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Your Community Press newspaper serving Addyston, Bridgetown, Cheviot, Cleves, Covedale, Dent, Green Township, Mack, Miami Township, North Bend, Westwood E-mail: westernhills@communitypress.com We d n e s d a y, A u g u s t 2 6 , 2 0 0 9

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Parade honors Green Township By Kurt Backscheider

kbackscheider@communitypress.com

Volume 83 Number 41 © 2009 The Community Press ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Labor Day is typically the unofficial end of summer. Summer in Cheviot lasts a little longer. For most Westsiders, the sign autumn is just around the corner arrives with the annual Harvest Home Parade. It won’t be long before lawn chairs line the sidewalks along Harrison Avenue and North Bend Road in preparation for the parade, which kicks off the Cheviot-Westwood Kiwanis Club’s annual Harvest Home Fair. This year’s parade begins promptly at 6 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 10, at the intersection of Harrison and Frances avenues. Ten parade divisions of veterans’ groups, Boy Scout and Girl Scout troops, marching bands, floats, local fire and police departments, dancers, gymnasts, community organizations, area sports teams and politicians will usher in the fair. The 150th annual fair runs through Sunday, Sept. 13, at Harvest Home Park. Kiwanis member Dave Backer, parade chairman, said the parade’s theme this year is “Green Township – 200 years old,” a nod to Cheviot’s neighbor celebrating its bicentennial. Green Township Trustee Tony

Fr. Lou, Rita move

We have again moved some of your favorite features to allow room for our high school sports fall previews. This week, you can find Father Lou Guntzelman’s column on page A6. Rita Heikenfeld’s cooking column is on page A7. The calendar is on B3. All will be back in their usual spots next week.

Collection time

In the next few days your Community Press carrier will be stopping by to collect $2.50 for delivery of this month’s Western Hills Press. Your carrier retains half of this amount as payment for his or her work. If you wish to add a tip to reward the carrier’s good service, both the carrier and The Community Press appreciate your generosity. If you have questions about delivery, or if your child is interested in becoming part of our junior carrier program, please call 853-6263 or 8536277, visit Cincinnati.com/ carrier, or e-mail Circulation Manager Sharon Schachleiter at sschachleiter@community press.com.

Grand marshal

The grand marshal for the 2009 Harvest Home Parade is CheviotWestwood Kiwanis Club member Matt Roth. Dave Backer, parade chairman, said the club decided to honor Roth with this year’s grand marshal title because he is a second-generation Kiwanian and serves as the club’s treasurer. Backer said every penny the Kiwanis Club takes in is distributed back to the community, and Roth oversees all the club’s finances. “He donates all his time,” Backer said.

FILE PHOTO

Green Township resident Ray Wegman and his Belgian horses are a staple in the Harvest Home Parade. Last year Wegman, far left, rode in the parade with Katie Wegman, center, and Vicki Thompson. Upton said he thinks it’s fantastic the Kiwanis Club chose to pay tribute to the township at this year’s parade. “It’s a very great honor dedicated to Green Township and its 200 years of existence,” Upton said. “The history of the township and all of the changes it has gone

through is pretty neat.” He said the original name of the Harvest Home Fair was the Green Township Harvest Home Fair. When the township’s harvest home association went bankrupt in 1939, he said the Kiwanis Club agreed to buy the association’s assets and took over the operation of the event.

Upton said the township is entering a 24-foot float in the parade. Backer said a new feature at this year’s parade is the promotion of the Thursday night festivities at Harvest Home Park. He said the fair has always been open on Thursdays following the parade, but attendance has never been great. “We’re trying to get more people into the park on Thursday night, and we are offering some specials to help families during these tough economic times,” he said. Admission on Thursday night is free, parking inside the park is free, the rides will be open and there will be $1 specials on pizza, soft drinks and beer, Backer said.

Favorites picked for Readers’ Choice honors By Kurt Backscheider kbackscheider@communitypress.com

In June, The Community Press presented readers with a ballot of 100 categories so they could choose their favorites ranging from American vehicle to produce to women’s clothing. And readers responded, filling out newspaper and online ballots with their choices. You can find the complete list of Readers’ Choice favorites in today’s special section. We’ve talked with some of our readers’ top choices about how they keep their customers coming back. Readers chose Ron’s Roost in Bridgetown as the best place to get a chicken dinner. Olga Larkin, who runs Ron’s Roost with her son, Ron, said their recipe for making customers happy is simple – good food and good service. “We do sell a lot of chicken,” she said. “I think it’s our consistent, good recipe. Our chicken is always cooked fresh, and you get what you want.” She said many of the employees have been with the restaurant for a long time and everyone who works there is experienced and knows what they’re doing.

Meeting place

Where in the world of Western Hills is this? Bet we got you this week. Send your best guess to westernhills@communitypress. com or call 853-6287, along with your name. Deadline to call is 3 p.m. Friday. If you’re correct, we’ll publish your name in next week’s newspaper along with the correct answer. See who guessed last week’s hunt correctly on B5.

To place an ad, call 242-4000.

When readers need their clothes cleaned they trust Kroner Dry Cleaners in Cheviot to do the best job. Ray Kroner runs the business his grandfather, Louis Kroner Sr., founded in 1939. He said his customers appreciate the fact he and his staff never let their guard down, and they treat every article of clothing as though it’s one of their own. “We keep trying,” he said. “Nobody is perfect. You have to wake up every morning with the intention of doing the best you can.” Lutz Flowers in Green Township was selected by readers as their favorite florist. Carol Wainscott, who owns the shop, said besides giving people a quality product at a reasonable price, her staff also provides excellent customer service. She said some of her florists have been with the shop for more than 20 years. She said her staff is very creative and detail-oriented, and every customer knows they will receive individual attention when they walk through the door.

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Steve Meyer, manager of Bridgetown Hardware & Paint, stocks and organizes one of the many shelves in the neighborhood hardware store. Readers selected the shop as their favorite hardware store. Meyer, who has managed the store for 30 years, said he thinks customers continue coming back to the store because they can find the specialty niche products large hardware stores don’t carry. He said the store’s staff is also very experienced in helping customers find exactly what they’re looking for. “We try to give people the best customer service we can,” Meyer said. “Our customers know they can come down, get what they need and get out quick with no hassles.” Wainscott said the shop also develops a camaraderie with its customers. “You get to know them so well,

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A2

Western Hills Press

News

August 26, 2009

Girl Scouts, Mercy High School host survival seminar kbackscheider@communitypress.com

Green Township resident

Debbie Phipps said she wants Westsiders to be empowered with the knowledge and confidence they need to survive

Your Community Press newspaper serving Addyston, Bridgetown, Cheviot, Cleves, Covedale, Dent, Green Township, Mack, Miami Township, North Bend, Westwood

PRESS

Find news and information from your community on the Web Addyston– cincinnati.com/addyston Bridgetown – cincinnati.com/bridgetown Cheviot – cincinnati.com/cheviot Cleves – cincinnati.com/cleves Dent – cincinnati.com/dent Green Township – cincinnati.com/greentownship Hamilton County – cincinnati.com/hamiltoncounty Mack – cincinnati.com/mack North Bend – cincinnati.com/northbend Westwood – cincinnati.com/westwood News Marc Emral | Senior Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . 853-6264 | memral@communitypress.com Kurt Backscheider | Reporter . . . . . . . . . 853-6260 | kbackscheider@communitypress.com Heidi Fallon | Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 853-6265 | hfallon@communitypress.com Melanie Laughman | Sports Editor . . . . . . . 248-7118 | mlaughman@communitypress.com Tony Meale | Sports Reporter . . . . . . . . . . 853-6271 | tmeale@communitypress.com Advertising Doug Hubbuch | Territory Sales Manager. 853-6270 | dhubbuch@communitypress.com Sue Gripshover Account Relationship Specialist. . . . . . . . . 853-6267 | sgripshover@communitypress.com Linda Buschmann Account Relationship Specialist . . . . . . . . . 768-8276 | lbuschmann@communitypress.com Delivery For customer service. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 853-6263 | 853-6277 Sharon Schachleiter | Circulation Manager .853-6279 | schachleiter@communitypress.com Maribeth Wespesser | District Manager . . .853-6286 | mwespesser@communitypress.com Mary Jo Schablein | District Manager . . . .853-6278 | mschable@communitypress.com Classified To place a Classified ad . . . . . . . . . . . . . 242-4000 | www.communityclassified.com To place an ad in Community Classified, call 242-4000.

in dangerous situations. As the troop leader for the eighth-grade Girl Scout troop at St. Jude School, Phipps particularly wants teenagers and young girls to learn awareness and habits that can help keep them out of risky situations. Her Girl Scouts and Mother of Mercy High School have partnered to offer Survive, a courage-based self-defense seminar presented by Debbie Gardner, a former Hamilton County Sheriff deputy turned motivational speaker and

self-defense instructor. The seminar runs 7-9 p.m. Monday, Aug. 31, at Mercy High School’s theater. Registration begins at 6:30 p.m., and the cost is $5 at the door. “Our seminar is so much more than literal selfdefense,” said Gardner, who is in her 26th year teaching people how to survive crimes. “We present a motivational speech on courage, with teeth. Others teach safety warnings, fear, guilt and

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A Week

Index Classifieds.....................................C Father Lou ...................................A6 Food.............................................A7 Obituaries....................................B6 Police...........................................B4 Viewpoints ..................................A8

restrictive rules. We teach rights, courage and simple, explicit tools to handle it yourself.” Phipps said her friend’s daughter was attacked in her college dorm, and she wanted to offer the seminar as a community service event to teach girls to be more proactive and help them learn how to stay away from dangerous situations. “I have two teenage daughters and I really wanted to do something for my girls and my troop,” Phipps said. “I want to educate as many girls as possible.” Gardner said she and her husband, Mike, a former police officer, created the Survive Institute because the safety advice of the past no longer applies to today.

Miami Twp. levies on ballot By Jennie Key jkey@communitypress.com

Miami Township voters will be asked to approve the continued funding of police, fire and emergency medical services in the township in November. The new levies would take the place of levies now on the books. Ohio law rolls back millage so that levies generate the same amount of money, eliminating inflationary

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“It infuriated me that the subject was being dealt with on a candy level, and what we needed was steak,” she said. While the seminar does provide physical techniques on how to strike someone who is attacking you, the training session is more about teaching people to be confident and control themselves in a scary situation. “Fear is contagious, but so is courage. Pick one,” she said. Phipps said the seminar is open to adults as well. The event is recommended for those ages 12 and older. “I hope we get as many people there as possible,” she said. “All of us should be more aware of our surroundings and able to help ourselves.”

growth. The rolled back rate is called the effective millage. The replacement levies would reset the base amount for the effective millage, causing an increase in cost to residents and an increased income for the police and fire departments. David Nurre, supervisor of budgets and settlements with the Hamilton County Auditor’s Office, said the 1.60-mill police levy was originally passed in 1990, generates $346,000 annually and costs the owner of a $100,000 home $21.63. Its effective millage has rolled back to .73-mills. The replacement police levy would generate $546,812 and cost the owner of a $100,000 home $47.49 annually. Nurre said the 3.29-mill levy for fire, emergency medical and paramedic services was originally passed in 2000. It currently generates $858,394 annually and costs the owner of a $100,000 home $76.04. Its effective millage is now 2.56 mills. The replacement police levy will generate $1,055,504 and cost the owner of a $100,000 home $97.66 annually. Trustee Paul Beck said the township needs the increase. “We have experienced increasing costs but collecting the same amount of taxes all these years,” he said. “The township has been absorbing the difference, but that can’t continue. We need the additional funds to provide the current level of police and fire services.”

Beginning September 12th & 13th 3 weekend worship services to choose from

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August 26, 2009

Western Hills Press

A3


A4

Western Hills Press

News

August 26, 2009

BRIEFLY

Mercy High School names 1st president search process to find the right fit to continue Mercy’s tradition of excellence and position the school for the future. MacDougal comes to Mercy from Alter High

Kirsten MacDougal had been named the first president of Mercy High School. During this past year, the school’s board of trustees and administration went through a comprehensive

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School where she served as the communications and marketing director for the last five years. Prior to that, she worked in business in sales, marketing, management and finance. She holds a summa cum laude bachelor of art’s degree from Rollins College in Winter Park, Fla., and a bachelor’s of music degree from Mercyhurst College, a Sisters of Mercy College in Erie, Penn.

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Mayor Mallory’s Neighborhood Movie Night comes to the Mount Airy Forest at dusk on Saturday, Aug. 29. The movie will be “Hotel for Dogs.” Concessions by Sweet Miss Confections will be available.

Antiques appraised

The Pioneer Antique and Hobby Association is hosting an antique appraisers fair from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 29, at Auctions By Maggie, 3350 Harrison Ave., in Cheviot. The event, similar to the “Antiques Roadshow,” will include evaluations by Maggie Beckmeyer and guest dealers, door prizes, complimentary desserts, coffee and beverages. Admission is $5, which includes one appraisal. Additional appraisals are $5 each or three for $10. For more information, call 941-4437.

Cap, gown donations

Taylor High School graduates are asked to not throw away or misplace their caps and gowns from the graduation ceremony. Taylor High School is collecting caps and gowns to be worn by future Taylor graduates. Anyone who can make a donation can contact French teacher Mrs. Metz at the high school at 467-3200.

Oktoberfest

The 39th annual Germania Society Oktoberfest is Aug. 28-30 at Germania Park, 3529

W. Kemper Road. Hours are 6 p.m. to midnight Friday, 2 p.m. to midnight Saturday and noon to 10 p.m. Sunday. Admission is $3, free for children 11 and younger. There will be German music, food, beer, dance groups, games, rides, contests and prizes, plus special entertainment for small children. In addition to parking at Germania Park, free shuttle bus parking is available at Pleasant Run Elementary School, 11765 Hamilton Ave., Pleasant Run Middle School, 11770 Pippin Road, and Vinoklet Winery, 11069 Old Colerain Ave. For more information, call 742-0060 or visit www.germaniasociety.com.

Campfire fun

Bring your campfire dinners and roasting sticks to cook on the coals at 6 p.m. Friday, Aug. 28, and Saturday, Aug. 29. The program with live animals and other campfire fun will begin at 7 p.m. at the Ellenwood Nature Barn in the Farbach-Werner Nature Preserve at Colerain Avenue and Poole Road.

Police academy

The next class of the Cincinnati Police Department’s Citizens Police Academy will begin Wednesday, Sept. 9 and run for eight consecutive Wednesday evenings from 6-9 p.m. For more information or to enroll, contact Monica Ervin at 357-7554 or monica.ervin@cincinnatioh.gov.

Oak Hills earns top report card rating Preliminary reports indicate the Oak Hills Local School District will receive its first “Excellent with Distinction” rating on the state report card. Each school year the Ohio Department of Education rates school districts and individual school buildings based on a number of indicators including student performance on state achievement tests, students’ yearly progress, attendance records and graduation rates. The state then designates school districts with ratings of either Excellent with Distinction, Excellent, Effective, Continuous Improvement, Academic Watch or Academic Emergency.

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Buffalo Ridge Road, between Thunder and Cowell, in Miami Township was expected to be closed beginning Monday, Aug. 24. Hamilton County’s western maintenance department will begin installing box culverts in the area. Work is expected to last three weeks depending on the weather. The county’s detour will be routed from Zion Road to Jordan Road to East Miami River Road and vice versa. Any problems or questions can be directed to Duane Fuchs at 946-4969. For information on other projects, visit the county engineer’s Web site at www.hamilton-co.org/engineer.

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The community is invited to a free dinner from 5-7 p.m. Friday, Aug. 28, at Shiloh United Methodist Church, 580 Anderson Ferry Road. The sit-down dinner of grilled meats, salad and homemade desserts will be served by youth volunteers. Shiloh offers a community meal the last Friday of each month. For more information, visit www.shilohumc.com.

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The Oak Hills High School orchestra will perform a live rock orchestra concert with Mark Wood of the TransSiberian Orchestra at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 5, in the Oak Hills High School auditorium. All seats are $20. Call 7205516 to reserve tickets.

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Oak Hills’ rating was unofficial. Official results for the 2008-09 school year were expected to be released by the department of education Tuesday, Aug. 25. In addition to the Oak Hills district receiving the overall Excellent with Distinction rating, Rapid Run Middle School also achieved the Excellent with Distinction status. Oak Hills High School earned an Excellent rating – the highest possible rating a high school can achieve. “The fact that we were able to obtain such a high honor is a great testament to our excellent staff, the dedication of our parents and their involvement with the schools, and the hard work and dedication of all our students,” said John Stoddard,

principal at Rapid Run Middle School. Oak Hills principal Jeff Brandt said the Excellent rating his school received is a credit to the work of the faculty, students, parents and community stakeholders. “It shows that when a community has high expectations and dedication to academic achievement, students thrive and maximize their potential,” Brandt said. Bridgetown Middle School, Delhi Middle School, C.O. Harrison Elementary School, J.F. Dulles Elementary School and Springmyer Elementary School all earned Excellent ratings on the report card. Delshire and Oakdale elementary schools each received Effective ratings for the 2008-09 school year.

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Western Hills Press

August 26, 2009

ACHIEVEMENTS

|

NEWS

|

ACTIVITIES

|

HONORS

Editor Marc Emral | memral@communitypress.com | 853-6264

Your Community Press newspaper serving Addyston, Bridgetown, Cheviot, Cleves, Covedale, Dent, Green Township, Mack, Miami Township, North Bend, Westwood

communitypress.com

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PRESS

COLLEGE CORNER

Awards

Miami University student Andrew Putz received a project citation from the International Green Community Design Competition, sponsored by the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture. The competition encouraged students to explore sustainable planning strategies such as brownfield/grayfield redevelopment, transitoriented communities, natural resource management and land conservation, and develop a proposal to create a flourishing and sustainable community using the tools of the environmental design disciplines: architecture, landscape architecture and urban planning. Putz was part of a team of five students who submitted a project entitled “Pieces in a Framework: Green Design Initiative.”

Dean’s list

Abigail Jung, Alyssa Polewski and Paige Rudler were named to the spring semester dean’s list at Bellarmine University. • Jonathan Kurtz and Danielle Reid were named to the spring semester dean’s list at Loyola University New Orleans. • Melissa Buschmann was named to the annual dean’s list at Otterbein College. To qualify, a student must take at least 45 quarter hours during the academic year with a grade-point average of at least 3.6. Buschmann is the daughter of Sheryl Reed of Delhi Township and Frederick Buschmann of Green Township. • Jonathan Glass was named to the spring semester dean’s list at Freed-Hardeman University. • Kyle Murray was named to the spring dean’s list at Seton Hall University. • David Frederick and Bradley Schutte were named to the spring dean’s list at Capital University. • The following students were named to the spring dwan’s list at Ohio University: Rebecca Baston, Kyla Boertlein, Andrew Brockmeyer, Andy Brown, Sarah Buelterman, Lauren Coffaro, Gregory Conklin, Robert Doll, Lauren Dupps, Erin English, Jennifer Gasparec, Courtney Geiger, Britney Grimmelsman, Robert Hartoin, Elliot Hebeler, Ellen Heidemann, Katie Holthaus, Arianna Iliff, Ryan Kain, Katie Kemen, John Kerkhoff, Stephanie Kollmann, Zach Kummer, Colin Lambert, Cassie Lampe, Sara Lorenz, Emily Luken, Emily Minges, Emma Morehart, Erin Murphy, Jonathan Nutter, Kelli O'Brien, Megan Oehler, Samantha Proctor, Morgan Sanders, Kristen Smith, Emily Stowe, Frank Trotta, Timothy Vogelsang, Anna Williams, Justin Williams, Patrick Wright and Carley Zimmerman. • The following students were named to the second semester president’s list at Miami University: Ashley Blaize, Katherine Davidson, Susan Dirr, Tricia Duffy, Jordan Dunnette, Sarah Ehrman, Allison Flynn, Ashleigh Gay, Joseph Healey, Jill Hettersimer, Jeffrey Noelcke, Natalie Ruhe, Brian Walsh, Eric Weberding, Robert Welling and Veronica Wiegele. Students named to the president’s list earned a 4.0 grade-point average. • The following students were named to the second semester dean’s list at Miami University: Lauren Allen, Amanda Berling, Heather Boddy, Wendy Boehmler, Thomas Bohache, Anna Borchers, Claire Boylson, Kevin Bretcher, Elizabeth Brown, Nicholas Brown, Michael Budde, Erika Bussard, Katlyn Callahan, Daniel Caproni, Rachael Carr, Sarah Carr, Brandon Chabot, William Clark, Aaron Coey, Meagan Fasbinder, Brian Faust, Erin Fischesser, Samantha Ginter, Brenyn Goodridge, Allison Groene, John Groene, Marita Hergert, Jon Holtgrefe, David Hurley, Matthew Jackson, Kenneth James, Brittany Jones, Brandon Lee, Alexander Lengerich, Matthew Liguzinski, Christopher Looney, Katy Lysaght, Krista Mahoney, Heather Mees, Megan Meier, Anna Montag, Sara Nienaber, Katrina Owens, Ashleigh Parker, Andrew Putz, Joseph Radley, Lindsey Riehl, Michael Schmees, Holly Schmidt, Kaitlyn Schroeck, Trisha St. Clair, Robert Stinson, Sarah Streicher, Kelsey Vehr, Hauna Viox, Laura Waltz, Stephanie Willhite, Mark Wiwi, Melissa Young and Laura Zenni. • Chelsea Graman was named to the spring semester dean's list at Villanova University.

Graduates

Daniel Reddy has graduated from Colorado College with a bachelor’s degree in economics. He is the son of Yvonne and Timothy Reddy of Green Township. • Anne Siegel has graduated from Emory College at Emory University with a bachelor of science degree. •

Bradley Christoph has graduated from Furman University. • Nick Jones has graduated summa sum laude from Loyola University Chicago with a bachelor of science degree in chemistry and minors in biology and mathematics. Jones received the Cassaretoo Scholarship, Robert A. Mode Memorial Scholarship, Analytical Chemistry Award and Merck Index Award for Top Senior Class Student. This fall, he will enter the Northwestern University chemistry doctoral program. A 2005 graduate of St. Xavier High School, he is the son of Steven and Mary Jones of Cleves. • Christopher Center and Nicoletta Frankenstein have graduated from Case Western Reserve University. Both graduates of Oak Hills High School, Center graduated with a bachelor of science in mechanical engineering, while Frankenstein earned a bachelor of arts in biology, chemistry and psychology. Center is now working in Grafton, Mass. Frankenstein is pursuing a master’s degree in biology at Case Western. • Craig Goldschmidt has graduated from the Ohio State University Moritz College of Law. Goldschmidt is a 2001 graduate of St. Xavier High School and a 2006 graduate of Ohio State with a bachelor’s degree in electrical and computer engineering. He is the son of Steven and Patricia Goldschmidt of Green Township. • Carolyn Maly and Joseph Meyer have graduated from Ohio Northern University with doctor of pharmacy degrees. Maly graduated with high distinction. The Mother of Mercy High School graduate is the daughter of Robert and Joyce Maly of Green Township. Meyer, an Elder High School graduate, is the son of Philip and Mary Meyer, also of Green Township. • Daniel Reddy has graduated from Colorado College with a bachelor’s degree in economics. • Tiffany Allen and Christian Goans have graduated from Denison University. Allen earned a bachelor of arts degree in political science, while Goans graduated magna cum laude with bachelor of arts degree in psychology and Spanish.

PROVIDED. SEND PHOTOS TO: MEMRAL@COMMUNITYPRESS.COM.

Ice cream for books

Students at Our Lady of Lourdes School competed in a reading contest this year with the top classroom winning an old-fashioned ice cream social. The second-graders in Kathy Berninger’s class won the treat after reading 4,674 books. Pictured from left are Joey Ward, Mary Tepe, Jeffrey St. John and Emily Ridder.

Scholarships

St. Xavier High School graduate Edward Herbers has accepted a Schawe Award from Xavier University. Herbers was active in Boy Scouts and the community action program at St. X. He is the son Mary and Ed Herbers of Westwood. All incoming freshmen are evaluated for Xavier’s Trustee and Presidential Scholarships, and the Honor and Schawe Awards. Award levels vary. • Katy Lysaght received the Bob and Barbara Williams Leadership Award, presented by Jon Olson, PSE Foundation president emeritus, during Miami University’s Paper Science & Engineering Foundation student recognition dinner. Lysaght, a Green Township resident, is a paper science and engineering major. Scholarships received during the 20082009 academic year ranged from $1,320 to over $5,900 per semester. • Western Hills resident Eric Krumpelbeck has received a Free Throw Scholarship. The Free Throw Scholarship Fund at Xavier University awards $2,500 scholarships to three full-time students who have completed at least one semester. The fund is a partnership between the university and HORAN Associates, an insurance and financial services organization. Each recipient must be an employee or the dependent of an employee of one of HORAN’s client companies. Scholarships are given to students based on academic merit and financial need.

Miscellaneous

Mack resident Martha Tiffany, a Walnut Hills High School graduate, has received an Honors Experience scholarship from Cincinnati State Technical & Community College. Tiffany plans to major in culinary arts through a dual admission program with Cincinnati State’s Midwest Culinary Institute and the University of Cincinnati. Officials at Cincinnati State recently hosted a reception to recognize graduates of its honors program and welcome new participants.

Tiffany

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Pictured with school librarian Kathy Thom, fourth row, are winning readers, from front left, Adam Jansen, Mary Tepe, Finn Mullaney and Brody Tebbe; second row, Kerry Healey, Bryce Gordon, Makaila Olthaus, Conner Crull, Emily Ridder, Jeffrey St. John and Gaven Florimonte; third row, Natalie Zeller, Julie Beamer, John Henry Foster, Joey Ward, Delaney Dirr, Casey Dirr, Ava Uchtman and Luke Masminster.

SCHOOL NOTES McAuley High School

More than 100 eighth-grade girls from 22 different elementary schools recently spent a morning attending McAuley’s Summer Sampler. The students had adventures in science, technology, theology and foreign language, went on a scavenger hunt, learned cheers and school history, and feasted on pizza and ice cream. McAuley’s open house for prospective students and parents is 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 4. The high school entrance test will be administered at McAuley Saturday, Nov. 21. Test registrants will receive a free brown and pink hoodie. For more information, visit www.mcauleyhs.net and click on “admissions.”

Rapid Run Middle School

Eighty eighth-graders participated in an essay contest sponsored by Village Life, a Cincinnati-based charity that helps impoverished communities in Tanzania. Students watched a video that showed disparities among American schools and then watched a video about Village Life. They then wrote a two to three page essay that addressed the following questions: why all children deserve an education, differences in educational systems and why is it important to partner with other communities.

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Kimberly Taber was the Village Life essay contest winner. • The National Junior Honor Society held a bike-a-thon to raise money for Village Life’s Bicycle Program. The money raised will finance the purchase of bikes for school children in Tanzania. Children who are able to attend secondary school in Tanzania often live greater than 15 kilometers from school and their daily trip can take three hours one-way on foot. The bicycles allow them to travel to school more quickly and safely. The students participating in the bike-athon raised $2,000, enough to purchase 20 bikes.

St. Xavier High School

Clem Wegman was named the 2009 recipient of the Saint Michael’s College Scholarship and Service Book Award. The award recognizes students who demonstrate a commitment to volunteerism and leadership through community service. Award recipients are high school juniors who are inductees of the National Honor Society or an equivalent school-sponsored honors organization. Wegman received the book “First They Killed My Father: A Daughter of Cambodia” by Loung Ung, a 1993 Saint Michael’s College graduate. He is the son of CJ and Jonica Wegman

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Seton High School

Junior Nicole Robbins and freshman Kaitlyn Cappel were finalists in the School of Advertising Art’s High School Art Show.

Taylor High School

Zane Decker, a Diamond Oaks pre-engineering student, won a gold medals at the 45th annual SkillsUSA National Leadership and Skills Conference in Kansas City. Decker won in the principles of technology competition, an event evaluates contestants’ understanding of basic technical concepts/principles and their ability to demonstrate and explain the concept/principle in action and application. SkillsUSA is an organization of more than 300,000 students in 13,000 chapters across the country that includes students, teachers, and industry leaders working together. • Ashley Jesse and Savannah Wade, students in the Diamond Oaks equine management program, recently participated in the American Paint Horse Association World Show in Fort Worth, Texas. Jesse and Wade were part of a team that earned fourth place in the state judging contest. The Hamilton County Farm Bureau donated all the funds necessary for the students to attend.

call me direct (513) 476-1490 Jeff James Vice President


A6

Western Hills Press

August 26, 2009

Life

Where do our crises come from? Where do our c r i s e s c o m e from? I d o n ’ t accept the idea that God causFather Lou es sufferGuntzelman ing and Perspectives crises. In this imperfect world, they come

along like hurricanes, lightening strikes causing forest fires, and volcanic eruptions. I agree with the analysis of various crises expressed by author Sue Monk Kidd. She says that the crises of life come mainly from three sources: developmental transitions, intrusive events, and internal uprisings. Developmental transitions occur naturally in

everyone’s life. We move from stage to stage though after awhile we hate the changing. Think of some of our changing stages: birth, beginning school, puberty, moving away from home, risking and forming relationships, choosing a career, entering the work force, and of course, marriage. Add to these raising children, dealing with midlife, the empty nest, retiring, losing a loved person, etc. Each occurrence usually brings varying degrees of crisis. They cause turmoil and rattle our illusion of control. There is a tug toward growth but a stronger tug to stay where we are. Intrusive events are a second source of life crises. Too many to number, they include accidents, serious illness, a loved person’s death, natural catastrophes, a miscarriage, a terminated relationship, losing our job, a wayward child, dashed dreams, etc. Though harsh on us, crises are also doorways. How we handle them changes us into bitter or better persons. The greatest factor affecting our lives for

good or ill is the attitude we take in the face of things we cannot change. Internal uprisings are the third source of personal crises. Their coming is usually subtle and unspecified. We may begin to notice a vague sense of restlessness, emptiness, or a tinge of depression that hangs on. There may be spiritual doubts, insomnia, blossoming addictions, heightened anxiety, etc. We try to explain them by the terminology of today – stress, burnout, exhaustion. From where do these come? There is a life-force within us straining toward wholeness. What do we think pulls us through all the stages of growth and development in our lives? This life-force has its own ways of getting our attention when healthy development is stymied or stuck. Creating some sort of inner crises in us is its usual technique. Typically we only make significant changes when we hurt. Such crises are meant to nudge us toward some doorway we need to pass through.

The trouble is, we never think of a crisis in this way. We just pour another drink, get busy, or use our cell phone. A crises is always considered as something wrong, not something potentially helpful. Such thinking keeps us from looking for the new doorway. A crisis can be a holy summons to become more the person God made us to be. The best way to meet the crises of life is to admit them, name as specifically as we can the feelings we are experiencing, spend time in genuine reflection (seek competent help if necessary), and be painfully honest with ourselves. In short: feel, reflect, learn, and seek understanding which is the key. Father Lou Guntzelman is a Catholic priest of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati. Reach him at columns@community press.com or contact him directly at P.O. Box 428541, Cincinnati, OH 45242. Please include a mailing address or fax number if you wish for him to respond.

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Everyone lives a drama. We try to be playwright and write the script to our lives. But it never works out that way. There are twists and turns both good and bad, unexpected surprises, disappointments and losses and challenging situations. And there are crises sprinkled throughout. Some of them can rock us to our toes.

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Community

August 26, 2009

Western Hills Press

A7

Mastering the art of salmon grilling

With all the hype about the movie “Julie & Julia,� anyone who has what we call a “ J u l i a C h i l d � story is sharing it. So today Rita I’m sharHeikenfeld ing mine. I was Rita’s kitchen u n d e r deadline for this column and the subject was cooking with wine. On a whim, I called Julia and, of course, she was “out� but the secretary said she’d give her the message. “OK,� I thought, “I’ll never hear.� About a half hour later the phone rang and my husband, Frank, answered and said the call was for me. When I asked him who it was he simply said “some elderly lady.� Well, it wouldn’t have mattered if it were a young

lady; I was under deadline and had no time to chitchat. When I picked up the phone and said hello, the voice that said hello back was ‌ Julia’s! I almost dropped the phone. She was so nice, answered every question, and then just Child asked about my family and me. We talked for a total of 30 minutes, 10 of which was professional and the rest was personal. And guess what? She even sent me a signed thank you note. So that’s my Julia story and that’s why she was so loved and that’s why my copy of her book “Mastering the Art of French Cookingâ€? is dog-eared with use.

Perfectly grilled salmon

The 70-30 rule applies to

COURTESY RITA HEIKENFELD

Rita’s pan-grilled salmon with lemon verbena and dill. any seafood on the grill. Have the grill hot, lightly brush both sides of the fish with oil, and start grilling skin side up with the grill closed as much as possible. (Or just put a disposable pan over the fish). Leave it alone until about 70 percent of the fish is done on the first side. You’ll know it by the looks and also if it will release easily. This allows the fish to form a nice crust. Turn it and finish cooking. The rule seven to 10 minutes per inch of thickness works

well, too. Here’s how I season mine: Brush four salmon fillets, about 6 ounces each, with skin (or not) on both sides with olive or other oil. Season both sides with salt and 1⠄4 teaspoon red pepper flakes (this is enough for all four) and the juice of a lime (about 2 tablespoons). Grill as indicated above.

Boil zucchini in water for 5 minutes. Drain well and return to pan. Add sugar and pineapple. Boil 10 minutes, stirring frequently so it doesn’t stick. Remove from heat and stir in Jell-O. Cool, spoon into jars and refrigerate.

Easy zucchini pineapple peach jam

• So important especially during this hot weather when they’re in sports, since a child’s body takes longer to adjust to heat and humidity. • Kids produce more body heat but don’t sweat as much as adults so in hot weather they are at increased risk for dehydration. • In the body, water works as a shock absorber protecting joints. • Cold water is absorbed best and kids will drink more if it’s cold. • Make a homemade

For several readers who wanted this recipe again. Go to taste on the sugar. I find 3 cups is plenty, but most folks like 4-5. A nonstick pan is best for this. Use your favorite flavor of Jell-O. 6 cups grated zucchini, skin left on 1 â „2 cup water 3-5 cups sugar 20 oz. crushed pineapple in juice or syrup 6 oz. favorite Jell-O: try peach, strawberry, apricot

Tips from Rita on keeping kids hydrated

power drink. Dilute a drink that contains 100 percent Vitamin C by using at least twice the water recommended on the package.

Can you help?

Chicken Recipe

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Blueberry pomegranate dressing Napa Valley baked beans

Pickled peppers: Ideas

Last week I published this recipe and forgot to say you could add up to 2 tablespoons salt to the brine if you want. Rita Nader Heikenfeld is Macy’s certified culinary professional and family herbalist, an educator and author. E-mail her at columns@communitypress.com with “Rita’s kitchen� in the subject line. Or call 513-2487130, ext. 356. Visit Rita at www.Abouteating.com.

Kiwanis honors Covedale Center By Kurt Backscheider kbackscheider@communitypress.com

George Ohntrup said the work Tim Perrino has done to transform the old Covedale theater into a vibrant arts center has been amazing. He said there wasn’t much hope for the 1940sera neighborhood movie theater after it shut down in the early 1990s. A couple of cinema grill businesses gave a shot at saving the building, but he said nothing significant took place until Perrino came along with his campaign to save the theater and revive it as the Covedale Center for the Performing Arts. “It’s really a blessing the theater ended up the way it did,� said Ohntrup, a member of the Price Hill-Western

Hills Kiwanis Club. The club recognized Perrino’s efforts at a meeting Tuesday, Aug. 18, and presented him with a plaque and a $500 donation. Ohntrup said the club presented the Covedale Center for the Performing Arts the award “in appreciation for its contributions to the vitality and development of our community.� Perrino, the artistic director at the performing arts center, said there were plenty of skeptics who doubted he would be able to open a successful live theater venue in Price Hill. “I told them, ‘You obviously don’t know the West side,’� said Perrino, a Westwood resident who grew up in Delhi Township. Since its grand opening in 2002, Covedale boasts nearly 3,000 season ticket

holders and a growing reputation as the area’s newest and most exciting venue for the performing arts. Perrino and his team have removed the old movie screens, built a brand new stage, added new seats and upgraded the facility’s lighting and sound systems. They also recently renovated the space behind the

stage and constructed a new addition to house dressing rooms, restrooms and an audition room for the performers. Perrino said none of the work could have been possible without support from organizations like the Kiwanis Club. “We cannot thank you enough,� he told the club

members. “It’s tremendous the amount of community support we enjoy every day.� Sandy Flick, president of the Price Hill-Western Hills Kiwanis Club, said members of the club, many of whom have season tickets to Covedale, voted to donate money to the theater because it’s important to the

neighborhood and they want to help it continue growing. “Tim has done a lot for the community,� Flick said. Perrino thanked the club for its generosity and encouraged the members to see a show. “It’s the best way to enjoy this side of town, if you ask me,� he said.

                

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VIEWPOINTS A8

Western Hills Press

August 26, 2009

EDITORIALS

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LETTERS

Editor Marc Emral | memral@communitypress.com | 853-6264

|

COLUMNS

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Your Community Press newspaper serving Addyston,

Cheviot, Cleves, Covedale, Dent, Green Township, C H @ T R O O MBridgetown, Mack, Miami Township, North Bend, Westwood

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PRESS

Looking back at Harvest Home Fair The 2009 Harvest Home Fair will be the milestone 150th! The Kiwanis Club of Cheviot-Westwood has sponsored the last 71 fairs and we are proud of its history. The founding editor of The Western Hills Press and a Charter Member of The Cheviot-Westwood Club, Albert Huneke wrote: “Early in its history, The Club was confronted with a community challenge and urged to accept that task by the first and only twoterm president, John J. O’Rourke, business manager of The Western Hills Press. The newly formed Kiwanis

Dr. William Gerhardt Community Press guest columnist

Club accepted the challenge. So only a year after The Kiwanis Club was established in mid 1937 as the community’s newest organization, the demise of the community’s oldest organization appeared inevitable. The Green Township Harvest Home Association, bankrupt and with aging leadership, voted to discontinue its annual Festival after 79 years without a miss during times of war and peace,

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR No more construction

In regards to the story “Retail center gets 1st OK” on Aug. 19, I would like to ask Adam Goetzman and the rest of the Green Township administration a question. Do we really need more retail in Green Township? Do we really need to keep allowing developers to build strip center after strip center? Are you people being paid personally to allow the desecration of our area by these buildings that tear down our green space only to sit empty? On Harrison Avenue alone, there are thousands of square feet sitting empty. On my intersection at Ruwe’s Oak and Rybolt we have two buildings that are not at 100 percent. I think the guy who

owned those has more buildings on Harrison sitting empty. I also think there is a strip center being built by a lone man on Saturdays right across from the proposed site of the one in this story. What is wrong with stopping issuing building permits and turning Green Township in to a clean, safe community again. Take a look around, guys and gal, Harrison Avenue does not need any more construction, it actually needs to be cleaned up a tad. The township leadership should be ashamed of what they are doing to our area. Paul E. Jones Jamie’s Oak Court Green Township

CH@TROOM What do you expect from the Bengals this season? “Same ol’ … same ol’ 500 season. That’s their game plan. It will never change. The city/county should have let Mr. Brown leave town (with his team) when he made the threat. Now we are in debt for a multimillion dollar stadium, used only a few days a year, for a predisposed mediocre team owned by someone who cares more about the “bottom line” than fielding a winning team. His father would disown him!” W.K.S. “Same thing I expected from them last season, I expect them to WIN, WIN, WIN!! Maybe this is the year for those expectations to be fulfilled.” M.E.N. “My family has had season tickets since 1970. We are eternal optimists... but I’m feeling an only ‘even-steven’ season.” C.A.S. “I expect them to go to the playoffs, if not the Super Bowl; but enough about wishful thinking and I won’t count my chickens before they hatch. Let’s see if they can win more games than lose and put Cincinnati in a positive limelight in football.” S.B.T. “More of the same. After watching the first HBO ‘Hard Knocks’, you can see why. “The show opened with Mike Brown addressing the team on their first day. Instead of a rousing pep talk, he sounded like the CEO of a Fortune 500 addressing a stockholders annual meeting. Dry,

This week’s question Do you think allowing casino gambling would hurt charitable events and fundraisers such as Monte Carlo nights and church festivals? Every week The Northwest Press asks readers a questions that they can reply to via e-mail. Send your answers to northwestpress@community press.com with “chatroom” in the subject line. uninspiring and not a bit of enthusiasm or emotion. “Then at the end of the hour program, and after the Bengals’ first scrimmage, HBO focused on Mikey presiding over a meeting of the professional coaching staff and their assistants. He’s telling the tight ends coach who he feels might step in for the two tight ends that went down. “Instead of keeping his nose out of the coaching side, he still fancies himself a brilliant coach like his Dad and that’s why this season will be more of the same.” P.A. “No better than a 50-50 season, if that.” B.N. “After watching them for a few plays in the pre season game against New Orleans all I can say is same old, same old.” L.S. “I expect the same from the Bengals as we have received from the Bengal’s management. Nothing.” D.M.

depression and prosperity. The young Kiwanis Club with 26 charter members assumed the sponsorship of the 80th annual Festival in 1939 (70 years ago). The GTHHA directors transferred the full title to the Festival to a new Board of young eager Kiwanians under the chairmanship of Dr. Foster Williams, a third generation community physician and the third generation of Williams physicians to chair the Harvest Home Committee. His father, Dr. John Williams and his grandfather, Dr. Peter Williams, were his predecessors in

both capacities. Foster Williams served as general chairman for 31 years, 1939-1970, and the Dr. Foster Williams Tot Lot on the Harvest Home Park grounds is a lasting memorial to his long-time dedication. He was designated as Chairman Emeritus until his death in 1976. The City of Cheviot had gained $25,000 from a bond issue to establish a municipal park on the historic site of Harvest Home Grove and the Village of Cheviot had purchased the land from the Harvest Home Association. The sole assets acquired by The Kiwanis Club were

Council starts with resident time This is the fourth in a series of articles to acquaint Cheviot residents with the inner workings of Cheviot city government and to encourage residents to attend council/committee meetings and/or become otherwise involved in city and community activities. Previously I discussed the administration and members of council. Let’s now look at council meetings. The order of events for the first half of a council meeting is: The president of council bangs the gavel and the Pledge of Allegiance is said and a moment of silence is observed. The clerk of council takes attendance of all the members of the City Council and the city administration that are present. I ask if there are any amendments to the agenda. Copies of the agenda are available to the public prior to the start of the meeting. I then review all the proposed ordinances and resolutions and committee reports that will be presented during the meeting. Council is asked to look over the minutes from the previous meeting and to verify that there are no errors. People requesting to address council relative to an agenda item shall normally be permitted to speak prior to the consideration of that item. This is where citizens can

approach council with questions or comments. Often council gives the citizen advice, the answer to their question, or additional help. Sometimes the council members will invite that citizen to attend a committee meeting to discuss the issue more in depth. This is the first time in the meeting where the public can address council. Each member of City Council will read the report of their committee meetings into the official record. After a city official or committee chairperson submits a report for council, the members of council take a voice vote to receive and file the report. Once passed, the clerk of council adds the report to the official record. Council then handles proposed legislation. An ordinance is a law that is used to solve problems, such as what the speed limit on a particular street will be. Typically, an ordinance will affect most of the citizens of Cheviot and is used for more important rules within the city. Sometimes an ordinance will take three meetings to pass, but more often than not, someone will make a motion to suspend the rules which means they are only going pass the ordinance in just the one reading. After an ordinance has been through its three readings or the

PRESS

rules have been suspended, a roll call vote is taken because the record must show who agreed to Debbie pass the law and McKinney who didn’t. A resolution is Community a general rule that Press guest is used to solve a columnist problem, such as moving funds from one part of the budget to another part. Generally a resolution does not affect the general population directly as it is used for less important items. There is a voice vote to whether or not to adopt the resolution. The next article will discuss the second half of a council meeting. Please join us at the next council meeting or check the Web site for committee meetings which may interest you. The public is always invited to express their opinion on agenda items or any other city related issue. If you are unable to attend the meetings, feel free to e-mail any member of council or the administration with your concerns. The links can be found on the city Web site www.cheviot.org. Deborah McKinney is the president of Cheviot City Council. You can e-mail her at dmckinney@cheviot.org.

Speed bumps: Common sense solution Monfort Heights Drive is a close-knit little neighborhood, spun with young families, senior citizens and neighbors who have lived on our street for decades. For years, our street and Arrow Avenue have been used as a cutthrough (to and from North Bend and Boomer roads) by drivers who don’t always observe the speed limit. This creates a troubling safety issue. Adding to ever-increasing levels of traffic on the two major roads, the traffic problem on our residential street is expected to increase when a major new development goes in behind St. Ignatius. With safety concerns in mind, we residents asked Green Township Trustee Tracy Winkler to help us. After almost a year of discussion, at an informal meeting on June 2, several well-researched options were presented by Green Township as solutions to help slow the traffic on our street. A traffic engineer had been hired and studied present conditions, conditions as they are to exist once the planned improve-

ments on North Bend have been completed, and also future conditions. Speed bumps were suggested as a solution that could help immeWow! Julie diately. Speed bumps resGallenstein onated with us. Community Finally, some Press guest action could be columnist taken to slow the traffic on our street. This was a common sense solution in which we as a neighborhood would be able to participate and help measure the results. Now, Monfort Heights Drive could be used as a test street for Green Township. If all goes well on our street, the process to implement the installation of speed bumps on other streets in Green Township will proceed. Green Township is currently following with a confidential survey of residents. A mailer was sent last week to all residents with a self-addressed, stamped return

A publication of Your Community Press newspaper serving Addyston, Bridgetown, Cheviot, Cleves, Covedale, Dent, Green Township, Mack, Miami Township, North Bend, Westwood

“lumber, seats, ropes, flag, tables, buildings (but not the dance pavilion) and the right to use the Harvest Home Park for the Festival.” Lacking operating cash, it was necessary for Kiwanis to raise a ‘starter fund’ to underwrite their first festival and a fund of $270.50 was subscribed by individual Kiwanians and community businesses that were just emerging from the great Depression. With that pool, the 80th annual Festival wound up $112.25 in the black! Dr. William Gerhardt is the historian for the Cheviot-Westwood Kiwanis.

Western Hills Press Editor . . . . .Marc Emral memral@communitypress.com . . . . . . .853-6264

post card asking our opinion. The township will need 60 percent of residents to return the postcards and 70 percent of those who respond must vote for the installation of the speed bumps. We are hoping that the speed bumps will be approved. The good neighbors of Monfort Heights Drive welcomed the opportunity to have worked with Fred Schlimm and Tracy Winkler, and are grateful the trustees voted to approve the ”street calming” resolution Aug. 10. We are honored to be the first street to test the effectiveness of speed bumps in Green Township. We are a watchful neighborhood, so we will monitor the effectiveness of this measure and keep the township up to date with any concerns. Traffic should be a little slower this fall on Monfort Heights Drive. As the school year begins, the children and neighbors will be safer when traffic slows to approach the new speed bumps on our street. Julie Gallenstein is a resident of Monfort Heights Drive.

s

A WORLD OF DIFFERENT VOICES

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Your Community Press newspaper serving Addyston, Bridgetown, Cheviot, Cleves, Covedale, Dent, Green Township, Mack, Miami Township, North Bend, Westwood

GIRLS V

LLEYBALL AND TENNIS PREVIEWS

PRESS

’09

We d n e s d a y, A u g u s t 2 6 , 2 0 0 9

This week in golf

• Oak Hills High School boys defeated Harrison and Colerain high schools in a close round of golf, Aug. 19. Oak Hills had 330 points, Harrison had 337, and Colerain had 338. • Mercy High School’s Melissa Funk shot a 6-over par 41 on the back nine at the Mill Course, Aug. 20, helping her team defeat McNicholas, 185-186. Mercy is now 1-2. • At the Sycamore invitational for boys golf, at the Blue Ash Golf Course, St. Xavier finished fifth with 313, Elder finished 10th with 326 and La Salle finished 11th with 329. Medalists included St. Xavier’s Smith Brinker with a 4-under par 68.

West-side volleyball teams return By Mark Chalifoux

mchalifoux@communitypress.com

Local volleyball teams are back in the gym preparing for the 2009 season and a number of local teams should be in the mix for league titles. Oak Hills, Western Hills and Taylor are at the top of the list as both teams return a considerable amount of talent.

Mother of Mercy

• Seton defeated Oak Hills 4-1 Aug. 22, bringing Seton and Oak Hills’ record to 1-2. Match winners included: Singles, Katelyn Gilkey of Oak Hills and Kelly Simpkins and Danielle Custer of Seton; and doubles, Ellie Cook-Cathie Bisher and Kilee WeiskittelLaney Sportsman of Seton. • McAuley High School girls defeated Talawanda High School, 3-2 in the first game of the season, Aug. 18. • McAuley girls defeated Northwest, 5-0, Aug. 19. McAuley is now 2-0.

The Mercy of Mercy High School volleyball team will be a younger squad in 2009 after going 21-6 and falling in the regional finals a year ago. “We’re going to be working to find our identity early in the season,” head coach Denise Harvey said. The team does return some strong talent in seniors Julie Murray and Carly Mazza and sophomores Lindsey Dinkelacker and Megan Wanstrath. “We don’t have as much experience this year but we should be competitive with some young arms to back us up,” Harvey said.

Baseball tryouts

Oak Hills

This week in tennis

The Delhi Eagles 9U baseball team is conducting tryouts for the 2010 team, from 3-5 p.m., Saturdays, Aug. 29 and Sept. 12, at Delhi Park Field No. 4. Players cannot turn 10 before May 1. Players must live in the Oak Hills Local School District. Call Andrew Angelo at 659-9466.

Swim lessons

Mercy HealthPlex will offer group swim lessons for children 6 months old to adult from Sept. 19 to Oct. 25. Private and semi-private lessons are available by appointment. For information and registration, contact Annie at 3895465 or e-mail asmacke@ health-partners.org.

Baseball tryouts

Westside Rebels 12 and 13U baseball team is conducting tryouts from 10 a.m. to noon, Sunday, Aug. 30, at Delhi Park Field No. 6. Cal 451-8143.

Ultimate H.S. football fan

Enter the Ultimate High School Football Fan Sweepstakes! Visit http://cincinnati.com/ultimatefan and post your photos showing off your school spirit. You could win a Skyline Chili tailgate party for you and your friends! No purchase necessary. Visit http://cincinnati.com/ultimatefan for a complete list of rules.

Tweet, tweet

Follow the Community Press sports staff on Twitter at twitter.com/cpohiosports.

Despite finishing at 1213 in 2008, Oak Hills High School aims to compete for a league title while also hoping for a successful tournament run this fall. Oak Hills finished with a league record of 6-3 in the Greater Miami Conference while taking fourth place last fall. Lakota East (19-5, 9-0) finished first in the GMC followed by second-place Mason (19-3, 8-1) and third-place Lakota West

JEFF SWINGER/STAFF

Seton’s player’s, from left, (9) Sarah Ritter, (2) Danielle Beckenhaupt, (7) Hanna Lietz, (18) Emily Averbeck, (19) Andrea Gentile and (10) Katie Ritter celebrate a point against Kings in their Division I sectional volleyball match in 2008. Seton should be competitive again in 2009.

FILE PHOTO

Outside hitter Sabrina Lemmink (black) leads Taylor’s offensive attack in a 2008 match.

Seton

TONY MEALE/STAFF

Mother of Mercy High School’s Megan Wanstrath unleashes a kill against McAuley in the Division I Regional Semifinal at Butler High School in 2008. Mercy won 3-0 and should have a good team again in 2009. (15-12, 7-2). The Highlanders lost in a Division I sectional championship game to Lakota West in 2008. A number of varsity players return for sixth-year head coach Jim Delong including Rachel Eubanks, Caraline Maher, Lauren Engleman, Kelsie Fieler, Megan Keller, Kelsey Wright, Rachel Ruehl, Nicole Setters and Emily Gibbemeyer. Eubanks finished with 241 kills and was named to the second team of the All

GMC squad last fall. Maher finished with 181 kills in 2008. Wright finished second in the GMC with 591 kills last season. Lindsey Massa will be an immediate contributor as a key new addition for Oak Hills. Oak Hills last won a GMC title in 2007 before finishing in fourth place in 2008. From 2000-2004, Oak Hills won five-consecutive GMC titles on the volleyball court.

The Seton volleyball team has a new head coach in Sara Redman and the Saints will look to get back on track after a 5-16 2008. Redman was 41-9 as a coach at Chaminade Julienne 2006-2007. Seton returns starters Emily Averbeck, Elle Schwartz, Sarah Ritter and Andrea Gentile. Carly Graman and Maria Svec are two new players who could develop into key contributors as well. “We hope to build a winning record and get back on track,” Redman said. “We have the talent and I believe the girls are really excited about the season.”

Taylor

Taylor High School finished third in the CHL in 2008 and could be poised for a better finish in 2009. The Yellow Jackets return

seven starters from their 17-7 2008 squad. Returning are Stephanie Bates, Melanie Corbett, Karen Getz, Sabrina Lemmink, Angela Marco, Allyson Rountree and Allie Sander. Lemmink is a four-year starter and was an All-District player in 2008 and Corbett was the team's MVP in 2008. The team also has a promising newcomer in freshman middle blocker Christina Dilley. Head coach Jessica Bates said the team is looking forward to the start of the season. “I like our drive to be league champions,” she said. “The girls have a lot of experience playing together and they will be comfortable playing together. “Our toughest games will be against Indian Hill and Wyoming, but we look forward to playing those teams. Our fans are great and those are always big games,” she said.

Western Hills

The Western Hills High School volleyball team went 14-6 overall in 2008 and went 10-1 in the CMAC. The team returns several key players in Asia Dillingham, Allyndra Dillingham, Brittany Autenrieb and KikI Mitchell. Desiree Adams and Simone Woods are two strong new players. “I like their dedication and determination,” head coach Peggy J. Peebles said of the 2009 squad. “They are hungry for another league title. They understand what it takes to be successful.”

Oak Hills, Mercy, Seton tennis back By Mark Chalifoux

underclassmen will also contribute including Ashley Goebel, Jamie Frolicher and Megan Wittich. “The underclassmen … have shown consistent improvement throughout the preseason,” Corman said. “In addition, we have an outstanding freshman (Wilhelmus) who will contribute greatly to our success as well.”

mchalifoux@communitypress.com

The season is in for high school girls’ tennis and several teams should have successful seasons.

Oak Hills

A trio of returning starters and the addition of a freshman standout look to make losing seasons a thing of the past for Oak Hills High School. After finishing at 6-8 last season, a trio of players return including Katelyn Gilkey, Jackie Ehrman and Maddie Bieber. Freshman Emma Wilhelmus and newcomer Kate Huber will also make immediate contributions, thirdyear head coach Tom Corman said via e-mail. “The girls have been

Mother of Mercy

FILE PHOTO

Danielle Custer of Delhi Township hits one back during a Seton practice. working hard all summer and are ready for the season to begin,” Corman said. “With three returning varsity players, the potential is there to have a successful season.” A number of additional

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The Mother of Mercy High School’s tennis team went 10-8 in 2008 and has a talented team in 2009. The team returns starters Heather Smith, Madeline Tucker and Caroline Sullivan. Head coach Candice Jones, in her second year at the helm of the program, also has a promising new player in Lizzie Miller.

“It should be a challenging but fun rebuilding season,” Jones said.

Seton

The Seton High School tennis team returns five starters from a 10-7 2008 squad and should be a very deep team in 2009. Senior Danielle Custer and juniors Kelly Simpkins, Cathie Bisher, Katy Schwaeble and Ellie Cook return for the Saints. The team also adds some promising new players in seniors Sarah Hensley, Natalie Watson and Jenna Bailey and juniors Kilee Weiskittel and Laney Sportsman. “I really have no great No. 1 but I don’t lose anything after our No. 1. We are good all the way though,” said head coach Bill Mathews. “We may not

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have any great players but we have no real weaknesses either.” Mathews said he expects the team to be the best on the west side of the city and that he expects to finish in the middle of the league, behind loaded tennis teams at Mount Notre Dame, Ursuline and St. Ursula. Mathews said new Seton Athletic Director Janie Shaffer is a big supporter of tennis and he hopes that will help more people become interested in the sport. “Hopefully we can push more girls into tennis in the future,” he said. “We do have an excellent junior varsity team this year so we may be even better next year.” The Press did not receive Taylor High School’s tennis information before press time.

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B2

Western Hills Press

Sports & recreation

August 26, 2009

Synchrogators defend national title

Our Lady of Visitation baseball team celebrates winning the Cincinnati Western Baseball Conference 9U American Tournament. In front, from left are Ryan Saupe, Jack Smith, Pierce Haucke, Nate Seltzer, Max Middendorf and Ben Wheeler. In middle are Jack Hilvert, Ben Zahneis, Ryan Marr, Ben Huhn, Evan Bates and Brandon Good. In back are coaches Rick Haucke, Don Hilvert, Dave Zahneis and Mike Saupe.

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nor of Milford, Laura Handleton of Anderson, Rachel Handleton of Anderson, Amrian Johnson of Westwood, Tory Lekson of Monfort Heights, Chelsea McAuliffe of Delhi, Nicole Porter of Anderson and Malika Smoot of Bond Hill swam their way to a ninth-place finish. The final days of the competition belonged to the 16-19 year-old swimmers. In side routine competition, 16- to 17-year-old swimmers Braxton Moore of Anderson, Nicole Porter of Anderson and Cory Justice of Anderson earned a fourth-place win for trios. In the 18-19 year-old events, Tara Porter of Anderson, Jenny Jarboe of Anderson, and Kaycee Meyer of Westwood finished second and Alexa Suhich, Becca Schall and Kira Schall finished fifth in trios. In duets, Rachel McWhorter of Westwood and Kaycee Meyer of Westwood finished third and McWhorter earned fifth place in the solo competition. Team members Jarboe, Justice, McWhorter, Meyer, Tara Porter, Becca Schall, Kira Schall, Alexa Suhich, and alternate, Moore, were facing a challenge.

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The Cincinnati YMCA Synchrogators Synchronized Swimming 16-19 year-old A Team had big shoes to fill: Defend their win of the 2008 ESYNCHRO Age Group National Championship. But going into the competition in Gainesville, Fla., recently, the younger swimmers had their competition first. The youngest team members, the 11-12 year old age group finished 13th among 40 teams in national competition. Coached by Head Coach Ginny Jasontek, the 11-12s swam to a Brazilian routine. Team members Olivia Bley of Delhi Township, Erin Connor of Milford, Abby Corpuz of Amelia, Alexa Doak of Anderson Township, Danielle Moser of Milford, Josie Nunner of Milford, Giorgia Toscani, and Elizabeth Walsh of Madeira were thrilled with their finish. Up next, the 13-15 yearold age group, coached by Beth Kreimer, swam a swing number. Team members Madeline Brass of Delhi, Quinn Con-

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August 26, 2009

Western Hills Press

B3

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD T H U R S D A Y, A U G . 2 7

ART & CRAFT CLASSES

Late Night Crop with a Movie, 6 p.m.-1 a.m., Stamp and Scrap Clubhouse, 5515 Bridgetown Road. Bring projects and pictures. Movie and popcorn provided. $5. Registration required. 503-1042; www.scrapink.com. Green Township.

ART EXHIBITS

Exhibition of Mount Student Art, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Studio San Giuseppe Art Gallery at the College of Mount St. Joseph, 5701 Delhi Road. Selected student art from the 20082009 academic year. Closing reception 4-7 p.m. Sept. 11. Free. Presented by College of Mount St. Joseph. 244-4314. Delhi Township.

BUSINESS MEETINGS

Business Network InternationalBridgetown, 8:30 a.m., Hillebrand Nursing and Rehabilitation Center, 4320 Bridgetown Road, third-floor conference room. Meets every Thursday. 941-6464; www.bniohio.com. Bridgetown.

For more about Greater Cincinnati’s dining, music, events, movies and more, go to Metromix.com.

FOOD & DRINK

Wine Tasting, 5:30-7:30 p.m., Bigg’s, 5025 Delhi Road. Three samples with snacks. $2. 354-1700. Delhi Township. Community Dinner, 5-7 p.m., Shiloh United Methodist Church, 580 Anderson Ferry Road. Everyone welcome. Free. 451-3600. Delhi Township. Wine Tasting, 3-11 p.m., Henke Winery, $5 seven wines; $1 per pour, choose from 15. 662-9463; www.henkewine.com. Westwood.

MUSIC - BLUES

Chuck Brisbin & the Tuna Project, 10 p.m., J’s Sportsbar, 4862 Delhi Ave. 244-6111. Delhi Township.

MUSIC - ROCK

One Nite Stand, 9:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m., Drew’s on the River, 4333 River Road. 451-1157. Riverside.

SINGLES EDUCATION

Summer Employment and Financial Information Series, 6-7:30 p.m., Elder High School Schaeper Center, 4005 Glenway Ave. Tips for Surviving on One Paycheck. Workshop series. Includes refreshments. Free. Presented by Price Hill Employment Network. 471-4673, ext. 12. West Price Hill.

EXERCISE CLASSES

Beginners Ashtanga Yoga, 7-8 p.m., Miami Heights Elementary, 7670 Bridgetown Road. Learn proper alignment, breathing and focus of gaze. Dress comfortably. Bring yoga mat. $8. 675-2725. Miami Township.

FARMERS MARKET

Hollmeyer Orchards, 9 a.m.-6 p.m., Hollmeyer Orchards, 3241 Fiddler’s Green Road. Apples, peaches, plums, pears and vegetables. 574-0663. Green Township.

1950s-90s Music Party, 8 p.m.-midnight, Werk Crossing Condominium Clubhouse, 5350 Werk Road. $8. Presented by Catholic Alumni Club. 531-1902. Bridgetown. S A T U R D A Y, A U G . 2 9

ANTIQUES SHOWS

Antique Appraisals, 11 a.m.-3 p.m., Auctions by Maggie, 3350 Harrison Ave. Appraisals done by Maggie Beckmeyer and guest appraisers. Refreshments available. Split-thepot with door prizes on the hour. $5, includes one appraisal. Presented by Pioneer Antique and Hobby Club. 941-4437. Cheviot.

ART EXHIBITS

Exhibition of Mount Student Art, 1-5 p.m., Studio San Giuseppe Art Gallery at the College of Mount St. Joseph, Free. 244-4314. Delhi Township.

Wine Tasting, 5-9 p.m., Henke Winery, 3077 Harrison Ave. $5 seven wines; $1 per pour, choose from 15. 662-9463; www.henkewine.com. Westwood.

Karaoke with Sean, 9:30 p.m.-2 a.m., Main Entrance Restaurant and Lounge, 5132 Delhi Ave. 451-1414. Delhi Township. F R I D A Y, A U G . 2 8

ART & CRAFT CLASSES

Late Night Crop with a Movie, 6 p.m.-1 a.m., Stamp and Scrap Clubhouse, $5. Registration required. 503-1042; www.scrapink.com. Green Township. Beginner-Intermediate Card Classes, 1011:30 a.m., Stamp and Scrap Clubhouse, 5515 Bridgetown Road. Basic to intermediate level card techniques using variety of designs and accessories. Bring two-sided adhesive. $8, $5 members. Registration required. 403-1042. Green Township.

ART EXHIBITS

Cruisin’ the Pike, 4 p.m., Kroger, 960 Enright Ave., parking lot. Free. Presented by Fast Eddie’s Grill. 979-4328. Price Hill. S U N D A Y, A U G . 3 0

ART EXHIBITS

Exhibition of Mount Student Art, 1-5 p.m., Studio San Giuseppe Art Gallery at the College of Mount St. Joseph, Free. 244-4314. Delhi Township.

Yardwaste Recycling Drop-off Program, 11:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Kuliga Park, 6717 Bridgetown Road. Materials include leaves, grass clippings, brush, garden waste, tree trunks and prunings from trees or shrubs. Free. 946-7755; www.hamiltoncountyrecycles.org. Green Township.

FARMERS MARKET

Hollmeyer Orchards, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Hollmeyer Orchards, 574-0663. Green Township.

FOOD & DRINK

Wine Tasting, 11 a.m.-11 p.m., Henke Winery, $5 seven wines; $1 per pour, choose from 15. 662-9463; www.henkewine.com. Westwood.

MUSIC - BLUES

Exhibition of Mount Student Art, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Studio San Giuseppe Art Gallery at the College of Mount St. Joseph, Free. 2444314. Delhi Township.

FARMERS MARKET

Wayward Son, 9:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m., Drew’s on the River, 4333 River Road. $3. 4511157. Riverside.

MUSIC - CLASSIC ROCK

Hollmeyer Orchards, 9 a.m.-6 p.m., Hollmeyer Orchards, 574-0663. Green Township.

FOOD & DRINK

Wine Tasting, 5-9 p.m., Henke Winery, $5 seven wines; $1 per pour, choose from 15. 662-9463; www.henkewine.com. Westwood.

HEALTH / WELLNESS

FARMERS MARKET

Hollmeyer Orchards, 1-5 p.m., Hollmeyer Orchards, 574-0663. Green Township.

FOOD & DRINK

SUPPORT GROUPS

Bob Cushing, 7-11 p.m., Babe’s Cafe, 3389 Glenmore Ave. 661-0831. Westwood.

CIVIC

FARMERS MARKET

Aquatic Prenatal Exercise Program, 7:158 p.m., Mercy HealthPlex Western Hills, 3131 Queen City Ave. Free for members, $26 per month for non-members. 3895465. Westwood.

MUSIC - ACOUSTIC

Chuck Brisbin & the Tuna Project, 9:30 p.m., Poppy’s Tavern, 5510 Rybolt Road. 574-6333. Green Township.

Hollmeyer Orchards, 9 a.m.-6 p.m., Hollmeyer Orchards, 574-0663. Green Township.

RECREATION

Wine Tasting, 5-9 p.m., Henke Winery, $5 seven wines; $1 per pour, choose from 15. 662-9463; www.henkewine.com. Westwood.

FOOD & DRINK

KARAOKE AND OPEN MIC

PROVIDED.

“Landscape” by Lauren Davis is among the work on display during the Studio San Giuseppe Art Gallery’s annual “Exhibition of Mount Student Art,” which runs through Sept. 11. The gallery is at the College of Mount St. Joseph, 5701 Delhi Road. Gallery hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday and 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. For more information, call 244-4314.

Talk-Act-Listen-Konnect, 6:30-8 p.m., The Women’s Connection Learning Center, 4022 Glenway Ave. T.A.L.K. is a weekly program focused on what it means to be a woman today. Weekly participation not mandatory. 471-4673, ext. 17. West Price Hill. T U E S D A Y, S E P T . 1

ART EXHIBITS

NATURE

Grasshoppers, 1 p.m., Fernbank Park, 60 Thornton Ave. Playground. Learn about grasshoppers, leafhoppers and other critters. All ages. Free, vehicle permit required. Presented by Hamilton County Park District. 521-7275; www.greatparks.org. Sayler Park. M O N D A Y, A U G . 3 1

ART EXHIBITS

Exhibition of Mount Student Art, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Studio San Giuseppe Art Gallery at the College of Mount St. Joseph, Free. 2444314. Delhi Township.

Exhibition of Mount Student Art, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Studio San Giuseppe Art Gallery at the College of Mount St. Joseph, Free. 2444314. Delhi Township.

DANCE CLASSES

Line Dance Class, 10-11 a.m., Dunham Recreation Complex, 4356 Dunham Lane, Line dancing with Jerry and Kathy Helt, instructors. Wear smooth-soled shoes. No partner dances and no prior dance experience required. $4. Presented by Southwestern Ohio/Northern Kentucky Square Dancers Federation. 321-6776. West Price Hill.

EXERCISE CLASSES

Yoga, 7:10 p.m., Dunham Recreation Complex, 4356 Dunham Lane, Tender yoga plus meditation. $10. 471-7653. West Price Hill.

FARMERS MARKET

Hollmeyer Orchards, 9 a.m.-6 p.m., Hollmeyer Orchards, 574-0663. Green Township. T H U R S D A Y, S E P T . 3

F R I D A Y, S E P T . 4

ART EXHIBITS

Exhibition of Mount Student Art, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Studio San Giuseppe Art Gallery at the College of Mount St. Joseph, Free. 2444314. Delhi Township.

CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS

Exhibition of Mount Student Art, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Studio San Giuseppe Art Gallery at the College of Mount St. Joseph, Free. 2444314. Delhi Township.

Women’s Monthly Meet-Ups, 10 a.m.-noon, The Women’s Connection Learning Center, 4022 Glenway Ave. Connecting with others in the community while participating in activities.471-4673, ext. 17; www.thewomensconnection.org. West Price Hill.

BUSINESS MEETINGS

FARMERS MARKET

ART EXHIBITS

Business Network InternationalBridgetown, 8:30 a.m., Hillebrand Nursing and Rehabilitation Center, 941-6464; www.bni-ohio.com. Bridgetown.

EXERCISE CLASSES

Beginners Ashtanga Yoga, 7-8 p.m., Miami Heights Elementary, $8. 675-2725. Miami Township.

FARMERS MARKET

Hollmeyer Orchards, 9 a.m.-6 p.m., Hollmeyer Orchards, 574-0663. Green Township.

DANCE CLASSES

Line Dance Class, 1-2 p.m., Dunham Recreation Complex, 4356 Dunham Lane, Line dancing with Jerry and Kathy Helt, instructors. Wear smooth-soled shoes. No partner dances and no prior dance experience required. $4. Presented by Southwestern Ohio/Northern Kentucky Square Dancers Federation. 321-6776. West Price Hill.

About calendar

To submit calendar items, go to “www.cincinnati.com” and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to “life@communitypress.com” along with event information. Items are printed on a space-available basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to “www.cincinnati.com” and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page.

SUPPORT GROUPS

Alzheimer’s Support Group, 7-8:15 p.m., Shiloh United Methodist Church, 580 Anderson Ferry Road. Open to any individual caring for a loved one with Alzheimer’s. Free. 451-3600. Delhi Township.

Hollmeyer Orchards, 9 a.m.-6 p.m., Hollmeyer Orchards, 574-0663. Green Township.

MUSIC - CLASSIC ROCK

Woodwind Steel, 9:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m., Drew’s on the River, 4333 River Road. 4511157. Riverside. S A T U R D A Y, S E P T . 5

ART EXHIBITS

Exhibition of Mount Student Art, 1-5 p.m., Studio San Giuseppe Art Gallery at the College of Mount St. Joseph, Free. 244-4314. Delhi Township.

EXERCISE CLASSES

Ashtanga Yoga, 6-7:15 p.m., Miami Heights Elementary, 7670 Bridgetown Road, cafeteria. Dress comfortably, bring yoga mat. All levels. $8. Registration required. Presented by Three Rivers Community Education. 6752725. Miami Township. Pilates/Slim & Sculpt, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Westwood Town Hall Recreation Center, 3017 Harrison Ave. With Michele Reeves. $6, first class free. 238-8816. Westwood.

FARMERS MARKET

Sayler Park Farmers Market, 4-7 p.m., Sayler Park, Parkland Avenue and Monitor Street. Local produce, plants and herbs, bread, ice cream, sweets and baked goods. Presented by Sayler Park Village Council. 675-0496. Sayler Park. Hollmeyer Orchards, 9 a.m.-6 p.m., Hollmeyer Orchards, 574-0663. Green Township. W E D N E S D A Y, S E P T . 2

ART EXHIBITS

Exhibition of Mount Student Art, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Studio San Giuseppe Art Gallery at the College of Mount St. Joseph, Free. 2444314. Delhi Township. PROVIDED

The Cincinnati Salsa Festival returns to Sawyer Point and expands to a four-day event from Thursday, Aug. 27, through Sunday, Aug. 30. It includes entertainment for all ages – music, dance, a children’s world with games and rides, dance workshops, concessions and performances, including headliners Chamaco Rivera and the Casablanca Tribute to Tito Puente. From 7-10 p.m. Thursday, there is a free concert by Son del Caribe and a free Salsa class at Fountain Square. A pre-party is 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Friday, at the Contemporary Arts Center. Cost is $15. The festival is noon to 10 p.m. Saturday and noon to 9 p.m. Sunday. It is free. Dancing workshops will be held Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Hyatt Regency of Cincinnati for beginner to advanced dancers for $15. Visit www.cincinnatisalsafestival.com.

DANCE CLASSES

Basic Square Dance, 10 a.m., Dunham Recreation Complex, 4356 Dunham Lane, With Jerry and Kathy Helt, instructors. Wear smooth-soled shoes. No partner dances and no prior dance experience required. $4. Presented by Southwestern Ohio/Northern Kentucky Square Dancers Federation. 3216776. West Price Hill.

PROVIDED

Cincinnati Outdoor Shakespeare presents the comedy “As You Like It,” at Seasongood Pavilion, Eden Park. A preview is at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 1. Performances are at 7 p.m. Wednesday-Saturday, Sept. 2-5; and at 2 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, Sept. 5-6. It is free. Visit www.cincyoutdoorshakes.com.


B4

Western Hills Press

CHEVIOT

fan stolen from home at 3838 Washington Ave. No. 5, Aug. 15.

Arrests/citations

Chris Chagman, 30, 3931 Carrie Ave., driving under suspension and drug possession at North Bend Road and Camvic Terrace, Aug. 11. Cory Smith, 27, 3345 Stathem Ave. No. 3, driving under suspension at Applegate Avenue and Mayfair Avenue, Aug. 12. Reginald Leary, 29, 819 West Galbraith Road, driving under suspension at Harrison Avenue and Washington Avenue, Aug. 13. Mark Linneman, 40, 4310 Fehr Road, driving under suspension, Aug. 13. Lucy Belcher, 41, 1344 Ethan Ave., driving under suspension, Aug. 13. Lewis Allen, 29, 1816 Fairmount, driving under suspension, Aug. 15. Jacob R. Kerekes, 27, 3842 Carrie Ave., obstructing official business at 3980 North Bend Road, Aug. 11. Michael Richter, 32, 4016 Lovell Ave., warrant, Aug. 12. Felicia Pfalz, 19, 3775 Robb Ave. No. 29, disorderly conduct, obstructing official business and underage consumption at 3775 Robb Ave., Aug. 14. Daniel Holbrook, 28, 457 Morvue Drive, warrant at 3814 Harrison Ave., Aug. 14. Thomas Shaver, 23, 4015 North Bend Road, warrant, Aug. 15. Randy Jones, 27, 2218 Kristen Drive, open container at 3711 Davis Ave., Aug. 15. Nicholas Sumpter, 18, 4329 Marlin Ave., unlawful restraint and obstructing official business at 4329 Marlin Ave., Aug. 15. Milt B. McAdams, 29, 5514 Section Ave., disorderly conduct at 3814 North Bend Road, Aug. 15. Jared Davis, 22, 741 Serben Drive, open container at 3711 Davis Ave., Aug. 15. Mark Smith, 22, 3326 Glenmore Ave., warrant, Aug. 15. Samuel Floyd, 18, 4329 Marlin Ave., unlawful restraint, obstructing official business and drug paraphernalia at 4329 Marlin Ave., Aug. 15. Brendan E. Murphy, 28, 1298 Herlin Place, open container at 3613 Harrison Ave., Aug. 15. Ron E. Houser, 42, 3293 Montana Ave., assault at 3724 Harrison Ave., Aug. 16. Juvenile, 16, receiving stolen property, Aug. 17. Juvenile, 14, aggravated arson, Aug. 17. Stanley Lawhorn, 33, 3306 Camvic Terrace No. 11, drug paraphernalia at 3306 Camvic Terrace No. 11, Aug. 11.

Incidents/reports Breaking and entering

Police reports

August 26, 2009

Video game system, 18 DVDs and a

Criminal damaging

Garage door damaged on home at 4229 Harding Ave., Aug. 14.

Theft

Interior trunk panels damaged and speaker stolen from vehicle at 3318 Camvic Terrace No. 11, Aug. 12.

Vandalism

Hand railing destroyed at St. Martin Church at 3628 Glenmore Ave., Aug. 17.

CINCINNATI DISTRICT 3 Arrests/citations

Richard E. Brock, born 1988, possession of drugs, 3625 McHenry Ave., Aug. 8. Brandon Newell, born 1988, obstructing official business, 3536 McHenry Ave., Aug. 16. Donald Williams, born 1954, theft under $300, 2435 Harrison Ave., Aug. 12. Gary Rone, born 1978, aggravated armed robbery 3191 McHenry Ave., Aug. 13. Jeffery Lee Hackle, born 1961, assault, 2883 Harrison Ave., Aug. 10. Kevin Walton, born 1968, felonious assault, domestic violence, 3314 Werk Road, Aug. 14. Quinton Jackson, born 1988, receiving a stolen motor vehicle, 2215 Harrison Ave., Aug. 11. Reginal Massey, born 1967, assault, 2332 Harrison Ave., Aug. 14. Shanna Kreglow, born 1980, theft under $300, 6165 Glenway Ave., Aug. 11. Thomas D. Nelms, born 1951, theft under $300, 6000 Glenway Ave., Aug. 11. Victor Blevins, born 1989, disorderly conduct, criminal damaging or endangering, 2884 Harrison Ave., Aug. 12. William Davis, born 1964, assault, 3002 Harrison Ave., Aug. 15. Joe Frasure, born 1970, theft under $300, 6140 Glenway Ave., Aug. 17. Sylvie Akaba, born 1978, violation of a temporary protection order, 3240 Boudinot Ave., Aug. 11. Angela Cooper, born 1969, falsification, 2930 Grasselli Ave., Aug. 9. Ashley J. Murphy, born 1987, disorderly conduct, 2934 Harrison Ave., Aug. 5. Brandon Jones, born 1988, assault of a law officer, resisting arrest, criminal damaging or endangering, 3077 Jadaro Court, Aug. 11. Britton Russia, born 1980, passing check with insufficient funds, theft $300 to $5,000, 3171 Westwood Northern Blvd., Aug. 13. Chauncey R. Lee, born 1978, theft under $300, 3360 Glenmore

Ave., Aug. 10. Elizabeth Sonya Crumpton, born 1964, disorderly conduct, 2435 Harrison Ave., Aug. 5. Erica N. Taylor, born 1975, domestic violence, 2465 Westwood Northern Blvd., Aug. 15. Kristal S. Nunnelley, born 1963, passing check with insufficient funds, 3098 Westwood Northern Blvd., Aug. 10. Laverne Anderson, born 1978, theft under $300, 2322 Ferguson Road, Aug. 16. Linda T. Ridging, born 1940, assault, felonious assault, 2533 Homestead Place, Aug. 13. Michael A. Garnett, born 1983, unauthorized use of a motor vehicle, 2623 Anderson Ferry Road, Aug. 13. Michael Pentecost., born 1971, theft $300 to $5,000, 5555 Glenway Ave., Aug. 16. Ronald L. Rhodes, born 1978, possession of drug paraphernalia, receiving a stolen motor vehicle, 2890 Four towers Drive, Aug. 15.

2785 Queen City Ave., Aug. 12. 2913 Boudinot Ave., Aug. 12. 3114 Glenmore Ave., Aug. 6. 3131 Queen City Ave., Aug. 7. 3360 Glenmore Ave., Aug. 10. 5038 Glencrossing Way, Aug. 8. 5100 Glencrossing Way, Aug. 6. 5100 Glencrossing Way, Aug. 7. 5130 Glencrossing Way, Aug. 5. 5555 Glenway Ave., Aug. 11. 6000 Glenway Ave., Aug. 10. 6000 Glenway Ave., Aug. 11. 6165 Glenway Ave., Aug. 11.

2298 Baltimore Ave., Aug. 8. 3191 McHenry Ave., Aug. 12.

GREEN TOWNSHIP

Incidents/reports Aggravated robbery

son Ave. No. 1, theft at 5071 Glencrossing Way, Aug. 15. Maurice F. Davis, 37, 1615 Birchwood Ave., obstructing official business at 8463 Colerain Ave., Aug. 16.

Robbery

2394 Harrison Ave., Aug. 8.

Theft-License plate(s)

2723 Faber Ave., Aug. 10.

Unauthorized use of motor vehicle

2508 Queen City Ave., Aug. 11. 2623 Anderson Ferry Road, Aug. 10.

Arson

Plastic trash can set on fire at entry to Bosken Park at 5260 Leona Drive, Aug. 15.

Vehicle theft

2215 Harrison Ave., Aug. 10. 2322 Ferguson Road, Aug. 8. 2916 Harrison Ave., Aug. 13. 3159 Montana Ave., Aug. 10. 3171 Westwood Northern Blvd., Aug. 4.

Breaking and entering

Window broken on door during attempted break in at 5303 Sidney Road, Aug. 13.

Burglary

Rifle stolen from home at 3393 Fiddlers Green Road, Aug. 10. Edger, jigsaw, circular saw and tape measure stolen from home’s garage at 3099 Lancer Lane, Aug. 13. Purse and contents stolen from home at 5724 Signal Pointe Drive No. 86, Aug. 14. Window screen cut during attempted burglary, but no entry was gained at 5421 Romilda Drive, Aug. 15. Three cell phones, credit card, money and digital camera stolen from home at 3350 Alpine Place, Aug. 16.

Arrests/citations

Breaking and entering

2476 Harrison Ave., Aug. 10. 3015 Bracken Woods Lane, Aug. 12.

Burglary

2643 Westbrook Drive, Aug. 6. 2660 Thomasville Drive, Aug. 13. 2703 East Tower Drive, Aug. 13. 2710 Erlene Drive, Aug. 8. 2787 Montana Ave., Aug. 11. 2811 Orland Ave., Aug. 13. 2883 Harrison Ave., Aug. 11. 2899 Shaffer Ave., Aug. 13. 2902 Four Towers Drive, Aug. 14. 3515 McHenry Ave., Aug. 12.

Felonious assault

2149 Weron Lane, Aug. 8. 2533 Homestead Place, Aug. 13.

Grand theft

2400 Harrison Ave., Aug. 7. 2435 Harrison Ave., Aug. 4. 2592 Westwood Northern Blvd., Aug. 12. 2623 Anderson Ferry Road, Aug. 10. 2723 Faber Ave., Aug. 12. 2861 Harrison Ave., Aug. 13. 2951 Ferguson Road, Aug. 11. 3901 Boudinot Ave., Aug. 9. 6165 Glenway Ave., Aug. 9.

Petit theft

2004 Ridgetop Way, Aug. 6. 2232 Westwood Northern Blvd., Aug. 11. 2251 Harrison Ave., Aug. 11. 2322 Ferguson Road, Aug. 7. 2322 Ferguson Road, Aug. 8. 2435 Harrison Ave., Aug. 12. 2435 Harrison Ave., Aug. 7. 2435 Harrison Ave., Aug. 7. 2654 Cora Ave., Aug. 4. 2679 Cora Ave., Aug. 3. 2745 Harrison Ave., Aug. 14.

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Jamie Deyhle, 18, 2809 Robers, drug paraphernalia and underage consumption at 2858 Fairhill, Aug. 9. Stacey Kendrick, 18, 3353 Alexis Road, drug paraphernalia and underage consumption at 2858 Fairhill, Aug. 9. Mary Dagenbach, 52, 5339 Cleander Drive, theft and criminal trespass at 5071 Glencrossing Way, Aug. 9. Lawrence R. Roell, 79, 5385 Julmar Drive, building code violation at 5385 Julmar Drive, Aug. 10. Thomara McArthur, 23, 469 Dewdrop, theft at 3491 North Bend Road, Aug. 10. Stacy P. Miller, 18, 933 Justis Road, theft at 6580 Harrison Ave., Aug. 11. Jesse Sellers, 21, 3511 Sandal Lane, drug abuse at 3511 Sandal Lane, Aug. 11. Tara L. Bowling, 36, 16116 Messerschmidt Road, theft at 5071 Glencrossing Way, Aug. 11. Rhonda E. Smith, 45, 4873 Overlook Drive, theft at 5071 Glencrossing Way, Aug. 11. Rebecca Morgan, 18, 366 Oakwood Park Drive, theft at 6580 Harrison Ave., Aug. 12. Juvenile, 17, theft at Harrison Ave., Aug. 12. Dennis Fitzgerald, 51, 508 Elberon Ave., theft at 6580 Harrison Ave., Aug. 12. Ronald Sprecker, 32, 711 State Ave., theft and receiving stolen property at 6580 Harrison Ave., Aug. 12. Juvenile, 14, theft at Glencrossing Way, Aug. 14. Juvenile, 15, theft at Glencrossing Way, Aug. 14. Ricky D. Tinsley, 18, 6226 Cheviot Road, assault at 6226 Cheviot Road, Aug. 14. Tracy L. Lawson, 32, 1790 Fairmount Ave., theft at 5071 Glencrossing Way, Aug. 15. Amanda S. Million, 29, 1922 Harri-

Criminal damaging

Trunk dented on vehicle at 6550 Harrison Ave., Aug. 10. Eggs thrown on vehicle, causing damage to paint at 5015 Nighthawk Drive, Aug. 11. Paint scratched and tire deflated on one vehicle, and tires deflated on three other vehicles at 6559 Hearne Road, Aug. 14. Three windows broken on construction trailer at 6495 Glenway Ave., Aug. 14. Window broken on vehicle at 2189 Neeb Road, Aug. 14. Window broken on home at 6323 Starridge, Aug. 15. Hanging planter and two wooden figurines broken at General Custer’s at 3325 Westbourne Drive, Aug. 15. Graffiti spray-painted on three utility poles at 3300 block North Bend Road, Aug. 16.

Criminal mischief

Unknown powder substance poured all over interior of vehicle at 5927 Oakapple Drive, Aug. 11. Unknown powder substance poured all over interior of vehicle at 5916 Oakapple Drive, Aug. 11. Urine poured on driveway at 6044 Peachview Drive, Aug. 12. Garbage can filled with water placed on victim’s porch at 4164 Runningfawn Drive, Aug. 14. Toilet paper thrown in trees and four lawn chairs thrown in pool at 5275 Rybolt Road, Aug. 15.

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Argument between spouses at Seiler Drive, Aug. 10. Argument between man and woman at Van Zandt, Aug. 10. Argument between man and woman at Hearne Road, Aug. 13. Argument between spouses at Cheviot Road, Aug. 16.

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Property damage

Vehicle driven through yard causing damage to landscaping and shrubs at 3713 Jessup Road, Aug. 13. Paint scratched on vehicle at 5403 North Bend Road, Aug. 14.

Theft

Money stolen from Scallywag Tag during a quick-change scheme at 5055 Glencrossing Way, Aug. 10. Checkbook, money and pocket knife stolen from vehicle at 5569 Raceview, Aug. 10. Purse and contents stolen from vehicle at 6617 Hearne Road, Aug. 10. Three vehicles were rummaged through, but nothing found missing at 5529 Vogel Road, Aug. 10. Purse, money, GPS unit, phone charger and power converter stolen from vehicle at 2928 Timberview Drive, Aug. 10. Medicine, diamond ring and money stolen from vehicle at 4586 Ebenezer Road, Aug. 10. Money stolen from vehicle at 3010 Jessup Road, Aug. 10. Money stolen from vehicle at 5630 Bridgetown Road, Aug. 11. Gasoline stolen from Thornton’s at 6504 Glenway Ave., Aug. 11. GPS unit stolen from vehicle at 3133 Lancer Lane, Aug. 11. Money and 100 CDs stolen from vehicle at 3199 Mary Jane Drive, Aug. 11. Rear license plate stolen from vehicle at 1373 Wexford Lane, Aug. 11. Purse and contents stolen from vehicle at 5944 Harrison Ave., Aug. 12. Five rings, seven necklaces, digital camera and money stolen from home at 5224 Leona, Aug. 13. Debit card stolen from vehicle at 6643 Hearne Road, Aug. 13. Box of tampons stolen from Speedway at 6537 Glenway Ave., Aug. 14. Two bracelets, ring, two pendants and one gold band stolen from home at 3300 Hader Ave., Aug. 13. Radar detector stolen from vehicle at 6251 Glenway Ave., Aug. 14. Garden gnome stolen from home’s front yard at 2480 Sylmar Court, Aug. 16. Revolver stolen from home at 7981 Bridgetown Road, Aug. 16.

Vandalism

Card reader slot damaged on ATM at Cincinnati Central Credit Union at 5625 Harrison Ave., Aug. 11.

MIAMI TOWNSHIP Arrests/citations

Timothy Haas, 34, 9529 Mount Nebo Road, possession of drug instrument at 9529 Mount Nebo Road, July 21.

Incidents/reports Burglary

Residence entered and gun, cigarettes, rings of unknown value removed at 7600 Buffalo Ridge Road, July 23. Ammunition and guns of unknown value removed at 7610 Buffalo Ridge Road, July 23. Residence entered and TV, jewelry, guns of unknown value removed at 7444 Bridgetown Road, July 28.

Burglary, criminal damaging TV valued at $1,500 removed at 7631 Dogtrot Road, July 19.

Criminal damaging

Vehicle damaged at 7797 Rhumba, July 24.

Domestic violence

Reported at Mount Nebo, July 27.

Menacing

Reported at 9528 Mount Nebo Road, July 27.

Theft

Irons of unknown value removed at 3068 Fiddlers Ridge Drive, July 27.

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Community

Western Hills Press

August 26, 2009

B5

Saving money

Last week’s scavenger hunt photo was from Greater Cincinnati Credit Union on Werk Road in Westwood. Congratulations to the following readers who guessed correctly: Keith, Susan, Kyle, Courtney and Brittany Oldfield, Julie Stacey, Zoe Zeszut, Jo Miller, Sue Prieshoff, Bud

I scream, you scream

Proud father Mark Mason looks on as his son, Ethan, makes a picture of an ice cream cone during one of the activities at St. Aloysius Gonzaga School’s ice cream social welcoming new kindergarten students. The festivities at the Bridgetown school included a tour of the classrooms, a meet-andgreet with teachers and, of course, making and eating ice cream sundaes.

Last week’s clue. McMurray, Jane and Don Wright, Roger and Wanda Schumacher, Lori Conners, Sharon A. Lewis, Lillian Stagge, Charlie and Chris Runtz, Becky Sutton and Emily Sutton.

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THE RECORD Carl Ackerman

Carl Allen Ackerman, 54, died Aug. 14. He was a mechanic for Cincinnati Water Works Survived by siblings Butch, Mark, Joe Ackerman, Marlene “Missy” Kassem; survived by many nieces and nephews. Preceded in death by brother Wayne Ackerman. Services were Aug. 18 at Dalbert, Woodruff & Isenogle Funeral Home.

August 26, 2009

BIRTHS

Margaret Carle

Margaret Fronsoe Carle, 78, Green Township, died Aug. 17. Survived by husband Bob Carle; children Joel, David Mechler, Sandi

4991 Cleves-Warsaw (Near Glenway) Accredited by the National Academy of Early Childhood Programs

www.myy.com

SOUTHERN BAPTIST

UNITED METHODIST

DELHI HILLS BAPTIST CHURCH

Zion United Methodist Church

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF DENT 6384 Harrison Ave. - 574-6411 Bible Study...........................9:30am Sunday Worship.................10:30am Wed. Youth Service..............7:00pm Wed. Prayer Service...........7:00pm

“Reflecting Christ...the Light of the World”

UNITED METHODIST CHEVIOT UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 3820 Westwood-Northern Blvd. Craig D. Jones, Senior Pastor Lois Schalk-Hartley, Associate Pastor

9:20 a.m. Traditional Worship 10:20 a.m. Sunday School for All Ages 11:20 a.m Contemporary Worship Service 662-2048 www.cheviotumc.org

SHILOH UNITED METHODIST

Anderson Ferry & Foley Roads 513-451-3600 www.shilohumc.com 9:30 a.m. Traditional Worship and Sunday School 11:00 a.m. Praise Celebration and Junior Church nursery provided for both services

Alberta Conover

Earl Case

Fayrene Cooper

PCW BINGO Purcell K of C 3621 Glenmore Ave.

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Fayrene Cooper, 75, died Aug. 17. Survived by husband Therman Cooper; children Pamela Ventre, Billy Cooper, Melody Messinger; grandchildren Christina Jones, Nicholas Ventre, Erin, Chelsea Cooper; great-grandchildren Logan Runyan, Mason Jones; siblings Pauline Gilreath, Donald Warman. Preceded in death by brother Robert Warman. Services were Aug. 21 at Vitt, Stermer & Anderson Funeral Home. Memorials to the American Heart Association.

Betty Issler

Betty Roellig Issler, 84, Green Township, died Aug. 14. Survived by sons Len, Steven Issler; grandchildren Wendy Ecklar, Todd, Kevin, Gregory, Randy Issler; great-grandchildren Tenley, Myranda, Layna. Preceded in death by husband Leonard Issler Sr., siblings George, John, Robert Roellig, CatherIssler ine Harrison. Services were Aug. 18 at St. Jude Church. Arrangements by Vitt, Stermer & Anderson Funeral Home. Memorials to the Riverview Community or Alzheimer’s Association.

Are You Considering Cataract Surgery?

Your Community Press newspaper serving Addyston, Bridgetown, Cheviot, Cleves, Covedale, Dent, Green Township, Mack, Miami Township, North Bend, Westwood

ESTATE

ity

PRESS

Shawn Kenney

Shawn C. Kenney, 40, died Aug. 9. He worked in credit card sales for Citibank. Survived by his four children; father Toby Kenney; half-brother Adam Kenney; stepbrothers Bryon, Matthew Helfer. Preceded in death by Kenney mother Regina Kenney. Services were Aug. 20 at Highland Cemetery, Fort Mitchell. Arrangements by Ralph Meyer & Deters Funeral Home. Memorials to the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, 8041 Hosbrook Road, Suite 422, Cincinnati, OH 45236.

Martha Leussing

Martha Nold Leussing, 99, died Aug. 17. She was a teller for Fifth Third Bank. Survived by daughter Carolyn Robben; grandchildren Bettie Reynolds, Beverly Vietti, Pam Imm-Killman, Dianne Wilder, Eddie, Leussing Tim Imm, Kimberly King, Ron Robben; 16 greatgrandchildren. Preceded in death by husband Stanley Leussing, daughter Elaine “June” Imm. Services were Aug. 22 at Vitt, Stermer & Anderson Funeral Home.

Walter Lewis

Walter C. Lewis, 83, Green Township, died Aug. 17. He was an assembly supervisor with Clippard Instrument. Survived by wife Esther Lewis; many nieces and nephews. Preceded in death by parents Lewis Joseph, Sophia Lewis. Services were Aug. 20 at Vitt, Stermer & Anderson Funeral Home. Memorials to a charity of the donor’s choice.

Roy Liedhegner

Roy A. Liedhegner, 88, died Aug. 15. He was an account executive. Survived by sister Joyce Horn; several nieces and nephews. Preceded in death by wife Vestal McNabb Liedhegner, sister Vera Zacharias. Services were Aug. 21 at Meyer & Geiser Funeral Home. Memorials to: Tri-State Parkinson’s Wellness Chapter, 165 W. Galbraith Road, Suite 218, Cincinnati, OH 45216.

Robert McCoy

Robert V. McCoy, 86, Green Township, died Aug. 18. He electrical engineer. He was an Army Air Corps veteran of World War II. Survived by wife Irene McCoy; children Michael, Robb McCoy, Pam McCoy Hammerschmidt, Kathy Rickels; grandchildren Heather, Colleen, Melissa, Josh, Greg, Kathy, Jeff, Jessica, Alexx, Steve, Allison; siblings Tom McCoy, Margie Sowell; 10 greatgrandchildren. Preceded in death by son Rick McCoy. Services were Aug. 22 at Our Lady of the Visitation. Arrangements by B.J. Meyer Sons Funeral Home. Memorials to: Daniel J. Huseman Scholarship Fund, c/o Our Lady of Visitation, 3172 South Road, Cincinnati, OH 45248.

Virginia Meier

Virginia Meier, 93, died Aug. 17. She worked in sales for Sears. Survived by children William, Steven, James Meier, Carolyn Metz, Sandra Gellenbeck, Judith Wauligman; 17 grandchildren; many greatgrandchildren. Preceded in death by husband Charles Meier, son Ronald Meier, brothers Ray, Bud Rink. Services were Aug. 20 at St. William. Arrangements by Meyer & Geiser Funeral Home. Memorials to: Cerebral Palsy, 333 Burnet Ave., Pavilion 3140, Cincinnati, OH 45229.

Deaths | Continued B8

9:00am Contemporary Service 9:00am Children’s Sunday School 10:45am Traditional Worship Service

PRESBYTERIAN OAK HILLS PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 6233 Werk Rd. (Enter off Werkridge) 922-5448 Rev. Jerry Hill 10:00 a.m Worship & Sunday School

One call for your insurance needs!

Nursery Care Avail.

Come and worship in a small casual church that emphasizes the fellowship and mission in the community and globally. www.oakhillspc.com

WESTWOOD FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

3011 Harrison Ave. (Near Montana) 661-6846 www.wfpc.org Steve Gorman, Pastor

9:00 AM Contemporary Rejoice Service 10:30AM Traditional Worship Sunday School - All Ages 10:30AM Youth group time 6:00 p.m.

Presbyterian USA / U.C.C.

Do you notice...

• Blurry Vision? • Colors that Appear Faded? • Difficulty Seeing to Read or Drive? • Glare and Halos Around Lights?

...You may have Cataracts!

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Zion and Zion Hills Rds., Miami Hts, OH 45002 Pastor Rodney Fightmaster Phone 941-4983

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Alberta Zeiner Conover, 93, died Aug. 17. She was a homemaker. Survived by daughter Shirley Malone; sister Helen Schrague; nieces and nephews. Preceded in death by husband John Conover. Services were Aug. 24 at the Spring Grove Cemetery mausoleum. Arrangements by Neidhard-Minges Funeral Home. Memorials to a charity of the donor’s choice.

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YMCA CHILD DEVELOPMENT CENTER WEST

Sunday School.......................10:00a.m. Sunday Morning Worship..........11:00a.m. Sunday Evening...................... 6:00p.m. Wednesday Evening Bible Study. . .6:00p.m.

POLICE

Crowley, Lynn Hennig, Bob Carle Jr., Ivy Carlotta, Terri Gill; grandchildren Joelinda, Erin, Josh, Joe, Dan, Stacey, Nolan, Heather, Laura, Samantha, Justin, Kelsey, Morgan; nine great-grandchildren. Services were Aug. 21 at St. Joseph Church. Arrangements by Meyer Funeral Home. Memorials to: Hospice of Cincinnati Inc., c/o Bethesda Foundation Inc., P.O. Box 633597, Cincinnati, OH 45263-3597.

Earl R. Case, 92, Bridgetown, died Aug. 15. He was a baker. He was an Army veteran of World War II. Survived by sons Ken, Gary Case; brothers Larry, Carl Case; seven grandchildren; three greatgrandchildren. Preceded in death by son Dale Case. Services were Aug. 19 at Rebold, Rosenacker & Sexton Funeral Home. Memorials to: Cheviot United Methodist Church, 3820 WestwoodNorthern Blvd., Cincinnati, OH 45211 or Willing Spirit Baptist Church Scholarship Fund, 2012 Westwood-Northern Blvd., Cincinnati, OH 45225.

Landscape Bodies Aluminum Van Bodies Custom & Specialty Bodies Dump Bodies Utility Bodies FRP Bodies Flatbeds Ice & Snow Removal Equipment Replacement Parts Tool Boxes Hitches Lift Gates Ladder Racks Vehicle Lighting AND REPAIRS TO THEM ALL!!!

“Come Hear The Story of Jesus” 5421 Foley Rd. • 513-922-8363 Rev. Bob Overberg

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Editor Marc Emral | memral@communitypress.com | 853-6264

Memorials to: Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Cincinnati, 3949 Colerain Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45223.



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As independent agents, Lauber & Will can check rates and products from several outstanding companies including Grange.

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ON

Western Hills Press

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B6


On the record

August 26, 2009

Western Hills Press

B7

REAL ESTATE CHEVIOT

3457 Tangent Drive: Gresham, Glenn L. to National City Bank; $56,000. 3861 Westwood Northern Blvd.: Ginley, William J. & Joyce to Glover, Kenneth G.; $50,000. 3945 Davis Ave.: Tristate Holdings Inc. to Erdman, Jonathan; $32,000.

CLEVES

111 Cleves Ave.: Mack Properties LLC to Tisch Properties LLC; $40,000. 428 Westgate Drive: Bank of New York Tr. to Cason, Sherry; $67,001.

GREEN TOWNSHIP

Bridge Point Pass: Fischer Single Family Homes II LLC to Sauser, Frank E. & Jennifer A.; $361,050. Tressel Wood Drive: Grand Communities Ltd. to Fischer Single Family Homes II LLC; $91,016. Tressel Wood Drive: Grand Communities Ltd. to Fischer Single Family Homes II LLC; $91,016. 1820 Sylved Lane: Wells Fargo Bank NA Tr. to Durbin, Brent; $34,000. 2750 Country Woods Lane: Flechtner, Thomas W. & Valerie R. to Ward, Paul H. Tr. & Jo Ann T. Tr.; $198,000. 2990 Kleeman Road: Smith, Karen Tr. to Mathauer, Lindsay & Christopher Wallpe; $135,263. 3041 North Bend Road: McMenana, Dewayne & Kimberly to Metts, Shawn C. & Holly A. Campbell; $113,500. 3184 Goda Ave.: Rensing, Ronald W. & Betty L. to Re Recycle It LLC;

$50,000. 3212 Bellacre Court: Hinds, Hugh R. Jr. & Linda S. to Kendall, Jed J. & Diane L.; $158,000. 3218 Lakepointe Court: Rudler, Thomas M. to Scherpenberg, Sue A.; $178,000. 3270 Algus Lane: Cittadino, Mark E. & Maggie M. Gruen to Kneflin, Lauren M.; $164,000. 3396 Bellehaven Court: Muhlen, Eric R. & Christy M. to Muhlen, Irmgard K.; $125,000. 3442 Greenvalley Terrace: P&B Investments of Greenvalley LLC to Kruthaupt, Stephanie M.; $125,000. 3698 Edgebrook Drive: The Bank of New York Tr. to Geak Properties LLC; $71,010. 3713 Monfort Heights Drive: Wright, Jeffrey D. & Diane L. to Vornehm, Nick D. & Lesa A.; $125,000. 3734 Monfort Heights Drive: Quinn, Kyle M. to Kestner, Bryan & Kristen; $131,500. 3813 Mack Ave.: Fannie Mae to Bies, Ann Marie; $76,000. 3959 Virginia Court: Lefever, Karen L. to Citifinancial Inc.; $50,000. 3985 School Section Road: Jostworth, Donald A. Sr. to Mistler, William E. & Maria A.; $73,000. 4039 Drew Ave.: Gregg, Annette M. to Citimortgage Inc.; $100,000. 4311 Hutchinson Road: Infinity Ventures LLC to Depco LLC; $44,000. 4311 Hutchinson Road: Citibank NA Tr. to Infinity Ventures LLC; $28,000. 4331 Regency Ridge Court: Garofalo, Lisa A. to Klare, Ralph & Margie; $97,900. 4336 Boudinot Ave.: Kile, Freda A. to Graman, Michael A.; $80,000.

4662 Fardale Drive: Schwierling, Margaret A. to Nonnamaker, Gregg L. & Melisa G.; $164,900. 4758 Ebenezer Road: Lambrinides, Amy P. to Lambrinides, Alex J.; $102,500. 5115 Leona Drive: Colemire, Catherine M. to Cappel, Joseph; $90,000. 5473 Michelle’s Oak Court: Klei, Suzanne T. to Gerth, Kathleen M.; $102,000. 5705 Lauderdale Drive: Herbst, Harry G. Jr. to Rotte, Amanda N.; $78,000. 5787 Heights Court: Holthaus, Patricia & Brenda Shaffer to Horvath, Amie J.; $155,000. 5852 Lawrence Road: Kern, Margaret J. to Schwarz, Ryan; $117,000. 6582 Bridgetown Road: Bauer, Frederick A. to Polychroniou, Constance G. & Carole H.; $180,500. 6775 Jennifer Lynn Drive: Deutsche Bank National Trust Company Tr. to Niehaus, Keith & Amanda; $285,900. 7296 Cleves Warsaw Pike: Dudley, Josephine to Burke, Terry J.; $38,000. 3625 Shady Lane: Barth, Louis Jr. 3 to Creighton, Bette-Jo Tr.; $179,000. 7490 Deer Run Lane: Guard, Jason to Fifth Third Mortgage Company; $460,000.

WESTWOOD

Feltz Court: Alf, Taye to Nicholas, Jon O. III; $96,800. 2512 Sarvis Court: Henline, Michael to Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation; $36,000. 2532 Sarvis Court: Nationstar Mortgage LLC to Dalton, Dennis;

$9,500. 2569 Montana Ave.: Veal, Kila S. to Fannie Mae; $48,000. 2715 Eugenie Lane: Spanyer, Mark A. to Frondorf, Matt E. & Kimberly; $173,000. 2718 Montana Ave.: Lupinetti, James R. to U S. Bank NA Tr.; $64,000. 2811 Rosebud Drive: LJH Investments LLC to Equity Trust Company [custodian FBO Thomas R. L.]; $92,000. 2916 Feltz Ave.: Alf, Taye to Nicholas, Jon O. III; $96,800. 2937 Westknolls Lane: Fannie Mae to Renaissance Men Properties LLC; $19,500. 3015 Ferguson Road: Assiddiq, Haneyah H. to Entrust Administration Inc.; $62,000. 3019 Glenmore Ave.: Hartig Radio & Television Service Co. to United Dairy Farmers Inc.; $100,000. 3035 Temple Ave.: K&K Renovations LLC to Greenbriar Homes LLC; $27,500. 3039 Feltz Ave.: Meeker, Gregory A. to Junda, Dustin C.; $102,000. 3054 Percy Ave.: IB Property Holdings LLC to Hannah C. Properties LLC; $17,000. 3077 Bracken Woods Lane: J.P. Morgan Chase Bank NA to Blue Spruce Entities LLC; $1,156. 3157 West Tower Ave.: Escher, Virginia L. to Johnson, Ivy; $74,000. 3204 Buell St.: Wilson, Jeffrey J. & Amy C. to Edwards, Amy M.; $111,000. 3348 Hanna Ave.: Fannie Mae to Brown, Carole L.; $57,500. 3446 Schwartze Ave.: Schuler, Robert D. to Estese, Mary E.; $103,000. 5713 Glow Court: Mayer, Jacalyn Tr. to Jennings, Tina M.; $76,900.

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LEGAL NOTICE The Council of the City of Cheviot has passed the following Legislation: RES 09-04 To Transfer Funds and to Declare an Emergency Passed: May 5, 2009 Deborah M. McKinney, President of Council Approved: May 5, 2009 Samuel D. Keller, Mayor Attest: Rachel A. McKinney, Clerk of Council RES 09-05 To Request that The Hamilton County Auditor Certify to the City of Cheviot the Tax Levy Calculations Enumerated in Section 5705.03(B) of the Ohio Revised Code; and to Declare an Emergency Passed: May 5, 2009 Deborah M. McKinney, President of Council Approved: May 5, 2009 Samuel D. Keller, Mayor Attest: Rachel A. McKinney, Clerk of Council RES 09-06 To Submit to the Hamilton County Board of Elections a Proposed New Tax Levy to be Voted upon by the Electors of the City of Cheviot at the August 4, 2009, Special Election; and to Declare an Emergency Passed: May 12, 2009 Kathleen Zech, President Pro-Tem of Council Approved: May 12, 2009 Samuel D. Keller, Mayor Attest: Rachel A. McKinney, Clerk of Council RES 09-07 To Authorize the Safety-Service Director to Solicit Bids for Ice Control Road Salt for the 2009-2010 Winter Season; and to Declare an Emergency Passed: June 2, 2009 Deborah M. McKinney, President of Council Approved: June 2, 2009 Samuel D. Keller, Mayor Attest: Rachel A. McKinney, Clerk of Council RES 09-08 To Transfer Funds; and to Declare an Emergency Passed: June 16, 2009 Deborah M. McKinney, President of Council Approved: June 16, 2009 Samuel D. Keller, Mayor Attest: Rachel A. McKinney, Clerk of Council RES 09-09 To Request That The Hamilton County Auditor Certify to the City of Cheviot the Tax Levy Calculations Enumerated in Section 5705.03(B) of the Ohio Revised Code; and to Declare an Emergency Passed: July 27, 2009 Deborah M. McKinney,President of Council Approved: July 29, 2009 Samuel D. Keller, Mayor Attest: Rachel A. McKinney, Clerk of Council RES 09-10 To Approve the Collective Bargaining Agreement with the F.O.P. for the Period Beginning April 1, 2009, and Ending March 31, 2010; and to Declare an Emergency Passed: August 4, 2009 Kathleen Zech, President Pro-Tem of Council Approved: August 4, 2009 Samuel D. Keller, Mayor Attest: Matthew D. McGowan, Acting Clerk of Council ORD 09-06 To Repeal Authorize a Memorandum of Understanding between the City of Cheviot and the Hamilton County Department of Community Development for the Neighborhood Stabilization Program, to Select a Realtor for the Use by the City in Implementing the Program; and to Declare an Emergency Passed: April 21, 2009 Deborah M. McKinney, President of Council Approved: April 21, 2009 Samuel D. Keller, Mayor Attest: Rachel A. McKinney, Clerk of Council ORD 09-07 To Set Rates for the Usage of the Municipal Swimming Pool; And To Declare An Emergency Passed: April 21, 2009 Deborah M. McKinney, President of Council Approved: April 21, 2009 Samuel D. Keller, Mayor Attest: Rachel A. McKinney, Clerk of Council ORD 09-08 To Amend the 2009 Annual Appropriations; and To Declare an Emergency. Passed: April 21, 2009 Deborah M. McKinney, President of Council Approved: April 21, 2009 Samuel D. Keller, Mayor Attest: Rachel A. McKinney, Clerk of Council ORD 09-09 To Approve the Agreement with the Ohio Department of Transport for the Resurfacing of Harrison Avenue; to Authorize the Safety-Service Director to Sign the Agreement on behalf of the City; and to Declare an Emergency Passed: May 5, 2009 Deborah M. McKinney, President of Council Approved: May 5, 2009 Samuel D. Keller, Mayor Attest: Rachel A. McKinney, Clerk of Council ORD 09-10 To Accept the Bid of Perram Electric for the Harrison Avenue Traffic Signal Project; and to Declare an Emergency Passed: May 5, 2009 Deborah M. McKinney, President of Council Approved: May 5, 2009 Samuel D. Keller, Mayor Attest: Rachel A. McKinney, Clerk of Council ORD 09-11 To Amend the 2009 Annual Appropriations; and to Declare an Emergency Passed: May 19, 2009 Deborah M. McKinney, President of Council Approved: May 19, 2009 Samuel D. Keller, Mayor Attest: Rachel A. McKinney, Clerk of Council ORD 09-12 To Approve a One Year Collective Bargaining Labor Contract with A.F.S.C.M.E.; and to Declare an Emergency Passed: July 7, 2009 Deborah M. McKinney, President of Council Approved: July 7, 2009 Samuel D. Keller, Mayor Attest: Rachel A. McKinney, Clerk of Council ORD 09-13 To Amend the 2009 Annual Budget Appropriations; and to Declare an Emergency Passed: July 21, 2009 Deborah M. McKinney, President of Council Approved: July 27, 2009 Samuel D. Keller, Mayor Attest: Rachel A. McKinney, Clerk of Council ORD 09-14 To Approve the Contract with the Advisory Council of Hamilton County General Health District for the Provision of Public Health Services in the Calendar year 2010 ; to Authorize the Mayor to Sign the Contract on Behalf of the City; and to Declare an Emergency Passed: July 21, 2009 Deborah M. McKinney, President of Council Approved: July 27, 2009 Samuel D. Keller, Mayor Attest: Rachel A. McKinney, Clerk of Council ORD 09-15 To Create a Committee to Authorize the Purchase and Sale of Real Property in the City of Cheviot Under the Neighborhood Stabilization Program; and to Declare an Emergency Passed: July 21, 2009 Deborah M. McKinney, President of Council Approved: July 27, 2009 Samuel D. Keller, Mayor Attest: Rachel A. McKinney, Clerk of Council ORD 09-16 To Accept the Bid of Morton Salt Company for the Provision of Ice Control Salt for the 2009-2010 Winter Season; and to Declare an Emergency Passed: July 21, 2009 Deborah M. McKinney, President of Council Approved: July 27, 2009 Samuel D. Keller, Mayor Attest: Rachel A. McKinney, Clerk of Council ORD 09-17 To Enact Sections 110.80 Through 110.94 of the Codified Ordinances of Cheviot Which Regulate The Operation of "Teen Clubs" in the City of Cheviot Passed: August 4, 2009 Kathleen Zech, President Pro-Tem of Council Approved: August 4, 2009 Samuel D. Keller, Mayor Attest: Matthew D. McGowan, Acting Clerk of Council ORD 09-18 To Approve the Projected 2010 Tax Budget for the City of Cheviot, Ohio; and to Declare an Emergency Passed: July 21, 2009 Kathleen Zech, President Pro-Tem of Council Approved: July 21, 2009 Deborah M. McKinney, Acting Mayor Attest: Rachel A. McKinney, Clerk of Council ORD 09-19 To Accept the Bid of Barrett Paving for the Harrison Avenue Phase 2 Reconstruction Project; and to Declare an Emergency Passed: August 4, 2009 Kathleen Zech, President Pro-Tem of Council Approved: August 4, 2009 Samuel D. Keller, Mayor Attest: Rachel A. McKinney, Clerk of Council Complete text of the above legislation is available for public inspection 8:00 A.M. - 4:00 P.M. Monday through Friday at the City of Cheviot Administrative Offices, 3814 Harrison Avenue, Cheviot, Ohio. 1001493428


B8

Western Hills Press

On the record

August 26, 2009

DEATHS From B6

Joseph Siegert

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Joseph Donald Siegert, 88, formerly of Miami Heights, died Aug. 19. He taught night school at the Ohio College of Applied Sciences for 30 years and worked as a machinist for Procter & Gamble for 28 years. He was an Army veteran of World War II and played professional baseball for eight years. Survived by wife Margaret Sanford Siegert; daughter Katherine Siegert; brother Robert Siegert; step-sons Michael, Jack Sanford; grandchildren Scott, Greg Bavaro, Kelli Snyder; step-grandchildren Glenn Sheriff, Sara Sheriff-Geiger, Eric, Mark Sanford; great-grandchildren Morgan, Noah, Adyn Bavaro, Luke, Nick Snyder; step-greatgrandchildren Oliver Sheriff, Avery Sanford; many nieces and nephews. Preceded in death by first wife Aletha Siegert, daughter Nancy Bavaro, brother Raymond C. Siegert. Services were Aug. 21 at Dennis George Funeral Home. Memorials to: First Baptist Church, 82 Harrison Ave., Cleves, OH 45002 or the Cleves Three Rivers Kiwanis Club Scholarship Fund in care of Dennis George Funeral Home.

To place an ad call 513.242.4000 or 859.283.7290, or visit CommunityClassified.com

If you’re looking for buyers, you’re in the right neighborhood.

TENN

BED AND BREAKFAST

ESSE

E

Jenny Eilermann

BED AND BREAKFAST

Feature of the Week

The Doolin House Bed & Breakfast

Somerset, Kentucky’s Premiere Inn Located Just Minutes from Lake Cumberland

THE DOOLIN HOUSE INN. Premier Inn. Gourmet breakfast, just minutes from Lake Cumberland. Join us for Romantic Weekend/women’s retreat. 606-678-9494 doolinhouse.com

FLORIDA

The rooms are only half of the reason to come to The Doolin House. Owners Charles and Allison just happen to both be chefs. Some of the breakfast specialties include Caramel Banana French Toast and Southern Eggs Benedict (2 fried green tomatoes topped with 2 slices of smoked bacon, 2 eggs over easy and Hollandaise). Chuck is usually in charge of breakfast and tries to do new and different things every day. Chef Chuck pointed out, “It’s fun to experiment with breakfast. It’s the one meal that encompasses all foods. It’s perfectly acceptable to see smoked salmon or a pork cutlet at the breakfast table. ”For those in no rush to rise and shine, breakfast in bed is served at no additional charge. When you need a weekend get away that’s not too far from home or you are planning your summer vacation to beautiful Lake Cumberland, remember that The Doolin House Bed and Breakfast is only a phone call away.

For more information, Visit the website at: www.doolinhouse.com or call 606-678-9494

FLORIDA

BeautifulBeach.com leads you to NW Florida’s Beach Vacation Rentals along the beaches of South Walton. Luxurious gulf-front homes, seaside condos and cottages. Dune Allen Realty, 50 yrs of excellent service and accommodations. 888-267-2121 or visit www.BeautifulBeach.com

Vacation in Sunny Florida! Picture yourself on the beautiful Anna Maria Island beach! $499/wk + tax. Just steps from the beach. 513-236-5091 www.beachesndreams.net

Beautiful Seagrove Beach Rent & Relax. Nr Destin, between famous Seaside & Rosemary Beach. Cozy Cottages to Gulf Front Condos. Web Specials. 1-800-537-5387 www.garrettbeachrentals.com

Doris Merithew Sweeney, 91, Westwood, died Aug. 18. She was a registered nurse. Survived by children James, Neil “Bob” Sweeney, Katherine Grimm; brother Claude Merithew; eight grandchildren; many nieces, Sweeney nephews, greatnieces and nephews. Services were Aug. 21 at Rebold, Rosenacker & Sexton Funeral Home. Memorials to: Fr. Flanagan’s Boys Town, 14100 Crawford St., Boys Town, NE 68010, Our Lady of Lourdes Capital Campaign, 3450 Lumardo Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45238 or Vitas Hospice Charitable Fund, 11500 Northlake Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45249.

Judy Vonstein

Judy Higgins Vonstein, 56, died Aug. 4. She was a housekeeping supervisor for the Netherland Plaza Hotel. Survived by son Doyle Higgins; sister Marti New; two grandchildren; several nieces and nephews. Preceded in death by parents William, Gertrude Higgins. Services were Aug. 7 at Ralph Meyer & Deters Funeral Home.

Visit CommunityClassified.com

513.768.8614

FLORIDA

CLEARWATER - Indian Rocks Beach 2br, 2ba Gulf Front condo. Heated pool, balcony. Many up grades. 513-771-1373, 260-3208 www.go-qca.com/condo

travelads@enquirer.com

FLORIDA

MARCO ISLAND The Chalet, 3 Bdrm, 3 Ba, on the beach. Pool, tennis, beautiful sunsets. Three month rental minimum. Avail Nov. thru April for $7000/mo. Local owner. 513-315-1700

INDIANA

BROWN COUNTY Be renewed by fall’s magnificent colors! Delight your family with a visit to Indiana’s autumn haven and family playground! Comfort Inn, in the ! of all of Nashville’s attractions. 812-988-6118 choicehotels.com

KENTUCKY

1001489241-01

BED AND BREAKFAST

Victoria Paige Stouffer, infant daughter of Kirby and Leeanna Stouffer, died Aug. 13 at Children’s Hospital. Also survived by grandparents Angela Kilby, Curtis Goldson, Penny Crouch, Brett Stouffer; great-grandparents, uncles, aunts and cousins.

Doris Sweeney

Travel & Resort Directory

Bed & Breakfast

There is a joke among friends here, “It’s a Phoenix that has risen from the ashes. ”When Charles and Allison Hahn Sobieck purchased the property at 502 North Main Street (in Somerset, Kentucky), there was a lot of work to be done, to say the least. With the vision of a B & B and a home in ruins, there were little choices. The dilapidated structure was removed, then reconstructed as it had been in the 1850’s. It’s a brand new home. A bit of an unusual concept for a bed and breakfast. “We reconstructed the home from scratch. This gave us the benefit of designing every amenity possible along the way, ”said Allison Sobieck, owner. Every room is equipped with many amenities you don’t often find in a traditional bed and breakfast, but rather a fine hotel. Every room has a full sized closet with a pair of micro-fiber robes hanging in them, 400- count Egyptian cotton sheets, cable TV with DVD players, queen sized beds, and a host of other things. For instance, 2 rooms have gas fireplaces and 3 rooms have whirlpool tubs. We even offer many add on amenities such as massage, dinner, flowers, etc…

Victoria Stouffer

Services were Aug. 17 at Dalbert, Woodruff & Isenogle Funeral Home. Memorials in memory of Victoria can be sent to Angela Kilby.

CLEARWATER/ST. PETE Gulf front condos. Sandy beach. January ’10, 4 Week Discounts! Florida Lifestyles. 1-800-487-8953 www.ourcondo.com DESTIN. Edgewater Beach Condos on the Gulf. 1-3 BR, beachfront, pvt balconies, FREE Wi-Fi, beach set-up (in season) & use of new fitness ctr. New massage/facial salon, 2 pools (1 heated), FREE $20 gift cert to pool grill (weekly rentals in season). Call or visit our website for lastminute specials. 800-822-4929 www.edgewaterbeach.com DESTIN. Local owner, 1 or 2 luxury condos. 2 BR, 2 BA overlooking gulf, sugar white beaches. Heated pool, hot tubs & more. 937-767-8449,or visit www.majesticsunindestin.com

MARCO ISLAND The South Seas Condo , 2 Bdrm, 2 Ba with direct beach ac cess. Pool, tennis, fishing dock. Bring your boat or use ours (add’l cost). Avail Nov. thru April for $2500/mo. Local owner. 513-315-1700

PANAMA CITY BEACH Family Atmosphere! Your Best Vacation Value! 800-354-1112 www.Summerhouse.com

WOODSON BEND RESORT Lake Cumberland Condos, golf, swimming pool, tennis, restaurant, 24 hr security. LABOR DAY SPECIAL 3 nights for the price of 2 800-872-9825 www.woodsonbendresort.com.

MICHIGAN

LEELANAU VACATION RENTALS Over 120 condos, cottages and homes on Lake Michigan, Glen Lake and other inland lakes. Call 231-334-6100 or visit www.leelanau.com/vacation

NEW YORK DESTIN. New, nicely furnished 2 br, 2 ba condo. Gorgeous Gulf view. Pools, golf course. Discount late Summer & Fall rates. 513-561-4683 Visit arieldunes.us or twcondo.us EAST COAST, NEW SMYRNA BEACH Luxurious oceanfront condos & vacation homes. Closest & best beach to Dinsey. Ocean Properties Vacation Rentals 800-728-0513 www.oceanprops.com

FT. MYERS. 2 BR, 2 BA condo in Parker Lakes. Fabulous pool & resort amenities. 10 min to Ft. Myers Beach, Sanibel & Captiva. Superb restau rants, shopping & golf nearby. Now accepting res ervations for Fall and Winter travel. Book Early! 859-750-7220

SANIBEL ISLAND Quality, beachfront condos. Excellent service! Great rates! www.SanibelIslandVacations.com 1-888-451-7277

MANHATTAN--NYC HOTEL $129/2 persons. Singles $124. Suites $139-$159. Lincoln Ctr area, Hudson River views, 18 flrs, kitchenette, 5 mins to midtown, safe, quiet, luxury area. RIVERSIDE TOWER, Riverside & 80th St. Call 1-800-724-3136 or visit: www.riversidetowerhotel.com

NORTH CAROLINA EMERALD ISLE. Ocean Front luxury vacation homes with community pool. Call for free brochure. 800-245-7746 Spinnaker’s Reach Realty www.SpinnakersReach.com

SOUTH CAROLINA SIESTA KEY. Gulf front condo, beach view from balcony. Bright & airy, nicely appointed, all amenities. Cinci owner. 232-4854. The Best Crescent Beach Vacation!

Hilton Head Island, SC

Visit www.hhisland.info and plan a getaway with Seashore Vacations. Our beach is free. Specials available for golf, tennis, dining, more. Visit our

site or call toll free: 800-845-0077.

N. MYRTLE BEACH Coastal Condos, Inc. 1-4 bdrm oceanfront & ocean view units. Call 1-800-951-4880 or visit www.coastalcondos.com Clearwater/Indian Rocks Beach GULF BEACH’S BEST VALUE! Beach front condo, 2 BR, 2 BA. Pool. Fall rates. 513-875-4155 www.bodincondo.com

FT. MYERS. Luxury 2 br, 2 ba condo at Cross Creek Golf & Country Club. Nr. Airport. Shopping & dining nearby. Monthly rental incl golf privileges at re duced price. Call owner 513-260-3395

SIESTA KEY - Spacious, complete ly furnished 2BR, 2BA condo. Heat ed pool, tennis & spectacular view! Walk to the beach! $3000-$3800/mo. 3 month. min. Owner 513-518-2753

SEABROOK EXCLUSIVES Villas & Private Homes. Ocean, golf, tennis, equestrian. Pet friendly rentals. Free brochure. Book online! 888-718-7949. www.seabrookexclusives.com

TENNESSEE 1-7 Affordable, Deluxe Chalets & Cabin Rentals. Pigeon Forge in the Smokies. Vacation/Dollywood Specials. Free brochure. Call 1-800-833-9987. www.firesidechalets.com

A Beautiful Cabin Getaway Gatlinburg/Pigeon Forge.Hot tub, jacuzzi, fireplace, gas grill. $85/nt, 5 nt special $375. 800-793-8699. smokymtncrossrdrentals.com A Beautiful Luxury Log Cabin Resort minutes from Dollywood & Pigeon Forge! Great amenities, pet friendly cabins. Excellent rates! Call now or visit us online www.hiddenspringsresort.com 1-888-HSR-TENN (477-8366) CHALET VILLAGE www.chaletvillage.com Cozy cabins to luxurious chalets Fully furnished, hot tubs, pool tables. Check SPECIALS, availability and book online 24/7, or call 1-800-722-9617 GATLINBURG. Affordable rates. Fully furnished. 1-8 bdrms. Chalets, Cabins, Privacy, Views, Hot Tubs, Jacuzzis, Fireplaces. 1-800-235-2661 www.alpinechaletrentals.com

GATLINBURG. Choose a 2 or 3 BR chalet, conveniently located, richly appointed and meticulously main tained. Pet friendly. 877-215-3335 or visit www.marysescape.com

GATLINBURG ! ! Fall Festival Private luxury cabins on rushing mtn streams all decorated for Fall. FP, hot tubs, more. Great rate! 800-404-3370 countryelegancecabins.com www.AUNTIEBELHAMS.com Gatlinburg-Pigeon Forge. Vacation in a beautiful log cabin or chalet with hot tub, Jacuzzi, views & pool tables. Call about specials! 800-436-6618

TIME SHARES DISCOUNT TIMESHARES Save 60-80% off Retail! Worldwide Locations! Call for Free InfoPack! 1-800-731-0307 www.holidaygroup.com/cn

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Your Community Press newspaper serving Addyston, Bridgetown, Cheviot, Cleves, Covedale, Dent, Green Township, Mack, Miami Township, North Be...

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