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UNION

RECORDER

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Union, Richwood and Walton 75¢

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2013

WINNING RUN A10 Crusaders take title

BECAUSE COMMUNITY MATTERS

Union theater group plans ‘Wonderful’ production Show was held over from last year By Stephanie Salmons ssalmons@nky.com

Boy Scout James Blazina and American Legion junior Johnathan Jenkins place American flags at the entrance to the Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport Nov. 9 in honor of Veterans Day. STEPHANIE SALMONS/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Scouts’ flags honor veterans By Stephanie Salmons ssalmons@nky.com

HEBRON — It was a bright and windy autumn morning at the Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport as Florence Boy Scouts and the Sons of the American Legion honor veterans. The Sons of the American Legion Squadron 4 partnered with Florence Boy Scout Troop No. 1 to place flags at the entrance of CVG Nov. 9. “We should never forget the people who gave us our freedom,”

Squadron 4 commander Norbert Lankheit said. Working with the scouts not only offers a chance for community involvement, but also “lets them know what the flag’s about, what it stands for,” he said. Scout Steven Boemker, 16, said it was important to place flags at the airport because of Veterans Day and because “it shows our support” for veterans who have served the country. “They deserve our respect and they need to be recognized for all the stuff they’ve done to keep us

safe and have our freedoms,” he said. “I believe it is important to put these out here because the veterans risked their lives and gave us our freedom, so we are honoring and respecting them by putting out the flags,” said Stephen Lee, 13. Those thoughts were echoed by James Blazina, 13. “I feel that it is important to recognize the veterans because they have helped us gain freedom and keep that freedom,” he said.

The Sons of the American Legion Squadron 4 and Florence Boy Scout Troop No. 1 to place flags at the Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky Airport

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STEPHANIE SALMONS/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

UNION — Get into the holiday spirit with a Christmas classic when the Union Community Theatre presents “It’s a Wonderful Life.” Performances are planned for 8 p.m. Thursday through Saturday, Dec. 5-7, and 2 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, Dec. 7-8, at the Union Community Building, 10087 Old Union Road. According to director Amanda Emmons, the theater group was founded to share a “love of arts and quality theater in Northern Kentucky.” “As a child, I grew up watching ‘It’s a Wonderful Life’ every Christmas Eve,” she said. “It was a family tradition. This movie is a tradition and a classic part of many homes. We believed this would be a great way of sharing the love of theater with the community through a show that is well-loved.” The show was postponed from last year because of a scheduling conflict with Ryle High School’s auditorium, executive producer Karen Franxman said. Union Community Theatre, she said, had never produced a holiday-type show. “We had come to the conclusion this was just a timeless classic and a story well-known and liked by many and this was something we wanted to pursue

See THEATER, Page A2

First quarter Boone budget performance is ‘uneventful’ By Stephanie Salmons ssalmons@nky.com

BURLINGTON — One quarter into the current fiscal year, Boone County’s budget performance has been “uneventful.” That’s a good thing, Boone County Administrator Jeff Earlywine told members of the fiscal court during a budget re-

port last month. county officials. “We beThere have been no lieve the county is off to a major surprises and positive start for the FY revenues are tracking (fiscal year) 2014 budget on target, he said. year.” “There is nothing Judge-executive Gary remarkable to report Moore said he’s pleased and no significant varithe budget is on track. ations that require fur- Earlywine “Any time we are ther explanation,” spending less than we Earlywine writes in a memo to have in the budget and reve-

REFLECTING

KITCHEN

Students dream and believe See story, B1

Holiday recipe season begins See story, B3

RITA’S

nues are on track, it’s a very positive situation,” he said. Budget updates are nothing new for county leaders. By receiving quarterly reports, issues – like if a particular item or department is not doing well – can be addressed sooner rather than later, Moore said. “If we continue to hold ex-

Contact us

News ..........................283-0404 Retail advertising .........513-768-8404 Classified advertising .........283-7290 Delivery ........................781-4421 See page A2 for additional information

penses down, but at the same time offer the same level of customer service, we can continue to keep tax rates low and improve efficiencies as we go forward,” said Moore. “The goal at the end of the day is to be as efficient and as effective as possible. When that hapSee BUDGET, Page A2

Vol. 2 No. 52 © 2013 The Community Recorder ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


NEWS

A2 • UNION RECORDER • NOVEMBER 14, 2013

Theater Continued from Page A1

and bring to life on stage,” said Franxman. Emmons said the group is excited to produce the second show at its new space in the Union Community Building. “The cast and production team is top notch and have done a phenomenal job of bringing this holi-

Index Calendar .................B2 Classifieds ................C Deaths ...................B8 Food ......................B3 Police .................... B9 Schools ..................A7 Sports ....................A8 Viewpoints ............A10

day classic to the live stage,” she said. Having community theater group of this nature gives residents a chance to enjoy, and participate in, the live arts, said Franxman. “That’s the beauty of community theater,” she said. “We just want to bring that to this area because there’s nothing here like (it).” Tickets are available online at showtix4u.com. Pre-order forms can also be found at the Union City Building 1843 Mt. Zion Road, Union. Cost is $10 for adults and $8 for seniors 65 and older and students under 18.

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Tara Caddell, playing Mary Hatch Bailey, Garrick Straub as George Bailey and Russ McGee as Clarence Odbody, rehearse for the Union Community Theatre’s upcoming production of “It's a Wonderful Life.”THANKS TO AMANDA EMMONS

UNION

RECORDER Find news and information from your community on the Web Union • nky.com/union Boone County • nky.com/boonecounty

News

Join us for all the fun of Markt plus Dinner Stations, Cash Bar, Live Music, and guest Emcees John Gumm and Bob Herzog of Local 12, WKRC

Marc Emral Editor ..............................578-1053, memral@communitypress.com Stephanie Salmons Reporter .................578-1057, ssalmons@nky.com Melissa Stewart Reporter .....................578-1058, mstewart@nky.com Melanie Laughman Sports Editor ............513-248-7573, mlaughman@nky.com James Weber Sports Reporter ................578-1054, jweber@nky.com

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To place an ad in Community Classified, call 283-7290.

Budget Continued from Page A1

pens, the tax rates stay low, customer service levels are maintained and everyone benefits.” While first-quarter receipts are off to a good start, Earlywine noted real and personal property tax rates adopted by the fiscal court will produce revenue slightly below the budget forecast. Occupational license revenues for the first quarter totaled $5.68 million, some 5 percent more than what was collected in the same period during

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the last fiscal year. Earlywine’s memo says the county will provide future rebates associated with economic development projects, which will slightly alter receipts for the quarter. According to the memo, the first quarter had no significant or unanticipated general fund expenditures and there have been no “significant expenditure anomalies” in other funds like public works, jail or the Public Safety Communication Center fund.

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NEWS

NOVEMBER 14, 2013 • FLORENCE-UNION RECORDER • A3

Burlington man features in magazine Joe Caminiti of Burlington, is featured in the fall 2013 issue of Woodcarving Illustrated magazine, the premier publication devoted to the art and hobby of woodcarving and design. Caminiti, a member of the River Valley Wood Carvers of Northern Kentucky, has developed a unique style that has earned him multiple awards. He carves whimsical houses in the round with only hand tools.

“It all starts with a good imagination – the ability to see something in bark. Then you carve that vision into the bark,” he said. See more of his work online at www.middlecreekcarver.com. Caminiti is profiled in an article called “Barking Up the Right Tree.” Woodcarving Illustrated magazine can be views at www.woodcarvingillustrated.com.

Gifts from last year’s Be a Santa to a Senior program.PROVIDED/LES MURPHY

Be Santa to a senior this Christmas season By Melissa Stewart mstewart@nky.com

FLORENCE — Christmas trees will pop up in several Northern Kentucky stores a little early this year. These aren’t just any Christmas trees. These will be covered with special ornaments that include the first name of a senior resident in need. You’ll see them starting Friday, Nov. 15. “There are a lot of programs around the holidays for children. It seems, however, that the senior population is often forgotten,” Florence Home Instead Senior Care general manager Les Murphy said. “During the holidays they can feel isolated and alone.” Home Instead Senior Care, an in-home care agency, is teaming up with non-profit agencies

and area retailers to change that with Be a Santa to a Senior. Since 2008, Home Instead in Florence has worked with local nursing and rehabilitation facilities, Northern Kentucky Ombudsman and the Area Office on Aging in Northern Kentucky to gather the names of seniors and their Christmas wish lists. This year there are 250 names of seniors, Murphy said. The public is invited to pick out an ornament with a senior’s name and wish list. Gifts are typically within the $10-$15 range, Murphy said, so they can be easily worked in almost any budget. After the shopping, the unwrapped gift is returned to the location they received the ornament. Last year, 1,200 gifts were collected. “A gift goes a long way

and brightens their spirits even throughout the new year,” Murphy said. Una Berry, 68, of Burlington has received gifts through Be a Santa to a Senior in previous years. Berry lives on a fixed income and is raising her 17-year-old grandson; her 20-year-old grandson just moved out on his own. Without the generously of those who purchase gifts she said her holidays wouldn’t be the same. “It feels great to get a gift,” she said. “It warms my heart to think that there are people out there who care. They are wonderful people. I hope this program continues forever.” This year, the program runs until Dec. 13. Home Instead will host a community gift wrapping party, open to the public, at 9 a.m. Wednesday, Dec. 18, at 268 Main St., Florence. CE-0000574682

Call 1-855-4kynect or visit kynect.ky.gov and Choose PUBA131391A APP_10/8/13


NEWS

A4 • FLORENCE-UNION RECORDER • NOVEMBER 14, 2013

BRIEFLY Caring neighbors

tions is Friday, Dec. 1. We look forward to hearing about them.

Men’s Christian Fellowship meets

The Men’s Holy Bible Christian Fellowship welcomes men to attend its next meeting, 2-4 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 16, at the

WALTON — Help stock the Senior Citizens Pantry now through December. A barrel to place nonperishable food items is available in the city building, 40 N. Main St., Walton. The pantry is in need of easy-to-open canned foods that can be used as a meal, such as tuna, soup, Spam. They can also use cereals, boxes of single serving oats and cream of wheat. Small bags of flour, sugar and artificial sweetener can also be donated. For more information, call 859-485-4383.

Get ready to decorate

WALTON — Registration is now open to participate in the Christmas House Decorating contest. Deadline is 5 p.m. Monday, Dec. 2. The city will be divided into “north and south poles,” with Old Beaver Road being the dividing line. Judging will be Tuesday, Dec. 3. Cash prizes will be awarded. Call 485-4383 to register.

Real

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Gateway joins retail federation

Gateway Community and Technical College, through its Workforce Solutions and Innovation Division, has been admitted to the Kentucky Retail Federation. “This is part of our new initiative to keep in touch with and address the training needs of Northern Kentucky’s retail sector,” said Phil Accardi, director of Gateway’s Workforce Development Center. “We plan to offer training in customized customer service, management skills, and related topics to the retail industry, all relevant to the ‘store’ environment.” The Kentucky Retail Federation is the “voice of retailing” throughout the Commonwealth, representing retailers of all types and sizes since 1939. As the state’s only association representing the retail industry, the Kentucky Retail Federation brings together the strength of more than 6,000 members. Retail employers interested in employee development training may contact Phil Accardi at 859442-1110 or phil.accardi@kctcs.edu for more information.

PVA inspections set

The Boone County Property Valuation Administrator’s office will inspect Orleans Subdivision, farms and new construction throughout Boone County Nov. 14-20. Staff members will be in a marked vehicle and have identification available upon request. For more information, contact PVA Cindy Arlinghaus at cindy.arling haus@boonecountyky.org .

ERLANGER — St. Elizabeth Healthcare is in the process of moving 330 employees to a new office at 1360 Dolwick Drive near the Interstate 275 exit off Mineola Pike. The marketing, planning and development departments have completed moving from Crestview Hills into the 50,000 square foot building, said Guy Karrick, spokesman for St. Elizabeth. Most of the remaining 300 employees moving to Erlanger are in the finance department working at offices at 20th Street in Covington, and are in the process of moving in now, Karrick said. Karrick said the move will likely be complete by

Kenwood Towne Centre Tri-County Mall Florence Mall Northgate Mall Eastgate Mall

land grants. Chapter regent Ruth Korzenborn will preside. For further information or to make a reservation send an e-mail to rgkorz@twc.com or call 859-341-2017.

Stock the Senior Citizens Pantry

St. Elizabeth moves 330 jobs to Erlanger

The

CE-0000573898

Nov. 15.

Boone County Public Library Main Branch, 1786 Burlington Pike in Burlington, in Room A on the the second floor. For more information, call 859-869-0444 or 859594-4439.

Difference in Diamonds

At The Community Recorder, we annually recognize those folks who go out of their way to help a neighbor or friend. We call it “Neighbors Who Care,” and we need your help. If you know someone who deserves some praise

for helping others, tell us about them. Send the information to memral@nky.com. Put “Neighbors Who Care” in the subject line and include your name, community and contact information, as well as the nominee’s name, community and contact information. Deadline for nomina-

DAR meeting

The Rebecca Bryan Boone Chapter, National Society Daughters of American Revolution, will meet at 11 a.m. Wednesday, Nov. 13, at the Erlanger Kenton County Library, 401Kenton Lands Road. Kandie Adkinson will speak about Kentucky

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NEWS

NOVEMBER 14, 2013 • FLORENCE-UNION RECORDER • A5

5K run benefits Boone dog park By Stephanie Salmons ssalmons@nky.com

BURLINGTON — A 5K will help the Boone County Parks and Recreation raise funds for improvements to the Boone County Dog Park. The eighth annual Boone County Parks 5K run/walk begins at 10 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 16, at England-Idlewild Park, 5550 Idlewild Road, Burlington. According to Jackie Heyenbruch, marketing and resources coordinator for the parks department, proceeds will be used to upgrade the dog park’s agility equipment. “A lot of people have asked about it,” Heyenbruch said, “(so we) decided to go ahead and use any proceeds for the dog park.” Parks Director David Whitehouse said the de-

Holiday Open House

Sat, November 16 through Sat, November 30

Runners at last year’s Boone County Parks 5K. This year, the race is Saturday, Nov. 16, at England-Idlewild Park.

GREAT

THANKS TO JACKIE HEYENBRUCH

partment started raising money for something different each year a few years ago. “This year, the agility equipment in our dog park needed some work and we (have) a lot of people using the dog park, so we’re going to take some of the proceeds and use it for

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that,” he said. Last year, proceeds from the race went to purchase automated external defibrillators. Register for the race by calling the Parks office at 859-334-2117; on-site registration for the race begins at 9 a.m..

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Turfway Park has new food manager Lone Star’s training general manager. He also has held the position of general manager at Buffalo Wild Wings, Denny’s, and Cracker Barrel locations as well as other food and beverage management positions at properties in Arizona and California. In addition to his management experience, DePew has been an executive chef at hotels in Ohio. He is also trained in garde-manger – the detailed art of preparation and presentation particularly of cold foods – a skill important both to the racetrack’s restaurant of-

ferings and to its catering services. “There are at least 200 restaurants in Florence, and a lot of them are concentrated along the section of I-75 where Turfway is located,” said DePew. “Our goal is to rise above that crowd as a standalone restaurant, not just as where you eat during the races. At the same time, live racing adds a fascinating dimension that no other restaurant in the area can offer. Live racing returns to Turfway on Dec. 1. Go to www.turfway.com.

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Turfway Park has hired veteran restaurateur Richard DePew to manage its food and beverage operations. The operations include Turfway Concessionaire, the racetrack’s restaurant and concessions division, and Park Avenue Catering, its on- and off-site catering service. A 25-year veteran of food and beverage management, DePew comes to Turfway from Lone Star Steakhouse in Anderson, Ind., where he was the store’s general manager. For five years earlier in his career he served as

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NEWS

A6 • FLORENCE-UNION RECORDER • NOVEMBER 14, 2013

Past president has barn quilt LaVerne Lawson was president of The Florence Woman’s Club when the club took on the Barn Quilt – Trail project. And now seven years later she is getting her own quilt board called Hidden Star. Lawson has no history of quilting in her family

as far as she can remember but has enjoyed each Boone County barn board as it has gone up. Born in Cincinnati, her family soon moved to Kentucky. She has lived in Erlanger and Florence, and has lived in her current house on Mt. Zion

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Road for 30 years. She and her husband Lewis were married 40 years and had two daughters. As the girls were growing up, Lawson managed to teach kindergarten at Jack and Jill School for five years and then worked for the Boone County Community Action Committee for 23 years. Lawson keeps busy. In addition to being president of Florence Woman’s Club in 2006-2008, she was worthy matron of the Florence Eastern Star for two terms, and has been a life member of the St. Elizabeth Hospital auxiliary for 17 years.

By Melissa Stewart mstewart@nky.com

FLORENCE

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LaVerne Lawson, former president of the Florence Woman’s Club, has her own barn quilt.PROVIDED

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She has bricks with her name on them at both the Florence City Building and St. Elizabeth. The quilt board can be viewed to the right about one-tenth mile south on Tiburon Road off Mt. Zion. Do not enter the property. The Florence Woman’s Club painted and hung the board as part of its community service project. To view the Barn Quilt Trail on line, go to BooneBarnQuilts.com or e-mailmailto: Joyce.Foley@twc.comfor a free brochure.

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Vogelpohl’s husband, Bill, died in August 2012 from a disease so few know about. It’s called amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, a motor neuron disease also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease. The Taylor Mill resident watched as, in just 10 months, this progressive neurodegenerative disease affected Bill’s ability to walk, talk, swallow and even breathe. No cure or treatment currently exists to halt or reverse ALS. “The story needs to get out there, people need to know about this horrendous disease,” she said. “I don’t want anyone else to go through what my husband had to go through.” That’s why she plans to attend the Quarter Mania and Craft Fair benefiting the ALS Association of Kentucky Chapter Thursday, Nov. 14, at Tufway Park in Florence. The craft fair starts at 6 p.m.,

the quarter auction 7 p.m. The association, based in Villa Hills, is one of 45 chapters nationwide that work to fund research, patient care, and family and caregiver support. In addition, the local chapter offers the Lending Closet. Various equipment, that is often very expensive, Money raised will also support local research conducted at the Kentucky Neurosciences Institute at the University of Kentucky. It is one of only 33 ALS Association certified centers nationwide. The center offers highly specialized care across multiple disciplines for patients and their families. said currently center is conducting a geographical study, trying to find out why there is a higher prevalence of ALS in the state. The goal of the craft fair and auction, according to the Kentucky chap-

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ter’s administrative project coordinator Jennifer Lepa, is to raise $5,000. With at least 200 guests, Lepa said this goal can be reached. “We are a 100 percent self-sustaining chapter,” Lepa said. “The more money we raise the more services we are able to offer to our patients and their families. ALS is 100 percent fatal, however, we are able to improve the quality of life for our patients.” Admission to the craft fair is $1, the quarter auction participation fee is $5 which includes three bidding paddles. More than 30 vendors featuring products, home goods, and crafts will be featured. Turfway Park will provide food and drinks for Quarter Mania. The auction will include an intermission so guests can visit the vendor tables. For the last three years the association has held a walk fundraiser. Lepa said the craft fair and auction is another way to raise awareness and help, while reaching a different demographic. “We look forward to making this an annual event and continuing our awareness efforts for ALS year-round” Lepa said. Cheryl Vogelpohl said she is looking forward to this fun event, which has a big purpose. “More awareness is needed,” she said. “Without money being raised, there wouldn’t be enough out there for research.”

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SCHOOLS

NOVEMBER 14, 2013 • FLORENCE-UNION RECORDER • A7

Editor: Marc Emral, memral@communitypress.com, 578-1053

ACHIEVEMENTS | NEWS | ACTIVITIES | HONORS

COMMUNITY

RECORDER

CommunityPress.com

The St. Joseph Academy Daddy Pumpkin-Carving Night group shows off their work. THANKS TO RHONDA O’LEARY

St. Joseph students enlist help to carve up fun Community Recorder

S

t. Joseph Academy Preschool and Daycare in Walton recently hosted its annual Daddy Pumpkin-Carving Night. The night included spooky songs, snacks and treats, a pumpkin craft and, of course, lots of pumpkins and pumpkin carving.

Ella Ryan picks out the right tools for her dad. THANKS TO RHONDA O’LEARY Wesley Ackerman and his dad smile for the camera. THANKS TO RHONDA O’LEARY

Peyton Kidwell and Jonah Lindsay share some treats. THANKS TO RHONDA O’LEARY

Jaxson Oliver and his father work closely on carving their pumpkin. THANKS TO RHONDA O’LEARY

Gavin Vaughn tells his dad how to carve their pumpkin. THANKS TO RHONDA O’LEARY

Kenadee Minton works hard on her pumpkin. THANKS TO RHONDA O’LEARY


SPORTS

A8 • FLORENCE-UNION RECORDER • NOVEMBER 14, 2013

COMMUNITY

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Editor: Melanie Laughman, mlaughman@communitypress.com, 513-248-7573

HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | RECREATIONAL

CommunityPress.com

Cougars, Bearcats football advance By James Weber

and Gannett News Service

BOONE COUNTY — Two Boone County teams advanced to the second round of the football playoffs this week. Here’s a wrap of round one: Boone County had the longest and toughest bus ride of any Northern Kentucky school last week. Boone lost 55-10 to McCracken County in the 6A playoffs. McCracken County (9-2), which is in first season of football after consolidating from Lone Oak, Heath and Reidland, has won nine straight games. The Rebels were bracketed in District 2 because that district only has three teams, prompting a 300mile trip to Paducah for the playoffs. The Rebels finished 0-11. Peter Westhoff completed 19-of-28 passes for

145 yards and a touchdown in the loss. Dillon Brelsford had a 20-yard TD catch. Dylon Bishop had eight grabs for 68 yards. Conner rallied for a 30-27 win over Montgomery County in the opening round of the 5A playoffs in Hebron. Conner trailed 14-0 in the second quarter and 27-14 in the fourth before rallying for two touchdowns to end the game. Drew Barker threw a 41yard TD pass to Andrew Way, and the two-point conversion made it 27-22. Jesse McKeehan gave the Cougars the lead with a 21-yard TD run. Barker was 17 of 28 passing for 233 yards and three TD passes while also rushing 11 times for 49 yards to lead Conner past Montgomery County. Jesse McKeehan rushed for 75 yards and a TD on six carries. Andrew Way had seven re-

Mason Compton (37) of Walton Verona tries to escape the tackle of Nehemiah Robinson (50) of Lloyd. MATTHEW BECK/FOR THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Chris Latimore of Walton-Verona breaks through the line and scores a touchdown during the first half. Walton-Verona beat Lloyd 21-18 in the 2A playoffs Nov. 8 at W-V’s athletic complex in Verona. MATTHEW BECK/FOR THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

ceptions for 85 yards and a touchdown, while Brian Loney had three receptions for 69 yards and a TD. Conner will play at Anderson County (9-2) this Friday. With a win, Conner would travel to South Oldham (8-3) or host Franklin County (10-1). Cooper lost 45-35 to Anderson County in the 5A playoffs to finish 3-8. Anderson is 9-2. The Jaguars took a 3521 lead into halftime behind the arm of quarterback Will Ludwig, however Cooper was outscored

24-0 in the second half. Ludwig was 16-for-23 passing for 262 yards and four touchdowns in the loss. Ryle lost 48-14 to 9-2 Butler in Louisville to finish the season 2-9. Walton-Verona edged Lloyd 21-18 in the 2A playoff opener. Mason Compton scored a TD run in the final minute for the win. The Bearcats began their final drive from their own 26, got a completion from Justin Kline to the 40 with three minutes to play and had it fourth-and-3 at the Lloyd

37. Compton converted with a 5-yard run. Chris Latimore carried seven yards to the 25. Compton scored the winning TD three plays later. “Wow, we pulled it out,” said Walton coach Jeff Barth. “The guys fought so hard. We’re a running team, and Mason Compton is one of the best we’ve had here.” He was great on that last drive.” Compton rushed for 171 yards on 32 carries and went more than 1,000 for the season.

“On my last score, first I had to secure the ball and get my mind right,” Compton said. “I saw a running lane, made one sharp cut, and went north.” The Bearcats will play at Newport Central Catholic 7 p.m. Friday at Newport High School. With a win, the Bearcats will play at Gallatin County (9-2) or host Carroll County (6-5). Follow James on Twitter @RecorderWeber

Cooper on the prowl at state cross country meet By James Weber jweber@nky.com

LEXINGTON — Aaron Kelter held the trophy as the Cooper High School boys cross country team celebrated a school milestone. The Jaguars finished in third place in the Class 3A state meet Nov. 9 at the Kentucky Horse Park, one of the best finishes ever by any Northern Kentucky team in the bigschool class. “I’m pretty excited,” said head coach Eric Vanlandingham. “It’s something we’ve been working for all year. We weren’t sure after the race if we got in there (for a top-four finish). The boys ran really well. They ran solid races and I’ll take that any time.” Kelter, the lone senior on the varsity team, didn’t get to race the last several weeks of the season, first to an injury, and then to

Cooper junior Brady Baker runs in 3A. The KHSAA state cross country meets were Nov. 9 at Kentucky Horse Park in Lexington. JAMES WEBER/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

appendicitis. The latter struck during the week of the regionals. “He’s had some really bad luck,” Vanlandingham said. “We tried to get him back in the end. The kids are like brothers and

they’re a great group of people. They’re a family and I’m really happy for them.” Junior Brady Baker led the way in 13th place. Connor Greenhalgh was 25th, Zachary Stewart 30th and Mitchell Greenhalgh 31st. Jake Vondermosten rounded out the scoring five in 80th place. Baker, a two-time regional champion, was not at full strength all season because of a knee injury incurred during track season in the spring. “Brady was here when the program opened,” Vanlandingham said. “He reminded me how bad we were starting out. We weren’t bad, we just didn’t have much talent at the school yet and the kids were really young. To come this far in six years is pretty crazy.” The Jaguars aren’t done for the year, as they See COOPER, Page A9

The St. Henry girls cross country team celebrates with its state championship trophy Nov. 9 at Kentucky Horse Park in Lexington. JAMES WEBER/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

St. Henry girls dominate By James Weber jweber@nky.com

LEXINGTON — Winning state championships is definitely tradition for the cross country programs at St. Henry District High School. Both the boys and girls teams have 16 champion-

ships all-time after action completed in the Class 1A state meet Nov. 9 at Kentucky Horse Park. The girls team collected its ninth championship in the past 11 years with a resounding rout of second-place Presentation. St. Henry scored 51points to win by 97.

The Crusaders had two individual medalists and pla ced all seven of their starters in the top 22, prompting head coach Tony Harden to heap praise on this year’s edition. The 2013 team had the largest margin of victory in 1A See STATE, Page A9


SPORTS & RECREATION

NOVEMBER 14, 2013 • FLORENCE-UNION RECORDER • A9

Cooper

STATE RESULTS

State

Continued from Page A8

CONNER BOYS (3A)

Continued from Page A8

will head south for the Footlocker regional meet later this month. Kelter may be able to run in that. The Cooper girls were 15th in 3A, led by Erin Mogus in 57th. The Conner boys were led by Nolan Gerlach in 33rd place overall. The Ryle girls were 10th overall and the boys were 14th. Katelyn Nichols was 23rd in girls and Jensen Bales 30th. Oscar Ramirez led the boys team in 46th place. The Walton-Verona boys team finished fourth overall in 1A to earn a team trophy. Joe Rider was 18th and Matthew Harper right behind in 19th. In girls, Walton-Verona’s Madison Lohr was 39th and McCall Ponzer 47th. Follow James on Twitter @RecorderWeber

16th place: 33. Nolan Gerlach 17:04, 79. Nick Baumann 17:45, 92. Andrew Elliott 17:53, 103. Drew Gray 17:58, 163. Daniel Palmer 18:38, 194. Franklin Boyd 18:58, 205. Jon Koogler 19:10.

COOPER BOYS (3A)

3rd place: 13. Brady Baker 16:31, 25. Connor Greenhalgh 16:51, 30. Zachary Stewart 17:00, 31. Mitchell Greenhalgh 17:02, 80. Jake Vandermosten 17:46, 112. Caleb Watson 18:06, 159. Stephen Russell 18:37.

COOPER GIRLS (3A)

15th place: 57. Erin Mogus 20:47, 66. Olivia Goessling 20:55, 81. Megan Kelter 21:15, 129. Isabelle Armstrong 21:57, 148. Ashley Dragan 22:14, 200. Karina Egger 23:54, 233. Hayley Blank 28:41.

RYLE BOYS (3A)

14th place: 46. Oscar Ramirez 17:13, 58. Parker Kay 17:22, 100. Justin Reed 17:56, 118. Ryan Tagher 18:10, 129. Matthew Uyeda 18:18, 173. Tyler Powell 18:40, 191. Bryce O’Neal 18:54.

RYLE GIRLS (3A)

10th place: 23. Katelyn Nichols 19:57, 30. Jensen Bales 20:15, 86. Mackenzie Wren 21:21, 94. Kaitlyn Bach 21:30, 117. Heidi Anderson 21:52, 178. Cayla Robinson 23:02, 218. Amanda Wright 24:46.

WALTON-VERONA BOYS (1A)

4th place: 18. Joe Rider 17:44, 19. Matthew Harper 17:48, 48. Nick Tanenbaum 18:30, 61. Caleb Flege 18:46, 63. Noah Schell 18:47, 71. Nathan Akins 18:56, 84. Will Compton 19:07.

WALTON-VERONA GIRLS (1A) Madison Lohr: 39th (21:43). McCall Ponzer: 47th (21:52).

girls history, although the Crusaders fell short of their school record 34 points scored in 1998. “This is the best team I’ve ever coached,” Harden said. “We’ve had standouts at the top two spots before, but from one to seven, this is the deepest team I’ve ever coached.” Junior Sam Hentz finished fourth overall, and sophomore Holly Blades placed ninth. Both won an individual state medal. Abbey Epplen, Taylor Connett, Libby Anneken, Renee Svec and Elizabeth Hoffman took half of the spots from 13-22. “It feels amazing,” Hentz said. “I’m so proud of our whole team. I’m so happy and so grateful for such great coaches and such a supportive team. We have a really deep team. Even if we had an alternate run, I still think we could do it. We all have the talent, we just had to prove it today, and I think we did that.”

STATE RESULTS ST. HENRY BOYS (1A)

2nd: 7. Josh Hannon 17:08, 16. Robert Brockman 17:43, 27. Andrew Smith 18:01, 38. Jake Plummer 18:20, 42. Brendan Hansen 18:24, 43. Michael Ridilla 18:25, 118. Nathan Freihofer 19:56.

ST. HENRY GIRLS (1A)

State champions: 4. Sam Hentz 19:46, 9. Holly Blades 20:25, 13. Abbey Epplen 20:36, 16. Taylor Connett 20:41, 18. Libby Anneken 20:51, 20. Renee Svec 20:58, 22. Elizabeth Hoffman 21:01.

Six of the starters also ran in last year’s meet, including Hoffman, a sophomore who won a spot in the starting seven for the 2013 meet late in the year. Harden, the veteran coach, has nurtured a new streak for the Crusaders, who won their third-straight championship. “He’s such a great coach,” Hentz said. “It means a lot to our school to win this and we’re so happy. He doesn’t single out any one runner. He supports all of us, whether it’s varsity, JV, state team or not. He pushes us all day and he never gives up on us.”

The girls tea m caught the boys team in total titles, as Ernie Brooks’ Crusaders finished second to Bishop Brossart, snapping an 11-year streak of state championships. Josh Hannon led the way with a seventhplace finish to win a medal. Robert Brockman was 16th. Jake Plummer was 38th and is the only senior in the starting seven. Follow James on Twitter @RecorderWeber

PRESS PREPS HIGHLIGHTS By James Weber jweber@nky.com

Fall senior moments

Senior Night is an important time in an athlete’s high school career and the Community Press & Recorder, along with cincinnati.com/nky.com, would like to highlight those moments.Please send a photo from your Senior Night to presspreps@gmail.com. Include the names of the people in the photo as they are shown, the school and the sport by Friday, Nov. 22. The photo can be of all the team’s seniors or a photo of athletes with their parents. Photos will run in print sometime in December and in a cincinnati.com photo gallery. Questions can be directed to mlaughman@nky.com.

Catching up

The Community Press & Recorder, along with cincinnati.com/nky.com, would like to give readers over the holidays the ability to catch up with local high school stars doing well in college athletics. In what has become an annual readership project, parents/friends of college athletes are welcome to send a photo and brief description of their college athletes’ accomplishments over the last calendar year to presspreps@gmail.com. Include the names of the people in the photo as they are shown, the college name and sport, parents’ names, where the athlete lives, what weekly newspaper they get at home and their accomplishments by Friday, Dec. 13. Photos will run in print Jan. 1 and in a cincinnati.com photo gallery. Questions can be directed to mlaughman@nky.com.

Volleyball

» The Northern Kentucky Girls Volleyball Coaches Association honored its all-opponent team Nov. 6. Bishop Brossart’s Alex Hinkel was the winner of the Dena Gosney Sportswoman Scholarship for $500. Runner-ups ($100) were Alexa Schulte of Notre Dame and Jordan Miller of Dixie Heights. Division 1 Player of the Year: Heidi Thelen (Notre Dame),

Coach of the Year: Tasha Lovins (Ryle). First team: Ashley Bush (Ryle), Morgan Hentz (NDA), Elly Ogle (NDA), Harper Hempel (Ryle), Kaitlin Murray (S. Kenton), Kaity Smith (Cooper). Second team: Sophie Dunn (SK), Stephanie Lambert (Boone), Dixie Schultz (Campbell), Hayley Bush (Ryle), Alexa Nichols (Ryle), Rebecca Ruppel (Cooper). Honorable mention: Carson Gray (Campbell), Jenna Trimpe (Scott), OliviaBarb(Cooper),AlliBorders (Boone), Lauren Hollman (NDA), Kirby Seiter (Campbell), Jessica Fortner (Cooper), Caitlyn Watt (Dixie). Division 2 Player of the Year: Georgia Childers, Coach of the Year: Maureen Kaiser (St. Henry). First team: Kendyll Kraus (St. Henry), Janelle Tobler (St. Henry), Paige Noble (St. Henry), Rachel McDonald (NCC), Jenna Fessler (Beechwood), Jessica Ginter (Highlands). Second team: Marissa Frommeyer (Brossart), Brandi Trenkamp (Holy Cross), Karlee Schreiber (St. Henry), Alyssa Maier (NCC), Liz Pawsat (Beechwood), Kaitlin Hall (Highlands). Honorable mention: Abby Schweitzer (Highlands), Erin Chaffin (Holy Cross), Keyaira Lankheit (NCC), Lindsay Leick (Brossart), Payton Brown (Lloyd), Madison Volk (NCC). Division 3 Player of the Year: Ellie Stoddart (Villa Madonna),

Coach of the Year: Jodi Schmidt (Ludlow). First team: Nicole Frevola (Ludlow), Hailey Ison (Walton-Verona), Tyler Smith (Ludlow), Charissa Junker (VMA), Halle McClintock (Heritage), Keely Borden (Calvary). Second team: Felicia Watts (Dayton), Hailey Lillard (Ludlow), Jessica Emmons (WV), Maggie Jett (Cov. Latin), Angel Wilson (WV), Morgan Trusty (VMA). Honorable mention: Hannah Rechtin (Bellevue), Aubry Donelan (Dayton), Alexius Crowley (Ludlow), Emma Bateman (VMA).

ship match in Bethany, W.Va. The Saints won by the scores of 25-21, 25-18, 19-25, 23-25 and 15-9. With the win, the Saints improve to 24-5 and earn the PAC automatic bid to the NCAA Division III Championship Tournament. Freshman outside hitter Marisa Meyer led the Saints’ offensive attack as she hit .256 with 14 kills. Sophomore middle hitter Jessica Knaley (Florence,

Ky./St. Henry) and junior outside hitter Felicity Britt each added 12 kills. Junior outside hitter Holly Bronner led the team in assists with 26 and sophomore setter Becca Kuhn added 20 assists. Junior defensive specialist Kelsey Castiglioni led the team in service aces with five. » The Thomas More College football team clinched at least a share of the Presidents’ Athletic

Conference Championship with a 49-14 win over Bethany College. With the win, the Saints improve to 8-1 overall and finish the PAC at 7-1. With the loss, the Bison fall to 3-6 overall and 3-4 in the PAC. Junior Domonique Hayden rushed for 152 yards to set the new Thomas More single-season rushing record with 1,801 yards.

TMC Notes

» The third-seeded Thomas More College volleyball team won its second-straight and fifth overall Presidents’ Athletic Conference Championship Tournament as it defeated top-seeded Bethany College, 3-2, in the champion-

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VIEWPOINTS A10 • UNION RECORDER • NOVEMBER 14, 2013

Marc Emral, memral@communitypress.com, 578-1053

EDITORIALS | LETTERS | COLUMNS | CH@TROOM

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Tips on keeping the holiday cheer Your to-do list for the holiday season is a mile long. There are presents to buy and wrap, cards to sign and mail, parties to plan and attend, food to prepare and serve. But your ability to accomplish the items on your list grinds to a halt if you or a family member gets sick. It doesn’t help matters that the holidays are a prime time for germ transmission. You’ve got the weather helping, as it gets colder and we tend to spend more time inside. Groups of people are congregating at parties and events. Plus, we’re worn down from all the extra holiday activity, which can weaken our immune system. So, I’d like to share some tips for spreading holiday

cine especially imporcheer and not illness tant to get if your holithis year: day plans involve inGet vaccinated. If fants – who are most at you haven’t done so risk for complications already this fall, get an if they catch whooping annual flu vaccine. cough. There are more options Wash your hands for vaccination than ever, including a vacLynne Saddler often. If available, use cine that protects COMMUNITY PRESS soap and water; if not, hand sanitizer works against four strains of GUEST COLUMNIST as a second choice. flu, rather than three; a Wash after using the bathvaccine for people allergic to room, before you eat, before eggs; a nasal spray and a vacyou prepare food, and before/ cine with a smaller needle. after caring for someone who Your options for where to get is sick. the vaccine are plentiful, too: Stay home when you’re pharmacies, doctors’ offices, sick. No one likes to miss holiemployers and the health deday festivities, but if you are partment as well. While you’re genuinely sick, it’s best to keep getting the flu vaccine, ask the germs to yourself. If you about the Tdap vaccine. It are running a fever, vomiting protects against whooping or have diarrhea, skip events cough, which makes this vac-

until you feel better. If you have a minor illness, like a cold, you’re usually okay – but do consider whom you’ll be coming in contact with. It’s best to avoid small babies and people with weak immune systems if you have even a minor illness. You should avoid shaking hands, kissing elderly Aunt Mildred, and for goodness sake, cough and sneeze into your elbow or a tissue. Make food that’s delicious, not suspicious. Part of being a great host or hostess is serving guests food that’s safe. If you’ve been ill – especially with a stomach bug – don’t prepare food. Keep food safe by washing hands before you prepare and after you handle raw meats. Watch food temperatures closely – you want to

If you like your plan, you can’t keep it For nearly five years, Unfortunately, stories like Kentuckians heard Presithis are all too common in dent Obama repeat one the Commonwealth. In fact, very familiar phrase: “If 130,000 Kentuckians with you like your current individual policies have rehealth care plan, you can ceived cancellation notices, keep it.” Kentuckians took and yet only about 4,600 the president at his word individuals have signed up Mitch as he echoed this promise for private insurance McConnell over and over again. through the Kentucky exNow that Obamacare is COMMUNITY PRESS change. Another 150,000 GUEST COLUMNIST coming into effect, we’re small group policies will be learning that millions of canceled, including policies people won’t be able to keep the held by groups like the Louisville plan they have – despite the presiBar Association. dent’s promise. Unfortunately, it’s Liberal Democrats and Obama not hard to find examples of Kensupporters in Kentucky are hailing tuckians who are being told, the president’s health law as somethrough no fault of their own, that thing positive, and bragging that the health insurance plan they have 32,000 Kentuckians signed up for relied on and want to keep is being coverage in the last month. But canceled, and many are finding that when a paltry 32,000 signups are Obamacare’s alternatives are more weighed against the nearly 10 times costly. as many Kentuckians whose insurTake one constituent who ance coverage is being canceled, reached out to me from Burlington. it’s obvious that Obamacare has He found out that his policy will be been a net loser for Kentucky. Plus, discontinued next year. He’s not 85 percent of those who sign up are happy that a plan on the Obamacare signed up on Medicaid (free health exchanges will dramatically drive care), not private plans. up his insurance costs from under Multiply this problem across all $400 a month to more than $700 – 50 states, and it’s no wonder that with zero subsidies available. “My the AP has reported that 3.5 million wife and I are 54,” he wrote. “We Americans will see their current don't need maternity care – and we health insurance plans canceled. don’t need Obamacare.” And despite the president’s many

promises to the contrary, we now know that the administration knew ahead of time that millions of Americans would lose their current policies when Obamacare went into effect. Let’s face it – Obamacare’s failures aren’t restricted to just a website. The law is proving to be a calamity for millions of Americans who, through no fault of their own, are being forced to drop health insurance plans they like and purchase different ones with higher costs. It’s still not too late to act to stop the worst parts of this law. That’s why, in the U.S. Senate, I have sponsored legislation to help protect thousands of Kentuckians from losing the health insurance plans they like and want to keep. If you can speak personally to the harmful effects of the new health care law, I hope you’ll contact my office at www.McConnell.senate.gov. The more we know about the damage being done to Kentuckians, the better we can put a stop to it. Because this disaster of Obamacare isn’t what Americans were promised. Sen. Mitch McConnell has an office at 1885 Dixie Highway, Suite 345, Fort Wright, KY., 41011; call 859-578-0188. Go to www.mcconnell.senate.gov/public/.

Have a little talk with Jesus OK. I was reminded of an old Just like the storm that hymn the other day. I couldn’t raged when Peter got out quite remember the lyrics, of the boat in Matthew 14. but when I looked them up, it After briefly walking on took me back to being a young the water toward Jesus he girl and hearing my mom sing turned his attention to his the tune around the house as dire situation. Quickly she was cleaning and cooking. realizing he could not help Julie House It’s a song that was covered by both Loretta Lynn and COMMUNITY PRESS himself, what did he do? He called out to Jesus, and GUEST COLUMNIST Brenda Lee and the second we are told that Jesus verse is my favorite. “I may have doubts and fears and stretched out his hand and pulled him to safety (vs. 31.) my eyes may be filled with tears, The bible urges us to call out to “but Jesus is a friend who God regularly. In 1 Thessalonians watches day and night. 5:17 we are told to “Pray without “I go to Him in prayer and He ceasing.” That means, continually knows my every care. without stopping. Call out to God “And just a little talk with my throughout your busy days and your Jesus is gonna make it right.” worry-filled nights. I think my I remembered that my mom mom’s singing was a form of prayer often sang hymns around the house, and calling out for her. (And what a and when she did, there was a cerblessing I received as a result.) tain peace and security that just We are also told in Luke 18:1 that covered me like a blanket. Although “men always ought to pray and not storms in our family often lingered and could brew up at any given time, lose heart.” When Peter got out of the boat he lost his faith in Jesus for when my mom was calling on Jesus a moment. For our faith to really I somehow knew everything was

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A publication of

develop we must be consistent, persistent and endure in our prayer lives. God will answer. Jesus tells us in His own words in Luke 18:7-8, “And shall God not avenge his own elect who cry out day and night to him, though he bears long with them? I tell you that he will avenge them speedily. Nevertheless, when the Son of Man comes, will he really find faith on the earth?” For God to avenge us and rescue us before we surely sink, we must stand firm in what we believe, and not waver. In order to stand firm we need to regularly “have our little talks with Jesus.” I’ve got a few things I need to share with him right now, how about you? Julie House is founder of Equipped Ministries, a Christian-based health and wellness program. She can be reached at 802-8965 or on Facebook.com/EquippedMinistries.

228 Grandview Drive, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017 654 Highland Ave., Fort Thomas, KY 41075 phone: 283-0404 email: kynews@communitypress.com web site: www.nky.com

keep hot foods hot and cold foods cold. Don’t let foods sit at room temperature for more than two hours. Be kind to yourself. Stress can wear down our immune systems and make us more likely to get sick. Don’t let the holiday rush keep you from getting enough sleep, eating regular and healthy meals, and getting exercise. A bonus of this: When it’s time to make your New Year’s resolution come January, you’ll be in better shape. Here’s to a happy – and healthy – 2013 holiday season! Dr. Lynne Saddler is the district director of health for the Northern Kentucky Health Department. For more information go to www.nkyhealth.org.

I miss the old days

Since being elected in 2009 to serve as your state senator I’ve developed a new morning routine: Making phone calls to constituents. These are not political calls or efforts to solicit votes. These are to resolve individual issues faced by the people in my district. Last year I processed more than 12,000 such cases and all of them required calling people on the phone. All this time spent dialing got me to thinking: “When was the last time I actually called someone’s house?” I don’t call people’s homes anymore. I call individuals on their cell phones. I remember when cell phones and voice mail – or answering machines – were not even in our vocabulary. To talk to someone, you’d call them at home. And you could really learn a lot about someone this way. You might hear the radio or the television playing in the background. Or maybe even someone practicing the piano. Other times you would hear the sounds of cooking, dishes clanking. You could almost smell the food. And sometimes you were told the person you had called could not come to the phone because he was eating dinner. John Schickel Many times one of the children in the home would answer. COMMUNITY PRESS They might be polite and helpGUEST COLUMNIST ful or not so helpful, though almost always entertaining. Or you would hear the woman in the house calling out in the yard over the sound of the lawnmower for the person you were trying to contact. You hear the lawnmower shut off, the screen door slam, and then someone ask: “Who is it?” You were not calling someone, you were calling their home. This is what I miss. I can remember as a teenager growing up, calling my best friend Pat but always hoping his sister Miriam would answer. And she would actually talk to me on the phone. That would make my day because I had a crush on her. Or his mother would answer and inquire how I was doing in school and how my mother was doing with her flower garden. I can remember calling Jill Holman’s house for my first date as a teenager. And being scared to death because I had to talk to her father first. How different it is for teenagers today calling their best friends. In this fast-paced age of texting, tweeting and smart phones going 24/7, I wonder if we’ve lost some of the advantages of now obsolete technology. Like slowing down to really get to know someone, to build a lasting relationship with neighbors and community. To have time “unplugged” from the rest of the world and focused on family. Yes, in those ways, I miss the old days. Republican State Sen. John Schickel represents District 11. He can be reached at PO Box 991, Union Ky., 41091. Call him at 1-800-372-7181.

Union Recorder Editor Marc Emral memral@communitypress.com, 578-1053 Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday See page A2 for additional contact information.


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2013

Students reflect on dreams, beliefs By Kamellia Soenjoto Smith kynews@nky.com

“I believe in myself, in my strength to succeed, in my very own abilities, in my possibilities to be realities,” wrote Tanvi Rakesh, a first-grader at Longbranch Elementary School in Union. She is just one among nearly 100 local students participating in the PTA’s Cultural Arts Reflections Program, presented by the 14th District PTA. Her essay will go on to compete for a blue ribbon at the state level. Rakesh doesn’t just write, she also composes music. Her entry in the music composition category has qualified for the state competition, too. “Last year, her music went all the way to the national level,” said her mother Radha Rakesh. Fifth-grader Logan Albrinck of Thornwilde Elementary School in Hebron will compete at state with one of his photographs. “My husband started taking pictures maybe four years ago as a hobby,” his mother Alice explained. “Logan just started picking up his dad’s camera, sometimes without asking. And he realized that Logan has an eye. He knows the right moment to snap the picture.” Sydney Hicks, a seventh-grader at Twenhofel Middle School in Independence, paints. “Let the mystery behind the door inspire you” is the message of her painting. Eleven-year old Loghan Currin, also from Twenhofel, loves dancing. “I like to express my-

self and show off how I feel,” she said. “So I just dance.” Together with a friend, she choreographed a dance and their work made it to state. There is even a category for film production. “My video is about the water crisis,” Lillian Hale wrote on her entry form. The second-grader, from Stephens Elementary School in Burlington, was moved after seeing a documentary on the subject. “It inspired me to help, and I want to inspire other people.” “Believe, Dream, Inspire” is the theme for this year’s program. “This is their way of shining,” said Linda Netherly, the program’s chair woman for the 14th District PTA. Entries were received from 272 elementary, middle, and high school students from Kenton, Boone, and Campbell counties. They were on display at William E. Durr branch of Kenton County Public Library recently. Netherly said 42 entries will go to the state competition. The winners will be recognized at a celebration Thursday, Nov. 21, at Campbell County High School. For next year’s contest, the theme will be “The world would be a better place if ...” “I have children that I have seen year in and year out. They come back, I see them progress,” Netherly said. “They might not have started out as winners, but they’ve eventually done well.” She has had winners at the district, state, and even national level. “It’s really awesome when that happens.”

LIFE

COMMUNITY RECORDER

PEOPLE | IDEAS | RECIPES

Logan Albrinck, 10, of Hebron jumps to point out his photograph selected to compete at the state level in the PTA’s Cultural Arts Reflections Program. KAMELLIA SMITH/FOR THE COMMUNITY RECORDER.

Jack Myers, 6, from White’s Tower Elementary School in Independence points to his drawing of firefighter submitted for the PTA’s Cultural Arts Reflections Program. KAMELLIA SMITH/FOR THE COMMUNITY RECORDER.

Tanvi Rakesh, 7, of Union shows her sister her essay for the PTA’s Cultural Arts Reflections Program at Durr Library. KAMELLIA COMMUNITY

Loghan Currin, 11, of Independence shows a move she used in her dance choreography for the PTA’s Cultural Arts Reflections Program. KAMELLIA SMITH/FOR

RECORDER.

THE COMMUNITY RECORDER.

SMITH/FOR THE

A painting by sventh-grader Sydney Hicks of Twenhofel Middle School in Independence, submitted for the PTA’s Cultural Arts Reflections Program. KAMELLIA SMITH/FOR THE COMMUNITY RECORDER.


B2 • FLORENCE-UNION RECORDER • NOVEMBER 14, 2013

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD FRIDAY, NOV. 15

ABOUT CALENDAR

Art & Craft Classes

To submit calendar items, go to www.NKY.com and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to life@communitypress.com along with event information. Items are printed on a space-available basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to www.NKY.com and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page.

Little Learners, 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., The Lively Learning Lab, 7500 Oakbrook Drive, Suite 10, Learn basic skills including fine motor skills, social skills, reading, dancing, music, science and arts/crafts. Ages -1-1. $15. 859371-5227; www.thelivelylearninglab.com. Florence.

Education Roller Coaster Science, 1-2 p.m., The Lively Learning Lab, 7500 Oakbrook Drive, Suite 10, Students design and build their own marble roller coaster to take home. Ages 5-12. $15. Registration required. Presented by Science Matters in America. 859-371-5227. Florence.

Exhibits Verbum Domini Exhibit, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Creation Museum, 2800 Bullittsburg Church Road, Verbum Domini, “The Word of the Lord,” is made up of a couple dozen Bible-related items in an exhibit that celebrates God’s word throughout the ages. Daily exhibit. $29.95 ages 13-59, $23.95 ages 60 and up, $15.95 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and under. 800-778-3390; www.creationmuseum.org. Petersburg. Dragon Invasion Exhibit, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Creation Museum, 2800 Bullittsburg Church Road, Portico. Come face-to-face with tales of dragons from all over the world. View artwork and other adornments strolling beneath Chinese dragons. Learn about encounters with these beasts from China to Africa, Europe to the Americas and Australia to the Middle East. Discover what ancient historians have written about these creatures, and examine armaments that may have been used by valiant dragon slayers. Daily exhibit. $29.95 ages 13-59, $23.95 ages 60 and up, $15.95 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and under. 800-778-3390; www.creationmuseum.org. Petersburg. Dr. Crawley’s Insectorium, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Creation Museum, 2800 Bullittsburg Church Road, Near Palm Plaza and downstairs from Dinosaur Den. Learn interesting facts, such as, not all insects are bugs, but all bugs are insects. Collection represents a lifetime of collecting by Dr. Crawley. With an animatronic person, named Dr. Arthur Pod, who answers many questions about insects. Daily exhibit. Included with admission: $29.95 ages 13-59, $23.95 ages 60 and up, $15.95 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and under. 800-778-3390; www.creationmuseum.org. Petersburg.

Health / Wellness DivorceCare: Surviving the Holidays Event, 6:15-8:30 p.m., Florence United Methodist Church, 8585 Old Toll Road, Encouraging seminar for people facing holidays after separation or divorce. Childcare available through grade 5. $5. Reservations required. 859-371-7961. Florence.

Karaoke and Open Mic Friday Night Karaoke, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Florence Elks Lodge 314, 7704 Dixie Highway, Karaoke and dance. Ages 21 and up. Free. 859-746-3557. Florence.

Scott Miller plays the Southgate House Revival, 8:30 p.m. Friday, Nov. 15.FILE PHOTO Literary - Libraries

SUNDAY, NOV. 17

Meet Your Match, 7 p.m., Boone County Main Library, 1786 Burlington Pike, Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-342-2665. Burlington. Mahjong, 1 p.m., Scheben Branch Library, 8899 U.S. 42, All skill levels welcome. 859-3422665. Union. Lend a Hand: Write a Letter to a Servicemember, 9 a.m.-8 p.m., Scheben Branch Library, 8899 U.S. 42, Write letter of appreciation for an active duty service member. At end of month, library will send letters to be distributed around the world. Free. 859-342-2665. Union.

Literary - Libraries

Shopping Flea Market Pre-Sale, 9 a.m.noon, Diocesan Catholic Children’s Home, 75 Orphanage Road, Festival Grounds. Featuring seasonal items, holiday items, jewelry, household furniture and more. Benefits Diocesan Catholic Children’s Home. Free admission. Through Nov. 16. 859-331-2040, ext. 8555; www.dcchome.org. Fort Mitchell.

SATURDAY, NOV. 16 Literary - Libraries Family Game Day (all ages), 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Boone County Main Library, 1786 Burlington Pike, Games, prizes and snacks. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-3422665. Burlington. Yoga, 6 p.m., Scheben Branch Library, 8899 U.S. 42, Suitable for all levels. $25 per month. 859-342-2665. Union. PAWS to Read (grades K-5), 10 a.m., Scheben Branch Library, 8899 U.S. 42, Read to therapy dog. Call to schedule 15-minute time slot. 859-342-2665. Union. Family Storytime (ages 2-5), 11 a.m., Chapin Memorial Library, 6517 Market St., Help your child build language and literacy skills through stories, songs and play. 859-342-2665. Petersburg. Used Book Sale, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Florence Branch Library, 7425 U.S. 42, Books, CDs, DVDs, reference materials and more. Free. 859-342-2665. Florence. Lend a Hand: Write a Letter to a Servicemember, 9 a.m.-8 p.m., Scheben Branch Library, Free. 859-342-2665. Union.

Used Book Sale, 1-4 p.m., Florence Branch Library, Free. 859-342-2665. Florence. Lend a Hand: Write a Letter to a Servicemember, 9 a.m.-8 p.m., Scheben Branch Library, Free. 859-342-2665. Union.

MONDAY, NOV. 18 Art & Craft Classes Little Learners, 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., The Lively Learning Lab, $15. 859-371-5227; www.thelivelylearninglab.com. Florence.

Civic Tea Party Meeting, 6-8 p.m., Sub Station II, 7905 Dream St., Meet and discuss limited government, free markets and fiscal responsibility. Free. Presented by Grassroots Tea Party of Boone County. 859-586-9207; www.teapartyboonecounty.org. Florence.

Literary - Libraries Homework Help (grades K-12), 5-7 p.m., Boone County Main Library, 1786 Burlington Pike, Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-342-2665. Burlington. Reviewers of Young Adult Literature: Middle and High School, 6:30 p.m., Boone County Main Library, 1786 Burlington Pike, Read new books before they hit the shelves. Free. Registration required. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-342-2665. Burlington. Gentle Yoga, 6 p.m., Boone County Main Library, 1786 Burlington Pike, Learn basic postures and flows. $25. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-342-2665. Burlington. Yoga, 7 p.m., Boone County Main Library, 1786 Burlington Pike, Hatha Yoga postures. $25. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-342-2665. Burlington. In the Loop, 10 a.m., Florence Branch Library, 7425 U.S. 42, Knit or crochet in relaxed, friendly company. Learn for first time or pick up new tricks. 859-342-2665. Florence. Zumba, 6 p.m., Scheben Branch Library, 8899 U.S. 42, 859-3422665. Union. NaNoWriMo (high school), 3:30 p.m., Boone County Main Library, 1786 Burlington Pike, Coffee, snacks and laptops provided. Free. Registration required. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-3422665. Burlington. Lend a Hand: Write a Letter to a Servicemember, 9 a.m.-8 p.m., Scheben Branch Library, Free. 859-342-2665. Union.

TUESDAY, NOV. 19 Education

Campbell County Environmental Education Center, 1261 Race Track Road in Alexandria, hosts an educational class about the wild turkey, 2:30-4 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 16.FILE PHOTO

Enrollment Information Session, 2-3 p.m., Gateway Community and Technical College Boone Campus, 500 Technology Way, Center for Advanced Manufacturing. Learn how to apply, what sort of financial aid is available, type of academic programs college offers and about advising process. Ages 18 and up. Free. 859441-4500. Florence. Financial Aid Workshop, 3-4 p.m., Gateway Community and Technical College Boone Campus, 500 Technology Way, Center for Advanced Manufacturing. Learn how to apply for financial aid using the Free Application for Federal Student

Aid. Deadlines for submission and submission process reviewed. Ages 18 and up. Free. 859-441-4500. Florence. Hopping Hover Craft, 10-11 a.m., The Lively Learning Lab, 7500 Oakbrook Drive, Suite 10, Students learn about Air Cushion Vehicles and investigate how hovercraft overcomes force of friction. Ages 5-12. $15. Registration required. Presented by Science Matters in America. 859-371-5227. Florence.

Exercise Classes Zumba Fitness, 7:15-8 p.m., Full Body Yoga, 7500 Oakbrook Road, $50 for 10 classes, $7 drop in. 859-640-9055. Florence.

Literary - Libraries Lego Mania (all ages), 5-6:30 p.m., Lents Branch Library, 3215 Cougar Path, Let your imagination run wild and build some amazing creations. Legos and Duplos provided. Registration required. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-3422665. Hebron. Bridge, 12:30-3 p.m., Scheben Branch Library, 8899 U.S. 42, Open play. Presented by Florence Branch Library. 859-3422665. Union. Writers Group, 7 p.m., Boone County Main Library, 1786 Burlington Pike, Share your work, get feedback, encouragement and perhaps even inspiration to write your masterpiece. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-3422665. Burlington. Teen Writer Tuesdays (middle and high school), 6:30 p.m., Boone County Main Library, 1786 Burlington Pike, Share your work. Free. Registration required. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-3422665. Burlington. Open Gym (middle and high school), 3 p.m., Chapin Memorial Library, 6517 Market St., Basketball, board games and snacks. 859-342-2665. Petersburg. The Benefits of Massage, 7 p.m., Florence Branch Library, 7425 U.S. 42, Learn about Swedish, deep-tissue and craniosacral therapy from massage therapist Susan Rose Kesti. Free. Registration required. 859-342-2665. Florence. Lend a Hand: Write a Letter to a Servicemember, 9 a.m.-8 p.m., Scheben Branch Library, Free. 859-342-2665. Union.

Tours Dinner and Plant Tour, 6-8 p.m., Mazak Corporation, 7975 Foundation Drive, Tours, demonstrations and dinner. $15. Registration required. 513-3947757. Florence.

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 20 Art & Craft Classes Little Learners, 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., The Lively Learning Lab, $15. 859-371-5227; www.thelivelylearninglab.com. Florence.

Literary - Libraries CSI for High School Kids, 7 p.m., Scheben Branch Library, 8899 U.S. 42, Join expert, Deputy Everett Stahl of the Boone County Sheriff’s Office, to see what it takes to solve a crime. Free. Registration required. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-342-2665; www.bcpl.org. Union. Chess Club, 7 p.m., Florence Branch Library, 7425 U.S. 42, All ages and levels are invited to play. 859-342-2665. Florence. Zumba Gold, 6 p.m., Florence Branch Library, 7425 U.S. 42,

Slow-paced, low-impact version of regular Zumba. $3. 859-3422665. Florence. Real Men Read, 10:30 a.m., Scheben Branch Library, 8899 U.S. 42, Group reads books that appeal to men and then share what they’ve read. 859-3422665. Union. Soups and Sweets, 7 p.m., Boone County Main Library, 1786 Burlington Pike, Chef Gina from Moody’s Discover Cafe shares tips and tricks for making soups and desserts perfect for wintertime. $5. Registration required. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-3422665. Burlington. Lend a Hand: Write a Letter to a Servicemember, 9 a.m.-8 p.m., Scheben Branch Library, Free. 859-342-2665. Union. I Love Rocks (2-5 years), 10:30 a.m., Walton Branch Library, 21 S. Main St., Watch as a geode is cracked open and take home a real fossil. Free. Registration recommended. 859-342-2665. Walton. I Wonder (grades 2-5), 4:30 p.m., Walton Branch Library, 21 S. Main St., Explore the mysteries of the world with Wonderopolis. Free. Registration recommended. 859-342-2665. Walton.

Support Groups DivorceCare Support Group, 6:30-8 p.m., Florence United Methodist Church, 8585 Old Toll Road, Those suffering from experiencing separation or divorce heal and find hope in shared experiences. Child care provided. $15. Registration required. 859-371-7961. Florence. Northern Kentucky Epilepsy Support Group, 6-7:30 p.m., St. Elizabeth Florence, 4900 Houston Road, Emergency Department Conference Room (lower level). Monthly gathering of adults with epilepsy, as well as parents, families and caregivers of those affected by epilepsy. Ages 18 and up. Free. Presented by Epilepsy Foundation of Greater Cincinnati and Columbus. 877-804-2241; www.epilepsy-ohio.org. Florence.

THURSDAY, NOV. 21 Education Admissions Information Session, 3-5 p.m., Gateway Community and Technical College Boone Campus, 500 Technology Way, Center for Advanced Manufacturing, B104A. Learn about admissions, financial aid, academic programs and advising. For ages 16 and up. Free. Presented by Gateway Community and Technical College. Through Dec. 19. 859-441-4500. Florence.

Exercise Classes

Main St., 859-342-2665. Walton. Boone County Historical Society: Banking in Boone County, 7 p.m., Boone County Main Library, 1786 Burlington Pike, Display of early bank records, photos and memorabilia from the old Florence Deposit Bank. Free. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-3422665. Burlington. Finger Knitting: Necklace (middle school), 6:30 p.m., Boone County Main Library, 1786 Burlington Pike, Learn basics of finger knitting and create a necklace. Free. Registration required. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-342-2665. Burlington. Fruitsgiving (2-5 years), 6:30 p.m., Florence Branch Library, 7425 U.S. 42, Create a fruity feast to celebrate the holiday. Free. Registration required. 859-342-2665. Florence. Lend a Hand: Write a Letter to a Servicemember, 9 a.m.-8 p.m., Scheben Branch Library, Free. 859-342-2665. Union.

FRIDAY, NOV. 22 Art & Craft Classes Little Learners, 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., The Lively Learning Lab, $15. 859-371-5227; www.thelivelylearninglab.com. Florence.

Education Spectacular Saturn, 1-2 p.m., The Lively Learning Lab, 7500 Oakbrook Drive, Suite 10, Students learn key facts about Saturn such as atmosphere and the name of Saturn’s largest moon. Ages 5-12. $15. Registration required. Presented by Science Matters in America. 859-371-5227. Florence.

Karaoke and Open Mic Friday Night Karaoke, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Florence Elks Lodge 314, Free. 859-746-3557. Florence.

Literary - Libraries Mahjong, 1 p.m., Scheben Branch Library, 859-342-2665. Union. Lend a Hand: Write a Letter to a Servicemember, 9 a.m.-8 p.m., Scheben Branch Library, Free. 859-342-2665. Union.

SATURDAY, NOV. 23 Craft Shows Melody’s Boot Camp Holiday Bazaar, 9 a.m.-noon, Impact Life Ministries, 8145 Connector Drive, Workouts 7-9 a.m. Vendors with holiday merchandise 9 a.m.noon. Protein smoothie bar for small charge. Free admission. Presented by Melody’s Boot Camp Fitness. 859-371-0821. Florence.

Exhibits

Sombo/Russian Judo, 6:30-8 p.m., Hebron Lutheran Church, 3140 Limaburg Road, Downstairs. Ages 6-adult. Learn Russian art of self-defense and how to fall properly to prevent injury. Ages 6-. $85 per year. Presented by Sombo Joe. 859609-8008. Hebron. Zumba, 6 p.m., Walton Branch Library, 21 S. Main St., Latininspired, calorie-burning workout. $5. 859-342-2665. Walton.

Verbum Domini Exhibit, 9 a.m.-6 p.m., Creation Museum, $29.95 ages 13-59, $23.95 ages 60 and up, $15.95 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and under. 800-778-3390; www.creationmuseum.org. Petersburg. Dragon Invasion Exhibit, 9 a.m.-6 p.m., Creation Museum, $29.95 ages 13-59, $23.95 ages 60 and up, $15.95 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and under. 800-778-3390; www.creationmuseum.org. Petersburg.

Literary - Libraries

Literary - Libraries

American Girl Club, 6:30 p.m., Boone County Main Library, 1786 Burlington Pike, Registration required. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-342-2665. Burlington. Bridge, 12:30-3 p.m., Scheben Branch Library, 859-342-2665. Union. Chick Picks, 10 a.m. Discuss “House of Silk” by Anthony Horowitz., Boone County Main Library, 1786 Burlington Pike, Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-342-2665. Burlington. Pizza and Pages, 3:30 p.m., Lents Branch Library, 3215 Cougar Path, Eat pizza and talk about books you’ve been reading. 859-342-2665. Hebron. Yoga, 6 p.m., Scheben Branch Library, $25 per month. 859-3422665. Union. Drop in Knitting, 9:30 a.m., Walton Branch Library, 21 S.

Yoga, 6 p.m., Scheben Branch Library, $25 per month. 859-3422665. Union. TGT: Ultimate Marvel vs. Capcom 3 (middle & high school), 10 a.m., Florence Branch Library, 7425 U.S. 42, Free. Registration required. 859-342-2665. Florence. Lend a Hand: Write a Letter to a Servicemember, 9 a.m.-8 p.m., Scheben Branch Library, Free. 859-342-2665. Union.

Sports Turf Wars 14 MMA Fighting Event, 8-11 p.m. Doors open 6:30 p.m., Turfway Park, 7500 Turfway Road, Professional and amateur MMA fighting. $25$45. 513-652-2191; www.mixedmartialarts.com. Florence.


LIFE

NOVEMBER 14, 2013 • FLORENCE-UNION RECORDER • B3

Liqueur, salad recipes kick off holiday season

3 cups water Thanksgiving will be here before you know it and some of Pour vodka in large gallon you are already preparing glass jar or container. your grocery list. ThanksWash fruit very well using giving is my favorite holiday hot water to remove wax coatsince it’s just about food, faming. Pat dry. Remove zest with ily and friends – no presents required. Yes, it can get stress- a vegetable peeler. The zest is ful, especially if you’re hosting the colored part. If some of the white part underneath the skin the feast. As I tell you every is visible, cut it off. That’s the year, it’s not only about the pith and it’s very bitter food, but who sits in the (though it is the most chairs. Some advice nutritious part of the from one who has been peel). If you can’t get it there, done that: Parsall off, do the best you ley and whipping cream can. Place zest in jar are great culinary with vodka and cover. Band-Aids. Let sit at room temperDuring one of my ature for at least a week, recent classes, the subor up to three weeks. ject of limoncello for Rita The vodka will take on the holidays came up. If Heikenfeld the color and flavor of you want to give this as RITA’S KITCHEN the citrus as it steeps. a gift or serve it at Bring sugar and water to a Christmas, it’s best to start the simmer and stir until sugar process now. dissolves and thickens a bit. Double Citrus Limoncello Let cool and then add that to The great thing about this is vodka mixture and stir. Strain and put in pretty bottles. Seal it keeps just about forever in and chill in refrigerator for a the freezer. You can use all couple of weeks, at least. lemons for classic limoncello. To use, serve straight over This year I made some with a ice chips, mix with sparkling combo of lemons and limes. It wine or mineral water and a was different, and good. lemon curl, toss with fresh 2 pounds lemons, thick skinned fruit, serve over ice cream, 4 limes, thick skinned if you can frozen yogurt or simple cake. find them 4 cups good quality 100 proof vodka 3 cups sugar

Orangecello

Lemon peel steeps in vodka for 1-3 weeks to make limoncello, a liqueur originally made in Italy.THANKS TO RITA HEIKENFELD

Holiday Waldorf salad

Hot buttered cider

For Will, a Colerain Township reader. For the life of me, I can’t remember the origin of this recipe. I think it was from another reader whose name I obviously misplaced. Regardless, this is one of the tastiest Waldorf salads you’ll ever eat. Mix together:

Add more or less of any ingredient, to your taste. This is a nice offering before the Thanksgiving dinner.

11⁄2 to 2 pounds grapes, mixture of red and green, halved 2 ribs celery, sliced thin 1 cup raisins 1 cup chopped English walnuts 3 diced apples

Mix and blend with above: 1 cup mayonnaise 1 tablespoon vinegar or more to taste 1 cup milk

Let sit in refrigerator several hours before serving.

It’s on my blog!

much horseradish do I add and when do I add it?” For three pounds potatoes, stir in a generous 1⁄4 cup bottled horseradish (not horseradish sauce) after mashing. Check your bottled horseradish if it’s been in the refrigerator a while. It should be nice and white. If it tastes vinegary or not really spicy, it’s old and needs to be replaced.

⁄2 stick butter ⁄2 cup dark brown sugar 1 ⁄2 gallon apple cider 2 oranges, sliced and seeds removed Dash or two ground cloves 2 3-inch long cinnamon sticks 1 ⁄2 cup dark rum (optional) 1 1

Coming soon

Melt butter and add brown sugar. Add cider and cook until sugar is dissolved. Add orange slices, cloves, cinnamon sticks and rum. Bring to boil and then simmer 10 minutes. Serves about 10.

Readers want to know

Horseradish mashed potatoes for Thanksgiving. “How

Cranberry celebration salad like Kroger.

Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educator and author. Find her blog online at Cincinnati.Com/blogs. Email her at columns@communitypress.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Call 513-248-7130, ext. 356

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LIFE

B4 • FLORENCE-UNION RECORDER • NOVEMBER 14, 2013

Student co-authors book wit dad Later this month, Headline Books will nationally release a book to help students better understand capitalism and America. A 13-year-old student author, Lauren Hudson, has crafted engaging coming-of-age tales, emphasizing education and entrepreneurship, with a political twist. Can Isabella, a once poor, unpopular girl, with few friends, someday become a business owner, a governor, or even president of the United States? In America, anything is possible. Students who read “Our Best Tomorrow” will embrace the principles of freedom and hard work which make America great. The book sets the record straight, through the captivating stories of three childhood friends. Isabella, Jake and Ade-

laide experience success, setbacks, heartache and joy as they make their way in the world, striving for American exceptionalism. Lauren’s co-author and father, Robert D. Hudson, a Northern Kentucky lawyer, author and a semi-regular column for the Community Recorders, presents chapter ending “Capitalism Pointers” and famous quotes about capitalism for emphasis. “Our Best Tomorrow” is the student follow-up book to “A Better Tomorrow – Fighting for Capitalism and Jobs in the Heartland.” which became an Amazon No. 1 bestseller. It received the Silver Medal in the national ELit Awards. In 2013, the New York and Great Midwest Book Festivals recognized it as one of the nation’s best business books. In “Our Best Tomor-

The cover of “Our Best Tomorrow” co-authored by daughter and father, Lauren and Rob Hudson of Villa Hills.PROVIDED

row,” the authors avoid party politics and political labels to present an optimistic, unabashedly probusiness, opportunitybased message tailored to America’s youth.

Outdoor calendar go on sale soon Orders are now being taken for one of the most anticipated publications offered by the Kentucky Department of Fish and

Wildlife Resources: the new Kentucky Afield outdoor calendar. In addition to its outstanding photography, the

Greater Cincinnati Veterinary Specialists & Emergency Services is proud to welcome

Justin Calhoun, DVM to our Emergency Services/ Critical Care Team in Wilder, Kentucky A native of the tri-state area and graduate of The Ohio State University College of Veterinary Medicine, Dr. Calhoun comes to our hospital with knowledge and experience in Small Animal Medicine, Surgery, Exotic Animal Medicine, especially reptiles and amphibians. Dr. Calhoun joins our caring and compassionate staff of Emergency Service Veterinarians and Technicians committed to providing your pet with state of the art medical and surgical care every night, weekend and holiday. If your primary care veterinarian’s office is closed,

GCVS Emergency Services is here for you. 11 Beacon Drive Wilder, KY 41076

859-572-0560

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calendar has all kinds of information for the outdoor enthusiast: proposed hunting season dates for 2014, what’s happening in nature each month, scheduled stockings of the Fishing in Neighborhoods (FINs) lakes, hunting and fishing tips, moon phases, meteor showers and more. To receive the 2014 calendar as part of a subscription, a person must subscribe by Monday, Nov. 18. Subscriptions received after this deadline might receive the 2015 calendar in December 2014 instead. Subscribe online at www.fw.ky.gov. Rates are $10 for one year or $18 for two years.

Lauren, a student at Turkeyfoot Middle School in Northern Kentucky, wrote the fiction portions of “Our Best Tomorrow” over her 2013 summer break. She is a Duke Scholar and has received a wide range of awards for academic achievement. Lauren has been recognized for her writing talent, having been selected from the Northern Kentucky region to compete in state writing contests. She also serves on the Turkeyfoot Student Council. A gifted presenter and actor, she has received statewide recognition in forensics speech and drama competitions, with starring roles in her school’s last several drama productions. Lauren plays the piano and was a member of the Kentucky State Honor Choir, performing in the Kentucky

Center for the Performing Arts. In 2011, Lauren presented a business speech to the Northern Kentucky Chamber. Lauren is also a talented athlete. From the guard position, she led Turkeyfoot Middle School in scoring on the basketball court over the 20112012 season and is currently playing AAU basketball. She plays elite soccer for Kings-Hammer in Greater Cincinnati. Most recently, she started center-mid for Dixie High School junior varsity squad, leading the team in scoring as an eighth grader. Rob is an attorney and owner of the law firm Frost Brown Todd LLC. representing businesses in the firm’s labor and employment law practice group. He has been immersed in his region’s

economic development for over two decades. He helped lead Northern Kentucky’s two largest business organizations, as chairman of the Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce and the Covington Business Council. Rob met his wife-to-be, then Melissa Martin, at the University of Kentucky in 1980. After graduating with a backelor’s of science in accounting from the Gatton College of Business and Economics at the University of Kentucky, Rob attended the University of Kentucky College of Law and moved to Greater Cincinnati to practice law. Rob and Melissa live in Villa Hills with their two children, Robbie (17) and Lauren (age 13).

GOOD SHOT

Carmen Hogan, 10, of Burlington shows the 8-point buck she shot on her family’s property in Burlington.THANKS TO EDNA BROOKS

Kindervelt celebrates with Markt Community Recorder

Kindervelt, a sanctioned auxiliary of Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, hosts its 38th annual citywide Kinderklaus Markt “Let It Snow” holiday fundraiser, Nov. 22 and 23, at The Syndicate in Newport. All funds raised this year are designated for the Heart Institute-Kindervelt Neurodevelopmental Educational and Learning Center at the hospital.

Festivities begin with the Snowball Bash, 6:30-10 p.m. Friday, Nov. 22. Ticket prices are $40 per person via reservation; $45 at the door. Kinderklaus Markt, one of the area’s longestrunning holiday craft shows, is scheduled for 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Nov. 23, also at The Syndicate. Admission is free. For registration information, visit www.kindervelt.org.

Members of Kindervelt Group No. 56, Sheila Horan, of Wilder, Carolyn Riehle, of Union, Libby Baker, of Lakeside Park, Terri Mitsch, of Fort Thomas and Ruth Wiley, of Anderson Township, Ohio, help get ready for the “Let It Snow” holiday fundraiser.THANKS TO SUSAN DEYE

Have You Been Diagnosed With Migraine Headaches? A clinical research study of an investigational migraine drug

What The purpose of this research study is to determine if a medicine (Theramine®) made from ingredients normally found in food will help prevent migraine headaches. Who Adults between the ages of 18 and 65 years of age who have been diagnosed with migraine headaches. Pay Qualified participants will receive compensation for their time and travel. Details For more information please call 513-614-7475 or email ucmigraine@gmail.com. CE-0000574938

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LIFE

NOVEMBER 14, 2013 • FLORENCE-UNION RECORDER • B5

Winter Ball set Nov. 23 cer, that inspired him to become an oncologist. Organization: Oncology Hematology Care will be recognized as Company of the Year. This award recognizes significant professional and voluntary contributions to the society. Physician: Dr. Lawrence Brennan of Oncology Hematology Care will be recognized as Physician of the Year. Volunteer: The Mary Middleton Spirit of Hope award will be given to

During the American Cancer Society’s 2013 Northern Kentucky Winter Ball, which will take place Saturday, Nov. 23, at the Marriott Rivercenter in Covington, local supporters will be recognized the for their contributions to the society. Honoree: Dr. Doug Flora of Oncology Hematology Care will be honored for his work in the field of oncology as well as a being caregiver to his mother, who lost her battle with breast can-

Two in N.Ky. win history awards There were two winners of Kentucky History Awards this year. The Northern Kentucky Regional History Day, put on in Highland Heights, won in the Education category. And the “Chronicles of Boone County QR Code Project” by Kaitlin Barber of the Boone County Public Library won in Publications. Winners received their awards at a special ceremony at the Old State Capitol in Frankfort Nov. 8, during the

Tommy Evans, who has worked to promote cancer awareness in the Northern Kentucky community through Bosom Buddy. Tickets are $1250 per person. For more information or to purchase tickets, call 859-647-2226 or www.striderswinter ball.org For more information, contact the American Cancer Society at 1-800-227-2345 or visit us at cancer.org.

Jaycees make a difference Boone County Jaycees participated in National Make a Difference Day Oct. 26 by serving the elderly and chronically ill patients of Bridge Point Nursing Home in Florence. Five adults and two children dressed in Halloween costumes and held a reverse trick-or-treat at the center. Treat bags were filled with tissues, hair brushes, notebooks, pens, and calendars. The chapter members attended the daily Bingo session and walked room to room handling out goodie bags and visiting with more than 70 residents. The chapter hosts a variety of events all year including: Redwood dances, high school scholarships, Veteran’s Day essay contests, needy family christmas, sporting events, speaker programs, prayer breakfast to honor local

wealth. Stuart Sanders, historical society professional services administrator, said award winners have shown a consistent effort to promote the preservation and appreciation of state and local history.

historical society’s annual meeting and Kentucky History Awards Celebration. The Kentucky History Awards recognize outstanding achievements by historians, public history professionals, civic leaders, communities and local history organizations across the common-

PRESENTS

TEXAS GUITAR WOMEN

McAuley Performing Arts Center 6000 Oakwood Ave. Cincinnati, Ohio 45224

Sat., Nov. 23 • 7:30 p.m.

The Boone County Jaycees who were at Make a Difference Day were, from left, Chris Pavese, Cassie, Evans, Alexys Pavese, Kristen Burleson, Alex Burleson and Erica Pavese. There but not in the photo was Lois Evans.PROVIDED

clergy, reverse trick or treat at the nursing homes, Kentucky Speedway races, membership socials, and quarter auctions. The Jaycees are cur-

rently running a membership drive in Boone County. The organization is looking for individuals between 18-41 would like to meet like minded people. Contact 2013 President

THE GRASCALS

St. Xavier Performance Center 600 West North Bend Rd. Cincinnati, Ohio 45224

Katie Beagle at 859-4668998 or visit a meeting at 7 p.m. on the first Wednesday of each month at the Florence Government Center.

Sat., Jan. 25 • 7:30 p.m.

For Tickets and Information Go To

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LIFE

B6 • FLORENCE-UNION RECORDER • NOVEMBER 14, 2013

Brothers think they have fire-eating record

St. E foundation celebrating holidays

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pearances by Heather French Henry, Miss America 2000; Jenna Day, Miss Kentucky 2013; and Dr. Shawn Nordhiem, Mrs. Kentucky 2006. The show and luncheon will include shopping from a variety of local vendors, lunch, style show and silent auction. In addition, this year’s style show features fashions provided by Dillard’s, Donna Salyers Fabulous Furs and designs from the Heather French Henry Collection. Complimentary valet parking will also be provided. Proceeds will allow the St. Elizabeth cardiovascular mobile van to offer free life-saving cardiovascular screenings for under-served communities. Tickets are $40. Sponsorships are also available at the $500-$1,000 levels. For more information or to RSVP, contact the foundation office at 859301-2490 or visit www.stelizabeth.com/ foundation.

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Brothers Erik Kloeker, 23, of Fort Thomas and Travis Fessler, 40, of Florence get fired up on the job together. The brothers have been eating fire together since 2002 when Erik was 14 and living in Cold Spring. Since then, the brothers have sharpened their act, and they also now juggle axes and swallow swords as the touring Pickled Brothers Circus. They are now waiting to hear from Guinness World Records to see if they broke the record for extinguishing the most lit torches by mouth in 30 seconds. On Sept. 4, at Jungle Jim’s in Union Township, Ohio, Kloeker said he put out 45 torches in 30 seconds, and his brother extinguished 43 torches in 30 seconds. The established record is 39 torches, according to guinnessworldrec ords.com. Kloeker said his brother got him interested in eating fire and juggling. In his spare time he practiced juggling upside down as a teen. “Mom was not too happy in the beginning, but she’s kind of used to it now,” he said. Working to break and set world records has been part of their act all along, Kloeker said. At age 16 he swallowed his first sword in an attempt to become the youngest sword swallower. In August 2012, Kloeker set the world record for most consecutive ax

SCOOTER MEDIA CO.

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FINDING THE CIRCUS For information about how to find the Pickled Brothers Circus visit http://pickledbrothers.com/ or search for them by name on Facebook.com.

wife Susan also eats fire. “She didn’t try for the record,” he said. “She doesn’t eat fire as often as I do.” One part of Fessler’s act has Susan holding a flower or another a prop to perform feats of using a whip precisely. “So, when I crack the bullwhip, I knock the head off the flower,” he said. “So, that takes a lot of courage and trust.” The brothers have taken their fire-eating, sword-swallowing and ax-juggling act across the United States, and even overseas to Milan, Italy, and Beijing, China, Fessler said. Becoming a fire eater and circus performer

juggling catches in Newport. The trick to extinguishing a flame inside your mouth is cutting off the oxygen, Kloeker said. And in all the times he has extinguished torches, he has never had a serious burn or a trip to the hospital. “It’s mostly about overcoming fear,” he said. “We’ve been doing it a long time. It’s just a lot of practice to be able to put them out so quickly.” He said they play up a brothers’ rivalry during their shows, but it rarely exists outside of their public act. Fessler said the circus is a family business – his

wasn’t Fessler’s first plan in life. “Growing up I always did little magic shows and I was always into magic, but I wasn’t very good at it,” he said. Fessler said a magic shop owner told him about how people eat fire as a different way to awe audiences. When the brothers are on stage they run their show like a vaudeville act. Fessler said they display signs with messages including “medicine show” as a way to harken back to live touring shows around before the advent of television and radio.

Time for turkey talk Across America, Thanksgiving plans are being made. The menu, the decorations and the guest list are being finalized. In many homes, turkey will be the star of the meal. In fact, the National Turkey Federation estimates more than 46 million turkeys will be cooked this year for Thanksgiving. Whether your choose a large, bone-in turkey, a frozen turkey breast or roll to cook, or a precooked bird, there are some food safety considerations to remember. Avoid waiting until the last minute to purchase your turkey. Frozen turkeys, turkey breasts and turkey rolls need to be safely thawed prior to preparation.

Thawing meat in the refrigerator is the safest and preferred method. Place the Diane packaged Mason turkey in a large pan EXTENSION NOTES in the refrigerator. The pan will keep any juices from leaking onto shelves or other food items. It may take five or six days to safely thaw a large turkey in the refrigerator. It takes about 24 hours for each 4-5 pounds of turkey to thaw in a 40-degree refrigerator. Properly thawed, turkey will keep for two days before it must be cooked or refro-

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zen. Plan ahead to allow enough time for thawing and for the space required in the refrigerator. Fresh turkeys should be purchased no more than two days prior to preparation. It is best to place an order to ensure the bird is ready for pickup when you need it. Precooked turkeys and turkey breasts should be used within three or four days of purchase. If you are not able to use all of the precooked meat, it may be safely frozen for later use. Wrap it well, label it, and plan to use it within a month or two. Depending on the amounts of precooked meat frozen, it may take 48 hours to thaw in the refrigerator. When planning your menu, the Food Safety In-

spection Service recommends purchasing threefourths to one pound of bone-in turkey per person; plan for one-half pound per person of boneless breast of turkey. Expect to need about threefourths pound per person if serving a bone-in turkey breast. After cooking and serving, do not allow the turkey to sit at room temperature for more than two hours. Plan to use or freeze all leftover turkey within two days of serving. This helps decrease the likelihood of food borne illness from improperly stored food. Diane Mason is county extension agent at the Boone County Cooperative Extension Service.

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The St. Elizabeth Healthcare Foundation will have its annual Style Show and Luncheon 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Monday, Nov. 25, at the Cincinnati Airport Marriott, 2395 Progress Drive, Hebron. The style show will feature speaker Dr. D.P. Suresh, of the Heart and Vascular Program at St. Elizabeth Physicians. Liz Bonis, Local 12 WKRC-TV anchor, will serve as emcee. There will also be special ap-

859-431-0087 Investment Property loans for Kentucky residents only.


LIFE

NOVEMBER 14, 2013 • FLORENCE-UNION RECORDER • B7

100th birthday at senior center man on Thursday. The club welcomed two guests, Rhonda Stevens and Annette Perkins. Annette presented a really nice program showing how to make some holiday coasters and had some of her beautiful wool quilts and needlework on display. The club will attend the Gaines History Museum Tea on Dec. 15 as the Christmas outing. ■ Would you like to make some unique Christmas ornaments? If so, please come to the Walton Christian Church on Nov. 20th at 1:00 pm. to ?. Everyone is invited along with Diggers and Planters Garden Club to discuss and make the type ornaments that were used in the early 1800s. These will be used to decorate the Gaines House Museum. Just

bring a snack to share, along with any news items you would like to discuss. If you would like to attend, let Jayme BonarBridges know by e-mail janary11292@yahoo.com or call 859.240.3050, so she can have plenty of supplies available. ■ Walton has a School of Music now located at the Walton Christian Church. If you are interested in learning to play an instrument, a qualified musician is available. The teacher is Pablo Benavides, who is the music director at Walton Christian Church. He is an adjunct professor of music at Northern Kentucky University, has a master’s of arts from Texas Christian University, and a master’s from the University of Cincinnati Conservatory

Bulbs light way to spring Question: Which flower bulbs are best for this area, and when should they be planted? Answer: You can plant flower bulbs any time from October through December. Consider planting a variety of types so you can enjoy their cheerful colors from late winter through late spring. Some even bloom in the summer or fall. Deer will eat tulips and a few other bulbs, but usually do not touch daffodils, which also seem to thrive longer in our clay soils. The earliest blooming bulbs for color next February and March include crocus, Greek anemone, glory-of-the-snow, winter aconite, snowdrops, daffodils, and Siberian squill. Several of these continue blooming into April. Others that bloom in April include trout lily, crown imperial, hyacinth, grape hyacinth, puschkinia, and tulips. Some of these continue blooming into May. Additional hardy bulbs, tu-

bers and corms that can be planted now for May bloom include allium, camassia, Mike Spanish Klahr squill, and HORTICULTURE bluebells. CONCERNS Many alliums keep blooming into June and July, and are joined by other summer bloomers such as brodiaea, asiatic lilies, and aurelian lilies. Oriental lilies bloom in July and August, when they are joined by various types of lycoris. Autumn crocus closes the show in September. All the above mentioned bulbs, tubers and corms may be safely planted this fall for seasonal bloom in 2014 and subsequent years. Most bulbs will tolerate a wide range of soil conditions. They generally do best in soils with a pH range of 5.5 to 6.5, although some, such as hyacinths, do better in a slightly more acidic soil.

In general, soil type is not as important as soil drainage. Avoid planting in low, wet areas, or in soils with poor drainage. When choosing a planting location, consider that most bulbs prefer full sun conditions. Spring blooming bulbs can be planted under the canopy of deciduous trees. Bulbs and corms are generally planted at a depth equal to two to three times the diameter of the bulb. Some exceptions include stem rooting lilies, which need to be planted a little deeper, and the Madonna lily, which is planted just below the soil surface. Soil type also affects planting depths. Bulbs should be planted deeper in sandy soils than in clay soils. You should water all bulbs thoroughly at planting time. Mike Klahr is the Boone County extension agent for horticulture.

of Music. Piano lessons are available currently on Thursday afternoon and evening. All lessons take place at Walton Christian Church. Lessons are available for all ages. The lessons (single student) takes place once a week at Walton Christian Church. Instruction is for 30 minutes. Student’s parent/ adult guardian must remain at WCC while lesson is taking place. Cost and information is available by calling 859-485-4591. Payment is made to Walton Christian Church. ■ If you are interested in learning some history about our Boone County you won’t want to miss Judge Anthony Frohlich’s review of his new book “Kentucky Courts.” The book is a history of court

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system from the creation of the state, focusing on Boone County, which at one time or another shared a court system with 14 other counties. There is valuable information on our different courts and commissions. There is history and photographs of the courthouses and of the hanging tree and mob lynchings. Also, Judge Frolich will be elaborating on one of his past books, “Time Keeper.” This gives lots of Boone County history in the life to Thomas Zane Roberts, the inventor of the solar clock 100 years ago and is still in existence. The review will be at the main library on Highway 18 at 7 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 5. By the way Judge Frohlich served as our Walton City Attorney in the 1980s.

■ The Baptist Shoebox Packing Party and Chili supper on Friday at the OFC Building looked about like Santa’s workshop. The ladies under the direction of Debbie Mulford and Barb Schadler have done a great job. Dedication of the Shoeboxes will be on November 17 at First Baptist morning service. ■ Get well wishes to Denise Lawrence due to hip surgery this past week at Christ Hospital

Ruth Meadows writes a column about Walton. Feel free to call her at 859-391-7282 with Walton neighborhood news items.

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LIFE

B8 • FLORENCE-UNION RECORDER • NOVEMBER 14, 2013

DEATHS Margie Alford Margie Rapp Alford, 61, died Nov. 5, 2013. She was self-employed as the business owner of Sprinkler Inspection Services and The Hub warehouse in Covington, was instrumental in developing R-3 services of Covington which include the Re-Use Center and services which aid in renewing and restoring productive life to those struggling with recovery from addictions, and was an active member of Main Street Baptist Church in Alexandria, where she was involved with women’s ministry and Bible study groups. Her father, Charles C. Rapp, died previously. Survivors include her husband, Ron Alford; mother, Josephine Rapp; siblings, Mary Reed, Julie Murphy, John Rapp, Dan Rapp, Chuck Rapp, Elizabeth Baumann, Tony Rapp, Gary Rapp and Cindy Vogt; and 35 nieces and nephews. Memorials: Hospice of the

Bluegrass, 7388 Turfway Road, Florence, KY 41042; or St. Elizabeth Hospice Program, 483 S. Loop Drive, Edgewood, KY 41017.

Glenn Cox Glenn “David” Cox, 66, of Fort Thomas, died Nov. 6, 2013, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. He worked with the Internal Revenue Service for 20 years in Covington, and was member of the First Baptist Church of Fort Thomas. Survivors include his wife, Sue Cox of Fort Thomas; sons, Jason Cox of Bellevue, and Jeremy Cox of St. Bernard, Ohio; sister, Sharon Webb of Burlington; and brother, Larry Cox of Dickson, Tenn. Memorials: American Parkinson Disease Association, 165 W. Galbraith Road, Suite 218 B, Cincinnati, OH 45216.

Shirley Cox Shirley J. Dennis Cox, 76, of Walton, died Nov. 3, 2013, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. She was a retired breakfast hostess for Residence Inn in Erlanger, member of Walton Christian Church, and enjoyed crocheting, sewing, traveling and reading. Her husband, Roy Gerald

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“Jerry” Cox; daughter, Jennifer Coleman; and grandson, Christopher Bowling, died previously. Survivors include her daughters, Debbie Bowling, Susan Collins and Sandy Patterson; son, Rob Cox of Florence; sisters, Brenda Watson and Becky Lewis; brother, Ronnie Dennis; 12 grandchildren, 15 great-grandchildren and one great-great grandson. Interment was at Independence Cemetery. Memorials: American Heart Association; or the American Cancer Society; or the Multiple Sclerosis Society.

Mary Dorning Mary Helen Powers Dorning, 86, of Covington, died Oct. 30, 2013, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. She was a retired nurse’s aide for St. Charles Nursing Home, was a member of Cathedral Basilica of the Assumption Church and St. John Church in Covington, and belonged to the Fussettes Club of Stan’s Café of Covington. Her husband, Herman B. Dorning; brothers, Bill Powers and Tom Powers; and sisters, Ruth Anneken and Ginny Macke, died previously. Survivors include her sons, Gregory Dorning of Covington, William B. Dorning of Covington, and Michael Joseph Dorning of Hebron; daughters, Judith Dorning of Covington and Jennifer Dorning of Cincinnati; sister, Betty Adams of Fort Mitchell; six grandchildren and one great-grandson. Interment was at St. Mary Cemetery in Fort Mitchell. Memorials: St. Charles Care Center, 500 Farrell Drive, Fort Wright, KY 41011.

Mary Dunlevy Mary Joyce Dunlevy, 81, of Fort Thomas, died Nov. 6, 2013, at Carmel Manor Nursing Home in Fort Thomas. She was a homemaker, graduate of Sacred Heart Academy in Louisville, attended the University of Louisville. She was a member of St. Thomas Church, Fort Thomas; St. Thomas Choir

CE-0000573826 0005738 3826 6

and Resurrection Choir; St. Thomas Parish Council and Mothers Club President; Diocese of Covington Marriage Tribunal; Tri Kappa; Catholic Family Movement; Campbell County Homemakers; Campbell County Extension Council and the Diocese of Covington Catholic Charities. Her husband, Walter Richard Dunlevy; children, John Anthony, Michele and Hilary; sister, Geri Stauble; and brother, Robert Huelsman, died previously. Survivors include her daughters, Maureen Mayer of Wilder, Lisa Kirst of Cold Spring, and Joy Bricking of Fort Thomas; sons, Walter B. Dunlevy of Cold Spring, and Tim Dunlevy of Burlington; brother, Ken Huelsman of Carlsbad, Calif.; 32 grandchildren and 23 greatgrandchildren. Burial was at St. Stephen Cemetery in Fort Thomas. Memorials: Catholic CharitiesDiocese of Covington, 3629 Church St., Covington, KY 41015; or St. Vincent de Paul Food Pantry/St. Thomas Church, 26 East Villa Place, Fort Thomas, KY 41075.

Emorillis Gettys Emorillis B. Gettys, 95, died Oct. 31, 2013, at the Highlandspring Nursing Home in Fort Thomas. She was a lifelong Boone/ Kenton County resident, a homemaker, member of St. Paul’s Parish in Florence, and worked several years at Thomas More College. Her husband, Paul; grandson, Trevor; and siblings, Aloysius “Bud” Mathis, Marcella Huser, Charlotte Gamm, Norbert Mathis, Leo Mathis and Philip Mathis, died previously. Survivors include her children, Paul, Robert, Norbert, Patrick, Jane Montgomery and Joyce Wagner; 15 grandchildren and 14 great-grandchildren. Memorials: Salvation Army; or the charity of donor’s choice.

Michael Hoskins Michael Hoskins, 58, of Covington, died Nov. 4, 2013, at his home. He was a roofer for Furlong Roofing. Survivors include his daughter, Alisa Lovelace of Independence, and Brandy Fountain of Walton; brother, Ben Hoskins, Joe Hall, Gary Hoskins and Allen Hoskins; sisters, Veronica Hoskins, Lisa Gibson, Holly Pitt and Dawn Placke; and four grandchildren.

Louise Hunt

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Louise W. Hunt, 99, of Newport, formerly of Bellevue, died Nov. 6, 2013, at the Baptist Convalescent Center in Newport. She was a homemaker, and member of the Prince of Peace Lutheran Church in Bellevue. Her husband, Charles Hunt, died previously. Survivors include her daughters, Judy Apted of Newport, and Linda Fennell of Florence; four grandchildren, 10 greatgrandchildren and two greatgreat-grandchildren. Burial was at Evergreen Cemetery in Southgate. Memorials: Prince of Peace

Lutheran Church, 306 Center St., Bellevue, KY 41073.

Elizabeth Kellerman Elizabeth J. Kellerman, 85, of Florence, formerly of Erlanger, died Nov. 3, 2013, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. She was a former K-Mart employee, homemaker, and member of St. Henry Church. Her husband, Arthur F. Kellerman, and son, John Kellerman, died previously. Survivors include her sons, A. Mike Kellerman of Burlington, Daniel Kellerman of Iowa City, Iowa, Tim Kellerman of Burlington, David Kellerman of Lakeside Park, Jeff Kellerman of Erlanger, and Tom Kellerman of Fort Mitchell; daughters, Kathy Drews of Burlington, Sandy Domsher of Boone County, and Marybeth Dotter of Louisville; brother, John Herrmann of Cynthiana; 24 grandchildren and 22 great-grandchildren. Interment was at St. Mary Cemetery in Fort Mitchell. Memorials: Diocesan Catholic Children’s Home, 75 Orphanage Road, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017.

Rodney Kenner Rodney Kenner, 60, of Florence, formerly of Williamstown, died Oct. 31, 2013, at his residence. He was a distribution manager for 25 years at Levi Strauss & Co. and DSI, a truck driver for 16 years at Team Worldwide, and member of the Williamstown Baptist Church. His father, Kenneth Kenner, died previously. Survivors include her mother, Willena Scroggins Kenner of Williamstown; wife, Debbie Brooking Kenner; son, Jeff Kenner of Houston; sisters, Patsy Kenner of Erlanger and Carol Souder of Williamstown; brothers, Dennis Kenner of Georgetown and Douglas Kenner of Williamstown; stepson, Adam Ashcraft of Anderson Township, Ohio; and stepdaughter, Jennifer Walsh of Burlington; and five grandchildren. Memorials: St. Elizabeth Hospice, 483 S. Loop Road, Edgewood, KY 41017.

Helen Kohorst Helen Kohorst, 84, of Burlington, died Nov. 6, 2013, at her residence. She was a homemaker, and a member of Immaculate Heart of Mary Church. Her husband, Donald Kohorst, and daughter, Pat Painer, died previously. Survivors include her two daughters, Jeanne Pierce and Diane Rudolph; sons, Steve, Paul and Tom Kohorst; 13 grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. Memorials: Alzheimer’s Association Greater Cincinnati, 644 Linn St., Suite 1026, Cincinnati, OH 45203; or Hospice of the Bluegrass 7388 Turfway Road; Florence, KY 41042.

Ronald Laws Ronald E. Laws, 72, of Burlington, died Oct. 31, 2013, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. He was a retired customerservice agent for US Air, and an avid Kentucky Wildcats fan.

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His brother, Clyde Laws, died previously. Survivors include his wife, Kathleen J. Hofer Laws; sons, Ronald E. Laws Jr. of Independence, Randall A. Laws of Ohio, Daryl Laws of Covington, Brandon E. Laws and Timothy R. Laws, both of Denver; daughters, Lori Anna Laws-Kien of Mason, Ohio, and Brandy Strange of Burlington; sister, Zetta Cirivello of Union Township, Ohio; brothers, Daryl L. Laws and Roger Laws, both of Villa Hills, and Jess Laws of Dry Ridge; and 13 grandchildren. Interment was at Hebron Lutheran Cemetery.

Nancye Lemox Nancye Elizabeth Lemox, 72, of Walton, died Oct. 24, 2013, at her home. She worked as an executive secretary at General Electric and later as a realtor. Her daughter, Lisa Buckner, died previously. Survivors include her daughter, Lauri Blevins of Independence; three grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Memorials: Nancye Lemox Memorial Fund, care of any US Bank.

Donna Mager Donna Sue Mager, 83, of Florence, died Oct. 31, 2013, at her home. Her husband, Donald A. Mager Sr., and sister, Madeline Insko, died previously. She was a homemaker, avid gardener, animal lover and advocate, and enjoyed cooking. Survivors her daughter, Dawn Roberts; son, Don Mager Jr.; two grandchildren, three stepgrandchildren and one stepgreat-grandchild. Memorials: Boone County Animal Shelter, 5643 Idlewild Road, Burlington, KY 41005; or Honor Flight Tri-State Headquarters, 8627 Calumet Way, Cincinnati, OH 45249.

Elden McCubbin Sr. Elden Coe McCubbin Sr., 73, of Independence, died Oct. 31, 2013, at home. He was an Army veteran of Vietnam, retired from Iron Workers Local No. 44 in 1998, and enjoyed golf, card-playing and watching sports. His brother, William Lloyd, died previously. Survivors include his wife, Paula; son, Elden Coe McCubbin Jr. of Erlanger; daughter, Dinah Bowman of Florence; sister, Alma Sallee of Florence; and four grandchildren. Memorials: the family of Elden McCubbin, care of Chambers and Grubbs Funeral Home.

Margie Meikle Margie Rector Woods Meikle, 71, of Burlington, died Oct. 30, 2013. Survivors include her daughter, Brigitte Woods Bachman; sister, Ella Rose Rector Bobb; and one grandson. Burial was at Belleview Cemetery. Memorials: St. Elizabeth Hospice, 483 S. Loop Road, Edgewood, KY 41017.

Stephen Ostafi Stephen Ostafi, 98, of Florence, died Nov. 4, 2013, at Florence Park Care Center. He was a retired glass laborer for Libby-Owens Ford in Toledo, member of St. Michaels Byzantine Catholic Church in Toledo, was one of the original owners and developers of Riverby Hills Country Club in Waterville, Ohio, and enjoyed fishing, hunting and golfing. His wife, Anna Andryc Ostafi, and daughter, Marsha OstafiGreenfield, died previously. Survivors include his son, Robert S. Ostafi; two grandsons, two step-grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Interment was at Fort Meigs Cemetery in Perrysburg, Ohio. Memorials: St. Elizabeth Hospice.

Elmo Perry Elmo R. Perry, 85, of Elsmere, died Nov. 4, 2013, at Woodcrest Manor Nursing Home in Elsmere. He retired from Burk Marketing Research Company in Cincinnati, and was a Marine Corps veteran of the Korean Conflict. His brothers, Elroy C. Perry, David Perry and Bernie Perry, died previously.

See DEATHS, Page B9


LIFE

NOVEMBER 14, 2013 • FLORENCE-UNION RECORDER • B9

POLICE REPORTS

George P. Otten, 34, alcohol intoxication in a public place, Oct. 19. Michael A. Bonfiglio, 53, failure to or improper signal, reckless driving, DUI, failure to produce insurance card, Oct. 19. Tony L. Eagle, 30, DUI, Oct. 19. Michael A. Craig, 35, possession of controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia, Oct. 19. Christopher L. Cooper, 23, public intoxication - controlled substance, possession of controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia, Oct. 18. Gregory L. Wells, 51, public intoxication - controlled substance, Oct. 18. Arbia T. Phillips Jr., 26, improper equipment, possession of controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia, Oct. 17. Larry D. Walling, 38, alcohol intoxication in a public place, Oct. 17. Sandy D. Sandlin, 46, leaving scene of an accident, DUI, failure to produce insurance card, Oct. 17. Michelle L. Cahall, 27, failure to illuminate head lamps, trafficking in marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia, Oct. 17. Eric D. Zauner, 26, DUI, careless driving, Oct. 17. Vincent F. Lavagna, 41, two charges of possession of controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia, Oct. 16. Kevin E. Hughes, 35, DUI, Oct. 15. Michael A. Klette Jr., 30, possession of controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia, Oct. 16. Cassie E. Workman, 28, careless driving, speeding 19 mph over the limit, DUI, Oct. 14. Tomas Sanchez, 35, DUI, no operators-moped license, reckless driving, Oct. 13. Travis M. Stamates, 37, DUI, Oct. 13. Michael W. Funk, 29, careless driving, DUI, Oct. 13. Keith D. McKinney, 19, public intoxication-controlled substance, Oct. 13. Marty D. Ickenbroth, 49, DUI, Oct. 6. Eric G. Taylor, 39, first-degree

Incidents/investigations Burglary Gasoline stolen at 2879 Ridge Ave., Oct. 18. Cash and change stolen at 216 Mount Zion Road, Oct. 18. Money stolen at 7109 Susan Court, Oct. 18. Program module for the entire facility and pieces of electrical boards in the facility stolen at 7964 Kentucky Drive, Oct. 16. Money and credit cards stolen at 5284 Country Club Lane, Oct. 15. Air compressor, tool box stolen at 7032 Glen Arbor Drive, Oct. 14. Business broken into and items taken at 177 S. Main St., Oct. 6. Business broken into and items taken at 10720 Dixie Hwy., Oct. 7. Business broken into and items taken at 12669 Dixie Hwy., Oct. 7. Burglary, theft Automobiles stolen at 11307 Sheffield Lane, Oct. 17. Household goods and money stolen at Cedarwood Drive, Oct. 15. Tools stolen at 6009 Petersburg Road, Oct. 13.

Criminal mischief Automobiles stolen/destroyed/damaged/vandalized at 1850 Airport Exchange Blvd., Oct. 19. Two vehicle tires destroyed/ damaged/vandalized at 550 Mount Zion Road No. 404, Oct. 17. Automobiles destroyed/ damamged/vandalized at 1274 Mount Zion Road, Oct. 14. Building vandalized at 7968 Kentucky Court, Oct. 7. Property vandalized at Dozer Drive and Dixie Hwy., Oct. 7. Vehicles vandalized at 7581 Thunder Ridge Drive, Oct. 7. Vehicles vandalized at 4460 Hathaway Road, Oct. 8. Vehicles vandalized at Limaburg Creek Road, Oct. 9. Fraud Subject tried to pass a check in victim’s name at 14973 Walton Verona Road, Oct. 7. Harassment Physical contact, no injury at 2036 Horizon Drive, Oct. 19. Victim harassed verbally by subject at 837 Karen Court, Oct. 6. Victim verbally harassed by subject at 270 Ashwood Drive, Oct. 7. Incident report Subject found in possession of more than eight ounces of marijuana at Farmhouse Way, Oct. 7. Narcotics Subject found in possession of heroin at 26 Kuchle Drive, Oct. 7. Subject found in possession of heroin at 195 Mary Grubbs Way, Oct. 7. Possession Possession of controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia at 6450 Camp Ernst Road, Oct. 18. Public intoxication- controlled substance, possession of controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia at 9950 Berberich Drive, Oct. 18. Improper equipment, possession of controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia at Interstate 75 southbound, Exit 178 exit ramp, Oct. 17. Two counts possession of controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia at 195 Whitfield Ave., Oct. 16. Possession of controlled substance, possession of drug

paraphernalia at Garden Drive, Oct. 16. Robbery Money stolen at 13019 Walton Verona Road, Oct. 13. Shoplifting Costume jewelry stolen at 12300 Towne Center Drive, Oct. 16. Subject tried to steal clothing from Kohl’s at 12300 Towne Center Drive, Oct. 8. Terroristic threatening Third degree at 15046 Walton Verona Road, Oct. 13. Victim threatened with violence by subject at 6234 Apple Valley Court, Oct. 7. Theft Pistol stolen at 6521 Rosetta Drive, Oct. 19. Headphones stolen at 3990 Olympic Blvd., Oct. 18. Cellphone stolen at 3680 Langley Drive, Oct. 17. Washing machine stolen at 137 Beeson Drive, Oct. 17. Wallet, social security card stolen at 3105 North Bend Road, Oct. 17. Purse, computer stolen at 204 Old Walton Nicholson Road, Oct. 17. Wallet, Iphone stolen at Doering Drive, Oct. 16. Money stolen at Afton Drive, Oct. 14. Ipod stolen at 4505 Margo

Survivors include his brothers, Wayne Perry of Erlanger, Karl Perry of Covington, and James Perry of Cincinnati; and sister, Velma Hiatt of Florence. Interment was at Independence Cemetery. Memorials: charity of the donor’s choice.

Daniel Schwarberg Daniel E. Schwarberg, 34, of Union, died Nov. 3, 2013. He was a graduate of Gate-

way Community College, and worked at R.A. Jones. Survivors include his wife, Tiah Thomas Schwarberg; mother and father, Edward J. and Peggy DeMaria Schwarberg; brothers, Ryan and Edward P. Schwarberg; and grandparents, Edward T. and Rose Schwarberg, Mary DeMaria. Burial was at St. John Cemetery in Fort Wright.

Kristy Sydnor Kristy Joy Sydnor, 36, of Florence, died Oct. 31, 2013, at

FLORENCE Arrests/citations Blake C. Withrow, 19, firstdegree criminal mischief, DUI, Oct. 11. Ricky R. Ackman, 53, DUI, Oct. 12. Christine E. Greenwell, 63, improper turning, DUI, Oct. 12.

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her mother’s home. She was a dental technician for many years. Survivors include her mother, Sharon Clark of Florence; father, Jeff Sydnor of Crittenden; brother, Jeff Sydnor of Florence; and children, Kiersten Sydnor, Christian Sydnor, both of Florence, and Hunter Stevens of Florida. Memorials: Kristy Sydnor Memorial Fund, care of any Fifth Third Bank.

Criminal mischief Vehicles vandalized at 7680 Banklick St., Oct. 11. Vehicles vandalized at 7629 Mall Road, Oct. 11. Vehicles vandalized at 306 Saint Judes Circle, Oct. 11. Vehicles vandalized at 7960 Mall Road, Oct. 12. Property vandalized at 12 Lacresta Drive, Oct. 12. Vehicles vandalized at Frogtown Road and War Admiral Drive, Oct. 6. Fraud Subject tried to use counterfeit money at Kroger at 7747 Mall Road, Oct. 11. Shoplifting Subject tried to steal merchandise from Macy’s at 5000 Mall Road, Oct. 12. Theft Money stolen from Burger King at 4868 Houston Road, Oct. 12. Theft from auto Parts stolen off of vehicle at 8392 Tamarack Drive, Oct. 11. Theft of auto Vehicle stolen and not recovered at 8053 Burlington Pike, Oct. 12.

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Lane, Oct. 14. Drugs/narcotics, jewelry stolen at 1917 Conway Hills Drive, Oct. 14. Ipod shuffles stolen at 6271 Woodcrest Drive, Oct. 13. Property stolen from Kroger at 3105 N. Bend Road, Oct. 7. Money stolen from business at 1960 N. Bend Road, Oct. 7. Purse stolen from residence at 2715 Coachlight Lane, Oct. 7. Items stolen from residence at 3051 Danbury Drive, Oct. 7. Items stolen from residence at 10165 Cedarwood Drive, Oct. 8. Theft from auto Parts stolen off of vehicle at Berberich Drive, Oct. 7. Trafficking, possession Failure to illuminate head lamps, trafficking in marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia at Hopeful Church Road, Oct. 17.

CE-0000573809

Arrests/citations

criminal mischief, DUI, Oct. 6. Charles V. Thomas, 40, possession of marijuana, Oct. 7. Joshua S. Becker, 19, possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia, Oct. 7. Jordan A. Wert, 18, trafficking in marijuana (less than eight ounces), possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia, Oct. 7. Lawrence E. Area, 73, possession of an open alcoholic beverage in a motor vehicle, DUI, Oct. 7. Timothy D. Banks, 31, firstdegree possession of a controlled substance (heroin), possession of drug paraphernalia, Oct. 7. Christine L. Saylor, 39, firstdegree possession of a controlled substance (heroin), possession of drug paraphernalia, public intoxication of a controlled substance, Oct. 7. Samantha J. Marinacci, 23, shoplifting, Oct. 8. Jeanine Bernadini, 28, DUI, reckless driving, Oct. 8. Daniel J. Collins, 44, possession of an o pen alcoholic beverage in a motor vehicle, Oct. 9.

CE-0000575467

BOONE COUNTY SHERIFF

Va 0/13 Expires 11/3

3220 Dixie Highway Erlanger, KY 41018 859-331-0678 Hours: 9A-9P Everyday

Phone Accessories | Copies | Fax | Media Center


LIFE

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CUSTOMER

S1

APPRECIATION EVENT!

Thank you Tri-State!

Make a donation and receive an extra

5%

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Fill The Truck pods are conveniently located at every Furniture Fair store! Cold Spring - Eastgate - Erlanger - Fairfield - Fields Ertel - Florence - Northgate

We are accepting any new non perishable goods or personal care items through December 20th up to

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NO INTEREST if paid in full in

36 MONTHS *on purchases of $3000 or more made on your Furniture Fair Gold Card 78;#5:8 *#4<&/<; 0,78) 0'2.( +""676#%13 -%1%$< #!76#%9 141631/3< 6% store. See store for details

by

Thunder Topaz 96” Sofa

This oversized sofa features plenty of seating room and includes four accent pillows

687 474

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687 545

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Quarterback Canyon 87” Reclining Sofa

This Contemporary sofa features plush padded arms and seats covered in a soft “Bomber Jacket” cover.

P WER

Special Orders welcome! Laramie 89” Sofa

The traditional Laramie Sofa is a classic choice for any décor, with curvy rolled arms, nailhead trim, and a modern unskirted base.

687 596

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RECLINING

Hester 87” Power Reclining Sofa Features a pub back with pillow top arms and cuddled shape seats.

687 798

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Stocked in cream and mocha!

687 $ 957 $

Meade Mocha Sectional Casual comfort sets the design tone for this contemporary styled sectional CE-0000574012

LOWEST PRICE

Special Orders welcome! Maximus 2 Piece Reclining Sectional

Includes left and right arm facing sectionals

$

687 1497 $LOWEST PRICE


CUSTOMER

S2

APPRECIATION EVENT!

Thank you Tri-State!

Make a donation and receive an extra

5%

off

The Low Price!

Fill The Truck pods are conveniently located at every Furniture Fair store! Cold Spring - Eastgate - Erlanger - FairďŹ eld - Fields Ertel - Florence - Northgate

We are accepting any new non perishable goods or personal care items through December 20th up to

Get your 2013 Fire Chief Eddie Bear FREE with a purchase of $399 or more! Or you can purchase the Bear with a portion of the proceeds going to

NO INTEREST if paid in full in

36 MONTHS *on purchases of $3000 or more made on your Furniture Fair Gold Card <=@#:?= -#9B'2B@ 3/<=, 3(61) ."";<;#%47 0%4%$B #!<;#%> 494;7427B ;% store. See store for details

View a large selection of Casual and Formal Dining at The Low Price and

in stock for Pre-Thanksgiving Delivery!

American A i Heritage 5 Piece Dining Set Includes leg table and 4 side chairs in a 2 tone weathered oak look Furniture Fair has a fantastic selection of top quality mattresses made in the USA! FURNITURE & MATTRESS STORES

Celebrating 50 years!

. P9/-L9-P . N9I0NIPG4 . NIPG4/ P0-PG . NG20PF6PB HE

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LOWEST PRICE

633

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Furniture Fairâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Guaranteed Low Price

CE-0000574011

We guarantee that our prices are the lowest available in the tri-state market. If you are able to find it lower, we will beat that price or it is free! Competitors pricing subject to verification. Excludes clearance items, floor samples, close-outs and dropped merchandise.

convenient budget terms

*Offer applies only to single-receipt qualifying purchases on purchases of $3000 or more with 25% down. Prior Sales, Hot Buys, Floor Samples, tent sale, Discontinued and Clearance Merchandise excluded from promotions and credit term offers. No interest will be charged on the promo purchase and equal monthly payments are required until the initial promo purchase amount is paid in full. Regular account terms apply to non-promotional purchases. For new accounts: Purchase APR is 29.99%; Minimum interest charge is $2. Existing cardholders should see their credit card agreement for their applicable terms. Subject to credit approval. Not responsible for typographical errors. See store for details and additional 0%4%$;%? #!<;#%>) +;>$#:%<> "# %#< 4!!7& <# 8B'!:@*!B";$, 5$#'A#@<, #@ 5>B@;B>)

110713 CP


CUSTOMER

T1

APPRECIATION EVENT!

Thank you Tri-State!

Make a donation and receive an extra

5%

off

The Low Price!

Fill The Truck pods are conveniently located at every Furniture Fair store! Cold Spring p g - Eastgate g - Erlanger - FairďŹ eld - Fields Ertel - Florence - Northgate

We are accepting a any new non perishable goods or personal care items through December 20th up to

Get your 2013 Fire Chief Eddie Bear FREE with a purchase of $399 or more! Or you can purchase the Bear with a portion of the proceeds going to

NO INTEREST if paid in full in

36 MONTHS *on purchases of $3000 or more made on your Furniture Fair Gold Card 78;#5:8 *#4<&/<; 0,78) 0'2.( +""676#%13 -%1%$< #!76#%9 141631/3< 6% store. See store for details

Innerspring Serta S Euro Top or Perfect Sleeper Firm

$

399 QUEEN SET

Perfect Sleeper Super S Pillow Top

799

$

QUEEN SET

The Furniture Fair Difference e

Serta Luxury Plush or Firm

! Free Delivery

with a mattress purchases of $699 or more

! 2 Free Serta Gel Memory Foam Pillows with a iComfort or iSeries purchase

! 36 Months Special Financing ! Most Sets in stock for Next Day Delivery ! 50+ Years of locally owned and operated with 6 locations in the Tri-State ! Serta-fied Bedding Specialists to assist you in getting a good nights sleep!

Serta Hybrid P Perfect Sleeper Ultra Firm or Super Pillow Top

$

899 QUEEN SET

$

599 QUEEN SET

iSeries C Corbin Gel Memory Foam + Dual Coil Hybrid

$

1299 QUEEN SET

CE-0000574013


T2

CUSTOMER APPRECIATION EVENT!

Thank you Tri-State!

Make a donation and receive an extra

5%

off

The Low Price!

Fill The Truck pods are conveniently located at every Furniture Fair store! Cold Spring p g - Eastgate g - Erlanger - Fairfield - Fields Ertel - Florence - Northgate

We are accepting a any new non perishable goods or personal care items through December 20th up to

Get your 2013 Fire Chief Eddie Bear FREE with a purchase of $399 or more! Or you can purchase the Bear with a portion of the proceeds going to

NO INTEREST if paid in full in

36 MONTHS *on purchases of $3000 or more made on your Furniture Fair Gold Card =>A#;@> -#:C'2CA 3/=>, 3(61) .""<=<#%47 0%4%$C #!=<#%? 4:4<7427C <% store. See store for details

Cool Action Gel Memory Foam + The Duet Coil

Cool ActionTM Gel Memory Foam The first of it’s kind!

$

1299 iSeries Corbin

T Twin XL Full King

$1099 $

1274 $ 1699

Queen LOWEST PRICE!

$

1599 iComfort Genius

TTwin XL Full King

$1199 $

1399 $ 1999

$

Queen LOWEST PRICE!

FURNITURE & MATTRESS STORES . P9/-L9-P . N9I0NIPG4 . NIPG4/ P0-PG . NG20PF6PB HE

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1999 iComfort Directions Inception

TTwin XL Full King

$1349 $

1799 $ 2499

Queen LOWEST PRICE!

FURNITURE & MATTRESS STORES + CLEARANCE OUTLETS

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T%SA%"*A#T>> %,(A(T%A##>> T%SA(&*A"**,

Furniture Fair’s Guaranteed Low Price

We guarantee that our prices are the lowest available in the tri-state market. If you are able to find it lower, we will beat that price or it is free! Competitors pricing subject to verification. Excludes clearance items, floor samples, close-outs and dropped merchandise.

convenient budget terms

*Offer applies only to single-receipt qualifying purchases on purchases of $3000 or more with 25% down. Prior Sales, Hot Buys, Floor Samples, tent sale, Discontinued and Clearance Merchandise excluded from promotions and credit term offers. No interest will be charged on the promo purchase and equal monthly payments are required until the initial promo purchase amount is paid in full. Regular account terms apply to non-promotional purchases. For new accounts: Purchase APR is 29.99%; Minimum interest charge is $2. Existing cardholders should see their credit card agreement for their applicable terms. Subject to credit approval. Not responsible for typographical errors. See store for details and additional 0%4%$<%@ #!=<#%?) +<?$#;%=? "# %#= 4!!7& =# 8C'!;A*!C"<$, 5$#'B#A=, #A 5?CA<C?) 9#'C '4==AC?? !>#=#? B#A <77;?=A4=<#% !;A!#;?C?) CE-0000574010

111413 ENQ_CP

Union recorder 111413