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PERSON TO PERSON B1

Your Community Press newspaper serving Evendale, Glendale, Sharonville,Springdale, Wyoming E-mail: tricounty@communitypress.com We d n e s d a y, S e p t e m b e r

PRESS

Web site: communitypress.com

2, 2009

B E C A U S E C O M M U N I T Y M AT T E R S

50¢

Read ’em and beep

Princeton High School student Jared Ballew

Scanners focus on plates

Volume 26 Number 3 © 2009 The Community Press ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

By Kelly McBride Reddy kreddy@communitypress.com

Reading a license plate while driving can be challenging for a police cruiser. Keeping track of plates passing in both directions of traffic, and doing it at night, is nearly impossible. In Wyoming, officers can patrol the city while tracking nearly all of the license plates that pass by in either direction, plus the ones on cars parked in lots. One of the city’s police cruisers has been equipped with an automated license plate reader system, linked to the computer in one of the cruisers. It includes four cameras mounted on top of the car, pointed in strategic directions to capture the images coming, going and parked. Each time a plate is registered, the computer beeps and shows two images. One is the license plate and the other is a photo of the vehicle. The cameras are equipped with infrared capabilities, so photos can be taken at night. If a warrant is attached to that license plate, the officer is alerted and given a description of the car owner and the offense. The warrants are downloaded at the beginning of each shift, to ensure that the list is current. Throughout the day, if the system registers a hit while out on the road, the officer then confirms that it’s current before taking any action.

Candidate e-mail addresses needed

Are you a candidate for election this fall? If you’d like to be included in the Cincinnati.com online election guide, please e-mail your name, office sought, and e-mail address to Government/Public Affairs Editor Carl Weiser, cweiser@enquirer.com, and TriCounty Press Editor Dick Maloney, rmaloney@ communitypress.com.

Sweet success

What do you do when life hands you lemon seeds, and leaves out the juice, sugar and water? If you’re Chuck Smith, you make lemonade anyway. Born in Akron, he has one daughter who lives in Smyrna, Ga. Fortunately for us, he is the owner of Complete Family and Sports Nutrition in Sharonville. Chuck has been in the health care industry 20 years, and located in the Sharonville area for 17. SEE LIFE, B1

KELLY MCBRIDE REDDY/STAFF

Wyominf Police Lt. Rusty Herzog points out one of the four cameras mounted atop a patrol car. The license plate reading system photographs plates from every passing car, as well as parked vehicles. The beeps are constant, as the cruiser passes cars, and become more rapid during rush hour. During six shifts, Wyoming police registered 11,363 plates read. Of those, 112 received hits. During the first few days using the plate reader, Wyoming police recovered two stolen vehicles,

made one felony warrant arrest and stopped three other cars with misdemeanor warrants that totaled 10 different warrants. “It becomes a force multiplier,” Wyoming Police Chief Gary Baldauf said. “It helps us do our job more efficiently.” The plate reader cost $25,000. It was paid for with an anony-

Springdale mayor’s daughter campaigns for council seat By Kelly McBride Reddy kreddy@communitypress.com

As Springdale voters prepare to choose new members of city council, one seat is contested, with a twist. Holly McQuillan-Emerson and Julie Matheny are vying for the seat being vacated by Randy Danbury. Both are new to the election process, but Matheny is a familiar face to many as the mayor’s daughter. “There’s nothing illegal about it, with her father being the mayor,” said her dad, Mayor Doyle Webster. Webster has two years remaining in his term as mayor. “I haven’t decided what I’m going to do at that point,” he said. “Health will dictate that. But I see

One down …

The first week of the high school football season is history. Find out who won, who lost and who starred. SEE SPORTS, A6

To place an ad, call 242-4000.

Matheny

the light at the end of the tunnel, as far as my public service career. “This is something she’s wanted to do for a long time,” he said. “She’s very qualified, and I’m glad she’s doing it.” Matheny’s opponent, McQuillan-Emerson, has been a Springdale resident for 19 years. She and her husband, Bob, have two sons, Adam and Andrew, who attend Princeton schools. “Do I have a problem with it?” McQuillan-Emerson said. “Yes.

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“But it’s not my campaign, it’s hers,” she said. “The voters will have to decide that. “My major concern is, will she be able to support the city, or will she support her father?” Matheny, a lifelong resident who lives in Springdale with her husband, Harry, said that won’t be a problem for her. “I would be one of seven votes,” she said of City Council. “I’m very independent-minded, and have disagreed with my dad in the past,” she said. “I’m sure I would disagree with him in the future. “I do not view that as a conflict of interest.” Matheny has been the executive director of the Springdale Chamber of Commerce for seven years. She said the community is in

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mous donation, the chief said. He said he’d like to eventually equip the other six cars in the Wyoming fleet with the plate reader, and will pursue grant funding as it becomes available. “Ultimately, this will improve public safety,” he said, “and get warrants off the street.”

Inside

For a list of local candidates and issues, see page A2. need of better communication. “It’s become somewhat stagnant through the years,” Matheny said. “In these changing times of communications and demographics, we need someone with fresh new approaches. “I would get back with the people if they have questions and concerns,” she said. “They would get an answer.” McQuillan-Emerson said she, too, would be a voice for the residents. “I’ve been a nurse for 24 years, and have a hunger to help people,” she said. “I’ve served on the parks commission and been a volunteer. I feel I need to be a voice for the people.”

3 DAYS ONLY!

*Savings include dealer discount plus all Customer Cash. Sale ends 9/4/09.


PERSON TO PERSON B1

Your Community Press newspaper serving Evendale, Glendale, Sharonville,Springdale, Wyoming E-mail: tricounty@communitypress.com We d n e s d a y, S e p t e m b e r

PRESS

Web site: communitypress.com

2, 2009

B E C A U S E C O M M U N I T Y M AT T E R S

50¢

Read ’em and beep

Princeton High School student Jared Ballew

Scanners focus on plates

Volume 26 Number 3 © 2009 The Community Press ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

By Kelly McBride Reddy kreddy@communitypress.com

Reading a license plate while driving can be challenging for a police cruiser. Keeping track of plates passing in both directions of traffic, and doing it at night, is nearly impossible. In Wyoming, officers can patrol the city while tracking nearly all of the license plates that pass by in either direction, plus the ones on cars parked in lots. One of the city’s police cruisers has been equipped with an automated license plate reader system, linked to the computer in one of the cruisers. It includes four cameras mounted on top of the car, pointed in strategic directions to capture the images coming, going and parked. Each time a plate is registered, the computer beeps and shows two images. One is the license plate and the other is a photo of the vehicle. The cameras are equipped with infrared capabilities, so photos can be taken at night. If a warrant is attached to that license plate, the officer is alerted and given a description of the car owner and the offense. The warrants are downloaded at the beginning of each shift, to ensure that the list is current. Throughout the day, if the system registers a hit while out on the road, the officer then confirms that it’s current before taking any action.

Candidate e-mail addresses needed

Are you a candidate for election this fall? If you’d like to be included in the Cincinnati.com online election guide, please e-mail your name, office sought, and e-mail address to Government/Public Affairs Editor Carl Weiser, cweiser@enquirer.com, and TriCounty Press Editor Dick Maloney, rmaloney@ communitypress.com.

Sweet success

What do you do when life hands you lemon seeds, and leaves out the juice, sugar and water? If you’re Chuck Smith, you make lemonade anyway. Born in Akron, he has one daughter who lives in Smyrna, Ga. Fortunately for us, he is the owner of Complete Family and Sports Nutrition in Sharonville. Chuck has been in the health care industry 20 years, and located in the Sharonville area for 17. SEE LIFE, B1

KELLY MCBRIDE REDDY/STAFF

Wyominf Police Lt. Rusty Herzog points out one of the four cameras mounted atop a patrol car. The license plate reading system photographs plates from every passing car, as well as parked vehicles. The beeps are constant, as the cruiser passes cars, and become more rapid during rush hour. During six shifts, Wyoming police registered 11,363 plates read. Of those, 112 received hits. During the first few days using the plate reader, Wyoming police recovered two stolen vehicles,

made one felony warrant arrest and stopped three other cars with misdemeanor warrants that totaled 10 different warrants. “It becomes a force multiplier,” Wyoming Police Chief Gary Baldauf said. “It helps us do our job more efficiently.” The plate reader cost $25,000. It was paid for with an anony-

Springdale mayor’s daughter campaigns for council seat By Kelly McBride Reddy kreddy@communitypress.com

As Springdale voters prepare to choose new members of city council, one seat is contested, with a twist. Holly McQuillan-Emerson and Julie Matheny are vying for the seat being vacated by Randy Danbury. Both are new to the election process, but Matheny is a familiar face to many as the mayor’s daughter. “There’s nothing illegal about it, with her father being the mayor,” said her dad, Mayor Doyle Webster. Webster has two years remaining in his term as mayor. “I haven’t decided what I’m going to do at that point,” he said. “Health will dictate that. But I see

One down …

The first week of the high school football season is history. Find out who won, who lost and who starred. SEE SPORTS, A6

To place an ad, call 242-4000.

Matheny

the light at the end of the tunnel, as far as my public service career. “This is something she’s wanted to do for a long time,” he said. “She’s very qualified, and I’m glad she’s doing it.” Matheny’s opponent, McQuillan-Emerson, has been a Springdale resident for 19 years. She and her husband, Bob, have two sons, Adam and Andrew, who attend Princeton schools. “Do I have a problem with it?” McQuillan-Emerson said. “Yes.

2,750 SAVINGS

$

On All 2009 Altima 2.5 S 10 Available

8680 Colerain Avenue •

McQuillan-Emerson

“But it’s not my campaign, it’s hers,” she said. “The voters will have to decide that. “My major concern is, will she be able to support the city, or will she support her father?” Matheny, a lifelong resident who lives in Springdale with her husband, Harry, said that won’t be a problem for her. “I would be one of seven votes,” she said of City Council. “I’m very independent-minded, and have disagreed with my dad in the past,” she said. “I’m sure I would disagree with him in the future. “I do not view that as a conflict of interest.” Matheny has been the executive director of the Springdale Chamber of Commerce for seven years. She said the community is in

4,000 SAVINGS

$

On All 2009 Maxima 3.5 S 4 Available

513-385-1400 • www.falhabernissan.com

mous donation, the chief said. He said he’d like to eventually equip the other six cars in the Wyoming fleet with the plate reader, and will pursue grant funding as it becomes available. “Ultimately, this will improve public safety,” he said, “and get warrants off the street.”

Inside

For a list of local candidates and issues, see page A2. need of better communication. “It’s become somewhat stagnant through the years,” Matheny said. “In these changing times of communications and demographics, we need someone with fresh new approaches. “I would get back with the people if they have questions and concerns,” she said. “They would get an answer.” McQuillan-Emerson said she, too, would be a voice for the residents. “I’ve been a nurse for 24 years, and have a hunger to help people,” she said. “I’ve served on the parks commission and been a volunteer. I feel I need to be a voice for the people.”

3 DAYS ONLY!

*Savings include dealer discount plus all Customer Cash. Sale ends 9/4/09.


Tri-County Press

News

September 2, 2009

Index

Calendar ......................................B2 Classifieds.....................................C Deaths .........................................B6

Life...............................................B1 Police reports..............................B8 Real estate ..................................B8 Religion .......................................B6 Sports ..........................................A6

Your Community Press newspaper serving Evendale, Glendale, Sharonville,Springdale, Wyoming E-mail: tricounty@communitypre

PRESS

Find news and information from your community on the Web Evendale – cincinnati.com/evendale Glendale – cincinnati.com/glendale Sharonville – cincinnati.com/sharonville Springdale – cincinnati.com/springdale Wyoming – cincinnati.com/wyoming Hamilton County – cincinnati.com/hamiltoncounty News Dick Maloney | Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 248-7134 | rmaloney@communitypress.com Kelly McBride Reddy | Reporter. . . . . . . . 576-8246 | kreddy@communitypress.com Amanda Hopkins | Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . 248-7577 | ahopkins@communitypress.com Melanie Laughman | Sports Editor . . . . . . . 248-7118 | mlaughman@communitypress.com Mark Chalifoux | Sports Reporter. . . . . . . 576-8255 | mchalifoux@communitypress.com Advertising Mark Lamar | Territory Sales Manager. . . . 248-7685 | mlamar@enquirer.com Kimtica Jarman Account Relationship Specialist . . . . . . . . . 936-4707 | kjarman@communitypress.com Hather Gadker Account Relationship Specialist . . . . . . . . . 768-8249 | hgadker@communitypress.com Delivery For customer service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 576-8240 Stephen Barraco | Circulation Manager . . 248-7110 | sbarraco@communitypress.com Lynn Hessler | District Manager . . . . . . . . 248-7115 | lyhessler@communitypress.com To place an ad in Community Classified, call 242-4000.

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It’s Time For:

Sharonville to sell property in job-creation project By Kelly McBride Reddy kreddy@communitypress.com

Sharonville is making a land sale that’s unprecedented in the city, and rarely seen within the federal government. The Sharonville Depot, 46.4 acres owned by the federal government, where ore was stored, is being sold. As is the practice with the U.S. government, land that’s being sold is first offered to other government partners. Economic Development Director Tammy Riddle said it’s not often that the government sells property. “This is the first of its type in Sharonville, and rare that the federal

NCH administrator leaving for new job By Heidi Fallon hfallon@communitypress.com

Jerry Thamann will leave his post as North College Hill administrator Sept. 18 to take a similar job with Springdale. Thamann, 50, has been with the city the past 17 years. He is leaving to become the assistant city administrator for Springdale, replacing Derek Parham who has been promoted to the top administrative job. Thamann said it was a hard decision, but one he

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ON THE BALLOT A look at candidates and issues on the Nov. 3 ballot:

EVENDALE

Member of Council (three to be elected; four-year term) J. Jeffrey Albrinck Douglas A. Lohmeier Christian J. Schaefer Stiney Vonderhaar

GLENDALE

Member of Council (four to be elected; four-year term) Monica L. Alles-White William S. Aronstein W. Charles Ehlers Debbie Grueninger Alan E. Hoeweler J. Brian Messmore

SHARONVILLE

(includes Butler County) President of Council (one to be elected; two-year term) Kevin M. Hardman (R) Treasurer (one to be elected; four-year term) Timothy N. Clements (NP) Alfred L. Ledbetter (R) Member Council at Large (three to be elected; two-year term) Vickie Hoppe (R) Greg Pugh (R) Paul J. Schmidt (R) Member Council Ward 1 (one to be elected; two-year term) Ed Cunningham Member Council Ward 2 (one to be elected; two-year term) Janey L. Kattelman (R) Member Council Ward 3 (one to be elected; two-year term) Kerry D. Rabe (R) Member Council Ward 4 (one to be elected; two-year term) Robert D. Tankersley (R)

SPRINGDALE

District 1 (one to be elected; four-year term) Lawrence C. Hawkins III District 2 (one to be elected; four-year term) Julie Matheny Holly McQuillan-Emerson District 3 (one to be elected; four-year term) Marjorie Harlow District 4 (one to be elected; four-year term) Thomas D. Vanover

WYOMING

Member Council at Large (seven to be elected; two-year term) Walter Cordes Lynn Crider Pamela Kamm Jenni McCauley

James T. O’Reilly Will Papa Barry S. Porter

PRINCETON CITY SCHOOL DISTRICT

(includes Butler & Warren counties) Member of Board of Education (two to be elected; four-year term) Lillian A. Hawkins Tawana Lynn Keels

WYOMING CITY SCHOOL DISTRICT

Member of Board of Education (three to be elected; four-year term) Jennifer Etler Vernon Etler Sheryl Felner Lynn P. Larson Terry G. Marty

HAMILTON COUNTY EDUCATIONAL SERVICE CENTER GOVERNING BOARD

(Comprised of the seven local school districts) Member of Board of Education (three to be elected; four-year term) William A. Brandenburgh Jr. Francis Fullam William K. Memke

ISSUES

State issues 1. Proposed Constitutional Amendment – Compensation to Veterans of the Persian Gulf, Afghanistan and Iraq conflicts 2. Proposed Constitutional Amendment – Create Livestock Care Standards Board 3. Proposed Constitutional Amendment – Casino Gambling. County issues Public Library – 10-mill, five-year additional property tax levy for current operating expenses and capital improvements. Hamilton County .34-mill, five-year additonal property tax levy for Family Services & Treatment Programs Hamilton County 4.13-mill, five-year renewal and increase property tax levy for Developmental Disabilities Hamilton County – .18-mill, five-year renewal and decrease property tax levy for Museum Center City issues Springdale E – Local option for Sunday Sales at Sam’s Club; wine and mixed beverages, 10 a.m. to midnight. Village/township issues Glendale – Proposed electric aggregation Glendale – Proposed natural gas aggregation

VILLAGE

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said is best for his family and career. Municipal management is a field, Thamann said, that “always intrigued me.” “It’s a way to help people in a job that offers something differ- Thamann ent every day,” he said. “I knew I could never have a job sitting behind a desk five days a week doing the same repetitive paperwork.” Before coming to North College Hill, Thamann was with Lockland for 10 years. He’s had a front-row seat to a variety of changes in the city since he started, including the completion of the Ronald Reagan/Cross County Highway and the Kroger development. He’s leaving before seeing the completion of a new Walgreens and a project that would develop the old Thriftway site. “During my tenure, the city has received more than $10 million in grant dollars that would not have been accomplished without the strong support from our residents with the street levy,” he said. Mayor Dan Brooks, who hired Thamann, said he will be hard to replace, but he’s already started looking for a new city administrator. He said he has several resumes and hopes to have someone in the job, at least on an interim basis, by the time Thamann leaves.

“We’re taking many measures to ensure this is a job-creating project,” Riddle said. Sharonville officials will be involved in the sale of the property and development of the land as part of the contract. The project will include 400,000 to 650,000 square feet of buildings at an investment of $20 to $30 million. Talks are under way with a purchaser of part of the parcel, but the identity of the company hasn’t yet been disclosed. “The region needs the construction jobs, and the community needs the jobs,” Mayor Virgil Lovitt said. “Everybody wins.”

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government releases land,” Riddle said of the property near Mosteller Road and Interstate 275. Sharonville decided to buy the land for $1.7 million and immediately put it up for sale again, with certain stipulations in the contract. The city is negotiating a sale with Cincinnati Commercial Contracting and Cole Realty Associates for the same amount because the city may not make a profit from the sale. So why did it buy the land in the first place? That’s part of the stipulation in any contract the city signs. Cincinnati Commercial Contracting was selected as the preferred developer.

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Tri-County Press

News

September 2, 2009

Index

Calendar ......................................B2 Classifieds.....................................C Deaths .........................................B6

Life...............................................B1 Police reports..............................B8 Real estate ..................................B8 Religion .......................................B6 Sports ..........................................A6

Your Community Press newspaper serving Evendale, Glendale, Sharonville,Springdale, Wyoming E-mail: tricounty@communitypre

PRESS

Find news and information from your community on the Web Evendale – cincinnati.com/evendale Glendale – cincinnati.com/glendale Sharonville – cincinnati.com/sharonville Springdale – cincinnati.com/springdale Wyoming – cincinnati.com/wyoming Hamilton County – cincinnati.com/hamiltoncounty News Dick Maloney | Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 248-7134 | rmaloney@communitypress.com Kelly McBride Reddy | Reporter. . . . . . . . 576-8246 | kreddy@communitypress.com Amanda Hopkins | Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . 248-7577 | ahopkins@communitypress.com Melanie Laughman | Sports Editor . . . . . . . 248-7118 | mlaughman@communitypress.com Mark Chalifoux | Sports Reporter. . . . . . . 576-8255 | mchalifoux@communitypress.com Advertising Mark Lamar | Territory Sales Manager. . . . 248-7685 | mlamar@enquirer.com Kimtica Jarman Account Relationship Specialist . . . . . . . . . 936-4707 | kjarman@communitypress.com Hather Gadker Account Relationship Specialist . . . . . . . . . 768-8249 | hgadker@communitypress.com Delivery For customer service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 576-8240 Stephen Barraco | Circulation Manager . . 248-7110 | sbarraco@communitypress.com Lynn Hessler | District Manager . . . . . . . . 248-7115 | lyhessler@communitypress.com To place an ad in Community Classified, call 242-4000.

UncleGreat Bill’s Garden Center Selection of Mums - Perennials Fall Decorations

• Mulching • Trimming • Seeding • Clean-up

FREE ES AT ESTIM

19500

FALL CLEAN - UP $ SPECIAL NOW SCHEDULING

522-4438

8642 Winton Rd.

We Recommend B & B Tree Service for your all Tree Work & Firewood

0000355046

It’s Time For:

Sharonville to sell property in job-creation project By Kelly McBride Reddy kreddy@communitypress.com

Sharonville is making a land sale that’s unprecedented in the city, and rarely seen within the federal government. The Sharonville Depot, 46.4 acres owned by the federal government, where ore was stored, is being sold. As is the practice with the U.S. government, land that’s being sold is first offered to other government partners. Economic Development Director Tammy Riddle said it’s not often that the government sells property. “This is the first of its type in Sharonville, and rare that the federal

NCH administrator leaving for new job By Heidi Fallon hfallon@communitypress.com

Jerry Thamann will leave his post as North College Hill administrator Sept. 18 to take a similar job with Springdale. Thamann, 50, has been with the city the past 17 years. He is leaving to become the assistant city administrator for Springdale, replacing Derek Parham who has been promoted to the top administrative job. Thamann said it was a hard decision, but one he

Proud sponsor of well-deserved shopping sprees.

Open a new checking account and get up to

$

125

*

In the spirit of enjoying life, we at WesBanco have made setting up your checking account not only easy, but also profitable. Simply open an account and you’ll get: $ $

ON THE BALLOT A look at candidates and issues on the Nov. 3 ballot:

EVENDALE

Member of Council (three to be elected; four-year term) J. Jeffrey Albrinck Douglas A. Lohmeier Christian J. Schaefer Stiney Vonderhaar

GLENDALE

Member of Council (four to be elected; four-year term) Monica L. Alles-White William S. Aronstein W. Charles Ehlers Debbie Grueninger Alan E. Hoeweler J. Brian Messmore

SHARONVILLE

(includes Butler County) President of Council (one to be elected; two-year term) Kevin M. Hardman (R) Treasurer (one to be elected; four-year term) Timothy N. Clements (NP) Alfred L. Ledbetter (R) Member Council at Large (three to be elected; two-year term) Vickie Hoppe (R) Greg Pugh (R) Paul J. Schmidt (R) Member Council Ward 1 (one to be elected; two-year term) Ed Cunningham Member Council Ward 2 (one to be elected; two-year term) Janey L. Kattelman (R) Member Council Ward 3 (one to be elected; two-year term) Kerry D. Rabe (R) Member Council Ward 4 (one to be elected; two-year term) Robert D. Tankersley (R)

SPRINGDALE

District 1 (one to be elected; four-year term) Lawrence C. Hawkins III District 2 (one to be elected; four-year term) Julie Matheny Holly McQuillan-Emerson District 3 (one to be elected; four-year term) Marjorie Harlow District 4 (one to be elected; four-year term) Thomas D. Vanover

WYOMING

Member Council at Large (seven to be elected; two-year term) Walter Cordes Lynn Crider Pamela Kamm Jenni McCauley

James T. O’Reilly Will Papa Barry S. Porter

PRINCETON CITY SCHOOL DISTRICT

(includes Butler & Warren counties) Member of Board of Education (two to be elected; four-year term) Lillian A. Hawkins Tawana Lynn Keels

WYOMING CITY SCHOOL DISTRICT

Member of Board of Education (three to be elected; four-year term) Jennifer Etler Vernon Etler Sheryl Felner Lynn P. Larson Terry G. Marty

HAMILTON COUNTY EDUCATIONAL SERVICE CENTER GOVERNING BOARD

(Comprised of the seven local school districts) Member of Board of Education (three to be elected; four-year term) William A. Brandenburgh Jr. Francis Fullam William K. Memke

ISSUES

State issues 1. Proposed Constitutional Amendment – Compensation to Veterans of the Persian Gulf, Afghanistan and Iraq conflicts 2. Proposed Constitutional Amendment – Create Livestock Care Standards Board 3. Proposed Constitutional Amendment – Casino Gambling. County issues Public Library – 10-mill, five-year additional property tax levy for current operating expenses and capital improvements. Hamilton County .34-mill, five-year additonal property tax levy for Family Services & Treatment Programs Hamilton County 4.13-mill, five-year renewal and increase property tax levy for Developmental Disabilities Hamilton County – .18-mill, five-year renewal and decrease property tax levy for Museum Center City issues Springdale E – Local option for Sunday Sales at Sam’s Club; wine and mixed beverages, 10 a.m. to midnight. Village/township issues Glendale – Proposed electric aggregation Glendale – Proposed natural gas aggregation

VILLAGE

25 for using direct deposit

DISCOUNT OUTLET at 9529 Pippin Road

Plus you’ll receive unrivaled customer service and convenience. Talk about a no brainer. Come in now to reap the benefits.

(Northbrook Shopping Center)

Already have a WesBanco checking account? Sign up for direct deposit and get $25.

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said is best for his family and career. Municipal management is a field, Thamann said, that “always intrigued me.” “It’s a way to help people in a job that offers something differ- Thamann ent every day,” he said. “I knew I could never have a job sitting behind a desk five days a week doing the same repetitive paperwork.” Before coming to North College Hill, Thamann was with Lockland for 10 years. He’s had a front-row seat to a variety of changes in the city since he started, including the completion of the Ronald Reagan/Cross County Highway and the Kroger development. He’s leaving before seeing the completion of a new Walgreens and a project that would develop the old Thriftway site. “During my tenure, the city has received more than $10 million in grant dollars that would not have been accomplished without the strong support from our residents with the street levy,” he said. Mayor Dan Brooks, who hired Thamann, said he will be hard to replace, but he’s already started looking for a new city administrator. He said he has several resumes and hopes to have someone in the job, at least on an interim basis, by the time Thamann leaves.

“We’re taking many measures to ensure this is a job-creating project,” Riddle said. Sharonville officials will be involved in the sale of the property and development of the land as part of the contract. The project will include 400,000 to 650,000 square feet of buildings at an investment of $20 to $30 million. Talks are under way with a purchaser of part of the parcel, but the identity of the company hasn’t yet been disclosed. “The region needs the construction jobs, and the community needs the jobs,” Mayor Virgil Lovitt said. “Everybody wins.”

GRAND RE-OPENING

50 for simply opening the account 50 after your first 10 debit card purchases

$

government releases land,” Riddle said of the property near Mosteller Road and Interstate 275. Sharonville decided to buy the land for $1.7 million and immediately put it up for sale again, with certain stipulations in the contract. The city is negotiating a sale with Cincinnati Commercial Contracting and Cole Realty Associates for the same amount because the city may not make a profit from the sale. So why did it buy the land in the first place? That’s part of the stipulation in any contract the city signs. Cincinnati Commercial Contracting was selected as the preferred developer.

September 3rd, 2009

• Ann Taylor • Polo • Kenneth Cole • Under Armour • American Eagle

LARGE selection of Men’s, Women’s and Children’s Clothing. East Coast/West Coast Styles Arriving Daily Trendy Juniors HOURS: Mon. thru Sat. 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. Closed Sunday

0000355037

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September 2, 2009

Tri-County Press

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September 2, 2009

Tri-County Press

A3


A4

Tri-County Press

Mike Albert builds bikes for kids By Amanda Hopkins ahopkins@commuitypress.com

Summer reading paid off for six kids from the Avondale Boys and Girls Club when they received new bikes and helmets from workers at Mike Albert Vehicle Fleet Management. The top readers at the Boys and Girls Club were rewarded with new bikes that were put together by the employees as part of a

News

September 2, 2009

Springdale residents feel safe By Kelly McBride Reddy kreddy@communitypress.com

AMANDA HOPKINS/STAFF

Workers from Mike Albert Vehicle Fleet Management help kids from the Avondale Boys and Girls Club adjust the seats on their new bikes. The Mike Albert company helped build the bikes for the kids. team building activity during the company’s July sales meeting “We think collaboration amongst people that work for us are going to make us a better place to work and help us do a better job and grow,� said Marty Betagole, president of Mike Albert Leasing. Betagole said that one of the core values of the Mike

AMANDA HOPKINS/STAFF

Workers from Mike Albert Vehicle Fleet Management helped build bikes for kids from the Avondale Boys and Girls Club.

Albert company is giving back and that the bike assembly for the kids was an important team builder. The kids showed up at the end of the meeting to surprise the employees and claim their bikes. ‘They got to experience having a new bike over the summer,� said Boys and Girls Club education director Christina Ellis. Some of the employees even helped the kids adjust the bike seats and find a good, fitted helmet before taking them for a test ride around the showroom. For help with the event, Mike Albert Leasing partnered with the Leader’s Institute, an organization that helps companies put together “Build-A-Bike� events all over the country.

The M o s t Unique U n i q u e Piano Sale T h e Most P i a n o Sale in i n Cincinnati Histor y! C i n c i n n a t i History! HUGE SELL-OFF OF OVER 120 PIANOS RETIRED FROM THE COLLEGE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC • plus other selected new & used pianos

Never before, and likely never again, will it be possible to select a piano from the retired inventory of one of the world’s most prestigious music schools. This truly historic piano sale event features more than 120 grand and vertical pianos used at the University of Cincinnati/ College-Conservatory of Music, consistently ranked among the top ten music schools in the nation.

PIANOS AVAILABLE BY APPOINTMENT ONLY

FRIDAY 9/4, SATURDAY 9/5, OPEN TO THE PUBLIC SUNDAY 9/6 & LABOR DAY 9/7 - NOON TO 5PM

FOR PRIORITY APPOINTMENTS & INFORMATION CALL 513-779-8098

BRANDS FEATURED INCLUDE STEINWAY, BALDWIN,YAMAHA, BALDWIN, YAMAHA, KAWAI & MORE! *SPECIAL FINANCING AVAILABLE*

WAREHOUSE

6142 CENTRE PARK DR WEST CHESTER, OH 45069 (5813) 779-8098

Exclusive Area Representatives For Steinway & Sons

The vast majority of residents feel safe in Springdale, according to a recent customer satisfaction survey. Springdale police had asked residents for their input, and those responses were compiled for council at its Aug. 19 meeting. “That’s pretty outstanding,� said Officer Dave Buschman, who reported to council along with Police Chief Michael Laage. Survey results showed 99 percent feel safe during the day, and 97 percent feel safe at night. The No. 1 complaint: traffic. Laage acknowledged that it’s an ongoing struggle that his department would continue to address. “But we will not solve this problem by giving out tickets,� the chief said. Council members commended the police department. On the Block Watch pro-

g r a m : “They’re grateful for it,â€? Tom Vanover said of Springdale residents. RegardBuschman ing the DARE program: “It allows people to know we’re there for them,â€? Randy Danbury said. Danbury and James Squires praised Buschman for his work with the senior community. Laage said there were five areas that warranted attention: • Construction. Laage said he’d forward residents’ concerns to the appropriate departments. • Patrols. The police department will be adding part-time officers to patrol neighborhoods, he said. • Traffic. Laage said one option would be to consider speed humps to discourage speeding in residential areas. • Noise. “We won’t

solve all the noise issues,â€? Laage said. “But we will issue citations.â€? • Quality of life issues. “It may be litter, or a junk car,â€? he said. “It’s not crime, but quality of life issue. We need to get on it quickly. “We’re going to look at these areas,â€? he said, “and try to attack these issues.â€? Also during the meeting, Squires reminded council and the community about a flu clinic, scheduled for 1 p.m, to 7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 24, at the Springdale Community Center. The shot will be free to those who carry several types of insurance, and it’s free to all children 6 months to 18 months old. Otherwise, the shot costs $20 for Springdale residents and $30 for non-residents. Squires noted that it’s not a vaccine against the H1N1 virus, also known as swine flu. Those who are interested are asked to call 346-5725 to make an appointment.

Princeton gears up for school year By Kelly McBride Reddy kreddy@communitypress.com

Princeton’s Board of Education welcomed a visitor bearing gifts to its August meeting. Mayor Virgil Lovitt presented the board with a tax abatement check for $238,690, reflecting earnings taxes from 17 businesses in Sharonville. “They have invested $91 million of real property and equipment in Sharonville,� Lovitt said. During the meeting, several administrators and staff members provided information on efforts to prepare for the upcoming school year. Human Resources coordinator Robin Bobbitt summarized her department’s recruitment and personnel efforts. It included participation in recruitment fairs, college visits and other research. She outlined the number of resignations and retirements, as well as positions that have been filled. Bobbitt concluded with a description of the teaching staff make-up within the district. “Fifty-two percent were hired from underrepresented groups,� Bobbitt said. Those include African-American,

KELLY MCBRIDE REDDY/STAFF

Sharonville Mayor Virgil Lovitt presents a tax abatement check to Princeton School Board President Lillian Hawkins. Eastern Indian, Asian, Latino, females in secondary math and science, and males in primary education. Board member Steve Moore commended Bobbitt, saying it was “a diverse staff with a quality that matches Princeton.� Tod Kutil, the district’s custodial supervisor, and Kevin Cross, director of buildings and grounds, updated the board on their departments’ preparations for the start of the 2009-10 school year. The board also took action on a proposal to contract with Managed Print Services for a program provided by Prosource.

Terrie Clark-Neufarth, director of technology and information services, said the district has been leasing its printers from Prosource for the past three years. The two-year agreement, which the board passed unanimously, provides installation, repair and management of printers, as well as a supply of toner and an online analysis of the equipment. Clarke-Neufarth said Managed Print Services had offered the lowest of four bids she had considered. The board also acknowledged the increase in breakfast and lunch prices for students, the first hike in four years. Rising costs for food and delivery were cited as reasons for the increase. When school resumes Aug. 17, students will pay $1 for breakfast at the elementary schools, up from 85 cents; $1.25 at the middle school, up from $1.10; and $1.50 at the high school, up from $1.10. At lunchtime, elementary students will pay $2, up from $1.70; middle school students will pay $2.25, up from $1.95; and high school students will pay $2.50, up from $2. Milk will go from 30 cents to 50 cents.

Enter the Ultimate High School Football Fan Sweepstakes! Visit Cincinnati.Com/ultimatefan and post your photo showing off your school spirit. Then in 500 characters or less tell us why you are the Ultimate Fan.

       

For ten weeks, 5 photos will be randomly selected and the public will vote on that weeks winner. Weekly winners will receive a $25 gift card to Skyline Chili. All ten weekly winners will then be posted November 9-20, the public will vote and the Ultimate Fan will be crowned receiving a Skyline Chili tailgate party and a donation to their schools Athletic Department in their name courtesy of Skyline Chili.

 

   

0000354937



          No purchase necessary. Deadline to submit photos is 11/1/09. Visit Cincinnati.Com/ultimatefan for a complete list of rules.


A4

Tri-County Press

Mike Albert builds bikes for kids By Amanda Hopkins ahopkins@commuitypress.com

Summer reading paid off for six kids from the Avondale Boys and Girls Club when they received new bikes and helmets from workers at Mike Albert Vehicle Fleet Management. The top readers at the Boys and Girls Club were rewarded with new bikes that were put together by the employees as part of a

News

September 2, 2009

Springdale residents feel safe By Kelly McBride Reddy kreddy@communitypress.com

AMANDA HOPKINS/STAFF

Workers from Mike Albert Vehicle Fleet Management help kids from the Avondale Boys and Girls Club adjust the seats on their new bikes. The Mike Albert company helped build the bikes for the kids. team building activity during the company’s July sales meeting “We think collaboration amongst people that work for us are going to make us a better place to work and help us do a better job and grow,� said Marty Betagole, president of Mike Albert Leasing. Betagole said that one of the core values of the Mike

AMANDA HOPKINS/STAFF

Workers from Mike Albert Vehicle Fleet Management helped build bikes for kids from the Avondale Boys and Girls Club.

Albert company is giving back and that the bike assembly for the kids was an important team builder. The kids showed up at the end of the meeting to surprise the employees and claim their bikes. ‘They got to experience having a new bike over the summer,� said Boys and Girls Club education director Christina Ellis. Some of the employees even helped the kids adjust the bike seats and find a good, fitted helmet before taking them for a test ride around the showroom. For help with the event, Mike Albert Leasing partnered with the Leader’s Institute, an organization that helps companies put together “Build-A-Bike� events all over the country.

The M o s t Unique U n i q u e Piano Sale T h e Most P i a n o Sale in i n Cincinnati Histor y! C i n c i n n a t i History! HUGE SELL-OFF OF OVER 120 PIANOS RETIRED FROM THE COLLEGE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC • plus other selected new & used pianos

Never before, and likely never again, will it be possible to select a piano from the retired inventory of one of the world’s most prestigious music schools. This truly historic piano sale event features more than 120 grand and vertical pianos used at the University of Cincinnati/ College-Conservatory of Music, consistently ranked among the top ten music schools in the nation.

PIANOS AVAILABLE BY APPOINTMENT ONLY

FRIDAY 9/4, SATURDAY 9/5, OPEN TO THE PUBLIC SUNDAY 9/6 & LABOR DAY 9/7 - NOON TO 5PM

FOR PRIORITY APPOINTMENTS & INFORMATION CALL 513-779-8098

BRANDS FEATURED INCLUDE STEINWAY, BALDWIN,YAMAHA, BALDWIN, YAMAHA, KAWAI & MORE! *SPECIAL FINANCING AVAILABLE*

WAREHOUSE

6142 CENTRE PARK DR WEST CHESTER, OH 45069 (5813) 779-8098

Exclusive Area Representatives For Steinway & Sons

The vast majority of residents feel safe in Springdale, according to a recent customer satisfaction survey. Springdale police had asked residents for their input, and those responses were compiled for council at its Aug. 19 meeting. “That’s pretty outstanding,� said Officer Dave Buschman, who reported to council along with Police Chief Michael Laage. Survey results showed 99 percent feel safe during the day, and 97 percent feel safe at night. The No. 1 complaint: traffic. Laage acknowledged that it’s an ongoing struggle that his department would continue to address. “But we will not solve this problem by giving out tickets,� the chief said. Council members commended the police department. On the Block Watch pro-

g r a m : “They’re grateful for it,â€? Tom Vanover said of Springdale residents. RegardBuschman ing the DARE program: “It allows people to know we’re there for them,â€? Randy Danbury said. Danbury and James Squires praised Buschman for his work with the senior community. Laage said there were five areas that warranted attention: • Construction. Laage said he’d forward residents’ concerns to the appropriate departments. • Patrols. The police department will be adding part-time officers to patrol neighborhoods, he said. • Traffic. Laage said one option would be to consider speed humps to discourage speeding in residential areas. • Noise. “We won’t

solve all the noise issues,â€? Laage said. “But we will issue citations.â€? • Quality of life issues. “It may be litter, or a junk car,â€? he said. “It’s not crime, but quality of life issue. We need to get on it quickly. “We’re going to look at these areas,â€? he said, “and try to attack these issues.â€? Also during the meeting, Squires reminded council and the community about a flu clinic, scheduled for 1 p.m, to 7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 24, at the Springdale Community Center. The shot will be free to those who carry several types of insurance, and it’s free to all children 6 months to 18 months old. Otherwise, the shot costs $20 for Springdale residents and $30 for non-residents. Squires noted that it’s not a vaccine against the H1N1 virus, also known as swine flu. Those who are interested are asked to call 346-5725 to make an appointment.

Princeton gears up for school year By Kelly McBride Reddy kreddy@communitypress.com

Princeton’s Board of Education welcomed a visitor bearing gifts to its August meeting. Mayor Virgil Lovitt presented the board with a tax abatement check for $238,690, reflecting earnings taxes from 17 businesses in Sharonville. “They have invested $91 million of real property and equipment in Sharonville,� Lovitt said. During the meeting, several administrators and staff members provided information on efforts to prepare for the upcoming school year. Human Resources coordinator Robin Bobbitt summarized her department’s recruitment and personnel efforts. It included participation in recruitment fairs, college visits and other research. She outlined the number of resignations and retirements, as well as positions that have been filled. Bobbitt concluded with a description of the teaching staff make-up within the district. “Fifty-two percent were hired from underrepresented groups,� Bobbitt said. Those include African-American,

KELLY MCBRIDE REDDY/STAFF

Sharonville Mayor Virgil Lovitt presents a tax abatement check to Princeton School Board President Lillian Hawkins. Eastern Indian, Asian, Latino, females in secondary math and science, and males in primary education. Board member Steve Moore commended Bobbitt, saying it was “a diverse staff with a quality that matches Princeton.� Tod Kutil, the district’s custodial supervisor, and Kevin Cross, director of buildings and grounds, updated the board on their departments’ preparations for the start of the 2009-10 school year. The board also took action on a proposal to contract with Managed Print Services for a program provided by Prosource.

Terrie Clark-Neufarth, director of technology and information services, said the district has been leasing its printers from Prosource for the past three years. The two-year agreement, which the board passed unanimously, provides installation, repair and management of printers, as well as a supply of toner and an online analysis of the equipment. Clarke-Neufarth said Managed Print Services had offered the lowest of four bids she had considered. The board also acknowledged the increase in breakfast and lunch prices for students, the first hike in four years. Rising costs for food and delivery were cited as reasons for the increase. When school resumes Aug. 17, students will pay $1 for breakfast at the elementary schools, up from 85 cents; $1.25 at the middle school, up from $1.10; and $1.50 at the high school, up from $1.10. At lunchtime, elementary students will pay $2, up from $1.70; middle school students will pay $2.25, up from $1.95; and high school students will pay $2.50, up from $2. Milk will go from 30 cents to 50 cents.

Enter the Ultimate High School Football Fan Sweepstakes! Visit Cincinnati.Com/ultimatefan and post your photo showing off your school spirit. Then in 500 characters or less tell us why you are the Ultimate Fan.

       

For ten weeks, 5 photos will be randomly selected and the public will vote on that weeks winner. Weekly winners will receive a $25 gift card to Skyline Chili. All ten weekly winners will then be posted November 9-20, the public will vote and the Ultimate Fan will be crowned receiving a Skyline Chili tailgate party and a donation to their schools Athletic Department in their name courtesy of Skyline Chili.

 

   

0000354937



          No purchase necessary. Deadline to submit photos is 11/1/09. Visit Cincinnati.Com/ultimatefan for a complete list of rules.


News

Tri-County Press

September 2, 2009

A5

Police program gives kids hands-on investigating, down to the fingerprints By Kelly McBride Reddy kreddy@communitypress.com

KELLY MCBRIDE REDDY/STAFF

Members of the Wyoming Police Department, from left: Chief Gary Baldauf, Officer Sean Feldhaus, Officer Rusty Herzog and Det. Eric Kirkland, lead a program for the city’s Youth Services department that familiarized kids with the workings of law enforcement.

It was a whodunit that needed the expertise of kids from the Wyoming Youth Services summer program. In the scenario presented by Wyoming police, the principal had been killed, and they had to study the clues to find the murderer. First, they swabbed the insides of each other’s cheeks. Then the water pistols, collecting DNA samples. It was a meticulous task, requiring purple latex gloves, cotton swabs and

plastic baggies. Finally, the culprit was identified. The daylong program, a partnership between Youth Services and the police department, was offered Aug. 4 for those in the free summer program for Wyoming residents ages 10-13. “Every Tuesday, we do community outreach, to give back,” said Angie Reichert-Hester, service coordinator for Wyoming Youth Services. “This year, we changed it up a bit. “We wanted to connect

these kids with the community,” she said, “to have a positive experience with the police.” The program included a tour of the police station, a discussion about car safety, building searches and crime scene processing. “You guys are our best eyes and ears,” Officer Rusty Herzog told the 22 participants. “I hope they learned a little about what we do,” Herzog said, “and understand how to be better citizens in Wyoming.” He said they also discussed police myths, “to

KELLY MCBRIDE REDDY/STAFF

Micah Callaway takes a DNA sample from a water gun during a CSI exercise at the Wyoming Police Department. help them understand why we do certain things.” Nat Polley, 13, enjoyed the program. “It was very interesting,” he said. “ His favorite part? “Simulating the crime scene investigation,” Polley said. “It was good to step into each other’s footsteps.”

New police officer on Sharonville beat By Kelly McBride Reddy kreddy@communitypress.com

Police Chief Michael Schappa, left, looks on as Officer Daniel Lee is congratulated by Mayor Virgil Lovitt and Council President Kevin Hardman.

KELLY MCBRIDE REDDY/STAFF

Councilwomen Janey Kattelman, left, and Vicki Hoppe, right, present Rachel Hammonds with a certificate of appreciation for her efforts to collect books to donate to Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center.

Wendy’s serves burgers, fries, community outreach By Kelly McBride Reddy

have a bin at the Sharonville Community Center throughout the year. Also during the meeting: • Safety Service Director Ted Mack confirmed that moving Princeton High School’s softball field across the street on Chester would cost the city $150,000. Because the Convention Center expansion required power lines to be moved into the path of the current softball field, the city agreed to relocate the field for Princeton. Moving it across the road will cost $20,000 more than if it were repositioned on the current side of Chester Road. • Council passed a resolution to apply for funding to continue the police department’s DARE program for students. • Council amended its 2009 appropriations fund with a nearly $2.2 million increase, to ensure the availability of funds for the Convention Center expansion. • Council announced two public hearings, both set for Aug. 25 beginning at 7 p.m. in Council Chambers. One hearing will address a zoning change of 4.67

acres at 11400 Lippelman Road, formerly Harmony Grove Apartment Complex.

We Gladly Accept Food Stamps

HUMBERT’S

Prices effective 9/02/09 9/15/09

2003 W. Galbraith Rd.

9159 Winton Rd.

Mon-Thurs. 9-6:00 • Fri 8-6 Sat. 9-5 • Sun 9-2

Mon-Fri. 8-6:30 Sat. 8-5 • Sun 8-2

521-6446

3 79 FRYERS1 49 2 99 5 99 7 Brats, Metts or Hot Metts

99 Baby Back LB.

Whole

LB.

Jumbo

Chicken Wings

LB.

Cheese

Swiss or Colby

LB.

Half Untrimmed

Beef Tenderloin

931-3324

4-5 LB. AVG.

LB.

Ribs

USDA Choice

Sirloin Steak Chopped

Sirloin Patties BLUE GRASS

4 99 6 29 3

99 LB.

LB.

LB.

Cottage Ham, Bacon, Round Deli Ham

4

49 LB.

Patrons, inside and at right, dine at Wendy’s at Northland Boulevard and Ohio 4 during the restaurant’s fundraiser for Springdale’s SOS.

kreddy@communitypress.com

KELLY MCBRIDE REDDY/STAFF

city’s health commissioner. “We usually give a gift card, but not money itself.” The proceeds from Wendy’s will go toward those gift cards. “This is a win-win for both Wendy’s and Springdale,” Police Chief Michael Laage said. “We will receive a portion of the sales, and Wendy’s feels this will increase their business to get involved with the Springdale community.” “We do it to help the

community, to show good will,” said Doug Sullivan, a manager at Wendy’s. “We want to make sure the city can help people down the road,” he said. Laage said he’d encourage other businesses to participate in SOS. “We’ve seen the good it does with people in need, and the aging community,” Laage said. “If everybody gives a little,” he said, “it benefits the whole.”

0000352426

Diners at Wendy’s in Springdale got more than a burger and fries recently. They were counted among those who contributed to the city’s community outreach program. The Wendy’s restaurant at Northland Boulevard and Ohio 4 donated 10 percent of all sales of food and beverages from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. Aug. 12 to Springdale Offering Support, or SOS. SOS typically pairs residents in need of services they can’t afford with providers willing to donate time or resources. Sometimes those in need require financial assistance for things such as gas for a car or money to pay a utility bill. “We need funds for that,” said Cammie Mitrione, the

KELLY MCBRIDE REDDY/STAFF

Councilwoman Vicki Hoppe, center, thanks Sharonville residents Ray Britton, left, and Jeff Boone for their work in coordinating a fund-raiser motorcycle ride as part of Sharon Fest.

0000354820

KELLY MCBRIDE REDDY/STAFF

Sharonville’s Police Department has welcomed a new officer to its ranks. Daniel Lee took the oath of office from Mayor Virgil Lovitt during city council’s Aug. 11 meeting. Lee, 24, graduated from the University of Cincinnati in 2008 with a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice as well as a minor in Spanish. Lovitt introduced the new officer to council, adding that the Green Township resident, who had worked at Skyline Chili in Clifton since age 14, has not missed a day of work in the past decade. Presentations continued as Councilwoman Vicki Hoppe thanked three individuals for their participation in Sharon Fest, the city’s annual festival that raises money for charities. Sharonville residents Ray Britton and Jeff Boone were thanked for their efforts to organize a fundraising motorcycle ride to help Leo Sharding, who is suffering from stage 4 lung cancer. Hoppe also presented a certificate of appreciation to Rachel Hammonds, 6, who is collecting gently used books to donate to Cincinnati Children’s Hospital. Patients there are encouraged to peruse the books and take one home to keep. Hammonds, who created Rachel’s Book Bin, will

The proposal would change the zoning from residential multi-family dwellings to general business. The city bought the property with plans to turn it into a parking lot that would serve the expanded Convention Center. The other public hearing would discuss a storm water assessment in relation to EPA regulations.


News

Tri-County Press

September 2, 2009

A5

Police program gives kids hands-on investigating, down to the fingerprints By Kelly McBride Reddy kreddy@communitypress.com

KELLY MCBRIDE REDDY/STAFF

Members of the Wyoming Police Department, from left: Chief Gary Baldauf, Officer Sean Feldhaus, Officer Rusty Herzog and Det. Eric Kirkland, lead a program for the city’s Youth Services department that familiarized kids with the workings of law enforcement.

It was a whodunit that needed the expertise of kids from the Wyoming Youth Services summer program. In the scenario presented by Wyoming police, the principal had been killed, and they had to study the clues to find the murderer. First, they swabbed the insides of each other’s cheeks. Then the water pistols, collecting DNA samples. It was a meticulous task, requiring purple latex gloves, cotton swabs and

plastic baggies. Finally, the culprit was identified. The daylong program, a partnership between Youth Services and the police department, was offered Aug. 4 for those in the free summer program for Wyoming residents ages 10-13. “Every Tuesday, we do community outreach, to give back,” said Angie Reichert-Hester, service coordinator for Wyoming Youth Services. “This year, we changed it up a bit. “We wanted to connect

these kids with the community,” she said, “to have a positive experience with the police.” The program included a tour of the police station, a discussion about car safety, building searches and crime scene processing. “You guys are our best eyes and ears,” Officer Rusty Herzog told the 22 participants. “I hope they learned a little about what we do,” Herzog said, “and understand how to be better citizens in Wyoming.” He said they also discussed police myths, “to

KELLY MCBRIDE REDDY/STAFF

Micah Callaway takes a DNA sample from a water gun during a CSI exercise at the Wyoming Police Department. help them understand why we do certain things.” Nat Polley, 13, enjoyed the program. “It was very interesting,” he said. “ His favorite part? “Simulating the crime scene investigation,” Polley said. “It was good to step into each other’s footsteps.”

New police officer on Sharonville beat By Kelly McBride Reddy kreddy@communitypress.com

Police Chief Michael Schappa, left, looks on as Officer Daniel Lee is congratulated by Mayor Virgil Lovitt and Council President Kevin Hardman.

KELLY MCBRIDE REDDY/STAFF

Councilwomen Janey Kattelman, left, and Vicki Hoppe, right, present Rachel Hammonds with a certificate of appreciation for her efforts to collect books to donate to Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center.

Wendy’s serves burgers, fries, community outreach By Kelly McBride Reddy

have a bin at the Sharonville Community Center throughout the year. Also during the meeting: • Safety Service Director Ted Mack confirmed that moving Princeton High School’s softball field across the street on Chester would cost the city $150,000. Because the Convention Center expansion required power lines to be moved into the path of the current softball field, the city agreed to relocate the field for Princeton. Moving it across the road will cost $20,000 more than if it were repositioned on the current side of Chester Road. • Council passed a resolution to apply for funding to continue the police department’s DARE program for students. • Council amended its 2009 appropriations fund with a nearly $2.2 million increase, to ensure the availability of funds for the Convention Center expansion. • Council announced two public hearings, both set for Aug. 25 beginning at 7 p.m. in Council Chambers. One hearing will address a zoning change of 4.67

acres at 11400 Lippelman Road, formerly Harmony Grove Apartment Complex.

We Gladly Accept Food Stamps

HUMBERT’S

Prices effective 9/02/09 9/15/09

2003 W. Galbraith Rd.

9159 Winton Rd.

Mon-Thurs. 9-6:00 • Fri 8-6 Sat. 9-5 • Sun 9-2

Mon-Fri. 8-6:30 Sat. 8-5 • Sun 8-2

521-6446

3 79 FRYERS1 49 2 99 5 99 7 Brats, Metts or Hot Metts

99 Baby Back LB.

Whole

LB.

Jumbo

Chicken Wings

LB.

Cheese

Swiss or Colby

LB.

Half Untrimmed

Beef Tenderloin

931-3324

4-5 LB. AVG.

LB.

Ribs

USDA Choice

Sirloin Steak Chopped

Sirloin Patties BLUE GRASS

4 99 6 29 3

99 LB.

LB.

LB.

Cottage Ham, Bacon, Round Deli Ham

4

49 LB.

Patrons, inside and at right, dine at Wendy’s at Northland Boulevard and Ohio 4 during the restaurant’s fundraiser for Springdale’s SOS.

kreddy@communitypress.com

KELLY MCBRIDE REDDY/STAFF

city’s health commissioner. “We usually give a gift card, but not money itself.” The proceeds from Wendy’s will go toward those gift cards. “This is a win-win for both Wendy’s and Springdale,” Police Chief Michael Laage said. “We will receive a portion of the sales, and Wendy’s feels this will increase their business to get involved with the Springdale community.” “We do it to help the

community, to show good will,” said Doug Sullivan, a manager at Wendy’s. “We want to make sure the city can help people down the road,” he said. Laage said he’d encourage other businesses to participate in SOS. “We’ve seen the good it does with people in need, and the aging community,” Laage said. “If everybody gives a little,” he said, “it benefits the whole.”

0000352426

Diners at Wendy’s in Springdale got more than a burger and fries recently. They were counted among those who contributed to the city’s community outreach program. The Wendy’s restaurant at Northland Boulevard and Ohio 4 donated 10 percent of all sales of food and beverages from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. Aug. 12 to Springdale Offering Support, or SOS. SOS typically pairs residents in need of services they can’t afford with providers willing to donate time or resources. Sometimes those in need require financial assistance for things such as gas for a car or money to pay a utility bill. “We need funds for that,” said Cammie Mitrione, the

KELLY MCBRIDE REDDY/STAFF

Councilwoman Vicki Hoppe, center, thanks Sharonville residents Ray Britton, left, and Jeff Boone for their work in coordinating a fund-raiser motorcycle ride as part of Sharon Fest.

0000354820

KELLY MCBRIDE REDDY/STAFF

Sharonville’s Police Department has welcomed a new officer to its ranks. Daniel Lee took the oath of office from Mayor Virgil Lovitt during city council’s Aug. 11 meeting. Lee, 24, graduated from the University of Cincinnati in 2008 with a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice as well as a minor in Spanish. Lovitt introduced the new officer to council, adding that the Green Township resident, who had worked at Skyline Chili in Clifton since age 14, has not missed a day of work in the past decade. Presentations continued as Councilwoman Vicki Hoppe thanked three individuals for their participation in Sharon Fest, the city’s annual festival that raises money for charities. Sharonville residents Ray Britton and Jeff Boone were thanked for their efforts to organize a fundraising motorcycle ride to help Leo Sharding, who is suffering from stage 4 lung cancer. Hoppe also presented a certificate of appreciation to Rachel Hammonds, 6, who is collecting gently used books to donate to Cincinnati Children’s Hospital. Patients there are encouraged to peruse the books and take one home to keep. Hammonds, who created Rachel’s Book Bin, will

The proposal would change the zoning from residential multi-family dwellings to general business. The city bought the property with plans to turn it into a parking lot that would serve the expanded Convention Center. The other public hearing would discuss a storm water assessment in relation to EPA regulations.


SPORTS A6

Tri-County Press

BRIEFLY

This week in soccer

• Wyoming High School girls shut out Princeton High School, 3-0, Aug. 24, thanks to goals from Michelle Jolson, Bonnie Grace and Jillian Anderson. Wyoming’s Alexa Levick racked up six saves. • Wyoming boys beat Roger Bacon, 2-1, Aug. 25. Scoring goals for Wyoming were Joe Panos and Gustav Plattenburg. Wyoming advances 1-0 with the win. • Wyoming girls beat McNicholas High School, 3-2, Aug. 26. • Princeton High School girls shut out Withrow 7-0, Aug. 27. Princeton’s goals were scored by Nicole Donnelly, Heather Steineman, Erika Renstrom, Brandi Ball, Thomas, Ali Smith and Morgan Bullock. Goalkeepers Andrea Perrin and Haley Grueninger kept Withrow from scoring.

This week in tennis

• Wyoming High School girls defeated Sycamore High School in a 5-0 shutout, Aug. 24. Berg defeated Mills, 6-2, 4-6, 6-1; Bourbon defeated Miller, 6-1, 6-2; Thoresen defeated Hura 6-3, 6-2; O. Hennessy and M. Hennessy defeated Choi and Wei, 3-6, 7-6, 6-3. A. Gibbons and S. Gibbons defeated Hsu and Geer 6-4, 3-6, 6-2. • Mt. Notre Dame High School girls defeated Alter, 4-1, Aug. 24. From Mt. Notre Dame: Wolf defeated Boeckman 6-0, 6-2; K. Dennis defeated Klein 6-0, 6-1; B. Dennis defeated Martin 6-1, 6-0. In doubles, Becker and Torbeck defeated Ewald and Cata 6-3, 6-1. In MND’s only loss of the day, Alter’s Grubmuller and Wireman defeated Towle and Landers 6-3, 16, 6-4. • Princeton High School girls defeated Hamilton High School, 5-0, Aug. 25. Brown defeated A. Gillis 61, 6-0; Edwards defeated C. Gillis 75, 1-6, 6-2; Kufeldt defeated Hood 60, 6-0. In doubles, Donaldson and D’Arcy defeated Smith and Campbell 6-2, 6-1; Grender and Nguyen defeated Boomershine and Forsythe 6-1, 6-0. Princeton advances to a 21 record with the win. • Wyoming girls defeated Kings High School, 4-1, Aug. 26. Wyoming’s Bourbon defeated Weed 6-0, 6-0; Thoresen defeated Leo 6-2, 6-2; in doubles, M. Hennessy and O. Hennessy defeated Kircher and Rummelhart 6-4, 6-3 and A. Gibbons and S. Gibbons defeated Bennett and Hamilton 6-2, 6-4. Wyoming advances to 2-0 with the win.

September 2, 2009

HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | Editor Melanie Laughman | mlaughman@communitypress.com | 248-7118

RECREATIONAL

Your Community Press newspaper serving Evendale, Glendale, Sharonville,Springdale, Wyoming

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PRESS

Wyoming crushes CHCA in opener By Mark Chalifoux

mchalifoux@communitypress.com

The Wyoming High School football team made a statement in the first game of the season as the Cowboys handled CHCA 39-3. The win will give Wyoming plenty of momentum as they hit the road Friday to play Dayton Oakwood. “We played great defense and offensively we had some big plays,” Wyoming coach Bernie Barre said on the season-opening win over CHCA. “We put a lot of pressure on their quarterback.” Defensively, Barre said Jibreel Black, Eric Price, Tommy Campbell, Tony Davis and Broderick Williams were key up front and that senior Jacob Allsop played very well in the secondary. Offensively, quarterback Kyle Seyfried threw for 351 yards and three touchdowns. Receiver Evan Aleshire caught two of those touchdowns and had 224 receiving yards. Receiver Jonathan Tighe also played well and caught the other touchdown pass. CHCA defeated Wyoming last year and Barre said the win over the Eagles meant a lot to the players who played in that game. “Almost all of our kids played in that game so it did mean a lot to them,” he said. “We have an experienced team and I think we’ll be pretty good if we keep getting better.” While there’s plenty to be optimistic about, Wyoming did have several miscues against CHCA that will need to be corrected against Oakwood. “We turned the ball over a few times and didn’t catch a punt we needed to catch, so we can’t do that,” Barre said. “We just need to stay focused and get better each week.” The game against Oakwood will be the first of four straight road games for the Cowboys, who won’t play at home again until Oct. 2 against Madeira.

Princeton 4, Huber Heights Wayne, 21

Princeton started its season with a tough 21-4 loss to Huber Heights Wayne. The Vikings (0-1) will try to get

ROD APFELBECK/CONTRIBUTOR

Wyoming High School junior running back Drew Perry eludes a CHCA defender to complete Wyoming’s scoring with a touchdown during the fourth quarter of Wyoming’s 39-3 victory over CHCA Aug. 28.

ROD APFELBECK/CONTRIBUTOR

Linebackers Dillon Burk and Michael Travers stuff a run attempt during Wyoming’s 39-3 opening night victory over CHCA this past Friday, Aug. 28. Wyoming’s defense held CHCA scoreless after giving up a field goal on the opening drive and held CHCA to -15 yards rushing.

back on track Friday with a home game against George Washington.

Moeller 45, Winton Woods, 34

The Moeller Crusaders won in dramatic fashion against Winton Woods 45-34. Moeller was down 21-0 and 2810 at halftime and outscored Winton Woods 35-6 in the second half. Moeller was led by running back Jeff Aubin, who had 106 rushing yards, and defensive end Marcus Rush, who had several big plays in the game including an interception returned for a touchdown. Moeller plays at 7:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 4, at Hamilton. Hamilton lost in week one to Springfield, 35-28.

This week in golf

• Princeton High School golfer Nick Perrin scored 8 over par 44 on the front nine at Miami Whitewater, Aug. 26, helping Princeton score 179 to defeat Northwest High School’s 200. Princeton advances to 1-0 with the win. • Wyoming High School girls defeated Mariemont High School 215-264, Aug. 26. Wyoming’s Liz Williams shot 11 over par 48 at Wyoming Golf Club during the match. Wyoming advances to 2-4 with the win. • Wyoming golfers Brian Spitzig and Zach Galluzzo both shot 3 over par 38 on the Ridge Club, Aug. 27, helping Wyoming defeat McNicholas 169-177.

JOSEPH FUQUA II /STAFF

Moeller’s Richie Dyer runs against Winton Woods linebacker Cornelius Roberts in their game at Nippert Stadium Saturday August 29, 2009. Moeller won 45-34.

Roger Bacon 34, Mount Healthy 32

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ROD APFELBECK/CONTRIBUTOR

Wyoming High School senior wide receiver Evan Aleshire makes a catch down the sideline despite tight coverage by CHCA’s junior defensive back Jeff Stagnaro during Wyoming’s opening game 393 victory over CHCA.

Roger Bacon scored all of its points in the second and third quarters and held on to beat Mount Healthy. The Spartans were led by junior quarterback Tanner Strong, who was 12-22 with three touchdowns and four interceptions; senior wide receiver Jake Rose, who caught six balls for 102 yards and two touchdowns; and sophomore Griffin Mouty, who rushed seven times for 46 yards. The Fighting Owls were led by junior quarterback Denzel Larkin, who rushed 13 times for 66 yards and two touchdowns. Roger Bacon (1-0) plays at Campbell County (0-1) Sept. 4., while Mount Healthy (0-1) hosts Western Hills (0-1).

ROD APFELBECK/CONTRIBUTOR

CHCA senior quarterback Alec Swartz gets off a pass during CHCA’s opening game at Wyoming despite strong pursuit from Wyoming defenders including senior defensive lineman Jibreel Black.


SPORTS A6

Tri-County Press

BRIEFLY

This week in soccer

• Wyoming High School girls shut out Princeton High School, 3-0, Aug. 24, thanks to goals from Michelle Jolson, Bonnie Grace and Jillian Anderson. Wyoming’s Alexa Levick racked up six saves. • Wyoming boys beat Roger Bacon, 2-1, Aug. 25. Scoring goals for Wyoming were Joe Panos and Gustav Plattenburg. Wyoming advances 1-0 with the win. • Wyoming girls beat McNicholas High School, 3-2, Aug. 26. • Princeton High School girls shut out Withrow 7-0, Aug. 27. Princeton’s goals were scored by Nicole Donnelly, Heather Steineman, Erika Renstrom, Brandi Ball, Thomas, Ali Smith and Morgan Bullock. Goalkeepers Andrea Perrin and Haley Grueninger kept Withrow from scoring.

This week in tennis

• Wyoming High School girls defeated Sycamore High School in a 5-0 shutout, Aug. 24. Berg defeated Mills, 6-2, 4-6, 6-1; Bourbon defeated Miller, 6-1, 6-2; Thoresen defeated Hura 6-3, 6-2; O. Hennessy and M. Hennessy defeated Choi and Wei, 3-6, 7-6, 6-3. A. Gibbons and S. Gibbons defeated Hsu and Geer 6-4, 3-6, 6-2. • Mt. Notre Dame High School girls defeated Alter, 4-1, Aug. 24. From Mt. Notre Dame: Wolf defeated Boeckman 6-0, 6-2; K. Dennis defeated Klein 6-0, 6-1; B. Dennis defeated Martin 6-1, 6-0. In doubles, Becker and Torbeck defeated Ewald and Cata 6-3, 6-1. In MND’s only loss of the day, Alter’s Grubmuller and Wireman defeated Towle and Landers 6-3, 16, 6-4. • Princeton High School girls defeated Hamilton High School, 5-0, Aug. 25. Brown defeated A. Gillis 61, 6-0; Edwards defeated C. Gillis 75, 1-6, 6-2; Kufeldt defeated Hood 60, 6-0. In doubles, Donaldson and D’Arcy defeated Smith and Campbell 6-2, 6-1; Grender and Nguyen defeated Boomershine and Forsythe 6-1, 6-0. Princeton advances to a 21 record with the win. • Wyoming girls defeated Kings High School, 4-1, Aug. 26. Wyoming’s Bourbon defeated Weed 6-0, 6-0; Thoresen defeated Leo 6-2, 6-2; in doubles, M. Hennessy and O. Hennessy defeated Kircher and Rummelhart 6-4, 6-3 and A. Gibbons and S. Gibbons defeated Bennett and Hamilton 6-2, 6-4. Wyoming advances to 2-0 with the win.

September 2, 2009

HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | Editor Melanie Laughman | mlaughman@communitypress.com | 248-7118

RECREATIONAL

Your Community Press newspaper serving Evendale, Glendale, Sharonville,Springdale, Wyoming

communitypress.com

PRESS

Wyoming crushes CHCA in opener By Mark Chalifoux

mchalifoux@communitypress.com

The Wyoming High School football team made a statement in the first game of the season as the Cowboys handled CHCA 39-3. The win will give Wyoming plenty of momentum as they hit the road Friday to play Dayton Oakwood. “We played great defense and offensively we had some big plays,” Wyoming coach Bernie Barre said on the season-opening win over CHCA. “We put a lot of pressure on their quarterback.” Defensively, Barre said Jibreel Black, Eric Price, Tommy Campbell, Tony Davis and Broderick Williams were key up front and that senior Jacob Allsop played very well in the secondary. Offensively, quarterback Kyle Seyfried threw for 351 yards and three touchdowns. Receiver Evan Aleshire caught two of those touchdowns and had 224 receiving yards. Receiver Jonathan Tighe also played well and caught the other touchdown pass. CHCA defeated Wyoming last year and Barre said the win over the Eagles meant a lot to the players who played in that game. “Almost all of our kids played in that game so it did mean a lot to them,” he said. “We have an experienced team and I think we’ll be pretty good if we keep getting better.” While there’s plenty to be optimistic about, Wyoming did have several miscues against CHCA that will need to be corrected against Oakwood. “We turned the ball over a few times and didn’t catch a punt we needed to catch, so we can’t do that,” Barre said. “We just need to stay focused and get better each week.” The game against Oakwood will be the first of four straight road games for the Cowboys, who won’t play at home again until Oct. 2 against Madeira.

Princeton 4, Huber Heights Wayne, 21

Princeton started its season with a tough 21-4 loss to Huber Heights Wayne. The Vikings (0-1) will try to get

ROD APFELBECK/CONTRIBUTOR

Wyoming High School junior running back Drew Perry eludes a CHCA defender to complete Wyoming’s scoring with a touchdown during the fourth quarter of Wyoming’s 39-3 victory over CHCA Aug. 28.

ROD APFELBECK/CONTRIBUTOR

Linebackers Dillon Burk and Michael Travers stuff a run attempt during Wyoming’s 39-3 opening night victory over CHCA this past Friday, Aug. 28. Wyoming’s defense held CHCA scoreless after giving up a field goal on the opening drive and held CHCA to -15 yards rushing.

back on track Friday with a home game against George Washington.

Moeller 45, Winton Woods, 34

The Moeller Crusaders won in dramatic fashion against Winton Woods 45-34. Moeller was down 21-0 and 2810 at halftime and outscored Winton Woods 35-6 in the second half. Moeller was led by running back Jeff Aubin, who had 106 rushing yards, and defensive end Marcus Rush, who had several big plays in the game including an interception returned for a touchdown. Moeller plays at 7:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 4, at Hamilton. Hamilton lost in week one to Springfield, 35-28.

This week in golf

• Princeton High School golfer Nick Perrin scored 8 over par 44 on the front nine at Miami Whitewater, Aug. 26, helping Princeton score 179 to defeat Northwest High School’s 200. Princeton advances to 1-0 with the win. • Wyoming High School girls defeated Mariemont High School 215-264, Aug. 26. Wyoming’s Liz Williams shot 11 over par 48 at Wyoming Golf Club during the match. Wyoming advances to 2-4 with the win. • Wyoming golfers Brian Spitzig and Zach Galluzzo both shot 3 over par 38 on the Ridge Club, Aug. 27, helping Wyoming defeat McNicholas 169-177.

JOSEPH FUQUA II /STAFF

Moeller’s Richie Dyer runs against Winton Woods linebacker Cornelius Roberts in their game at Nippert Stadium Saturday August 29, 2009. Moeller won 45-34.

Roger Bacon 34, Mount Healthy 32

If you’re looking for buyers, you’re in the right neighborhood. To place an ad call 513.242.4000 or 859.283.7290, or visit CommunityClassified.com

ROD APFELBECK/CONTRIBUTOR

Wyoming High School senior wide receiver Evan Aleshire makes a catch down the sideline despite tight coverage by CHCA’s junior defensive back Jeff Stagnaro during Wyoming’s opening game 393 victory over CHCA.

Roger Bacon scored all of its points in the second and third quarters and held on to beat Mount Healthy. The Spartans were led by junior quarterback Tanner Strong, who was 12-22 with three touchdowns and four interceptions; senior wide receiver Jake Rose, who caught six balls for 102 yards and two touchdowns; and sophomore Griffin Mouty, who rushed seven times for 46 yards. The Fighting Owls were led by junior quarterback Denzel Larkin, who rushed 13 times for 66 yards and two touchdowns. Roger Bacon (1-0) plays at Campbell County (0-1) Sept. 4., while Mount Healthy (0-1) hosts Western Hills (0-1).

ROD APFELBECK/CONTRIBUTOR

CHCA senior quarterback Alec Swartz gets off a pass during CHCA’s opening game at Wyoming despite strong pursuit from Wyoming defenders including senior defensive lineman Jibreel Black.


Sports & recreation

September 2, 2009

Tri-County Press

A7

Princeton, Wyoming girls soccer back By Tony Meale tmeale@communitypress.com

High school girls’ soccer is back in full swing and a number of local teams seem poised for strong seasons.

Princeton

After serving as an assistant coach for the past two years, Katie Isaacs enters her first season as head coach of the Princeton Vikings. She takes the reigns of a team that finished 6-11-1 and won just one league game in 2008. The Vikings, however, return five starters, including s e n i o r s Nicole Donnelly and Cheryl Ridings. “Our team Donnelly will be highlighted by strong leadership within the upperclassmen,” Isaacs said. “We are returning some key players who will help form our foundation on the field.” Among those key players are juniors Brandi Ball and Andrea Perrin, as well as sophomore Heather Steineman. The Vikings also boast several newcomers ready to make an impact, including freshman Claire Albertz and sophomore Morgan Bullock. “We have skilled underclassmen who we will be looking for to step into key roles, both offensively and defensively,” Isaacs said. “Overall, our team is well balanced with new talent and seasoned players.

Wyoming

The Wyoming girls’ soccer team went 10-5-3 in 2008 and return a number of key starters from that squad. The team returns goalkeeper Alexa Levick, defenders Brooke Smith, Nikki McKee and Meghan McAllister, midfielders Jillian Anderson, Jane Streeter, Bonnie Grace and Hailee Schlager and forwards Jenny Marck and Michelle Jolson. Head coach Kellie Siler said she expects to have a strong team. “We bring back a strong core of talented players and we look to execute and win games,” she said. Wyoming started the season with wins over Princeton and McNick.

CHCA

Dave Sauve will field a particularly young team as he enters his 10th year as head coach of the Eagles. Sauve led CHCA to a 7-72 finish last season but returns just three starters – Michele Tobeson, Darcie Dixon and Anna Marie Vandenberg. Several newcomers, however, hope to make an impact; among them are midfielder Heather Morrison, striker Anna Love and sweeper Alison Lehky. “We are a very young team with half the program being freshmen,” Sauve said. “We will struggle early, but as the team learns to play together, we will get stronger.”

MND

The Cougars suffered a plethora of season-ending injuries in 2008 and finished

TONY TRIBBLE/STAFF

Desirae Ball (13) of Ursuline is chased by Kim Love of Lakota West during a game in 2008. Ball is one of the standouts for Ursuline. the year at 5-7-5. But with eight returning starters from a team that lost only one senior, the Cougars have the talent and depth to be competitive. Head coach Doug Conway said his girls expect to have a winning season, finish no worse than third in the GGCL-Scarlet division and make a deep run in the state tournament. Leading the way will be four seniors – defenders Chelsea Murphy and Fallon Wujek (three assists in 2008) and midfielders Samantha Gaier (four goals) and Lacie Oliver (five goals). Junior defender Carolyn Hartman and sophomore midfielder Sally Beiting (one goal) will also play pivotal roles for MND this season, as will freshman forward Rose Lavelle. “(Lavelle) has amazing quickness and is a real goal scorer,” Conway said. Perhaps the Cougars’

toughest challenge this year will come when they play two-time defending state champion and league rival St. Ursula in the final game of the regular season Oct. 14.

Ursuline

A quintet of Ursuline Academy players already committed to collegiate programs can focus on playing soccer instead of worrying about life beyond high school this fall. After finishing at 13-1-4 in 2008, nine starters return to the pitch for 11th-year head coach Colleen Dehring. The seniors committed to collegiate programs are all returning starters and include Monica Melink (Indiana University, soccer), Ali Backscheider (Butler University, soccer), Mary Allen (Butler University, soccer) and Desirae Ball (St. Louis University, basketball). Junior Gabby Hausfeld,

ROD APFELBECK/CONTRIBUTOR

Wyoming High School senior keeper Alex Levick makes a save during Wyoming’s 2-0 scrimmage win over Kings High School, Aug. 20. Junior defender Nikki McKee (9) looks on. also a returning starter, is committed to the collegiate program at Ohio University. “This team is a very cohesive unit,” Dehring said via e-mail. “The work well together, have great chemistry and respond to critique and criticism well.” Additional returning starters for Ursuline include senior Molly Allen, senior Bea Hobson, junior Katie Ford and sophomore Erika Wolfer. Ursuline took second place in its Girls’ Greater Catholic League Scarlet Division last fall with a 2-0-3 conference record. Saint Ursula Academy (20-0-3, 3-0-2) won the GGCL Scarlet Division title before going on to win its second-consecutive Division I state championship in 2008.

Ursuline took first place in the GGCL Scarlet Division before Saint Ursula made its run to the state championships in 2007. Ball has been Ursuline’s leading scorer since her freshman year. Last spring, Ball led Ursuline with 32 points including 14 goals and four assists. “If she can stay healthy, she will be a force up top,” Dehring said of Ball. Despite missing half of the 2008 season with multiple fractures in her arm, Melink went on to score 19 points for Ursuline with nine goals and one assist. Backscheider controls Ursuline’s defense as the Lions’ “strongest, most vocal player on the team,” Dehring said. Hausfeld and Allen are midfielders.

Princeton, Wyoming boys soccer in action tmeale@communitypress.com

High school boys’ soccer teams have started playing games. Here’s a quick look at the local teams.

Princeton

The Vikings enjoyed their sixth straight winning season last year, but it didn’t come easily; they finished 87-3. Princeton will try to make it seven in a row in 2009, hopefully with a little more breathing room. In order to do so, they’ll need help from their five returning starters, particularly senior goalie Antonio Trujillo, who posted five shutouts last season. Other seniors include midfielders Tim Leonard and Chris Steinman, as well as defenders Matt Direnzi, Michael Greenwood and Kyle Washington. Sophomore Alton Reisen also figures to contribute. “The defense is good,” head coach Jeff Hemphill said.

Wyoming

The Wyoming High School boys’ soccer team went 9-9-1 in 2008 and could be a strong squad in 2009. The team returns several key starters, including seniors Reed Jaeger and Alex Hinger and juniors Greg Athans, Aaron Linn, Joe Panos and JB Heisey. Promising newcomers include sophomores Cory Macke and Nick Kamphaus and freshmen Daniel Richtand, Harrison Glover and Nathan Meisner.

CHCA

ROD APFELBECK/CONTRIBUTOR

Wyoming senior sweeper Reed Jaeger controls the ball against Hamilton during Wyoming’s 4-2 victory in their first scrimmage of the year. “We’re cautiously optimistic,” said head coach Stephen Thomas. “We will surprise a lot of teams.” Wyoming started the season with a 2-1 win over Roger Bacon.

Moeller

The Moeller Crusaders return 12 lettermen from a team that went 10-5-3 in 2008 and could be a team to watch for the next few seasons as Moeller has only seven seniors. The team returns six starters, including tri-captains defender Joe Breitenbach, forward Thomas

The CHCA Eagles enjoyed their eighth straight winning season last year, but it didn’t come easy. CHCA went 6-65 and finished third in the Miami Valley Conference. This year, however, the Eagles are focused on capturing a league title, which they last won in 2007. Leading the way offensively is forward Peter Riewald, who will wreak havoc on defenses this season. “He’s a very strong forward that will score and set up a lot of goals for us this year,” head coach George Stinson said. Craig McGinlay and Andrew Amend, meanwhile, will command the midfield. “Craig has exceptional skill and puts himself in the right place,” Stinson said. “Andrew is a tough workhorse that never stops working and is tough to get around. Anchoring the defense will be Joe Riefenberg, an exceptional tackler with 4.7 speed, and Jack McIver, who excels in the counter attack.

CHCA figures to be in the hunt for a league title with Summit and Seven Hills. “The team came into the preseason training at a higher level that last year and playing exceptionally well in our preseason tournaments,” Stinson said. “If we can maintain that high level of play, we should be one of the

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top teams in the state.”

Roger Bacon

The Spartans finished 411-3 last year, but they return two first-team All-GCL senior midfielders in Jordan Jatzek (10 goals and five assists) and Mark Vetere (three goals and three assists).

Also contributing will be Eric Tonis, junior defender Eric Brunner, senior defender Matt Schaffer and senior midfielder Michael Eckart. Dick Arszman enters his 22nd year as head coach of the Spartans and carries a lifetime 229-146-56 record.

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Devore and goalkeeper Ben Peterson. The team also returns junior defender Luke Guju and sophomores Jeffrey Fuller and Raymond Roberts. Junior Luke Agricola and sophomore C.J. Polack are the top newcomers on the varsity team. “We have a young team that will improve with experience,” said head coach Randy Hurley. “Our biggest strength is our depth and work ethic.”

By Tony Meale


Sports & recreation

September 2, 2009

Tri-County Press

A7

Princeton, Wyoming girls soccer back By Tony Meale tmeale@communitypress.com

High school girls’ soccer is back in full swing and a number of local teams seem poised for strong seasons.

Princeton

After serving as an assistant coach for the past two years, Katie Isaacs enters her first season as head coach of the Princeton Vikings. She takes the reigns of a team that finished 6-11-1 and won just one league game in 2008. The Vikings, however, return five starters, including s e n i o r s Nicole Donnelly and Cheryl Ridings. “Our team Donnelly will be highlighted by strong leadership within the upperclassmen,” Isaacs said. “We are returning some key players who will help form our foundation on the field.” Among those key players are juniors Brandi Ball and Andrea Perrin, as well as sophomore Heather Steineman. The Vikings also boast several newcomers ready to make an impact, including freshman Claire Albertz and sophomore Morgan Bullock. “We have skilled underclassmen who we will be looking for to step into key roles, both offensively and defensively,” Isaacs said. “Overall, our team is well balanced with new talent and seasoned players.

Wyoming

The Wyoming girls’ soccer team went 10-5-3 in 2008 and return a number of key starters from that squad. The team returns goalkeeper Alexa Levick, defenders Brooke Smith, Nikki McKee and Meghan McAllister, midfielders Jillian Anderson, Jane Streeter, Bonnie Grace and Hailee Schlager and forwards Jenny Marck and Michelle Jolson. Head coach Kellie Siler said she expects to have a strong team. “We bring back a strong core of talented players and we look to execute and win games,” she said. Wyoming started the season with wins over Princeton and McNick.

CHCA

Dave Sauve will field a particularly young team as he enters his 10th year as head coach of the Eagles. Sauve led CHCA to a 7-72 finish last season but returns just three starters – Michele Tobeson, Darcie Dixon and Anna Marie Vandenberg. Several newcomers, however, hope to make an impact; among them are midfielder Heather Morrison, striker Anna Love and sweeper Alison Lehky. “We are a very young team with half the program being freshmen,” Sauve said. “We will struggle early, but as the team learns to play together, we will get stronger.”

MND

The Cougars suffered a plethora of season-ending injuries in 2008 and finished

TONY TRIBBLE/STAFF

Desirae Ball (13) of Ursuline is chased by Kim Love of Lakota West during a game in 2008. Ball is one of the standouts for Ursuline. the year at 5-7-5. But with eight returning starters from a team that lost only one senior, the Cougars have the talent and depth to be competitive. Head coach Doug Conway said his girls expect to have a winning season, finish no worse than third in the GGCL-Scarlet division and make a deep run in the state tournament. Leading the way will be four seniors – defenders Chelsea Murphy and Fallon Wujek (three assists in 2008) and midfielders Samantha Gaier (four goals) and Lacie Oliver (five goals). Junior defender Carolyn Hartman and sophomore midfielder Sally Beiting (one goal) will also play pivotal roles for MND this season, as will freshman forward Rose Lavelle. “(Lavelle) has amazing quickness and is a real goal scorer,” Conway said. Perhaps the Cougars’

toughest challenge this year will come when they play two-time defending state champion and league rival St. Ursula in the final game of the regular season Oct. 14.

Ursuline

A quintet of Ursuline Academy players already committed to collegiate programs can focus on playing soccer instead of worrying about life beyond high school this fall. After finishing at 13-1-4 in 2008, nine starters return to the pitch for 11th-year head coach Colleen Dehring. The seniors committed to collegiate programs are all returning starters and include Monica Melink (Indiana University, soccer), Ali Backscheider (Butler University, soccer), Mary Allen (Butler University, soccer) and Desirae Ball (St. Louis University, basketball). Junior Gabby Hausfeld,

ROD APFELBECK/CONTRIBUTOR

Wyoming High School senior keeper Alex Levick makes a save during Wyoming’s 2-0 scrimmage win over Kings High School, Aug. 20. Junior defender Nikki McKee (9) looks on. also a returning starter, is committed to the collegiate program at Ohio University. “This team is a very cohesive unit,” Dehring said via e-mail. “The work well together, have great chemistry and respond to critique and criticism well.” Additional returning starters for Ursuline include senior Molly Allen, senior Bea Hobson, junior Katie Ford and sophomore Erika Wolfer. Ursuline took second place in its Girls’ Greater Catholic League Scarlet Division last fall with a 2-0-3 conference record. Saint Ursula Academy (20-0-3, 3-0-2) won the GGCL Scarlet Division title before going on to win its second-consecutive Division I state championship in 2008.

Ursuline took first place in the GGCL Scarlet Division before Saint Ursula made its run to the state championships in 2007. Ball has been Ursuline’s leading scorer since her freshman year. Last spring, Ball led Ursuline with 32 points including 14 goals and four assists. “If she can stay healthy, she will be a force up top,” Dehring said of Ball. Despite missing half of the 2008 season with multiple fractures in her arm, Melink went on to score 19 points for Ursuline with nine goals and one assist. Backscheider controls Ursuline’s defense as the Lions’ “strongest, most vocal player on the team,” Dehring said. Hausfeld and Allen are midfielders.

Princeton, Wyoming boys soccer in action tmeale@communitypress.com

High school boys’ soccer teams have started playing games. Here’s a quick look at the local teams.

Princeton

The Vikings enjoyed their sixth straight winning season last year, but it didn’t come easily; they finished 87-3. Princeton will try to make it seven in a row in 2009, hopefully with a little more breathing room. In order to do so, they’ll need help from their five returning starters, particularly senior goalie Antonio Trujillo, who posted five shutouts last season. Other seniors include midfielders Tim Leonard and Chris Steinman, as well as defenders Matt Direnzi, Michael Greenwood and Kyle Washington. Sophomore Alton Reisen also figures to contribute. “The defense is good,” head coach Jeff Hemphill said.

Wyoming

The Wyoming High School boys’ soccer team went 9-9-1 in 2008 and could be a strong squad in 2009. The team returns several key starters, including seniors Reed Jaeger and Alex Hinger and juniors Greg Athans, Aaron Linn, Joe Panos and JB Heisey. Promising newcomers include sophomores Cory Macke and Nick Kamphaus and freshmen Daniel Richtand, Harrison Glover and Nathan Meisner.

CHCA

ROD APFELBECK/CONTRIBUTOR

Wyoming senior sweeper Reed Jaeger controls the ball against Hamilton during Wyoming’s 4-2 victory in their first scrimmage of the year. “We’re cautiously optimistic,” said head coach Stephen Thomas. “We will surprise a lot of teams.” Wyoming started the season with a 2-1 win over Roger Bacon.

Moeller

The Moeller Crusaders return 12 lettermen from a team that went 10-5-3 in 2008 and could be a team to watch for the next few seasons as Moeller has only seven seniors. The team returns six starters, including tri-captains defender Joe Breitenbach, forward Thomas

The CHCA Eagles enjoyed their eighth straight winning season last year, but it didn’t come easy. CHCA went 6-65 and finished third in the Miami Valley Conference. This year, however, the Eagles are focused on capturing a league title, which they last won in 2007. Leading the way offensively is forward Peter Riewald, who will wreak havoc on defenses this season. “He’s a very strong forward that will score and set up a lot of goals for us this year,” head coach George Stinson said. Craig McGinlay and Andrew Amend, meanwhile, will command the midfield. “Craig has exceptional skill and puts himself in the right place,” Stinson said. “Andrew is a tough workhorse that never stops working and is tough to get around. Anchoring the defense will be Joe Riefenberg, an exceptional tackler with 4.7 speed, and Jack McIver, who excels in the counter attack.

CHCA figures to be in the hunt for a league title with Summit and Seven Hills. “The team came into the preseason training at a higher level that last year and playing exceptionally well in our preseason tournaments,” Stinson said. “If we can maintain that high level of play, we should be one of the

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Roger Bacon

The Spartans finished 411-3 last year, but they return two first-team All-GCL senior midfielders in Jordan Jatzek (10 goals and five assists) and Mark Vetere (three goals and three assists).

Also contributing will be Eric Tonis, junior defender Eric Brunner, senior defender Matt Schaffer and senior midfielder Michael Eckart. Dick Arszman enters his 22nd year as head coach of the Spartans and carries a lifetime 229-146-56 record.

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Devore and goalkeeper Ben Peterson. The team also returns junior defender Luke Guju and sophomores Jeffrey Fuller and Raymond Roberts. Junior Luke Agricola and sophomore C.J. Polack are the top newcomers on the varsity team. “We have a young team that will improve with experience,” said head coach Randy Hurley. “Our biggest strength is our depth and work ethic.”

By Tony Meale


VIEWPOINTS

A8

Tri-County Press

September 2, 2009

EDITORIALS

|

LETTERS

|

COLUMNS

Editor Dick Maloney | rmaloney@communitypress.com | 248-7134

|

CH@TROOM

Your Community Press newspaper serving Evendale, Glendale, Sharonville,Springdale, Wyoming

communitypress.com

PRESS

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

Council member stepping aside

About letters & columns

To the residents of Springdale: Election time is once again upon us. I have had the fortunate opportunity to serve you for the past 20 years as your city councilman. As a life long resident of Springdale, I have tremendous pride in seeing our city grow in many ways. I feel that I have had some impact on these positive changes. The streetscape projects along Springfield Pike, our expanded community center, our and our new Veterans Memorial are just a few of the things that I feel proud to be a part of. At this time I feel even though

We welcome your comments on editorials, columns, stories or other topics important to you in The Tri-County Press. Include your name, address and phone number(s) so we may verify your letter. Letters of 200 or fewer words and columns of 500 or fewer words have the best chance of being published. All submissions may be edited for I still love serving as your councilman, I will not be running for reelection. I believe it is best to take a brief time out and let someone else serve you as your councilperson. I have loved every minute that I have served and I truly want to thank each and every one of

CH@TROOM Aug. 26 questions

Princeton High School earned an “Excellent” rating from the state on its most recent report card. What are the reason’s for Princeton’s improvement? “I believe it is a combination of having a young, energetic principal, Mr. William Sprankles, along with an equally energetic group of grade principals who have the support of Superintendent Gary Pack and the Princeton School Board. From speaking with teachers at Princeton High School, Mr. Sprankles is highly-respected and loved by his teachers and staff. Mr. Sprankles started last year with three principles: “Relationships “Multiple opportunities for children to show improvement, progress and achievement “All children in all subgroups meet state standards. “It is quite evident that Mr. Sprankles instilled these principles in the teaching staff and to our students, with the result being an Excellent rating. My older son graduated from Princeton High School in 2006 and I can definitely say that starting last year with Mr. Sprankles, Princeton was a totally different school and is a very welcoming school, encouraging parents to be involved.” Rebecka Adams

Do you think legalizing casino gambling will hurt charitable events and fundraisers such as Monte Carlo nights and church festivals? “Nobody knows if casinos will hurt chairitable events because nobody knows who to believe. Casino opponents say because the proposed constitutional amendment expressly allows bingo, lottery games and horse-race betting, any other form of gambling in Ohio would automatically be banned if Ohio voters approve Issue 3. On the other side you have former Cincinnati Mayor Charlie Luken (the new poster boy for allowing casinos) saying that casinos in Ohio will not restrict charitable gambling, including church festivals. So how do we answer this question without knowing what is true and what is false? “Let’s say that church festivals and Las Vegas nights can still have gambling if Issue 3 passes. If that’s the case, then no, they will not suffer at all. These events only occur a few times a year, and only a handful of people go to church festivals with the sole purpose of gambling. Those people will con-

Next question A recent survey found that Springdale residents generally feel safe in their community, but were concerned about traffic in the community. Do you feel safe in your community? Why or why not? What do you think is the enduring legacy of Ted Kennedy? Every week The Tri-County Press asks readers a question they can reply to via e-mail. Send your answers to tricountypress@communitypress.com with Chatroom in the subject line. tinue to stay local and play at the festivals. “But if Issue 3 does in fact make chairitable gambling illegal, then yes, churches and other fundraising groups will suffer big time. An analysis by The Enquirer last month found that summer Roman Catholic parish festivals generate $12 million in revenue in Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky. That number will greatly reduce if they are unable to operate casino games. So there is no right or wrong answer to this question because we don’t know how to answer it. “I for one hope Issue 3 passes and churches can keep their gambling. But if they can’t I’m OK with that too. I only gamble a few times a year. But I would like the option of going whenever I want and not having to wait for summer festivals. And I would like to do this without having to spend my money in Indiana. The Catholic church is the richest most powerfull business in the world. They will find a way to survive.” T.Z. “Most people attend church bingo, Monte Carlo nights and church festivals for social reasons. These events are local and gambling is secondary. People who want to gamble in casinos want to gamble, not socialize and they are willing to travel a distance to do it. I believe the effect will be small.” F.D. “I’m not a gambler and am definitely not in favor of casinos in our area, but I really don’t believe, even if they are approved, that casinos will have an impact on small venues that include gambling. I suspect that people believe in and support their local charities and will continue in that effort. There is a personal camaraderie and community spirit that these events provide over and above the gambling component. L.D.

length, accuracy and clarity. Deadline: Noon Friday E-mail: tricountypress@ communitypress.com. Fax: 248-1938. U.S. mail: See box below. Letters, columns and articles submitted to The Tri-County Press may be published or distributed in print, electronic or other forms. you for your continued support. I will walk away proud of what I have done while in office. I plan on continuing coordinating the Springdale Day at the Cincinnati Reds, as this is not an official city function. Although I feel that I can con-

tinue to contribute much more, I have always said if someone who I thought was well qualified to serve this city were to run, I would not run against him or her. This is not my council position, but yours. Its up to you, the community, to place who you want in there. The candidate that I would encourage you to consider is Holly Emerson. I believe that she has the insight, the strength of her convictions and the communication skills that would best serve both you and me. She is in this for the same reasons I have for being on council, namely to serve the city. She is not a politician. I have known Holly for about 18 years and know that she will do an outstanding job. I have

Crime victims have rights too Criminal defendants have many well known constitutional rights. These include the right to counsel, due process and speedy trial. Victims of crime in Ohio also have important legal rights. Police, prosecutors, judges and correction officials have a legal duty to consider the victim’s rights. Within a reasonable amount of time after an offender’s arrest, the police must notify the victim of the offender’s arrest, the offender’s name and whether the offender is eligible for pre-trial release. The prosecutor in the case, to the extent practicable, must confer with the victim before agreeing to a plea bargain or dismissing any charges. Upon the victim’s request, the prosecutor must inform the victim of the date, time and place of any scheduled proceeding in the case. The victim may be present whenever the defendant is present during any stage of the case conducted on the record other than grand jury proceedings or if neces-

sary to ensure a fair trial. The court shall make reasonable efforts to minimize contact between the victim and the defendant and Judge Brad their family Greenberg members includproviding Community ing separate waiting Press guest areas if availcolumnist able. The prosecutor is required to notify the victim of the defendant’s acquittal or conviction and the sentencing hearing. Before imposing sentence, the court must permit and consider the victim’s statement about the impact of the crime and recommended sentence. The court must also permit and consider the victim’s statement before granting early release of the defendant. The victim may also request information from the jail or prison housing the defendant. If request-

PRESS

Unfortunately, crime victims often feel that the justice system cares more about the rights of criminal defendants than victims. Victims of crime should know that they have legal rights too. ed, the prison must notify the victim in advance of any parole hearing. The victim also must be notified of any escape, release or death of the inmate. Unfortunately, crime victims often feel that the justice system cares more about the rights of criminal defendants than victims. Victims of crime should know that they have legal rights too. The justice system must protect the rights of victims and the accused. Judge Brad Greenberg presides in Hamilton County Municipal Court. He is a resident of Loveland.

Ethics: Reflection in our mirror Before we start casting stones it is always a good idea to consider all of the issues, including our own. Yes, I know, but I taught ethics and am now very involved in medical ethics. For clarification, medical ethics is no different than any other type of ethics other than sometimes lives and medical advancements are at stake. This merely makes it critical. My question for you is whether you think common folks (I consider myself as one) are to be held to a lesser standard than “elite” people of various callings. For the purpose of this essay consider that you have the opportunity to commit some ethical lapse and there is little possibility that you will be caught. In the course of our lives, we all face some tempting situations. Take some time to think this over. OK, time is up! Consider all the reasons why you would not do this. Now, think about all the reasons why you might be tempted. Let’s face it. There are some situations where we might submit to this temptation. Sometimes, it is our financial situation that forces a tough decision. Would you fault a poor single mother who has a hungry baby

Edward Levy Community Press guest columnist

for doing what a more fortunate person would not have to do? Would you blame her because her poor choices might have caused the problem in the first place? Did our society either cause or allow her to make bad deci-

sions? What we learn from this exercise is that sometimes bad ethical choices are made for many reasons. Some of them may make the decision reasonable to many people. Many of us would still fault the mother of the starving baby. Where most of us would agree is the recent scandal in New Jersey. People who have positions of trust should have the same ethical standards as the rest of us, but they should, by virtue of that trust hold themselves to higher public scrutiny. Now we are getting to my point. We cannot control the ethical decisions of others, but we are very much in charge of our own ethics. A clear example is how crooked politicians stay in office.

A publication of

Your Community Press newspaper serving Evendale, Glendale, Sharonville,Springdale, Wyoming

known of her interest in serving as your council representative for quite some time. Her family values and honesty are just a few other attributes that would make me proud to place my vote for her. I thank you from the bottom of my heart for the opportunity to serve you as best that I could. I am not leaving Springdale and am not saying that I won’t be asking for your support in the near future. I am only asking you to give whoever is your next council representative the same support that you have given me. Again, thank you. You have all allowed me to fulfill a dream that most could only hope for. Randy Danbury Springdale City Council

Tri-County Press Editor . . . . . .Dick Maloney rmaloney@communitypress.com . . . . . .248-7134

We have only to look at the people who have made news lately to see that greed is the proper term to use for them. The same is true for religious leaders. This is our fault. We should demand better ethics and punish wrongdoers. Let’s take a self examination of our ethical standards. When our desire for money or fame becomes more important than our own ethical values the only definition that fits is greed. We have only to look at the people who have made news lately to see that greed is the proper term to use for them. Most of us would rather lead a straight and modest life than to worry about who is watching us and why. This is not to vilify those who become wealthy or famous by legitimate means. They most often perform a service to society. They create wealth for others by their lifestyle. What really matters is when we can look in the mirror and say “this is someone I am proud of.” Edward Levy is a longtime resident of Montgomery and a former college instructor.

s

A WORLD OF DIFFERENT VOICES

Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday-Friday | See page A2 for additional contact information. 248-8600 | 394 Wards Corner Road, Loveland, Ohio 45140 | e-mail tricountypress@communitypress.com | Web site: www.communitypress.com


VIEWPOINTS

A8

Tri-County Press

September 2, 2009

EDITORIALS

|

LETTERS

|

COLUMNS

Editor Dick Maloney | rmaloney@communitypress.com | 248-7134

|

CH@TROOM

Your Community Press newspaper serving Evendale, Glendale, Sharonville,Springdale, Wyoming

communitypress.com

PRESS

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

Council member stepping aside

About letters & columns

To the residents of Springdale: Election time is once again upon us. I have had the fortunate opportunity to serve you for the past 20 years as your city councilman. As a life long resident of Springdale, I have tremendous pride in seeing our city grow in many ways. I feel that I have had some impact on these positive changes. The streetscape projects along Springfield Pike, our expanded community center, our and our new Veterans Memorial are just a few of the things that I feel proud to be a part of. At this time I feel even though

We welcome your comments on editorials, columns, stories or other topics important to you in The Tri-County Press. Include your name, address and phone number(s) so we may verify your letter. Letters of 200 or fewer words and columns of 500 or fewer words have the best chance of being published. All submissions may be edited for I still love serving as your councilman, I will not be running for reelection. I believe it is best to take a brief time out and let someone else serve you as your councilperson. I have loved every minute that I have served and I truly want to thank each and every one of

CH@TROOM Aug. 26 questions

Princeton High School earned an “Excellent” rating from the state on its most recent report card. What are the reason’s for Princeton’s improvement? “I believe it is a combination of having a young, energetic principal, Mr. William Sprankles, along with an equally energetic group of grade principals who have the support of Superintendent Gary Pack and the Princeton School Board. From speaking with teachers at Princeton High School, Mr. Sprankles is highly-respected and loved by his teachers and staff. Mr. Sprankles started last year with three principles: “Relationships “Multiple opportunities for children to show improvement, progress and achievement “All children in all subgroups meet state standards. “It is quite evident that Mr. Sprankles instilled these principles in the teaching staff and to our students, with the result being an Excellent rating. My older son graduated from Princeton High School in 2006 and I can definitely say that starting last year with Mr. Sprankles, Princeton was a totally different school and is a very welcoming school, encouraging parents to be involved.” Rebecka Adams

Do you think legalizing casino gambling will hurt charitable events and fundraisers such as Monte Carlo nights and church festivals? “Nobody knows if casinos will hurt chairitable events because nobody knows who to believe. Casino opponents say because the proposed constitutional amendment expressly allows bingo, lottery games and horse-race betting, any other form of gambling in Ohio would automatically be banned if Ohio voters approve Issue 3. On the other side you have former Cincinnati Mayor Charlie Luken (the new poster boy for allowing casinos) saying that casinos in Ohio will not restrict charitable gambling, including church festivals. So how do we answer this question without knowing what is true and what is false? “Let’s say that church festivals and Las Vegas nights can still have gambling if Issue 3 passes. If that’s the case, then no, they will not suffer at all. These events only occur a few times a year, and only a handful of people go to church festivals with the sole purpose of gambling. Those people will con-

Next question A recent survey found that Springdale residents generally feel safe in their community, but were concerned about traffic in the community. Do you feel safe in your community? Why or why not? What do you think is the enduring legacy of Ted Kennedy? Every week The Tri-County Press asks readers a question they can reply to via e-mail. Send your answers to tricountypress@communitypress.com with Chatroom in the subject line. tinue to stay local and play at the festivals. “But if Issue 3 does in fact make chairitable gambling illegal, then yes, churches and other fundraising groups will suffer big time. An analysis by The Enquirer last month found that summer Roman Catholic parish festivals generate $12 million in revenue in Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky. That number will greatly reduce if they are unable to operate casino games. So there is no right or wrong answer to this question because we don’t know how to answer it. “I for one hope Issue 3 passes and churches can keep their gambling. But if they can’t I’m OK with that too. I only gamble a few times a year. But I would like the option of going whenever I want and not having to wait for summer festivals. And I would like to do this without having to spend my money in Indiana. The Catholic church is the richest most powerfull business in the world. They will find a way to survive.” T.Z. “Most people attend church bingo, Monte Carlo nights and church festivals for social reasons. These events are local and gambling is secondary. People who want to gamble in casinos want to gamble, not socialize and they are willing to travel a distance to do it. I believe the effect will be small.” F.D. “I’m not a gambler and am definitely not in favor of casinos in our area, but I really don’t believe, even if they are approved, that casinos will have an impact on small venues that include gambling. I suspect that people believe in and support their local charities and will continue in that effort. There is a personal camaraderie and community spirit that these events provide over and above the gambling component. L.D.

length, accuracy and clarity. Deadline: Noon Friday E-mail: tricountypress@ communitypress.com. Fax: 248-1938. U.S. mail: See box below. Letters, columns and articles submitted to The Tri-County Press may be published or distributed in print, electronic or other forms. you for your continued support. I will walk away proud of what I have done while in office. I plan on continuing coordinating the Springdale Day at the Cincinnati Reds, as this is not an official city function. Although I feel that I can con-

tinue to contribute much more, I have always said if someone who I thought was well qualified to serve this city were to run, I would not run against him or her. This is not my council position, but yours. Its up to you, the community, to place who you want in there. The candidate that I would encourage you to consider is Holly Emerson. I believe that she has the insight, the strength of her convictions and the communication skills that would best serve both you and me. She is in this for the same reasons I have for being on council, namely to serve the city. She is not a politician. I have known Holly for about 18 years and know that she will do an outstanding job. I have

Crime victims have rights too Criminal defendants have many well known constitutional rights. These include the right to counsel, due process and speedy trial. Victims of crime in Ohio also have important legal rights. Police, prosecutors, judges and correction officials have a legal duty to consider the victim’s rights. Within a reasonable amount of time after an offender’s arrest, the police must notify the victim of the offender’s arrest, the offender’s name and whether the offender is eligible for pre-trial release. The prosecutor in the case, to the extent practicable, must confer with the victim before agreeing to a plea bargain or dismissing any charges. Upon the victim’s request, the prosecutor must inform the victim of the date, time and place of any scheduled proceeding in the case. The victim may be present whenever the defendant is present during any stage of the case conducted on the record other than grand jury proceedings or if neces-

sary to ensure a fair trial. The court shall make reasonable efforts to minimize contact between the victim and the defendant and Judge Brad their family Greenberg members includproviding Community ing separate waiting Press guest areas if availcolumnist able. The prosecutor is required to notify the victim of the defendant’s acquittal or conviction and the sentencing hearing. Before imposing sentence, the court must permit and consider the victim’s statement about the impact of the crime and recommended sentence. The court must also permit and consider the victim’s statement before granting early release of the defendant. The victim may also request information from the jail or prison housing the defendant. If request-

PRESS

Unfortunately, crime victims often feel that the justice system cares more about the rights of criminal defendants than victims. Victims of crime should know that they have legal rights too. ed, the prison must notify the victim in advance of any parole hearing. The victim also must be notified of any escape, release or death of the inmate. Unfortunately, crime victims often feel that the justice system cares more about the rights of criminal defendants than victims. Victims of crime should know that they have legal rights too. The justice system must protect the rights of victims and the accused. Judge Brad Greenberg presides in Hamilton County Municipal Court. He is a resident of Loveland.

Ethics: Reflection in our mirror Before we start casting stones it is always a good idea to consider all of the issues, including our own. Yes, I know, but I taught ethics and am now very involved in medical ethics. For clarification, medical ethics is no different than any other type of ethics other than sometimes lives and medical advancements are at stake. This merely makes it critical. My question for you is whether you think common folks (I consider myself as one) are to be held to a lesser standard than “elite” people of various callings. For the purpose of this essay consider that you have the opportunity to commit some ethical lapse and there is little possibility that you will be caught. In the course of our lives, we all face some tempting situations. Take some time to think this over. OK, time is up! Consider all the reasons why you would not do this. Now, think about all the reasons why you might be tempted. Let’s face it. There are some situations where we might submit to this temptation. Sometimes, it is our financial situation that forces a tough decision. Would you fault a poor single mother who has a hungry baby

Edward Levy Community Press guest columnist

for doing what a more fortunate person would not have to do? Would you blame her because her poor choices might have caused the problem in the first place? Did our society either cause or allow her to make bad deci-

sions? What we learn from this exercise is that sometimes bad ethical choices are made for many reasons. Some of them may make the decision reasonable to many people. Many of us would still fault the mother of the starving baby. Where most of us would agree is the recent scandal in New Jersey. People who have positions of trust should have the same ethical standards as the rest of us, but they should, by virtue of that trust hold themselves to higher public scrutiny. Now we are getting to my point. We cannot control the ethical decisions of others, but we are very much in charge of our own ethics. A clear example is how crooked politicians stay in office.

A publication of

Your Community Press newspaper serving Evendale, Glendale, Sharonville,Springdale, Wyoming

known of her interest in serving as your council representative for quite some time. Her family values and honesty are just a few other attributes that would make me proud to place my vote for her. I thank you from the bottom of my heart for the opportunity to serve you as best that I could. I am not leaving Springdale and am not saying that I won’t be asking for your support in the near future. I am only asking you to give whoever is your next council representative the same support that you have given me. Again, thank you. You have all allowed me to fulfill a dream that most could only hope for. Randy Danbury Springdale City Council

Tri-County Press Editor . . . . . .Dick Maloney rmaloney@communitypress.com . . . . . .248-7134

We have only to look at the people who have made news lately to see that greed is the proper term to use for them. The same is true for religious leaders. This is our fault. We should demand better ethics and punish wrongdoers. Let’s take a self examination of our ethical standards. When our desire for money or fame becomes more important than our own ethical values the only definition that fits is greed. We have only to look at the people who have made news lately to see that greed is the proper term to use for them. Most of us would rather lead a straight and modest life than to worry about who is watching us and why. This is not to vilify those who become wealthy or famous by legitimate means. They most often perform a service to society. They create wealth for others by their lifestyle. What really matters is when we can look in the mirror and say “this is someone I am proud of.” Edward Levy is a longtime resident of Montgomery and a former college instructor.

s

A WORLD OF DIFFERENT VOICES

Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday-Friday | See page A2 for additional contact information. 248-8600 | 394 Wards Corner Road, Loveland, Ohio 45140 | e-mail tricountypress@communitypress.com | Web site: www.communitypress.com


Your Community Press newspaper serving Evendale, Glendale, Sharonville,Springdale, Wyoming

We d n e s d a y, S e p t e m b e r

2, 2009

PERSON TO PERSON

KELLY MCBRIDE REDDY/STAFF

Jared Ballew makes the afternoon announcement each day at Princeton High School.

Princeton student is Viking through and through By Kelly McBride Reddy kreddy@communitypress.com

Every day, Jared Ballew heads to the front office at Princeton High School to make the afternoon announcements. The senior from Woodlawn has a lot to say, and he says it with enthusiasm. “I was the first and only junior last year in the Princeton basketball cheering section,” Ballew said. “The rest were seniors. I’d wear all my gear, paint my face, lead the cheers and dance.” This season, he’s starting as an offensive guard on the Princeton Vikings football team. He’s involved in more than sports. The football player is also a member of the school’s a cappella choir and part of Princeton’s Key Club. This year, Ballew said he’s working in his community service class to be a peer counselor to help stop violence at Princeton.

His cheering expertise had landed him the invitation to make announcements about basketball games last year. Near the end of the season, he was asked to continue the job. “I’m an attention-seeking person,” Ballew said. “I jumped right on it.” His goals for the future, however, belie the spotlight. “I want to be a nurse,” Ballew said. “I like to help people.” That confidence has been noticed by staff members, as well. Dana Zinnecker, adviser to the Key Club, said he’s known to her as Fozz, after Fozzi Bear of the Muppets. “He was an adorable character,” she said of the Muppet, and of Ballew. “He makes me laugh even when I’m having a bad day.” Marni Durham, dean of student and family services at Princeton High School, summed him up. “Jared’s spirit is the heart of Princeton High School.” Zinnecker agreed. Ballew didn’t dispute it.

THINGS TO DO Be a master gardener

The Ohio State University Extension Hamilton County is hosting a master gardener class from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 3, at The Ohio State University extension Hamilton County, 110 Boggs Lane, Suite 315, Springdale. The class continues Thursdays through Nov. 5. A completed application and interview are required. The cost is $250. Registration is required. Call 946-8998 or visit http:// hamilton.osu.edu/.

Stamp your art out

PRESS

Ribbon drinkware sales will be donated to Komen for the Cure. Call 745-8980 or visit www.komencincinnati.org.

Labor Day concert

The Blue Ash/Montgomery Symphony Orchestra is hosting the Blue Ash/Montgomery Symphony Orchestra Labor Day Concert at 6 p.m. Monday, Sept. 7, at Blue Ash Towne Square, Cooper and Hunt roads, Blue Ash. The concert features a variety of classical works. The event is free and open to all ages. Call 232-0949.

Stamp Your Art Out is hosting the class “Cheaper by the Dozen” from 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 5, at Stamp Your Art Out, 9685 Kenwood Road, Blue Ash. Learn card-making techniques and create 12 cards: three each of four designs including a winter/holiday card. Fishing tournament The cost is $25; some supHamilton County Park Displies additional. Registration trict is hosting the Holiday is required. Call 793-4558. Kids’ Fishing Tournament from 10 a.m. to noon Monday, Sept. 7, at Lake Isabella, Artist signing Loveland-Madeira Macy’s is hosting the Loli- 10174 ta Pink Ribbon Signing from 1 Road, Symmes Township. Registration is at 9 a.m. p.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 5, at Macy’s-Kenwood, 7800 Trophies will be awarded. The Montgomery Road, Kenwood. event is open to ages 12 and The designer signs “Pink Rib- under with an adult. Space is bon” wine and martini glass- limited. The event is free. Call es. Portion of Lolita’s Pink 521-7275.

Share your events Go to communitypress.com and click on Share! to get your event into the Tri-County Press.

PEOPLE

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IDEAS

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RECIPES

Bumps in life’s road just lift him higher

What do you do when life hands you lemon seeds, and leaves out the juice, sugar and water? If you’re Chuck Smith, you make lemonade anyway. Born in Akron, he has one daughter who lives in Smyrna, Ga. FortunateEvelyn ly for us, Perkins he is the owner of Community C o m p l e t e Press F a m i l y columnist and Sports Nutrition in Sharonville. Chuck has been in the health care industry 20 years, and located in the Sharonville area for 17. How nice to have his expertise so nearby. Educated in business, Chuck took a long and torturous route to his life’s work. His story made me reconsider how I view my own problems. In 1975, he began having serious health problems. Fatigue and flu-like symptoms morphed into about 20 other disorders. A few are fibromyalgia, food and chemical allergies, insom-

nia, ADD, brain fog, hypoglycemia, frequent viral infections, memory difficulties and sensitivity to bright lights and loud noises. At the time, he was a sophomore at Miami University. As a testament to his perseverance, Chuck graduated in 1977 with a degree in business management despite his ailments. “By the late ’80s I couldn’t drive a car, work, talk or read. Consequently, I held mediocre jobs.” For almost 15 years he went from doctor to doctor with no success. When traditional medicine failed, he began studying health and alternative medicine on his own. “As a result of my studies, I learned to manage and greatly improve my health problems. In understanding the spirit, mind and body relationship and through prayer, I’ve been healed of most problems in everything and received improvement in all health issues.” His studies led him to open Complete Family and Sports Nutrition. “I have knowledge in all areas of health and medicine,” he said. Since recovering his health, Chuck remains on a

EVELYN PERKINS/CONTRIBUTOR

Chuck Smith in his well-stocked Complete Family and Sports Nutrition store. continual journey of improvement and a quest to help others. When he confers with you, he will speak knowledgeably and professionally.

Fall carnival

As long as we are on the subject of health, I want you to know about the First Annual Fall Carnival coming to Glendale Place Care Center, 779 Glendale-Milford Road, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Friday, Sept. 18. There will be food, games, prizes, raffles, a bake sale and much more in the multi-purpose room and surrounding areas. Robby Linkmeyer advises it will be fun for the

FROM CINCINNATI.COM/SHARE Supporting schools

Wyoming residents can enjoy a good magazine and support community schools at the same time. The Parent School Association (PSA) reminds area residents that the Wyoming Middle School Student Magazine Sale will begin Sept. 3 and extend for three weeks. The organization earns 50 percent of the profit from each subscription ordered. “Last year alone, the magazine sale generated just under $34,000,” sale organizer Julia Taylor said. “One hundred percent of the money is invested in our schools and is used districtwide on items such as primary school playground upgrades, middle school field trip expenses, and scholarships for our deserving high school students.” Taylor said that subscriptions can be given as birthday or holiday gifts, or even sent to armed service personnel overseas. Renewals as well as new subscriptions count toward the fundraising total. Folks who are not contacted by a middle school salesperson can order or renew magazines online at www.aphearst.com. After clicking on “shop now,” the subscriber should enter the school code of WB3027. Ordering deadline is Sept. 24. For details, contact Taylor at 761-3997 or email at tjtaylor@cinci.rr.com.

On Playhouse board

Evendale resident Michelle Hopkins, a twotime Emmy Award-winning

reporter, has joined the Cincinnati Playhouse’s Board of Trustees. Since February 2000, Hopkins has worked as a reporter at Channel 5 and also writes “From the Heart,” a column featured in Inspire Cincinnati. Hopkins is a member of the advisory board of the Salvation Army and a Board member with the Cincinnati May Festival. She also volunteers with the Cincinnati Youth Collaborative and the Cincinnati Ballet. The Board of Trustees at the Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park is the governing body of the theatre and ensures the fiscal integrity of the organization. It is composed of dedicated volunteer leaders from across the Greater Cincinnati community.

Sunglasses for troops

U.S. troops serving in Afghanistan will see a bit more clearly, thanks to Cliff York. York, president of York Vision in Kenwood, is donating nearly 3,000 sunglasses to U.S. troops through the Yellow Ribbon Support Center. The donation was motivated after a client, Dr. Rob Heidt, mentioned that his son, Chip, who is stationed in Afghanistan, said there is a great need for personal items for the troops and goodwill items to give to Afghanis. York contacted Keith Maupin, father of slain PFC Keith “Matt” Maupin, for help in shipping the sunglasses at a cost of $1 per

pound. Donations are being accepted to offset the cost. To donate, call 752-4310 or go to www.yellowribbonsupportcenter.com.

Silverton Paideia

Nearly 400 students made their way through the periodic rain showers to attend opening day at Silverton Paideia Academy, an elementary magnet school in the Cincinnati Public School District that features Paideia-based instruction and a supporting museum school concept. In addition to a focus on increasing test scores and student achievement, the school will be hosting two series of communityfocused events throughout the school year. The first is a partnership with Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park to bring three community performances of Playhouse shows to the school, beginning at 3 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 3. The second is a series of community conversations called “Front Porch Forum,” a bi-monthly opportunity for members of the Silverton community to gather for an informative presentation and discussion about topics in the arts, history, science or other current issues of importance to the Silverton community. Silverton Paideia Academy’s Web is at http://silverton.cps-k12.org.

Ffishing tournament

Lake Isabella in Symmes Township will hold a holiday kids’ fishing tournament from 10 a.m. to noon

entire family. Of great importance, it will also benefit the Alzheimer’s Association. Because my mother has Alzheimer’s, I know firsthand how terrible the disease is for the patient and the family. Constant research is making headway, so bring the family to support the association’s efforts as well have a great time. Evelyn Perkins writes a regular column about people and events in the Tri-County Press area. Send items for her column to 10127 Chester Road, Woodlawn, 45215, or call her directly at 772-7379.

About Share!

Cincinnati.com/Share is your online way to share your news with your friends and neighbors. To post stories and photos, go to Cincinnati. com/Share and follow the simple instructions. Monday, Sept. 7. The free event for children ages 12 and under is limited to 50 children each in three age categories: 1012, 6-9 and under 6. All children will receive certificates and any child who catches a fish will be awarded a trophy. The angler with the biggest catch of the day will receive a prize from Bass Pro Shops. Registration begins at 9 a.m. that day at the boathouse. A valid Hamilton County Park District Motor Vehicle Permit ($5 annual; $2 daily) is required to enter the parks. Call the parks district at 521-7275.

Sonja Stratman talk

On Thursday, Sep. 3, at 7:30 p.m., Twin Lakes Senior Living Community is hosting a one-hour presentation by Sonja Stratman: “Growing up under the Swastika.” Stratman, a resident of Twin Lakes, was born in Germany on April 25, 1927, and had no idea that the history books in her school were re-written to favor Hitler and his agendas. Stratman’s one-hour presentation enlightens audiences to the unforgettable events of Germany under the Hitler regime. The Twin Lakes campus is at 9840 Montgomery Road. Call 247-1330.


B2

Tri-County Press

September 2, 2009

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD T H U R S D A Y, S E P T . 3

CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS

Venus and Mars, 7:30 p.m. Wyoming Civic Center, 1 Worthington Ave. Plus-level Western square and round dance club for experienced dancers. $5. Presented by Southwestern Ohio/Northern Kentucky Square Dancers Federation. 929-2427; www.so-nkysdf.com. Wyoming.

FARMERS MARKET

Springdale Farmers Market, 3 p.m.-7 p.m. Springdale Town Center, 11596 Springfield Pike. Fresh produce, baked goods, herbs, meats and honey. Presented by City of Springdale. 346-5712. Springdale.

HEALTH / WELLNESS

Senior Fitness Sampler, 2:30 p.m.-3:30 p.m. Continues Thursdays through Oct. 22. Wyoming Recreation Center, 9940 Springfield Pike, Studio A. Eight-week exercise sampler featuring different styles of exercise each week with certified Senior Fitness Instructor, Melissa Schmit. All fitness levels welcome. Ages 60 and older. Free. Presented by Personal Touch Home Health Services. 207-6406. Wyoming.

HOME & GARDEN

Master Gardener Class, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Continues Thursdays through Nov. 5. Ohio State University Extension Hamilton County, 110 Boggs Lane, Suite 315. Completed application and interview required. $250. Registration required. 946-8998; http://hamilton.osu.edu/. Springdale. How’s Your Well Water? 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Hamilton County Soil and Water Conservation District, 29 Triangle Park Drive. Pick up a sample bottle to test your well water-no municipal-supplied water. Take water sample to be tested, 4 p.m. and 9 p.m. Sept. 11, at the Hamilton County Soil and Water Conservation District’s booth at the Harvest Home Fair. Presented by Hamilton County Soil & Water Conservation District. 772-7645. Springdale. F R I D A Y, S E P T . 4

BARS/CLUBS

Friday Industry Mixology, 7 p.m.-11 p.m. Seecretz Sports Lounge & Grill, 10088 Springfield Pike. Half-off appetizers, drinks $3, VIP and bottle service. Entertainment and music by DJ. Ages 21 and up. 771-5800. Woodlawn.

CIVIC

Computer and TV Recycling Drop-Off, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. 2trg, $20 TVs over 60 pounds, $10 TVs under 60 pounds, free for other items. 946-7766. Blue Ash.

EDUCATION

Fundamentals of Instructor Training, 8:30 a.m.-1 p.m. American Red Cross-Blue Ash Chapter, 10870 Kenwood Road. Course covers American Red Cross history, structure, policies, procedures and activities and develops skills to teach with quality and consistency to diverse populations. Course is mandatory part of any Red Cross instructor course. Ages 18 and up. Free. Registration required. Presented by American Red Cross Cincinnati Area Chapter. 792-4000; www.cincinnatiredcross.org. Blue Ash.

FARMERS MARKET

Greenacres Farm Store, 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Greenacres Farm Store, 891-4227. Indian Hill. Gorman Heritage Farm, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Gorman Heritage Farm, 563-6663. Evendale. Turner Farm, 8:30 a.m.-8:30 p.m. Turner Farm, 574-1849. Indian Hill.

HOME & GARDEN

How’s Your Well Water? 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Hamilton County Soil and Water Conservation District, 772-7645. Springdale.

MUSIC - R&B

Dawn Woods Band, 7:30 p.m.-9:30 p.m. Seecretz Sports Lounge & Grill, 10088 Springfield Pike. 771-5800. Woodlawn.

ON STAGE - COMEDY

Mike Lukas, 8 p.m. $12. Ages 18 and up. Go Bananas, Reservations required. 984-9288; www.gobananascomedy.com. Montgomery. S A T U R D A Y, S E P T . 5

ART & CRAFT CLASSES

Woodworking Demonstrations, 9:30 a.m. Router Basics. Rockler Woodworking and Hardware, 421 E. Kemper Road. Free. 6717711; www.rockler.com. Springdale.

FARMERS MARKET

Gorman Heritage Farm, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Gorman Heritage Farm, 563-6663. Evendale. Turner Farm, 8:30 a.m.-8:30 p.m. Turner Farm, 574-1849. Indian Hill.

FESTIVALS

Russian Festival, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. St. George Russian Orthodox Church, 4905 Myrtle Ave. Russian foods, crafts, jewelry, religious books and icons, music, dancing and children’s activities. Free. 791-6540. Blue Ash.

FOOD & DRINK

Trivia, 7:30 p.m.-9:30 p.m. Through The Garden Restaurant, 10738 Kenwood Road. Chance to win gift certificates and other prizes. Free. 791-2199. Blue Ash.

HAPPY HOURS

Happy Hour, 4:30 p.m.-6:30 p.m. Apsara Restaurant, 554-1040. Blue Ash. Happy Hour, 5 p.m.-6 p.m. Through The Garden Restaurant, 10738 Kenwood Road. Free. 791-2199. Blue Ash.

MUSIC - BLUES

Sonny Moorman Group, 4 p.m.-6 p.m. Guitar Lovers, 7342 Kenwood Road. 793-1456. Sycamore Township.

ON STAGE - COMEDY

Mike Lukas, 8 p.m. $12. Ages 21 and up. Go Bananas, Reservations required. 984-9288; www.gobananascomedy.com. Montgomery. Red Carpet Comedy and Martinis, 8 p.m.10 p.m. With Spike Davis, host and Teddy Carpenter, comedian. Music by DJ Chris Paul until 2 a.m. Seecretz Sports Lounge & Grill, 10088 Springfield Pike. Includes after party, VIP and bottle service. First 20 ladies receive complimentary martinis. Drink specials: Hennessy and Long Island $3. Part of Tickle Me Comedy Series. $10. Reservations required. 771-5800. Woodlawn.

PUBLIC HOURS

Heritage Village Museum, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Heritage Village Museum, $5, $3 ages 5-11. 563-9484; www.heritagevillagecincinnati.org. Sharonville. Glendale Heritage Museum, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Glendale Heritage Museum. Free, donations accepted. 771-4908. Glendale. Gattle’s, 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Gattle’s, 8714050. Montgomery. Gorman Heritage Farm, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Gorman Heritage Farm, $5, $3 ages 3-17 and seniors, free for members. 563-6663; www.gormanfarm.org. Evendale. Sharon Woods Fishing Boathouse, 8 a.m.8 p.m. Sharon Woods. Free fishing, vehicle permit required. 521-7275; www.greatparks.org. Sharonville.

For more about Greater Cincinnati’s dining, music, events, movies and more, go to Metromix.com. Tri-County Mall, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Tri-County Mall, 671-0120; www.tricountymall.com. Springdale. Kenwood Towne Centre, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Kenwood Towne Centre, 745-9100; www.kenwoodtowncentre.com. Kenwood.

SHOPPING

Lolita Pink Ribbon Signing, 1 p.m.-4 p.m. Macy’s, 7800 Montgomery Road. Designer signs “Pink Ribbon” wine and martini glasses. Portion of Lolita’s Pink Ribbon drinkware sales donated to Komen for the Cure. 745-8980; www.komencincinnati.org. Kenwood.

SPECIAL EVENTS

Rubber Duck Regatta Duck Sales, noon-4 p.m. Kroger, 4100 Hunt Road. Purchase ducks for 15th annual Rubber Duck Regatta Sept. 6. Owner of first duck to cross the finish line wins 2010 Honda Insight and chance to win $1 million. Ducks also available online: www.rubberduckregatta.org. Benefits FreestoreFoodbank. Presented by FreestoreFoodbank. 792-1500. Blue Ash.

TOURS

Peterloon Estate Tour, noon-4 p.m. Peterloon Estate, 8605 Hopewell Road. Benefits Cincinnati Preservation Association. $30, $25 members. Registration required. Presented by Cincinnati Preservation Association. 721-4506; www.cincinnatipreservation.org. Indian Hill. S U N D A Y, S E P T . 6

FARMERS MARKET

Gorman Heritage Farm, noon-5 p.m. Gorman Heritage Farm, 563-6663. Evendale.

HAPPY HOURS

Happy Hour, 4:30 p.m.-6:30 p.m. Apsara Restaurant, 554-1040. Blue Ash.

ON STAGE - COMEDY

Mike Lukas, 8 p.m. $8, $4 bar and restaurant employees. Ages 18 and up. Go Bananas, Reservations required. 984-9288; www.gobananascomedy.com. Montgomery.

PUBLIC HOURS

Heritage Village Museum, 1 p.m.-5 p.m. Heritage Village Museum, $5, $3 ages 5-11. 563-9484; www.heritagevillagecincinnati.org. Sharonville. Gorman Heritage Farm, noon-5 p.m. Gorman Heritage Farm, $5, $3 ages 3-17 and seniors, free for members. 563-6663; www.gormanfarm.org. Evendale. Sharon Woods Fishing Boathouse, 8 a.m.8 p.m. Sharon Woods. Free fishing, vehicle permit required. 521-7275; www.greatparks.org. Sharonville. Winton Woods Fishing Boathouse, 8 a.m.8 p.m. Winton Woods, 10245 Winton Road. Ohio state fishing license required. Free fishing, vehicle permit required. Presented by Hamilton County Park District. 521-7275; www.greatparks.org. Springfield Township. Sharonville History Museum, noon-4 p.m. Sharonville History Museum, Creek Road and Main streets. Home to a variety of Sharonville memorabilia, and contains an extensive file collection about area residents, buildings and other places in and around Cincinnati. Free, donations accepted. Presented by Society of Historic Sharonville. 563-9756. Sharonville.

PROVIDED.

Hamilton County Park District is hosting Fall Garden Workshops at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 9, at Glenwood Gardens, 10623 Springfield Pike, Woodlawn. The workshops cover the use of native plants in a landscape, steps in selecting the right tool, the benefits of ornamental grasses and an introduction to vermicomposting. This workshop is “Gardens of the Great Lawn.” The event is open to adults only. The cost is $10 per class; and a vehicle permit is required. Registration is required. Call 771-8733 or visit GreatParks.org.

SUPPORT GROUPS

Learning, Education, Networking, and Support (LENS), 12:15 p.m. Church of the Saviour United Methodist Church, 8005 Pfeiffer Road. Information and support for anyone dealing with mental illness/brain disorder. Presented by National Alliance on Mental Illness of Hamilton County. 3513500. Montgomery. M O N D A Y, S E P T . 7

About calendar

To submit calendar items, go to “www.cincinnati.com” and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to “life@communitypress.com” along with event information. Items are printed on a space-available basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to “www.cincinnati.com” and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page.

HAPPY HOURS

FOOD & DRINK

Happy Hour, 4 p.m.-8 p.m. Old Saloon, 7450654. Kenwood. Happy Hour, 3:30 p.m.-7 p.m. BJ’s Restaurant & Brewhouse, 671-1805. Springdale. Happy Hour, 4:30 p.m.-6:30 p.m. Apsara Restaurant, 554-1040. Blue Ash. Happy Hour, 5 p.m.-6 p.m. Brown Dog Cafe, 794-1610. Blue Ash.

KARAOKE AND OPEN MIC

Karaoke, 8 p.m. Sluggers Rockin’ Sports Cafe, 10765 Reading Road. With DJ Julie J. 9563797. Evendale.

MUSIC - CONCERTS

Blue Ash/Montgomery Symphony Orchestra Labor Day Concert, 6 p.m. Blue Ash Towne Square. Cooper and Hunt roads, Variety of classical works. All ages. Free. Presented by Blue Ash/Montgomery Symphony Orchestra. 232-0949. Blue Ash.

PUBLIC HOURS

Gattle’s, 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Gattle’s, 8714050. Montgomery. Sharon Woods Fishing Boathouse, 8 a.m.8 p.m. Sharon Woods. Free fishing, vehicle permit required. 521-7275; www.greatparks.org. Sharonville. T U E S D A Y, S E P T . 8

ART & CRAFT CLASSES

Colored Pencils with Gamsol, 6 p.m.-8 p.m. Stamp Your Art Out, 9685 Kenwood Road. Learn new colored pencil blending techniques using Gamsol to achieve quick, artful and near watercolor-like effects ideal for your papercrafting projects. $24, supplies additional. Registration required. 793-4558. Blue Ash.

772-3333. Glendale.

Lobster Tuesdays, 5 p.m.-9 p.m. Iron Horse Inn, 40 Village Square. Chef Nathaniel Blanford features lobster dinner special. Reservations recommended.

HOME & GARDEN

How’s Your Well Water? 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Hamilton County Soil and Water Conservation District, 772-7645. Springdale. W E D N E S D A Y, S E P T . 9

CIVIC

Hazardous Waste Drop-Off, 2 p.m.-6 p.m. Environmental Enterprises Inc. 10163 Cincinnati-Dayton Road. Acceptable items include paint, household and auto batteries, thermostats, antifreeze and more. Hamilton County residents only. Proof of residency required. Free. Presented by Hamilton County Environmental Services. 946-7700; www.hamiltoncountyrecycles.org. Sharonville. Computer and TV Recycling Drop-Off, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. 2trg, $20 TVs over 60 pounds, $10 TVs under 60 pounds, free for other items. 946-7766. Blue Ash.

EDUCATION

First Aid/Adult CPR with AED, 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. American Red Cross-Blue Ash Chapter, 10870 Kenwood Road. Learn about first aid and CPR/AED for breathing and cardiac emergencies in adults. $55. Registration required. Presented by American Red Cross Cincinnati Area Chapter. 792-4000; www.cincinnatiredcross.org. Blue Ash.

FARMERS MARKET

Greenacres Farm Store, 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Greenacres Farm Store, 891-4227. Indian Hill. Gorman Heritage Farm, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Gorman Heritage Farm, 563-6663. Evendale. Turner Farm, 8:30 a.m.-8:30 p.m. Turner Farm, 574-1849. Indian Hill.

HAPPY HOURS

Happy Hour, 4 p.m.-8 p.m. Old Saloon, 7450654. Kenwood. Happy Hour, 3:30 p.m.-7 p.m. BJ’s Restaurant & Brewhouse, 671-1805. Springdale. Happy Hour, 4:30 p.m.-6:30 p.m. Apsara Restaurant, 554-1040. Blue Ash. Happy Hour, 5 p.m.-6 p.m. Brown Dog Cafe, 794-1610. Blue Ash. Happy Hour, 3 p.m.-7 p.m. Chi-nnati’s Pizza, 985-4445. Madeira.

HEALTH / WELLNESS

On Our Own, 6 p.m.-8 p.m. American Red Cross-Blue Ash Chapter, 10870 Kenwood Road. For grades 3-6. Participants learn simple rules and procedures to follow to keep themselves safe when home alone. $10. Registration required. Presented by American Red Cross Cincinnati Area Chapter. 7924000; www.cincinnatiredcross.org. Blue Ash.

HOME & GARDEN

How’s Your Well Water? 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Hamilton County Soil and Water Conservation District, 772-7645. Springdale. Fall Garden Workshops, 6:30 p.m. Gardens of the Great Lawn. Glenwood Gardens, 10623 Springfield Pike. Workshops cover use of native plants in a landscape, steps in selecting the right tool, the benefits of ornamental grasses and an introduction to vermicomposting. Adults only. $10 per class; vehicle permit required. Registration required. Presented by Hamilton County Park District. 771-8733; GreatParks.org. Woodlawn.

CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS

Northeast Welcomers, 10 a.m. Good Shepherd Catholic Church, 8815 E. Kemper Road. N.E.W. Social group designed to introduce new residents to the Northeast corridor to the resources of the community. Welcoming coffee and sign-up meeting. Officers and activity chairs will be introduced. $25 yearly membership. Presented by Northeast Welcomers. 489-8815; NEWelcomers.googlepages.com. Montgomery.

FARMERS MARKET

PROVIDED

“Dinosaurs Unearthed,” the third most-attended exhibit at The Cincinnati Museum Center, comes to an end on Monday, Sept. 7. It is the first exhibit in the world to feature a set of full-size, feather-covered dinosaur models. Recent discoveries suggest some dinosaurs may have been covered in feathers for camouflage. Tickets are $15, adult; $10, child. Hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday; 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Friday; 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday; and 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday. Visit www.cincymuseum.org or call 513-287-7000.

Wyoming Farmers Market, 3 p.m.-7 p.m. Wyoming Avenue Farmers Market, Corner of Wyoming and Van Roberts avenues. Local organic and sustainably raised fruit, vegetables, eggs and meat, and carefully produced cottage products. Presented by Wyoming Farmers Market. 761-6263; www.wyomingfarmersmarket.net. Wyoming. Greenacres Farm Store, 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Greenacres Farm Store, 891-4227. Indian Hill. Turner Farm, 8:30 a.m.-8:30 p.m. Turner Farm, 574-1849. Indian Hill.

PROVIDED

Elaine Youngs, pictured, is one athlete scheduled to compete at the AVP Crocs Tournament of Champions at the Lindner Family Tennis Center, Friday, Sept. 4, through Sunday, Sept. 6. Tickets are $5-$90. Visit www.avp.com.


Life

Tri-County Press

September 2, 2009

B3

How do we deal with the unfairness of life? Sooner or later we know that life is not fair. It never was. It never will be. Though that fact infuriates us at times, we are powerless to change it. Rather, it presents us with the challenge of what to do with such a life or with the cynical attitude it often engenders. Even though we may be religious-minded people, God does not step in to make our lives fair. Earth is not heaven. Earth is not where all unfairness is righted. As analyst Robert A. Johnson puts it, “The world is not supposed to work. All it does effectively is produce consciousness.” It is to wake us up before we die. It is to create situations that can potentially form us by how we choose and how our egos deal with the inequities that surround us.

Spiritually we are called upon to discover that life is a mystery and a paradox. We’re forged by it, formed by it, made whole by it. Unfairness is such a part of the fabric of life that the most noble spiritual leaders who have lived among us have all been treated unfairly. In fact, it contributed to their nobility. Are we to expect to be treated better than they? Do they not try to teach us how to transcend unfairness? One of the important questions we must ask ourselves at times – and which serves as an indicator of whether we’re becoming cynical through our experience of unfairness, or more whole – is, “How do I behave in the face of things I cannot change? In the face of things that are obviously unfair?”

One of the best real-life examples in someone else’s life was the example George Will wrote of years ago in Newsweek. It was about his son Jon, the oldest of four children. Jon had just turned 21 years old and his father characterized him as a happy and active young man. Yet a crucial fact was that Jon has Down syndrome. George wrote, “… this is a chromosomal defect involving degrees of mental retardation and physical abnormalities.” Then we wrote of his son’s condition words we might all remember, “Jon lost, at the instant he was conceived, one of life’s lotteries, but he was also lucky. “His physical abnormalities do not impede his vitality and his retardation is not so severe that it inter-

feres with life’s essential joys – receiving love, returning it, and reading baseball box scores. Jon has seen a brother two years younger surpass him in size, get a driver’s license, and leave for college, and although Jon would be forgiven for shaking his fist at the universe, he has been equable. I believe his serenity is grounded in his sense that he is a complete Jon and that is that.” George Will and his family evidently love son Jon very much. He approaches head-on the unfairness of life wrought in their own family, and for Jon, accepting the fact that, through no fault of his own, “Jon lost one of life’s lotteries.” It’s most probable that you and I have already lost some of life’s various lotteries, and may lose some more. Does that need to be

an utter catastrophe? In fact, it is not winning all Father Lou the lotteries that Guntzelman most tests our mettle. Perspectives There’s a short prayer we might offer for ourselves when life’s unfairness gets in our face: “God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, the courage to change the things I can, and the wisdom to know the difference.” Father Lou Guntzelman is a Catholic priest of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati. Reach him at columns@community press.com or contact him directly at P.O. Box 428541, Cincinnati, OH 45242. Please include a mailing address or fax number if you wish for him to respond.

Be on the lookout for moisture conditions in your house Todd said, ‘I don’t k n o w , n e v e r noticed it – t h a t ’ s where the bed has Howard Ain ab lewe an y. s’ Hey Howard! They said w e l l , we’ve got termites,” Debbie said. The termites were in the same spot back in 1999. At the time of that last treatment the Harprings had bought inspection and damage repair plans, so they called the termite treatment company.

“The inspector came out and informed us right away it was not their problem, it was our problem because there’s too much moisture,” Debbie said. The moisture is in the crawlspace underneath their house and it’s that moisture that attracts termites. Yet, the contract with the treatment company specifically excludes coverage if there���s moisture. “I didn’t know if we had moisture before or after. I had no idea because nobody ever said anything to us about moisture being in the crawlspace,” Debbie said. The termite treatment company had conducted

inspections three times a year – but they were only checking a termite baiting system located in areas around the house. No one ever checked under the home, in the crawlspace where the termites had been found in the past. There is an access panel to the crawlspace right out back so no one has to be home for the inspectors to check. Debbie Harpring said she was quite surprised to learn termites are back and that they had done considerable damage to her home. This occurred even though she was supposed to get regular inspections.

“I think that’s what the whole contract is about, they’re supposed to inspect my home to make sure there were no termites – and that was never done,” she said. So I contacted the termite extermination company, which sent out an independent inspector. He found inactive termite mud tubes and signs of other destructive insects still in the crawlspace. He concluded moisture, as well as termites, caused more than $9,300 damage to the house. The termite treatment company told me it values its long relationship with the Harpring family and so has agreed to pay for the full

amount of repairs – both from the termites and moisture – even though it is excluded from its contract. Bottom line, everyone should be aware of, and look out for, any moisture conditions in and around their house – particularly crawlspaces. Moisture can attract termites as well as lead to a number of other problems including mold. Troubleshooter Howard Ain answers consumer complaints and questions weekdays at 5:30 p.m., 6 p.m. and 11 p.m. newscasts on WKRC-TV Local 12. You can write to him at Hey Howard, 12 WKRC-TV, 1906 Highland Ave., Cincinnati 45219.

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When you own a home, it’s always a good idea to get regular termite inspections to prevent possible infestation. But a Tristate couple who got termite treatment 10 years ago, and regular inspections since then, says they were shocked to find termites had returned with a vengeance. Debbie Harpring and her husband, Todd, had bought a termite inspection and protection plan and recently started remodeling their bedroom. “The contractor said, ‘What is that dip in your floor?’ We had to take everything out of the room.


B4

Tri-County Press

Life

September 2, 2009

Reader spills the beans with Napa recipe

I was in a meeting the other day when a colleague told me how nice I looked in my magenta and black suit and trendy peep-toe heels. I had to laugh because had he seen me a few hours earlier in tank top and shorts digging potatoes he might Rita have had Heikenfeld a different opinion. Rita’s kitchen But I think I’m a lot like most of you: one look for the professional side and one for the personal side. It’s the personal side that helps keep me balanced in my high-tech world. I guess that’s why today was a perfect day: up early, feed the chickens, pull weeds from the garden, hang clothes on the line with enough time left to can peaches and make wild elderberry and rose petal jellies.

Labor Day’s almost here and I’ve got some good recipes for your celebration.

Napa Valley baked beans

Indian Hill reader Clare Ackerman shared this recipe recently. “Always a hit,” she said. Stir together: 1 can each: kidney, pinto, baked beans, French cut green string beans (drained) 1 jar chili sauce 1 ⁄2 cup brown sugar 1 tablespoon or so Worcestershire sauce Bake at 325 degrees for about two hours or so, uncovered. Cover when beans start to thicken, stir occasionally.

My attempt at Uno’s salad dressing

Clermont County reader Monica Friedl loves the blueberry pomegranate vinaigrette dressing from

Uno’s in Anderson Township. Rick Arbic, kitchen manager/chef told me the salad is an iceberg and romaine mix and they add cucumber, tomato and onion, a couple ounces of Gorgonzola and some candied walnuts which they purchase from a vendor. Uno’s dressing is from its food service. Rick told me it has blueberry purée, vinegar, sugar, oil, etc. It’s hard to re-create restaurant dishes – that’s why I always tell you to enjoy them there.

1 cup pomegranate blueberry juice (Kroger has it) 1 tablespoon red onion or more to taste White wine or rice vinegar – start with a tablespoon 1 ⁄2 teaspoon garlic minced Salt and pepper 2 tablespoons olive oil or soybean oil (Uno’s contains soybean) or more to taste Reduce juice to 1⁄4 cup. Let cool. Whisk in rest of ingredients.

My candied nuts

Any nut works here. Uno’s uses walnuts 1 egg white from large egg 1 tablespoon water 1 bag nuts (anywhere from 10-16 ounces) 1 cup sugar 1 ⁄2 teaspoon salt Cinnamon if you like – start with a couple good shakes. Preheat oven to 250 degrees and spray cookie sheet. Mix sugar, salt and cinnamon. Set aside. Whisk egg white and water until frothy. Add nuts and coat evenly then toss in sugar mixture until coated. Pour in single layer on sheet and bake 45 minutes to an hour, stirring every 15 minutes. Cool and store covered at room temperature.

“Hakhma” (wisdom), “Ziknah” (maturity) and “Kadima” (forward). The HaZaK programs are for adults 55 and older, and are open to the entire community. The New Horizons Dixieland Band is an ensemble which plays traditional Dixieland-type music. The audience will recognize such favorite tunes as “Basin Street Blues,” “Way Down Yonder in New Orleans,” “Lazy River,” and

“When the Saints Go Marching In.” Other enjoyable selections the Band will play include “Coney Washboard Blues,” featuring a real washboard, and “Bei Mir Bistu Sheyn.” Members of the New Horizons Dixieland Band are also members of the Cincinnati New Horizons Band, sponsored by Buddy Rogers Music. The New Horizons Band offers adult musicians the opportunity to play in a concert band,

JOEL MACKE

TZ DANIEL STUL

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1 ⁄2 to 1 cup feta cheese, crumbled Lemon juice to taste (start with 2-3 tablespoons) 2-3 tablespoons canola oil 3 ⁄4 to 1 teaspoon ground cumin 1 clove garlic, minced (roasted or not) Chopped mint to taste (optional but so good) Salt and pepper to taste

Whisk juice, canola, cumin and garlic together. Taste for seasonings. Cook one cup of quinoa, let it cool and toss with dressing. Stir in mint and feta. Chill.

Can you help?

Rita’s roasted garlic quinoa salad dressing

Carol Yeazell of Springfield Township needs a

Northern Hills to host Dixieland band The New Horizons Dixieland Band will provide the entertainment as Northern Hills Synagogue - Congregation B’nai Avraham resumes its popular HaZaK programs for seniors at noon Wednesday, Sept. 9. This event will take place at the Synagogue, 5714 Fields Ertel Road, between Interstate 71 and Snider Road. Lunch will be served. “HaZaK” is an acronym, with the letters standing for the Hebrew words

recipe for the quinoa salad dressing at Whole Foods in Rookwood. Here’s one I use for quinoa and bulgur wheat salad. I’m thinking a squirt of Dijon mustard would be excellent, too.

sometimes after a hiatus of many years. Banjo player Bill Knabe is the leader and organizer of the New Horizons Dixieland Band. Other members are Bruce Behlow, clarinet; Don Bedwell and John Hager, trumpet; Bruce Knapp, tuba; Helen Rhoad, trombone; Herb Krombholz, drums. and Claire Lee, keyboard. As Lee said, “The band is sure the audience will have as much fun hearing this music as the Band does making it.” There is no charge for the program and lunch, but donations are appreciated. For reservations or more information, call the Synagogue office at 931-6038.

Dressing like Whole Foods puts on their quinoa salad

Readers sound off

Several Northern Kentucky, east- and west-side readers are sure happy with the chocolate zucchini bread recipe: • “The best zucchini bread ever.” • “More like a dense chocolate cake than bread – son loves it.” • “The best thing that’s happened to zucchini.”

Tips from readers’

“Parve” means dairyfree.

Coming soon

Jimmy Gherardi’s lemon blueberry pie Rita Nader Heikenfeld is Macy’s certified culinary professional and family herbalist, an educator and author. E-mail her at columns@communitypress.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Or call 513-2487130, ext. 356. Visit Rita at www.Abouteating.com.

Health department hosts flu clinic The Springdale Health Department is hosting the yearly flu vaccination clinic from 1 p.m. to 7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 24, at the Springdale Community Center, 11999 Lawnview, Springdale. The yearly seasonal flu vaccine will be offered free of charge to individuals with the following insurance cards: Aetna, Advantra Freedom, Humana Gold Choice, WellCare, SummaCare and Medicare Part B (Note: Only if this is your primary insurance that pays for doctor offices visits). If you do not have one of the above insurances, then

you will need to pay for the flu vaccination. For NonSpringdale residents, the cost is $30; for Springdale adult residents the cost is $20. You will be given paperwork that you can submit to your insurance company for possible reimbursement. The yearly seasonal flu vaccine will be free to all children aged 6 months through 18 years old. Flu vaccine against the H1N1 (swine) flu will be available later in the fall. Details will be published later. Call 346-5725 to make an appointment.

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You can vote online now at MomsLikeMe.com/cincycontests NO PURCHASE OR DONATION REQUIRED TO ENTER. ALL FEDERAL, STATE, LOCAL AND MUNICIPAL LAWS AND REGULATIONS APPLY. VOID WHERE PROHIBITED. The Enquirer Lend-A-Hand Baby Idol 2009 Contest is open to Ohio, Indiana and Kentucky residents who are 18 years or older and a parent or legal guardian of a child at the time of entry. Employees of The Enquirer Lend-AHand, The Cincinnati Enquirer, Gannett Co., Inc., and each of their respective affiliated companies, and advertising and promotional agencies, and the immediate family members of, and any persons domiciled with, any such employees, are not eligible to enter or to win. Contest begins at 12:01 a.m. (EST) 8/30/09 and ends at 11:59 p.m. (EST) 10/5/09. Vote for your favorite baby photo by submitting an original ballot with a donation of $.25/vote to Enquirer Lend-A-Hand. Voting will begin at 12:01 a.m. (EST) 8/30/09 and end at 11:59 p.m. (EST) 10/5/09. Vote online at MomsLikeMe.com/cincycontests. Vote in person or by mail: Original Ballots available at in The Cincinnati Enquirer, The Kentucky Enquirer, The Community Press and Recorder in Ohio & KY, and at The Enquirer Customer Service Center M-F, 8 am – 5 pm. One vote per Original Ballot without a donation. Only 1 Original Ballot per person/per day. No facsimiles or mechanical reproductions permitted. Sponsor will not accept more than 27 Original Ballots from one person nor more than 27 Original Ballots in one day from any individual. 1 First Place Winner will receive a $500.00 Kroger gift card, a Cincinnati Zoo Gold Level family membership for the 2010 season (ARV:$164.00), and a $100 Portrait Innovations gift card. 1 Randomly Selected Winner will receive a $500.00 Kroger, a Cincinnati Zoo Gold Level family membership for the 2010 season (ARV:$164.00), and a $100 Portrait Innovations gift card. 1 Runner Up Winner will receive a $500 Kroger gift card. Winners will be notified by telephone or email on or about 10/7/09. Participants agree to be bound by the complete Official Rules and Sponsor’s decisions. For a copy of the prize winners list (available after 10/11/09) and/or the complete Official Rules send a SASE to Baby Idol 2009 c/o The Enquirer, 312 Elm Street, Cincinnati, OH 45202 or contact Kristin Garrison at 513.768.8135 or at kgarrison@enquirer.com.


Community

Tri-County Press

September 2, 2009

B5

Some things you just have to live with

Kids, teens achieve superstar status More than 28,000 readers of all ages – preschoolers, kids, teens, parents, grandparents, and other adults – discovered the pleasures of reading together during the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County’s 36th annual Summer Reading program. From June 1 to July 31, they explored the riches of books, attended fun programs, and won prizes just for having fun reading. This summer’s “Creature Feature” theme captured the imaginations of preschoolers, kids and teens. They encountered creatures of all kinds between the covers of books and inperson at the Library’s creepy crawly programs like “Wildlife Comes to You” with the Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden. Upon completing the final level of the program,

more than 17,000 of these sensational summer readers earned the treasured book prize and proudly displayed their “A Library Superstar Lives Here” yard signs for all to see. Together, the entire family experienced the power of the Public Library’s summer reading program. Overall program participation increased by nearly 6 percent from last year. Plus, by actually participating alongside the Library Superstars in their lives, adults generated superstar powers of their own and became Reading Role Models. Research suggests that seeing adults engaged in reading for pleasure is one of the best ways to promote childhood literacy and help children grow into happy, productive, and literate adults.

PROVIDED.

PROVIDED.

Nathan Young is the winner of the grand prize for preschoolers at the Sharonville Branch Library. Librarians at the Branch entered his name in the drawing to win a Tough Trike after he completed four levels of “Creature Feature,” the Public Library’s 36th annual summer reading program.

Sharonville Branch Teen Librarian Miki Kitchkowsky presents Elizabeth Garduno with the grand prize for teens, a $25 gift card to Target. Librarians at the Sharonville Branch entered this Library Superstar’s name into the drawing for the grand prize Target gift card after she completed four levels of “Creature Feature,” the Public Library’s 36th annual Summer Reading Program.

“What is this yellow stuff growing in my mulch?” That slimy stuff is called “dog bark fungus” and really isn’t a fungus, but is a slime mold. When the weather is just right, this stuff shows up in the mulch, and can actually slime its way onto the tree trunks and up the side of the foundation. Again, a very natural occurrence, and there are no controls for it. Just fluff it up and let it dry, or scoop it up and throw it away. “I have mushrooms popping up in my lawn. What can I do?” When mushrooms appear in the lawn or on the landscape beds, there’s really not a whole lot you can do. They are just a natural

part of the decomposing process. So as any type of organic matter is breaking down in Ron Wilson the soil, and In the the weather garden c o n d i t i o n s are right, mushrooms can appear. Decaying roots from a tree, small twigs, grass blades, any organic debris in the soil, mulch, even soil amendments can result with a few mushrooms popping up. So what can you do to prevent them? Not a whole lot. Fungicidal sprays aren’t really recommended for control, and it would be almost impossible to remove the organic matter from the soil (You actually want organic matter in your soil). If you pick them and throw them away, you may prevent some of the spores from spreading, but those spores are spread long distance in the winds, so that really doesn’t help much. The only reason I can see to collect them and throw them away is to keep them away from the kids and the pets, as some mushrooms can be toxic. So when you see mushrooms, step on them, mow them, pick and throw away if you want. And if you’re a golfer, I say get out the clubs and practice your swings on the mushrooms. I mean, hey, they’re already teed up and ready to hit. “I have a limey green grass that grows faster than the other grass. I also see it in my landscape beds.

Plant of the week

OK, all you Buckeye fans, so you’d like to grow your own buckeyes, but just don’t have the room for a buckeye tree? No frets, as I have the perfect answer for you! Aesculus parviflora, or commonly known as Bottlebrush Buckeye. And it’s not a tree, but instead a large growing shrub! And way underused in the landscape, if I must say so myself. Bottlebrush Buckeye has the same gray brown stems and palmately compound medium green leaves as the Buckeye trees, but will grow to about 8-10 feet in height and width – as a suckering multi-stemmed shrub – so give it plenty of room to spread out. And it’ll grow in the sun or the shade! Bottlebrush Buckeye flowers in late June and early July with 8- to 12-inch long cylindrical white flowers that resemble a bottlebrush. It gives a very nice show of color that time of the year. As the flowers fade, the traditional buckeye nuts begin to appear, and will ripen in late September and early October. These are easily grown from seed, but you must collect the seeds just as they begin to fall to the ground in late September, and sow them fresh from the tree. If you wait until later in the fall, the seeds typically will not grow. What is it, and how do I get rid of it?” It’s called nutgrass and can be one of the toughest weeds to get rid of. Nutgrass, or sometimes called watergrass or nutsedge, isn’t really a grass – it’s a sedge – and a tough one to get rid of. It grows faster than grass, has the limey green color, and loves low poorly drained areas, although it will grow just about anywhere. It is a perennial, and reproduces from seed, tubers and nutlets, which makes it so hard to get rid of. So how do you tackle it? Hand pulling the younger plants may have some control, but once the tubers and nutlets have formed underground, pulling becomes a waste of time. But you can dig them out, making sure you get the plant, tubers, nutlets and all. In open landscape beds, spot treating with Roundup, Kleenup or Sedgehammer works best – and be sure to

the Humane Center at 11900 Conrey Road. Admission is free. The top five funniest pets will compete for the title of “Cincinnati’s Funniest Pet” at 2 p.m. in the dog training room. To enter send a nonreturnable DVD of your pet’s hilarious hijinks by Tuesday, Sept. 7. For more information and a registration form, visit www.spcacincinnati.org. In addition to all the laughter, there will also be

Ron Wilson is marketing manager for Natorp’s Inc. Garden Stores and is the garden expert for 55KRCAM and Local 12. You can reach him at columns@communitypress.com

Sisterhood to feature sex therapist The Sisterhood of Northern Hills Synagogue-Congregation B’nai Avraham will kick off its programming year Sunday, Sept. 13, with a special program featuring Jill W. Bley, a noted local clinical psychologist and sex therapist. The event will begin at 10 a.m. in the Zorndorf Social Hall of the Synagogue, located at 5714 Fields-Ertel Road, between Interstate 71 and Snider Road. Following a continental breakfast and a brief business meeting, Dr. Bley will speak on “Multi-generational Female Sexuality,” focusing on the physical and emotional aspects of female sexuality from infancy to the golden years. A discussion period will follow. Bley received her Ph.D. from the University of Cincinnati, and was affiliat-

ed with the university as an adjunct associate professor of psychology from 1982 until 1994. During that time she taught sex therapy to graduate students in psychology. She was a founder of Women Helping Women/ Rape Crisis Center. Bley became certified as a sex therapist in 1982 and a sex therapy supervisor in 1988 by the American Association of Sex Educators, Counselors and Therapists. She is a co-editor and author of “Innovations in Clinical Practice: Focus on Sexual Health,” published in 2007. Bley has held a number of position with the Cincinnati Psychological Association, and served as president in 1991. There is no charge for Sisterhood members. Nonmembers are welcome to

attend. A $5 donation is appreciated. Reservations by Sept. 8 are requested.

WE NOW /C! HAVE A

food, a dunking booth, free giveaways, on-site dog nail trimming services (proceeds go to SPCA Cincinnati), and an appearance by Jessica Byington, Miss Teen International. Byington is from Indian Hill. Parking will be available at Stewart Elementary School (across the street on the School Road side.) If you have any questions or would like to be a vendor or sponsor for this fun event, call Carol Ferris at 4897392.

For more information or to make a reservation, call the Synagogue at 9316038.

We can handle it all . . . from socks to comforters!

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OPEN 24 HOURS

COME IN OUT OF THE HEAT! WE NOW HAVE AIR CONDITIONING.

Greenhills Laundromat 6 ENDICOTT

in the Greenhills Shopping Center around the corner on the south side

Make SPCA howl with laughter Is your cockatoo crazy? Is your feline funny? Is your wiener dog just downright weird? Then the SPCA Cincinnati wants you to record your pet being silly, performing a great trick, or just looking goofy. SPCA Cincinnati is looking for Cincinnati’s funniest pets to help celebrate the first “birthday” of the Sharonville Humane Center at the Bark Day Bash Sunday, Sept. 13. The Bark Day Bash will be from noon to 4 p.m. at

use a surfactant for better results. But it will take repeated applications. Spray it, kill it, and if it regrows, spray again. Spray only the nutgrass. In the lawn, there are several chemicals that list nutgrass, but I like Sedgehammer the best. Again, use with a surfactant. Spot treat the lawn as needed (only spray the infected areas), and watch for regrowth and a possible followup spray. NOTE: For optimum control, you must use a surfactant to help these chemicals work. Basically the surfactant helps the chemicals stick to the waxy slick foliage of the nutgrass, which in turn gives you better results, and less repeated spraying.

Expires 9/8/09

0000354311

PROVIDED.

Jack Betz is the winner of the grand prize for kids at the Sharonville Branch Library. Librarians at the Sharonville Branch entered his name in the drawing to win a one-year basic family membership to the Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden after he completed four levels of “Creature Feature,” the Public Library’s 36th annual summer reading program. Pictured with Jack are his parents, Steve and Michelle, and his big sister Jillian.

Let’s take a moment and answer some of your great gardening questions! “What is that blue green stuff growing on my tree trunks, and how do I get rid of it?” That blue-green stuff is very common and it’s called lichens. It’s an unusual combination of algae and fungus growing together on the top of the plant’s bark. No, lichens will not harm your tree and no, it doesn’t mean your tree is dying. But, lichens enjoy the sun, and if by chance your tree or plant is declining, so that there are fewer leaves and more sunlight hitting the lichens, they will respond by growing more vigorously. But again, lichens are a very common thing, will not harm the tree, and there’s no real reason to try and get rid of it.


B6

Tri-County Press

Community

September 2, 2009

REUNIONS Anderson High School Class of 1954 – is conducting its 55th year reunion, Friday, Sept. 11, Saturday, Sept. 12 and Sunday, Sept. 13. For details call Wayne Wykoff at 513-321-7109, or Kirs Schwegler Wilshire at 859-441-7560. From 7-10 p.m., Friday, the group will meet at AJ’s Roadhouse. On Saturday, at 7 p.m., the group will meet at Vito’s Restaurant in Ft. Thomas and on Sunday, there will be a picnic at noon at Woodland Mound Park off Nordyke Road. Glen Este High School Class of 1989 – is having a reunion from 711 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 12, at Receptions Eastgate (Biggs Plaza). Go to www.alumniclass.com/gleneste, or the Facebook page under “Glen Este Class of 1989 Reunion” for more details, or call Melanie Sturgeon at 513-688-1886. The Woodward High School Class of 1959 – is having its 50th reunion the weekend of Sept. 12. For information, contact the Web site at www.woodward59.com. The Amelia High School Class of 1969 – is having its 40th year class reunion from 6 p.m. to midnight, Saturday, Sept. 12, at Hilltop Reception Hall, 2141 Ohio 125,

(Old DX Ranch). Cost is $30 per person. The class is inviting any other classes that would like to attend. Listed below are classmates needed for correct mailing/e-mail information. Contact Nancy Knox at njpinger@roadrunner.com or 513876-2859, or Kathy Baker at kathymomrose@hotmail.com. Denise Bein-Nailor, Stephen Gail Brooks, Phillip Craig, Albert Delisle, Gary Frazee, Tom Garcia, Ben Gillespie, Daryl Gilliland, Sharon Goins-Angel, Alvis Gary Hastings, Michael Hogue, Peggy Jones-Robinson, Paul Kendall, Joncey Ladd, Penny Mason, James McCracken, Stuart Edward Mentz, Robert Nolte, Carol Pearson-Boehm, Carl Ramsey, Ray Eugune Short, Jeff Smith, Ruby Snider, Gary Stone, Doug Waddle and Danny Wilson. Withrow High School Class of 1944 – Will celebrate the 65th anniversary of its graduation with a reunion luncheon on Wednesday, Sept. 16, at the Touch of Elegance, 5959 Kellogg Ave. Any class members and families of that year are invited to attend. Contact Bob McGrath at 513-871-3631, or e-mail him at RMGrath@fuse.net. St. Dominic Class of 1969 – is having its 40th reunion from 8 p.m. to

midnight, Friday, Sept. 18, at St. Dominic O’Connor Hall. Cost is $20 per graduate or $25 per couple, and includes soft drinks, chips/pretzels and wine and beer. BYOB is permitted. RSVP by emailing stdominicclass1969@ zoomtown.com, or by contacting Sharon Lipps Holtz at 859-4412980, or Marcia Hammersmith Wechsler at 513-451-3775. Clermont Northeastern Class of 1999 – will celebrate its 10-year reunion Friday, Sept. 18. Organizers are still looking for some classmates. Contact Maryann Huhn at 859-391-3375, or e-mail cne1999@yahoo.com. Include name, e-mail address, mailing address and telephone number. Princeton High School Class of 1959 – is having its 50th reunion from 6-10 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 19, at the Mill Race Banquet Center, Winton Woods. Contact “Tooter” Jan Adams at 513-729-0066 or John Adams at jadams4990@aol.com. St. Dominic Class of 1985 – is having a reunion from 6:30-10:30 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 26, in O’Connor Hall at St. Dominic Church. In addition, there will be a 4:30 p.m. Mass, followed by a

tour of the school. If members of the class have not been contacted about this event, or for information or to make reservations, call Gayle Dreiling Campbell at 245-1228. Email stdominicclassreunion85@ gmail.com for information.

planning a 50-year reunion for Oct. 10. If you are a member of the class or know someone who was, please call either Eleanor (Kraft) McSwiggin at 513-941-4619, Bob Honkomp at 513-921-3762 or Jack Lisk at 513-921-3670.

Glen Este Class of 1969 – is conducting its 40th reunion on Sept. 26 at Ivy Hills Country Club. From 7-8 p.m. is a reception and cocktail hour. Dinner is 8-9 p.m. From 9 p.m. to midnight is reminiscing, dancing and fun. From 6 p.m., Friday, Sept. 25, the class is having a tour of the school. Meet at the flag poles in front of the high school. Game starts at 7:30 p.m. Those who are in this class and haven’t been contacted are asked to notify Cathy Wilmers Recker at 513265-1283.

Hughes High School Class of 1969 – is planning to celebrate its 40year reunion on Saturday, Oct. 24, with a dinner/dance at the Grove of Springfield Township. Classmates from the classes of 1967, 1968 and 1969 will be the hosts of this reunion. To make this the “Reunion of the 60s Decade” we are inviting other alumni classes from 1965 through 1969 to join in. Come out for a fun evening of catching up with old friends, dining and dancing. Help is needed to find lost classmates. If you are an interested member of these classes or know of anyone who is, for more information and to register, contact Julia Caulton at 513-742-5916.

The Bellevue High School Class of 1969 – is looking for graduates and close friends to celebrate the 40th anniversary of its graduation. The reunion is being planned for the weekend of Oct. 2 in Bellevue. Anyone knowing graduates or wishing further information should contact sandrawetzel@cinci.rr.com. The 1959 graduating class of Resurrection School – in Price Hill is

Amelia High School Class of 1959 – a reunion is scheduled for 6 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 7, at the Holiday Inn, Eastgate. Call Rosalind (Fell) MacFarland at 513-752-8604. Our Lady of Perpetual Help – is having a reunion for all graduates

RELIGION Ascension Lutheran Church

INDEPENDENT BAPTIST Friendship Baptist Church 8580 Cheviot Rd 741-7017 Gary Jackson, Senior Pastor Sunday School 10:00am Sunday Morning Services 8:45 & 11:00am Sunday Evening Services 6:30pm Wednesday Service 7:00pm AWANA (Wed) 7:00 - 8:45pm Well staffed Nursery, Active Youth & College Groups, Exciting Music Dept, Seniors Group, Deaf Ministry www.friendshipbaptistcincinnati.org

LUTHERAN Trinity Lutheran Church, LCMS 5921 Springdale Rd 1mi west of Blue Rock

Rev Lyle Rasch, Pastor

Worship 10:30 am Sunday School: 9:20 am Traditional Service and Hymnbook

www.lutheransonline.com/joinus

385-7024

Trinity Lutheran Church (ELCA)

BAPTIST

“Growing Closer to God, Growing Closer to Neighbor” www. trinitymthealthy.org 513-522-3026

Creek Road Baptist Church

1553 Kinney Ave, Mt. Healthy

3906 Creek Rd., Sharonville, Cincinnati, OH 513-563-2410 elder@creekroad.org Sunday School 9:30am Sunday Worship 10:45am, 6:00pm Wednesday Worship 7:00pm Pastor, Rev. David B Smith

Worship: 8:30 am traditional - 11 am contemporary Sunday School: 9:45 am Nursery provided

ROMAN CATHOLIC

Christ, the Prince of Peace

St. Martin Dr Porres Catholic Church

9927 Wayne Ave * Lincoln Hts, Ohio 45215 513-554-4010 Pastor: Fr Thomas Difolco African American in History & Heritage Roman Catholic in Faith & Practice Services: Saturday at 7:00p & Sunday at 10:00a You are always welcome at St. Martin de Porres

CHRISTIAN CHURCH DISCIPLES Mt. Healthy Christian Church (Disciples of Christ)

7717 Harrison Ave Mt. Healthy, OH 45231 Rev. Michael Doerr, Pastor 513-521-6029 Sunday 9:00 a.m...... Contemporary Service 9:45a.m...... Sunday School 10:45 a.m........ Traditional Worship Nursery Staff Provided “A Caring Community of Faith” Welcomes You

EPISCOPAL Christ Church Glendale Episcopal Church 965 Forest Ave - 771-1544 christchurch1@fuse.net www.christchurchglendale.org The Reverend Roger L Foote The Reverend Laura L Chace, Deacon 8am Holy Eucharist I 9am Holy Eucharist II 11am Holy Eucharist II Child Care 9-11 Healing intercessory prayer all services

Seek Jesus Share Jesus Serve Jesus

St. Stephen’s Episcopal C hurch 9191 D aly R oad, Springfield Tw p., 522-8628 w w w .s ts te p h e n s -c in c i.o rg The R ev’d D avid B. Bailey, Pastor Sum m er Schedule: June thru August Sunday, 8am & 10:30am Holy Com m union W ed. 7pm Evening Prayer First Sat. of each m onth, 10am Outdoor Stations of the Cross

LUTHERAN Christ Lutheran Church (LCMS)

Pastor Todd A. Cutter

UNITED METHODIST United Methodist Church 10507 “Old” Colerain Ave (513)385-7883 Rev. Joe Hadley, Pastor Church School for all ages 9:15am Worship 10:30am - Nursery Available www.cpop-umc.org “Small enough to know you, Big enough to care”

CHURCH OF THE SAVIOUR 8005 Pfeiffer Rd Montgmry 791-3142 www.cos-umc.org "Entering God’s Presence"

Traditional Worship 8:20am & 11:00am Contemporary Worship 9:40am Sunday School (All ages) 9:40 & 11am

FOREST CHAPEL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 680 W Sharon Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45240

513-825-3040

Traditional Service: 8:30 & 11:00am ConneXion Contemporary Service: 11:00am Sunday School: 9:30am

Monfort Heights United Methodist Church

3682 West Fork Rd , west of North Bend Traditional Worship 8:30 & 11:00am Contemporary Worhip 9:44am

Nursery Available * Sunday School 513-481-8699 * www. mhumc.org Spiritual Checkpoint ... Stop In For An Evaluation!

Mt Healthy United Methodist Church

Corner of Compton and Perry Streets 931-5827 Sunday School 8:45 - 9:45am Traditional Worship 10:00 - 11:00am Contemporary Worship 11:30 - 12:30 Healing Service, last Sunday of the month at 5 pm "Come as a guest. Leave as a friend".

Sharonville United Methodist

Faith Lutheran Church

NON-DENOMINATIONAL

Sunday School 10:15 9:30 am Traditional Service 11:00 am Contemporary Service

4695 Blue Rock Road Colerain Township South of Ronald Reagan and I-275 923-3370 www.hopeonbluerock.org

EVANGELICAL PRESBYTERIAN EVANGELICAL COMMUNITY CHURCH

Sunday School Hour (for all ages) 9:15 - 10:15am Worship Service - 10:30 to 11:45am (Childcare provided for infants/ toddlers) Pastor: Rich Lanning Church: 2191 Struble Rd Office: 2192 Springdale Rd

3751 Creek Rd.

513-563-0117

www.sharonville-umc.org HIGHVIEW CHRISTIAN CHURCH “Life on Purpose in Community” 2651 Adams Rd. (near Pippin) Worship Assembly-Sunday 10:45am Phone 825-9553 www.highviewchristianchurch.com

VINEYARD CHURCH NORTHWEST COLERAIN TOWNSHIP Three Weekend Services! Saturday - 5:30 pm Sunday - 9:30 & 11:15 am 9165 Round Top Rd (1/4 mi. so. of Northgate Mall)

513-385-4888 www.vcnw.org

50th Anniversary

542-9025

Visitors Welcome www.eccfellowship.org

PRESBYTERIAN Northminister Presbyterian Church 703 Compton Rd., Finneytown 931-0243 Transforming Lives for Jesus Christ Sunday Worship Schedule Traditional Services: 8:00 & 10:15am Contemporary Services: 9:00 & 11:30am Student Cafe: 10:15am Childcare Available Jeff Hosmer & Nancy Ross- Zimmerman - Pastors

Nursery Care Provided

8:15 & 11am Traditional Service & Kingdom Kids 9:30am Contemporary Worship & Sunday School 7:00pm Wednesday, Small Groups for all ages Infant care available for all services

HOPE LUTHERAN CHURCH

Christ Church Glendale

Dr. Cathy Johns, Senior Pastor Rev. Doug Johns, Senior Pastor

3301 Compton Rd (1 block east of Colerain) 385-8342 Sunday School & Bible Class (all ages) 9:45am Sunday Worship 8:30 & 11:00am Saturday Evening Worship 5:30pm A great community church in a great community! Also home to Little Bud Preschool 385-8404 enrolling now! Visit our website: www.church-lcms.org

8265 Winton Rd., Finneytown www.faithcinci.org Pastor Robert Curry Contemporary Service 9am Traditional Service 11:00am

NON-DENOMINATIONAL

Ascension’s Sunday worship service is at 10 a.m. Sunday school and adult forum begin at 9 a.m. A nursery is provided during the worship service. The church is hosting the Fall Chamber Concert Series. On Saturday, Sept. 26, the 16-year-old 2009 World Piano Competition winner, David Mamedov, will be

performing in concert. Former Metropolitan Opera soloist Blythe Walker, soprano, and former European opera soloist, David Bezona, tenor, will be performing Saturday, Oct. 17. The final concert of the fall season will feature the choirs of Sycamore High School, Kenneth Holdt directing, Saturday, Nov. 21. All concerts are free and will begin at 7 p.m. (A free-will donation will be accepted.) The church is at 7333 Pfeiffer Road, Montgomery; 793-3288; www.ascensionlutheranchurch.com.

Northwest Community Church 8745 Cheviot Rd, by Colerain HS 513-385-8973 Worship and Sunday School 10AM Handicap Accessible/Nursery Available

Salem White Oak Presbyterian

Stanley and Donna Mae (Berry) Wernz celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary on August 29. Donna Mae (of Ashridge, Brown County, OH) and Stan (of Greenhills) were married at Peace Lutheran Church, Arnheim, Brown County, OH by the late Rev. William F. Frey. They currently reside in Wyoming, OH.

NILLES POINTE BAPTIST CHURCH

50TH ANNIVERSARY Sept 13, 2009 11AM, Former members welcome.

The feast of St. Francis of Assisi, Christ Church Glendale will host an ecumenical Blessing of the Animals Sunday, Oct. 4. Clergy from St. Gabriel’s Roman Catholic Church, the First Presbyterian Church in Glendale, the Glendale New Church and Christ Church Glendale will participate. The service will begin at 2 p.m. on the church lawn at the corner of Forest and Erie avenues in Glendale. Following a brief service of prayer and song the clergy will bless pets individually. All pets must be on a leash or in a cage. E-mail christchurch1@fuse.net. The church is at 965 Forest Ave., Glendale; 771-1544; www.christchurchglendale.org.

Church of the Saviour United Methodist

Senior Adults meet at 5 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 9. Bring your own bag supper or call ahead for dinner reservations by Monday, Sept. 7. A new Moms Group is forming. They will meet from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Monday, Sept. 21, or from 7 to 9 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 22. Ladies Lunch Bunch meets at 11:30 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 5, to carpool to the lunch spot. Call 792-9222 for reservations. Haiti Mission Trip 2010: Sign-ups are being taken for an adult mission trip to Haiti in February 2010. Call the church office for details.

Church By The Woods (USA) Sun Worship 10:00am Childcare Provided 3755 Cornell Rd 563-6447 www.ChurchByTheWoods.org ............................................

Taiwanese Ministry 769-0728

2:00pm

3:00pm

UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST FLEMING ROAD United Church of Christ 691 Fleming Rd 522-2780 Rev Pat McKinney

MT. HEALTHY NIGHT OWL BINGO

Mt. Healthy High School Cafeteria 2046 Adams Rd. Mt. Healthy - 729-0131

WED. NIGHT ONLY

Sunday School - All Ages - 9:15am Sunday Worship - 10:30am

Doors Open 6:00 pm Bingo Starts 6:55 pm • No Computers Guaranteed $3500 Payout With 150 Players or More

Nursery Provided

St. Paul United Church of Christ 5312 Old Blue Rock Rd., off Springdale

Pastor: Jessica Taft 385-9077 Sunday Worship: 10:30am Sunday School: 9:15am

Nursery Available/Handicap Access

www.stpaulucccolerain.org

St Paul - North College Hill

931-2205 6997 Hamilton Ave Rev. Virginia Duffy, Interim Minister Lollie Kasulones, Minister for Program Evelyn Osterbrock, Minister for Children Sundays: Music & Announcement 9:45am Worship at 10:00am Sunday School and Child Care Nurtured And Fellowship Groups For All Ages www.stpaulnch.org

MT. NOTRE DAME H.S. - EVERY TUESDAY EVE. SmokeFree Bingo Do O ors 5:00pen pm

711 East Columbia • Reading PROGRESSIVE GAME $7600 & GROWING

aries Prelimin Start 6:45

specials Call Cathy at 513-494-1391 to get on mailing list for monthly specials. Ca

Save the Animals Foundation BINGO

11330 Williamson Rd. off Cornell, in Blue Ash TUESDAY & FRIDAY Evenings - Doors Open 6pm

Preliminary Games 7:00pm - Reg Games 7:30pm OVER 25 DIFFERENT INSTANTS

To place your

BINGO ad call 513.242.4000 or 859.283.7290

from 7-11 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 7, at St. William’s Church Undercroft, West Eighth and Sunset avenues, Price Hill. Cost is $15 per person and includes soda, beer, chips, pretzels, bartender, hall rental and music by Jerry “Tiger” Iles. Donations given to Santa Maria Community Services, Sedamsville Civic Association and other organizations. Graduates are asked to bring a snack to share. Last names from A to M are asked to bring appetizers. Names from N to Z are asked to bring desserts. Mail reservations to Pat Oates Telger, 4125 Pleasure Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45205. Include name, name of spouse or guest, address, phone number, e-mail address, year graduated and a check for $15 made out to Pat Telger. For questions, call Marlene Mueller Collinsworth, 513-921-0620; Cathy Boone Dryden, 859-282-1788; Katky Oates Finkelmeier, 513-451-4392; Jane Corns Garrett, 513-451-7420; Jenny Corns Newman, 513-4518787; Judy Oates Paff, 513-9228708 or Telger at 513-251-4507. St. Dominic Class of 1988 – reunion is being rescheduled for at a date and place to be determined. E-mail Angela (Fischer) Seiter at angelaseiter@hotmail.com.

About religion

Religion news is published at no charge on a spaceavailable basis. Items must be to our office no later than 4 p.m. Wednesday, for possible consideration in the following edition. E-mail announcements to tricountypress@communitypre ss.com, with “Religion” in the subject line. Fax to 248-1938. Call 248-8600. Mail to: Tri-County Press, Attention: Teasha Fowler, Religion news, 394 Wards Corner Road, Suite 170, Loveland, Ohio 45140. Vendors are needed for the Fall Craft Show from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 7. Crafters and vendors are invited to call the church for details. Senior Men meet at 11:30 a.m. Tuesdays at the church. Bring your lunch and enjoy the fellowship. The church is at 8005 Pfeiffer Road, Montgomery; 791-3142; www.cos-umc.org.

Forest Dale Church of Christ

Toby and Amy Hill will be visiting the church for all of the morning worship services Sunday, Sept. 6. The Hills run a medical clinic and teach in the Merendon Mountains of Honduras, where recent political events are expected to impact their work. The Hills will speak at the 9 a.m. and 11 a.m. worship services and will report on their work at 10 a.m. More information about their visit is posted at www.myspace.com/fdccgrapevine. Visit http://Merendon.net. The church is at 604 West Kemper Road, Springdale; 825-7171.

Hartzell United Methodist Church

The church is hosting a Fish Fry from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 19. The menu consists of all-youcan-eat Icelandic cod, mac and cheese, coleslaw, bread, dessert and drink. The cost is $9 for adults, $4 for ages 5-10, and free for ages 4 and under. There will be a variety of bid-and-buy baskets for a silent auction. At the conclusion of the evening, bidding will be suspended and winners will be notified. The church is at 8999 Applewood Drive, Blue Ash; 891-8527.

New Church of Montgomery

The church conducts worship at 10:30 a.m., Sundays and Divine Providence Study Group the first four Sundays of the month from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. The church is located at 9035 E. Kemper Road, Montgomery; 4899572.

Sharonville United Methodist Church

Sharonville United Methodist Church has services; 8:15 a.m. and 11 a.m. are traditional worship format, and the 9:30 a.m. service is contemporary. SUMC welcomes all visitors and guests to attend any of its services or special events. The church is at 3751 Creek Road, Sharonville; 563-0117.

Sycamore Christian Church

Sunday Worship Service is at 10:30 a.m. Bible Study is at 9 a.m. every Sunday. The church is hosting Ladies WOW Study Group at 7 p.m. the second Wednesday of every month. The event includes light refreshments and a study of Beth Moore’s “Stepping Up.” The church hosts Adult and Youth Bible Studies at 7 p.m. every Wednesday. The church is at 6555 Cooper Road, Sycamore Township; 891-7891, www.sycamorechristianchurch.


Community

Tri-County Press

September 2, 2009

B7

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES Animals/ Nature

Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Garden – needs volunteers in the volunteer education program. Volunteers will receive training, invitations to special events and a monthly newsletter, among other benefits. There are numerous volunteer opportunities now available, including: “Ask Me” Station Program, Slide Presenters Program, Tour Guide Program, Animal Handlers Program, CREW Education Program. Each area has its own schedule and requirements. Certified training is also required. Must be 18 or older and have a high school degree or GED diploma. For more information, call the zoo’s education department at 559-7752, or e-mail volunteereducator@cincinnatizoo.o rg, or visit www.cincinnatizoo.org. Grailville – needs volunteers for the garden in Loveland. Volunteer days are 9 a.m.-noon selected Saturdays through November. For a complete list visit www.grailville.org or call 683-2340. Volunteers will work in the kitchen and herb gardens. No experience is needed, volunteers may participate once or for the entire season. Volunteers should bring gloves, water bottle, sunscreen, hat, footwear that can get dirty and a snack if desired. Tools are provided. Granny’s Garden School – needs help in the garden. Granny’s is growing produce for needy families in the area, with support from the Greenfield Plant Farm. Greenfield Plant Farm donated their surplus tomato and green pepper plants to the Granny’s Garden School program. Granny is seeking help with maintaining the gardens, planting and harvesting more produce. Granny’s is at Loveland Primary School, 550 Loveland-Madeira Road. Call 324-2873 or e-mail schoolgarden@fuse.net, or visit www.grannysgardenschool.com. GRRAND – Golden Retriever Rescue and Adoption of Needy Dogs takes in needy displaced, abandoned or unclaimed stray golden retrievers and places them in volunteer foster homes until adoptive families are found. Call 1-866-981-2251 and leave your name and phone. Visit www.ggrand.org. E-mail www.cincygrrand@yahoo.com. League For Animal Welfare – A no-kill shelter, needs volunteers 16 and older to help socialize cats and 18 and older to socialize and walk dogs. Other opportunities available. Call 735-2299, ext. 3. Save the Animals Foundation – Needs people 18 and older to staff its shelter for homeless cats and dogs. Call 378-0300 for cats and 588-6609 for dogs. Tri State County Animal Response Team (CART) – Is at 11216 Gideon Lane in Sycamore Township. Meetings are open to the public. Visit www.tristatecart.com for monthly subjects or more information. Call 702-8373.

Education

Change a life – Volunteer to tutor an adult with low-level literacy skills or GED preparation needs. Call 621READ. Cincinnati Reads – a volunteer tutoring program working with K-4 students in Cincinnati Public Schools. Volunteers receive free training to work one-on-one with children who are struggling to read. Call 621-7323 or e-mail Jayne Martin Dressing, jdressing@lngc.org. Clermont 20/20 – and its college access program, Clermont Educational Opportunities, offer a mentoring program that matches adults to work with a group of high school students from local high schools. Volunteers are needed to become mentors to help students stay in school and prepare to graduate with a plan for their next step. Call Terri Rechtin at 753-9222 or 673-3334 (cell) or e-mail mentor@clermont2020.org for more information. Granny’s Garden School – Volunteers needed from 1-3 p.m. Wednesdays to work on behind-thescenes projects. Volunteers also needed to help with developing Web pages. Call 489-7099; Granny’s Hands-on Gardening Club is looking for new gardeners, to work with garden manager Suellyn Shupe. Experienced gardeners, come to share your expertise and enjoy the company of other gardeners while supporting the Granny’s Garden School program times: 1:30-4 p.m. Mondays; 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. The school is located at the Loveland Primary and Elementary, 550 Loveland-Madeira Road. E-mail schoolgarden@fuse.net or visit www.grannysgardenschool.com. Great Oaks Institute of Technology and Career Development – Volunteers are needed for Adult Basic and Literacy Education classes and English to Speakers of Other Language classes. There are numerous sites and times available for volunteering. The next training date is from 1-6:30 p.m, Wednesday, Sept. 2. Call 612-5830. Inktank – Group looking for volunteers to help children and adults improve their skills in writing-based initiatives across the city. Call 5420195.

Raymond Walters College – Needs volunteers to serve as tutors to skills enhancement students. The class meets from 1-4 p.m. Wednesdays and from 5-8 p.m. Thursdays. Call 745-5691. Winton Woods City Schools – Wants to match community members who are interested in volunteering in the schools with the students. Volunteer opportunities at Winton Woods Primary North and South, middle school and high school. Volunteers who would have oneon-one contact with students outside of a classroom are required to have a background check. To volunteer, contact Gina Burnett at burnett.gina@wintonwoods.org or 619-2301. The YMCA of Greater Cincinnati’s Black Achievers Program that inspires and encourages teens of color toward paths of success is looking for caring professionals who want to make a difference, and for young people who can benefit from positive adult role models. Part of a national YMCA initiative, the local program incorporates mentoring, career exploration and college readiness; and helps students develop a positive sense of self, build character, explore diverse college and career options. Volunteers, many of whom are sponsored by area companies, share their own personal insight and encouragement. Contact Program Director Darlene Murphy at the Melrose YMCA, 961-3510 or visit www.myy.org. YMCA – The Ralph J. Stolle Countryside YMCA is looking for volunteer trail guides for school groups. Call 932-1424 or e-mail melittasmi@countrysideymca.org.

Entertainment

Business Volunteers for the Arts – BVA is accepting applications from business professionals with at

Notice of Public Auction In accordance with the provisions of State Law, there being due and unpaid charges for which the undersigned is entitled to satisfy an owner’s lien of goods hereinafter described and stored at Uncle Bob’s Self-Storage location(s) listed below. And, due notice has been given, to the owner of said property and all parties known to claim an interest therein, and the time specified in such notice for payment of such having expired, the goods will be sold at public auction at the below stated location (s) to the highest bidder or otherwise disposed of on Monday, September 21, 2009 at 11:00 A.M. at 11378 Springfield Pike, Springdale, OH 45246, 513771-5311. Friedman Swift, 110 Boggs Lane (Suite 200)Cincinnati, OH 45246; Office records; Fr ie dm an Swift, 110 Boggs Lane, Cincinnati, OH 45246; Office Records; Peter Rhodes, 55 Tucker Ln., Newport News, VA 23606; Household goods; Susan Maus, 313 Stockton Dr., Loveland, OH 45140; Household goods, furniture, boxes, sporting goods, tools, TV’s or Stereo Equip; Angela Huddleston, 12160 Lawnview Ave., #1, Springdale, OH 45246; Household goods, furniture, boxes; Friedman Swift, 110 Boggs Lane (Suite 200) Cincinnati, OH 45246; Office records; L u c r e t i a Lowe, 1810 Washington Circle, Cincinnati, OH 45215; Furniture, boxes, toys; F r i e d m a n Swift, 110 Boggs Lane, Cincinnati, OH 45246; Company furniture. 1495623

least three years experience, interested in volunteering their skills within the arts community. Projects average six to eight months in length and can range from marketing or accounting to Web design or planning special events. A one-day training program is provided to all accepted applicants. Call 871-2787. Center for Independent Living Options – Seeking volunteers to staff Art Beyond Boundaries, gallery for artists with disabilities. Volunteers needed noon to 4:30 p.m. Tuesday through Friday, and noon to 5 p.m. Saturday. Call 2412600. Cincinnati Museum Center – Needs volunteers to work in all three museums, the Cincinnati History Museum, the Museum of Natural History and Science and the Cinergy Children’s Museum, and special exhibits. Call 287-7025.

Health care

Alzheimer’s Association – Volunteers are being asked to move in support of the fight against Alzheimer’s disease at the Greater Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky Memory Walk. Organizers of the annual fundraising event, which will be Saturday, Oct. 3 at the P&G Pavilion at Sawyer Point, are currently recruiting volunteers to serve on the planning committee and to assist with logistical needs. Planning committee co-chairs for this year’s Memory Walk are Becky Reynolds of Saturn of Western Hills and Mark Cawley of Cawley Chiropractic Health Center in Boone County. Anyone interested in assisting in the planning of the Memory Walk are asked to call Reynolds at 699-4900 or Cawley at 859-525-2222. Serving as the primary national fundraiser for the Alzheimer’s Association, Memory Walk is an annual event that brings those affected by Alzheimer’s, family

PUBLIC SALE NANCY BLAKELY PO BOX 6746 CINCINNATI, OH 45206 ROOM# 120 TABLES BOXES CHAIR MATTRESSES MICROWAVE STORAGE TUBS. THOMAS NELMS 1036 MARSHALL AVE CINCINNATI, OH 45225 ROOM# 131 STORAGE TUBS STORAGE CRATES COOLER. CASSANDRA MOORE 4224 WILLIAMSON AVE CINCINNATI, OH 45223 ROOM# 172 TV STORAGE TUBS BEDFRAME TABLES BOXES. NATHAN CUNNINGHAM 1729 GRAND AVE. CINCINNATI, OH 45214 ROOM# 94 EXERCISE EQUIPMENT CHAIRS TURNTABLE SHELVING UNIT RUGS BOXES BAGS. DJUANA WHITE 830 BEECHER ST CINCINNATI, OH 45206 ROOM# B19 DRESSER TV MONITOR MATTRESSES BAGS BOXES. MAURICE COLLINS 28 EHRMAN AVE CINCINNATI, OH 45229 ROOM# B39 DOORS WINDOWS TILE CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL. LAMONICA CALHOUN 739 CHAFFONTE PL CINCINNATI, OH 45229 ROOM# B43 CHAIRS BAGS AQUARIUM BOXES TABLE DRESSER STORAGE TUB. WILLIE COMAN 1425 SECTION RD. CINCINNATI, OH 45237 ROOM# B48 CHAIRS BOXES LOVESEAT TABLE. THE ABOVE ARE HEREBY NOFIFIED THAT THEIR GOODS STORED AT U-HAUL 2320 GILBERT AVE CINCINNATI, OHIO 45206, WILL BE SOLD AT PUBLIC AUCTION ON SEPTEMBER 14TH, 2009 AT OR AFTER 9AM. 1001495124 PUBLIC SALE EDGAR CHRISTIAN III 830 FAIRBORN CINCINNATI, OH 45240 ROOM# 136 TABLES SECTIONAL COUCH BOXES CLOTHES STATUE FRAMED PICTURE. STEPHANIE SMITH 6125 CARY AVE CINCINNATI, OH 45224 ROOM# 137 COUCH MATTRESSES TABLE BEDFRAME DESKCHAIR TOYS BOXES MICROWAVE. JOHN COLLINS 2616 WEST NORTHBEND CINCINNATI, OH 45239 ROOM# 164 MATTRESSES SPEAKERS 2 TV’S DRESSERS TABLES COUCH BOXES CHAIR. SHANA GRAY 5467 KIRBY RD CINCINNATI, OH 45223 ROOM# 186 BUNKBED FRAME BASKET. STEVEN CARTER 2500 QUEENS CITY AVE CINCINNATI, OH 45238 ROOM# 196 STEREO MICROWAVE PRINTER BAGS BOXES TABLES SUITCASE STORAGE TUBS. KATHY COOPER 5465 KIRBY RD 1 CINCINNATI, OH 45223 ROOM# 236 COUCH LOVESEAT DESK DRESSER BIKE DRYER WASHER TV STORAGE TUBS CHAIR MATTRESSES. MURSE D LACKEY 6048 TAHITI DR CINCINNATI, OH 45224 ROOM# 273 CREDENZA TABLES BOXES STORAGE CRATES DESK BOOKS CORNER BOOKCASE. MARY KRAUS 706 EAST ST HARRISON, OH 45030 ROOM# 289 TABLES REFRIDGERATOR SWEEPERS BEDFRAMES CHAIRS BOXES BAGS DRESSER. TRACIE WILSON 10173 CREST LN CT CINCINNATI, OH 45246 ROOM# 308 DRESSER HEADBOARDS TABLES STEREO PLANT STAND BOXES TOYS BABY ITEMS. DARREN SMITH 5465 KIRBY AVE NORTHSIDE, OH 45223 ROOM# 309 MATTRESSES HEADBOARD ENTERTAINMENT CENTER REFRIDGERATOR COMPUTER DRESSER SPEAKERS BAGS STORAGE TUBS. THE ABOVE ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED THAT THEIR GOODS STORED AT U-HAUL, LOCATED AT 9178 COLERAIN AVE CINCINNATI, OH 45239, WILL BE SOLD AT PUBLIC AUCTION ON SEPTEMBER 14TH, 2009 AT OR AFTER 9AM. 1001495125

CQI manager and communications coordinator, at 735-8123 or, Kim King, administrative assistant at 735-8144. Destiny Hospice – is seeking caring and compassionate people to make a difference in the life of a person living with terminal illness. No special skills or experience needed; simply a willingness to help provide comfort and support. Orientation is scheduled to fit the volunteer’s schedule. Opportunities are available throughout the Cincinnati, Middletown and Butler County area. Contact Anne at 554-6300, or ababcock@destinyhospice.com. Evercare Hospice and Palliative Care – is seeking volunteers in all Greater Cincinnati communities. Evercare provides care for those facing end-of-life issues and personal support to their families. Volunteers needed to visit with patients and/or assist in administrative and clerical tasks. Volunteers may provide care wherever a patient resides, whether in a private home or nursing facility. Call 1-888-866-8286 or 682-4055. Heartland Hospice – Seeking people with an interest in serving terminally ill clients and their families. Volunteers are needed for special projects such as crochet, knitting, making cards, and lap robes, as well as to make visits to patients. Training provided to fit your schedule. Call Jacqueline at 731-6100, and Shauntay 831-5800. Hospice of Southwest Ohio – Seeks volunteers to help in providing hospice services, Call 770-0820, ext. 111 or e-mail ajones@hswo.org. Hoxworth Blood Center – Hoxworth is recruiting people to help during community blood drives and blood donation centers in the area. Positions include: Blood drive hosts, greeters, blood donor recruiters and couriers. Call Helen Williams at 558-

members and community together in a show of love, remembrance and support. Participants can register online at www.alz.org/cincinnati. For more information on how to register a fundraising team, contact Marcy Hawkins, Special Events coordinator, at 721-4284 or e-mail: marcy.hawkins@alz.org. American Diabetes Association – Seeks volunteers in its area office located downtown for clerical support, filling requests for educational materials from phone requests, data entry, special events support and coordinating the Health Fair. Call 759-9330. American Heart Association – Volunteers needed to assist with the American Heart Association’s cause campaigns, Power to End Stroke, Go Red For Women, Start!, and the Alliance for a Healthier Generation. Assignments include clerical work, event specific duties and community outreach. Contact the American Heart Association at 281-4048 or e-mail ray.meyer@heart.org. Bethesda North Hospital – Seeks volunteer musicians for music therapy, featuring soothing music. Call 8710783 or e-mail bnxmusic@fuse.net. Also openings for volunteers in various areas. Call 745-1164. Captain Kidney Educational Program – Needs volunteers one or more mornings or afternoons a month during the school year to educate children in first through sixth grades about kidney function and disease. Training provided. Call 961-8105. Clermont Recovery Center – Needs volunteers to fill positions on the board of trustees. Clermont County residents interested in the problem of alcohol or drug abuse, especially persons in long-term recovery and their family members, are encouraged to apply. Contact Barbara Adams Marin,

1292 or helen.williams@uc.edu. The Jewish Hospital – 4777 E. Galbraith Road, Kenwood, needs adult volunteers to assist at the front window in the pharmacy and also to assist with clerical duties, sorting patient mail, etc. They also need volunteers to assist staff in the family lounge and information desk and a volunteer is also needed in the Cholesterol Center, 3200 Burnet Ave., to perform clerical duties. Shifts are available 9 a.m.7 p.m. Monday through Friday. Volunteers receive a free meal ticket for each day he or she volunteers four or more hours, plus free parking. Call 686-5330. The hospital also needs adult volunteers to assist MRI staff and technologists at the reception desk of the Imaging Department in the Medical Office Building, located across from the hospital at 4750 East Galbraith Road. Volunteers are also needed to assist staff in the family lounge and at the information desk in the main hospital. Shifts are available Monday through Friday. Call 686-5330. Mercy Hospital Anderson – Seeks volunteers for the new patient services team, the Patient Partner Program. This team will provide volunteers with the opportunity to interact directly with the patients on a non-clinical level. Volunteers will receive special training in wheelchair safety, infection control, communication skills, etc. The volunteers will assist in the day-to-day non clinical functions of a nursing unit such as reading or praying with the patient; playing cards or watching TV with the patient; helping the patient select meals; running an errand; cutting the patient’s food. Call the Mercy Hospital Anderson Volunteer Department at 624-4676 to inquire about the Patient Partner Program.

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Tri-County Press

THE

September 2, 2009

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BIRTHS

DEATHS

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POLICE

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REAL

Editor Dick Maloney | rmaloney@communitypress.com | 248-7134

ESTATE

Your Community Press newspaper serving Evendale, Glendale, Sharonville,Springdale, Wyoming

communitypress.com

POLICE REPORTS

EVENDALE

Arrests/citations

Michael Harrison, 31, 24 E. North St., theft at 2831 Cunningham Dr., Aug. 13. Quentin Wallace, 46, 11343 Lippelman, theft, receiving stolen property at 11343 Lippelman, Aug. 13. Jonathan Seiter, no age given, 2385 Bethelmaple, theft, criminal damaging at 1000 Sycamore, Aug. 16.

GLENDALE

Arrests/citations

Eric Shropshire, 39, 4834 Shagbark Ct., operating a motor vehicle without a valid license, Aug. 20. Juan Prather, 38, 7 Creekwood Square, operating a motor vehicle while under suspension, Aug . 20. Camila Stroud, 23, 2960 High Forest Lane, operating a motor vehicle while under suspension and warrant from Elmwood Place, Aug. 21. Catherine Stroud, 39, 18 Matthews Ct., warrant for failing to appear in Mayor’s Court, Aug. 21. Jorge Movales, 26, 2486 Queen City Ave., operating a motor vehicle without a valid license, Aug. 22. Khaleef Smith, 20, 1571 Pleasant Run Drive, warrant for failing to appear in Mayor’s Court, Aug. 23. Gaspar Ailon, 33, 71 Princeton Square Ci., operating a motor vehicle without a valid license, Aug. 24.

Incidents/investigations Property damage

Rocks and other items thrown at car while on southbound Interstate 75, Aug. 22.

SHARONVILLE

Arrests/citations

DEATHS Luke Albert Walker Sr.

Aug. 12. Charles Slaughter Jr., 26, 6728 Montgomery Rd., possession at Econolodge, Aug. 13. Travarius Smith, 23, 3547 Beldare Ave., disorderly conduct intoxicated at 11379 Lippelman Rd., Aug. 5. Christopher Prater, 37, 6 Shenandoah K, domestic violence at 10900 Reading Rd., Aug. 6. Ricky Barrett, 32, 308 Henrysuchle Terrace, passing bad checks at 1688 E. Kemper Rd., Aug. 13. Christopher Dunn, 21, 2712 Erlene Dr., disorderly conduct intoxicated at 11620 Lebanon Rd., Aug. 15. Thomas Nelms, 58, 2811 Warsaw Ave., theft at 11755 Mosteller Rd., Aug. 15. Nicholas Dickerson, 27, 3370 Walnut, criminal damaging at 2468 E. Sharon Rd., Aug. 15. Brad Stropes, 22, 23 Woods View, disorderly conduct intoxicated at 11620 Lebanon Rd., Aug. 15. Michael Phelps, 30, 505 N. Cooper Ave., possession of drugs at 3850 Hauck Rd., Aug. 16. Mitchell Robinson, 19, 431 E. Benson St., receiving stolen property at 431 E. Benson St., Aug. 14. Jorge Vazquiez, 37, 3861 Woodward Blvd., disorderly conduct intoxicated at 11369 Lippelman Rd., Aug. 14. Shawana Chapman, 23, 433 Knight Bridge Dr., theft at 12035 U.S. 42, Aug. 16. Niki Knight, 25, 1112 Lane St., theft at 12035 U.S. 42, Aug. 16.

removed at 11701 Bedivere Ct., Aug. 17. Vehicle removed at 11785 Caerleon Ct., Aug. 17. Spouts valued at $1,250 removed at 32 Triangle Office Park, Aug. 17. $17.36 removed at 2391 E. Sharon Rd., Aug. 15. $1,000 removed from vending machine at 11499 Chester Rd., Aug. 14. Camera valued at $300 removed at 11320 Chester Rd., Aug. 12. Purse and contents of unknown value removed at 3000 E. Sharon Rd., Aug. 11. GPS valued at $250 removed at 11320 Chester Rd., Aug. 11.

Theft, criminal damaging

GPS, currency, clothing valued at $770 removed at 11499 Chester Rd., Aug. 11.

SPRINGDALE

Arrests/citations

Christiana Cromer, 18, 3624 Ohio 28, theft at 300 Kemper Rd., Aug. 13. Jonhnell Mckinney, 22, 9756 Arvin Ave., theft at 11700 Princeton Pk., Aug. 31. Juvenile Female, 17, theft at 11700 Princeton Pk., Aug. 13. Mario Cintron, 26, 477 Wood Duck Dr., criminal trespassing at 10270 Springfield Pk., Aug. 14. Patrick Hill, 18, 1143 Van Buren, robbery at 1200 Chesterwood Ct., Aug. 15. Jeremy Welch, 19, 1442 Wabash, robbery at 1200 Chesterwood Ct., Aug. 15. Michael Williams, 19, 10035 Bowlingbrook, obstructing official business, disorderly conduct at 11700 Princeton Pk., Aug. 15. David Baldrick, 28, 238 Pedretti, driving under the influence, Aug. 15. Clifford Retzsch, 58, 5717 Gamay, soliciting at 12150 Springfield Pk., Aug. 16. Amanda Smail, 26, 1233 Kenneth Ave., prostitution at 12105 Springfield Pk., Aug. 16.

Incidents/investigations Breaking and entering

Trailer entered at 11388 Lebanon Rd., Aug. 16. Air compressor valued at $7,500 removed at 11413 Enterprise Park Dr., Aug. 17.

Burglary

Greggory Sinclair, 27, 7238 Creekview Dr., theft at 3000 E. Sharon Rd., Aug. 11. Miguel Sebastian, 25, 2121 Apache Dr., identity fraud at 11177 Reading Rd., Aug. 11. Victor Sebaston, 21, 2121 Apa, identity fraud at 11177 Reading Rd., Aug. 11. William Fugate, 31, 1312 Wiley Ave., domestic violence at 11320 Chester Rd., Aug. 8. Alisha Phelps, 21, 5950 Trowbridge, drug abuse at 4001 Hauck Rd.,

Game system, games, phone of unknown value removed at 11643 Timber Ridge, Aug. 12.

Criminal damaging

Windows valued at $50 removed at 11590 Lebanon Rd., Aug. 14.

Disorderly conduct

Reported at 11620 Lebanon Rd., Aug. 15.

Receiving stolen property

Reported at 11320 Chester Rd., Aug. 16.

Theft

Sheet metal valued at $100 removed at 2649 Commerce Blvd., Aug. 17. GPS unit and phone valued at $400

TENN

ESSE

E

Jenny Eilermann

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BeautifulBeach.com leads you to NW Florida’s Beach Vacation Rentals along the beaches of South Walton. Luxurious gulf-front homes, seaside condos and cottages. Dune Allen Realty, 50 yrs of excellent service and accommodations. 888-267-2121 or visit www.BeautifulBeach.com

Beautiful Seagrove Beach Rent & Relax. Nr Destin, between famous Seaside & Rosemary Beach. Cozy Cottages to Gulf Front Condos. Web Specials. 1-800-537-5387 www.garrettbeachrentals.com

Incidents/investigations Burglary

Residence entered and tools and recreational equipment of unknown value removed at 515 Canvasback Ci., Aug. 15. Garage door damaged at 668 Cedarhill Dr., Aug. 17.

Criminal mischief

Eggs thrown at residence at 670 Cedarhill Dr., Aug. 17.

EVENDALE

Reported at Greencastle Dr., Aug. 10. Reported at Observatory Dr., Aug. 11. Reported at Lawnview and Springfield, Aug. 12.

Evendale Office Condominiums LLC to L. & L. Of Cincinnati LLC; $224,700. 10199 Reading Rd.: Neyer Evendale Car Wash LLC to Agile Pursuits Inc.; $1,250,000.

Reported at 12105 Lawnview Ave., Aug. 12.

GLENDALE

Domestic

Menacing Theft

Fishing equipment valued at $225 removed at 942 Chesterdale, Aug. 10. Reported at 11470 Springfield Pk., Aug. 10. Cover of mirror valued at $140 removed at 11711 Princeton Pk., Aug. 10. GPS unit of unknown value removed from vehicle at 100 Kemper Rd., Aug. 10. Books and book bag valued at $235 removed at 12105 Lawnview Ave., Aug. 11. Counterfeit traveler’s check recovered at 11700 Princeton Pk., Aug. 11. Scooter of unknown value removed at 11999 Lawnview Ave., Aug. 12. $18,000 taken at 1340 Kemper Rd., Aug. 13. Purse and contents valued at $450 removed at 11700 Princeton Pk., Aug. 14. Merchandise valued at $500 removed at 11700 Princeton Pk., Aug. 15. $700 taken and services not received at 12105 Lawnview Ave., Aug. 16.

About obituaries

Basic obituary information and a color photograph of your loved one is published without charge. Call 248-7134 for a submission form. To publish a larger memorial tribute, call 242-4000 for pricing details. West Chester, Ohio, 45069; or Hospice of Cincinnati, P.O. Box 633597, Cincinnati, Ohio, 45263-3597.

REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS

Criminal damaging

513.768.8614

Bed & Breakfast

THE DOOLIN HOUSE INN. Premier Inn. Gourmet breakfast. Minutes from Lake Cumberland. Join us for a romantic weekend/women’s retreat. 606-678-9494 doolinhouse.com

Paul Gebell, 21, 162 Woodstock, theft at 12105 Lawnview Ave., Aug. 17. Michael Harris, 37, 1182 Stableview Ci., theft at 1100 Kemper Rd., Aug. 17.

Luke Albert Walker Sr., 93, of Sharonville died Aug. 25. Survived by wife of 56 years, Dotty Bush Walker; children, Luke A. “Pat” Walker and Linda K. Hott; grandchildren, Nathan and Michael Hott, and Kathleen and Kristine Walker. Services were Aug. 29 at Mihovk-Rosenacker Funeral Home, 10211 Plainfield Road (just south of Glendale-Milford Road). Memorials to: American Diabetes Association, 8899 Brookside Ave., Suite No. 2,

15 Little Creek Ln.: Fifth Third Mortgage Co. to Hilling Gregory T. & Deborah K.; $415,000.

SHARONVILLE

10672 Turfwood Ct.: Winstel John R. & Mary J. Meyer to Fogelson Catherine S. & Mark E.; $162,000. 10784 Bridlepath Ln.: Fuchs Rebecca J. @3 to Bucheit Brett A. & Teresa A.; $165,000. 10951 Timberwood Ct.: Ryberg Betty L. to Eveland Christine M.; $150,000. 3762 Creek Rd.: Miller Diana N. & Martin G. to Federal Home Loan Mortgag Corp.; $42,000. 3762 Creek Rd.: Miller Diana N. &

About real estate transfers

Information is provided as a public service by the office of Hamilton County Auditor Dusty Rhodes. Neighborhood designations are approximate. Martin G. to Federal Home Loan Mortgag Corp.; $42,000.

SPRINGDALE

11998 Marwood Ln.: Harville Oliver Paul Jr. & Stephanie A. to New York Mellon Bank Of T; $124,695. 12000 Bridgeport Ln.: Copeland Sean L. & Audrey to J.P. Morgan Mortgage Acquisition Corp; $104,000.

WYOMING

512 Oak Ave.: Asberry Leatta to Wyoming Community Improvement Corp.; $100,000.

Follow Community Press sports on Twitter twitter.com/cpohiosports

Travel & Resort Directory

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Visit a “medieval castle” on a high hilltop on 115 secluded and forested acres of the most beautiful area of Southeast Ohiothe Hocking Hills! Owners Sue & Jim Maxwell are creating the most unusual guest experience of stepping back 800 years in a reconstruction of a “12th century Norman castle.” The Maxwells have traveled throughout England & Scotland & have always loved castles & the medieval era. Although the building is new, the couple has been collecting architectural antiques for several years. Each guest room or suite has a stained glass window, usually in the bedroom, a Victorian fireplace mantel with a gas log unit, antique light fixtures and some have beautiful old doors. The wood mouldings around the door & windows & the 5 stairways are inspired by centuries old motifs from Great Britain’s stately homes & castles. Most rooms also have a French door with a balcony, private deck overlooking the forest. There are also “medieval” themed cottages with fireplaces and whirlpools. Ravenwood has

its own food service for guests, so they can spend their entire visit immersed in solitude if they wish, surrounded by tall trees, huge rocks, the castle‘s own hiking trails and plenty of peace and quiet. Or guests can drive the few miles to outside attractions & other dramatic scenery in the Hocking Hills. Ravenwood offers popular “murder mystery” weekends and also plans “medieval dinners”, getaway workshops, and other special events. Facilities are also perfect for small weddings and other festive occasions. The building has no steps into the 1st floor level - a “drawbridge” leads from the driveway to the massive front door and the first floor guest rms. Nearby are caves, waterfalls, lots of hiking trails, a scenic railway, arts & crafts studios & shop, antique malls and much more. There are often midweek discounts and a special “Royal Family” Adventure Package in the summer.

For info call 800-477-1541 or visit www.ravenwoodcastle.com

FLORIDA

FLORIDA

CLEARWATER - Indian Rocks Beach 2br, 2ba Gulf Front condo. Heated pool, balcony. Many up grades. 513-771-1373, 260-3208 www.go-qca.com/condo

DESTIN. Edgewater Beach Condos on the Gulf. 1-3 BR, beachfront, pvt balconies, FREE Wi-Fi, beach set-up (in season) & use of new fitness ctr. New massage/facial salon, 2 pools (1 heated), FREE $20 gift cert to pool grill (weekly rentals in season). Call or visit our website for lastminute specials. 800-822-4929 www.edgewaterbeach.com

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MARCO ISLAND The Chalet, 3 Bdrm, 3 Ba, on the beach. Pool, tennis, beautiful sunsets. Three month rental minimum. Avail Nov. thru April for $7000/mo. Local owner. 513-315-1700

MICHIGAN

1-7 Affordable, Deluxe Chalets & Cabin Rentals. Pigeon Forge in the Smokies. Vacation/Dollywood Specials. Free brochure. Call 1-800-833-9987. www.firesidechalets.com

LEELANAU VACATION RENTALS Over 120 condos, cottages and homes on Lake Michigan, Glen Lake and other inland lakes. Call 231-334-6100 or visit www.leelanau.com/vacation

NEW YORK MANHATTAN--NYC HOTEL $129/2 persons. Singles $124. Suites $139-$159. Lincoln Ctr area, Hudson River views, 18 flrs, kitchenette, 5 mins to midtown, safe, quiet, luxury area. RIVERSIDE TOWER, Riverside & 80th St. Call 1-800-724-3136 or visit: www.riversidetowerhotel.com

NORTH CAROLINA EMERALD ISLE. Ocean Front luxury vacation homes with community pool. Call for free brochure. 800-245-7746 Spinnaker’s Reach Realty www.SpinnakersReach.com

SOUTH CAROLINA Hilton Head Island, SC

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SANIBEL ISLAND Quality, beachfront condos. Excellent service! Great rates! www.SanibelIslandVacations.com 1-888-451-7277

TENNESSEE

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