5, comprised of 17 clubs in Ohio, Kentucky,

and West Virginia. Directors installed for the 2012-14 term were Cathy Bruckert of West Chester and Aurora Lambert of Colerain Township. Directors Laura Delaney of Montgomery, Patri-

Trusted Senior Home Care Assistance with: Personal Hygiene Cleaning Cooking Laundry Med. Reminders Transportation

cia Jude of Loveland, and Verna Tuttle of North Bend were installed at an earlier date, as was Dr. Mary Clare Hill of Harrison as a Director on the Zonta Service Fund of Cincinnati Board from 2012-15. Membership Committee Chair Dr. Mary Clare Hill and Service Chair Glenda Carota of Cleves were also recognized at the international, district, and club levels for their out-

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Many older Americans are struggling to afford food to meet their basic dietary needs. This month, nearly 1,000 vulnerable older adults will receive a jar of peanut butter in addition to their Meals on Wheels delivery, thanks to

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standing recruitment of new members over the past biennium. . Through service, advocacy and fundraising, the Zonta Club of Cincinnati supports organizations such as The Bethany House, Visiting Nurse Association, North Fairmount

Community Center, The Women’s Connection, Tender Mercies, and several others. The group advocates for women returning to college by providing scholarships through its Ann Rasche Scholarship Fund at Cincinnati State Technical and Community Col-

lege. Membership in Zonta is by invitation and provides members the opportunity to meet other professionals and executives and provides provide a venue for service, fellowship, and friendships. Contact the membership committee at info@zonta-cinti.org.

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New Zonta members are, from left, Gail Heimburger, Akosua Addo, and Dr. Eleanor Canos with Zonta Club of Cincinnati President Terri Purtee-Stein. THANKS TO CORY KEMP.

donations from friends and neighbors during a food drive last month. In October, Wesley Community Services, AARP Ohio and Walgreens effort asked area residents to “Spread Some Good” with donations of peanut butter at 57 local Walgreens stores in Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky. The food drive, Oct. 11-29, collected 940 jars. The food drive is part of the national AARP Drive to End Hunger; which promotes awareness about the serious problem of senior hunger. The U.S. Department of Agriculture Economic Research Service shows that in Ohio,15.5 percent of households were food insecure at some time during the year between

2009 and 2011, compared to 14.7 percent nationally. While there are many similar food drives across the country, the effort in Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky was different in its focus on a singular item. The partnership also helped to assure that donations remained in the community. Peanut butter is low in calories and is a source of fiber, protein, and good dietary fat. For older adults, the benefits of healthy eating include increased mental acuteness, resistance to illness and disease, higher energy levels, faster recuperation times, and better management of chronic health problems. “On behalf of the board of directors for Wesley Services Organization, we are

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LIFE

DECEMBER 12, 2012 • WESTERN HILLS PRESS • B9

DEATHS Aberta Clark Alberta Cahall Clark, 95, died Nov. 30. Survived by children Miriam, Robert (Nedra) Clark Jr., Diana Ortiz, Carol (Richard) Fisher; grandchildren Aarin (Tobey) Standford, Andrew (Ann), Adam (Holly), Arden Clark, Erica (Heather) OrtizValencia, Stephanie (Jared) OrtizGray, Krisha, Diana Ortiz, Clark Morgan (Travis), Allison Fisher; greatgrandchildren Skye, Doran, Dell Sanford, Trey, Alex Fisher. Preceded in death by husband Robert Clark Sr., parents Homer, Alberta Cahall, siblings Everette, Levitte, Jack, Alice, Ruth. Services were Dec. 4 at the Cedars of Lebanon Chapel, Spring Grove Cemetery. Arrangements by Gwen Mooney Funeral Home. Memorials to the Doris Day Animal League, Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Cincinnati and American Heart Association.

Vincent DiCiero Vincent J. DiCiero, 93, Western Hills, died Dec. 2. Survived by daughters Anne (Rick Brock) Scaringelli, Adele (Patrick) Ellery; grandchildren Erica, Diana, Jim, Carol, Michael; great-grandchildren Avery, Caden. Preceded in death by wife Filomena DiCiero. Services were Dec. 7 at St. Teresa of Avila. Arrangements by Dalbert, Woodruff & Isenogle Funeral Home.

Harold Distler Harold A. Distler, 97, died Dec. 5. He was an Army veteran of World War II. Survived by wife Rose Distler; children Carol Ann Link, Ken (Mary Catherine) Distler; grandchildren Randy (Leeanna), Lisa, Anne (Mark), Mike (Carrie), Brian (Julie); greatgrandchildren Allie, Josie, James, Maddie, Connor, Blake. Services were Dec. 8 at Mihovk-Rosenacker Funeral Home. Memorials to the Alzheimer’s Association.

Mary Catherine Dittly Mary Catherine Stadtmiller Dittly, 94, died Nov. 30. She was a homemaker. Survived by daughter Lynn (Donald) Cruse; son-in-law Jakob Ruprich; grandchildren Theresa (Matthew), Laura (Mark) Johnson, Karen (Jeff) Suder, Michael (Connie) Ruprich, Dittly Steven (Karen) Cruse; great-grandchildren Nicholas, Christopher Cruse, Catherine, Declan Johnson; brother Joseph Stadtmiller; many nieces and nephews. Preceded in death by husband Bernard Dittly, daughter Mary Catherine Ruprich, brother

Leonard Stadtmiller. Services were Dec. 4 at St. Vincent de Paul. Arrangements by Vitt, Stermer & Anderson Funeral Home.

Phillis Garber Phillis Iles Garber, 79, died Dec. 1. She retired from the banking industry as a vice president. She was the first female president of the Downtown Cincinnati Kiwanis Club. Survived by children Gail Garber (the late Randy) Baker, Charles (Kim), Patrick Garber, Paula (Jeff) Quatkemeyer; grandchildren Christopher (Carrie) Baker, Edward, Barron, Kathryn Quatkemeyer, Jamie (Albert) Sheets, Brian (Liz), Ross, Lindsey Garber; great-granddaughters Corinne, Cara Baker, Gracie, Carlie Sheets; siblings Ronnie, Carl Iles, Marilyn Kunkel, Martha Browning; many nieces and nephews. Preceded in death by husband Carl Garber Jr., parents Clifford, Maude Iles, brothers Dennis, Billy Iles. Services were Dec. 8 at the Arlington Memorial Gardens Mausoleum Chapel. Arrangements by Dennis George Funeral Home. Memorials to: Friends of Madison County Parks and Trails, P.O. Box 308, London, OH 43140.

Kay Johnston Carolyn “Kay” Johnston, 70, Green Township, died Nov. 23. She was a homemaker. Survived by husband George Johnston Sr.; children George (Dawn) Jr., John (Amy) Sr. Johnston, Angela (Sean) Westrich; grandchildren Whitney (Paul), Sarah (Scott), Kristin, Jessica, Reilly, Ryan, Anthony, John Jr., Mattea; great-grandchild Reagan; siblings Sonny, Judy Davis. Services were Dec. 2 at Impact Church. Arrangements by Vitt, Stermer & Anderson Funeral Home. Memorials to: Jewish National Fund, Attn. General Donations, 78 Randall Ave., Rockville Centre, NY 11570.

Pamela Kaeser Pamela Stephenson Kaeser, 65, Miami Township, died Dec. 6.

Inc., P.O. Box 633597, Cincinnati, OH 45263-3597.

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Esther Meiners, 94, Green Township, died Nov. 29. Survived by husband Louis Meiners; children Louis (Libby), Dan (Mary), Rick (Jenny) Meiners, Elaine (Ray) Westrich; grandchildren Tracy (Tom) Umberg, Jeff, Shaun (Suzanne), Michael (Laura), Betsy, Ben (Genevieve), Dave Meiners, Mark (Amy), Matt (Renee), Anne, Tim Westrich, Margie (Brian) Metz, Tina (Andy) Videkovich, Katie Meiners (Anthony) Clark; sisters-in-law Jean Meiners, Rita Bill; 23 greatgrandchildren. Preceded in death by parents George, Katherine Schneider, siblings Adelaide, Jerome, Ruth. Arrangements by NeidhardMinges Funeral Home. Memorials to: Our Lady of Lourdes Tuition Fund, 2832 Rosebud Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45238.

Mary Vukmanic Schafer, 95, Western Hills, died Nov. 30. Survived by children Lila (Tim) Loughlin, Louise (Joe) Kaiser, Ray (Joyce) Schafer, Lois (Dale) Matthews; sister Fran Fulton; eight grandchildren; 11 greatgrandchilSchafer dren; many nieces and nephews. Preceded in death by husband Ray Schafer, one grandson. Services were Dec. 6 at St. Teresa of Avila. Arrangements by B.J. Meyer Sons Funeral Home. Memorials to: St. Teresa of Avila Church, 1175 Overlook Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45238, Evercare Hospice and Palliative Care, 9050 Centre Pointe Drive, West Chester, OH 45069 or Alzheimer’s Association of Greater Cincinnati, 644 Linn St., Suite 1026, Cincinnati, OH 45203.

Basic obituary information and a color photograph of your loved one is published without charge by The Community Press. Please call us at 853-6262 for a submission form. To publish a larger memorial tribute, call 242-4000 or pricing details.

Joseph Ferrarelli Joseph R. Ferrarelli, 84, Green Township, died Dec. 1. Survived by wife Vivian; children David (Denise), Mike (Karen) Ferrarelli, Kim (Jim) Aug; four grandchildren; five great-grandchildren. Preceded in death by brother Angelo Ferrarelli. Ferrarelli Services were Dec. 5 at Dalbert, Woodruff & Isenogle Funeral Home. Memorials to the Cheviot Elks or Hospice of Cincinnati.

Timmy, Brian White and many other nieces and nephews. Preceded in death by parents Paul, Delores Wilson, motherin-law Margie Raley. Services were Dec. 8 at Dalbert, Woodruff & Isenogle Funeral Home. Memorials to: The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society, Southern Ohio Chapter, 2300 Wall St., Suite H, Cincinnati, OH 45212.

ABOUT OBITUARIES

Survived by husband Charlie Kaeser; children Donna (Gary) Bischof, Michael (Lynn) Kaeser, Sherry (Tommy) Smith; grandchildren Kory, Ben, Ali, Sam, Sierra; siblings Betty (Tom) Adrian, Tom Stephenson, Jeannie (Butch) Denlinger, Debbie (Phil) Lind, Taffy (Jim) Adelata; many nieces and nephews. Services were Dec. 10 at Our Lady of the Visitation. Arrangements by Dalbert, Woodruff & Isenogle Funeral Home.

Marcy Leininger Marcia “Marcy” Leininger, Miami Township, died Nov. 30. Survived by husband Paul Leininger; sons Michael (Nicole), Mark (Kristin) Leininger; grandchildren Brady, Lily, Ryan, Elizabeth; brother- and sister-in-law Ed, Carol Leininger. Preceded in death by children Phyllis, Walt, sister Carol. Services Leininger were Dec. 3 at Our Lady of Lourdes. Arrangements by Neidhard-Minges Funeral Home. Memorials to: Hospice of Cincinnati Inc., c/o Bethesda Foundation Inc., P.O. Box 633597, Cincinnati, OH 45263.

Esther Macke Esther Kleine Macke, 92, Western Hills, died Dec. 3. Survived by daughter Sister Mary Macke, OSU; many nieces and nephews. Preceded in death by husband Francis Macke, siblings Mary Anne Grogg, Vincent, John Kleine. Services were Dec. 7 at St. Simon the Apostle. Arrangements Macke by B.J. Meyer Sons Funeral Home. Memorials to: Ursulines of Brown County Retirement Fund, 20860 State Route 251, St. Martin, OH 45118, West Park Angel Fund, 2950 West Park Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45238 or Hospice of Cincinnati Inc., c/o Bethesda Foundation

Peggy Raley Peggy Wilson Raley, 56, Cleves, died Dec. 4. Survived by husband Jerry Raley; siblings Tom (Patsy), Paul (Thelma), Roger (Debbie), Robert (Shawna) Wilson, Debbie (Joe) Zimmerman, Kim (Fred) White; brothRaley ers- and sisters-in-law Tom (Sue) Raley, Tami (Don) Martin; nephews

LEGAL NOTICE The following ordinance was adopted at the 12/4/12 meeting of the Cheviot City Council: Ord 12-37 To Amend The 2012 Annual Budget Appropria tions; And To Declare An Emergency. 0026

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Andy Spalvis Andris “Andy” Spalvis, 54, died Dec. 2. Survived by sons Jeffrey, Jacob Spalvis; former wife Kim Means Spalvis; aunts and uncle Vic (Virginia) Belickis, Ilga Lacis; niece and nephews Danielle, Matthew Krimmer, Robert, Tim Gruen, JackSpalvis son Huddleston; cousins Maris, Steve Belickis, Susan Orzel, Sandra

Chubner, Ligita Matison. Preceded in death by parents Francis, Gaida Spalvis. Services were Dec. 7 at Rebold, Rosenacker & Sexton Funeral Home. Memorials to: St. Jude Children’s Hospital, 501 St. Jude Place, Memphis, TN 38105.

David Stutzman David J. Stutzman, 60, Addyston, died Nov. 30. He was a hazardous waste remover at Fernald. He was an Army veteran of the Vietnam era and a member of the American Legion, Miller Stockum Post 485. Stutzman Survived by wife Cynthia Meyer Stutzman; son David B. Stutzman; grandson David B. Stutzman II; mother Mary Lou; siblings Kim, Chris, Johnny Stutzman; inlaws the Don and Joy Meyer family. Preceded ion death by father David J. Stutzman. Arrangements by Dennis George Funeral Home. Memorials to: American Legion, Miller Stockum Post 485, c/o Dennis George Funeral Home, 44 S. Miami, Cleves, OH 45002.

Mark Tucker Mark Scott Rucker, 49, formerly of Cleves, died Dec. 4. He was a jockey and horse trainer. Survived by wife Suzanne Tucker; daughters Lauren, Madison; parents Gerry, Orrin Tucker; sister Kristie Tucker (Randy) Cornelius; nephews Sean, Brett Cornelius, niece Sara Cornelius (Jeremy) Chipman; grandmother Flora Gabbard; many aunts, uncles and cousins. Preceded in death by grandparents Clarence Gabbard, Blanche, Silas Tucker. Memorials to: Madison Tucker Education Fund, c/o Suzi Tucker, 9250 N.W. 200th Street Road, Micanopy, FL 32667.


LIFE

B10 • WESTERN HILLS PRESS • DECEMBER 12, 2012

REAL ESTATE Cheviot

3838 Washington Ave.: City National Bank to Washington 3838 LLC; $224,600. 3300 Gamble Ave.: Boenitsch, Eric and Lisa to Janson, Tim and Sue; $5,000. 3929 Delmar Ave.: CPA1 Holdings LLC to Eagle Savings Bank; $26,000.

Green Township

3574 Sandal Lane: Bedinghaus, Todd to U.S. Bank NA Tr.; $112,000. 3669 Summerdale Lane: Hautman, Ruth G. Tr. to Lacy, Amanda R.; $94,000. 6150 Sharlene Drive: Stephens, Ronnie @3 to Lawson, Michael B. and Angela M.; $125,000. 5471 Asbury Lake Drive: Gildea, Diane @5 to Vanoy, Deborah J.; $130,000. 5578 Biscayne Ave.: Enginger, Corey S. to Spurling, Keith E.; $99,900. 6563 Hayes Road: CSK Electric, LLC to Skelley, John E. Sr. Tr.; $179,000. Boulder Path Drive: MVR2 LLC to Baer, John H. Tr. and Mary Ann Tr.; $24,900. 2101 Van Blaricum Road: Knox, John A. to Ruberg, Jeffrey P.; $191,000. 7066 Jessicas Oak Court: Fannie Mae to AH4R I OH LLC; $163,000. 5680 Harrison Ave.: Corbly, Roger S. Tr. and Sandra L. Corbly Tr. to Ozar, Harry R. Tr.; $961,500. 5425 Bluesky Drive: Beck, Dorothy C. to Voelkerding, Jason;

$30,000. 3644 Whiteoak Drive: Taphorn, Daniel P. and Kimberly A. to Fifth Third Mortgage Company; $72,000. 6759 Jimjon Court: Richter, Debra D. and Eric N. to Braun, Christopher J. and Kelly E.; $176,500. 5869 Willow Oak Lane: Froehlich, Peter R. Jr. and Carolyn R. to Stroud, Anthony W. Tr.; $40,000. 5127 Carriage Hill: Roehrig, Rahe J. and Janet A. to Wuebbling, Robert M. and Catherine S.; $112,000. 3428 Tolland Court: Martin, Terrance W. to Miller, Brandy R.; $137,720. 6474 West Fork Road: Vanoy, Deborah J. to Taphorn, Jonathan W.; $176,600. 5168 Castlebrook Court: Searle, Patricia S. to Chrisman Properties LLC; $230,000. 3272 Alpine Place: Buis, Edward W. to Stroud, Anthony W. Tr.; $9,000. 3591 Gailynn Drive: Wessendarp, Jeffrey C. and Melinda L. to Korte, Martin J.; $130,000. 5153 Scarsdale Circle: Henn, Dorothy M. to Grote, Leo Tr.; $121,000. 4358 Airymont Court: Harrell, Lawrence W. to Sinclair, Dale; $116,000. 5631 Lawrence Road: Wright, Jonathan R. to Smith, Jewell; $96,500. 6652 Hearne Road: Venture, Angela F. to Sieve, Karen G.; $25,765. Bridge Point Pass: Grand Communities Ltd. to Fischer Single

ABOUT REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS Information is provided as a public service by the office of Hamilton County Auditor Dusty Rhodes. Neighborhood designations are approximate. Family Homes II LLC; $65,583. Oakbridge Way: Grand Communities Ltd. to Fischer Attached Homes Iillc; $422,000. 3717 Ridgedale Drive: Home Investors of Cincinnati 2 LLC to Rema II LLC; $140,000. 6111 Wilmer Road: Horne, Kathleen M. Tr. to Mushrush, Lisa Horne and Robert H.; $185,000. 5287 Jessup Road: Schoenlaub, Sarah and Scott A. Kist to Mellott, Meghan and Tyler Buechel; $147,500. 6111 Wilmer Road: Horne, Kathleen M. Tr. to Mushrush, Lisa Horne and Robert H.; $185,000. 7187 Wyandotte Drive: Haglage, Brian Joseph Tr. to Enginger, Corey S.; $167,000. 3483 Ebenezer Road: Winters, Mark and Victoria to Schill, William C. Jr.; $130,000. 6775 Menz Lane: Hucke, Alvin E. and Margaret N. to Santen, Genevieve S.; $153,000. 3241 Balsamridge Drive: Alexander, Lori F. to Pruitt, Judy; $128,250. 5622 Samver Road: U.S. Bank Trust NA Tr. to Brackmeier, Dianne A and Kenneth R. Long; $21,500. 3225 South Road: Bank of America NA successor by merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing LP to Federal National Mortgage Association; $198,550.

3658 Eyrich Road: Kain, Michael and Joy A. to Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation; $58,000. 6640 Westchase Park Drive: Spencer, Craig J. and Karen R. to Forte, Anthony E. and Annette M.; $373,900. 6289 Eagles Lake Drive: Hanrahan, Betty Sue to Hoelmer, Karl H.; $67,000. 3595 Eyrich Road: Mowl, George Jr. and Jenny Ann to Mentrup, Danielle and Kristopher; $99,000. 3481 Ebenezer Road: Winters, Mark and Victoria to Schill, William C. Jr.; $130,000.

Miami Township

3046 Fiddlers Green Road: Ray, Henry K. to Felix Jeffrey A. Tr.; $27,000. St. Cloud Way: Siam/American Trading Co. LLC to Holmes Blacktop and Concrete Inc.; $25,000. 7467 Bridgetown Road: Bender, Kathleen to Jones, Brandon; $137,500. 7711 Wesselman Road: Brown, Michael T. to Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation; $40,000. Southpointe Drive: Anneken, William B. and Carol M. to Schulcz, Mary; $2,000. 3505 Buckeye Trail: Kelley,

Shannon M. to Kreidenweis, David J. and Marilyn E.; $85,000.

North Bend

43 Stonehaven Drive: Kurzhals, Edward G. and Heidi A. to Fitzgibbon, Denis J. and Antoinette A.; $215,900.

West Price Hill

4448 Carnation Ave.: Witte, Cynthia M. to Williams, Justin; $121,000. 826 Rosemont Ave.: Deleon, Mario D. and Wanda Herrera Salazar to Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation; $48,780. 809 Pedretti Ave.: Lello, Dan Tr. to Eichhorn, Thomas L. and Judith L.; $27,000. 809 Pedretti Ave.: Real Estate Management Holdings LLC to Lello, Dan Tr.; $21,000. 4018 Fawnhill Lane: Fannie Mae to Teetor, Gregory A.; $18,100. 1103 Rutledge Ave.: Eagle Savings Bank to Price Hill Will; $23,000. 974 Covedale Ave.: U.S. Bank NA ND to Kolianos, John G.; $38,500. 1024 Morado Drive: Singleton, Kim and L. Kelly to Singleton, Samantha M.; $80,000. 4067 Eighth St.: Price Hill Will to Lewis, Christina D.; $85,000. 4826 Prosperity Place: Strehle, Brian T. to Muddy River Homes LLC; $34,000. 1153 Olivia Lane: Northcutt, Timmy Lee to Couch, Ricky and Karen S.; $91,500. 1211 Manss Ave.: Ammon, Glenn A. and Kimberly to Brown,

Albert L.; $3,000.

Westwood

3268 Buell St.: Advantage Bank to Stroud, Anthony W. Tr.; $17,000. 2918 De Breck Ave.: Citimortgage Inc. to Helfrich, Gene; $27,000. 2684 Cyclorama Drive: Sheehan, Angela M. to Wozniak, Hope; $135,000. 2911 Kling Ave.: Decker, Marian L. to Stitzlein, Joel Q. and Hanna; $55,000. 3449 Anaconda Drive: Henderly, Betty Jane to Ladisa Investments LLC; $36,000. 2915 Temple Ave.: Brauch, Kenneth J. and April L. to Langen, Ryan G.; $52,000. 3107 Manning Ave.: Wissel, Robert R. Jr. and Laurie L. to Lack, Gary; $102,500. 2721 Robert Ave.: Covey, Luella E. to Federal National Mortgage Association; $12,000. 2746 Pickmeier Lane: Fancote, Brandon Scott to Hensley, Fred J. Sr. Tr.; $35,000. 2702 Queenswood Drive: Perron, Brian D. to Boykier, Diego; $78,000. 2919 Woodrow Ave.: Thobe, Jeremy and Allison Muldoon to Muldoon, Allison; $31,950. 2482 Harrison Ave.: Morgan/ Morgan Properties LLC to Morgan/Morgan Properties and Jackson and Jackson Prope; $20,045. 2871 Lafeuille Ave.: Rutland, Lisa to Dalton, Dennis and Kim M.; $28,000.

Krista Ramsey, Columnist kramsey@enquirer.com

www.youtube.com/enquirermedia

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LIFE

DECEMBER 12, 2012 • WESTERN HILLS PRESS • B11

POLICE REPORTS CINCINNATI DISTRICT 3 Arrests/citations Clarence J. Melius, born 1983, city or local ordinance violation, 4634 Glenway Ave., Nov. 19. David A. Williams, born 1986, theft under $300, 4105 W. Eighth St., Nov. 18. David Harris, born 1986, assault, 4053 W. Eighth St., Nov. 13. Ebony McClendon, born 1978, theft over $5000, 3775 Westmont Drive, Nov. 15. Eugene E. Wilson Jr., born 1974, domestic violence, 939 Edgetree Lane, Nov. 12. Geno Cunningham, born 1976, having a weapon under disability, receiving a stolen firearm, trafficking, 904 Harris Ave., Nov. 16. Hattie E. Smith, born 1964, assault, 1506 Beech Ave., Nov. 12. Jimmy Swint, born 1980, aggravated armed robbery, 1266 Iliff Ave., Nov. 15. Lisa Price, born 1965, disorderly conduct, 1059 Schiff Ave., Nov. 10. Markham J. Mattar, born 1967, telecommunication harassment, unauthorized use of a motor vehicle, 4163 W. Eighth St., Nov. 14. Michael J. Elder, born 1990, criminal damaging or endangering, 1275 Sunset Ave., Nov. 12. Mike Ronan, born 1990, possession of drug abuse instruments, theft under $300, 4354 W. Eighth St., Nov. 18. Robert Lee Claxton, born 1961, assault, 1905 Wyoming Ave., Nov. 15. Sharon E. Masten, born 1966, assault, violation of a temporary protection order, 833 Seton Ave., Nov. 18. Sinaca Wagoner, born 1986, possessing a defaced firearm, misdemeanor drug possession, possession of drug paraphernalia, 1926 Westmont Lane, Nov. 12. Steven C. Dattilo, born 1985, domestic violence, 1015 Gilsey Ave., Nov. 16. Vanita Shannon, born 1959, aggravated menacing, menacing, 4441 W. Eighth St., Nov. 17.

William Moore, born 1983, possession of drugs, 3980 Glenway Ave., Nov. 9. Amy Lee, born 1983, welfare fraud, 3222 Harrison Ave., Nov. 12. Andrew Klei, born 1990, possession of criminal tools, theft under $300, 6150 Glenway Ave., Nov. 12. Ashley Morgan, born 1985, possession of drug paraphernalia, 2688 Lafeuille Circle, Nov. 15. Caroline D. Jackson, born 1993, theft under $300, 6100 Glenway Ave., Nov. 13. Crystal S. McKines, born 1984, felonious assault, 3364 Anaconda Drive, Nov. 16. Damone Thomas, born 1984, possession of drugs, 3001 Bracken Woods Lane, Nov. 8. Darryl Portis, born 1975, assault, 2733 East Tower Drive, Nov. 15. Debbie Gill, born 1962, falsification, welfare fraud, 3222 Harrison Ave., Nov. 12. Delania Young, born 1983, theft under $300, 6165 Glenway Ave., Nov. 12. Demico M. Williams, born 1984, assault, 3145 Sunshine Ave., Nov. 9. Elliott Gray, born 1987, domestic violence, 2734 East Tower Drive, Nov. 16. Gregory D. Robinson, born 1980, assault, 3364 Anaconda Drive, Nov. 16. Holly Young, born 1986, welfare fraud, 3222 Harrison Ave., Nov. 12. John Pryne, born 1952, possession of drugs, 2576 Queen City Ave., Nov. 11. Lamar Kendrick, born 1986, domestic violence, 111 Vienna Woods Drive, Nov. 17. Leonard Smith, born 1989, trafficking, 2247 Harrison Ave., Nov. 13. Mark Andrew Muddiman, born 1969, theft $300 to $5000, theft under $300, 5555 Glenway Ave., Nov. 18. Marvin Brown, born 1991, aggravated burglary, domestic violence, 2654 Queen City Ave., Nov. 15. Mary Griffin, born 1961, aggravated menacing, theft under $300, 6165 Glenway Ave., Nov. 16.

3320 Parkcrest Lane, Nov. 11. 3565 Carmel Terrace, Nov. 10. 3959 W. Eighth St., Nov. 12. 4207 Glenway Ave., Nov. 12. 4439 Glenway Ave., Nov. 11. 4931 Glenway Ave., Nov. 13. 5006 Rapid Run Road, Nov. 14. 830 Greenwich Ave., Nov. 15. Criminal mischief 1262 Gilsey Ave., Nov. 13. Criminal trespass 2461 Westwood Northern Blvd., Nov. 15. Domestic violence Reported on Beech Avenue, Nov. 16. Reported on Boudinot Avenue, Nov. 10. Reported on East Tower Drive, Nov. 16. Reported on Edgetree Lane, Nov. 12. Reported on Fyffe Avenue, Nov. 13. Reported on Gilsey Avenue, Nov. 16. Reported on Glenway Avenue, Nov. 10. Reported on Harrison Avenue, Nov. 16. Reported on Vienna Woods, Nov. 17. Felonious assault 3031 Westwood Northern Blvd., Nov. 10. 4280 Glenway Ave., Nov. 10. Menacing 1928 Westmont Lane, Nov. 11. 913 Sunset Ave., Nov. 11. Robbery 1000 Vienna Woods Drive, Nov. 14. 2510 Harrison Ave., Nov. 14. Theft 1184 Coronado Ave., Nov. 14. 1233 Texas Ave., Nov. 13. 1245 Mckeone Ave., Nov. 12. 1262 Gilsey Ave., Nov. 13. 1516 Sidona Lane, Nov. 14. 1614 Iliff Ave., Nov. 14. 1628 Gilsey Ave., Nov. 15. 1756 Esmonde St., Nov. 16. 1912 Westmont Lane, Nov. 11. 2146 Ferguson Road, Nov. 12. 2301 Ferguson Road, Nov. 15. 2322 Ferguson Road, Nov. 12. 2439 Oaktree Place, Nov. 11. 2703 East Tower Drive, Nov. 12. 2720 Queen City Ave., Nov. 14. 2851 McKinley Ave., Nov. 16. 2872 Montana Ave., Nov. 12. 2906 Fischer Place, Nov. 19. 2913 Boudinot Ave., Nov. 14.

ABOUT POLICE REPORTS The Community Press publishes the names of all adults charged with offenses. The information is a matter of public record and does not imply guilt or innocence. To contact your local police department: » Cheviot: Chief Joseph Lally, 661-2700 (days), 825-2280 (evenings) » Cleves: Chief Bill Renner, 941-1212 » Cincinnati District 3: Capt. Russell A. Neville, 263-8300 » Green Township: Chief Bart West, 574-0007; vandalism hotline, 574-5323 » North Bend and Miami Township are patrolled by the Hamilton County: Sheriff Simon Leis, 825-1500 Rickey Johnson, born 1956, disorderly conduct, possession of an open flask, 2454 Harrison Ave., Nov. 9. Sufyan Ma Alanani, born 1976, domestic violence, 3424 Fyffe Ave., Nov. 13. Tabitha Bales, born 1980, forgery, 5582 Glenway Ave., Nov. 15. Todd Washington, born 1968, assault, domestic violence, menacing, 2610 Harrison Ave., Nov. 16. Trivia T. Lewis, born 1984, theft under $300, 2356 Harrison Ave., Nov. 10. Vernon Blair, born 1973, misdemeanor drug possession, trafficking, 6030 Glenway Ave., Nov. 14. William Baldrick, born 1982, misdemeanor drug possession, theft under $300, 2411 Boudinot Ave., Nov. 15.

Incidents/reports Abduction 1878 Sunset Ave., Nov. 10. Aggravated menacing 2200 Harrison Ave., Nov. 10. 2844 Montana Ave., Nov. 11. Aggravated robbery 1266 Iliff Ave., Nov. 15. 1878 Sunset Ave., Nov. 10. 2388 Ferguson Road, Nov. 12. 2672 Montana Ave., Nov. 15. 2710 East Tower Drive, Nov. 13. 2990 Harrison Ave., Nov. 17. 3063 Verdin Ave., Nov. 11. 3519 Boudinot Ave., Nov. 16. 3900 Glenway Ave., Nov. 15. 5300 Glenway Ave., Nov. 17. Assault 1905 Wyoming Ave., Nov. 15.

2461 Westwood Northern Blvd., Nov. 15. 2733 East Tower Drive, Nov. 15. 2900 Fischer Place, Nov. 11. 3419 Belltone Ave., Nov. 10. 3565 Carmel Terrace, Nov. 10. 3907 W. Liberty St., Nov. 11. 4053 W. Eighth St., Nov. 12. 4118 Glenway Ave., Nov. 17. 4942 Ferguson Place, Nov. 13. 5131 Glenway Ave., Nov. 16. Breaking and entering 1306 Beech Ave., Nov. 13. 1811 Ashbrook Drive, Nov. 12. Burglary 1225 Sunset Ave., Nov. 15. 2451 Westwood Northern Blvd., Nov. 12. 2943 Montana Ave., Nov. 15. 3129 Boudinot Ave., Nov. 13. 3411 Broadwell Ave., Nov. 13. 3411 Hazelwood Ave., Nov. 13. 4046 W. Eighth St., Nov. 11. Criminal damaging/endangering 1044 Rutledge Ave., Nov. 12. 1220 Iliff Ave., Nov. 15. 1266 Gilsey Ave., Nov. 13. 1275 Sunset Ave., Nov. 12. 1670 Iliff Ave., Nov. 11. 2160 Karla Drive, Nov. 11. 2299 Wyoming Ave., Nov. 15. 2301 Ferguson Road, Nov. 15. 2487 Harrison Ave., Nov. 15. 2679 Montana Ave., Nov. 12. 2913 Boudinot Ave., Nov. 13. 3001 Westwood Northern Blvd., Nov. 16. 3020 Harrison Ave., Nov. 10. 3031 Westwood Northern Blvd., Nov. 11. 3031 Westwood Northern Blvd., Nov. 19. 3259 Lakeview Ave., Nov. 13.

2913 Queen City Ave., Nov. 11. 2921 Montana Ave., Nov. 13. 3001 Westwood Northern Blvd., Nov. 19. 3211 Midway Ave., Nov. 13. 3470 Hazelwood Ave., Nov. 13. 3635 Janlin Court, Nov. 12. 3759 Westmont Drive, Nov. 10. 3959 W. Eighth St., Nov. 10. 4122 Glenway Ave., Nov. 14. 4629 Glenway Ave., Nov. 16. 4916 Heuwerth Ave., Nov. 11. 4980 Glenway Ave., Nov. 12. 5304 Glenway Ave., Nov. 15. 6000 Glenway Ave., Nov. 11. 6000 Glenway Ave., Nov. 12. 6012 Glenway Ave., Nov. 19. 6100 Glenway Ave., Nov. 13. 6150 Glenway Ave., Nov. 10. 6150 Glenway Ave., Nov. 11. 6150 Glenway Ave., Nov. 11. 6150 Glenway Ave., Nov. 12. 6165 Glenway Ave., Nov. 12. 703 Vienna Woods Drive, Nov. 13.

GREEN TOWNSHIP Arrests/citations Brandy Matthew, 22, 1143 Anderson Ferry, theft and warrant at 6290 Glenway Ave., Oct. 26. Justin Holt, 29, 4727 Clevesdale, theft and warrant at 6290 Glenway Ave., Oct. 26. Susan Mueller, 48, 795 Neeb Road, theft at 6550 Harrison Ave., Oct. 26. Gregory D. Noel, 24, 914 Voss St., disorderly conduct at 5166 Crookshank, Oct. 26. Jared Thompson, 34, 8593 Woodview Drive, drug possession and drug paraphernalia at 6775 Bridgetown Road, Oct. 27. Lucrecia Ramirez, 20, 4647 Glenway Ave. No. 9, theft at 6580 Harrison Ave., Oct. 26. Mauro M. Gonzales, 24, 4543 Glenway Ave., complicity to theft at 6580 Harrison Ave., Oct. 26. Pete L. Steinmetz, 24, 547 1/2 Puthoff St., obstructing official business and possession of drug paraphernalia at Rybolt Road and Interstate 74, Oct. 27. Jennifer Humphrey, 42, 6185 Kingsgate, disorderly conduct while intoxicated at 6783

See POLICE, Page B12

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LIFE

B12 • WESTERN HILLS PRESS • DECEMBER 12, 2012

POLICE REPORTS Continued from Page B11 Bridgetown Road, Oct. 27. Mary A. Feucht, 48, 3039 Montana Ave., theft at 6300 Glenway Ave., Oct. 27. James Wallace, 27, 109 Wamsley Ave., theft at 6580 Harrison Ave., Nov. 5. Juvenile, 15, disorderly conduct at 3200 Ebenezer Road, Nov. 5. Juvenile, 15, disorderly conduct at 3200 Ebenezer Road, Nov. 5. Lisa Perdue, 30, 910 S. State St. No. 9, drug abuse and possessing drug abuse instrument at 6401 Colerain Ave., Nov. 6. John M. Bowman, 34, 3540 Jessup Road, domestic violence at 3540 Jessup Road, Nov. 6. Juvenile, 15, theft at 5071 Glencrossing Way, Nov. 7. Jamie L. Gray, 19, 2216 South Road, drug possession at 3200 Ebenezer Road, Nov. 8. Anthony J. Cucinotta, 18, 4472 Harrison Ave., drug possession at 4036 Race Road, Nov. 8. Justin A. Boettcher, 27, 117 E. 12th St., drug abuse and possessing drug abuse instrument at 5106 Cleves Warsaw, Nov. 8. Tara Johnson, 32, 3238 Balsamridge Drive, burglary and theft at 5588 Mayberry Drive, Nov. 8. James Linneman, 22, 3785 Rosealta Lane, theft and possessing drug abuse instrument at 6303 Glenway Ave., Nov. 8. Ryan Kersey, 27, 3233 Springdale Road, theft at 6550 Harrison Ave., Nov. 9. Tyler A. Cox, 18, 100 Deerview Court, drug abuse at 6375 Harrison Ave., Nov. 9. Antwone M. Brown, 30, 2709 Hillvista Lane No. 3, theft and obstructing official business at 5825 Shadymist Lane, Nov. 9. Kyle R. Shaw, 21, 4276 McKeener Pike, theft at 6300 Glenway Ave., Nov. 10. Dustin J. Kramer, 29, no address listed, theft at eastbound Interstate 74 at mile marker 11, Nov. 11. Jessica Woodrum, 20, no address listed, theft, possession of drugs, possessing drug abuse instruments and drug paraphernalia at 6221 Eagles Lake Court, Nov. 11. Zach Harmeyer, 19, 5386 Haft

Road, possession of drugs, possessing drug abuse instruments and drug paraphernalia at 6221 Eagles Lake Court, Nov. 11. Savannaha M. Tipton, 22, 3342 Kleeman Road, drug abuse and unauthorized use of vehicle at 3342 Kleeman Road, Nov. 12. Juvenile, 16, disorderly conduct at 5400 Edalbert Drive, Nov. 13. Markham Mattar, 45, 6016 Musketeer Drive, domestic violence at 2039 South Acres, Nov. 14. David C. Beagle, 45, 3997 Delhi Ave., drug possession at 6100 Glenway Ave., Nov. 15. Juvenile, 14, disorderly conduct at 3200 Ebenezer Road, Nov. 16.

Incidents/reports Aggravated menacing Suspect threatened to physically harm victim at 3121 Mary Jane Drive, Oct. 26. Assault Suspect punched victim in the mouth at Ebenezer Road and Werk Road, Nov. 7. Suspect struck victim in the chest at 3971 Virginia Court, Nov. 7. Suspect punched victim at 3364 North Bend Road No. 3, Nov. 13. Breaking and entering Money stolen from office at Danbarry Cinemas at 5190 Glencrossing Way, Nov. 5. Chainsaw and a welder stolen from home’s shed at 6183 Rambling Ridge Drive, Nov. 10. Burglary Kindle e-reader, checkbook, television and credit card stolen from home at 5538 Reemelin Road, Oct. 22. Window broken on home during burglary, but nothing found missing at 5112 Cleves Warsaw, Oct. 25. Copper piping, coil from air conditioning unit, faucet fixtures and heating/ventilation/ air conditioning unit stolen from home at 5438 Lawrence Road, Nov. 5. Six decorative figurines, two goblets, two necklaces and two rings stolen from home at 4331 Regency Ridge Lane No. 202, Nov. 6. Handgun and a watch stolen from home at 3121 Mary Jane

Drive, Nov. 7. Copper pipe stolen from home’s garage at 6686 Russell Heights Drive, Nov. 8. Water meter, two faucets and pressure regulator stolen from home at 3236 Van Zandt, Nov. 10. Gold nugget, silver quarter and several pieces of jewelry stolen from home at 5548 Biscayne, Nov. 12. Gasoline can stolen from home’s garage at 3066 Hoock Court, Nov. 13. Money stolen from vehicles parked in home’s garage at 2936 Orchardknoll Court, Nov. 13. Two televisions and an MP3 player stolen from home at 4836 Kleeman Green Drive, Nov. 14. Camera, money and two cash boxes stolen from home at 3920 West Fork Road, Nov. 15. Tablet computer stolen from vehicle parked in home’s garage at 2348 Devils Backbone, Nov. 15. Criminal damaging Garage window broken on home at 6183 Rambling Ridge Drive, Oct. 24. Vehicle rear bumper hit intentionally by another vehicle while traveling at 6080 Colerain Ave., Oct. 25. Tire slashed on vehicle at 6873 Rackview, Oct. 27. Window broken on vehicle at 2080 Neeb Road, Nov. 9. Rear window broken on vehicle at 6441 Glenway Ave., Nov. 11. Window broken on vehicle at 5064 Sidney Road, Nov. 12. Section of chain link fence damaged at 5394 Karen Ave., Nov. 14. Criminal mischief Barbecue sauce poured on vehicle at 5762 Lawrence Road, Oct. 25. Vehicle rifled through, but nothing found missing at 2456 Devils Backbone, Nov. 15. Vehicle rifled through, but nothing found missing at 2450 Devils Backbone, Nov. 15. Vehicle rifled through, but nothing found missing at 2452 Devils Backbone, Nov. 15. Domestic dispute

Argument between spouses at Linneman Road, Nov. 11. Argument between parent and child at Parkview, Nov. 12. Argument between man and woman at Antoninus Drive, Nov. 15. Domestic dispute Argument between spouses at Ridgecombe Drive, Oct. 27. Argument between parent and child at Rybolt Road, Nov. 7. Argument between siblings at Pinecroft Drive, Nov. 9. Domestic violence Physical altercation between man and woman at Muddy Creek Road, Nov. 12. Menacing Suspect threatened to harm victim at 5055 Casa Loma Blvd., Nov. 8. Misuse of credit card Victim had debit card used to make unauthorized purchases at 3540 Jessup Road No. 1, Oct. 23. Theft Vehicle stolen from home’s driveway at 5028 Race Road, Oct. 22. Three credit cards, money, two GPS units, vacuum cleaner, bag and wallet stolen from one vehicle; and money stolen from second vehicle at 6846 Kildare, Oct. 22. Amplifier and subwoofer stolen from vehicle at 5756 Sidney Road, Oct. 23. Money stolen from cash register at Steak ‘N Shake at 3835 Race Road, Oct. 23. Purse and contents stolen from vehicle at 6346 Starridge, Oct. 23. Laptop computer stolen from vehicle at 5826 Seiler Drive, Oct. 23. Two political signs stolen from home’s front yard at 3332 Diehl Road, Oct. 23. Military ammunition case, bayonet scabbard, three rifle magazines and two boxes of ammunition stolen from vehicle at 3960 Raceview Ave. No. 1, Oct. 23. Trailer containing several pieces of construction equipment and tools stolen from road construction site at 5151 North Bend Road, Oct. 23.

Join us for Grandparents’ Weekend December 8 & 9 Pancakes with Santa

Grandparents, bring your grandkids! Enjoy a decorate-your-own pancake buffet, family activities and photo opportunities with Santa! Tickets are $30 for adults, $15 for children, children younger than 2 are free December 8, 10 a.m. to Noon

HoliDate!

Celebrate the holidays with the special young person in your life at HoliDate! Enjoy baked treats from Mrs. Claus’ kitchen, hot cocoa and a performance of excerpts from the Nutcracker by Cincinnati Ballet’s Otto M. Budig Academy. Tickets are $12 for Members, $15 for Non-Members December 9, 6 p.m. Call (513) 287-7021 for reservations. For a full list of weekend programming visit: cincymuseum.org

Cincinnati Museum Center CE-0000533249

cincymuseum.org CE-0000534275

Employee at TGI Fridays walked off the job without turning in their server book with money at 6320 Glenway Ave., Oct. 21. Money, GPS and cellphone stolen from vehicle at 6150 Harrison Ave., Oct. 25. Money, several bank receipts and an unknown number of extension cords stolen from vehicle at 5150 Leona, Oct. 25. Two dirt bikes stolen from home’s back yard at 2211 Devils Backbone Road, Oct. 25. MP3 player stolen from home at 3705 Coral Gables, Oct. 25. Sixty-nine CDs stolen from home at 2997 Bailey, Oct. 27. Several pieces of jewelry stolen from home at 6221 Eagles Lake Court, Nov. 5. Several tools stolen from vehicle at 3786 Mack Ave., Nov. 6. Money stolen from two vehicles at 7129 Wyandotte Drive, Nov. 6. Apple iPad stolen from home at 5342 Werk Road No. 4, Nov. 6. Four cases of energy drinks, one steak, one package of pork ribs and three boxes of hamburger patties stolen from Gordon Food Service at 3825 Race Road, Nov. 6. Laptop computer and GPS stolen from vehicle at 5556 Leumas, Nov. 7. Money stolen from Dunkin Donuts during a “quickchange” scheme at 5431 North Bend Road, Nov. 7. Vehicle stolen from home at 3633 Summerdale Lane, Nov. 8. Necklace and a ring stolen from home at 5546 Nickview Drive, Nov. 9. Laptop computer stolen from vehicle at 4614 Farcrest Court, Nov. 9. Portable video game system stolen from vehicle at 3489 Hader Ave., Nov. 9. Vehicle stolen from home’s driveway at 5622 Reemelin Road, Nov. 10. Purse and contents stolen from vehicle at 6645 Woodcrest Court, Nov. 10. Miscellaneous clothing items stolen from Dollar General at 5700 Harrison Ave., Nov. 10. Cellphone stolen from vehicle at 2696 Devils Backbone, Nov. 10.

Cordless drill, flashlight and fluke meter stolen from vehicle at 5530 Karen Ave., Nov. 11. Weight set, punching bag and subwoofer stolen from home at 5654 Surrey Ave., Nov. 11. Phone charger, phone adapter, backpack and several text books stolen from vehicle at 3359 Stevie Lane, Nov. 12. Money, MP3 player and a power cord stolen from vehicle at 5465 Haft Road, Nov. 12. Money stolen from one vehicle; and GPS, three ink cartridges and a tower cartridge stolen from second vehicle at 6096 Johnson Road, Nov. 12. GPS stolen from vehicle at 3318 Sumac Terrace, Nov. 12. Money and GPS stolen from vehicle at 3448 Tallahassee Drive, Nov. 12. Money stolen from vehicle at 5945 Giffindale Drive, Nov. 12. Vehicle stolen from home’s driveway at 5733 West Fork Road, Nov. 12. MP3 player stolen from vehicle at 6633 Woodcrest Drive, Nov. 10. CD case and 10 CDs stolen from vehicle at 3311 Sumac Terrace, Nov. 12. Money and a ring stolen from vehicle at 3087 Lancer Lane, Nov. 13. Two vacuum cleaners stolen from Kohl’s at 6580 Harrison Ave., Nov. 13. Apple handheld tablet stolen from victim at 6807 Monte Vista, Nov. 14. Money and prescription medicine stolen from victim’s purse at Pizza Hut at 6463 Glenway Ave., Nov. 14. Tablet computer stolen from vehicle at 2716 Devils Backbone, Nov. 15. Two gasoline cans stolen from home at 2630 Devils Backbone, Nov. 15. Money stolen from vehicle at 2458 Devils Backbone, Nov. 15. Cellphone and pocket knife stolen from vehicle at 3917 Biehl Ave., Nov. 15. Computer e-chip stolen from vehicle at 4055 Lee Court, Nov. 15.


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