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UNION

RECORDER

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Union, Richwood and Walton

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2013

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Mailbox could tip off ID thieves Police, bank suggest fraud protection tips By Maureen O’Hara TheCommunityRecorder@gmail.com

Have you fallen victim to identity theft? In Boone County, identity theft is increasing: Fifty-nine cases of identity theft were reported during 2012, 35 during 2011, and 27 during 2010. Major Jack Prindle, Boone County Sheriff’s Office, has investigated electronic theft since 2001. “There is almost an infinite number of circumstances that are lumped into the general cate-

gory of identity theft,” said Prindle. He said people tend to think of credit card theft as identity theft. In Boone County, that crime is classified as fraudulent use of a credit card. “If your credit card is used to buy a taco in Southern California, there is no crime in Boone County,” said Prindle. “You’d have to contact law enforcement in Southern California. “Most people are fearful that their credit card information has been criminally obtained from their PC or Internet,” said Prindle. He said only a small percentage of credit card fraud can be tracked to online buying. Factually, most credit card fraud hap-

pens when criminals get credit card data from small businesses where the customer paid with a real credit card.

Use mailbox at post office

Alarmingly, many ID theft criminals steal your information directly from your mailbox. Prindle said thieves travel streets looking for mailboxes with red flags pointing up. “... They steal outgoing mail from the mailbox, looking for that check being sent in to pay your credit card bill,” said Prindle. One mailbox theft gives all the information needed to open

other accounts using your name, address, bank name, account and routing numbers, and credit card number. You can avoid this by using a mailbox at any post office. Currently, it’s income tax filing time. Are you paying a tax preparer to complete your taxes? You might want to reconsider how you pay a preparer. “One of the biggest growths in ID theft last year, and probably this year, will be in the theft of your information by tax preparers,” said Prindle. He said this ID theft reached epidemic proportions” last year when the federal government decided to allow income tax refunds to be

paid using pre-paid debit cards.

Tax filing a growth area for ID theft

“(During the 2012 tax season), organized crime went into the tax business,” said Prindle. They collected personal information, mailed bogus tax returns and had the pre-paid debit card mailed to them. “The IRS had no mechanism in place, or resources, to handle the millions of dollars in fraud conducted in this manner last year,” Prindle noted. He said federal law prohibits the IRS from See IDENTITY, Page A2

Local leaders encourage retirement reform

AN EYE-OPENING TEA

By Stephanie Salmons ssalmons@nky.com

From left, Annika Koeppel, 10, of Union and Troop 1554 samples Tom Kar Gai, a coconut chicken soup at the Thailand booth as Payden Neiser, 12, of Burlington, Elizabeth Apollonio, 11, of Burlington and Hannah Mullane, 11, of Union serve during the Girl Scout Tea Feb. 16 at Cooper High School. Story, B1. MARTY WHITACRE FOR THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

WHO’S THE BEST BOSS? There’s still time to make your nomination. A4

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Local leaders are taking a stand against rising pension costs, passing resolutions supporting reforms to the County Employees Retirement System. The Boone County Fiscal Court and the city of Florence recently passed resolutions, almost verbatim the resolution passed in Union earlier in February, “supporting reforms to the County Employees Retirement System (CERS) to make the plan sustainable, sound and secure for current and future employees.” The resolutions, all of which “strongly encourages” the Kentucky General Assembly to make these reforms during the current legislative session, support recommendations made by the Task Force on Kentucky Public Pensions. Each resolution “strongly supports” the adoption of a hybrid cash balance plan, resetting the amortization period for CERS for payment of the unfunded liability to a new 30year period, eliminating the See REFORM, Page A2

Vol. 2 No. 15 © 2013 The Community Recorder ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


NEWS

A2 • UNION RECORDER • FEBRUARY 28, 2013

Reform Continued from Page A1

automatic cost of living adjustment for current and future retirees and increasing representation on the Kentucky Retirement Systems Board of Trustees “representing local government associations including the Kentucky Association of Counties” or from a list submitted by the Kentucky League of Cities (in the case of cities). The resolution approved by the Boone County Fiscal Court goes one step further and recommends considering an increase in the employee contribution for current employees “if such increase would not be deemed in conflict with

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funding to “fully the inviolable conmeet the future obtract provisions of ligations of the rethe state constitutirement system,” tion.” Earlywine said. In a phone con“We have seen versation, Boone our rates rise draCounty Administramatically in recent tor Jeff Earlywine years and we just said required pen- Earlywine cannot continue to sion contributions make the kind of are a “very costly contribution recomponent” to the quired of us.” county budget. That’s where The county, he the reform comes said, spends “over in, he said, to find $5 million a year on another structure required pension to pension benefits contributions to the that have a longstate system.” Thayer term sustainabiliEarlywine said the current system isn’t sus- ty. Earlywine said there’s tainable for the long term. Non-hazardous em- “a whole lot of us in local ployees contribute 5 per- government” with high excent of their salary and the pectations that “somecounty picks up the rest of thing could happen” this the required cost, which is legislative session. Sen. Damon Thayer inabout 19.5 percent in the current year, he explained. troduced Senate Bill 2, reHazardous employees, lating to retirement, which like those working for a po- has made it through the lice or fire department or Senate. If nothing is done this the jail staff, contribute 8 percent of their salaries session, the cost will conand employers put in the tinue to escalate, Earlyremainder of the required wine said. “Pension obligations 37 percent. Those numbers have will eat up more and more “increased rapidly” over of our resources,” he said. Since local governthe last 10 or 15 years, he ments don’t administer the said. “Even contributing that system, aside from reducamount, the pension sys- ing staffing levels, Earlytem is still noticeably un- wine said there’s “very little we can do to control our derfunded.” Even at those rates, costs.” there still won’t be enough

Identity Continued from Page A1

sharing tax information with law enforcement. Banks play an important part in helping customers prevent credit card fraud. William Santos, regional manager and vice president for The Bank of Kentucky, gives some specific information about how banks protect you. “The most effective (safeguard) is a fraud detection service which monitors card usage, and identifies any purchases that are out of the ordinary for a particular customer,” said Santos. If you use your debit card in Florence at 8 a.m. and the same card number is used a few hours later in California, the

detection system flags your card. You’ll receive a phone call from the fraud protection center. “We ask that customers notify us of any travel plans,” said Santos. “This is so that we can communicate this to our fraud center and avoid any issues using the card while traveling.”

Wire transfer requests suspicious

Your bank can help to protect you from the mailbox thieves described by Prindle. The Bank of Kentucky offers “Notify Me Alerts.” The free service tells you when a transaction exceeds a designated amount, whenever a check clears, and when your account falls below a certain level. “The most likely misuse of an account/rout-

UNION

RECORDER Find news and information from your community on the Web Union • nky.com/union Boone County • nky.com/boonecounty

News

Nancy Daly Senior Editor ......................578-1059, ndaly@nky.com Justin Duke Reporter ..........................578-1058, jbduke@nky.com Stephanie Salmons Reporter .................578-1057, ssalmons@nky.com Melanie Laughman Sports Editor ............513-248-7573, mlaughman@nky.com James Weber Sports Reporter ................578-1054, jweber@nky.com

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ing number is presenting a forged check at a bank,” said Santos. If that happens, a service like “Notify Me Alerts” proves invaluable. Working as a Bank of Kentucky branch manager for eight years, Santos has seen many scams. He recommends that anyone who receives an unexpected check or money order call a bank for help. The bank will research its authenticity. Santos warns against any offer on the Internet using a wire transfer. “Anything requesting a wire transfer should be regarded as highly suspicious,” said Santos. “Some of the perpetrators of these crimes are getting very sophisticated,” said Santos. He describes two recent scams. The first scam features pop-up ads for online sales. When you “click here” to buy a sale item from a known retailer, you’re actually entering your credit card information into the scammers’ platform. “It’s a really convincing website,” said Santos. You can avoid this new scam by visiting the retailer’s actual website.

Index Calendar .................B2 Classifieds ................C Food ......................B3 Life ........................B1 Police .....................B6 Schools ..................A6 Sports ....................A7 Viewpoints .............A9

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NEWS

FEBRUARY 28, 2013 • FLORENCE-UNION RECORDER • A3

BRIEFLY

By Amanda Joering ajoering@nky.com

The Northern Kentucky chapter of a statewide advocacy group working to help those struggling with addiction is being reborn. In light of the recent increase in drug abuse, particularly heroin, local voices who have spoken out to combat this epidemic are coming together to revitalize the NKY Chapter of People Advocating Recovery (PAR). Local advocate Charlotte Wethington, one of the founding members of the statewide initiative, said there used to be an active NKY chapter a few years ago. “This is certainly a good time to revitalize this chapter because of the interest of so many local people wanting to do something about this heroin epidemic, but not knowing what to do,” Wethington said. “So many people out there are feeling hopeless and helpless.” The NKY chapter of PAR will assist these people, Wethington said, by being a tool to bring everyone together to work on solutions and advocate recovery. Recovering addict Jason Merrick, who is serving as the chair of the local chapter, said he is working with Wethington and Dr. Jeremy Engel, who spearheaded the forming of the Northern

Kentucky Heroin Impact and Response Workgroup, to get this chapter going again. “We know that chemical dependency is really hitting hard in this area, and through this group, we hope to make a difference in this community,” Merrick said. Merrick said the goal is to work toward making treatment more accessible and see that the necessary legislation is passed to address these drug issues. Merrick said one of the first goals of the NKY PAR chapter is to support House Bill 79, legislation that will make Naloxone, a medication that can reverse opioid overdoses safely and easily, more accessible in the community. “This legislation could save so many lives,” Merrick said. “And this is just one of the issues we plan to attack in the community. The sky is the limit really.” To get more people involved, the chapter is holding a focus group meeting at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 28, at the Grateful Life Center. At the meeting, Merrick said they will be outlining goals and organizing the infrastructure of the group. “This is a really exciting time for us, but this is just the beginning,” Merrick said. “We really need people to get involved and bring their skill sets to this group.” For more information, email Merrick at par.nky@gmail.com.

Stephens seeks Governor’s Cup volunteers

Boone County Extension Homemakers members Kathleen Davis of Erlanger, Farralee Baldwin of Dayton, Ohio, and Rae Beasley of Florence, sew blankets that will be donated to local hospitals for premature babies and seat belt covers. STEPHANIE SALMONS/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Homemakers make blankets for premature babies By Stephanie Salmons ssalmons@nky.com

The sewing machines were humming and the conversations were flowing freely on a bitter cold February morning as members of the Boone County Extension Homemakers group gathered in Burlington to make blankets for babies born prematurely. The ladies laugh and sometimes joke, but their focus this morning is on sewing the baby blankets (as well as seat belt covers, caps and heart pillows for cancer patients). This isn’t anything new. The group, which meets the third Wednesday of the month from January to May, has made around 7,000 blankets since first starting the endeavor in 2000, member Linda Padgett said. The blankets, donated to St. Elizabeth hospitals, are given to children born prematurely. When donated materials aren’t able to be used BURLINGTON

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for those projects, Padgett says the group also makes blankets for the homeless. While the project started small, “it keeps growing and growing,” she said. It’s one of the Homemakers’ community projects. “The Homemakers have reached out into the community in many different ways,” she said. Cooperative extension agent Katie Smallwood said the ladies gather and provide “a very fun, social avenue to do a really good project for the community.” It’s important for the group to undertake such efforts to show that there are local organizations that care during difficult times. According to Smallwood, the group finished around 288 blankets last month.

PVA inspections set

As host of the 2013 Governor’s Cup district academic competition, Stephens Elementary School is seeking volunteers for tasks such as set-up and test monitoring March 1-2. For questions or more information, email chris tine.frondorf@boone.ky schools.us.

Santoro co-sponsors meeting bill

State Rep. Sal Santoro, R-Florence, has co-sponsored a bill concerning the locations where public agencies hold their meetings. Proposed amendments to open meeting requirements include provisions relating to adequate space, seating and acoustics for public meetings. House Bill 392 was filed last week.

The Boone County Property Valuation Administrator’s office will inspect Fitzgerald, Belle Meadows, Tall Trees, Hampton Ridge Estates, Persimmon Grove, Silver Creek, Willowbend, Bel Air Estates, and farms and new construction throughout Boone County the week of March 11. Staff members will be in a marked vehicle and have identification available upon request. For more information, contact PVA Cindy Arlinghaus at cindy.arling haus@boonecountyky.org

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NEWS

A4 • FLORENCE-UNION RECORDER • FEBRUARY 28, 2013

Arts group offers scholarship to Boone students

Show NKY who’s the ‘Best Boss’ What makes a great boss? Is it the guidance they gave that helped you bring your first major project to successful completion? Or did they go to bat for you to get an important promotion? There’s still time to recognize your boss in the Best Boss of Northern Kentucky online contest sponsored by the Community Recorder. You can nominate your boss by going online to bit.ly/bestbossNKY and telling us a little about him or her. Besides your boss’ name and contact information, we want to know what makes your boss special. The deadline to nominate a Best Boss is March

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By Stephanie Salmons ssalmons@nky.com

Young artists in Boone County can get monetary support thanks to a new scholarship from the Boone County Visual Arts Association. All Boone County high school students in grades 9-12 are eligible to compete for the $500 scholarship in the first BCVAA High School Art Scholarship Competition, the group’s first juried art exhibit showcasing local

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Later in March the list of finalists will be announced. The public will have a two-week period to vote online for the Best Boss of Boone, Campbell and Kenton counties. The winners will be announced in the Community Recorder on April 18.

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students. BCVAA member Linda Whittenburg said money raised from a raffle at a December art show went toward the scholarship. “We just felt it was important to support our local young people,” she said. While there’s no restriction on the use of the cash award, Whittenburg said organizers hope the money is used for tuition or art supplies “to further their art studies.” “We’ve grown to the point where we’re a strong group and we have some extra funds and we felt we needed to give back (to) the community,” she said. The group, Whittenburg said, struggled for many years but has

“Red Barn on Maple” is by Linda Lee Whaley, a member of the Boone County Visual Arts Association. FILE PHOTO

“really grown into its own.” “The community has supported us, so we’re going to do a little to thank them for that.” The competition is open to students working in all visual media.

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Selected artists will be featured in an April group exhibition at the Main branch of the Boone County Public Library. Awards, announced at the exhibition’s April 26 reception, will be given based on displayed originality, self-expression, technical skill and emergence of personal vision. The $500 scholarship will be awarded to the piece nominated as “best in show” by the BCVAA. Each student may enter up to three pieces of artwork. For questions or more information about requirements, registration and entry forms, visit www.bcvaa.com. The entry deadline is March 1. Want to continue the conversation? Tweet at @SSalmonsNKY

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NEWS

FEBRUARY 28, 2013 • FLORENCE-UNION RECORDER • A5

Walton making donated land a pocket park and kids, is excited to have a new park so close to home. “It’s a nice addition,” Mize said. “You don’t have to drive there. It’s more convenient and accessible.” Council plans to purchase the equipment at next month’s council meeting and start construction once the weather breaks in the spring, Trzop said. Once the park is up, Walton will take responsibility for mulching, building the sidewalk and fence, along with maintaining the park.

on for several years,” said Mayor Phil Trzop. A pocket park is a relatively small park Trzop that’s built on a single vacant building lot. With the deed heading to the city, Walton plans to spend $18,900 on playground equipment and other park amenities. “Council didn’t want to spend the $18,000 to $19,000 on a park until we got the deed,” Trzop said. Rob Mize, who lives in Aosta Valley with his wife

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SCHOOLS

A6 • FLORENCE-UNION RECORDER • FEBRUARY 28, 2013

COMMUNITY

RECORDER

Editor: Nancy Daly, ndaly@nky.com, 578-1059

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BCHS voice teachers start opera company By Justin B. Duke jbduke@nky.com

CINCINNATI — Two Boone County High School voice teachers are putting on their first opera. Shawn Mlynek and Autumn West recently graduated from the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music and founded the Cincinnati Chamber Opera. “We decided we wanted to start our own company,” Mlynek said. After looking at the kind of

opera being performed in the area, Mlynek and West saw a need for some of the more emerging artists’ work to be performed, he said. West “The Cincinnati area is an artistically hungry area,” Mlynek said. The new company is showing its first production, “Acis and Galatea,” March 1-3, in Cincinnati. The company raised the funding needed for the produc-

tion through the crowdfunding website kickstarter.com. The process of putting on a production has been an eyeopening experi- Mlynek ence for Mlynek and West, who spent their time in school focused on performing and got little training in the administrative aspects of scheduling, booking locations and funding, Mlynek said. “It’s been awesome, and it’s

been very difficult at the same time,” he said. The two have worked to get the production together while continuing their roles as voice teachers at Boone County High School. Mlynek has worked at the school for two years, while West started a year ago. Their time working at the school has helped them become a lot more familiar with the area, Mlynek said. “We have such a heart for Boone County and Florence,” he said. It wouldn’t surprise Mlynek

to have some of his former students on the Cincinnati Chamber Opera stage in a few years, he said. “The students there are just so talented and motivated,” Mlynek said. For more information about the Cincinnati Chamber Opera, visit http://bit.ly/chamopera. For tickets to “Acis and Galatea” visit http://bit.ly/chamoperatix. Visit nky.com/florence for more community news

COLLEGE CORNER Bauer volunteers tax assistance

Allison Bauer of Union, an accounting student at Xavier University, is offering free basic federal and state income tax assistance to low income, elderly and student taxpayers in the Cincinnati area in March and April, through the Internal Revenue Servicesponsored Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Program. For information, contact Dr. Priscilla O’Clock at 513745-4245.

Boone residents graduate

The following Boone County residents graduated from Eastern Kentucky University: Florence: Kaitlin Emily Brubaker, Nicholas Stephen Dawn, Carlo Vicente Jorge, Jennifer Rose Lasita, Justin Tyler Neidig, Caitlyn Irene Rich and Amber Marie Schwartz. Union: Danielle Nicole Cook, Suzanne Rose Fedders, Magan L. Meade and Sean Anthony Parr.

Knapik on dean’s list

Marlee and MaryElle Reynolds are fascinated by the bubbles they hold when teacher Julie Keyser performed a science experiment exploring the states of matter. THANKS TO KELLY EIBEL

Reading, balance, science: Life at St. Paul

From reading to building to science experiments to experiments in balance, students at St. Paul Catholic School in Florence are learning and growing everyday.

Lindsay Catherine Knapik of Florence was named to the president’s list for the fall semester at Eastern Kentucky University. Knapik is a senior special education major. The list includes full time undergraduate students who attain a perfect 4.0 gradepoint average for a semester.

Knibbe on dean’s list

Chase A. Knibbe, son of Dr. Mark A. Knibbe, of Union, was named to the dean’s list for the first semester at Virginia Military Institute. The list includes cadets who have a term grade-point average of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale and no grade below C.

Powellon dean’s list

Jacqueline Paige Powell of Union was named to the dean’s list for the fall semester at Georgetown College. The list includes undergraduate students who completed the semester with at least 12 credit hours and a 3.7 grade-point average.

Williams accepted to college

Jeremiah Williams of Florence has been accepted to attend Union College.

Maddy Musk of Julie Keyser’s first-grade class at St. Paul Catholic School in Florence works on her balance as the class participates in Minds in Motion. THANKS TO KELLY EIBEL

Braxton Portwood, Emma Fischer and Rick Erwin, in Andrea Lonneman's first-grade class at St. Paul Catholic School in Florence show off the “buildings” they created during indoor recess. THANKS TO KELLY EIBEL

First-grade student Carson Gould holds a bubble created when Julie Keyser, first-grade science teacher, performed a science experiment to explore the states of matter. THANKS TO KELLY EIBEL

Spalding graduates

Christopher D. Spalding Jr. of Florence graduated from Kentucky State University with a bachelor’s degree in physical education and a minor in athletic coaching. Spalding played football and ran track and field while attending the school.


SPORTS

FEBRUARY 28, 2013 • FLORENCE-UNION RECORDER • A7

COMMUNITY

RECORDER

Editor: Melanie Laughman, mlaughman@communitypress.com, 513-248-7573

HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | RECREATIONAL

CommunityPress.com

Jaguars learn how to win when favored By James Weber jweber@nky.com

Cooper junior Sharli Brady, left, shows her state championship medal in the 200 IM. The state swimming meet was Feb. 23 at the University of Louisville. JAMES WEBER/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Brady thrilled with state title repeat By James Weber jweber@nky.com

LOUISVILLE — Sharli Brady

didn’t expect to break her Kentucky state record in the 500yard freestyle, so she was pleased with her overall result Feb. 23. The Cooper High School junior lost her status as defending state champion in that event, but retained her title in the 200-yard individual medley during the state meet at the University of Louisville. The one title was enough for Brady, who was happy to be competing as she thought of young Clippers club teammate Elizabeth Smith. Smith, an 8year-old girl from Erlanger, is battling bone cancer but has still been competing in club meets. “Before I race I dedicate every race to her because I feel so lucky to be able to be here and to be able to swim,” Brady said. Brady defended her state championship in the individual medley, winning in 2:00.67 to touch the wall 1.53 seconds ahead of second place. “I felt good,” she said. “I love the IM; it’s probably my favorite event. I’ve been training a lot and I think I did really well. I was pretty nervous before the IM, but my club coach being here and being around people who really love swimming really

STATE RESULTS BOONE COUNTY

Karly Brungs: 24th in diving (127.15). Ryan Brown: 10th in diving (321.85).

COOPER

200 medley relay: 28th (2:03.91) - Taylor Czirr, Alyssa Schlotman, Megan Kern, Michaela Smith 200 free relay: 9th (1:42.06) Brooke Harkrader, Kandis Arlinghaus, Michaela Smith, Sharli Brady 400 free relay: 13th (3:44.39) Kandis Arlinghaus, Brooke Harkrader, Michaela Smith, Sharli Brady Kandis Arlinghaus: 14th in 200 free (1:59.02), 16th in 100 free (54.86) Sharli Brady: State champ in 200 IM (2:00.67), 2nd in 500 free (4:51.48). Brooke Harkrader: 23rd in 50 free (25.69), 27th in 100 free (56.19)

helped me. It’s a blessing to be here.” Brady finished second in the 500 free in 4:51.48. That was about four seconds off her state record in winning last year, but a full eight seconds behind Sacred Heart sophomore Leah Stevens, who shattered Brady’s mark at 4:43.38.

RYLE GIRLS

200 medley relay - 14th (1:57.03), Taylor Malkemus, Grace Bank, Savanna Bolin, Katie Clements 200 free relay - 21st (1:47.42) Grace Bank, Katy Dunham, Taylor Malkemus, Katie Clements Grace Bank: 18th in 200 IM (2:14.65), 11th in 100 breast (1:07.26)

RYLE BOYS

200 medley relay: 25th (1:48.21) - T.J. Albright, Mikey O’Leary, Tristan Stamm, Connor Galloway. 200 free relay: 24th (1:36.18) Connor Galloway, Joe Albers, Mikey O’Leary, T.J. Albright T.J. Albright: 20th in 200 free (1:48.94), 17th in 100 back (55.72) Bryce Craven: 19th in diving (206.00)

ST. HENRY

Thomas Steiber: 23rd in diving (119.05)

“I can’t even be mad about it because that was an unbelievable swim,” Brady said. “That’s the fastest 500 free I’ve ever seen. She did awesome. I’ve been focusing less on 500 free this year, which I think was pretty evident from my times. I had a See STATE, Page A8

UNION — Tim Sullivan had a hunch Spencer Holland would have a good night. The Cooper head boys basketball coach didn’t know how much of a hero his junior guard would become, or how much postseason drama his Jaguars would be involved in. Sullivan was still in disbelief long after Cooper outlasted rival Conner 72-68 in double overtime Feb. 21 in the 33rd District semifinals, advancing to the Ninth Region Tournament and ending the Cougars’ season. Holland had 24 points to lead the way, including several key shots in crunch time. “I said to our scorekeeper before the game, watch for No. 12; he’s probably going to have a big night,” Sullivan said. “I didn’t think he would go out and get 24 points. He is a self-made player. He works as hard as he can every single day in practice.” Holland had a big second quarter as Conner led by one at the half. The Cougars stormed ahead with 11 straight points to start the second quarter and led by 11 going into the fourth. They gradually clawed their way back, and despite Conner being near-perfect from the freethrow line down the stretch, Cooper had the ball, down three, in the final seconds. Senior guard A.J. Collins delivered, making an off-balance trey with nine seconds left to send the game to OT. Collins was quick to credit his backcourt mate for giving the Jags a chance. “Spencer Holland really led the way,” Collins said. “He made big shots. He’s a really good kid. He works hard every day in practice. He had this coming.” Cooper had beaten its similar-named foe (13-15) by 11 points twice this year, but Sullivan knew the postseason meeting wouldn’t be easy. “They were absolutely phenomenal,” Sullivan said. “They were so prepared, they did an unbelievable job, they played with passion. They weren’t going to just roll over and die and let us walk into the championship game. They did a good job of taking away what we do well.” They are now one of the regional favorites after gradually building their way up in their fifth year of existence. “In this district, you can throw one through four in the

Ryle junior Will Stuhr had 23 points and 23 rebounds in the game. Ryle beat Boone County in the 33rd District semifinals Feb. 20. JAMES WEBER/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

ONLINE EXTRAS Check out a related video on nky.com at http://bit.ly/Yp31Y8

hat, you’ll have a dogfight,” Sullivan said. “We tried to be the spoiler a couple of years ago and now we’re on the other side and we’re learning how to handle that situation.” Two nights later, Cooper won its second 33rd District title in a row by beating Ryle. Both teams played in the regional quarterfinals after print deadlines. Ryle (12-16) advanced with a 69-51 over Boone County, ending the Rebels’ (13-16) reign as Ninth Region champions. Junior center Will Stuhr dominated play with 23 points and 23 rebounds. “We just came out and played hard, and let the rest take care of itself,” Stuhr said. “We got their main guy, Brenden Stanley, in foul trouble. Our guards took advantage of that and drove the basket and either dished or got the layup.” The Raiders have been up and down and Stuhr is a key to any upswing. “We’ve learned through the season that when Will plays well and gets to touch the ball quite a bit, we’re pretty good,” said head coach Alan Mullins. “We learned from our games against them that the ball had to go into the paint. Our guards played outstanding. They made good decisions and took care of the basketball.”

PRESS PREPS HIGHLIGHTS By James Weber jweber@nky.com

This Week’s MVP

» Cooper junior Sharli Brady for her second state swimming title in the 200 IM.

Boys basketball

From left, Boone County’s Alexis Switzer (20), Dallis Knotts (24) and Jessica Jones (13) celebrate after beating Ryle Feb. 21 in the 33rd final. JOSEPH FUQUA II/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

» The Eighth Region tourney is at Henry County. Semifinals begin at 6:30 p.m. Friday, the final is 7 p.m. Saturday. Simon Kenton would be in the second semifinal with a win Tuesday. » The Ninth Region tourney is at the Bank of Kentucky Center. The semis are 12 and 1:30 p.m. Saturday, the final is 6 p.m. Sunday. The first semi features Monday’s winners between Dixie/Newport and CovCath/ Ryle. The second semi is Tues-

day’s winners between NewCath/Holmes and Cooper/St. Henry. » Cooper’s Drew Shelton was tourney MVP in the 33rd District. Louis Maniacci and Spencer Holland were all-tourney picks. Ryle’s Drew Mays and Will Stuhr, and Boone County’s Michael Warning were other picks. » Heritage fell 85-47 to Conner in the 33rd District tourney. Charles Henthorn had 18 points for the Eagles, who finished 718. He was the all-tourney pick. » Walton-Verona lost 53-47 to Simon Kenton in the 32nd District semis. The Bearcats were led by Tanner Moeves’ 16 points and 15 from Daniel Helton. Moeves was named all-8th Region last week.

Girls basketball

» The Eighth Region tourney is at North Oldham. The semis begin at 6 p.m. Monday, March 4 and the final is 7 p.m. Tuesday, March 5. Simon Kenton plays in the first semi with a win Wednesday after deadline. » The Ninth Region is at the Bank of Kentucky Center: Friday’s quarterfinals feature Dixie Heights and Ryle at 6:30 p.m. followed by Highlands vs. Holmes. The semifinals begin at12 p.m. Sunday and the final is 7 p.m. Monday. Wednesday’s first round included Boone vs. St. Henry and Notre Dame vs. Newport and winners of those games meet in the first semi. » Boone County beat Ryle 55-54 in the 33rd District final. Alexis Switzer hit the game-

winning shot with eight seconds to go. She was tourney MVP. Macey Ford and Jessica Jones were all-tourney for Boone, McKell Oliverio and Dawn Johnson for Ryle. » Conner lost 59-57 to Boone County in the 33rd District semis to finish 22-8. Madi Meyers had 21 points and Jordan Scott 17. » Cooper lost 65-50 to Ryle in the 33rd District semis. Andrea Thompson had 17 points and Savannah Brinneman 10. » St. Henry finished second in the 34th District, losing 47-40 to Dixie Heights in the final. » Walton-Verona lost 40-39 in overtime to Grant County in the 32nd District to end 18-10. Michele Judy and Courtney Sandlin were named all-region in the 8th.


SPORTS & RECREATION

A8 • FLORENCE-UNION RECORDER • FEBRUARY 28, 2013

Showcase begins March 25 By Scott Springer

CAMP ERNST GOES UNDEFEATED

SHOWCASE SCHEDULE

sspringer@communitypress.com

CINCINNATI — At the Reds Hall of Fame and Museum Feb. 19, the Cincinnati Reds and InGame Sports announced the 64team field for the second-annual Reds Futures High School Showcase. The event begins March 25 and runs through April 15 featuring teams from southeastern Indiana, northern Kentucky and southwestern Ohio. The event culminates with all 64 teams in a “March at the Majors” parade before the Reds/ Marlins game April 21. In a year’s time, the prep showcase has grown dramatically, according to Tom Gamble of In-Game Sports. “Last year we had 25 games involving 50 schools,” he said. “This year, 32 games involving 64 schools and 20 of the schools are new.” Games are slated to be played at Northern Kentucky University, Xavier, UC, Prasco Park, Western Hills and Reds Community Fund fields in Batavia, Winton Terrace and Roselawn. The marriage with the Reds is perfect as everyone in the Tristate always looks fondly upon their alma mater and anything involving the wishbone C. “If you are from Cincinnati, you’re always talking about what high school you went to,” Reds Vice President and Princeton High graduate Karen Forgus said. “That’s just how we are around here.” Reds COO and distinguished Summit Country Day alum Phil Castellini also voiced his support. “This is important in developing future Reds players and future Reds fans,” Castellini said. “We’re proud to be associated with this. We’re going to

Northern Kentucky games for the 2013 Reds Futures High School Showcase presented by PNC: Monday, March 25 Conner vs. Lawrenceburg, 5 p.m. (Northern Kentucky University) Tuesday, March 26 St. Henry vs. Simon Kenton, 5 p.m. (St. Henry High School) Thursday, March 28 Covington Catholic vs. Newport Central Catholic, 2 p.m. (Northern Kentucky University) ** Ryle vs. Scott, 5 p.m. (Northern Kentucky University) ** Saturday, March 30 Beechwood vs. Campbell County, Noon (Northern Kentucky University) Cooper vs. Holy Cross, 2:30 p.m. (Northern Kentucky University) **Reds mascots and the Reds Rover events team will appear at these games. Additional appearances will be announced at a later date.

Camp Ernst Middle School seventh-grade girls basketball team went undefeated in the regular season and are district champions. Pictured are Lexi Held, Asyah Mitchell, Abbey Tierney, Carlie Conway, Hope Brooks, Cary Sebree, Christie Duncan, Emily Bleska, Hannah Tharp, Becky Fryman and Lydia Hinton. THANKS TO MONICA

ONLINE EXTRAS See a related video from the event at: http://bit.ly/XOUUSO

Reds COO Phil Castellini speaks about the Reds Futures High School Showcase Feb. 19. THANKS TO MICHAEL ANDERSON

continue this and hopefully it gets stronger and stronger each year.” Among the participants, Division I Ohio champion Moeller will take on La Salle at Prasco Park April 11. “It’s an honor that the Reds would jump on board and sponsor this and bring that notoriety back to the high school game,” Crusaders coach Tim Held said. Northern Kentucky has numerous representatives playing at NKU, including Newport Central Catholic and Covington Catholic on March 28.

HELD

“I told them one of the things they get to do is go to the Reds game against the Marlins and be down on the field before the game,” Newport Catholic Coach Jeff Schulkens said. “They’re real fired up about the opportunity.” Likewise, Coach Chris Fiehrer’s Wyoming Cowboys are happy a 2012 postseason run got them invited to the spring affair. Wyoming will play at Western Hills April 2. “All of the kids returning are really excited to get going,” he said. “They’re also excited to go down on the field in the parade.” Tickets for the Reds Futures Showcase games are $5 and good for all games that day. Each ticket also comes with a voucher good for a free View Level ticket to select Reds regular season games at Great American Ballpark and a coupon for a free Skyline Chili cheese coney. Tickets will be available at the participating schools and on game days at the host facilities.

State Continued from Page A7

lot of fun and that was the most important thing.” Brady anchored two relays, helping the 200 freestyle relay to ninth place and the 400 free relay to 13th. Cooper’s Kandis Arlinghaus scored points in two events, finishing in the consolation final in the 100 free and 200 free. Brooke Harkrader competed in two solo events. For Ryle, eighth-grader Grace Bank led the way, placing 11th in the 100 breaststroke to score points. Ryle junior T.J. Albright competed in the maximum four events. Boone County senior Ryan Brown finished 10th in boys diving. Follow James on Twitter @RecorderWeber and check out more photos and coverage at nky.com/preps.

Ryle’s Grace Bank swims the breaststroke. JAMES WEBER/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

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FEBRUARY 28, 2013 • UNION RECORDER • A9

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Editor: Nancy Daly, ndaly@nky.com, 578-1059

EDITORIALS | LETTERS | COLUMNS | CH@TROOM

CommunityPress.com

Tea Party mistakes regarding McConnell

In a recent article, one of the Northern Kentucky Tea Party elite said in reference to the U.S. Senate race of Mitch McConnell, “My concern … is that in the same way that Romney was unable to defeat Obama, Mitch McConnell will be unable to defeat Ashley Judd.” Look at the 2012 Presidential election results in Kentucky. Mitt Romney got almost 61 percent (60.5 percent) and Barack Obama got less than 38 percent (37.8 percent). McConnell will defeat Judd handily. As to the elitist’s comment “… conservatives wouldn’t or couldn’t support Romney.” The results above said they did. I personally know Tea Partiers who worked for Romney, putting up signs, making phone calls and going door-to-door. Those TPs helped Romney get his impressive Kentucky victory. I am not a Tea Party member. I am a Republican activist

with more than 28 years on the Kenton County Republican Party Executive Committee. The Tea Party’s hyperconservatism Ted Smith has gotten me COMMUNITY to the point RECORDER GUEST COLUMNIST where the term “conservative” causes me to retch. The Tea Party has been a disaster in U.S. Senate races. Republicans had good chances to win several seats in 2010 and 2012 but state Tea Parties injected their candidates into the primaries and the results were disastrous. The TPs won the primaries then lost the general elections. In the 2010 races: » Colorado: Ken Buch (TP) beat GOP candidate Jane Norton in the primary then lost the general election to Michael Bennett (D) keeping the seat

Session is past halfway point The Kentucky General Assembly passed the halfway point of the 2013 Legislative Session this past week, yet several major issues are left to be resolved. Despite the continued delay and frustration we continue to efforts to push forward major items of legislation. Meanwhile, often there is legislation that doesn’t make headlines, but quietly rise out of personal experience of the legislator and citizens Addia we serve, HB Wuchner 172 is one of COMMUNITY those proposed RECORDER GUEST COLUMNIST bills. Watching any child suffer from a lifethreatening health emergency is tragic. When it is a member of your own family, it is a heart-wrenching nightmare. I lived that nightmare several years ago when our grandson went into anaphylactic shock from a previously unknown food allergy. As a registered nurse, I immediately understood the severity of the situation. We were in the car when the allergic reaction occurred. Changing our course my daughter drove directly to the hospital. I knew we had little time. I rushed from the car carrying my grandson immediately into the ER past the registration desk straight to the back calling out for epinephrine and a doctor. At the hospital, he received an epinephrine injection which saved his life. Allergic or “anaphylactic” reactions are also extremely hard to predict and are most commonly caused by insect bites, medications, latex or foods. When someone has an allergic reaction they may experience hives, swelling, difficulty breathing and some so severe and their onset so rapid they require immediate medical attention. Anaphylactic reactions are

treated through the immediate injection of epinephrine – the medical term for adrenaline – which can quickly reverse the symptoms of a reaction. This medication is often administered via inexpensive and easy to use epinephrine auto-injectors. I have met many parents, grandparents and children who share the same frightening and life-changing event like our grandson’s. Parents and children living with a lifethreatening allergy, learn to read every label, bring their own snacks to school and birthday parties and carry an auto-injector or EpiPen with them. Children are especially at risk because they are constantly exposed to new and different things and may still unknowingly have an allergy. Since children spend six of their waking hours at school it would be prudent for schools keep these lifesaving medicines on hand. That is why again this year I have filed legislation (HB 172) recommending all Kentucky schools to keep epinephrine auto-injectors on campus in case of a severe allergic emergency and have an anaphylactic emergency plan. Protecting Kentucky children against a life-threatening medical emergency should never be a question, yet some Kentucky school officials and school boards are concerned about the cost to schools. Good news: Thanks to the launch of the Free EpiPen4 Schools Program from Mylan pharmaceutical company, schools can now receive two 2-Pak ephedrine auto-injector sets preschool year at no cost. House Bill 172 passed the House Education Committee on Thursday. I hope Kentucky school children can count passage of HB 172 this session and to Governor Beshear signing HB 172 into law this spring. Rep. Addia Wuchner is a member of the Kentucky House of Representatives.

UNION

RECORDER

A publication of

Democrat. » Delaware: Christine O’Donnell (TP) beat GOP candidate Mike Castle in the primary then lost the general election to Chris Cooms (D) keeping the seat Democrat. » Nevada: Sharron Angle (TP) beat GOP candidate Sue Lowden in the primary then lost the general election to Harry Reid (D) keeping the seat Democrat and Reid as Senate Majority Leader. The Tea Party got Harry Reid reelected in 2010. The Tea Party candidates won the primaries because their hyper-conservatism appealed to more conservative Republicans who outnumbered the more moderate and liberal ones. However, the Tea Party candidates lost the general elections because their voter base was too narrow. Moderates, liberals and Democrats wouldn’t vote for them because of their stridency.

Look what happens when a Republican candidate can draw from a bigger base. In 2010, the New Hampshire Senate seat was held by Republican Senator Judd Gregg who was retiring. Kelly Ayotte, the GOP candidate and a more moderate conservative defeated Ovide Lamontagne (TP) in the primary. Ayotte got 38 percent of the vote and Lamontagne got 37 percent. But in the general election, Ayotte got 60 percent and Paul Hodes (D) got only 36.8 percent. Why did Ayotte do so well? Because, as a more moderate, she appealed to a broader range of voters and the results show it. In 2012, the Tea Party repeated their mistake in Indiana. (TP) Richard Mourdock beat incumbent GOP U.S. Sen. Richard Lugar in the primary then lost the general election to Joe Donnelly, a Blue-Dog Democrat. It was Colorado,

Delaware and Nevada all over again, only this time, we lost a Republican seat. The Tea Party is making two major mistakes: 1) they have spent their time “taking out” Republicans who aren’t considered “conservative” enough by injecting themselves into primary races and defeating the Republicans. The TPs should be working to defeat Democrats, not Republicans, and 2) they need to understand they can’t do anything to improve government if they can’t win the general elections. In Kentucky, the Tea Partier elitists seem out to sabotage U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell because he isn’t “conservative” enough to suit their tastes. That would be another incredibly stupid mistake. Ted Smith, of Park Hills, is former chairman of the Kenton County Republican Party.

Ky. cracks Top 10 in education Failure and lagging behind. That used to be Kentucky’s national story when it came to schools, and so the release of any education rankings was cause for embarrassed cringing. No longer. Thanks to decades of hard work and aggressive policy changes, Kentucky has a new reputation: National leader. And it’s a cause of celeSteve Beshear bration. That new and Terry narrative was Holliday bolstered and COMMUNITY solidified by RECORDER GUEST COLUMNISTS the recent update of one of the education world’s most respected and comprehensive assessments of school performance and improvement. The publication Education Week – a national, independent source that relies on comprehensive research and current realities – ranked Kentucky 10th in the nation in its annual “Quality Counts” report. The report is based on an assessment of more than 150 key education indicators, and grades states on their education policy efforts and outcomes. The seeds of Kentucky’s improvement were sown with the passage of the Kentucky Education Reform Act in 1990 and later with the approval of 2009’s Senate Bill 1 – both of which demanded significant changes in teaching and assessments. As a result, Kentucky has moved up in the Education Week rankings for the past several years. In 2010, we placed 34th in the nation. Last year we jumped to 14th. And with the 2013 report, Kentucky has broken into the top 10 with a grade of B-, bettering the national average of C+. The highest ranked state was Maryland with a B.

“Quality Counts” examines a wide range of policies and results. On one level, it’s a measure of current performance, but it’s also a measure of forward progress. Clearly, Kentucky is on the move. Most notably, Kentucky ranked in the top 20 in four out of the six categories examined. The state was recognized for: » connecting the K-12 education system with early learning, higher education and the world of work. » efforts to improve teaching. » K-12 achievement. (Kentucky was among the states showing the most rapid improvement.) » standards, assessments and accountability. We can, and should, be proud of these statistics. They reflect the amazing work being undertaken by teachers, administrators, staff, board members, parents, students, business and community leaders and lawmakers. It is difficult work. Yet, despite budget cuts, no money for textbooks, higher expectations, new standards and a new testing and accountability system, Kentucky teachers and students are succeeding. However, there is one area of the “Quality Counts” report that we should heed as a warning and as a clarion call for action. That is the area of school finance. In education funding, Kentucky failed miserably – a low F. Kentucky spends $1,685 less per pupil than other states on average, and only

about 12 percent of our students go to school in districts with funding that matches or exceeds the national average (adjusted for regional cost differences). We have much to celebrate in this “Quality Counts” report. But imagine where our students could be if we were adequately funding our schools. The recession and its aftermath required 13 separate budget reductions. While basic classroom funding was preserved, an increase in the number of students meant less money spent per student and reduced services to children. Our basic funding formula for classroom funding – Support Educational Excellence in Kentucky (SEEK) – has not changed since 2008. If we continue to flat-fund our classrooms, the progress we’ve made, as noted in “Quality Counts,” will stagnate or possibly erode. Our children will be the ones who lose. We could and we should be doing more to adequately fund education in Kentucky. It’s time we find new revenue that both fosters economic activity and also allows us to invest in our people, our workforce and our schools. It is an investment in Kentucky’s future and one that will pay off exponentially with a more competitive workforce, stronger economy and improved quality of life for the people of the commonwealth. The authors are Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear and Education Commissioner Terry Holliday.

ABOUT LETTERS AND COLUMNS We welcome your comments on editorials, columns, stories or other topics important to you in the Recorder. Include your name, address and phone number(s) so we may verify your letter. Letters of 200 or fewer words and columns of 500 or fewer words have the best chance of being published. All submissions may be edited for length, accuracy and clarity. Deadline: Noon Monday E-mail: kynews@communitypress.com Fax: 859-283-7285 U.S. mail: See box below Letters, columns and articles submitted to the Recorder may be published or distributed in print, electronic or other forms.

228 Grandview Drive, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017 654 Highland Ave., Fort Thomas, KY 41075 phone: 283-0404 email: kynews@communitypress.com web site: www.nky.com

Union Recorder Editor Nancy Daly ndaly@nky.com, 578-1059 Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday See page A2 for additional contact information.


A10 • FLORENCE-UNION RECORDER • FEBRUARY 28, 2013

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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2013

LIFE

COMMUNITY RECORDER

PEOPLE | IDEAS | RECIPES

From left, Catherine Wolf, 9, of Union samples Kugelis, a savory potato pudding at the Lithuania booth served by Arielle Keller, 14, of Hebron, Samantha Moore, 14, of Florence, and Vicki Rice, 14, of Florence. THE COMMUNITY

From left, Allyssa Smith, 8, of Union and Rebecca Berner, 9, of Union pose with a Finland flag during the Girl Scout Tea.

RECORDER

MARTY WHITACRE FOR THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

MARTY WHITACRE FOR

At the Dubai booth Toni Clevenger, 10, right, serves hummus to Emily Baell, 9, of Union during the Girl Scout Tea Feb. 16 at Cooper High School. MARTY WHITACRE FOR THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Girl Scout tea has an international flavor By Melissa Stewart mstewart@nky.com

UNION — The white-walled commons

area of Cooper High School bursts to life with the colors of the world as more than 250 Girl Scouts gather together to explore 20 countries on World Thinking Day. In celebration of the Girl Scout holiday, Boone County troops held a Tasting Tea at the school. It was much more, however, than sipping herbal beverages. It was a hands-on opportunity to stimulate the mind and senses. “I think learning about other places and cultures is a fun and important part of any good education,” said Stephanie Fuller, troop leader and an event coordinator. “I especially think it’s important for Girl Scouts because we are trying to create leaders who will make positive change not only in their families and local communities, but also the global community. An event like this can also be an eye-opener.” Twenty troops from Boone County selected a country and created a display including facts, artifacts and artwork, as well as “tastes” of a national dish or

beverage. Some displays also included craft-making, like a Brazilian mask. The booth hosts even dressed in costumes native to their selected nation. Every visiting Girl Scout made a small donation for each “taste” which went toward the Juliette Gordon Low World Friendship Scholarship Fund. Elizabeth Apollonio, 11, of Burlington, made a stop at England. She saw Big Ben, learned about Pax Lodge, and even met the queen, well in spirit anyway. “All the countries are all really cool,” she said. “I like England. I really like the doll (of the queen) and the tea was really good.” She traveled far across the commons area from Thailand, the display she helped organize. “I loved doing the Thailand display,” Apollonio said. “My uncle is Thai. I like explaining about the country to others. One of the most interesting things about Thailand is that it is the land of white elephants because the ruler gives white elephants as gifts to visitors. They’re a symbol of royalty.” Just a little across the way “in Russia” Libby Brockman, 11, stands patiently with her arm extended and the words

SHARE IN THE FUN Want to make some of the delicious international treats? Recipes, B4.

PHOTO GALLERY The Recorder presents more photos in an online gallery “Girl Scouts Go International” at nky.com.

“push” written in red on the back of her hand. Once pushed, she springs to life, her legs flying quickly up and down, over and over – completing a traditional Russian dance. She’s then eager to tell fellow scouts all that she’s learned about Russia. “I can say zdravstvuj, which means hello,” said the Union resident. She goes on to tell how the Girl Scouts weren’t started in Russia until 1998, but that they have many things in common with the American Girl Scouts, like service projects, such as the World Thinking Day project. “Each year for the special holiday Girl Scouts of the United States of

America chooses a theme that focuses on ways the girls can make the world a better place,” Fuller said. “This year’s theme is improving the health of children around the world.” Boone County’s goal was to collect 400 bars of soap and have the girls reshape them with Girl Scout themed soap molds for United Ministries. Outside the commons area, Laura Hoskins, 10, takes a break from traveling to work on the project. She scoops, smooshes and works the small soap shavings into a clump before pushing it into the plastic mold. “It feels like Play-Doh,” she said. “We get to keep one and then the other we donate. Doing this makes me feel happy because it’s actually going to help somebody.” According to Fuller, the very first part of the Girl Scout promise is, “to serve God and my country.” “Our mission is to build girls of courage, confidence, and character who make the world a better place,” Fuller said. “The girls involved in these projects learn, most importantly, that they do have the power to make a real difference.”


B2 • FLORENCE-UNION RECORDER • FEBRUARY 28, 2013

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD FRIDAY, MARCH 1 Community Dance Friday Night Open Dance, 7:30-10 p.m., The Ritz Ballroom Dance Studio, 8150 Mall Road, Group dance class starts at 7:45 p.m. Open dancing starts at 8:30 p.m. Ages 18 and up. $5 group class, $5 party. Through May 31. 859-371-1151. Florence.

Dining Events St. Joseph Academy Lenten Fish Fry, 4:30-8 p.m., St. Joseph Academy, 48 Needmore St., Dinner includes fried or baked fish, three side items, dessert and drink. Drive-through available. Family friendly. $10 dinner. 859-485-6444; www.saintjosephacademy.net. Walton. Fish Fry, 5-8 p.m., St. Paul School, 7303 Dixie Highway, Presented by St. Paul Church. 859-647-4070. Florence. Fish Fry, 5-8 p.m., Immaculate Heart of Mary Church, 5876 Veterans Way, Gymnasium. Dining room and carryout. Drive-thru runs 4:30-7 p.m. Tommy Boy sandwiches, plus shrimp and fish. $3-$8 for entrees. 859-689-5010; www.ihmky.org. Burlington. Mary, Queen of Heaven Fish Fry, 4-8 p.m., Mary, Queen of Heaven Parish, 1150 Donaldson Highway, Full menu and pricing online. Call-ahead/carry-out at 859-371-2622. Drive-thru and fully-accessible dine-in service. Official home of "The Codfather.". 859-525-6909; www.mqhparish.com. Erlanger. Fish Fry, 5-8 p.m., Florence Elks Lodge 314, 7704 Dixie Highway, Fish and side items available. 859-746-3557. Florence.

Drink Tastings Wine Tasting, 4-8 p.m., The Liquor Cabinet, 1990 North Bend Road, Free. 859-586-9270. Hebron.

Education AARP Tax-Aide, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., Boone County Main Library, 1786 Burlington Pike, Middle and low income taxpayers eligible for free tax preparation service. Those with complex tax returns will be advised to seek professional tax assistance. Spots are available on a first come, first served basis. Free. Registration required. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-342-2665; www.bcpl.org. Burlington.

Exercise Classes Jazzercise, 9:30 a.m., Sports of All Sorts Mt. Zion, 10094 Investment/Demia Way, Burn up to 600 calories in an effective 60-minute total body workout. Jazzercise is jazz dance, resistance training, yoga and kickboxing. Wear loose, cool stretchy clothing. Aerobic or a cross trainer shoes is recommended. Arrive to first class 15-20 minutes ahead of time. $25-$80. Presented by Promenade Palace. 859-341-4392. Union.

Karaoke and Open Mic Friday Night Karaoke, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Florence Elks Lodge 314,

7704 Dixie Highway, Karaoke and dance. Ages 21 and up. Free. 859-746-3557. Florence.

Literary - Libraries Mahjong, 1 p.m., Scheben Branch Library, 8899 U.S. 42, Open play. All skill levels welcome. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-3422665. Union.

On Stage - Student Theater Once upon a Mattress, 7-9:30 p.m., Randall K. Cooper High School, 2855 Longbranch Road, Auditorium. Tells story of a curse of a silent king, a talkative and overbearing queen and a kingdom helping the prince find his princess. $10, $5 student. Presented by Cooper High School Drama Club. Through March 2. 859-384-5040. Union.

Senior Citizens Get Healthy with Tai Chi, 9 a.m.-10 a.m., Walton Multipurpose Senior and Community Center, 44 N. Main St., Presented by Walton Senior Activity Center. 859-485-7611. Walton. Walk @ Walton, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Walton Multipurpose Senior and Community Center, 44 N. Main St., Presented by Walton Senior Activity Center. 859-4857611. Walton. Euchre Tournament, noon-2 p.m., Walton Multipurpose Senior and Community Center, 44 N. Main St., Presented by Walton Senior Activity Center. 859-485-7611. Walton.

SATURDAY, MARCH 2 Drink Tastings Wine Tasting, 2-6 p.m., The Liquor Cabinet, Free. 859-5869270. Hebron.

Music - Acoustic

MONDAY, MARCH 4 Civic Tea Party Meeting, 6-8 p.m., Sub Station II, 7905 Dream St., Meet and discuss limited government, free markets and fiscal responsibility. Free. Presented by Grassroots Tea Party of Boone County. 859-586-9207; www.teapartyboonecounty.org. Florence.

Exercise Classes Gentle Yoga, 6 p.m., Boone County Main Library, 1786 Burlington Pike, Learn basic postures and flows. Bring yoga mat. $25 per month. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-342-2665. Burlington. Yoga, 7:10-8 p.m., Boone County Main Library, 1786 Burlington Pike, Hatha yoga postures, breathing techniques and meditation. Bring yoga mat. $25 per month. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-3422665. Burlington. Zumba, 6 p.m., Scheben Branch Library, 8899 U.S. 42, Latininspired dance-fitness program blends international music and dance steps. $25 per month. Registration required. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-342-2665. Union. Jazzercise, 9:30 a.m., Sports of All Sorts Mt. Zion, $25-$80. 859-341-4392. Union.

Health / Wellness Five Secrets to Weight Loss, 7 p.m., Boone County Main Library, 1786 Burlington Pike, Learn to turn your body into fat burning machine by increasing your metabolism and removing toxic chemicals that cause your body to hold onto fat. Free. Registration required. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-342-2665. Burlington.

Saturday Night Music, 6-7:30 p.m. Music by Elijah Creek (bluegrass/folk)., Velocity Bike & Bean, 7560 Burlington Pike, Fresh baked goods, desserts and coffee available. Free. 859-3718356; www.velocitybb.com. Florence.

Literary - Libraries

Music - Oldies

Senior Citizens

Walk-thru Time Dance, 8 p.m.-midnight, Florence Elks Lodge 314, 7704 Dixie Highway, Upper level. Music from ’60s-’80 by 4 Way Stop Band. Hors d’oeuvres and best-dressed era prize. Ages 21 and up. $10. 859-746-3557. Florence.

Yoga Fitness for Seniors, 12:30-1:30 p.m., Walton Multipurpose Senior and Community Center, 44 N. Main St., Presented by Walton Senior Activity Center. 859-485-7611. Walton.

In the Loop, 10 a.m., Florence Branch Library, 7425 U.S. 42, Knit or crochet in relaxed, friendly company. Free. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-342-2665; www.bcpl.org. Florence.

group discussion that will help you remain accountable to your financial goals. Child care provided. $89. Registration required. 859-371-7961; www.florenceumc.com/FPU. Florence. Basic Self Defense, 7 p.m., Scheben Branch Library, 8899 U.S. 42, NKY Self Defense teaches easy-to-learn and easy-to-use techniques that require little to no strength. Registration required. 859-342-2665. Union.

Exercise Classes Zumba Gold, 6 p.m., Florence Branch Library, 7425 U.S. 42, Slow-paced, low-impact version of regular Zumba, perfect for anyone with physical limitations or just starting out an exercise program. $3. Registration required. 859-342-2665. Florence.

Literary - Libraries Chess Club, 7 p.m., Florence Branch Library, 7425 U.S. 42, All ages and levels. Instruction available. 859-342-2665. Florence.

Mom’s Clubs

TUESDAY, MARCH 5

MOMS Next, 9:30-11:30 a.m., Florence United Methodist Church, 8585 Old Toll Road, Hot breakfast provided along with speaker topics relevant to mothers of children in grades 1-12. Free childcare provided. Free. 859-371-7961; www.florenceumc.com. Florence.

Exercise Classes

Senior Citizens

SUNDAY, MARCH 3

Zumba Fitness, 7:15 p.m., Full Body Yoga, 7500 Oakbrook Road, $30 for 10 classes, $5 drop in. 859-640-9055. Florence. Jazzercise, 9:30 a.m., Sports of All Sorts Mt. Zion, $25-$80. 859-341-4392. Union.

Euchre Tournament, noon-2 p.m., Walton Multipurpose Senior and Community Center, 44 N. Main St., Presented by Walton Senior Activity Center. Through June 26. 859-485-7611. Walton.

Music - Jazz

Literary - Libraries

Under the Dome, 2 p.m., Boone County Main Library, 1786 Burlington Pike, Light refreshments and music. Free. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-342-2665. Burlington.

Comets and Meteors, 7:30 p.m., Florence Branch Library, 7425 U.S. 42, Dean Regas from Cincinnati Observatory Center discusses structures, parts and orbits of comets and meteors. Free. Registration required. 859-342-2665. Florence.

On Stage - Student Theater Once upon a Mattress, 2-4:30 p.m.; 7-9:30 p.m., Randall K. Cooper High School, $10, $5 student. 859-384-5040. Union.

Recreation Bridge, 12:30 p.m., Scheben Branch Library, 8899 U.S. 42, Open play. All ages. Free. 859342-2665. Union.

Senior Citizens Bingo, 12:30-2:30 p.m., Walton Multipurpose Senior and Community Center, 44 N. Main St., Presented by Walton Senior Activity Center. 859-485-7611. Walton. Walk @ Walton, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Walton Multipurpose Senior and Community Center, 859485-7611. Walton.

Support Groups DivorceCare Support Group, 6:30-8 p.m., Florence United Methodist Church, 8585 Old Toll Road, Those suffering from experiencing separation or divorce heal and find hope in shared experiences. Child care provided. $15. Registration required. 859-371-7961. Florence.

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 6 Education

Stephen Geddes’ Cylinder Head II (Western Romance) will be featured in the exhibit Contoured Essence 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday, March 1-April 19, at the Artisans Enterprise Center in Covington. Free. THANKS TO PAIGE WIDEMAN

The Northern Kentucky Camper Show will be 1 p.m. Friday, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, March 1-3, at the Northern Kentucky Convention Center in Covington. Cost is $6; free for ages 14 and under. Call 859-261-1500. FILE PHOTO

Dave Ramsey’s Financial Peace University, 6:30-8 p.m.; 6:30-8 p.m., Florence United Methodist Church, 8585 Old Toll Road, Newly formatted ninesession seminar. Each session includes video hosted by Dave Ramsey and incorporates small

ABOUT CALENDAR To submit calendar items, go to www.cincinnati.com and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to life@communitypress.com along with event information. Items are printed on a spaceavailable basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to www.cincinnati.com and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page. Registration required. 859-3422665. Florence. Cake Pops, 6:30 p.m., Boone County Main Library, 1786 Burlington Pike, Fantasy in Frosting provides everything to make cake pops. All ages. Registration required. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-342-2665. Burlington.

Music - Country Original Hillbilly Thursdays, 10 p.m.-2 a.m., The Southgate House Revival, 111 E. Sixth St., The Lounge. Country, bluegrass, Americana and old fashioned hillbilly music. Different artist each week. Includes 50 cents off Jack Daniels. Ages 21 and up. Free. 859-431-2201; www.southgatehouse.com. Newport.

plished journalist driven solely by his career, and Morrie Schwartz, his former college professor. $20. Presented by Footlighters Inc.. Through March 17. 859-652-3849; www.footlighters.org. Newport.

Recreation Bridge, 12:30 p.m., Scheben Branch Library, Free. 859-3422665. Union. Aerial Fitness, 6-7 p.m., Locomotion on the Levee, 1 Levee Way, Work on core body strength and endurance and use aerial equipment for workout. Rigorous course suitable for all fitness levels. Ages 18 and up. $15. Presented by Cincinnati Circus Company. 513-921-5454; www.cincinnaticircus.com. Newport.

On Stage - Theater

Senior Citizens

Tuesdays with Morrie, 8 p.m., Stained Glass Theatre, 802 York St., Comedic autobiographical story of Mitch Albom, accom-

Bingo, 12:30-2:30 p.m., Walton Multipurpose Senior and Community Center, 859-485-7611. Walton.

THURSDAY, MARCH 7 Education Basic Computing for Seniors, 1 p.m., Florence Branch Library, 7425 U.S. 42, Learn how to use mouse, navigate Windows desktop, get to websites and use search engines and email. Registration required. Presented by Boone County Public Library. Through March 28. 859-3422665. Florence.

Exercise Classes Yoga, 6:15-7 p.m., Scheben Branch Library, 8899 U.S. 42, Basic/beginner yoga practice offers holistic approach to maintaining healthy weight with increased flexibility, more stamina and lean muscle. Bring mat. All levels. $25 per month. Registration required. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-334-2117. Union. Jazzercise, 9:30 a.m., Sports of All Sorts Mt. Zion, $25-$80. 859-341-4392. Union.

Literary - Book Clubs Best of the Best Book Discussion Group, 3 p.m., Florence Branch Library, 7425 U.S. 42, Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-342-2665; www.bcpl.org. Florence.

Literary - Libraries Bring Your Own Lunch and a Movie, 11:30 a.m. Movie: "Robot and Frank.", Lents Branch Library, 3215 Cougar Path, Adults. Free. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-342-2665; www.bcpl.org. Hebron. Computer and Internet Basics, 10 a.m. Weekly through March 28., Florence Branch Library, 7425 U.S. 42, Learn how to use a computer and surf the Internet.

“Legally Blonde” will be performed 8 p.m. Friday through Sunday, March 1-3, at the Northern Kentucky University Corbett Theatre. Cost is $14 for adults; $13 staff and alumni; $11 senior; and $8 student. Call 859-572-5464. Pictured is Kathryn Miller. FILE PHOTO


LIFE

FEBRUARY 28, 2013 • FLORENCE-UNION RECORDER • B3

Simple fixings make a delicious quiche The only reason we keep chickens is to get fresh eggs. I grew up eating eggs just about every day, especially on school days. And eggs are so versatile. If I have eggs in the refrigerator, I feel like I’ve got a meal, no matter how lean the budget or how bare the pantry. Think about this: Eggs are all natural, and one egg has lots of vitamins and minerals with only about 70 calories. The nutrients in eggs can play a role in weight manageRita ment, musHeikenfeld cle RITA’S KITCHEN strength, healthy pregnancy, brain function, eye health and more. Eggs got a bad rap a few years ago but now health professionals are back on the egg bandwagon – just don’t overdo eating them. One of the first table foods we feed the babies for breakfast are eggs. The protein in eggs is the highest-quality protein found in any food.

Simple quiche

Sometimes we forget about the really easy meals. Quiche is one of those. Most of us have eggs, onions and cheese on hand and those ingre-

dients alone, with milk added, make a delicious quiche. When I want to make the quiche special, I use whipping cream. Now be sure to mince the onions very small so they cook well. Otherwise, just sauté them in a bit of butter until they’re translucent before adding to the egg mixture. I got the original recipe, before I adapted it, from a food magazine, but can’t recall which one. 9- or 10-inch pie pan lined with pie dough 10-12 slices bacon, crisply fried and crumbled (optional, but so good) 1 heaping cup shredded Swiss cheese (or your favorite, try extra sharp cheddar) 1 ⁄3 cup minced onions 4 large eggs, room temperature 2 cups whipping cream, half and half or milk About 1 teaspoon salt and 1⁄2 teaspoon pepper

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Sprinkle bacon, cheese and onion in pan. Whisk eggs well and whisk in cream and seasonings. Pour into pan. Pour mixture into pie pan. Bake 45-60 minutes or until knife inserted 1 inch from edge comes out clean.

Tips from Rita’s kitchen

Substitute about 1 cup chopped ham or 1⁄2 pound cooked sausage for the

Nutritious combined with simple ingredients add up to an easy meal. THANKS TO RITA HEIKENFELD

bacon. A few dashes cayenne pepper are good in here. If crust browns too much before quiche is done, make a “collar” of foil around the crust.

Pineapple crunch cake

Don’t look for a high and fluffy cake here. This is a moist, dense cake that keeps well in the refrigerator. Yes, it’s even better the next day. I’ve tweaked the recipe through the years and now add more vanilla than I used to. I like to toast my pecans in a 350 degree oven for about 8 minutes or so, until they smell fragrant, before chopping. You don’t have to toast the nuts, though. Now if you don’t add nuts, just call it pineapple cake. This is a yummy snacking cake. 2 large eggs, room temperature, lightly beaten 2 cups sugar 2 cups all-purpose flour 2 teaspoons baking soda 1 tablespoon vanilla 1 ⁄2 to 1 cup chopped pecans mixed with a little of the flour (optional) 1 20 oz. can unsweetened, undrained, crushed pineapple Extra chopped pecans for garnish

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Whisk sugar, flour and baking soda together. Add vanilla, eggs and pineapple and

blend well. Stir in nuts Pour into sprayed 9-inch by 13-inch pan. Bake in preheated 350 degree oven for 35-40 minutes until toothpick inserted in center comes out fairly clean. Don’t overbake. Cool, and frost with cream cheese icing. Serves 12 generously.

Tip from Rita’s kitchen

By tossing nuts with a bit of flour, they will remain suspended in the cake and not sink to the bottom. Cream cheese icing ⁄2 stick butter or margarine, softened 8 oz, cream cheese, softened 1 to 11⁄2 cups confectioners sugar 2 teaspoons vanilla 1

Beat butter and cream cheese. Add sugar and vanilla. Blend. Frost cooled cake. Sprinkle on nuts if using.

Making store-bought icing taste like homemade Check out my blog for this tip. Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educator and author. Find her blog online at Cincinnati.Com/blogs. Email her at columns@communitypress.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Call 513-248-7130, ext. 356.

SUMMER FUN IS CALLING

FISH FRY GUIDE MARCH St. Paul School Fish Fry 5-8 p.m. Fridays, March 1-22, at 7303 Dixie Hwy., Florence. Dine in or Carry out Call 647-4070. Cost is $10.50 for blackened salmon dinner; $10 thick cut fried haddock; $9 fried cod; $10 crab cake; and $8.50 shrimp.

St. Mary Parish Fish Fry 4:30-7:30 p.m., Friday, March 1, at St. Mary, 8246 East Main St., Alexandria. Dinners start at $8.

Standard Club Fish Fry 5-8 p.m. Friday, March 8, at 643 Laurel St., Covington. Cost is $6 a fish sandwich; $4 grilled cheese; $4 fish sandwich only. Beer will be available for $1 until 7 p.m.

Mary, Queen of Heaven Parish Fish Fry 4-8 p.m. Fridays, March 1-22, at 1130 Donaldson Hwy., Erlanger. Supports Mary, Queen of Heaven School. Visit http://bit.ly/ bGGAmI. Dine in or call for carryout, 859-371-2622.

Alexandria Masonic Lodge Fish Fry 4-8 p.m. Fridays, March 1-29, at the Alexandria Masonic Lodge at the corner of U.S. 27 and Pete Neiser Drive. Dine in and carry out. Cost is $7 for adults; $5 children. Fish sandwich available for $4. Call 859-760-5782.

Wilder Firefighters Fish Fry 4-8 p.m. Fridays, March 1-29, at Wilder City Building, 520 Licking Pike, Wilder. Dine-in and carryout. Dinners cost $7. Call 4315884.

St. Timothy Parish, Union, Fish Fry 4:30-7 p.m. drive-thru; 5-7:30 p.m. Fridays, March 1-22, at 10272 U.S. 42, Union. Dine-in and carryout. Cost is $8 for shrimp, fried fish, baked cod, or small combo meals; $10 for baked salmon or large combo meals; $4.50 for kids and seniors fish meal; and $3 pizza dinner.

Immaculate Heart of Mary 4:30-7:30 p.m. drive-thru; 5-8

FISH FRY TIME To have your fish fry information included, send the time, date, place, cost and contact information to Melissa Stewart at mstewart@nky.com or Community Recorder, 228 Grandview Drive, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017. p.m. dine-in and carryout Fridays, March 1-22. Cost is $5 for a cod sandwich; $7.50 cod or shrimp platter; and $10 combo platters. Call 689-4303.

St. Barbara Church 4:30-8 p.m. Fridays, March 1-22, at 4042 Turkeyfoot Road, Erlanger. Cost is $7.50 cod fish; $9.50 shrimp and baked tilapia; $1.50 LaRosa's by the slice; $3.50 fish sandwich. Dinners cost $4 for children. Call 859-371-3100.

St. Thomas Parish Fish Fry 4-8 p.m. Fridays, March 1-22, at St. Thomas School cafeteria, 428 South Fort Thomas Ave., Fort Thomas. Cost is $6.50 for fish dinner; $6 shrimp; and $1.50 slice of pizza. Call 859-572-4641.

Silver Grove Volunteer Fire Association Fish Fry 4-7:30 p.m. Fridays, March 1-29, at 5011 Four Mile Road, Silver Grove. Cost is $6.75 for dinner, $7.50 frog legs ($8.75 dinner); $5 sandwiches. Call 859-441-6251.

St. Augustine Church Lenten Fish Fry 4-7 p.m. Fridays, March 1-29, at 1840 Jefferson Ave., Covington. Cost is $6.50 fish dinners; $ baked fish or salmon and shrimp. Call 859-431-3943.

Burlington Lodge No. 264 Fish Fry 4-7:30 p.m. Fridays, March 1-29, at 7072 Pleasant Valley Road, Florence. Cost is $9 a dinner; $1 beverages; $2 desserts; $5 sandwich; $5 children (includes brownie and beverage). Call 859-746-3225 or 859-689-4328.

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Your neighborhood YMCA has been providing outstanding day camps and specialty programs for boys and girls, ages 2-15, for generations. Located in neighborhoods across Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky, the camps provide the perfect settings to appreciate nature, build skills, create memories, and establish friendships that will last a lifetime. Visit any YMCA of Greater Cincinnati on March 2 and we’ll waive your reigstration fee. Visit the website www.MyY.org or call (513) 362-YMCA to learn more!

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YMCA CAMP ERNST

Steeped in tradition and built on the YMCA values of caring, honesty, respect, and responsibility, Camp Ernst hosts overnight campers who enjoy top notch counselors, making new friends, and doing a wide variety of activities including zip-line, banana boat, 100 foot waterslide, giant swing, horseback riding, the BLOB, and much more! Come see for yourself at our Open House Sundays: March 3, April 7, and May 5, from 1 p.m. - 4 p.m. Visit the website www.MyYcamp.org or call (859) 586-6181 to learn more!

At St. Elizabeth Weight Management Center, we understand that every patient is unique; that’s why our programs are focused around your needs. We’re a multi-disciplinary center with specialists trained to help you decide the weight management route that’s best for you, whether it’s bariatric surgery or a medically managed program. For more information, please visit us online at

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LIFE

B4 • FLORENCE-UNION RECORDER • FEBRUARY 28, 2013

Tastes to explore Scouts sample flavors of the world By Melissa Stewart mstewart@nky.com

The Tasting Tea held Feb. 16 in honor of the Girl Scout holiday World Thinking Day gave Boone County scouts a real taste of the world. Canda Jongakien, 9, of Union, enjoyed learning about Uganda and may visit there someday. “I like the Girl Scouts because you get to explore new things,” she said. “Today I enjoyed learning about the different countries. I like

Uganda the best, I like the animals it has.” She also likes the African Peanut Butter Candy she sampled there. The taste of peanut butter with a hint of coconut left her with a smile. “I like it,” she giggled. Here is the recipe for the candy, as well as a few other treats Jongaqkien and more than 250 other Girl Scouts discovered. Troop 1135’s African Peanut Candy

1 cup low-fat peanut

butter 1 cup honey, slightly warm 1 to 2 cup powdered milk or 1 to 2 cup toasted wheat germ 1/2 cup finely grated coconut Directions: Put peanut butter and honey in bowl and blend well. Add 1 cup powdered milk or wheat germ and blend into a stiff dough, adding more powdered milk or wheat germ as needed. Form mixture into small 1-inch balls or patties. Put coco-

From left, Lea Mitchell, 12, of Hebron, and Kaylee Harris, 12, of Burlington, try South African Koeksters presented by troop leaders Cyndi Harris and Teresa Sweeney of Burlington and Troop 1029 during the Girl Scout Tea Feb. 16 at Cooper High School. MARTY

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nut in flat pan. Roll balls or patties in coconut to coat. Place side by side on dish covered with wax paper, cover with another wax paper sheet, and refrigerate. Serve as a sweet snack treat. Troop 116’s Chocolate Fudge Truffles Brigadeiros

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Roadside Assistance Among leading automotive luxury brands, Cadillac is the only brand to offer standard 5-year Roadside Assistance that provides lock-out service, a tow, fuel, Dealer Technician Roadside Service and more. Courtesy Transportation During the warranty coverage period, this Cadillac program provides alternate transportation and/or reimbursement of certain transportation expenses if your Cadillac requires warranty repairs.

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LIFE

FEBRUARY 28, 2013 • FLORENCE-UNION RECORDER • B5

Walton’s ‘Idol’ sings at Indy Pacers game

busy with school commitSt. Joseph Academy is ments the past few having its 2013 Lenten months, so we haven’t Fish Fry 4:30-8 p.m. each Friday through March 22. heard too much about her musical career. Drive-thru We did get to service is availsee her cheerleadable. Adult fried/ ing for the Lady baked fish and Bearcats. Also, shrimp dinners are congratulations for available as well as being awarded a special priced scholarship from senior citizen and Berea College. children’s meals. A March 6, Courtchild’s pizza dinner Ruth ney has been inincluding two Meadows vited to sing the sides and dessert WALTON NEWS national anthem at is only $5. the Boston Celtics and St. Joseph is located at Indiana Pacers game in 48 Needmore St. near Indianapolis. Thanks Walton Kroger. For more Courtney for representinformation, you can call ing our city with your 859-485-6444. beautiful voice. Our “American Idol,” We are glad to report Courtney Flege, has been

that Barbara Foley of Main Street Salon is able to be back in her shop. Barbara had major foot surgery and has been recuperating for several weeks. She would enjoy serving her customers again. Main Street Salon is located at 12 South Main and the salon is open Tuesday through Friday at 2 p.m. until the last appointment. Saturday hours are 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. You may call 859-485-7116 for appointments.

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Ruth Meadows (391-7282) writes a column about Walton. Feel free to call her with Walton neighborhood news items.

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the state, as well as providing the portion of child sexual abuse exams not covered by Medicaid or private insurance. The Child Victims’ Trust Fund provides partial support for the adult education program Stewards of Children offered through Family Nurturing Center. Stewards of Children is a revolutionary prevention program designed to teach adults to prevent, recognize and react responsibly to child sexual abuse. Three ways that Kentucky residents can help are: » Check Off Box on State Tax Returns. Just look for this box on your

Kentucky State Income Tax Form. Contributions to this fund finance local programs designed to prevent the sexual abuse and exploitation of children. » Purchase the “I Care About Kids” license plate. Select the colorful “I Care About Kids” license plate at your local county clerk’s office the next time you renew. » Make a Private Donation to the Child Victims Trust Fund. Contributions may also be made directly to the Child Victims’ Trust Fund, Kentucky Attorney General, Victims Advocacy Division, 1024 Capital Center Drive, Suite 200, Frankfort, KY 40601. Info: 502-696-5312.

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LIFE

B6 • FLORENCE-UNION RECORDER • FEBRUARY 28, 2013

POLICE REPORTS BOONE COUNTY Arrests/Citations Lashonda D. Shavers, 35, firstdegree criminal possession of a forged instrument at 3000 Mall Rd., Dec. 14. Juliana Washington, 18, firstdegree criminal possession of a forged instrument at 3000 Mall Rd., Dec. 14. Mary J. Smith, 35, shoplifting at 5000 Mall Rd., Dec. 14. Bryan W. Jones, 27, first-degree wanton endangerment, second-degree assault, possession of marijuana at 1090 Vandercar Way, Dec. 14. Dennis A. Finkenstadt, 44, DUI at U.S. 42, Dec. 15. Carl E. Williams, 35, seconddegree disorderly conduct, alcohol intoxication in a public place at 8405 U.S. 42, Dec. 15. Jack B. Sims, 56, alcohol intoxication in a public place at 8385

U.S. 42, Dec. 15. Alicia M. Pracht, 21, possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia at 7534 Canterbury Ct., Dec. 15. Tina L. Henson, 52, shoplifting at 7625 Doering Dr., Dec. 15. Jamie Sizemore, 41, alcohol intoxication in a public place at 6741 Parkland Pl., Dec. 15. Kameila D. Finch, 29, seconddegree criminal possession of a forged instrument at 4949 Houston Rd., Dec. 15. Jodie A. Woods, 29, shoplifting at 7625 Doering Dr., Dec. 15. Brian Schwwartz, 21, shoplifting at 3000 Mall Rd., Dec. 15. Stephanie M. Foltz, 21, shoplifting at 61 Spiral Dr., Dec. 16. Shaun K. Kelly, 34, alcohol intoxication in a public place at 7777 Burlington Pk., Dec. 17. Alqurashi M. Mosab-Abdullah, 25, second-degree disorderly conduct at 8075 Steilen Dr.,

ABOUT POLICE REPORTS The Community Recorder publishes the names of all adults charged with offenses. The information is a matter of public record and does not imply guilt or innocence. To contact your local police department: Boone County Sheriff Mike Helmig at 334-2175; Florence Police Chief Tom Szurlinski at 647-5420. Dec. 18. Jessica Sterling, 27, shoplifting at 7625 Doering Dr., Dec. 18. Laura E. Lachtrupp, 24, shoplifting at 7625 Doering Dr., Dec. 18. Joseph M. Collanbine, 24, shoplifting at 7625 Doering Dr., Dec. 18. Brandon K. Hughes, 20, shoplifting at Mall Rd., Dec. 19. Deborah F. Quinlan, 24, shoplifting at 6920 Burlington Pk., Dec. 19. Jay H. Campbell, 38, first-degree

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YOUR

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I TRY TO CALL ON ALL OF US TO BE OUR BETTER SELVES. TO GIVE US A VISION OF WHO – ON OUR BEST DAY – WE CAN BE. Cincinnatians get it. They’re not bystanders. When they see a need, they step up to help, again and again and again. It’s what I love most about them. From bags of reader mail and impromptu grocery store chats to Twitter & Facebook posts, readers are right there with me developing each story. That tells me I’m exactly where I’m meant to be.

possession of a controlled substance (methamphetamine) at 8193 Mall Rd., Dec. 19. Katherine A. Harris, 29, resisting arrest, second-degree disorderly conduct, alcohol intoxication in a public place at 1090 Tamarack Cir., Dec. 20. Jeremy P. Wilson, 22, reckless driving, possession of marijuana at U.S. 42, Dec. 20. Tracy A. Fields, 47, alcohol intoxication in a public place at 7490 Woodspoint Dr., Dec. 20. Barbara L. Edwards, 51, shoplifting at 61 Spiral Dr., Dec. 20. Patrick Gaymen, 32, alcohol intoxication in a public place, disorderly conduct at 7500 Oakbrook Rd., Jan. 1. Heather N. Cochran, 35, alcohol intoxication in a public place, disorderly conduct at 2674 Coachlight Lane, Jan. 1. Justin T. White, 20, failure to dim headlights, careless driving, operating on suspended or revoked operators license, DUI at 6080 Burlington Pk., Jan. 4. Charleah A. Johnson, 22, lottery altered/forged/counterfeited at Merchants St., Jan. 4. Robert D. Bundy, 42, recless driving, failure to or improper signal, failure to produce insurance card, DUI at Interstate 275, Jan. 4. Amy M. Muller, 35, failure to dim headlights, failure to produce insurance car, DUI at Mt. Zion Rd. and Interstate 75, Jan. 5. Patricia Rios, 28, failure to produce insurance card, DUI at Burlington Pike and Limaburg Creek, Jan. 5. Hope D. Smith, 49, alcohol intoxication in a public place at 1130 Boone Aire Rd., Jan. 5. Christopher M. Pugh, 37, alcohol intoxication in a public place at 5972 Carlton Dr., Jan. 6.

Justin L. Willliams, 21, burglary at 10754 Calle Victoria, Jan. 6. Humberto Martinez, 31, no operators-moped license, failure to produce insurance card, DUI at Dixie Hwy. and Richardson Rd., Jan. 6. Judd E. Allison, 56, DUI at Mary Grubbs Hwy., Jan. 7. Christopher M. Bowen, 34, possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia at 159 White Pine Cir., Jan. 7. Leonard D. Kemplin Jr., 30, wanton endangerment, criminal mischief at Conrad Ln. and Ky. 237, Jan. 8. Eric S. Decker, 34, DUI, careless driving at Weaver Rd. and Evergreen Dr., Jan. 10. Zachary J. Allen, 31, alcohol intoxication in a public place at 13019 Walton Verona Rd., Jan. 10.

Incidents/Investigations Assault Known subject assaulted victim and put others lives in danger at 1090 Vandercar Way, Dec. 14. Known subject assaulted victim at 8100 block of Diane Dr., Dec. 14. Victim assaulted by known subject at 7300 block of Blackstone Dr., Dec. 18. Victim assaulted by known subject at Turfway Racetrack at 7500 Turfway Rd., Dec. 19. Fourth degree, minor injury at 3990 Olympic Blvd., Jan. 1. Fourth degree, minor injury at 5972 Carlton Dr., Jan. 6. Burglary Residence broken into and items taken at 33 Miriam Dr., Dec. 17. Money stolen at 4400 River Rd., Jan. 3. Money stolen at 1911 Carolina Way, Jan. 3. Air conditioning unit, electric heater stolen at 272 Melinda Ln., Jan. 5. Gaming system, games, controllers stolen and recovered at 10768 Calle Victoria, Jan. 6. Motorcycle, moped stolen at 12938 Pavilion Ct., Jan. 7. iPhone stolen at 1119 Boone Aire Rd., Jan. 7. Reported at 880 Donaldson Hwy., Jan. 7. Door handle seized at 5995

Jefferson St., Jan. 7. Reported at 5981 Orient St., Jan. 7. Money stolen at 5437 Country Hills Ct., Jan. 7. Alcohol, money stolen at Jefferson St., Jan. 10. Criminal mischief Vehicles vandalized at 8035 Action Blvd., Dec. 16. Structure vandalized at 6067 Celtic Ash Ave., Dec. 17. Automobiles destroyed/damaged/vandalized at 2275 Flicker Dr., No. 134, Jan. 1. Structures destroyed/damaged/ vandalized at 10134 Old Union Rd., Jan. 2. Automobiles destroyed/damaged/vandalized at 6301 Remington Cv., Jan. 4. Structures destroyed/damaged/ vandalized at 9221 Tranquility Dr., Jan. 5. Automobiles destroyed/damaged/vandalized at 6701 Summertime Ln., Jan. 6. Automobiles destroyed/damaged/vandalized at 1105 Amber Dr., Jan. 7. Automobiles destroyed/damaged/vandalized at 1760 Elmburn Dr., Jan. 4. Fraud Subjects tried to use counterfeit money at Macy's at 3000 Mall Rd., Dec. 14. Subject tried to pass a fraudulent check at Sam's Club at 4949 Houston Rd., Dec. Subject passed a fraudulent check at Hobby Lobby at 7932 Connector Dr., Dec. 17. Incident reports Subject falsely reported an incident at 7975 Dixie Hwy., Dec. 18. Lottery altered/forged/ counterfeit/ticket Scratch off lottery tickets counterfeited/forged at 5992 Merchants St., Jan. 4. Narcotics Subject found in possession of methamphetamine at Walgreens at 8193 Mall Rd., Dec. 19. Possession of controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia, public intoxication-controlled substance

See POLICE, Page B7

STRIKE UP A CONVERSATION WITH ME IN THE GROCERY STORE OR VIA FACEBOOK. I CAN’T WAIT TO HEAR YOUR STORY. Connect with KRISTA RAMSEY kramsey@enquirer.com facebook.com/krista.ramsey.52

Columnist


LIFE

FEBRUARY 28, 2013 • FLORENCE-UNION RECORDER • B7

POLICE REPORTS Continued from Page B6

iPod stolen at 2532 Northern Dancer Ct., Jan. 1. License plate and decal stolen at 5076 Flintlock Dr., Jan. 2. Money stolen at 6494 Rosetta Dr., Jan. 2. Purse stolen at 76 Alta Vista Dr., Jan. 2. Credit/debit card stolen at 825 Mt. Zion Rd., Jan. 3. Money stolen at 1335 Donaldson Hwy., Jan. 4. Automobile batteries stolen at 111 Frogtown Rd., Jan. 4. Nintendo Wii stolen at 6309 Tessie Cir., Jan. 7. Collectibles stolen at 2886 Lawrenceburg Ferry Rd., Jan. 8. Credit/debit card, driver license stolen at 1600 Worldwide Blvd., Jan. 8. Firearms stolen at 1020 Merrell Rd., Jan. 9. Theft from auto Vehicle broken into and items taken at 8377 St. Louis Blvd., Dec. 17. Parts stolen off of vehicle at 8053 Burlington Pk., Dec. 17. Vehicle broken into and items taken at 7928 Dream St., Dec. 17. Theft of auto Vehicle stolen and not recovered at 1130 Tamarack Cir., Dec. 15. Theft of controlled substance Reported at 6494 Rosetta Dr., Jan. 3. Wanton endangerment, criminal mischief Automobiles destroyed/damaged/vandalized at Conrad Ln., Jan. 8.

Drugs/narcotics and equipment seized at 2514 Burlington Pk., Jan. 3. Shoplifting Subject tried to steal merchandise from Macy's at 5000 Mall Rd., Dec. 14. Subject tried to steal items from Walmart at 7625 Doering Dr., Dec. 15. Subject tried to steal items from Walmart at 7625 Doering Dr., Dec. 15. Subject tried to steal goods from Macy's at 3000 Mall Rd., Dec. 15. Subject tried to steal merchandise from Kohl's at 61 Spiral Dr., Dec. 16. Subject tried to steal items from Walmart at 7625 Doering Dr., Dec. 18. Subject tried to steal items from Walmart at 7625 Doering Dr., Dec. 18. Subject tried to steal items from Walmart at 7625 Doering Dr., Dec. 18. Subject tried to steal goods from Macy's at 3000 Mall Rd., Dec. 19. Subject tried to steal merchandise from Remke's at 6920 Burlington Pk., Dec. 19. Cigarettes stolen at 281 Richwood Rd., Jan. 2. Terroristic threatening Reported at 3720 Langley Dr., Jan. 8. Theft Registration plate stolen from vehicle at Walmart at 7625 Doering Dr., Dec. 14. Registration plate stolen from vehicle at 2028 Mall Rd., Dec. 15. Property stolen from Value Place at 40 Cavalier Blvd., Dec. 18. Merchandise stolen from Super Cuts at 1052 Hansel Ave., Dec. 18. Metal stolen from business at 7107 Turfway Rd., Dec. 19. Property stolen from residence at 7207 U.S. 42, Dec. 19. Incident of identity theft reported at 6011 Montrose Ave., Dec. 19. Collectibles stolen at 1678 Brierwood Ct., Jan. 1.

How to reduce your energy costs Energy costs fluctuate throughout the year, since much of our heating and cooling usage depends on Mother Nature. However, you can make your home more energy efficient and reduce some of your energy expenses by locating and switching off sources of phantom energy in your home. Plugged-in devices that are not performing their primary duty but still using electricity are said to use phantom energy. Phantom energy users include many products that have a standby mode, such as microwaves, coffee makers and similar products that constantly display the time. Devices with remote

regularly use the controls, external product. If you find power supplies yourself in that and battery charsituation, consider gers are other purchasing a smart examples of power strip to manphantom energy age a group of elecculprits. These tronics or a coninclude televiserve power switch sions, cell phone Diane for small applichargers and Mason ances. cordless phones. EXTENSION Smart power These devices use NOTES strips are equipped electricity when with control outlets, plugged into an outlet whether or not they are in switched outlets and constant outlets. The control use or charging. outlets manage much of The easiest way to the power coming into the reduce phantom energy strip. When you plug a use is to unplug these device into a control outproducts when they are let and it goes into sleep not needed. Sometimes mode, the strip will cut this is easier said than off the power to it and done, especially if you

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LIFE

B8 • FLORENCE-UNION RECORDER • FEBRUARY 28, 2013

DEATHS Karen Adams Karen Gail Morgan Adams, 63, of Walton died Feb. 18, 2013, at her residence. She was a secretary at Holmes High School, a member of Florence Baptist at Mt. Zion Church, and enjoyed reading, working puzzles and traveling. Her parents, William Sr. and Katherine Walden Morgan, died previously. Survivors include her husband, Henry Adams; daughter, Kimberly Adams Reams of Independence; sons, Jeremy Lee Adams of Independence and Aaron Thomas Adams of Walton; sisters, Sandy Mulligan of Erlanger and Connie Crittenden of Florence; brothers, Billy Morgan of Burlington and Johnny Morgan of Florence; and eight grandchildren. Burial was at Independence Cemetery. Memorials: Florence Baptist Church at Mt. Zion, 642 Mt. Zion Road, Florence, KY 41042 or the American Cancer Society, 297 Buttermilk Pike, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017.

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2013 COLLECTOR EDITION PIECE

Rebecca Barker

The 2013 Stickley Collector Edition Wine Rack is crafted of solid cherry or quartersawn oak with an inlay of maple, walnut, pear, ebony and oak. Paired with a serving tray and storage compartment that conceals a solid cherry Stickley branded cheeseboard. 38"h x 31" w x 13.25" d.

MSRP $1650. Verbarg's Price: $999. (Special Factory Price, no other discounts apply.)

Rebecca J. Campbell Barker, 75, of Union, died Feb. 19, 2013, at her residence. She was a member of New Hope Tabernacle Church of God in Walton and a Kentucky Colonel. Survivors include her husband, Roger Barker; daughters, Melissa Lankford of Union and Sandra Barker of Verona; sons, Roger “Joe” Barker of Hebron and Donald Barker of Union; brother, Brown Campbell Jr. of Tennessee; eight grandchildren; and 10 great-grandchildren.

Emily Becherer

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Emily Sophie Becherer, 88, of Florence, died Feb. 13, 2013, at her residence. She was a retired buyer and purchasing agent for General Electric in DeKalb, Ill., and Holland, Mich. Her husband, Lawrence Becherer, and brother, Adolph Miller, died previously. Survivors include her daughter, Marlene Becherer of Florence; son, Richard Becherer of

ABOUT OBITUARIES For the most up-to-date Northern Kentucky obituaries, click on the “Obituaries” link at NKY.com. Funeral homes may submit basic obituary information to recorderobits@nky.com. To publish a larger memorial tribute, call 513-242-4000 for pricing details. Elburn, Ill; six grandchildren; and 12 great-grandchildren. Memorials: Hebron Lutheran Church, 3140 Limaburg Road, Hebron, KY 41048 or Immanuel Lutheran Church, 511 Russell Road, DeKalb, IL 60115.

Betty Lou Deaton Betty Lou Deaton, 84, of Florence, died Feb. 15, 2013, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. She was a retired tax examiner with the Internal Revenue Service and a member of Florence Baptist Church at Mt. Zion in Florence. Her husband, Thomas Deaton; a son, Thomas A. Deaton Jr.; and a brother, Jack Harrison, died previously. Survivors include her daughter, Vikki L. Deaton-Downing; sons, Timothy Clark Deaton and Tracy Harrison Deaton; sisters, Christine Lewis and Ann Adams; brother, Terry Harrison; 10 grandchildren; and 14 greatgrandchildren. Memorials: Florence Baptist Church at Mt. Zion, 642 Mt. Zion Road, Florence, KY 41042.

Edward Egbers Edward W. “Bill” Egbers, 76, of Florence, died Feb. 17, 2013. Survivors include his wife, Ann Egbers; children, Dan Egbers, Donna Durnwald and Debbie Egbers; six grandchildren; and brothers, Tom Egbers and David “Skip” Egbers. Memorials: Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, 8050 Hosbrook Road, Cincinnati, Ohio 45236.

Virginia Fischer Virginia J. Fischer, 91, of Latonia, died Feb. 18, 2013, at The Baptist Convalescent Center in Newport. She was a homemaker, a member of Holy Cross Church, and enjoyed boating and fish-

ing. Her husband, Raymond Fischer, died previously. Survivors include her sons, Dan Fischer of Edgewood, Jeff Fischer of Florence and Tim Fischer of Lakeside Park; nine grandchildren; and many greatgrandchildren.

Brenda Kiser Brenda Carole Kiser, 66, of Lexington, died Feb. 14, 2013, at the University of Kentucky Medical Center. She was a compliance officer for the State of Kentucky Child Support Enforcement, and a life member of the University of Kentucky Alumni Association and the University Women’s Club. A brother, Jimmy Applegate, died previously. Survivors include her husband, Eugene Kiser; sons, Michael Mohring of Florence, and Dustin Mohring of Erlanger; stepson, Eugene Kiser, III, of Morning View; siblings, Margena Applegate of Carrolton, Bonnie Crawford, Newward, Ohio, and Sonny Applegate, Beverly Holt and Pamela Schnitzler, all of Covington, and Sandena Byrd of Lebanon, Ohio; six grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren. Memorials: University of Kentucky Women’s Scholarship Fund or the Lexington Fire Department Toy Program.

Gordon Maynard Gordon Maynard, 75, of Union, died Feb. 18, 2013, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. He was a Teamster Union steward and retired truck driver from O.K. and Wentz Freightways. He was a member of Union Baptist and served in the Navy. He enjoyed fishing, and

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LIFE

FEBRUARY 28, 2013 • FLORENCE-UNION RECORDER • B9

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LIFE

B10 • FLORENCE-UNION RECORDER • FEBRUARY 28, 2013

DEATHS Continued from Page B8 hunting, was an avid University of Kentucky basketball fan and watched “Gunsmoke” every night on TV. A brother, Charles Maynard, died previously. Survivors include his wife, Ruth Chapman Maynard; sons, Mickey of Anderson Township, Ohio, and Bradley of Crittenden; sisters, Ruth Blakley of LasVegas, and Jeanetta Dabney and Loretta Finnicum, both of Burlington; and brother, John Maynard of Walton. Memorials: Union Baptist Church, Mortgage Fund, 1985 Mt. Zion Road, Union, KY 41091.

Diana Monoskie Diana S. Monoskie, 61, of Williamsburg, Ohio, died Feb. 16, 2013, at her residence. She was a nurses’ aide. Her parents, George Rankins Pope and Cora Lee Herrington; husband, Phillip R. Monoskie; a daughter, Michelle L. Coffey; and a sister, Joyce B. Pope, died previously. Survivors include her sons, Jeff Coffey of McDermit, Ohio, and Kenny Coffey of Georgetown;

daughter, Rebecca Coffey of Mount Orab; brothers, Wayne Pope of Crittenden, Jerry Pope of Alexandria, Bill Pope of Cincinnati, Denny Pope of Florence, Jack Pope of Melbourne and David Pope of Olympia, Wash.; sisters, Carol Schlosser of Alexandria, Wanda Brock of Elsmere and Georgette Lyons of Alexandria; eight grandchildren; and three greatgrandchildren. Memorials: Meeker Funeral Home.

James Mulcahey James Edward Mulcahey, 74, of Fort Thomas, died Feb. 14, 2013, at Greystone Nursing Home. He attended Holy Cross High School, was the star centerfielder and Mr. Graduate of his class in 1957. After high school he became active in the Kenton County Men’s Democrat Club and was elected as their youngest president. He was also a Kentucky Colonel. His companion, Harviettia Engelhart, died previously. Survivors include his brother, Robert Mulcahey of Florence; sister, Marcia Smith of Wiscon-

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sin; a niece; and two nephews. Memorials: Alzheimer’s Association of Cincinnati, 644 Linn St., Cincinnati, OH 45203.

Robert Nipper Robert L. Nipper, 78, of Florence, died Feb. 20, 2013. He was a retired industrial maintenance technician with the former Cincinnati Die-Cast Co., served in the Army, was a member of the Masonic Lodge, a guitar player and singer with various local groups, and a member of Island Creek Baptist Church in Manchester. His sisters, Mary Shouse and Lucille Hudson, died previously. Survivors include his wife, Shelby Nipper; daughter, Bobbie Nipper-Ferry; and two grandchildren. Memorials: Hospice of the Bluegrass, 7388 Turfway Road, Florence, KY 41042.

Tawni Pina Tawni Marie Pina, 21, of Florence, died Feb. 14, 2013, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. She was a graduate of Scott High School and worked as a waitress. Survivors include her father, Collin Pina; mother and stepfather, Traci and Rick Wolfe Jr.; grandmother, Jennifer Carter; and sister, Ambria Pina.

Marie Suedkamp Marie Suedkamp, 81, of Covington, died Feb. 14, 2013. Her husband, Ralph Suedkamp, and sister, Margaret Tarvin, died previously. Survivors include her children, Sharon Warneford of Middletown, R.I., Sandy Suedkamp of Cincinnati, Terry Milles of Covington, Gay Sammons of Covington, Tammy Gillespie of Erlanger, Greg Suedkamp of Florence and Barry Suedkamp of Independence; 13 grandchildren; six great-grandchildren; and siblings, John “Bo” Rider, William “Bossie” Rider, Lill Elliott and Delores Click. Memorials: Greater Cincinnati Alzheimer’s Association, 644 Linn St., Cincinnati Ohio 45203 or The Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, 2300 Wall Street, Suite H, Cincinnati, Ohio 45212.

Billie Williams Billie F. Williams, 79, of Ludlow, died Feb. 16, 2013, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. She was a retired seamstress with Globe Corp. and a member of First Baptist Church of Ludlow. Her husband, Jack Williams, died previously. Survivors include her daughters, Hope Hazelip of Ludlow, Gayle Daniels of Byardstown, Tenn., and Mickey Todd of Florence; and a grandson. Memorials: First Baptist Church, 400 Linden St., Ludlow, KY 41017.

Boosting your knowledge of

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Whether you’re working or retired, these mini workshops will help you better understand the three biggest issues that affect you daily. The recent changes in healthcare, taxes and insurance have created new questions. Boost your knowledge and learn about your new choices.

Taxes: Session 1 | March 12th & 14th

Income Tax, Capital Gains/Dividend Income, Social Security

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Our popular event also consists of a free Information Fair, held in our Rotunda and open to the public, where you can meet with representatives from more than thirty local organizations dedicated to educating and supporting young learners and families.

Instructors: Stephen A. Wright CFP, CRPC Jeffery A. Herold CFP, CRPC

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