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WESTERN HILLS PRESS

Your Community Press newspaper serving Addyston, Bridgetown, Cheviot, Cleves, Covedale, Dent, Green Township, 50¢ Mack, Miami Township, North Bend, Westwood

WEDNESDAY, MAY 23, 2012

CLUB HONORS B1 The Town Club of Cincinnati recently honored its members with 20 years or more of membership and support.

BECAUSE COMMUNITY MATTERS

World War II vet’s daughter documents his service

Vets council hosts parade

By Kurt Backscheider

By Kurt Backscheider

Kathy Kitts, left, has written a book about her father, Ray Wissel's experiences in the U.S. Army during World War II. Wissel was a minesweeper who fought in Italy during the war. The pair are holding "souvenirs" Wissel brought home, detonators from German mines.

kbackscheider@communitypress.com

R

ay Wissel said the best way to really learn about World War II is to talk to the men who experienced it firsthand and listen to their stories. The Green Township war veteran’s story will now live on forever. Wissel’s daughter, Kathy Kitts, has written a book about her father’s service in the war. Her tribute, “The Minesweeper: A Cincinnati Teenager Serves in Italy During World War II,” is the true story of Wissel’s days in an Ammunition & Pioneer platoon in the U.S. Army. “It has turned into a legacy for our family,” Kitts said. “We never knew much about what he did during the war.” She said the story follows her father from Cincinnati to South Carolina, where he completed basic training, then to Texas and onto Virginia, where he boarded a ship to travel across the Atlantic Ocean to the Atlas Mountains in Africa to learn the dangerous art of explosives. It follows him as he fought his way up the boot of Italy with the Army’s 88th Infantry Division, disarming German mines and delivering ammunition to the front lines. And it charmingly, and sorrowfully, follows his friendship with fellow minesweeper Wesley Cobb. Kitts said the book comes full circle and ends in 2007, when the then 82-year-old Wissel fulfilled a promise he made to always remember his fallen friend. “This is his memory,” she said. “It was fascinating to do and it brought us closer as father and daughter.” The nonfiction book, complete with photographs, is written in the third person, and she said adults and children alike should enjoy reading it. When his daughter told him she wanted to write a book about him, Wissel said at first he wondered who would want to buy it. “I told her she better be sure she can make some money,” he joked. All kidding aside, he said he’s proud of the way it turned out. “She’s done a great job with it,” Wissel said. “All these stories would have died with me. I wanted my descendants to know the story, and

KURT BACKSCHEIDER/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Green Township resident Ray Wissel took a break to have a photograph taken of him sitting on a table at a cafe in Rome, Italy, during World War II. Wissel was a minesweeper in the U.S. Army. His daughter wrote a book about his service during the war. THANKS TO KATHY KITTS

now they will.” A teenager enlists Wissel was six months shy of his 17th birthday when he enlisted in the Army in 1943. “Everybody else was going, and my brother was already in the Marines,” he said. “I wanted to join the Marines, but I had a heart murmur so they turned me down. I walked right across the street to the Army recruiter and a half-hour later I was enlisted.” After basic training, he said he was placed in an Ammunition & Pioneer outfit with the 88th Infantry Division, which earned the nickname Blue Devils because of how hard they fought. “We had two main duties,” he

said. “The ammunition part meant we had to keep the front lines supplied with ammunition, and the pioneer part is when they sent you out in front of everyone else to clear mines so the infantry could advance safely. “The Germans originated mine warfare,” he said. At night, Wissel and his squad would scour the Italian hillsides and valleys for mines and booby traps. “As soon as your mine detector goes off you hit the ground and start feeling around for trip wires, very slowly,” he said. “I was always careful.” Kitts said she learned her father was a minesweeper in the Army when she was an eighthgrader. “I felt sick to my stomach,” she said. “As a kid, I couldn’t believe they made people do that – crawl around on the ground and sweep for trip wires.” Heartbreaking loss Wissel and North Carolina native Wesley Cobb became quick friends in the Ammunition & Pioneer platoon. The duo got along very well and always had each others back as they swept mine fields and ran ammo to the front lines. They even shared a close call together one night after several hours of mine-sweeping. Wissel said they were walking back to camp and decided, after having been on their feet for several hours manning mine detec-

STAR CHANCE

FUND SUCCESS

The Delhi Skirt Game is looking for the next Rising Star. See A3

Setonsation 2012 was a success for the entire Seton High School community. See photos, A6

tors, to sit down for minute on the side of a hill. “All of the sudden we heard this loud, ‘Whack,’” he said. “A mortar shell had landed right in between the both of us. I dove one way and Cobb dove the other.” Luckily, he said the ground was soft from a previous rain and the shell didn’t land on its nose. Instead of exploding, the mortar shell slid across the wet earth, he said. That was one of several close calls Wissel experienced, but unfortunately the same didn’t ring true for Cobb. He died in the autumn of 1944, during the brutal battle on three craggy mountain peaks at Mount Battaglia. Wissel had been transferred from the Ammunition & Pioneer platoon prior to that battle. Since he knew how to type, he was pulled from the mine-sweeping unit and placed temporarily in the personnel unit to help prepare morning reports for the officers. “The casualties were so heavy at Mount Battaglia, we couldn’t keep up with the morning reports,” he said. He learned of his friend’s death one morning while typing the names of the men who had been killed the previous day –Cobb’s name was on one of the lists that came across his desk. “It was horrible for my dad,” Kitts said. “He made a vow he would never forget Wesley

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West Siders are invited to honor our troops and veterans at the annual Memorial Day Parade in Cheviot. The 63rd annual Memorial Day Parade presented by the Western Hills Veterans Council begins at11a.m. on Memorial Day, Monday, May 28, at the intersection of Harrison and Frances avenues. “It’s an important event,” said Covedale resident Cassie Thornton, president of the Ladies Auxiliary of the American Legion Schwab-Bailey Post. Thornton and her husband, George, who is retired from the U.S. Navy and serves as commander of the Western Hills Veterans Council, help organize the parade each year. She said this year’s parade features close to 50 entries. Those who attend will see several veterans groups, community organizations and even a few floats. Mrs. Thornton said Don Kuhr, a Marine veteran who served in the Gulf War, is this year’s grand marshal. Kuhr is now a Cincinnati firefighter with Ladder Co. 24 in Price Hill. Planning the parade takes a great deal of time, but she said it’s worth it to see the crowds lined up to pay tribute to our servicemen and women. “I see a lot more support every year for our troops,” she said. Cheviot Mayor Samuel Keller said the city has always been supportive of veterans and it’s an honor for the city to have the parade on its streets. “We think it’s great we’re able to host the parade,” he said. Memorial Day holds many different meanings for people, and he said it’s important for the community to remember those who sacrificed so we can enjoy our freedoms. The parade ends at Harvest Home Park, where an awards ceremony and memorial tribute will take place.

MORE INFO See other Memorial Day stories on A3, A4

Vol. 84 No. 27 © 2012 The Community Press ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

See page A2 for additional information

FOR THOSE WHO REFUSE TO

ACT THEIR AGE.

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NEWS

A2 • WESTERN HILLS PRESS • MAY 23, 2012

Service Continued from Page A1

Cobb.” After years of searching, Wissel finally located his friend’s burial site in North Carolina, and in 2007 he visited the grave with Cobb’s sister. Nine of the 12 men who were in Wissel’s squad died in the war. “I wouldn’t have paid $1 million for the experience, but I wouldn’t have accepted $1 million for my service either,” he said.

“I survived.” Wissel was discharged from the Army at the end of the war in 1945. He returned home to Cincinnati, worked at the Kahn’s meat plant during the day – where he worked as an office boy before the war – and attended night school at Xavier University. “It took me 10 years to earn my degree,” he said. “I had three kids by the time I graduated from college.” He earned his degree in accounting from Xavier and eventually went on to

become chief financial officer at Kahn’s. He worked there for more than 44 years before retiring in 1986. Wissel and his late wife, Jean, raised six children. He now has 10 grandchildren. Kitts, who is an avid writer, said her father didn’t talk much about his service in World War II, which is why, when she began looking for a larger writing project, she thought of him. Her book is available at Barnesandnoble.com and Amazon.com.

Teachers become students Will pursue own adventures Fund for Teachers recently awarded eight Cincinnati educators $39,000 in grants to pursue learning adventures they designed. After proposing what they want to learn and where they want to learn it via an online application, a committee of civic, corporate, education and philanthropic leaders from

LAST CHANCE TO CATCH 2 YEARS OF LOWEST ELECTRIC RATE

Over 15,500 households have joined the Green Township ELECTRIC AGGREGATION PROGRAM or the PREFERRED PROVDER PROGRAM at the lowest rate available for Green Township residents and small businesses. This opportunity expires on May 30, 2012. Please call 866-683-1610 for a 5.45¢ per kilowatt hour for 2012 and 5.2¢ per kilowatt hour for 2013. The 3,000 residents who had old contracts with Duke Retail need to call today. The Township program would save you considerably. Please call today. CE-0000511563

Green Township Trustees

across the state selected the winners. These preK-12 educators now embark on their global fellowships throughout the summer. Examples of the winning fellowships include these from the West Side: » Robert Hollifield – Gilbert A. Dater High School – who will navigate through seven national parks, three private nature reserves, three active volcanoes, and one coastal ecosystem in Costa Rica to introduce students to biodiversity outside their urban Ohio environment and ignite a passion to engage in local activities promoting environmental awareness and protection. » Rachel Zerkle Deshpande – Oyler School – Ex-

Index Calendar .................B2 Classfieds .................C Food ......................B3 Life ........................B1 Police .................... B7 Schools ..................A6 Sports ....................A7 Viewpoints ............A10

plore the rich history and modern diversity of architecture across Italy, Spain, and France to help students appreciate “dwellings” including those comprising their immediate surroundings, as our most commonly viewed and popularly shared art form. » Allison Miller – Winton Hills Academy – Research coral reef ecology and the conservation of marine systems on Australia’s Great Barrier Reef with a team assembled by Miami University and the Cincinnati Zoo to integrate social studies/math into an ecosystems unit supporting Next Generation Science Standards. » Megan Garrity – St. Ignatius School – Participate in marine ecology and conservation studies on the Great Barrier Reef off of Queensland, Australia, to establish a school environmental club and create an inquiry-driven, participatory science curriculum incorporating a communitybased conservation component.

WESTERN HILLS PRESS

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News

Marc Emral Senior Editor ...............853-6264, memral@communitypress.com Kurt Backscheider Reporter ............853-6260, kbackscheider@communitypress.com Melanie Laughman Sports Editor ......248-7573, mlaughman@communitypress.com Tom Skeen Sports Reporter .............576-8250, tskeen@communitypress.com Nick Dudukovich Sports Reporter .....248-7570, ndudukovich@communitypress.com

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To place an ad in Community Classified, call 242-4000.

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NEWS

MAY 23, 2012 • WESTERN HILLS PRESS • A3

Memorial Day in Delhi Twp. People throughout the West Side will come together this Memorial Day weekend to remember and honor the sacrifice of the men and women who have died protecting our freedoms. The Delhi Township Veterans Association will host its annual Memorial Day Ceremony at 1 p.m. Sunday, May 27, at the Delhi Township Veterans Memorial Park, 934 Neeb Road. This year’s speaker is U.S. Army Lt. Col. Shane Ousey, a decorated officer and professor of military science at Xavier University. Veterans will also dedicate the association’s new Killed In Action Biographical Directory, which tells the story of the 19 men from Delhi who were killed in action while serving their country. The observance also features color guards, patriotic music, a roll call of those killed in action and the playing of “Taps.” Due to limited parking at the Veterans Memorial Park, parking at the park is reserved for those with handicaps and event participants. Shuttle bus service and parking will be available at the Delhi Township Seniors Center, 647 Neeb Road. For more information about the ceremony, visit www.delhiveterans.com

In Price Hill, the St. Joseph Cemetery on West Eighth Street is one of three Cincinnati Catholic Cemeteries hosting a special Memorial Day Mass. The cemetery will have a Mass at 11 a.m. on Memorial Day, Monday, May 28. The service will be followed by the playing of “Taps” in the cemetery and a special recognition of those who served. “Memorial Day is a time to honor and remember all of our loved ones who have gone before us, but especially those who sacrificed their time and life defending our country,” said Stephen Bittner, president of Cincinnati Catholic Cemetery Society. St. Joseph Cemetery shelters veterans of the U.S. Civil War, both World Wars, the Korean War, Vietnam War and the more recent conflicts in the Middle East. “The history of our community and our nation is well represented at St. Joseph’s,” Bittner said. “Anyone in the community is invited to share in honoring our heroes at the services on Monday or the entire Memorial Day weekend.” For more information, contact the Cincinnati Catholic Cemetery Society at 557-2306, extension 317 or visit www.cccsohio.org.

BRIEFLY Yards wanted

The Westwood Civic Association is continuing its efforts to encourage residents and businesses to beautify the landscaping in residential yards of residences and the properties of offices, apartments and churches. Each month from May through September, about 10 of the most beautiful landscapes will be recognized with Westwood Civic Association Yard-of-theMonth signs posted on the properties. The association encourages residents to nominate yards and gardens that they feel are works of beauty. Nominations can be made by calling the chair persons for the award competition, Joan or Gil McLean, at 661-6017. Nominations must be of properties within the boundaries of Westwood.

Pool opening

Cheviot’s municipal pool at Harvest Home Park will open for the season Saturday, June 2. The pool will be open every day from noon to 8 p.m., until Sunday, Aug. 19. Passes are now on sale at Cheviot City Hall, 3814 Harrison Ave. Those interested can call Theresa Sunderhaus at 661-2700 for more information or a brochure with all the details about membership. Cheviot residents can receive a discounted membership if they purchase a

pool pass before Thursday, May 31.

Civil War commemoration

In honor of the 150th anniversary of their Sisters’ participation in the Civil War, the Sisters of Charity of Cincinnati invite the public to a Memorial Day Civil War commemoration recognizing the nuns who served on the battlefields. The program will begin at 2 p.m. Saturday, May 26, in the Sisters of Charity cemetery, and will include prayer, music by the Hills of Kentucky Dulcimers, and recognition of the 35plus Sisters who served and are buried on the Mount St. Joseph grounds. The event will take place regardless of weather conditions. For additional information, contact S. Judith Metz at 513-347-5467 or Judith.metz@srcharitycinti.org.

Playing baseball

The Gamble-Nippert YMCA, 3159 Montana Ave., is having YMCA baseball leagues, both T-ball and coach pitch, from June 2July 21. Fee is $40 for members and $70 for community members. For info, go to www.MyY.org or call 513661-1105.

Kreuter hiway bill OK’d

State representatives Louis Blessing (R-29th District) and Lou Terhar (R-30th District) said the Ohio House last week passed House Bill 325, which designates 28 memorial highways throughout the state, including the “Sergeant David Kreuter Memorial Highway” in Hamilton County. On Aug. 3, 2005, Kreuter was killed serving in Iraq while riding in an assault vehicle that was hit by an improvised explosive device. The commemorated highway will be designated on state Route 264, Bridgetown Road, between Cleves and South Road. “Sergeant Kreuter was a true American hero, and I am honored to be able to recognize his service by renaming a portion of state Route 264,” said Terhar. House Bill 325 passed the Ohio House unanimously and will now be sent to the Senate.

Audit award

The Oak Hills Local School District recently received the Auditor of State Award with Distinction. “Clean and accurate record-keeping are the foundation for good government, and the taxpayers can take pride in your

commitment to accountability,” said Dave Yost, Auditor of State. Oak Hills Treasurer Ronda Johnson said, “We are honored to accept this award on behalf of the district. This recognition speaks to the great work of my staff and everyone across the district who shares our commitment to financial accountability.” The award is given to those entities that file a Comprehensive Annual Financial Report and timely financial reports in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP), as well as receive a “clean” audit report.

Clothing collection

OneMain Financial will provide area residents and customers the opportunity to support their local community during its Customer Appreciation Days, through May 31. Throughout the entire month, the OneMain Financial branches in Cincinnati will be collecting clothing donations to help support the mission of Goodwill. Local donations will benefit the local Goodwill branch. OneMain has branches at 5872 B. Cheviot Road, 433 Colerain Ave. and 6175 Glenway Ave.

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NEWS

A4 • WESTERN HILLS PRESS • MAY 23, 2012

Time new enemy for VFW By Jennie Key jkey@communitypress.com

As Memorial Day nears, time is taking its toll on the White Oak Woodrow Pies VFW Post 9246. Membership is dwindling, and Mike Mason, quartermaster of the post, says this could be the last year the group can make its traditional rounds to the communities’ cemeteries on Memorial Day to pay honor to fallen soldiers. Each year, with the help of local Boy Scouts, the post is responsible for placing almost 700 flags in the cemeteries. Not only will 288 flags be placed at St. Aloysius and 212 at St. James cemeteries, but the post also supplies cemeteries at St. Bernard Church, St. John’s Church on Dry

Ridge and at the Dunlap Pioneer Cemetery and other historical cemeteries in the townships. The post will visit area cemeteries and memorials on Monday, May 28, to pay respect to fellow veterans beginning at 8:15 a.m. and winding up at the memorial at Haubner Field at about 11 a.m. The Green Township Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 10380 will sponsor the 19th annual Memorial Day Ceremony and Flag Raising at 2 p.m. Monday, May 28, at Veterans Park, 6230 Harrison Ave. The ceremony will take place at the park’s Patriotic Plaza. Guest speaker will be Army Reserve Col. Phillip S. Jolly, nominated for appointment to brigadier general and assignment as

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commander of the Army Reserve Sustainment Command, Birmingham, Ala., according to the Army Times. » In Cleves, the Miller Stockum American Legion Post 485 sponsors a Memorial Day Parade, as well. The parade begins at Taylor High School at 9:30 a.m. Monday, May 28, and travels to the end of Cleves. There will be buses to take people to the Maple Grove Cemetery, where the Legion sponsors a ceremony. Member Don Bennett says there will be 1,000 flags placed on the graves and a speaker for each of the three mounds in the cemetery. Jack Welch, also a member of the Legion, said a student from the Three Rivers School District will give the Gettysburg Address at the Civil War mound and veterans Jason Garrison and Don Larrick, principal at Miami Heights Elementary School, will speak at the World War I and II mound and the Korean/Vietnam War mound. Following the ceremony, there will be a community picnic at the Legion Post, which is at 29 E. State Road in Cleves.

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Delhi groups looking for ‘Rising Star’ By Kurt Backscheider kbackscheider@communitypress.com

The Delhi Skirt Game Committee and the Delhi Civic Association are looking for the next big star. The community groups have teamed up to present the inaugural Delhi Rising Star talent contest. Modeled after “American Idol,” the talent contest is a way for the two organizations to add to the events surrounding the annual benefit softball game. “My wife and I have been members of the Delhi Civic Association for several years now, and the Delhi Skirt Game Committee has served food at virtually all of the summer Concerts in the Park since the civic association took those over several years ago,” said Clyde Kober, vice president of the Delhi Skirt Game Committee and cochair of the Delhi Skirt Game. “The civic association approached me about partnering with them and allowing the civic association to become more involved with the Delhi Skirt Game.” Kober said he and Marty Smith, president of the skirt game committee, attended a few civic association board meetings and discussed several ideas about how to partner and make 2012 one of the best years ever for both the Skirt Game and the civic association. Through those meetings and conversations, Delhi Civic Association President Lisa Witterstaetter said the association decid-

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ed as a group to not have the summer concerts this year. “The costs to put on the concerts and the resulting small attendance made the concerts economically unfeasible,” she said. “So we determined we needed to go in a different direction.” Enter the Delhi Rising Star contest. Kober said anyone who is16 years old or older is eligible to show off their singing voices and have a chance to win a $250 main prize. Witterstaetter said there will also be a second place prize of $100 and a third place prize of $50. The fee to enter the contest is $10 per person. Auditions for the contest will take place at the civic association’s meeting at 7 p.m. Thursday, June 7, at the Delhi Park Lodge. Each individual who wants to try out for the contest must sing a two-minute song, with no music. Participants who pass the audition will be asked to perform at one of three semi-finals that will take place in June and July. “We are still working on the venues and dates and times for these semi-finals, but they will be held somewhere in Delhi,” Witterstaetter said. The finals will be held at the Delhi Skirt Game Tailgate Party, scheduled for Thursday, Aug. 2, at the Plaza Villarta restaurant on Delhi Pike. “Out of the three semifinals will come three finalists,” Witterstaetter said. “These three finalists will

Alerting folks attending last year's Delhi Skirt Game tailgate party that “ladies” would be in the parking seeking donations, are, from left, Randy Roth; Clyde Kober, Skirt Game co-chair; Eric Gehm and Chuck Tripp. This year's tailgate party will feature performers competing in the Delhi Rising Star talent contest. FILE PHOTO compete on stage at the tailgate party and the audience will select the winner.” Kober said the winner will receive the $250 grand prize, and they’ll also be asked to perform at the Delhi Skirt Game on Friday, Aug. 3 – “On pitcher’s mound, right before the start of the fireworks,” he said. “We think this will be exciting not only for the people attending the game to see this local talent, but also to give the winner a chance to perform in front of a few thousand of their closest friends.” The contest is open to anyone, entrants do not have to live in Delhi. For complete contest rules and registration forms, visit www.delhicivicassociation.org or www.delhiskirtgame.org. “Please challenge anyone you know who can sing to enter this contest,” Witterstaetter said. “If they win, you might be cheering for them at the biggest event in Delhi.”

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SCHOOLS

A6 • WESTERN HILLS PRESS • MAY 23, 2012

Editor: Marc Emral, memral@communitypress.com, 578-1053

ACHIEVEMENTS | NEWS | ACTIVITIES | HONORS

WESTERN HILLS

PRESS

CommunityPress.com

Guests make their way into Seton High School's gym for the annual Setonsation fundraiser. The theme to this year's dinner auction was "An Emerald Evening: There's no place like Seton." THANKS TO ERIN GRADY

Lisa Grace, right, plays with a Yorkie-poo puppy that was auctioned at Setonsation 2012. The annual fundraiser supports Seton High School. THANKS TO ERIN GRADY

Seton supports Setonsation

S

etonsation 2012 was a success for the entire Seton High School community. The school hosted its 16th annual fundraiser March 31, and the event was sold out. Setonsation is one of the school’s largest fundraisers, with all the proceeds going di-

rectly toward supporting Seton students. Hundreds of volunteers step up each year to help make the event a success, whether they’re helping decorate the gymnasium or gathering gift items for the auction. Some of the auction items at

From left, Jan and Steve Thiemann, and Lois Reis were happy to support Seton High School at this year's Setonsation fundraiser. THANK TO ERIN GRADY

this year’s fundraiser included high-end jewelry, Seton spirit wear, box seats to the Cincinnati Reds, Cincinnati Bengals tickets, an Elder-St. Xavier tailgate party and a backyard movie night. This year’s theme was “An Emerald Evening: There’s no place like Seton.”

From left, Diane and Rick Martini, and Dan and Janet Fisher enjoyed the evening at Seton High School's annual fundraiser, Setonsation. THANKS TO ERIN GRADY

Seton High School recently hosted its annual fundraiser, Setonsation. From left, Mike and Linda Niehaus, and Theresa and Sid Goettke were among those who came out to support the school. THANKS TO ERIN GRADY From left, Theresa and Ed Salter, and Mary and John Lammers helped support Seton High School by attending it's Setonsation fundraiser. THANKS TO ERIN GRADY

Sister Christine Rody, SC, far left, pauses for a photo with Loretta and Kevin Dees during Seton High School's annual Setonsation fundraiser. This year's event took place March 31. THANKS TO ERIN GRADY

Seton High School's gym was the setting for this year's Setonsation fundraiser. The sold out event was a success for the entire Seton community. THANKS TO ERIN GRADY Jim and Robin Zentmeyer were among hundreds of guests who had a good time at Seton High School's annual fundraiser, Setonsation. This year's event took place March 31. THANKS TO ERIN GRADY


SPORTS

MAY 23, 2012 • WESTERN HILLS PRESS • A7

WESTERN HILLS

PRESS

Editor: Melanie Laughman, mlaughman@communitypress.com, 513-248-7573

HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | RECREATIONAL

CommunityPress.com

OH slays competition during 1st season

Lacrosse team has bright future By Tom Skeen tskeen@communitypress.com

Oak Hills junior Lauren Slatten takes a cut during the Lady Highlanders’ opening-round victory over Walnut Hills. While dominating on the mound, Slatten is getting it done at the plate with a .422 average and 17 RBI. TOM SKEEN/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Former Texan leads OH to promised land Team advances to play Fairborn By Tom Skeen tskeen@communitypress.com

GREEN TWP. — It has been a special year for the Oak Hills Lady Highlanders softball team. The girls won a sectional title after coming from behind to beat Loveland 6-3, May 15 behind a strong pitching performance from junior Lauren Slatten. “(She) and the freshmen class are all legit softball players,” coach Jackie Cornelius Bedel said. “In the past Oak Hills teams, especially softball, have been filled with good athletes, but not so much good softball players. Now they are legit all year-round softball players. We have kids knowing and understanding what it takes to be a top team.”

HIGHLANDER HIGHLIGHTS The 10th-seeded Lady Highlanders kept their magical postseason run alive and captured the district title May 19 with a 3-0 win over secondranked Clayton Northmont. Slatten struck out 12 and drove in a run. They advance to play Fairborn, at 5 p.m. Wednesday, May 23, at Northmont High School. It’s the farthest the team has advanced since 1997.

In three sectional games she has struck out 35, including her 300th of the season in an opening-round victory over Walnut Hills May 7. As of May 17, Slatten has 346 strikeouts on the season, nearly 200 more than anybody else in the Greater Miami Conference and 47 more than anybody in the city. She sports a 17-11 record,

with a 1.33 ERA and five shutouts in 194.1 innings. “It’s natural gift, but a lot of players could do it,” Cornelius Bedel said. “She pursued it. She goes to the extra lessons and plays over 100 games in the summer. They are taking their talents and pushing it to the next level.” What makes it even more amazing is this is Slatten’s first year with the Lady Highlanders after moving from Elgin, Texas, where she pitched for the Elgin Lady Cats for two seasons. While at Elgin, she rang up 224 strikeouts in two years, boasted a 0.80 ERA and help her opponents to a .126 batting average. She was seen as the team’s ace before her move to Cincinnati. The junior is getting it done at the plate as well. She ranks second on the team with a .422 average, 17 RBI and 35 hits.

GREEN TWP. — Starting a program is a process. That is exactly what Oak Hills lacrosse coach Brandon Sipes did this season, leading his Highlanders to a 15-5 record. “I think (this season) went really good,” Sipes said. “The kids learned a lot. They have grown as a team and to have 14 kids who had never played the game, to come out with a record like that, it’s outstanding.” With the Ohio High School Athletic Association basically giving coaches the ability to create their own schedule and with such a young team and the program being in its first season, Sipes scheduled mainly junior varsity and club teams. Some of their big wins came against the Lakota East, Sycamore and Fairfield junior varsity teams, as well as the Elder freshmen team. “We were thrown in as a varsity team right away,” Sipes said. “I figured why don’t we play junior varsity teams with 14 kids who had never played

and a lot of freshmen, and we can play some varsity club teams and go about it that way.” Freshmen Connor Swanger and Brian Kurtz, along with junior Danny Kurtz, made up the Highlanders’ defense. “We had an outstanding defense,” Sipes said. “Those guys played outstanding to help out the defense.” According to the first-year coach, junior goalie A.J. Moser kept the team in a lot of games. The teams leading scorer was freshman Conor Acus. The good news for Sipes, who said the team will play more club teams and Division II competition: He has the entire squad back next season. “Looking at how they played from the beginning of the season and how much we improved at the end, I think they can improve double from this season to next,” he said. “The way they overcame all the challenges this year, I think they have come a long way. They are always going to be able to improve, but it depends on how much they work in the offseason. You have to keep with it to keep the flow going. If they do that, I think they can come out and compete with some of the DII schools and club varsity teams.”

The Oak Hills lacrosse team gathers on the field for a pregame pep talk in its inaugural season at the school. The squad finished the season 15-5 and returns the entire team next season. THANKS TO ANGELA GREGORY

La Salle’s Bell, Hytchye leaving their mark Lancers earn 6th-straight GCL championship By Nick Dudukovich ndudukovich@communitypress.com

MONFORT HEIGHTS — Goodnatured ribbing. That’s what it is when La Salle High School track and field standouts Jaleel Hytchye and Tim Bell line up for the 100-meter dash. Before the gun sounds, Hytchye and Bell like to put each other on notice that they’re in for a tight race. Bell likes to let Hytchye know he’s coming for him, while Hytchye likes to tell his teammate that he’ll be the one to come out on top. That’s usually when Bell, who is a sophomore, reminds the upperclassman that he took first

place at the first meet of the year. “He beat me in the first meet. I was mad, and I never let him beat me again,” Hytchte said with a laugh. At the GCL Championships May 12, Hytchye took first in the 100 (11.10), while Bell took second (11.33). Together, they helped La Salle win its sixth-straight league title. Hytchye garnered track athlete of the year honors after taking first place in the 100-, 200(22.24) and 400-meter (48.71) dashes. His 400 time was his personal best. Bell was named field athlete of the year after taking the top spot in the long (21-04) and high jump (6-03). “A lot of great athletes in the past have won the award, and I think the GCL is one of the best conferences in all of America and all-around in sports,” Hytchye said. “Being the athlete of the year meant a lot to me.”

After winning the 800-meter relay at the GCL Championships May 12, La Salle's Devon Steagall (top, left), Antonio Nelson (top, right), Jaleel Hytchye (bottom, left) and Tim Bell (bottom, right) won the 200 relay at the Winton Woods sectional May 16. THANKS TO

GREG TANKERSLEY

Bell never expected to have this type of success so early in his prep career. “It’s great. I never thought as a kid before I came to La Salle I’d get anything like this,” Bell said.

“I was hoping to do good, but having awards and all that is out of my mind. I wouldn’t have ever imagined it.” As the Lancers embark on the postseason, Hytchye is looking to

leave his mark on individual events after helping La Salle win the team state title as a member of the state championship 800meter relay team. “…I’m still trying to find that team title, but I’m still trying to win it on more individual efforts,” Hytchye said. Bell knows a run at the state long jump title could be tough, considering there are leapers around the state hitting the 23foot mark. He believes the high jump is where he might have the best chance for success, and he’s aiming for a spot on the podium. “I hope to make it to state for both events. I don’t know about winning, I’m hoping to make it to the meet this year and maybe next year win it,” he said. The duo also likes the chances of their 4x200-meter relay team, which placed first at the GCL meet with a time of 1 minute, 29.66 seconds.


SPORTS & RECREATION

A8 • WESTERN HILLS PRESS • MAY 23, 2012

TOURNAMENT HIGHLIGHTS

ON THE RUN

Tayler Godar, a senior at Taylor High School signs a letter of intent and receives a scholarship offer from Georgetown College in Kentucky for cross country and track. She ran cross country, track and was a swim team member during her high school career. THANKS TO JOE GODAR

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Baseball

» Elder came from behind to beat Loveland 8-7 in a Division I sectional final May 17. Senior Zack Coon earned the win, while Kevin Helmers went 3-4 with three RBI and a run scored. Elder scored six times in the third to overcome a three-run deficit and held off a Northmont comeback attempt late to beat the Thunderbolts 9-8 Saturday, May 19, and claim a Division I district championship at Centerville High School. The Panthers (22-8) advance to next week Thursday’s regional semifinals at UC against Vandalia Butler. Elder trailed 4-1 entering the bottom of the third inning but got a two-run single from senior Tyler Trame and a two-run double from senior Anthony Asalon as part of a six-run outburst. Both hits came with two outs. The Panthers scored six of their nine runs after two were out. Northmont (21-9) rallied to tie the score, 7-7, but Elder retook the lead for good on a two-out single by senior Kevin Helmers that drove in junior Jimmy White. Asalon walked and stole second in the fifth inning before scoring an insurance run on a single by senior David Haley. Northmont had the tying run at first base in the seventh inning but senior Andrew Crofton got the final out to seal the win.

Softball

» Oak Hills defeated Loveland 6-3 to win the Division I sectional title May 15 behind senior Lauren Slatten who struck out 12. Junior Devan Colebank was

Elder team captain Kevin Groll watches the serve all the way in as Elder hosted Milford in the second round of tournament play at Elder High School May 17. BRANDON SEVERN/FOR THE COMMUNITY PRESS

4-5 with a run batted in, which sophomore Sammy Sagers went 3-4 with a double and two RBI. The Lady Highlanders beat Northmont 3-0. They will play Fairborn at 5 p.m., Wednesday, May 23.

Girls lacrosse

» Seton beat Fenwick 16-5, May 17 in Division II playoff action. The Saints will play Indian Hill Tuesday after print deadline at Indian Hill.

Track

The following have advanced to the regional meet beginning May 23: Division I Boys » Western Hills: Darrell Bullock, 200-meter, fourthplace; Denzel Peters, 110-meter hurdles, third-place; 300-meter

hurdles, second-place. » Oak Hills: Kevin Konkoly, 400-meter, third-place; Blake Meyer, 1,600-meter, fourthplace; Bobby Dennis, discus, second-place. » Elder: Evan Vondermeulen, shot put, second-place; discus, third-place; Jake Taylor, discus, fourth-place; Joey Upton, high jump, third-place; Joe Ratterman, pole vault, firstplace. » La Salle: Jaleel Hytchye, 100, first; 400, second; 200, second; Jonathan Campbell, 110 hurdles, fourth; Tim Bell, high jump, first; long jump, fourth; Linnie Ayoki, shot put, third; 4x200 relay, second; Alex Murray, pole vault, second; Ben Vidourek, pole vault, fourth. Girls » Seton: Ashley Niemann, 200-meter, fourth-place; 4x100-, 4x200-, 4x400-meter relays; Ashley Eversole, long jump, fourth-place. » Mercy: Emma Hatch, 3200-meter, third-place; Erin Newell, shot put, second-place; Haley Baker, discus, third-place; pole vault, fourth-place. » Oak Hills: Gabriella Kain, 300-meter hurdles, third-place; Jenna Haarmeyer, 300-meter, fourth-place; 4x400-meter relay. Division II Boys » Taylor: Alec McCoy, shot put, fourth-place; Sam Harper, high jump, fourth-place.

Volleyball

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SPORTS & RECREATION

MAY 23, 2012 • WESTERN HILLS PRESS • A9

15th Showdown to include 42 football teams sspringer@communitypress.com

In-Game Sports, the owner and operator of the Skyline Chili Crosstown Showdown, announced the 15th anniversary schedule of prep football games on May 15 at the University of Cincinnati. The list includes 42 schools playing 21 games over a 10-day period and will utilize several venues. The 2012 event starts Aug. 17 at Dixie Heights High School with defending district champion Campbell County playing Covington Catholic at 6 p.m. The nightcap will feature Dixie Heights and defending district champ Newport Central Catholic at 8:30. The first Ohio game is

clashing with Oak Hills at 3 p.m. The Eagles made their Showdown debut a year ago with a win over Wyoming. Walnut Hills eventually made their first playoff appearance. At 5:30 on Aug. 25, Colerain takes on Ohio DI runner-up Pickerington Central. The final game of the day is an 8 p.m. kick-off between La Salle and Lakota West. However, there are more Aug. 25 games as Dayton’s Welcome Stadium will host four contests. Hamilton and Springfield start the day at noon, followed by Northmont and Princeton at 2:45. The third game is Wayne and Winton Woods at 5:30,

Following Anderson/ Sycamore, it’ll be Middletown and St. Xavier at 8:30 on Aug. 23. The Bombers advanced to the state semis last season, while the Middies feature Ohio State commit Jalin Marshall. On Friday, Aug. 24, Elder gets into the mix by hosting Centerville at “The Pit” at 7:30. Across the river, it’ll be a Northern Kentucky double-header with Simon Kenton hosting the Beechwood Tigers at 6. The late game is district champion Cooper against the defending Division 2A champion Holy Cross. The games return to Nippert Stadium Aug. 25, opening with Walnut Hills

town and Northwest will have a 7 p.m. kick-off at that 1,500 seat field. The same night, Anderson and Sycamore play at 6 p.m. at Nippert. “It’ll be a real challenge for us,” Sycamore coach Scott Dattilo said. “Anderson’s such a good program with great coaching. They’re not too far removed from a state championship and state runnerup (2007 and 2008).” It’s been a while since Sycamore’s been in the kick-off event and the Aves are happy to wear their green and gold on the big field. “When we told them we’d be playing in it, that was the first thing they asked me, ‘Are we going to be playing at UC?’,” Dattilo said.

Aug. 22 with Reading and Roger Bacon meeting at 5:30 at Colerain High School. Following that, at 8 p.m. will be Mount Healthy and North College Hill. Aug. 23 will shift the games to Sycamore where Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy and Madeira will have a rematch of their first-round playoff game. The Eagles spoiled the Mustangs’ perfect season last fall with a 16-10 victory. After that 5:30 game, Wyoming will square off under new head coach Aaron Hancock against Bishop Fenwick. A new wrinkle takes place Aug. 24 at UC’s Sheakley Athletics Complex, where the Bearcats use “the bubble” during the winter months. Finney-

By Scott Springer

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VIEWPOINTS A10 • WESTERN HILLS PRESS • MAY 23, 2012

Editor: Marc Emral, memral@communitypress.com, 853-6264

EDITORIALS | LETTERS | COLUMNS | CH@TROOM

bers must be under 21). Prizes given to the top three bands. Band Battle will take place on Saturday Aug. 11. First band goes on at noon, rain or shine. Band registration begins June 1 and ends Pamela Healy July 31. Call 513-369COMMUNITY PRESS 6095. GUEST COLUMNIST » Once Upon a Time – Discover popular fairy tales with fun activities. June 7, at 4 p.m. for ages 5-12. » Bubbles, Bubbles, Bubbles –. Join us for a bubbly blast as we enjoy fun with bubbles on Wednesday, June 13, at 2 p.m. for ages 12 and under. » I’ve Got Rhythm – Make an instrument and learn about creating your own beat on Thursday, June 21, at 2 p.m. for ages 5-12. » Animal Choirs – Hear the beautiful songs of frogs, toads, birds and insects with a Naturalist from the Hamilton County Park District on Monday, June 25, at 1:30 p.m. for all ages. » Rock Star Music Camp – Campers can choose from Wii Rock Band or PS3 DJ Hero and Guitar Hero and play like a star; Saturday, June 23, 2-4 p.m. for ages 12-18. Summer Reading has other great benefits for your family, too. Studies show that library summer reading programs can help prevent the loss of kids’ reading skills due to time away from school. Plus, by participating in Summer Reading along with your children, parents become reading role models. This is

ABOUT LETTERS AND COLUMNS We welcome your comments on editorials, columns, stories or other topics important to you in The Western Hills Press. Include your name, address and phone number(s) so we may verify your letter. Letters of 200 or fewer words and columns of 500 or fewer words have the best chance of being published. All submissions may be edited for length, accuracy and clarity. Deadline: Noon Friday E-mail: westernhills@community press.com Fax: 853-6220 U.S. mail: See box below Letters, columns and articles submitted to The Western Hills Press may be published or distributed in print, electronic or other forms.

one of the best ways to get your kids excited about reading. Sign up as a family and log your hours online or print out a log and track your reading on paper. It’s free, fun, and easy. Join the band today by registering online at www.CincinnatiLibrary.org/SummerRead/. Pamela Healy, pamela.healy@CincinnatiLibrary.org, is the Children’s Librarian at the Green Township Branch Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County, 6525 Bridgetown Road. She can be reached at 513-3696095.

MARCHING SAINTS

Members of the Saints for Life Club at Seton High School traveled to Washington, D.C., for the March for Life. Standing next to the St. Elizabeth Ann Seton stature inside the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception are, from left, Quinn Scheiner, Lexi Neltner, Sami Pragar, Rachel Watkins, Allie Mohan and Ellie Hahn. PROVIDED.

Ways you can help reduce smog With summer right around the corner, air quality concerns are on the radar but the Southwest Ohio Air Quality Agency is here to help you find ways to reduce smog. On your way to work you may see “Smog Alert” flashing on the highway boards. It is especially important on smog alert days to fuel your car after sundown and to avoid any unnecessary driving. Even on days when there is not a smog alert, it is important to be aware of your pollution output. Every step toward a more sustainable lifestyle is a step toward a greener community.

Maria Butauski COMMUNITY PRESS GUEST COLUMNIST

Here are some other smog-reducing tips: » Take the bus (METRO: 513-621-4455 or TANK: 859-331-8265). » Carpool; call 513241-RIDE. » Bike, walk or inline skate instead of driving. » Avoid using gasoline powered lawn equipment. » Keep your vehicle

maintained. » Do not leave vehicles running when not in use.

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Summer reading rocking in Green Twp. Get ready to rock and Read. The Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County wants you to get with the beat this summer and jam with our 39th annual Summer Reading Program. From June 1 to July 31, everyone – preschoolers, kids, teens, and grown-ups – is invited to join in the fun at a library location near you. Your family will flip for the prizes we have on the stage. Complete the first level of the program to receive a book. Keep reading to earn more prizes. Readers of all ages are eligible for chances to win family four-packs to a Cincinnati Reds game or tickets for performances by the Cincinnati Symphony and Pops orchestras. Be the lucky winner of a random drawing at your library location, and you could also win a grand prize. A grand prize will be awarded to one winner in all four age categories at each of our 41 locations. Preschoolers could win a LeapFrog Tag, kids and teens are eligible to win an iPod Touch and $25 Gold Star Gift Certificate, and adults can win a Sony e-Reader. Our lineup of programs will keep you and all of your family members reading until the stage lights fade. Save the dates for these programs you won’t want to miss at the Green Township Branch Library, 6525 Bridgetown Road, 369-6095. » Summer Reading Teen Kick-Off – Teens, help us kick off Summer Reading. We’ll have games, music, food and more. Friday, June 1, at 6:30 p.m. » Teen Battle of the Bands – Do you have a band? Want to get noticed? Open to any teen band (majority of the mem-

WESTERN HILLS

» Do not top off when refueling. » Avoid use of oil-based paints and stains. » Save electricity; if you’re not using it, turn it off. More importantly, spread the word about ways your family and friends can be more environmentally friendly. Small actions really can make a significant impact. Cleaner air helps everyone have a healthier lifestyle. Maria Butauski is a public relations intern at the Southwest Ohio Air Quality Agency. She can be reached at 513-946-7777.

5556 Cheviot Road Cincinnati, Ohio 45247 phone: 923-3111 fax: 853-6220 email: westernhills@communitypress.com web site: www.communitypress.com

Obesity epidemic threatens health $147 billion! In today’s financial world, we discuss the terms billion and even trillions, as inconsequential. Why $147 billion? That’s the amount we spend as a nation each year in direct medical costs as a result of obesity. Recent studies have predicted that by 2030, the rate of obesity in the U.S. could be over 40 percent. Here in Hamilton County, the numbers are even worse than what we see nationally. Twentytwo percent of our third-graders are obese. The adult obesity rate is 26 percent. While money is a good way to draw attention to the issue, Tim Ingram COMMUNITY PRESS the true heartbreak is in the human sufGUEST COLUMNIST fering brought on by obesity. Hamilton County Public Health recently had an opportunity to share a public preview of the current HBO series “Weight of the Nation.” I must admit that the film was shocking, moving and ultimately, scary. Our current generation of youth could likely be the first in recorded history to live shorter lives than the previous generation, entirely due to obesity. What’s fueling this epidemic? Government policies have helped make less-than-desirable foods inexpensive while healthy foods like fruits and vegetables are more expensive. Today’s portion sizes are larger. Soda and sugar-sweetened drinks are staples contributing thousands of empty calories to our diets. Concurrently, physical activity is on the decline. Combined with increased caloric intake, this is a deadly combination. Finally, we are bombarded with messaging from the food industry, to the tune of nearly $30 billion a year in advertising. As county health commissioner, it’s difficult for me to sit back and watch this epidemic progress because at the end of the day, most of it is preventable and ultimately reversible. There is no single answer. One comprehensive approach is the burgeoning WeTHRIVE! movement. WeTHRIVE! represents individuals and organizations joining together to make our communities, workplaces, schools and places of worship healthier. WeTHRIVE! has already worked with several communities in Hamilton County to develop safe and accessible play areas for children. Representatives have worked with convenience stores and produce distributors to include fresh foods in their product offerings. WeTHRIVE! ambassadors partner with schools, daycare centers and after-school activity facilities to include healthy foods, exercise opportunities and tobacco-free policies. A good place to start is with a visit to watchusthrive.org. Adopt a school or daycare facility and help them get healthy. Start a community garden. Work with your local convenience store to sell fresh foods. Encourage your families to incorporate physical activity into your daily regimen. Text HEALTH to 300400 and join the free Txt4Health program to receive text tips on healthy lifestyles. Let’s make the healthy choice the easy and affordable choice throughout Hamilton County. Tim Ingram is the health commissioner for Hamilton County.

Western Hills Press Editor Marc Emral memral@communitypress.com, 853-6264 Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday See page A2 for additional contact information.


WEDNESDAY, MAY 23, 2012

LIFE

WESTERN HILLS

PRESS

PEOPLE | IDEAS | RECIPES

At the Town Club lunch were, from left seated, Kay Hauer, Gail Huttenbauer, Barbara Bushman, Peggy Kahn; standing: Helle Hoermann, Mary Jo Barnett of Western Hills, Dana Glasgo, Joyce Foley, Margie Leis of Western Hills, and Mary Ann Robbe of Western Hills. THANKS TO EILEEN K. KNOLLMAN.

TOWN CLUB HONOR MEMBERS

T

he Town Club of Cincinnati, a prestigious women’s club formed in 1933, recently honored its members with 20 years or more of membership and support. They also recognized the past presidents. President Mary Jo Barnett, of Western Hills, presented the 20plus-year members with a long stem pink tulip and the past

Several 20-plus-year members of the Town Club attended the lunch. From left, seated, were: Kay Hauer, Adele Schiff, Peggy Kahn, Charlotte Deupree; standing: Nancy Clagett, Joyce Foley, Elizabeth Kuresman, Jayne Aglamesis, Jackie Lett-Brown, Jane Cox and Ester Binns. THANKS TO EILEEN K. KNOLLMAN.

presidents with a pink potted dahlia. At the close of the luncheon meeting, the newly elected president, Barbara Bushman, was presented the gavel by outgoing president Barnett. To thank Barnett for her two years of leadership, new Bushman gave her a bouquet of specially chosen spring flowers.

Outgoing president of the Town Club Mary Jo Barnett of Western Hills receives a bouquet from Barbara Bushman of the club’s board of directors. THANKS TO EILEEN K. KNOLLMAN. Past Presidents of the Town Club at the lunch were, from left, Kay Hauer 1984-85; Elizabeth Kuresman 1997-99; Jayne Aglamesis 1991-93; Eileen Knollman 2006-08; Peggy Kahn 1995-97; Yvonne Schrotel 2008-10; and Barbara Bushman 2004-06. THANKS TO EILEEN K. KNOLLMAN.

Mary Jo Barnett, a Western Hills resident, has been the president of the Town Club of Cincinnati for two years. THANKS TO EILEEN K. KNOLLMAN.


B2 • WESTERN HILLS PRESS • MAY 23, 2012

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD THURSDAY, MAY 24 Exercise Classes Spintensity, 5:45-6:45 p.m., Western Hills Sports Mall, 2323 Ferguson Road, Cycling combined with boot camp and strength training moves. Ages 14 and up. Family friendly. $8.50$10 per class. Presented by SpinFit LLC. 451-4905; www.spinfitcincinnati.com. Westwood. Gentle Beginners Ashtanga Vinyasa Flow Yoga, 7-8 p.m., EarthConnection, 370 Neeb Road, Gentle progression of postures to ease into a fulfilling Ashtanga practice. Each class engaging in a flow of asanas, creating a moving meditation of energy and heat. Family friendly. $7 drop-in, $30 for five-class pass, $49 for 10-class pass, $85 for 20-class pass. Presented by Yoga by Marietta. 675-2725; www.yogabymarietta.com. Delhi Township. Boot Camp, 7-8 p.m., Western Hills Sports Mall, 2323 Ferguson Road, Combination of strength training and conditioning that will help you improve strength, lower body fat, improve body composition and improve Aerobic and Anaerobic capacity. $10. Presented by Western Sports Mall. 451-4905. Westwood.

Recreation Thursday Night Lightz, 7 p.m.-12:30 a.m., Edgewater Sports Park, 4819 E. Miami River Road, Heads-up car and motorcycle drag racing, burnout competition, music, food and $1 beers. Gates open 6 p.m. $5 off at participating sponsors. $10; $15 to race, requirements available online. Presented by Thursday Night Lightz. 874-2508; www.facebook.com/ThursdayNightLightz. Cleves.

Senior Citizens Movement Class for Seniors, 11 a.m.-noon, Guenthner Physical Therapy, 5557 Cheviot Road, $6, first class free. 923-1700; www.guenthnerpt.com. Monfort Heights. Exercise to Music, 10-11 a.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, $1. 385-3780. Green Township. Open Bridge, 12:15-3:15 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, free. 385-3780. Green Township.

FRIDAY, MAY 25 Exercise Classes Tone and Strength, 9-10 a.m., Western Hills Sports Mall, 2323 Ferguson Road, Combination of upper body, lower body and core strengthening exercises mixed in with light conditioning and stretching. $10. Presented by Western Sports Mall. 4514905. Westwood.

Farmers Market Lettuce Eat Well Farmers Market, 3-7 p.m., Harvest Home Park, 3961 North Bend Road, Locally produced food items. Free. Presented by Lettuce Eat Well. 661-1792; www.lewfm.org. Cheviot.

Festivals St. Dominic Parish Festival, 6-11 p.m., St. Dominic Church, 4551 Delhi Road, Music by Tressler Comet. Bid and buy, raffle, bingo, games for all ages, entertainment and food. Major award is $15,000. Tickets are $20. Free. 471-7741; www.stdominicdelhi.org. Delhi Township. Price Hill Cultural Heritage Fest, Noon-6 p.m., Price Hill Will, 3724 St. Lawrence Ave., St. Lawrence Corner. Music, arts, culture and food from around the world show off Price Hill’s international heritage. Free. 251-3800; www.pricehillliving.com. Price Hill.

Music - R&B Basic Truth, 9:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m., Drew’s on the River, 4333 River Road, $3. 451-1157; basictruth.webs.com. Riverside.

Senior Citizens Pinochle, Noon-4 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, 385-3780. Green Township. Arthritis Exercise, Noon-12:45 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Workout to videos geared to help lessen arthritis symptoms. For seniors. Free. 385-3780. Green Township. Taking Off Pounds Sensibly, 10-11 a.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road,

Weight loss support and accountability. For seniors. $28 annual fee. 385-3780. Green Township.

ity Event, 6 p.m.-1:30 a.m., The Sedamsville Rectory, 639 Steiner Ave., With special guest Ben Hansen from SyFy channel’s “Fact or Faked: Paranormal Files.” Benefits Lost Limbs Foundation. $20-$100. Presented by Lost Limbs Foundation. 384-9793; www.lostlimbsfoundation.org. Sedamsville.

SATURDAY, MAY 26 Civic Yard Trimmings Drop-off, 11:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Kuliga Park, 6717 Bridgetown Road, Hamilton County residents may drop off yard trimmings. free to all Hamilton County Residents. Bring proof of residency. Landscapers and commercial establishments not eligible to participate. Free. Presented by Hamilton County Recycling and Solid Waste District. 946-7766; www.hamiltoncountyrecycles.org. Green Township.

Exercise Classes Tone and Strength, 9-10 a.m., Western Hills Sports Mall, $10. 451-4905. Westwood.

Farmers Market Lettuce Eat Well Farmers Market, 3-7 p.m., Harvest Home Park, free. 661-1792; www.lewfm.org. Cheviot.

Festivals

Exercise Classes Gentle Beginners Ashtanga Vinyasa Flow Yoga, 10-11 a.m., EarthConnection, $7 drop-in, $30 for five-class pass, $49 for 10-class pass, $85 for 20-class pass. 675-2725; www.yogabymarietta.com. Delhi Township. Vinyasa Flow Yoga for Fitness, 9-10 a.m., Western Hills Sports Mall, 2323 Ferguson Road, Practice ancient styles and modern mix of vinyasa flows, with integrated music. $10, free for members. Presented by Western Sports Mall. 451-4900. Westwood. Boot Camp, 9-10 a.m., Western Hills Sports Mall, $10. 451-4905. Westwood.

Festivals St. Dominic Parish Festival, 5-11 p.m., St. Dominic Church, Music by Excalibur. Spaghetti dinner in O’Connor Hall from 5-7:30 p.m. Free. 471-7741; www.stdominicdelhi.org. Delhi Township.

St. Jude Bridgetown Festival, 7 p.m.-midnight, St. Jude Church, 5924 Bridgetown Road, Rides, games, bid-n-buy and more. Friday: music by DJ Jeff Smith. Saturday: music by My Sister Sarah. Sunday: Family Day. Free. 574-1230. Bridgetown.

Music - Pop Nathan Schweitzer of Colerain Township was at last year’s “Thurzday Night Lightz” at Edgewater Raceway Park. Racing starts at 7 p.m. at Edgewater Sports Park, 4819 E. Miami River Road. FILE PHOTO. Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Wear comfortable workout attire and gym shoes. Bring water. $5. Presented by Deb’s Fitness Party. 205-5064; www.debsfitnessparty.com. Green Township.

TUESDAY, MAY 29 Exercise Classes

Historic 1795 Cabin and Schoolhouse, 2-5 p.m., Shawnee Lookout Park, 2008 Lawrenceburg Road, free, vehicle permit required. Presented by Hamilton County Park District. 521-7275; www.greatparks.org. North Bend.

Spinning, 5:45-6:45 p.m., Western Hills Sports Mall, 2323 Ferguson Road, Cycling class. First class free. Ages 14 and up. Family friendly. $8.50-$10 per class. Presented by SpinFit LLC. 451-4905; www.spinfitcincinnati.com. Westwood. Pilates Mat Class, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Guenthner Physical Therapy, 5557 Cheviot Road, Taught by Judy Fazel. Family friendly. $15 drop-in; $120 for 10 classes. 923-1700; www.guenthnerpt.com. Monfort Heights. Body Sculpt, 6-7 p.m., Western Hills Sports Mall, 2323 Ferguson Road, Divided into 15 minutes of cardio, 15 minutes of upper body toning, 15 minutes of core/ab toning and 15 minutes of leg toning. $10. Presented by Western Sports Mall. 451-4905; westernsportmall.com. Westwood. Boot Camp, 6-7 a.m., Western Hills Sports Mall, $10. 451-4905. Westwood. TRX training, 7-8 p.m., Western Hills Sports Mall, 2323 Ferguson Road, Consists of body-weight exercises to develop strength, balance, flexibility and core stability. $10. Presented by Western Sports Mall. 451-4905. Westwood.

Exercise Classes

Farmers Market

Yoga, 4-5 p.m., Guenthner Physical Therapy, 5557 Cheviot Road, Strengthen, stretch and tone with gentle postures that release tension rand support the integrity of the spine. Family friendly. $7 walk-in; $120 for 10 classes. 923-1700; www.guenthnerpt.com. Monfort Heights. Zumba, 10-11 a.m., Western Hills Sports Mall, 2323 Ferguson Road, Latin dance-inspired fitness program combines dance and aerobic elements to create fun and challenging workout. $10. Presented by Western Sports Mall. 451-4905. Westwood.

Sayler Park Farmers Market, 4-7 p.m., Sayler Park, Parkland Avenue and Monitor Street, Farmers Market with homegrown items like fruits, vegetables, desserts, salsas, relishes, jam and olive oil. Presented by Sayler Park Village Council. 675-0496. Sayler Park.

Literary - Libraries Gold Star Chilimobile, 12:30-3 p.m., Delhi Township Branch Library, 5095 Foley Road, Summer Reading rocks and Gold Star Chili rolls in your neighborhood this spring. Register for the 2012 Summer Reading program and get a free coney from the Gold Star Chilimobile courtesy of Gold Star Chili. Free. Presented by Public Library of Cincinnati & Hamilton County. 369-6019. Delhi Township.

SUNDAY, MAY 27 Civic Yard Trimmings Drop-off, 11:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Kuliga Park, free. 946-7766; www.hamiltoncountyrecycles.org. Green Township.

Education

Festivals St. Dominic Parish Festival, 3-11 p.m., St. Dominic Church, Music by Tommy & Hub. Chicken dinner in O’Connor Hall from 4-7 p.m. Free. 471-7741; www.stdominicdelhi.org. Delhi Township.

Holiday - Memorial Day Memorial Day Ceremony, 1-2 p.m., Veterans’ Memorial Park, 934 Neeb Road, Dedication of Killed-in Action Biographical Directory of 19 Killed-in-Action of Delhi. Speaker: LTC Shane Ousey (Iraq veteran) Color Guards, TAPS, 21-gun salute and patriotic songs. Grill-out after ceremony. Free. Presented by Delhi Township Veterans Association. 471-8693; www.delhiveterans.com. Delhi Township.

MONDAY, MAY 28 Exercise Classes Zumba, 5:30-6:30 p.m., Green

Health / Wellness Yoga for Healing, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Westwood Town Hall Recreation Center, 3017 Harrison Ave., Begin journey of healing physically, mentally and emotionally with certified yoga teacher, Michelle HsinYi, through mixed yoga styles to bring more strength and flexibility to the body and learn various breathing techniques to restore balance in the mind. First class free. $8. Registration required. 662-9109. Westwood.

Senior Citizens Movement Class for Seniors, 11 a.m.-noon, Guenthner Physical Therapy, $6, first class free. 923-1700; www.guenthnerpt.com. Monfort Heights. Quilting, 9:30-11:30 a.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Make blankets to donate to Project Linus and Children’s Hospital. For seniors. 385-3780. Green Township. Exercise to Music, 10-11 a.m., Green Township Senior Center, $1. 385-3780. Green Township. Ceramics, 11:30 a.m.-3 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, 385-3780. Green Township. Stability Ball, 9:30-10 a.m., Green Township Senior Center,

Saffire Express, 9 p.m.-1:30 a.m., Jim & Jack’s on the River, 3456 River Road, $5. 251-7977; www.jimandjacks.net. Riverside.

Senior Citizens

ABOUT CALENDAR To submit calendar items, go to www.cincinnati.com and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to life@communitypress.com along with event information. Items are printed on a spaceavailable basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to www.cincinnati.com and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page. 3620 Epley Road, Bring your own stability ball and work on strengthening your core. For seniors. 385-3780. Green Township. Euchre, 12:30-3:30 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Open game. For seniors. 385-3780. Green Township. Pattern Dancing, 1-2:30 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Learn line dancing and have fun while exercising. For seniors. Free. 385-3780. Green Township. Billiards, 1:30-3:30 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, free. 385-3780. Green Township.

WEDNESDAY, MAY 30 Exercise Classes Women and Weights, 6-7 p.m., Western Hills Sports Mall, 2323 Ferguson Road, Program specifically designed for women. Maintain bone density, increase metabolism and discover health benefits of weight training. Family friendly. $7.50-$10. Presented by SpinFit LLC. 4514905; www.spinfitcincinnati.com. Westwood. Power and Pump, 5:15-6 p.m., Western Hills Sports Mall, 2323 Ferguson Road, Simple, yet challenging cardiovascular and strength training exercises combined for total body workout. Family friendly. $7.50-$10. Presented by SpinFit LLC. 4514905; www.spinfitcincinnati.com. Westwood. Ashtanga Vinyasa Flow Yoga Classes, 5:30-6:45 p.m., EarthConnection, 370 Neeb Road, Sequence of postures to increase strength, flexibility and allow release of stress. Family friendly. $7 drop-in, $30 for five-class pass, $49 for 10-class pass, $85 for 20-class pass. Presented by Yoga by Marietta. 675-2725; www.yogabymarietta.com. Delhi Township. Yoga for the Back, 7-8 p.m., EarthConnection, 370 Neeb Road, Students use breath and movement to lengthen and strengthen the back muscles. Family friendly. $7 drop-in, $30 for five-class pass, $49 for 10class pass, $85 for 20-class pass. Presented by Yoga by Marietta. 675-2725; www.yogabymarietta.com. Delhi Township. Abs Express, 7-7:20 p.m., Western Hills Sports Mall, 2323 Ferguson Road, Racquetball Center. Work core like never before in quick class that will hit entire abdominal area. Free. Presented by SpinFit LLC. 4514905; www.spinfitcincinnati.com. Westwood.

Senior Citizens Strengthening and Range of Motion Class for Seniors, 10-11 a.m., Guenthner Physical Therapy, 5557 Cheviot Road, $6, first class free. 923-1700;

www.guenthnerpt.com. Monfort Heights. Pinochle, Noon-4 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3853780. Green Township. Vintage Artist, 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Place for artists to paint together. Beginners welcome. Bring own supplies. For seniors. Free. 385-3780. Green Township. Knitting and Crocheting, 10-11:30 a.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Knit or crochet blankets for Project Linus. Yarn provided. For seniors. Free. 385-3780. Green Township. Wood Carving, 1-3 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Carve with Greenwood Chippers. Many different techniques used: relief carvings, scroll saw, figurines. Bring own tools. For seniors. Free. 3853780. Green Township. Wii Bowling, 2-3:30 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, free. 385-3780. Green Township. Zumba Gold, 1-2 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Modified Zumba for seniors with standing and chair participation. For seniors. $3, $25 for 10 classes. 205-5064; www.debsfitnessparty.com. Green Township.

THURSDAY, MAY 31 Exercise Classes Spintensity, 5:45-6:45 p.m., Western Hills Sports Mall, $8.50$10 per class. 451-4905; www.spinfitcincinnati.com. Westwood. Gentle Beginners Ashtanga Vinyasa Flow Yoga, 7-8 p.m., EarthConnection, $7 drop-in, $30 for five-class pass, $49 for 10-class pass, $85 for 20-class pass. 675-2725; www.yogabymarietta.com. Delhi Township. Boot Camp, 7-8 p.m., Western Hills Sports Mall, $10. 451-4905. Westwood.

Recreation Thursday Night Lightz, 7 p.m.-12:30 a.m., Edgewater Sports Park, $10; $15 to race, requirements available online. 874-2508; www.facebook.com/ ThursdayNightLightz. Cleves.

Senior Citizens Movement Class for Seniors, 11 a.m.-noon, Guenthner Physical Therapy, $6, first class free. 923-1700; www.guenthnerpt.com. Monfort Heights. Exercise to Music, 10-11 a.m., Green Township Senior Center, $1. 385-3780. Green Township. Open Bridge, 12:15-3:15 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, free. 385-3780. Green Township.

FRIDAY, JUNE 1 Benefits Lost Limbs Foundation Char-

Pinochle, Noon-4 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3853780. Green Township. Arthritis Exercise, Noon-12:45 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, free. 385-3780. Green Township. Taking Off Pounds Sensibly, 10-11 a.m., Green Township Senior Center, $28 annual fee. 385-3780. Green Township.

SATURDAY, JUNE 2 Benefits Lost Limbs Foundation Charity Event, 6 p.m.-1:30 a.m., The Sedamsville Rectory, $20-$100. 384-9793; www.lostlimbsfoundation.org. Sedamsville.

Civic Yard Trimmings Drop-off, 11:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Kuliga Park, free. 946-7766; www.hamiltoncountyrecycles.org. Green Township.

Exercise Classes Gentle Beginners Ashtanga Vinyasa Flow Yoga, 10-11 a.m., EarthConnection, $7 drop-in, $30 for five-class pass, $49 for 10-class pass, $85 for 20-class pass. 675-2725; www.yogabymarietta.com. Delhi Township. Vinyasa Flow Yoga for Fitness, 9-10 a.m., Western Hills Sports Mall, $10, free for members. 451-4900. Westwood. Boot Camp, 9-10 a.m., Western Hills Sports Mall, $10. 451-4905. Westwood.

Festivals St. Jude Bridgetown Festival, 6 p.m.-midnight, St. Jude Church, free. 574-1230. Bridgetown.

Music - Blues Chuck Brisbin & the Tuna Project, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Poppy’s Tavern, 5510 Rybolt Road, free. Through July 28. 574-6333. Green Township.

SUNDAY, JUNE 3 Auditions Snoopy: The Musical, 2-5 p.m., Glenmore Playhouse, 3716 Glenmore Ave., Characters: Snoopy, Charlie Brown, Linus, Lucy, Sally, Peppermint Patty and Woodstock (silent). Bring headshot and resume. Prepare 16-32 bars of song in style of show. Performance dates: Oct. 5-21. Family friendly. Free. Presented by The Drama Workshop. 470-5516; www.thedramaworkshop.org. Cheviot.

Civic Yard Trimmings Drop-off, 11:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Kuliga Park, free. 946-7766; www.hamiltoncountyrecycles.org. Green Township.

Education Historic 1795 Cabin and Schoolhouse, 2-5 p.m., Shawnee Lookout Park, free, vehicle permit required. 521-7275; www.greatparks.org. North Bend.

Festivals St. Jude Bridgetown Festival, 4-10 p.m., St. Jude Church, free. 574-1230. Bridgetown.


LIFE

MAY 23, 2012 • WESTERN HILLS PRESS • B3

Rita shares friend’s tabouleh recipe Memorial Day is approaching and, with it, we honor our veterans. Rita It’s a day Heikenfeld for remembering all RITA’S KITCHEN those who have gone before us. Three generations of our family attend outdoor Mass at St. Philomena Church. My mom and dad are buried there, so afterwards I decorate their graves with mom’s mint along with marigolds and zinnias, my dad’s favorite flowers. Memorial Day signals the start of the picnic season, and these recipes fill the bill.

Helen Sarky’s tabouleh (tabooli salad) Helen and I are “sitties,” Lebanese grandmas. We both make tabouleh, the famous wheat and parsley salad. I’m sharing Helen’s today. This is a wonderful salad for that Memorial Day celebration. In fact, at the Lebanese Festival at St. Anthony of Padua Church, which is June 3 this year, it’s always one of the most popular offerings. “Sometimes I add seedless cucumbers. Everyone in my family loves it,” she told me. Like me, Helen uses small grape or leaf lettuce leaves as scoops. 1 cup of No. 1 fine bulghur wheat (cracked wheat) 2 bunches parsley 1 cup fresh mint leaves 6 green onions 6 fresh tomatoes Juice of 3 lemons ¼ cup oil Salt and pepper to taste

Rinse bulghur with tap water and drain well. Set aside. Pull leaves from parsley and chop. Chop mint. Dice onions and tomatoes into small pieces. Mix parsley, mint, onions and tomatoes with the wheat. Pour juice and oil in and mix well. Season to taste.

Wiedeman’s Pastry Shop kipfel (crescent nut cookies) When a reader asked

Mercy Health hosts film premiere

Eileen Baker’s butter pecan cake

Mercy Health wil lhave the the world premiere of “Until Sadie Blotz,” the second film written by and starring Mercy Health – West Park’s DaySTAE residents, who have Alzheimer’s disease and related dementia. Special guest Bob Herzog from WKRC-TV Local 12 will emcee the premiere, which includes dinner, from 6:30-8:30 pm on Thursday, May 24, at Receptions Conference Center, 3302 Westbourne Drive. In 2010, Emmy-nominated filmmaker Melissa Godoy teamed with residents of Mercy Health — West Park, a senior living community, to film the short documentary “Runaway Train.” Residents shared stories about their lives and Godoy picked common themes from the tales to craft a fun, WWII-era spy film for the residents to act out. The residents improvised their dialogue to great effect as the cameras rolled. The movie premiering on May 24 is Godoy’s second film with the residents and has been made possible

I tasted this at Fox 19 recently. Kenny Baker, one of our production crew, brought it in from his mom, Eileen. You can also use devil’s food cake mix. So good! 1 box butter pecan cake mix 3 eggs 1 stick melted butter 1 cup water 2 cans sweetened condensed milk ½ bag Heath candy bits, regular or chocolate

Cool tabouleh is perfect for warm-weather parties. THANKS TO RITA HEIKENFELD.

for this beloved cookie from the now-closed Fort Thomas, Ky., bakery, it brought on a slew of requests along with great memories from former customers. I spoke to Carole, sister of owner Pete Wiedeman, and she found a recipe close to what the bakery offered. I was going to use that recipe, but then I got really lucky. I was able to contact Pete, her brother, who owned the bakery and is now 86 years old. It has an interesting history. Their father was the head pastry chef at Hotel Metropole. He and his wife started the bakery in Cincinnati in 1940 and moved to Fort Thomas in 1941. All eight kids helped in the bakery. When Carole was 6 she counted raisins for fruitcakes. Pete eventually took over ownership and sold it after many years. He developed a kipfel recipe for the home cook. “I am amazed and thrilled that anyone would remember a cookie after 22 years,” he said. I know I’m making some readers very happy with this recipe. Thanks, Pete! 2 sticks softened margarine 1¼ cups shortening, like Crisco 1¼ cups sugar 1½ teaspoons vanilla 1 teaspoon salt 4 cups all-purpose flour 1 cup sliced natural almonds

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Cream marga-

rine, shortening, sugar, vanilla and salt until fluffy. Stir in flour and nuts. Blend well. Refrigerate dough overnight. It will be stiff, so take a lump about the size of a baseball and knead it a bit. Roll out strips about the thickness of a finger. Cut into about 1½-inch pieces. Shape as crescents. Place on ungreased cookie sheets. Pete gets about seven rows of seven cookies on each sheet. They will not spread. Bake until lightly browned (I would check after about 9 minutes and go from there) and when cool, roll in granulated sugar.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Mix cake mix, eggs, butter and water. Pour into sprayed 9-inch by 13-inch pan. Bake 25 minutes. Poke holes all over, pour one can milk over cake. Pour Heath candy over that. Pour other can of milk over candy. Let sit 20 minutes. Store in refrigerator. Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educator and author. Email her at columns@communitypress.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Call 513-2487130, ext. 356.

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You hold the keys to hope for your neighbors in need Proceeds from cars, trucks, motorcycles and RVs donated to St. Vincent de PaulCincinnati provide food, furniture, rent, utilities and free prescription medication to families in need in your neighborhood. Giving is easy and you may qualify for a tax deduction.

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in part by a grant from the Ohio Arts Council. It was created in the same manner and showcases the potential of people with Alzheimer’s disease in a unique and dignified way. “The filmmaking process allows the resident to enjoy the in-the-moment experience,” explains Amy Kruep, RN and co-creator of DaySTAE (which stands for Success Through Arts & Environment). “It is also a great way to help us live our motto, which is that persons with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementia do have the ability to create and add value to the world.” The DaySTAE program uses a tailored, therapeutic approach to activities designed to communicate meaning and purpose to participants and also to enhance the dignity and selfesteem of those struggling with Alzheimer’s and/or related dementia. The program includes TimeSlips, Memories in the Making (through a partnership with the Alzheimer’s Association), Creative Memories art classes, drumming circles, dance and improvisational theatre.

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LIFE

B4 • WESTERN HILLS PRESS • MAY 23, 2012

Consider full value moving insurance May is National Moving Month, the start the busiest time of the year for changing homes. But if you’re planning to move, there’s something you need to consider buying,

even if the move is only a short distance. Judy Woods and her husband were only moving from one part of Maineville to another. They hired a moving company and ev-

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erything went well at first. “The day after, I did laundry. I had done laundry Howard about a day Ain before we moved, I HEY HOWARD! cleaned the sheets and stuff like that they moved with. I noticed that the washer wouldn’t spin out,” Woods said. Woods said she called the moving company and reported it after the washing machine stopped working completely. “There was a young fellow named Jason who came out here, he was a mover.

He looked at it and he said he was going to have to call someone who worked on washers,” Woods said. She thinks the washer was damaged as a mover bounced the machine down a flight of steps in order to get it out of their other house. After a week, she says, a second man came to look at the washer, but “he said because the washer was too new he’d have to call someone who was used to working on new washers,” Woods said. However, no one ever showed up even though Woods says she called the moving company several times. “They’re not going to help us … We read the contract

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and thought there would be no problems that someone would come out and fix our washer and that would be the end of it – but no one came out,” Woods said. So two weeks after the move, Woods said she decided to replace the washer. She paid about $500 for a new machine because, she says, the moving company couldn’t seem to fix it and she really needed a washer. “We need to have our washer working. We’ve been to the laundromat now three times in between calls and it’s ridiculous,” Woods said. So I contacted the moving company and was told, “The Woods informed us they would hire a certified electrician to inspect the unit and would let us know the result. To date we had not heard the outcome of the inspection, and we had not denied any claims.”

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Fortunately, in this case the moving company has a good record with the Better Business Bureau and is a BBB member. Therefore, I suggested Woods file a complaint with the bureau and ask it to act as a mediator or arbitrator of this dispute. The American Moving Association recommends consumers purchase full replacement value insurance when they move. It does cost more upfront, but it can eliminate a lot of headaches if something goes wrong later. Any lost or damaged articles will be repaired or replaced, or a cash settlement will be made to repair the item or replace it at its current market value regardless of age. Without such insurance you’re limited to the coverage the mover provides and the minimum required coverage is just 60 cents per pound. That certainly will not cover the replacement cost of a washing machine or flat panel television. In fact, a new federal law for interstate moves requires the cost of full value protection to be included in the estimate you receive. Howard Ain answers consumer complaints weekdays on WKRC-TV Local 12. Write to him at 12 WKRC-TV, 1906 Highland Ave., Cincinnati 45219.

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Can Reverse Mortgages Work for Seniors? Reverse mortgages were originally designed as the final recourse to help cash-poor seniors stay in homes that are paid off. In recent years, however, housing market troubles have shown that home equity can offer seniors a financial cushion. As a result, it appears older homeowners are changing their attitude toward using reverse mortgages to manage their debt. According to AARP, a reverse mortgage is a loan that allows a homeowner age 62 or older to convert home equity into cash. The amount a senior can borrow is based on age, value of the home and interest rates. For an estimate, check out the calculator at rmaarp.com. No repayments are due as long as the homeowner lives in the house. A reverse mortgage is different from a conventional loan, according to the U.S. Department of Housing & Urban Development: • With a second mortgage or a home equity line of credit, borrowers must have adequate income to qualify for the loan and they make monthly payments on the principal and interest. • A reverse mortgage pays the homeowner, and there are no monthly principal and interest payments. The homeowner must pay real estate taxes, utilities and insurance premiums or face losing the home.

When the owner moves, such as to enter an assisted living facility, the house is sold. Proceeds go toward covering the loan plus all fees and interest that have accrued over time. It's no problem if the house sells for less than what the senior owes. But if the owner has used up all the money borrowed, the senior may end up in foreclosure late in life.

How close are we to a cure for cancer? In her case...About 15 miles.

Our advice Proceed with caution. The National Council on Aging (NCOA) is a nonprofit service and advocacy organization that strives to improve the lives of older adults. NCOA offers free information about reverse mortgages. Call (800) 510-0301 or visit www.ncoa.org and search for and download a guide called "Use Your Home to Stay at Home."

Despite remarkable progress in the fight against cancer, there are many cancer patients whose greatest challenge isn’t lack of treatment. It’s lack of transportation. To make sure that everyone who needs a ride gets one, the American Cancer Society is currently

The NCOA also manages an educational website that helps older middle- and low-income adults use their home equity wisely. Visit www.homeequityadvisor.org.

seeking volunteer drivers. If you have one or more mornings or afternoons free during the month, you can volunteer for this lifesaving program. A person can volunteer as often as he or she wishes. For information on how to volunteer, or if you need transportation assistance, call your American

Homeowners can specify their current situation, such as 'preparing for unplanned expenses,' to view possible solutions, then receive a personalized report with information, tools and consumer advice to protect the value of their home.

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LIFE

MAY 23, 2012 • WESTERN HILLS PRESS • B5

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DEATHS Carolee Snyder Black, 74, died May 14. She worked for Clippard Manufacturing. She was a former member of St. Ann

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Basic obituary information and a color photograph of your loved one is published without charge by The Community Press. Please call us at 853-6262 for a submission form. To publish a larger memorial tribute, call 242-4000 or pricing details. children; 14 great-grandchildren; many nieces and nephews. Preceded in death by husband Donald Cox Sr., sons Donald Jr., Robert Cox, sister- and brotherin-law Betty, Walt (the late Claudette). Services were May 16 at St. Dominic. Arrangements by Vitt, Stermer & Anderson Funeral Home. Memorials to the Hospice of Cincinnati or Alzheimer’s Association.

Parish. Survived by son Jeff (Carol) Black; grandchildren Christopher (Donna), Misty, Dom (Amber) Black; great-grandchildren Kyler, Garett Black. Services were May 18 at Rebold, Rosenacker & Sexton Funeral Home. Memorials to: Hospice of Cincinnati, 4310 Cooper Road, Cincinnati, OH 45242 or Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Cincinnati, 3949 Colerain Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45223.

Christine Daush M. Christine Aufdemkampe Daush, 59, died May 13. She was a frequent volunteer, including for the Cincinnati Zoo, Kindervelt, St. Antoninus Parish and St. Xavier High School. Survived by husband Stephen;

Charet Colter Charlet F. Colter, 45, Cheviot, died May 5. She was a homemaker. Survived by husband Mike “Mick” Campbell; children Colter Michael, Elizabeth Campbell; parents Clarence (Connie) Colter, Geraldine Wilson; siblings Robert Brumett, Clarence, Elizabeth Colter, Kelly Colter Eggers, Tonya Kirby. Services were May 15 at Ralph Meyer & Deters Funeral Home.

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sons Geoffrey, Brandon; siblings Leah (Francis) DeJoseph, Edward (Judith) Aufdemkampe; nieces, nephDaush ews and cousins. Services were May 17 at St. Simon the Apostle. Arrangements by Meyer Funeral Home. Memorials to: Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, P.O. Box 5202, Cincinnati, OH 45201 or Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park, 962 Mount Adams Circle, Cincinnati, OH 45202.

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Margie Cox Margaret “Margie” Bacon Cox, 85, Cheviot, died May 12. She was a homemaker. Survived by children ThomCox as (Kathleen) Cox, James (Colleen) Cox, Susan (Tony) Cox Burkhart; siblings Edward (Marie), Robert (Kathy), Larry (Pat), Jane (Robert), Jean (the late Edward); sister-in-law Joan (the late Donald); 17 grand-

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LIFE

B6 • WESTERN HILLS PRESS • MAY 23, 2012

DEATHS John Gundrum

Continued from Page B5

John William Gundrum, 80, died May 4. He worked for the Wm. Powell Valve Co. for 44 years. He was a member of Gundrum Heritage Community Church for 46 years, serving as a deacon. Survived by children Sandy (Bob) Parsons, John (Vickie) Gundrum, Edna (Bob) Willmann, Pam (Harry) Hall, Trish (Dave) Wall; grandchildren Elizabeth, Timothy, Eric, Amber, Jennifer, Sherry, Steven, Patricia, Samantha, Melissa, Melinda, Rob; 17 great-grandchildren. Preceded

Brenda Dicus Brenda Bennett Dicus, 56, died May 16. Survived by daughter Tammy Bennett; grandchildren AriDicus ana, Mariah, Nickolas; siblings Bernice, Patty, Melonie, Donna, Doug; companion and friend Pebbles. Preceded in death by parents Ovie, Grace Bennett, brother David Sr. Services were May 19 at Vitt, Stermer & Anderson Funeral Home. Memorials to the Hospice of Cincinnati.

in death by wife Alice, brothers Harvey, Edward, Earl. Gundrum. Services were May 10 at Heritage Community Church. Arrangements by Radel Funeral Home. Memorials to the Hospice of Cincinnati, Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Cincinnati or Neurofibromatosis Inc.

Patricia Hahn Patricia Flaherty Hahn, 86, West Price Hill, died May 11. She was a homemaker. Survived by daughters Joyce (Bob) McElroy, Kathy Hahn; grandchildren Melissa (John) Collins, Jennifer (Burke) Byer, Bobby McElroy; great-grandchildren Machlan, Catherine Flaherty Collins, Savannah, Colt, Rory Byer. Preceded in death by husband Lloyd Hahn. Servuces were May 16 at Our Lady of Victory. Arrangements by Radel Funeral Home. Memorials to: Children’s Hospital, P.O. Box 5202, Cincinnati, OH 452015202.

Elizabeth Kernan Elizabeth “Betty Ann” Cappel Kernan, 78, died May 11. Survived by children Kathleen (Melvin) Bedree, Brian (Anne) Kernan; grandchildren Joseph, Samuel, Helen Bedree, Michael,

Kernan

Megan Kernan; siblings Warren (Joan) Cappel, Dora (Lester) Weber. Preceded in death by husband Jerome Kernan, brother

Daniel Cappel. Services were May 18 at the Church of the Annunciation of the Blessed Virgin Mary. Arrangements by B.J. Meyer Sons Funeral Home. Memorials to: Mother of Mercy High School, 3036 Werk Road, Cincinnati, OH 45211 or Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Cincinnati, 11900 Conrey Road, Cincinnati, OH 45249.

Adam Kleinholz Adam Emil Kleinholz, 87, died May 11. He was a pipefitter and a member of the Local 392 for 63 years. He was a Navy veteran of World War II. Survived by children Mark (Phyllis), Adam (Nanci), Eric (Janet), Chris (Connie), Carl (Karen) Kleinholz, Karen (Mark) Swearingen, Lisa (Tom) Tanner, Marla (Ken) Wagner; brother Milton Kleinholz; 22 grandchildren; 16 great-grandchildren.

Preceded in death by wife Rosemary Kleinholz, siblings Barb Traum, John, Peter Kleinholz. Services were May 16 at Holy Family. Arrangements by Radel Funeral Home. Memorials to: Honor Flight, Attn: Diane Gresse, 300 E. Auburn Ave., Springfield, OH 45505.

Frederick Murdock Frederick P. Murdock, 88, Westwood, died May 12. Survived by children Fred C. (Mary Ann), Charles (Diane) Murdock, Louella (Bob) Canning, Ann (Ken) Fey; brother Louis Murdock; 10 grandchildren; 14 great-grandchildren. Preceded in death by wife Betty Jane Murdock, daughter Therese Murdock. Services were May 17 at St. Teresa of Avila. Arrangements by Neidhard-Minges Funeral Home. Memorials to the Hospice of Cincinnati.

Charles Nullmeier Charles Nullmeier, 56, Green Township, died May 11. Survived by wife Jennifer Nullmeier; daughter Alison Nullmeier; nephew Steven (Barb Brock) Nullmeier. Preceded in death by niece Sue Nullmeier.

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Carolee “Carol” Wagner Sager, 83, died May 2. She was an inspector for Leibel Flarsheim. Survived by grandchildren Sager Kyle, Courtney Luebbe; sister Adelia Wisbey; nephew James (Vickie Sandfoss) Wagner; grandniece and nephew Sadie Wagner, Matthew Sandfoss; friends Judy, Ken Ingram. Preceded in death by husband Frank Sager, son John Luebbe, daughter-in-law Carla Luebbe, parents John, Catherine Wagner, sister Clarice Wagner, former husband Arthur Luebbe. Services were May 9 at St. Peter & St. Paul United Church of Christ. Arrangements by Ralph Meyer & Deters Funeral Home.

Jennifer Sherman Jennifer Elizabeth Sherman, 20, died May 7. Survived by father John Sherman; sisters Jill, Megen Sherman; grandSherman mother May Agnes Taney; aunts and uncles Julie (Steve Roth) Gonella, Tim (Tiffany) Taney, Harlan Peck, Peggy, Bill, Joe (Belinda) Sher-

See DEATHS, Page B7

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LIFE

MAY 23, 2012 • WESTERN HILLS PRESS • B7

POLICE REPORTS

ABOUT POLICE REPORTS The Community Press publishes the names of all adults charged with offenses. The information is a matter of public record and does not imply guilt or innocence. To contact your local police department: » Cheviot: Chief Joseph Lally, 661-2700 (days), 825-2280 (evenings) » Cleves: Chief Bill Renner, 941-1212 » Cincinnati District 3: Capt. Russell A. Neville, 263-8300 » Green Township: Chief Bart West, 574-0007; vandalism hotline, 574-5323 » North Bend and Miami Township are patrolled by the Hamilton County: Sheriff Simon Leis, 825-1500

CHEVIOT Arrests/citations Dakota Sellers, 20, 7659 Bridgetown Road, forgery and passing bad check, May 14. Tonya Cipriani, 28, 6356 Gracely Drive, warrant, May 11. Juvenile, 17, carrying concealed weapon at 3301 Weavers Alley, May 11. Chris Bowden, 18, 3682 Hader Ave., obstructing official business and underage possession at 3301 Weavers Alley, May 11. Michael Williams, 28, 3801 Dina

Terrace, domestic violence, May 11. Bromlyn Douglas, 36, 4035 Homelawn Ave. No. 4, disorderly conduct at 4035 Homelawn Ave. No. 4, May 12. Samantha Slaven, 21, 7060 State Route 128, warrant, May 14. Deany Hampton, 27, 2323 Aquarius Drive, disorderly conduct, May 14. Thomas Clements, 39, 3157 Glenmore Ave., warrant, May 14.

Incidents/reports

Meyer & Deters Funeral Home.

man. Preceded in death by mother Mary Pat Sherman, grandparents Charles Taney, Bill, Marge Sherman, aunt Anne “Mickey” Peck, uncle Steven Taney. Services were May 15 at St. Teresa of Avila. Arrangements by Radel Funeral Home. Memorials to Seton High School or Margaret Rost School.

Mark Vollmer

Tom Stanley Tom Stanley, 55, died May 11. Survived by wife Barbara Slaten Stanley; daughter Star Bomar; parents Marjorie, Howard Stanley; sisters Julie Silva, Bonnie Stanley. Preceded in death by sister Sandra Harshberger. Arrangements by Gwen Mooney Funeral Home.

Charles Stratton Charles Gary Stratton, 74, died May 9. He was a flooring installer. Survived by Stratton son Charles (Colleen) Stratton; brother Bill Stratton; brother-in-law Daniel Koch; four grandchildren. Preceded in death by wife Mary Emma Stratton, parents Charles F., Lorraine Stratton. Services were May 14 at Ralph

Mark A. Vollmer, 55, Westwood, died May 4. He was a techVollmer nician for Cincinnati Testing Labs. He was an Air Force veteran. Survived by wife Therese Vollmer; siblings Gregory (Barbara), Jeffrey (Lynn), Lisa Vollmer. Preceded in death by parents Carl, Aura Vollmer. Services were May 19 at the Knights of Columbus, Mother Seton Council. Arrangements by Ralph Meyer & Deters Funeral Home.

James Westerfield James “Jay” Westerfield, 83, Green Township, died May 17. He was a veteran of Korea and a volunteer for Santa Maria Community Services.

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See POLICE, Page B8

SOUTHERN BAPTIST

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DEATHS Continued from Page B6

Criminal damaging Five storage lockers damaged in apartment building at 3954 Washington Ave., May 10. Theft

Survived by wife Ethel Westerfield; sons Ed (Bev), Jim (Diane), Mike (Michelle) Westerfield; grandchildren Westerfield J.T, Kristin, Mitch, Jennifer, Paige, Mark, Zachary, Maggie Westerfield; brothers Tom,

Robert Westerfield. Preceded in death by brother Richard Westerfield. Services were May 21 at Our Lady of Victory. Arrangements by Meyer & Geiser Funeral Home. Memorials to: Elder High School Scholarship Fund, 3900 Vincent Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45205 or Hospice of Cincinnati, 4310 Cooper Road, Cincinnati, OH 45242.

On this Memorial Day let us remember that this day signifies, perhaps more deeply than any other patriotic observance, the soul of America. The patriots to be remembered on this day represent every generation of Americans. They fell in battles widely separated by distance and time. Some came from families long established in America; many others were new to the land. These patriots differed in color, in religious beliefs, in political faith and other ways which historically have divided the human family. Yet, all had this in common; they loved their country and they died to make men free. And so, on this Memorial Day, lets us solemnly pay tribute to these fallen heroes… Let us spare a prayer of thanksgiving that there have always been men and women willing to offer the ultimate sacrifice so that our national ideals could endure… Marilyn Holt

3440 Glenmore Avenue, Cheviot 661-0690 CE-0000508088 www.gumpholtfuneralhome.com

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LIFE

B8 • WESTERN HILLS PRESS • MAY 23, 2012

POLICE REPORTS Continued from Page B7

May 8. David Roper, born 1987, criminal trespassing, obstructing official business, resisting arrest, 1924 Westmont Lane, May 8. Janet P. Kelly, born 1950, assault, 4829 Prosperity Place, May 8. Melissa Brown, born 1974, telecommunication harassment, violation of a temporary protection order, 3203 Gobel Ave., May 8. Myriam A. Konate, born 1992, disorderly conduct, 1659 First Ave., May 8. Nickolas Woodard, born 1980, criminal trespassing, obstructing official business, 1915 Westmont Lane, May 8. Ralph Stacey, born 1963, theft under $300, 5712 Glenway Ave., May 8. Ricky A. Weiler, born 1959, possession of drugs, 1914 Westmont Lane, May 8. Tony Campbell, born 1986, drug abuse, misdemeanor drug possession, possession of drug paraphernalia, possession of an open flask, trafficking, 1659 First Ave., May 8. Aneisha Williams, born 1989, assault, theft under $300, 6150

bine Avenue, May 12.

CINCINNATI DISTRICT 3 Arrests/citations

Don’t miss Cincinnati.com’s Metromix Stage at Taste of Cincinnati 2012! Along with a great band lineup, there will be more than 40 restaurants gathered along 6 blocks of 5th Street in downtown Cincinnati Memorial Day Weekend: Saturday and Sunday, May 26 & 27, Noon – Midnight and Monday, May 28, Noon – 9pm. Cost is FREE!

Derrick Clemens, born 1970, possession of an open flask, 2767 Queen City Ave., May 3. Steven M. Schroot, born 1967, possession of an open flask, 6150 Glenway Ave., May 3. Kelly J. Nolan, born 1971, disorderly conduct, 709 overlook Ave., May 5. Michael Gerald Hoersting, born 1959, possession of an open flask, 3165 Harrison Ave., May 6. Brandon K. Hall, born 1987, carrying concealed weapons, trafficking, possession of an automatic weapon, 2300 Ferguson Road, May 8. Christopher W. Roark, born 1980, vicious dog, 948 Edgetree Lane, May 8. Clifton Lail, born 1986, carrying concealed weapons, having a weapon under disability, misdemeanor drug possession, trafficking, 2300 Ferguson Road,

Maury’s

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Saturday, May 26th

1:00 - 2:00 Faux Frenchmen 2:30 - 3:30 Cincy Brass 4:00 - 5:00 Cincinnati Museum Center 5:30 - 6:30 Magnolia Mountain 6:30 - 7:30 The Kickaways 8:00 - 9:00 Nicholas & The Pessimistics 9:30 - 11:00 Grooveshire

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Glenway Ave., May 9. Chris Curry, born 1988, domestic violence, 1713 First Ave., May 9. Deangelo T. Tait, born 1972, domestic violence, 2874 Shaffer Ave., May 9. Jason Elder, born 1976, misdemeanor drug possession, 2400 Harrison Ave., May 9. Johanna M. Smallwood, born 1985, theft under $300, 2310 Ferguson Road, May 9. Kristen Kurtz, born 1982, drug abuse, possession of drug paraphernalia, 3201 Harrison Ave., May 9. Lozerik Boyd, born 1981, falsification, 3134 Harrison Ave., May 9. Marcus Barker, born 1980, criminal trespassing, 1126 Alcliff Lane, May 9. Deandre M. Shannon, born 1991, obstructing official business, trafficking, 1820 Sunset Ave., May 11. Pedro Mercer, born 1993, burglary, 4300 Glenway Ave., May 11. Toriauna Anderson, born 1992, burglary, 4300 Glenway Ave., May 11. Bernard D. Morgan, born 1986, domestic violence, violation of a temporary protection order, 3755 Westmont Drive, May 12. Clark Martin, born 1980, theft under $300, 6150 Glenway Ave., May 12. Elizabeth Wadlinger, born 1984, possession of drug abuse instruments, 1031 Beech Ave., May 12. Lindsey Marie Meier, born 1986, theft under $300, 6150 Glenway Ave., May 12. Brandon Jenkins, born 1989, theft under $300, 2322 Ferguson Road, May 13. Charles Arnold James, born 1954, burglary, violation of a temporary protection order, 1159 Coronado Ave., May 13. Jeanine Adjei, born 1980, assault, possession of drug paraphernalia, 3980 Yearling Court, May 13. Joseph Robert Coldiron, born 1980, possession of drug abuse instruments, 6165 Glenway Ave., May 13.

See DEATHS, Page B9

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LIFE

MAY 23, 2012 • WESTERN HILLS PRESS • B9

Two arrested in Cleves copper thefts Police arrested two men for allegedly scrapping 1,100 pounds of copper sheeting taken from the ETown Recycling Company, Highway 50, North Bend. Hamilton County Chief Deputy Sean Donovan said in a press release the two arrested were Santana Jones, age 40, of the 3400 block of Lawrenceburg Road, North Bend, and Ryan Gerhardt, age 21, of the 8100 block of West Mill Street, Cleves. Both were charged with receiving stolen property and breaking and entering and arrested May 14 at their homes. Police say the two men entered the gated property of William Kramer & Sons on Harrison Avenue in Cleves after 10:30 p.m. May 4 by cutting barbed wire on the fence and climbing over. Once inside the property, police say the men used a forklift and winch on the property to break into secured areas, giving them access to high end tools and copper sheeting.

POLICE REPORTS Continued from Page B8 Kirk Long, born 1971, theft under $300, 6000 Glenway Ave., May 13. Melissa S. Thomas, born 1984, assault, 2732 East Tower Drive, May 13.

Gerhardt

man, of the sheriff’s criminal investigation section, obtained video surveillance from Kramer & Son and distributed photos from the video to the media and local law enforcement officers, resulting in tips identifying Jones and Gerhardt as the two suspects. Detective determined Jones and Gerhardt had scrapped 1,100 pounds of copper sheeting at the ETown Recycling Co. Jones scrapped 578 pounds and Gerhardt 522 pounds, al-

Jones

Police say the men also went through toolboxes on other vehicles on the property, loading all of the stolen property into a 2008 Chevrolet truck belonging to Kramer & Son. The truck was then used to pull down to fences, allowing the subjects to drive off the property. The truck was later located in the area of Mount Nebo and Lawrenceburg Road. There was damage done to the truck and all of the stolen property was gone. Detective Mike Peters-

most exactly the total weight stolen from Kramer & Son. The copper sheets were already destroyed. Police said none of the tools and power equipment stolen from Kramer & Son has been recovered. The missing property consists of Stihl gas saws and blades, DeWalt impact wrench/tool, side mounted tool boxes, Sony digital recorder, three generators, and other miscellaneous property valued at approximately $10,840. The stolen

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Incidents/reports Aggravated burglary 3751 Westmont Drive, May 5. Aggravated menacing 1024 Winfield Ave., May 5. 5101 Colerain Ave., May 6. 4868 Hawaiian Terrace, May 8. Aggravated robbery 2680 Hillvista Lane, May 10. Assault 2446 Boudinot Ave., May 10. 2953 Boudinot Ave., May 10. 1907 Wyoming Ave., May 4. 5131 Glenway Ave., May 4. 5396 Bahama Terrace, May 5. 4878 Hawaiian Terrace, May 6. 2545 Montana Ave., May 7. 4829 Prosperity Place, May 8. 2600 Montana Ave., May 8. 1504 W. North Bend Road, May 8. 5300 Colerain Ave., May 8. 2725 Hillvista Lane, May 9. Breaking and entering 3156 Glenmore Ave., May 4. 5315 Colerain Ave., May 5. 6255 Banning Road, May 6. 6273 Collegevue Place, May 7. 1054 Coronado Ave., May 8. 3991 Yearling Court, May 8. 5604 Colerain Ave., May 8. 1113 Alcliff Lane, May 9. Burglary 1318 Manss Ave., May 4. 4515 Clearview Ave., May 4. 3905 Boudinot Ave., May 4. 1024 Winfield Ave., May 5. 4725 Rapid Run Road, May 5. 5916 Lantana Ave., May 5. 2665 Wendee Drive, May 6. 2809 Temple Ave., May 7. 1622 Elkton Place, May 7. 6431 Hamilton Ave., May 8.

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and destroyed copper sheets replacement value is about $7,007. The cost of repairs to the property, including fences, gates and doors, was estimated at $10,561.

Anyone with additional information about this offense or the location of the stolen property is asked to call the sheriff’s office at 513-825-1500 or CrimeStoppers at 513-352-3040.

LEGAL NOTICE INVITATION FOR BID Sealed proposals shall be addressed to and will be received by the Fiscal Officer of Green Township at the Administrative Complex, 6303 Harrison Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45247-6498 until June 7, 2012 at 3:00 P.M. for the following Township work Green Township 2012 Street Rehabilitation Contract. Detail information for the work may be obtained at the Office of the Assistant Director of Public Services. Cost for bid package will be $25.00 non-refundable. For more information please call 574-8832. Furnishing all necessary labor, materi als, and equipment for Green Township 2012 Street Rehabilitation Contract. The contract consists of 19 streets with a total length of 3.693 miles. All work is to conform to current State of Ohio Department of Transportation Construction and Materials Specifications with supplements and changes thereto. Each proposal must be accompanied by a hundred percent bid guarantee bond or a certified check, cashier’s check or letter of credit on a solvent bank in an amount equal to ten percent of the bid, conditioned that the bidder shall, if his bid is accepted, execute a contract in conformity to the invitation and his bid. Bidders must use the printed forms provided. The bidder to whom the contract is awarded will be required to furnish a Corporate Surety Company Bond in a sum equal to one hundred percent of the total bid price, conditioned according to the law. All contractors and subcontractors involved with the project will, to the extent practicable use Ohio Products, materials, services, and labor in the implementation of their project. Additionally, contract compliance with the equal employment opportunity requirements of Ohio Administrative Code Chapter 123, the Governor’s Executive Order of 1972, and Governor’s Executive Order 849 shall be required. Bidders must comply with the prevailing wage rates on Public Improvements in Hamilton County and the (Green Township, Hamilton County), Ohio as determined by the Ohio Bureau of Employment Services, Wage and Hour Division, (614)644-2239 The Trustees of Green Township, Hamilton County, Ohio, reserve the right to reject any or all bids, or to accept or reject any part thereof. Attest: David Linnenberg, Chairman Thomas J. Straus, Fiscal Officer Close of Bidding: 3:00 p.m., June 7, 2012 1705726 LEGAL NOTICE INVITATION FOR BID Sealed proposals shall be addressed to and will be received by the Fiscal Officer of Green Township at the Administrative Complex, 6303 Harrison Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45247-6498 until June 7, 2012 at 2:30 P.M. for the following Township work Green Township 2012 Curb Rehabilitation Contract. Detailed information for the work may be obtained at the Office of the Assistant Director of Public Services. Cost for bid package will be $25.00 non-refundable. For more information please call 574-8832. Furnishing all necessary labor, materi als, and equipment for Green Township 2012 Curb Rehabilitation Contract. The contract consists of 14 streets with a total area approximately 22,000 lineal feet. All work is to conform to current State of Ohio Department of Transportation Construction and Materials Specifications with supplements and changes thereto. Each proposal must be accompanied by a hundred percent bid guarantee bond or a certified check, cashier’s check or letter of credit on a solvent bank in an amount equal to ten percent of the bid, conditioned that the bidder shall, if his bid is accepted, execute a contract in conformity to the invitation and his bid. Bidders must use the printed forms provided. The bidder to whom the contract is awarded will be required to furnish a Corporate Surety Company Bond in a sum equal to one hundred percent of the total bid price, conditioned according to the law. All contractors and subcontractors involved with the project will, to the extent practicable use Ohio Products, materials, services, and labor in the implementation of their project. Additionally, contract compliance with the equal employment opportunity requirements of Ohio Administrative Code Chapter 123, the Governor’s Executive Order of 1972, and Governor’s Executive Order 849 shall be required. Bidders must comply with the prevailing wage rates on Public Improvements in Hamilton County and the (Green Township, Hamilton County), Ohio as determined by the Ohio Bureau of Employment Services, Wage and Hour Division, (614)644-2239 The Trustees of Green Township, Hamilton County, Ohio, reserve the right to reject any or all bids, or to accept or reject any part thereof. Attest: David Linnenberg, Chairman Thomas J. Straus, Fiscal Officer Close of Bidding: 2:30 P.M.., June 7, 2012 1705736


LIFE

B10 • WESTERN HILLS PRESS • MAY 23, 2012

Lourdes students make annual Trek for Tech

2012 Environment Contest Winners Announced The top entries presented their project ideas on how to improve their local watershed

By Kurt Backscheider kbackscheider@communitypress.com

Thank you to all of the students, teachers and volunteers who participated. In a verbal competition on May 5, 2012, at the Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Garden the top entries presented their project ideas on how to improve their local watershed. Sanoma Capps, Julia Love and Janae McClair from Arlington Heights Academy placed first in the 9-12th grade competition for their idea to plant a rain garden to filter runoff from I-75. Each of the top contestants won a cash prize plus a matching cash prize for their school. $12,000 was awarded to Hamilton County students and schools. Agrium will also provide $10,000 to help students implement their ideas.

Turning ideas into realistic solutions is the key to improving our local watersheds

Caring for our Watersheds 9-12 Category Award

Student Name(s)

Proposal Name

School

1st

$1,000

Sanoma Capps, Julia Love & Janae McClair

A Rain Garden for I-75 Runoff

Arlington Heights Academy

2nd

$900

Daniel Kruzel & Luke Groene

Impervious Surface Runoff

Loveland High School

3rd

$800

Jasmyn Fuson, Jonathan Simms & Samantha Miracle

Pervious Pavers

Loveland High School

4th

$700

Taryn Heidel & Noah Yasgur

The Sharon Woods Project

Sycamore High School

5th

$600

Libby Graham, Katie Jonas & Emily Knue

Promoting Natural and Organic Lawn Care

WM Henry Harrison High School

6th

$500

Ben Iaciofano, Alex Anderson, Carley Wallace & Maddy Jones

Rain Gardens

Loveland High School

7th

$450

Megan Day & Kate Randall

Be Pesticide and Fertilizer Smart

Loveland High School

8th

$400

Elliott Higgins & Nathan Gorman

Project Clarify

McNicholas High School

9th

$350

Mitchell Casperson, Paige Raterman, Matt Vogt & Lauren Thomas

Adopt-A-Stream

Loveland High School

10th

$300

Gabrielle Quesnell & Michelle Rowekamp

Caring for our Watersheds

McNicholas High School

Students at Our Lady of Lourdes School had a picture perfect day for continuing a spring tradition. The school hosted its annual Trek for Tech fundraiser Friday, May 18, where students enjoyed sunny, 70-degree morning weather as they walked around the Lourdes campus for two hours to raise money to support the school’s technology needs. Lourdes Principal Aimee Ellmaker said this is the 10th year the PTO has organized the walk. Students gather pledges for their trek, and she said all the money raised goes toward purchasing servers, computers, software, Smart boards and projectors for the school. “It’s really a community effort,” she said. “This has become a tradition here.” Many parent volunteers turn out to ensure the event runs smoothly and man the variety of booths children stop at along the walk route, she said. This year’s theme was “Tropical Paradise.” Students donned sunglasses and other beach accessories, and as they made their

Parent volunteer Melissa Flohre, left, of Westwood, places a temporary flamingo tattoo on the cheek of Our Lady of Lourdes first-grader Rose Danenhauer during the school’s Trek for Tech event Friday, May 18. This year's fundraiser had a tropical theme. KURT BACKSCHEIDER/THE COMMUNITY PRESS forward to it every year. “It’s so nice to see everyone come out to support our school,” Leesman said. “It’s a great day and it’s so much fun.” Ellmaker said she loves listening to the students laugh and seeing their snow cone-stained smiles as they walk with their classmates. “It’s their last hurrah before the end of the school year and they move on to the next step in their journey,” she said. “We usually go home dancing.” She said this year’s trek was projected to raise about $11,000 for the school.

way around the campus they took part in activities like the limbo booth, the photo booth, a cornhole booth and a misting booth. A DJ provided musical entertainment throughout the walk and students snacked on treats like snow cones and popcorn. “It’s a festival atmosphere,” Ellmaker said. “The kids get so excited.” Heather Leesman, a PTO member who helps organize the walk with fellow members Jenn Bruce, Shawna Smith and Lisa Waltz, said this is the sixth year she’s been involved with the event and she looks

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