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TRI-COUNTY PRESS

Your Community Press newspaper serving Evendale, Glendale, Sharonville, Springdale, Wyoming

50¢

WEDNESDAY, MAY 30, 2012

BECAUSE COMMUNITY MATTERS

Students lead charge in Relay Duo organizes Wyoming event By Kelly McBride kmcbride@communitypress.com

Though they will be graduates by the time Wyoming’s Relay For Life takes place, Seth Gold and Allanah Jackson will continue to lead the effort they helped initiate at their school. In past years, Wyoming has participated in Princeton’s Relay For Life, but when students decided to hold their own event last year, they established a policy and made a promise. Under the 10-10-10 policy, students were asked to spend 10 minutes, donate $10 and bring 10 friends to the fundraiser event June 1 and 2. The promise: “You will have tons to do,” Jackson said. Relay For Life raises funds for cancer research. During the 24-hour event, team members take turns walking laps around a track. It starts with a survivor lap, during which cancer survivors and their caregivers are recognized. After dark, a luminary ceremony honors those who lost their fight against cancer. Jackson is the relay chairperson, as well as student body president, said more than 100 people have signed up to participate. Gold participated last year. “I fell in love with it,” he said. “It was an unbelievable

experience. “I want to help the American Cancer Society,” Gold said. “That’s why I got involved.” The two students will attend college in the fall, and both plan to pursue occupations that impact public wellbeing. Gold plans to study public health and economics at George Washington University. Jackson will study human and organizational development at Vanderbilt University. Gold has shown his leadership as an athlete, as well, as captain of the school’s cross country team, which qualified for the state meet for only the second time in school history. Social studies teacher Travis Glendenning is also Wyoming’s cross country coach. “The thing that makes Seth special is his willingness to put other people before himself,” Glendenning said. “He focuses on goals that are bigger than the individual,” he said. “His work ethic made the team better.” Math teacher Matt Harms has enjoyed having Gold in his class. “Seth brings a wonderful attitude to my class and is always brightening the atmosphere with his smile, wit and ability to communicate with myself and the other students,” he said. Jackson turned a free period into a project that will continue to raise money for cancer research. See RELAY, Page A2

Mason helps Charles Hiser navigate the halls of Princeton High School. KELLY MCBRIDE/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Music, moxie, Mason guide Hiser Princeton senior sees a clear path for future

By Kelly McBride kmcbride@communitypress.com

For Charles Hiser, obstacles are simply opportunities to overcome. The Princeton High School senior was born with a vision impairment. He attended Evendale Elementary, where he learned early to cut his own path. Hiser had tested into the hon-

ors program, but wasn’t included “because they thought I couldn’t do it.” The student, who became bored in class, didn’t understand why. Through his own determination and advocacy of his mom, Hiser was placed in an advanced curriculum. He remains in the accelerated track today. Hiser is taking three advanced placement classes in his

senior year, and has been involved in music since thirdgrade. That’s when he joined the Cincinnati Boychoir. Three years later, he learned to play the violin. “I threw myself into music,” Hiser said. “It gave me the opportunity to be recognized.” When he entered high school

STAND AND DELIVER B1

success.

More than 100 volunteers made the annual Rockwern Passover Delivery project another

Princeton High School honors former baseball star Josh Harrison June 5. See Story, B5

PROUD PIRATE

See HISER, Page A2

Contact The Press

Wyoming High School cross country team captain Seth Gold and student author Allanah Jackson lead the way with the school’s Relay for Life. KELLY MCBRIDE/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Collection time In the next few days your Community Press carrier will be stopping by to collect $2.50 for delivery of this month’s TriCounty Press. Your carrier retains half of this amount along with any tip you give to reward good service. This month we’re featuring Henry Kuechly. Henry is an eighth-grader at St. Nicholas Academy and the youngest of three boys. He likes to fish, hunt and play basketball, and is a eucharistic

News ..........................248-8600 Retail advertising ..............768-8196 Classified advertising .........242-4000 Delivery ........................576-8240 See page A2 for additional information

minister and server at his church. In his spare time, he is a caddy. This is his third year as a carrier. For information about our Kuechly carrier program, call circulation manager Steve Barraco at 248-7110, or email him at sbarraco@communitypress.com.

Vol. 28 No. 39 © 2012 The Community Press ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


NEWS

A2 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • MAY 30, 2012

Hiser

cane for a partner, a dog named Mason. “There are advantages and disadvantages,” Hiser said. “The dog also screws up sometimes. “At times, he tells me something, but I’m not listening to him. “Before, I was able to trail along the walls, and feel things with tactile input and my cane,” he said. “Now, I trust the dog.”

Though they are on a constant learning curve, Mason has helped Hiser move more efficiently. “The biggest advantage is that he’s able to guide me and help me get around,” he said. “I don’t have to stand around and figure it out.” Hiser’s love of music has led him to the stage as a cast member of Princeton’s musical “Joseph and the

TRI-COUNTY

Relay

Find news and information from your community on the Web Evendale • cincinnati.com/evendale Glendale • cincinnati.com/glendale Sharonville • cincinnati.com/sharonville Springdale • cincinnati.com/springdale Wyoming • cincinnati.com/wyoming Hamilton County • cincinnati.com/hamiltoncounty

As an independent study, she wrote a book for children in grades one through four. “The Little Girl and Her Two-Pocket Dress” takes a little girl on an imaginary adventure during a car ride to her grandmother’s house. She slips into her pockets treasures from each of her adventures, until she realizes that she really wants to be at her grandma’s house, pulling out two chocolate chip cookies. English teacher Danica White oversaw Jackson’s independent study. “Allanah is a very determined young lady,” White said. “When she came to me, I didn’t have to do much because she took it on herself and did all the hard work. “She is mature, dedicat-

ed and a great role model.” Latin teacher Todd Wegenhart has taught both students. “Both are incredibly intelligent and sensitive learners, and have been leaders in my classroom,” Wegenhart said. “Both excel at sacrificing themselves and their time for the growth, development and improvement of others. “They are certainly leaving big shoes to fill.” As they leave high school, both students hope others will carry on with Relay For Life, as well as other efforts that help those who are suffering. “My mom jokes that I want to save the world,” Gold said. “But you can help, and make the world a little better. “I have a chance to help people, and that appeals to me.” » More Grade A Graduates, A2

Index

Continued from Page A1

Calendar .................B2 Classfieds .................C Food ......................B3 Life ........................B1 Police .....................B8 Schools ..................A5 Sports ....................A6 Viewpoints .............A8

in 2008, his vision had deteriorated further, making navigation of a new environment even harder. “It took some getting used to,” the Springdale resident said, but his cane and his friends kept him on track. This year, he traded his

PRESS

Continued from Page A1

News

Dick Maloney Editor ......................248-7134, rmaloney@communitypress.com Kelly McBride Reporter ...................576-8246, kmcbride@communitypress.com Leah Fightmaster Reporter ..............248-7577, lfightmaster@communitypress.com Melanie Laughman Sports Editor .......248-7573, mlaughman@communitypress.com Nick Dudukovich Sports Reporter .......248-7570, ndudukovich@communitypress.com Scott Springer Sports Reporter ..........576-8255, sspringer@communitypress.com

Advertising

Doug Hubbuch Territory Sales Manager .................687-4614, dhubbuch@communitypress.com Sue Gripshover Account Relationship Specialist ........768-8327, sgripshover@communitypress.com

Delivery

For customer service ....................576-8240 Stephen Barraco Circulation Manager ....................248-7110, sbarraco@communitypress.com Lynn Hessler District Manager ...........248-7115, lyhessler@communitypress.com

Classified

To place a Classified ad .................242-4000, www.communityclassified.com

To place an ad in Community Classified, call 242-4000.

Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat” in March. Auditorium Manager Don Freeman said Hiser also has worked with him in the school’s recording studio. “It’s amazing how he adapts and how fast he learned the studio equipment,” Freeman said. “He’s one of those that you know will leave Princeotn and do great things.”

Hiser will attend Wright State University in the fall, to study psychology. He’ll have to navigate a new environment, but looks forward to the experience. “It’s part of me,” Hiser said of being blind. “But it doesn’t define me.” For more about your community, visit www.Cincinnati.com/local.

Art is Tsai’s own language Senior came to United States from Taiwan By Kelly McBride kmcbride@communitypress.com

Kelly Tsai came to Ohio several years ago because her parents wanted her to be educated in the United States. She lives with relatives in Sycamore Township as she attends Princeton High School, adjusting to a different culture and language, traveling home to Taiwan to see her parents and younger sister only two months each summer. “Not living with my parents is difficult,” Tsai said, “But I’m glad to go to school here.” She will study biology at Ohio State University next year. “Maybe I’ll be a CSI in the future,” Tsai said, noting one of her favorite

classes is Lonnie Dusch’s AP chemistry. “Kelly is a rare person whose talents in the arts and sciences are equally impressive, and she works to make sure she’s not just getting by on her talent,” Dusch said of his student. “She is as likely to ace a test in AP chemistry as she is to have an artwork hung in a gallery.” As an artist, Tsai is an example and mentor. “She has a very sophistocated approach to the way she creates her art,” art teacher Lindsay Holliday said of Tsai. “Her ability to create meaning within her artwork is exceptional.” Tsai also serves as role model to her artist peers. “She’s willing to take the time to offer advice to her peers,” Holliday siad, “or even to teach them.” For more about your community, visit www.Cincinnati.com/Sharonville

BRIEFLY Square meals

Fill the Glendale Village Square with food for neighbors in need. A collection is scheduled for 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, June 2, next to the train depot. Bring cans of vegetables, fruits, soups and other non perishable canned or boxed foods, personal care products such as tooth paste, tooth brushes, soaps, shampoo and household cleaning products. Drop off donations at the Glendale Village Square next to the train depot. The collection will be given to The Valley In-

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St. Michael Festival June 8-June 10

St. Michael Parish in Sharonville is hosting its annual festival Friday, June 8-Sunday, June 10, at the church, 11144 Spinner Ave. Featured bands include The Rusty Griswolds June 8; The Naked Karate Girls June 9, and The Paul Otten Band June 10. Festival hours are 6 p.m. to midnight Friday and Saturday, and 3 p.m. to 10 p.m. Sunday.


NEWS

MAY 30, 2012 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • A3

Vermont singers round up a good time Who says lightning can’t strike twice or even three times or more in the same place? Musical director Victoria Hurd and Wyoming’s Vermont Elementary School singers disproved that old saw May 14, when once again they presented an hour of expertly executed excerpts of 26 songs and theater unexpected from students so young. Little Annie Oakleys greeted us at the door with an 11-inch-by-17-inch replica of a 19th century newspaper, the Vermont Gazette. Filled with information about the third-grade performers, the Wyoming Music Association, the whys and wherefores of cowboy music, and thanks to all who made the evening possible, it looked authentic and we have Victoria Hurd to thank for it and her imaginative

production. Alice Dimond should also take a bow for calling me about this event. She and husband, Harold, saved me a front row center seat. Cactus was in bloom, “Tumbling Tumble Weeds” lay about the prairie, hobby horses were tied the hitching posts and coyotes bayed at the moon. Cowboys and cowgirls rode into town to the tune of “Rawhide.” Dressed in neckerchiefs, chaps, period skirts and gingham dresses, plaid shirts and vests, they were “Back in the Saddle Again.” Victoria, also in Western rig played the piano and a quartet sang “He’s An Old Cowhand.” A fiddle solo, xylophone and snare drum added to the entertainment as did Mr. John Anderson on his harmonica, who kindly volunteered for the fun of it and because he

loves music. His solo took many of us back in time to Roy RogEvelyn Perkins ers and COMMUNITY PRESS Gene Autry. COLUMNIST Dogies were rounded up, roped and branded for the “Trail to Wyoming”. Stage humor was big entertainment of the era, so we laughed at: “Did you hear about the cowboy dressed in paper?” “I sure did. He was arrested for rustling.” rum roll please! Ghost riders galloped in the sky, and cowboys faced the barren waste in search of “Cool, Clear Water.” Their spurs jingled and jangled as they rode merrily along in hats of felt, straw, leather and even a

Stetson. With believable twangs and thumbs hooked in jeans, beans were cooked, the riders of the range refused to be fenced in, and gave good advice about drinking water upstream from the herd. Eleven flutes played “Home on the Range” with nary a flat note. An upbeat “Ragtime Cowboy Joe,” complete with choreography, told about the high falutin’, rootin’ tootin’ son–of-a gun from Arizona. A special visit from Willie Nelson by way of the Vermont School singers

explained why mamas shouldn’t let their babies grow up to be cowboys. First of all they won’t stay home and then they would rather sing you a song than give you diamonds or gold. Victoria wrote in her newspaper, “I chose songs carefully, thinking I might have to “sell” them to the kids. That wasn’t the case, as they almost instantly liked each one! It is so heartening to hear a nineyear-old say, ‘Ohhh, I LOVE that song!’” Victoria notes that there is not a single radio station dedicated to

cowboy music, and she wants to share it in an effort to help the music remain alive. “Happy Trails to You” wished us goodbye, and everyone galloped off lip syncing to Frankie Laine’s “Mule Train.” I noticed Mr. Dimond patting his feet. Wow, what a show! Evelyn Perkins writes a regular column about people and events in the Tri-County Press area. Send items for her column to 10127 Chester Road, Woodlawn, 45215, or call her directly at 772-7379

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NEWS

A4 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • MAY 30, 2012

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SCHOOLS

MAY 30, 2012 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • A5

Editor: Dick Maloney, rmaloney@communitypress.com, 248-7134

ACHIEVEMENTS | NEWS | ACTIVITIES | HONORS

TRI-COUNTY

PRESS

CommunityPress.com

Robotics team wins big Eagle Robotics, Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy’s first high school robotics team, dazzled competitors at Purdue University by winning a spot at nationals. The team (comprised of Edie Alexander of West Chester Township, Molly Burdsall of Loveland, Kevin DeGroft of Liberty Township, Hope Dehner of Cheviot, Brad Feldman of Mason, John Gear of Sycamore Township, Mark Hodge of Montgomery, Joe Kabalin of Loveland, Jonathan Kenney of Sharonville, Tanner Kuremsky of Sycamore Township, Lauren Lawley of Indian Hill, Che Li of Symmes Townshup, Tyler Li of Mason, Jim Mao of Sycamore Township, Spencer Meador of Springboro, Michael Nelson of Mason, Haley Palmore of Sharonville, Gabe Sequiera of West Chester Township, Austin Skoglund of Symmes Township, Jessica Tandoc of Mason, Tyler Vonderhaar of Symmes Township and A.J. Walden of Sycamore Township) faced off against 40 high schools from Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Kentucky and Wisconsin at the ninth annual FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Boilermaker Regional Robotics competition March 15-17. At the end, Eagle Robotics was part of a three-team alliance that advanced to the national competition in St. Louis April 25. Team advisors were high schoolphysics instructor Andy Ciarnello and high school math instructor Adam Cool. So how does a rookie squad make it to this point in its first year? Cool explains. How long did it take to build your robot? “We had just over six weeks to build the robot. The competition details were announced Jan. 7 and we had to stop working by Feb. 21. We met at least twice a week and every weekend leading up to that point, and during the last two weeks of 'build season' it was every day. Does your robot have a

The Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy robotics team has qualified for national competition April 25 in St. Louis. THANKS TO LIZ BRONSON name? “We named it EleVader because after we painted it black we thought it kind of looked like Darth Vader’s helmet.” What’s the general structure of the competition? “Teams must have their robot perform 15 seconds of fully automated movement, followed by two minutes of shooting baskets, then attempt to balance their robot on a bridge in the middle of the court with our fellow robots. (View a Youtube video that describes the rules of the competition.) Points are scored by how effective your team is at each maneuver.” What did CHCA do to get to nationals? “From the beginning we knew that our strength lay in our ability to work well as a team and to adapt to the needs of the other teams in our alliance. What we discovered as the competition developed was that our design was particularly well-balanced and stable which made us a great candidate for a strategy that focused on balancing on the bridges. During the competition we tried to develop a reputation among the other competitors along those lines. During the selection process (where the top teams pick who’s going to be on

their alliance) we were chosen by two strong teams to complement their strengths. Our robot fit like a puzzle piece with another (team 1501) which made balancing all three robots on the bridge much easier…and often providing the points necessary to win the match.” What did your team learn from the process of building and competing? “One of the first things we really recognized as a team was that it was better to do some things well than to try and do everything and do it poorly. The entire process has been a lesson in priorities: where will we spend our money, our time, the available weight (there is a 120-pound limit), etc ... The process of determining what skills and attributes distinguish you from the crowd was something each of our members had to think through, both how they would contribute within the team and how our team could be valuable to other potential alliance teams. Many of the students were surprised at the amount of work necessary to construct something from scratch - even constructing something as relatively simple as a box with four wheels felt like a victory. We all learned to celebrate the small victories.”

KINDERGARTENERS CELEBRATE DR. SEUSS

Ursuline French students show the backpacks they collected for a Haiti school. From left: front, Anosha Minai (West Chester Township), Jen Mathews (West Chester Township), Erin Yonchak (Liberty Township), Rachel Treinen (Loveland), Sarah Byrne (West Chester Township) and Brooke Kurkjian (Mason); ; second row, AutumnGrace Peterson (Milford), Colleen Johns (Loveland), Alex George (Mason), Jen Schoewe (West Chester Township), Jean-Robert Cadet (Cincinnati), Theresa Roy (Sharonville), Olivia Schwartz (Amberley Village), Ellie Tyger (Mason) and Sam Fry (Indian Hill). THANKS TO MARIANNE LANG

UA students collect backpacks Ursuline Academy students and faculty collected backpacks over the winter to send to school children in Haiti. The backpacks were delivered by Jean-Robert Cadet, a former restavek (child slave) from Haiti who now lives in Cincinnati. The children attend the Ecole Communautaire du Canape Vert, a school Cadet chose because the students cannot afford items such as these; and Cadet said the backpacks were well received. "The backpacks increase the students' self-worth on their way to and from school, and in classrooms. They were all smiles. The backpacks also facilitate the building of relationships with both schools and students in order to influence the new generation,” Cadet said. Cadet chose this school because he attended classes there when he was a restavek; the Jean R. Cadet Restavek Organization is paying school fees for three girls there; and the school administration agrees to teach the curriculum based on the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child that Cadet developed and tested in collaboration with the University of Cincinnati Blue Ash. Ursuline French teacher Barbara Mustard, who has helped Cadet with many relief efforts in Haiti, said that collecting backpacks to send to the children was a project that was very tangible

for UA students and faculty. The students also made key rings to be attached to each backpack. "Being able to add the friendship key ring to each and every bag was important because our students felt they were sending a piece of themselves to Haiti even if they could not be there in person. The support of the Ursuline community for this project has been overwhelming, and I hope we can make it an annual collection effort." Cadet is an advocate for children enslaved in the Haitian Restavek system and the founder of Jean R. Cadet Foundation, based in the United States. He is an author, husband, father and onetime member of the UN Working Group on Contemporary Forms of Slavery. He has collaborated on several documentaries and has testified before the United Nations and the U.S. Congress regarding his experience as a survivor of slavery. No longer involved with Restavek Freedom, which he created in 2006, Cadet now focuses on initiatives which will change the hearts and minds of the Haitian people - initiatives which will bring about change within the culture so the next generation will not tolerate child slavery. "My biggest need is a vehicle to travel to different schools and sensitize the student population on the plight of children in servitude," Cadet said.

O, WHAT A GREAT DAY

Kindergarten students in Michele Starke and Jennifer Wagner's classes at Saint Gabriel Consolidated School recently celebrated the birthday of Dr. Seuss with their eighth-grade buddies. They read their favorite Seuss stories with their buddies, made Cat in the Hat hats, ate a Cat in the Hat hat-shaped cake and ate green eggs and ham for lunch. PROVIDED

SNA makes honorable donation To enrich their studies of World War II, eighth graders at St. Nicholas Academy supported the Honor Flight Program to send a World War II Veteran to Washington, D.C. The Honor Flight program pays tribute to veterans for their sacrifices and dedication. The eighth-graders held a reverse egg hunt for the students at SNA, in which students bought and hid Easter eggs for the Easter bunny to find. The money earned was presented to Cheryl

St. Nicholas Academy eighth-graders Alberto Mora, Khalil Carter and Kaitlyn Fryman present a $400 check to Cheyl Popp for the Honor Flight Program. THANKS TO ANN FALCI Popp, a representative to the Honor Flight program. Popp gave a presentation to the eighthgraders explaining the details of the program and why the Honor Flight Network is an important

way to honor our heroes. The fundraiser and presentation were supervised by teachers Marianne Wright, Tom Hertlein and curriculum coordinator Carol Graler.

Bethany School second-graders celebrated Ohio's 209th birthday with Thomas Edison, also known as teacher Angela Bell. The students played with Etch-a-Sketch and the Uno card game, (both with ties to Ohio) built Ohio buildings from Legos for a competition, made the shape of the state from clay, and made an Ohio state flag. Shown with Bell are Jordan Mitchell (left) and Cameron Robinson. THANKS TO SCOTT BRUCE


SPORTS Cowboys’ ride north ends in Dayton

A6 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • MAY 30, 2012

Editor: Melanie Laughman, mlaughman@communitypress.com, 513-248-7573

HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | RECREATIONAL

By Scott Springer

sspringer@communitypress.com

WYOMING — The key to Wyoming’s baseball season may have been several good, old-fashioned trips to the woodshed administered to them during a spring break trip to Tennessee. After out-of-state losses of 7-0, 14-4, 7-1 and 10-0, the Cowboys limped home April 4 with a record of 1-6. After their regional semifinal win over Tipp City Tippecanoe, 3-2, May 24, Wyoming had gone 16-5 since their return from the Smoky Mountain state. Sophomore Michael Kelly got his seventh win, and Max Kadish his third save as the Cowboys advanced to play Columbus St. Francis DeSales the following day for the Division II regional title. The DeSales game didn’t quite go as planned as Wyoming was shutout 3-0 to end their season at 17-12. It was the Cowboys’ first winning season since 2007. “I don’t how many people thought we’d be any good or not,” coach Chris Fiehrer said. “Offensively, we were somewhat limited, but I think the kids kind of liked that underdog mentality.” If there ever was a team that proved the long ball was overrated, it was this Wyoming squad. In

Adam Chalmers tries to score in the bottom of the first in Wyoming's 3-2 win over Tippecanoe at Dayton May 24. Ealier in the inning, younger brother Parker Chalmers, Casey Howell, and Max Kadish (on the elder Chalmers' suicide squeeze) scored. Starter and winning pitcher Micheal Kelly (five innings) and Kadish (two innings) made the runs stand up for the victory. THANKS TO ROD APFELBECK 2011, the Cowboys swatted 17 homers and were sub .500. In 2012, not one Cowboy poked a ball over a fence, yet they advanced to the regional final. “We had really good pitching across the board and played really good defense,” Fiehrer said. “Adam Crider played a phenomenal third base, Kadish was at short, Parker Chalmers was at second and Daniel Gilbert behind the plate did a great job blocking balls.”

Fiehrer also benefited from the reliable bat of Furman-bound Kadish (.526) and was pleasantly surprised by the senior’s pitching efforts. After not pitching a lot, Kadish was among the league leaders in earned run average in strikeouts. “Offensively, he did a great job and pitching he worked himself into the No. 2 guy,” Fiehrer said. “He started some games and played great defense at short. He’s been a ‘team-first’ guy all

year.” Beyond Kadish and fellow senior Andy Dickson, the Cowboys often relied on sophomores on the mound. Michael Kelly was the team’s top starter and Henry Moore and Casey Howell were just behind Kadish in innings pitched. Next year, Fiehrer expects Will Marty to also see time on the “bump”. The beauty of this season comes from the lessons learned by the underclassmen. “To have a nice run like this and get some tournament experience is key for the young guys,” Fiehrer said. “We’ve got some good young players and a lot of pitching coming back.” The tough thing for Wyoming and their fans is wondering what might have been with last year’s starting catcher Chris Campbell. The three-sport regular suffered a torn ACL during football season and has had to watch the success of his teammates from the dugout. “I think people focus on him catching and what we missed there, but I think what we missed with Chris throughout the year was his offense,” Fiehrer said. “He had a pretty good junior year.” See BASEBALL, Page A7

TRI- COUNTY

PRESS

CommunityPress.com

TOURNAMENT HIGHLIGHTS By Nick Dudukovich ndudukovich@communitypress.com

Baseball

» Wyoming defeated Tipp City Tippecanoe 3-2 in the Division II regional semifinal May 24 at the University of Dayton to move to the final May 25 against Columbus St. Francis DeSales. Sophomore Micheal Kelly earned his seventh win, with senior Max Kadish picking up his third save. The Cowboys run came to a close May 25 with a 3-0 loss to DeSales.

Girls track

The following individuals advanced to the Division I track and field championships at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium at The Ohio State University June 1-2. » Princeton: Jada Grant, 400, second; Claudia Saunders, 100 hurdles; 300 hurdles, first; 4x200 relay, third; 4x400 relay, third; Cayla Carey, long jump, first The following athletes qualified for the Division II state track meet in Columbus June 1-2: » Wyoming: Emily Stites, 3,200, first place and Division II regional champion; 1,600, third.

Boys track

The following individuals advanced to the Division I track and field championships at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium at The Ohio State University June 1-2. » Princeton: 4x400 relay, fourth

Wyoming midfielder Corbin Guggenheim, No. 6, chases after Indian Hill's Rob Becker, No. 15 in their second-round playoff game May 23.

Crosstown stickout W

yoming’s lacrosse season came to a close in the second round of the playoffs May 23 with a defeat at Indian Hill, 15-3. The Braves were the only team all season to hold the Cowboys in single digits, doing it twice. With the loss the Cowboys finish the spring at 7-8. Photos by Scott Springer/The Community Press

Wyoming attacker Travis Courtney, No. 21, is pursued by Indian Hill midfielder Daron Artis, No 32.

Wyoming defender Larson Graham stands guard over Indian Hill attack Tres Irvine on May 23.


SPORTS & RECREATION

MAY 30, 2012 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • A7

Frisbee team ends on high note

Wyoming senior Emily Stites crosses the finish line to win the 3,200 meter run at the CHL championships in 10:37.79, a meet record, at Mariemont High School May 11. Stites also won the 1,600 meters, leading the Cowboys to the CHL Championship. THANKS TO

Jalen Fox runs to victory in the 100 meter dash at the CHL championships at Mariemont on May 11. Fox, a sophomore, also won the 200 meters and, with Cory Macke, Branford Darlington and Terrell Dailey, the 4 x 100 meter relay. He was named CHL boys' co-runner of the year.

ROD APFELBECK

THANKS TO ROD APFELBECK

League champions lead Cowboys Coming off the boys and girls Cincinnati Hills League championship, Wyoming finished second at the Division II district meet at New Richmond May 19. Jalen Fox (100 and 200), Kayla Livingston (100 hurdles and 300 hurdles), and Emily Stites (1600 and 3200) were all double win-

WYOMING — The Wyoming High School co-ed Ultimate team, the Jackrabbits, closed out its season on a very high note, finishing second in the 13-team B division tournament for the Cincinnati high school league. Wyoming High School has had a co-ed Ultimate Frisbee club since 2000, and the program had about 40 active players this year, with a varsity and reserve team. The Jackrabbits beat Sycamore 11-3, Indian Hill 11-2, and Lebanon 9-7, extending their overall winning streak to eight games, before falling in the finals to Tipp City, which finished third in the state tournament last weekend. All 15 Jackrabbits who played in the tourney threw and or caught a goal. The Jackrabbits were again led by juniors Eric Reichwein, who had 14 scoring tosses and one goal catch in the four games, and David Weinrich, who had 8 and 3. The two juniors were also dominant at the defensive end, forcing numerous

turnovers in the back of a tough zone defense. Senior Max Myers had three scoring throws and three goals caught, junior Khafra Flynn had one and six, junior Nick Woods had two and five, and sophomore Sam White had two and four. Sophomore Alex Kellner was particularly impressive on the offensive end, repeatedly getting open and making numerous circus catches. Season-ending awards were presented to juniors Melissa Golden and Ethan Padnos, for Most Improved and Most Spirited players on the “A” team, and to Sophomore Olivia Richardson and freshman Mary Criddle on the reserve squad. The runner-up finish in the tournament is the Ultimate program’s highest finish in the Cincinnati high school league in 10 years. With just three seniors on the “A” team, and a reserve team of more than 25 eighth through 10th graders, the Jackrabbits team is poised to pursue an even loftier finish in 2013.

Baseball

In his eighth year, this was Fiehrer’s third trip to the districts and second time in the regionals. After a dry spell of a few years, he hopes Wyoming continues to play deep into May for many seasons to come. “We want to build a tradition here where we win sectionals every year and get to districts,” Fiehrer said. “There’s definitely nothing more fun than playing in a tournament this time of year.”

Continued from Page A6

As painful as it had to be to miss his senior year, Campbell was still a regular whenever Wyoming trotted on to the diamond. “I’m sure it grinds at him that he had to miss it,” Fiehrer said. “He handled himself great. He came to practices, he came to games.”

ners at the league meet and advanced to the regionals with good showings in the district Division II meet at New Richmond. Livingston took first in the 100 hurdles and Stites won both her events (1600 and 3200) again. Photos thanks to Rod Apfelbeck

Wyoming High School Ultimate frisbee players celebrate a good season. From left are: Back, Nick Woods, Khafra Flynn, John Potter, David Thoms, David Weinrich, Max Myers, Matt Brown, Eric Reichwein and Sam White; front, coach George White, Katie Scholles, Shaun Woodrow-Wilson, Ethan Padnos, Sarah Sawin, Melissa Golden and Alex Kellner. Not pictured are coaches Ian Stevens and Izzi Bikun. THANKS TO GEORGE WHITE

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VIEWPOINTS

A8 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • MAY 30, 2012

CommunityPress.com

Student loan interest rates set to double Richard Schwab COMMUNITY PRESS GUEST COLUMNIST

imperative that every family must be able to afford ... Making it harder for young people to afford higher education and earn their degrees is nothing more than cutting our own future off at the

knees.” At a time when the unemployment rate for Americans with at least a college degree is half the national average, it has never been more important to put higher education within reach for every American. House Education and the Workforce Committee Chair John Kline (R-MN) noted, “Congress must either allow interest rates to rise on student loans or stick taxpayers with another multi-billion dollar bill.” What hypocrisy! The House Republicans just passed a “small business” tax cut which adds about $47 billion to the deficit. They’re not paying for it. They’re not talking about it. They don’t mind. Small businesses are defined as companies with less than 500

employees that earn more than $1 million a year. So it’s a tax cut going to sports teams, lobbying firms, law firms, hedge fund managers, and the likes of Donald Trump. Republicans seem to use the deficit issue as a club against Democrats. When push comes to shove, and the choice is between a tax cut or reducing the deficit, Republicans take the tax cut. Preventing an unnecessary and damaging increase to student loan interest rates should be an area of bipartisan agreement. It makes no sense for Congress to short change investing in education. We face an increasingly competitive global economy. To stay on top, we need the most highly educated workforce in the world. We need to give our young people every chance to succeed in the jobs of today and tomorrow. Richard O. Schwab was formerly associate head of school, and middle school head, Cincinnati Country Day School. He is currently neighborhood team leader, Glendale Organizing For America Community Team (www.gofact.blogspot.com)

CH@TROOM May 23 question Should applicants suspected of illicit drug use pay for and pass a drug test before receiving welfare benefits?

“Yes, this is a great idea. If they are tested positive, they should then be required to enter a substance abuse program to help them to escape their addiction. “That is a lot more compassionate than what we are doing today, which is enabling their bad habit and all the problems that it causes in their lives, the lives of their loved ones, and in society. “Crime would plummet, since a lot of it is done by people with drug and alcohol problems. Alcohol should also be part of this program.” T.H. “All applicants for welfare benefits, not just those ‘suspected’ of illicit drug use should be tested. Otherwise the state could be accused of profiling or discrimination. “Most employers today use drug screening of all potential employees. A person applying for welfare is essentially asking for a paycheck from the taxpayers. We, as employers, have a right to deny payment to any person whom we feel is undeserving, or may misuse the funds we provide.” R.W.J. “Such people should absolutely have to pass a drug test before receiving benefits. However, I would concede that the welfare organization should finance the cost of the test. Common sense.” Bill B. “No it has already been declared unconstitutional. It is very expensive and not cost ef-

NEXT QUESTION What was the best (or worst) summer vacation you ever took? What made it so memorable? Every week Tri-County Press asks readers a question they can reply to via email. Send your answers to tricountypress@community press.com with Chatroom in the subject line.

fective. “In states that have tried this the percentage of drug use was no higher than in the typical population and since addiction is considered a disease would the state then have to provide treatment. This is just another Republican stereotype.” K.S. “Applicants for almost any kind of job are expected to submit to a drug test, so why not for the job of being on the public dole? Why should we pay to feed someone’s drug habit? ‘Suspected’ is a sticky word, prone to interpretation. Test everyone who applies and retest periodically.” F.S.D. “I like the general concept, but in our litigious society what low-paid civil servant is going to accuse a person of being a druguser when that person has unlimited free legal help waiting with bated breath to sue the deep-pocket government?” R.V. “Consider that welfare recipients, by definition, are short on money. Unless someone, presumably someone with know how and authority, has reason to consider the recipient is cheating (using the money received in an illicit manner) the suggestion comes across as mean spirited and unnecessary. “Those tests are expensive.

TRI-COUNTY

PRESS

A publication of

PRESS

Editor: Dick Maloney, rmaloney@communitypress.com, 248-7134

EDITORIALS | LETTERS | COLUMNS | CH@TROOM

The White House and Democratic lawmakers seek a student loan fix. On July 1, interest rates on subsidized Stafford student loans, that almost 8 million students use to pay for college, will double. This will cause some borrowers to pay almost $5,000. more on their loans over a 10year repayment. U.S. representatives Gary Peters (D-Mich) and Joe Courtny (D-Conn) have introduced bill H.R. 3826 to keep Federal Stafford loans at 3.4 percent. In a written statement to Congress, Peters and Courtny make the case, “When Treasury bonds are being sold at 2 percent and mortgage rates can be had for less than 4 percent, it is outrageous to make college students pay two to three times the going interest rates.” The Obama Administration has taken historic steps to provide Americans with a fair shot at an affordable college education. President Obama has called on Congress to extend the tuition tax credit and to double the number of work-study jobs over the next five years. President Obama said, “In America, higher education cannot be a luxury. It’s an economic

TRI-COUNTY

If you suspect someone is cheating the system, check it out. If you find you are right, throw the book at them. Leave the ones who need the help alone. Better yet, help them solve their problems.” F.N. “I think the key word here is ‘suspected.’ I’m not sure how one would determine on what basis those singled out would be chosen and who would make that decision. “I’m really not that concerned about welfare fraud or the reincarnation of Reagan’s welfare queen scenario. I feel that there is so much cutting being done to social services and so much damage being done to every day workers that any amount of fraud would pale in comparison to the amount of need to keep people in basic human needs and services. “What I am more concerned about though would be the taxes I pay that are used to support the salaries of my representatives. “I feel like they are cheating me out of that money by basically standing idle and obstinate. It’s like paying someone top salary and benefits who can’t even preform the most base level tasks of what a company does. “So I think the question should be: Should candidates suspected of uncompromising, non-negotiable, ideologies, pass a test on the concept of compromise governing before receiving tax payer provided salary and benefits.” “The problem are the politicians who are driving people towards public assistance all the while they hold their hands out, unashamed, to be gorging at the people’s diminishing financial resource trough.” I.P.

Giving help to military, families For over a decade our nation has been at war. Our brave soldiers have stood up for our nation to protect our freedoms and keep us safe. Without question these men and women in uniform deserve our utmost respect and gratitude. While we stand in appreciation of their dutiful service this Memorial Day, we must not forget their families. It is our military families whose support and dedication give our heroes the strength they need to serve our country. Given the often overlooked sacrifices made by military families, it is only fitting that our nation celebrates Military Spouse Appreciation Day the Friday before Mother’s Day. Although the sacrifices made by military spouses are admirable, it is our job as lawmakers to lessen the burden where we can. That is why I introduced House Bill 449. Currently, Ohio’s unemployment compensation program disqualifies workers from receiving unemployment benefits for voluntarily leaving work. This means an individual who leaves a job to move with his or her spouse to a new military assignment would be disqualified from receiving unemployment benefits because the job separation was not directly caused by the employer. HB 449 would remedy this difficult situation by permitting unemployment compensation for military spouses who leave an Ohio job due to such a military transfer. This change is just one thing we can do to lighten the burden on military families and to show our support for those who protect and serve our country Currently, only six states (Utah, North Dakota, South Dakota, Ohio, Virginia, and Vermont) exclude military spouses from such a benefit. I’d like to reduce that number to five.

Military families experience tremendous costs associated with serving our country, espeConnie Pillich cially now in COMMUNITY PRESS times of acGUEST COLUMNIST tive mobilization. Our military spouses make tremendous sacrifices with frequent moves, school transitions for their children, and separation of the family. A military spouse often must work to meet the financial needs of the family, not unlike the general population who depend upon dual income to avoid hardship. I understand the budgetary concerns of our current state government. The cost of this benefit would comprise less than one hundredth of one percent (0.01 percent) of our total unemployment compensation budget: a negligible cost compared to the sacrifices of our military families. Moreover, under HB 449, unemployment compensation rates of individual businesses would not be affected. Instead, benefits would be paid from the general unemployment compensation fund. With surplus revenues available in state coffers, it is only fair that Republicans at the State House begin to give these men and women the attention they deserve. Now is the time for our elected officials to support those who support the defenders of our freedoms and liberties. It is our duty to protect the families of the service men and women who sacrifice so much for our freedoms. State Rep. Connie Pillich served in the United States Air Force for eight years. She is the ranking member on the Ohio House Veterans Affairs Committee.

Ways you can help reduce smog With summer right around the corner, air quality concerns are on the radar but the Southwest Ohio Air Quality Agency is here to help you find ways to reduce smog. On your way to work you may see “Smog Alert” flashing on the highway boards. It is especially important on smog alert days to fuel your car after sundown and to avoid any unnecessary driving. Even on days when there is not a smog alert, it is important to be aware of your pollution output. Every step toward a more sustainable lifestyle is a step toward a greener community. Here are some other smogreducing tips: » Take the bus (METRO: 513-621-4455 or TANK: 859-3318265). » Carpool; call 513-241RIDE. » Bike, walk or inline skate instead of driving. » Avoid using gasoline

394 Wards Corner Road Loveland, Ohio 45140 phone: 248-8600 email: tricountypress@communitypress.com web site: www.communitypress.com

powered lawn equipment. » Keep your vehicle maintained. » Do not leave vehicles running Guest when not in columnist use. » Do not COMMUNITY PRESS GUEST COLUMNIST top off when refueling. » Avoid use of oil-based paints and stains. » Save electricity; if you’re not using it, turn it off. More importantly, spread the word about ways your family and friends can be more environmentally friendly. Small actions really can make a significant impact. Cleaner air helps everyone have a healthier lifestyle. Maria Butauski is a public relations intern at the Southwest Ohio Air Quality Agency. She can be reached at 513-946-7777

Tri-County Press Editor Dick Maloney rmaloney@communitypress.com, 248-7134 Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday See page A2 for additional contact information.


WEDNESDAY, MAY 30, 2012

LIFE

TRI-COUNTY PRESS

PEOPLE | IDEAS | RECIPES

Sallie and Allen Cohen of Montgomery deliver boxes of Passover food. THANKS TO SHERRY KAPLAN

Jewish Family Service volunteer coordinator Sandee Golden of Woodlawn explains the project to Binah UC students Sharon Rosner, Samantha Gerstein, Dora Powell, John Blevins and Anna Nagle. THANKS TO SHERRY KAPLAN

Helping Hands

Beth Schwartz of Kenwood with daughters Monica and Eve. THANKS TO SHERRY KAPLAN

Jewish Family Service volunteers deliver Passover food to families in need

“W

e love volunteering. When we did this last year we found the people to be so welcoming and appreciative to see visitors in their homes,” said Jewish Family Service volunteer Sarah Gentry, who was on her way to deliver boxes of Passover food to Cincinnati Jewish families in need. Sarah and her husband, Charles, were two of 115 volunteers who made the 14th annual Dr. Samuel S. Rockwern Passover Delivery of Jewish Family Service project another success. The high cost of Kosher for Passover food compelled families to volunteer their time to those less fortunate to ensure recipients had an adequate meal. Volunteers of all ages, from 3 to 84, delivered boxes filled with matzah, matzah ball soup mix, macaroons, gefilte fish, Passover candy, grape juice, nuts, apples, and a chicken dinner to 270 households, feeding approximately 450 individuals. Additional volunteers came during the week to sort the thousands of cans and boxes of donated food. Deliveries stretched more than 30 ZIP codes. The Dr. Samuel S. Rockwern Passover Delivery of Jewish Family Service involves more than just delivering food; it personally connects the volunteers with families. Beth Schwartz, Jewish Family Service executive director, delivered the food with her daughters Eve, 7, and Monica, 15. “We were invited to sit down at the kitchen table in one home where we were served Israeli cookies, Russian bubliks, fruit, and tea. We knew it gave our hosts great pleasure to serve us in their home,” Schwartz said. “The highlight was meeting a woman who was a Russian-Spanish translator. She and my daughter Monica (a freshman who has studied Spanish since 3rd grade) conversed together

Carolyn Wetzler of West Chester Township, Jeff Haas of Montgomery and Elana Wetzler of West Chester Township help prepare boxes of Passover food. THANKS TO SHERRY KAPLAN Rabbi Gershom Barnard of Symmes Township, Eve Smiley of Kenwood and Monica Valentini of Kenwood prepare boxes of food.

Dennis Mitman and Susan Shorr (right of table) of Symmes Township check in volunteers. THANKS TO SHERRY KAPLAN

THANKS TO SHERRY KAPLAN

Adam and Richard Berhman of Wyoming load a car with boxes of Passover food. THANKS TO SHERRY

Rabbi Stuart Lavenda of Golf Manor and Ari Ziv of Montgomery carry boxes. THANKS TO SHERRY KAPLAN

KAPLAN

and both were surprised and delighted to discover their shared language.” This Passover delivery project was started by a group of dedicated volunteers in 1998 and continues to be embraced by the community. Cincinnati Hebrew Day School donated the storage and set-up facilities. Area congregations, organizations, and businesses collected the nonperishable, boxed food. The balance was purchased with monetary donations from The Rockwern Charitable Foundation, Manuel D. and Rhoda Mayerson Foundation, and individual community donors. Two area grocery stores made it easy for shoppers to donate. Remke/biggs at Highland and Ridge displayed signs with tearoff slips for shoppers to donate specifically to this project by adding $5, $10 or $20 to their purchase. Meijer on Marburg Avenue also tied in their Simply Give Food Pantry drive around

Bob and Diane Steele of Evendale. THANKS TO SHERRY KAPLAN

Fouad and Mary Ezra of West Chester Township. THANKS TO SHERRY KAPLAN

Passover, matching customer’s $10 donations to Jewish Family Service Food Pantry through May 19. No cash or food donations went to waste as the need for food continues throughout the year at Jewish Family Service Food Pantry, which feeds an average of 130 people each month. It is the only kosher food pantry in the region and is in space donated by Golf Manor Synagogue.

Wyoming residents Alex and Elizabeth Woosley help deliver food. THANKS TO SHERRY KAPLAN


B2 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • MAY 30, 2012

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD THURSDAY, MAY 31 Art Exhibits Epiphany, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sharonville Fine Arts Center, 11165 Reading Road, experimental, mixed-media exhibit by Nancy Gamon, local artist. Works explore moments of insight, both mystical and commonplace. Free. 554-1014; sharonvillefinearts.org. Sharonville.

Exhibits First Ladies of Fashion Exhibit, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Heritage Village Museum, 11450 Lebanon Road, Featuring 14 gowns on loan from Frankenmuth Historical Association, exhibit has been traveling country to give viewers more insight into the lives of former First Ladies. Exhibit continues through June 17. $2. Through June 17. 563-9484; www.heritagevillagecincinnati.org. Sharonville.

Karaoke and Open Mic Karaoke, 9 p.m., Tap House Grill, 8740 Montgomery Road, 8918277. Sycamore Township. Karaoke World Championships USA Local Competition, 10-11 p.m., The Pike Bar and Grill, 10010 Springfield Pike, Competition to qualify local singers for state competition. Ages 21 and up. Free. Registration required. Presented by Karaoke World Championships USA. 866-610-7464, ext. 953; www.kwcusa.net. Woodlawn. Karaoke, 8 p.m.-2 a.m., The Pike Bar and Grill, 10010 Springfield Pike, Hosted by Wendell Payne. Ages 21 and up. Free. 772-7453. Woodlawn.

On Stage - Comedy Kevin Brennan, 8 p.m., Go Bananas, 8410 Market Place, $8-$14. Reservations required. 984-9288; www.gobananascomedy.com. Montgomery.

Support Groups Codependents Anonymous, 7-8 p.m., The Community of the Good Shepherd, 8815 E. Kemper Road, Room 31. Literature discussion group. Family friendly. Free, donations accepted. Presented by Codependents Anonymous Inc. Through June 28. 800-0164. Montgomery. Codependents Anonymous, Noon-1 p.m., Blue Ash Presbyterian Church, 4309 Cooper Road, Book discussion group. Open to everyone who desires healthy loving relationships. Family friendly. Donations accepted. Presented by Codependents Anonymous Inc. 673-0174. Blue Ash.

FRIDAY, JUNE 1 Art Exhibits Epiphany, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sharonville Fine Arts Center, Free. 554-1014; sharonvillefinearts.org. Sharonville.

Dining Events Dinner with Salsa Friends, 8-10 p.m., Cactus Pear Southwest Bistro, 9500 Kenwood Road, Private Room. Group dinner held on the first Friday of the month. $10. Presented by MidwestLatino. Through Nov. 2. 791-4424; www.midwestlatino.com. Blue Ash.

Drink Tastings Wine Tasting, 5-7 p.m., Wyoming Wines, 1208 Springfield Pike, Carefully selected flight of five wines in tasting room. Taste one or all five, most are just $1 per pour. 761-9463; www.wyomingwinesonline.com. Wyoming.

www.allsaints.cc. Sycamore Township.

Karaoke and Open Mic Karaoke, 8 p.m.-2 a.m., The Pike Bar and Grill, Free. 772-7453. Woodlawn.

Music - Concerts Blue Ash Concerts on the Square, 8-11 p.m., Blue Ash Towne Square, Cooper and Hunt roads, The Devonshires. Bring lawn chairs or blankets. Free. Presented by Blue Ash Recreation Department. 745-8550; www.blueashevents.com. Blue Ash.

Nature Free Firsts Appreciation Days, 7 a.m.-8 p.m., Sharon Woods, 11450 Lebanon Road, Residents can enjoy any park without the need for a motor vehicle permit, while enjoying a host of other free and discounted activities. Dress for weather. Family friendly. Free, no vehicle permit required. Presented by Hamilton County Park District. 521-7275; www.greatparks.org/freefirsts. Sharonville.

On Stage - Comedy Kevin Brennan, 8 p.m. and 10:30 p.m., Go Bananas, $8-$14. Reservations required. 984-9288; www.gobananascomedy.com. Montgomery.

Recreation Pick-Up Basketball, 10:30 a.m.-noon, TriHealth Fitness and Health Pavilion, 6200 Pfeiffer Road, Men and women ages 25 and up. $15, free members. Through Dec. 28. 985-0900; www.trihealthpavilion.com. Montgomery.

SATURDAY, JUNE 2 Art Exhibits Epiphany, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Sharonville Fine Arts Center, Free. 554-1014; sharonvillefinearts.org. Sharonville.

Cooking Classes Healthy Cooking Classes, Noon-1:30 p.m., Peachy’s Health Smart, 7400 Montgomery Road, Peachy Seiden discusses nutrition and health while preparing two delicious, simple and easy meals. Ages 18 and up. $30. Registration required. Through Dec. 8. 315-3943; www.peachyshealthsmart.com. Silverton.

Drink Tastings Wine Tasting, 5-7 p.m., Wyoming Wines, 761-9463; www.wyomingwinesonline.com. Wyoming.

Exercise Classes Big John’s Zumba Hour, 11 a.m.-noon, Holiday Inn Cincinnati I-275 North, 3855 Hauck Road, Ballroom. $5. 907-3512. Sharonville. Aqua Zumba, 9-10 a.m., TriHealth Fitness and Health Pavilion, 6200 Pfeiffer Road, Safe, challenging, water-based workout. Saturdays, June 2-Aug. 25. $99-$120. Registration required. 985-0900. Montgomery.

Exhibits First Ladies of Fashion Exhibit, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Heritage Village Museum, $2. 563-9484; www.heritagevillagecincinnati.org. Sharonville.

Festivals All Saints Parish Festival, 5:30 p.m.-midnight, All Saints Church, Saturday: music by the Rusty Griswolds. 792-4600; www.allsaints.cc. Sycamore Township.

Exercise Classes

Karaoke and Open Mic

AquaStretch, Noon-1 p.m., TriHealth Fitness and Health Pavilion, 6200 Pfeiffer Road, Involves being stretched by trained instructor in shallow water with 5-10 pound weights attached to body. Price varies. Registration required. 985-0900. Montgomery.

Karaoke World Championships USA Local Competition, 10-11 p.m., The Pike Bar and Grill, Free. Registration required. 866-610-7464, ext. 953; www.kwcusa.net. Woodlawn. Karaoke, 8 p.m.-2 a.m., The Pike Bar and Grill, Free. 772-7453. Woodlawn.

Exhibits

On Stage - Comedy

First Ladies of Fashion Exhibit, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Heritage Village Museum, $2. 563-9484; www.heritagevillagecincinnati.org. Sharonville.

Kevin Brennan, 8 p.m. and 10:30 p.m., Go Bananas, $8-$14. Reservations required. 984-9288; www.gobananascomedy.com. Montgomery.

Festivals

Recreation

All Saints Parish Festival, 6 p.m.-midnight, All Saints Church, 8939 Montgomery Road, Friday: over 21 night, music by the Naked Karate Girls; $5 admission. Food, music, games and raffle. Presented by All Saints Parish. 792-4600;

Montgomery Kiwanis Fishing Contest, 9-11 a.m., Swaim Park, Zig Zag and Cooper roads, Fishing contest for ages 1-15. Cash prizes for first fish caught each half hour in each age group. Bring rod and bait. Free. Presented by Montgomery Kiwanis Club. 910-7068. Mont-

gomery.

SUNDAY, JUNE 3 Exhibits First Ladies of Fashion Exhibit, 1-5 p.m., Heritage Village Museum, $2. 563-9484; www.heritagevillagecincinnati.org. Sharonville.

Festivals All Saints Parish Festival, 3-10 p.m., All Saints Church, Sunday: music by the Remains. 792-4600; www.allsaints.cc. Sycamore Township. All Fired Up, 1-5 p.m., Swaim Park, Zig Zag and Cooper roads, Art show and sale. Wide variety of works including painting, drawing, sculpture, glass, pottery, jewelry, etc. Children’s activities, music by the Bobby Sharp Trio and more. Free. Presented by Montgomery Arts Commission. 891-2424; www.montgomeryohio.org. Montgomery.

On Stage - Comedy Kevin Brennan, 8 p.m., Go Bananas, $8-$14. Reservations required. 984-9288; www.gobananascomedy.com. Montgomery.

MONDAY, JUNE 4 Exercise Classes Pilates Plus, 6:50-7:50 p.m., Springdale Community Center, 11999 Lawnview Ave., Unique system of strengthening and stretching exercises through slow, mindful and purposeful movements. $5. Presented by Springdale Parks and Recreation. Through Dec. 17. 346-3910. Springdale.

Karaoke and Open Mic Acoustic Open Mic, 7-10 p.m., Shady O’Grady’s Pub, 9443 Loveland-Madeira Road, Hosted by Bob Cushing. 791-2753. Symmes Township.

Literary - Libraries Stockpiling 101, 7 p.m., Blue Ash Branch Library, 4911 Cooper Road, Learn how to strategically use coupons to build your stockpile. Stockpiling Moms teach basics, store tips and more. Leave class ready to collect and organize your coupons and start building your stockpile. Free. Presented by Public Library of Cincinnati & Hamilton County. 369-6051. Blue Ash.

Recreation Pick-Up Basketball, 10:30 a.m.-noon, TriHealth Fitness and Health Pavilion, $15, free members. 985-0900; www.trihealthpavilion.com. Montgomery.

Summer Camp Miscellaneous Camp at the J, 9:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Mayerson JCC, 8485 Ridge Road, Continues weekdays through June 8. Sports, art room, game room, swim lessons, indoor waterpark, outdoor pool, day trips, nature, crafts and music. Kindergarten-eighth grade. Varies. 761-7500; www.JointheJ.org. Amberley Village.

Summer Camp - Sports Basketball Camp, 5:30-8:30 p.m., TriHealth Fitness and Health Pavilion, 6200 Pfeiffer Road, Through July 19. Instruction by the Ohio Ballstars Organization. $55-$65. Registration required. 985-0900. Montgomery.

Support Groups Monthly Meeting, 7:30 p.m., Mercy Franciscan Terrace, 100 Compton Road, Presented by Compassionate Friends. 7619036; urbiscimichael@zoomtown.com. Springfield Township.

TUESDAY, JUNE 5 Civic Household Hazardous Waste Drop-Off Program, 2-6 p.m., Environmental Enterprises Inc., 10163 Cincinnati-Dayton Road, Accepted items: pesticides/ fertilizers, solvents/thinners, lawn/pool chemicals, cleaners, household/auto batteries, fire extinguishers, propane tanks, oil-based paint, mercury, fluorescent bulbs, driveway sealer, gasoline/motor oil, antifreeze and thermostats. Free. Presented by Hamilton County Recycling and Solid Waste District. 946-7766; www.hamiltoncountyrecycles.org. Sharonville.

The Glendale Lyceum, 860 Congress Ave., is having an Art Gal from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. Friday, June 8, featuring paintings created by children in Building Blocks for Kids and paintings donated by local artists for sale. Cost is $25 and includes two drinks and hors d'oeuvres by Gabby's Cafe and sweets by Graeter's. The event is for ages 18 and older, and benefits Building Blocks for Kids. Call 770-2900, or visit bb4k.org/artgala. FILE PHOTO Health / Wellness Living the Gluten Free Lifestyle, 5:30-6:30 p.m., Evendale Cultural Arts Center, 10500 Reading Road, Easily prepared gluten free foods with tastings. Each class features daily meal with additional classes that deal with child friendly foods and the challenge of baking. Five classes in all offered as follows: breakfast, lunch, dinner, kid friendly and baking. $60 five-week session, $13 per class. 563-2247; www.evendaleohio.org. Evendale. Women On Weights, 6-7 p.m., TriHealth Fitness and Health Pavilion, 6200 Pfeiffer Road, Weekly through July 24. Focus on losing weight, decreasing body fat percentage and increasing strength and flexibility. $160-$199. Registration required. 985-0900. Montgomery.

Home & Garden Compost in Your Backyard, 6 p.m., Robert L. Schuler Sports Complex, 11532 Deerfield Road, Learn how to balance a compost bin, what materials are compostable and where to purchase a compost bin. Includes free kitchen collector, “Simple Guide to Composting in Your Backyard,” magnet and $20 coupon for purchase of bin. Free. Presented by Hamilton County Recycling and Solid Waste District. 946-7734; www.hamiltoncountyrecycles.org. Sycamore Township.

Music - Concerts Tuesday Concerts in the Park, 7-9 p.m., Blue Ash Nature Park, 4433 Cooper Road, Music by Maple Knoll Big Band. Dress for weather. Bring seating. Free. Presented by City of Blue Ash. 745-6259; www.blueash.com. Blue Ash.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 6 Art Exhibits Epiphany, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sharonville Fine Arts Center, Free. 554-1014; sharonvillefinearts.org. Sharonville.

Cooking Classes Kid’s Healthy Cooking Classes, 4-6 p.m., Peachy’s Health Smart, 7400 Montgomery Road, Peachy Seiden, registered dietitian and nutrition science instructor, teaches children to be more health conscious by encouraging them to make healthy food choices and teaching them how to prepare and cook nutrientdense meals. Ages 11-14. $40. Registration required. Through Dec. 5. 315-3943; www.peachyshealthsmart.com. Silverton.

Exercise Classes TRX QuickBlast, 4:30-5 p.m., TriHealth Fitness and Health Pavilion, 6200 Pfeiffer Road, Learn new training techniques to spice up current routine. Free. 985-0900. Montgomery.

Exhibits First Ladies of Fashion Exhibit, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Heritage Village Museum, $2. 563-9484; www.heritagevillagecincinnati.org. Sharonville.

Health / Wellness Great Grilling Cooking Demo, Noon-1 p.m. and 6-7 p.m., TriHealth Fitness and Health Pavilion, 6200 Pfeiffer Road, Sample favorite quick and healthy ideas. $10, free for members. 985-0900. Montgo-

ABOUT CALENDAR To submit calendar items, go to www.cincinnati.com and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to life@communitypress.com along with event information. Items are printed on a spaceavailable basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to www.cincinnati.com and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page. mery.

Recreation Pick-Up Basketball, 10:30 a.m.-noon, TriHealth Fitness and Health Pavilion, $15, free members. 985-0900; www.trihealthpavilion.com. Montgomery.

THURSDAY, JUNE 7 Art Exhibits Epiphany, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sharonville Fine Arts Center, Free. 554-1014; sharonvillefinearts.org. Sharonville.

Exhibits First Ladies of Fashion Exhibit, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Heritage Village Museum, $2. 563-9484; www.heritagevillagecincinnati.org. Sharonville.

Home & Garden Hot Kitchens and Cool Baths Seminar, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Neal’s Design Remodel Gallery, 7770 E. Kemper Road, Project consultants and designers discuss trends in kitchen and bath design. Light fare provided. Free. Presented by Neal’s Design Remodel. 489-7700; www.neals.com. Sharonville.

Karaoke and Open Mic Karaoke, 9 p.m., Tap House Grill, 891-8277. Sycamore Township. Karaoke World Championships USA Local Competition, 10-11 p.m., The Pike Bar and Grill, Free. Registration required. 866-610-7464, ext. 953; www.kwcusa.net. Woodlawn. Karaoke, 8 p.m.-2 a.m., The Pike Bar and Grill, Free. 772-7453. Woodlawn.

On Stage - Theater Disney’s My Son Pinocchio: Geppetto’s Musical Tale, 7:30 p.m., Blue Ash Amphitheatre, 4433 Cooper Road, $8. Presented by East Side Players. 7458550; www.esptheater.org. Blue Ash.

Religious - Community What We Talk About When We Talk About Anne Frank, 7:30-9 p.m., Valley Temple, 145 Springfield Pike, Discussion of short stories by Nathan Englander, led by Rabbi Kopnick. Ages 18 and up. Free. 761-3555. Wyoming.

Support Groups Codependents Anonymous, 7-8 p.m., The Community of the Good Shepherd, Free, donations accepted. 800-0164. Montgomery. Codependents Anonymous, Noon-1 p.m., Blue Ash Presbyterian Church, Donations accepted. 673-0174. Blue Ash.

FRIDAY, JUNE 8 Art Exhibits Epiphany, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sharonville Fine Arts Center, Free. 554-1014; sharonvillefinearts.org. Sharonville.

Benefits Art Gala, 7-10 p.m., Glendale Lyceum, 865 Congress Ave., Paintings created by children in

bb4k and paintings donated by local artists for sale. Includes two drinks and hors d’oeuvres by Gabby’s Cafe and sweets by Graeter’s. Ages 18 and up. Benefits Building Blocks for Kids. $25. Presented by Building Blocks for Kids. 770-2900; bb4k.org/artgala. Glendale.

Drink Tastings Wine Tasting, 5-7 p.m., Wyoming Wines, 761-9463; www.wyomingwinesonline.com. Wyoming.

Exercise Classes AquaStretch, Noon-1 p.m., TriHealth Fitness and Health Pavilion, Price varies. Registration required. 985-0900. Montgomery.

Exhibits First Ladies of Fashion Exhibit, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Heritage Village Museum, $2. 563-9484; www.heritagevillagecincinnati.org. Sharonville.

Festivals St. Michael Parish Festival, 6-11:30 p.m., St. Michael Church of Sharonville, 11144 Spinner Ave., Music by the Rusty Griswolds. More than 40 booths and rides. Chance to win $50,000. Family friendly. 563-6377; www.stmichaelfestival.net. Sharonville.

Karaoke and Open Mic Karaoke, 8 p.m.-2 a.m., The Pike Bar and Grill, Free. 772-7453. Woodlawn.

Lectures First Ladies Programs, 7 p.m., Heritage Village Museum, 11450 Lebanon Road, Topic: Eleanor Roosevelt. Jessica Michna takes audiences on journey back in time as she makes famous figures come to life. Stories, both humorous and emotional, give listeners an idea of what life was like in past times. $20. Reservations required. 563-9484; www.heritagevillagecincinnati.org. Sharonville.

Music - Concerts Blue Ash Concerts on the Square, 8-11 p.m., Blue Ash Towne Square, The Websters. Free. 745-8550; www.blueashevents.com. Blue Ash.

On Stage - Theater Disney’s My Son Pinocchio: Geppetto’s Musical Tale, 7:30 p.m., Blue Ash Amphitheatre, $8. 745-8550; www.esptheater.org. Blue Ash.

Recreation Pick-Up Basketball, 10:30 a.m.-noon, TriHealth Fitness and Health Pavilion, $15, free members. 985-0900; www.trihealthpavilion.com. Montgomery.

Support Groups Women’s Separation/Divorce Support, 9:30-11:30 a.m., Comprehensive Counseling Services Inc., 10999 Reed Hartman Highway. $35 per two-hour session. Registration required. 891-1533. Blue Ash.


LIFE

MAY 30, 2012 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • B3

Flavorful fish tacos: Here’s the rub I can’t tell you how many recipes I’ve had over the years for fish tacos. Some Rita were comHeikenfeld plicated, some were RITA’S KITCHEN easy and most were pretty good since I have always used a homemade spice rub. Today I was in a time crunch so I used a Southwestern blend from Colonel De Gourmet Herbs & Spices at Findlay Market instead of making my own rub. It was so good that I decided to leave the fish whole and serve it as an entree instead of as a taco. The time saved from making my own rub was happily spent in the garden, pulling weeds from the rows of Swiss chard and red onions.

Master recipe for Tex-Mex fish and tacos Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Fish 2 pounds firm white fish (I used halibut) Olive oil Southwestern seasoning

Brush fish on both sides with olive oil. Sprinkle on both sides with seasoning. Roast 8-10 minutes depending upon thickness of fish, until it flakes with a fork. Don’t

overcook. While fish is roasting, make sauce. To serve fish as an entree: Leave whole and serve sauce alongside or drizzled on top. I served mine with a side of potatoes. To make tacos: 8 tortillas (corn or flour), warmed 1 small head Napa cabbage, shredded or favorite greens, shredded

Break cooked fish into pieces and divide among tortillas. Top with cabbage and taco sauce. Serve with avocado wedges. Cathy’s cilantro scallion creamy sauce Cathy, an Eastern Hills Journal reader, gave me this recipe after I finished teaching a class on easy seafood entrees. “This is delicious on top of fish tacos,” she said. I used cilantro from the herb garden. You can also top the tacos with salsa, guacamole or pico de gallo sauce, if you want. Stir together: ¼ cup thinly sliced scallions/green onions Chopped cilantro to taste: start with 1⁄3 cup 3 tablespoons each sour cream and mayonnaise Grated rind from 1 lime Lime juice to taste: start with a scant 2 teaspoons and go from there 1 nice-sized clove garlic, minced Salt and pepper to taste Diced tomatoes (optional) Avocado slices to serve alongside (optional)

Rita's recipe for Southwestern-seasoned fish can be used by itself or as a component in fish tacos. THANKS TO RITA HEIKENFELD.

Boston brown bread I hope this is close to what Northern Kentucky reader John Meier is looking for. It’s adapted from a recipe by Jasper White, the famous New England cook. John loved Busken Bakery’s brown bread served in their downtown location. John enjoyed it with cream cheese and strawberries. Cooks Illustrated also

has a wonderful recipe for Boston brown bread, which is a bit too long to include here. Check out their site for the recipe. To make strawberry (or pineapple) cream cheese, mix softened cream cheese with fresh diced strawberries and sweeten with confectioners sugar, or blend softened cream cheese with drained, crushed pineapple. You can also simply stir straw-

berry jam into softened cream cheese. Butter 1½ cups brown-bread flour (see note) 1 teaspoon baking soda ½ teaspoon salt 1 ⁄3 cup dark molasses 1 cup whole milk ½ cup raisins, currants, dried cherries, cranberries, apricots or your favorite dried fruit

degrees. Generously butter a 1-pound coffee can. Combine flour, baking soda and salt. Stir in molasses and milk. Fold in fruit. Fill coffee can with batter. It should come up only about two-thirds of the way. Cover top with foil and tie with string to make airtight. Place in a deep baking pan, put pan in oven and fill pan with boiling water halfway up the side of coffee can. Steam for two hours, checking water level after one hour. Add more boiling water if needed. Check by sticking a skewer into the bread; it will come out clean when done. Remove string and foil and allow to cool one hour before unmolding. Note: Brown bread flour is a specialty New England flour and can be hard to find. Make your own by combining equal amounts of whole wheat flour, rye flour and cornmeal. Store in freezer. Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educator and author. Email her at columns@communitypress.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Call 513-248-7130, ext. 356.

Preheat oven to 325

Princeton has free summer food program Princeton City School District announces the sponsorship of the Summer Food Service Program for Children. Free meals will be made available to all children 18 years of age and under or persons over 18 who are determined by a state or local public educational agency to be mentally or physically disabled. The meals will be provided without regard to race, color, national origin, gender, age, or disability, and there will be no discrimination in the course of the meal service. Any person who believes he or she has been discriminated against in any USDA–related activity

should write or call to the U. S. Department of Agriculture, Director, Office of Civil Rights, Room 326-W, Whitten Building, 14th & Independence Ave. S. W., Washington, D.C. 202509410; (202) 720-5964 (voice or TDD). Meals will be provided at the site(s) listed below: Heritage Hill Elementary School, 11961 Chesterdale Road, June 11-June 29; breakfast 8:30 a.m. to 9 a.m., lunch 11:30 a.m. to noon. Lincoln Heights Elementary School, 1113 Adams St., June 11-July 20; breakfast 9 a.m. to 9:30 a.m.; lunch 11:30 a.m. to noon.

Road to Recovery® Begins with you.

The

The American Cancer Society is in need of volunteers to help patients get to treatment for its Road to Recovery® program. For just a few hours a month, you can make a big difference. If you have more time, we are also looking for coordinators to match drivers and patients. For details, call your American Cancer Society at 1.800.227.2345.

cancer.org | 1.800.227.2345 CE-0000511339

CE-0000506670


LIFE

B4 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • MAY 30, 2012

Women need to plan for health costs Women live longer, earn less and save less for retirement, and need to establish a financial plan that incorporates the need for long term health care costs, said Lisa Baab, financial planner, at a recent Kehoe Financial Advisors presentation for women. Baab presented “Six Things Women Need to Know about Money” Thursday, April 26, to a dozen women at the Kehoe office in Springdale. She said women need to become involved with their spouses or partners in creating a financial plan that incorporates their financial needs as they grow older. The average American woman lives to be 80 years old, and the average man lives to be 75, according to

recent national demographic data. About 90 percent of women eventually become solely responsible eventually for their financial affairs, yet women often lack confidence in making financial decisions, and tend to defer those decisions to the men in their lives. Baab said women make up 87 percent of all long term health care recipients, and need to incorporate long term health care expenses into their financial portfolios. The “six things” Baab identified that women need to know about money include: » save and reduce debt; » create a financial plan; » invest for your future; » generate personal documents;

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» build a long-term health care plan, and » envision retirement. “Women can build wealth and knowledge at any age,” said Steve Kehoe, founder and partner at Kehoe Financial Advisors, in a question-and-answer period. “But there’s a lot you can do 10 to 15 years before retirement. It doesn’t matter how much money you have today; the most important thing is to create a financial plan and get started saving and investing. Successful investing in real estate is based on location, location, location. Building a successful financial portfolio is based on discipline, discipline, discipline.” Baab said Kehoe has identified three “buckets” of retirement revenue that become streams for the financial needs of retirees: income for day-to-day living, a “golden years” lifestyle and financial legacy for heirs. Living – Retirement requires stable income from Social Security, pensions and annuities to cover the basic needs of life. Needs during retirement include rent or mortgage, utilities, car, clothing and health care. Lifestyle – These funds make a difference between sustenance living and putting the “gold” into the golden years, said Baab. Revenue from equities, real estate, growth and bonds can provide a financial cushion for the good things in life: vacations, dining out, gifts and even a second home. Legacy – Many of us have parents who sacrificed spending money on themselves during retirement to

Twelve Cincinnati area women attended a recent presentation by Kehoe Financial Advisors called "Six Things Women Need to Know about Money." From left: Colerain Township resident and presenter Lisa Baab of Kehoe Financial Advisors, Mary Ann Jacobs of Ritter and Randolph, Mollie Stegman of Ritter and Randolph in downtown Cincinnati, and Alice Bayman of Loveland. THANKS TO OAK TREE COMMUNICATIONS Area women learned about the "Six Things Women Need to Know about Money" at a presentation by Kehoe Financial Advisors at the company's office in Springdale. From left: Cinda Gorman of Green Township and Leslie Hoekzema of Newtown, who won premium wines in a raffle, Steve Kehoe, president of Kehoe financial Advisors, and Carol Clevidence of West Chester Township, who won a Mitchell's Salon and Spa certificate. THANKS TO OAK TREE COMMUNICATIONS

leave a larger inheritance for family, but found that medical costs in the last three years of life drained their estates. Life insurance, taxes, trusts and surplus assets provide funds for family, philanthropy and the government.

TOLL FREE

Raffles followed the presentation. Cinda Gorman of Green Township and Leslie Hoekzema of Newtown won bottles of premium cabernet and chardonnay from Buena Vista Winery in Sonoma, CA. Carol Clevidence of West Chester

Township won a $100 Mitchell’s Salon and Day Spa certificate. For more information , visit www.kehoe-financial.com or call 513-481-8555.

1-855-295-3642 5815 DIXIE HWY (RT 4), FAIRFIELD

Come Experience the Jeff Wyler Cadillac Difference! A Better Way to Buy a Vehicle

JeffWylerFairfieldCadillac.com

INTRODUCING THE NEW STANDARD OF LUXURY OWNERSHIP.

Premium Care Maintenance Standard on all 2011 and newer Cadillac vehicles, Premium Care Maintenance is a fully transferable maintenance program that covers select required maintenance services during the first 4 years or 50,000 miles.[1]

Connections by OnStar Hands Free Calling capability from OnStar[3] allows you to safely make and receive calls from your Cadillac. With MyCadillac and OnStar MyLink[4] mobile apps, you can access and control your Cadillac from anywhere you have cell phone service. All Cadillac models come with 1 year of OnStar service.

Warranty Protection Cadillac Powertrain Warranty[2] is 30K miles more than Lexus and 50K more than BMW and Mercedes-Benz. The 4-year/50,000-mile[1] Bumper-To-Bumper Limited Warranty covers repairs on your entire vehicle, including parts and labor, to correct problems in materials or workmanship.

Emergency by OnStar In a crash, built-in sensors can automatically alert an OnStar[3] Advisor who is immediately connected into your Cadillac to see if you need help sent to your exact location. Other OnStar emergency services include Injury Severity Predictor and First Assist. All Cadillac models come with 1 year of OnStar service.

Diagnostics by OnStar With best-in-class diagnostics from OnStar[3], maintaining your Cadillac can be as simple as checking your email or your OnStar MyLink mobile app. Every month you can receive an email with the status of key operating systems. All Cadillac models come with 1 year of OnStar service.

Security by OnStar If you’ve reported your Cadillac stolen, OnStar[3] can use GPS technology to help authorities quickly locate and recover it. On most Cadillac models, an Advisor can send a Stolen Vehicle Slowdown® or Remote Ignition Block signal to help authorities safely recover it. All Cadillac models come with 1 year of OnStar service.

2012 Cadillac

CTS

LEASE

309

$

SPORT SEDAN

PER MONTH

CTS

COUPE

MSRP DISCOUNT

$39,725 -$2,730

36,995

$

Courtesy Transportation During the warranty coverage period, this Cadillac program provides alternate transportation and/or reimbursement of certain transportation expenses if your Cadillac requires warranty repairs.

LUXURY COLLECTION

LEASE

429 PER MONTH

$

6

39 MONTHS $995 DUE AT SIGNING NO SECURITY DEPOSIT

STOCK # 6NG626

2011 Cadillac

Roadside Assistance Among leading automotive luxury brands, Cadillac is the only brand to offer standard 5-year Roadside Assistance that provides lock-out service, a tow, fuel, Dealer Technician Roadside Service and more.

SRX

5

39 MONTHS $995 DUE AT SIGNING NO SECURITY DEPOSIT

STOCK # 6DM69

2012 Cadillac

2012 Cadillac

Navigation by OnStar Just push the OnStar[3] button and ask the Advisor to download directions to your Cadillac, and a voice will call out every turn. You can also plan routes from Google Maps™ or MapQuest.com® to your Cadillac. All Cadillac models come with 1 year of OnStar service.

CTS-V

MSRP DISCOUNT REBATE

$71,285 -$5,334 -$4,000

61,951

$

(1) Whichever comes first. See dealer for details.(2) See dealer for limited warranty details.(3) Visit onstar.com. for coverage map, details and system limitations. Services vary by model and conditions. (4) OnStar MyLink is available on 2011 and newer vehicles, excluding STS. (5) CTS closed end lease 39 months/10k per year lease $309 mo. $995 due at signing, no security deposit required with highly qualified approved credit. Total of payments $12051. (6) SRX closed end lease 39 months/10k per year lease $429 mo. $995 due at signing, no security deposit required with highly qualified approved credit. Total of payments $16731. $.30 cents per mile penalty overage. Purchase option at termination. All offers are plus tax license and fees. Not available with some other offers. See dealer for details. Vehicle / equipment may vary from photo. In stock units only, while supplies last. Expires 5/31/2012


LIFE

MAY 30, 2012 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • B5

Princeton pitches Josh Harrison night By Kelly McBride kmcbride@communitypress.com

It was just a few years ago that Princeton High School's baseball team advanced to the state Final Four. The Vikings had knocked off one of the heavy favorites, Moeller High School, to leave its mark on Princeton athletic history. "Our team came together, and achieved something that has never been done in Princeton," former player Matt Weber recalled of that 2005 game. Today, he's Princeton's assistant athletic director. He's planning to attend a Reds game June 5, as part of Josh Harrison night, in

honor of his former classmate and teammate. Harrison is a former Viking and current Pittsburgh Pirate, and a portion of Princeton ticket sales to that game will help raise funds for the district’s Education Foundation. "Josh is not only a graduate of Princeton High School and a member of the Major League Pittsburgh Pirates, but a contributing alumni of the Princeton Education Foundation," Superintendent Gary Pack said. "This organization is building a presence in the Princeton community and great young folks like Josh will certainly provide a lasting legacy for future generations of Vikings." The Princeton Educa-

tion Foundation was established to build and sustain relationships between the schools and the commuHarrison nities that serve Princeton. The foundation goals include: » enhancing reading, math and science skills; » expanding opportunities for low-income Princeton students and families; » providing resources to schools and teachers; and » sustaining the work of the foundation. A donation check will be presented during the Reds-

Pirates game, which Princeton officials hope will bring support for the foundation, and fans for their Viking alumnus. "He was not only an excellent teammate, but a great friend," Weber said of Harrison. "He is very outgoing, and comes from an outstanding family. “To be a former teammate of his, and to see him continue to take the most of his opportunities from high school, college and professional career is incredible. "Josh Harrison Night is a great way for us as a school and city to celebrate Josh and his outstanding accomplishments in his young and promising baseball career" he said. "That sunny day in June of 2005,

we were able to play for our friends, family, community, and school. "Now, one of our Vikings gets the opportunity to play in front of us in the major leagues. It is very special to me to see a teammate of

fast food drive-throughs or simply “warming up the car.” Anti-idling conserves energy, saves on fuel costs and reduces wear on vehicle engines. The best part about an anti-idling campaign is that it’s easy and free: the agency provides the materials and guidance to start a campaign. An anti-idling tool kit includes educational brochures, newsletter articles and 18-inch-by-24inch signs and posts to be installed at locations where residents may find themselves idling. Common places for antiidling signs are schools, athletic fields, libraries and other places where children may be dropped off and/or picked up for activities. In addition, the

agency can support antiidling efforts with presentations to parent or community groups, and interactive demonstrations for children. Idling adversely affects our health, the environment and our wallets. For example, a car that idles for 10 minutes a day emits approximately 9.5 ounces of carbon dioxide and it wastes gasoline. Thirty seconds of idling can use more fuel than turning off the engine and restarting it. Idling can actually damage a vehicle’s engine.

at Evergreen and Wellspring

NewLife newbeginning!

The Southwest Ohio Air Quality Agency is the regional resource for antiidling and other air quality issues in Butler, Clermont, Hamilton and Warren counties. For help establishing an anti-idling campaign in your community, school district or business, please contact Joy Landry at (513) 946-7754 or joy.landry@hamilton-co.org For more information about anti-idling, visit the Southwest Ohio Air Quality Agency website at southwestohioair.org.

Whether your new beginning is a country cottage, a spacious apartment or returning home after a successful rehabilitation stay, your New Life begins here.

Wellspring Health Center Rated 5 stars by the Center for Medicare & Medicaid

CALL TODAY TO BEGIN YOUR NEW LIFE! 513-457-4401

Army Pvt. Ryan L. Scott has graduated from the Basic Field Artillery Cannon Crewmember Advanced Individual Training course at Fort Sill, Lawton, Okla. The course is designed to train service members to maintain, prepare and load ammunition for firing; operate and perform operator maintenance on prime movers, self-propelled Howitzers, and ammunition vehicles; store, maintain, and distribute ammunition to using units as a member of battery or battalion

ammunition section; perform crew maintenance and participate in organizational maintenance of weapons and related equipment, and establish and maintain radio and wire communications. Scott is the son of Raquel L. and Randy D. Scott of East Kemper Road, Sharonville. His wife, Brittany, is the daughter of Gary E. Dick and Royce Bowling, both of Cincinnati. He is a 2010 graduate of Princeton High School. CE-0000510970

CE-0000510357

IN THE SERVICE Scott graduates artillery training

For more about your community, visit www.Cincinnati.com/local.

Livinglife

Southwest Ohio Air Quality Agency expands anti-idling campaign Summer in Cincinnati means Reds baseball, backyard barbecues, outdoor concerts and…smog alerts. Although we can’t change our Cincinnati heat and humidity, we can make an effort to decrease air pollutants so we can all breathe a little easier. The Southwest Ohio Air Quality Agency is taking a proactive approach by inviting communities, schools and businesses throughout Butler, Clermont, Hamilton and Warren counties to participate in anti-idling campaigns. Idling takes place anytime a motorist leaves their vehicle running for more than 30 seconds (except in traffic). Idling is common when dropping off or picking children or friends; at

mine reach 'the show.'"

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CE-0000507720


LIFE

B6 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • MAY 30, 2012

RELIGION Sunday worship services are at 8:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. with programs for all ages at 9:45 a.m. The church is at 7333 Pfeiffer Road, Montgomery; 7933288,www.ascension lutheranchurch.com.

Brecon United Methodist Church

The church offers worship services on Sundays at 8:30 a.m. and 10:45 a.m. Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Sundays. Samaritan Closet hours are 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday. Samaritan Closet offers clothing and food to people with demonstrated needs. Bread from Panera is available on Thursdays and Saturdays. The Samaritan Closet is next to the church. The church is at 7388 E. Kemper Road, Sycamore Township; 489-7021.

Church of the Saviour United Methodist

Summer children’s weekday program is 9 a.m. to noon Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Register online at www.cos-umc.org. Register for vacation Bible school at www.cos-umc.org. Morning VBS is 9:30 a.m. to noon, June 25-29; and evening VBS is 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Aug. 6-10. The rummage sale is coming

INDEPENDENT BAPTIST

FRIENDSHIP BAPTIST CHURCH 8580 Cheviot Rd., Colerain Twp 741-7017 www.ourfbc.com Gary Jackson, Senior Pastor Sunday School (all ages) 9:30am Sunday Morning Service 10:30am Sunday Evening Service 6:30pm Wedn. Service/Awana 7:00pm RUI Addiction Recovery (Fri.) 7:00pm Active Youth, College, Senior Groups Exciting Music Dept, Deaf Ministry, Nursery

BAPTIST

SHARON BAPTIST CHURCH 4451 Fields Ertel Road Cincinnati, OH 45241 (513) 769-4849 gstep77507@aol.com

Services

Sunday School - 10:00 am Sunday Morning - 11:00 am Sunday Evening - 6:00 pm Wednesday - 7:00 pm Evening Prayer and Bible Study Wyoming Baptist Church

(A Church For All Seasons) Burns and Waverly Avenues Cincinnati OH 45215 821.8430

Steve Cummins, Senior Pastor Sunday School..............................9:00 am Coffee & Fellowship...................10:00 am Praise & Worship........................10:30 am www.wyomingbc.homestead.com Visitors Welcome!

CHRISTIAN CHURCH DISCIPLES

Mt. Healthy Christian Church (Disciples of Christ)

7717 Harrison Ave Mt. Healthy, OH 45231 Rev. Michael Doerr, Pastor 513-521-6029 Sunday 9:00 a.m...... Contemporary Service 9:45a.m...... Sunday School 10:45 a.m........ Traditional Worship Nursery Staff Provided “A Caring Community of Faith” Welcomes You

EPISCOPAL

Christ Church Glendale Episcopal Church 965 Forest Ave - 771-1544 christchurch1@fuse.net www.christchurchglendale.org The Reverend Roger L Foote 8am Holy Eucharist I 9am Holy Eucharist II 11am Holy Eucharist II Child Care 9-12

LUTHERAN

Faith Lutheran LCMC

8265 Winton Rd., Finneytown www.faithcinci.org Pastor Robert Curry Contemporary Service 9am Traditional Service 11:00am

Sunday School 10:15

Trinity Lutheran Church (ELCA) “Growing Closer to God, Growing Closer to Neighbor”

www. trinitymthealthy.org 513-522-3026

1553 Kinney Ave, Mt. Healthy

Worship: 8:30 am traditional - 10:45 am contemporary Sunday School: 9:45 am Nursery provided

Pastor Todd A. Cutter

from 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. May 31, and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. June 1. The annual craft show is recruiting vendors to buy space at the show. Register at www.cos-u.c.org/craftshow.htm . The church is at 8005 Pfeiffer Road, Cincinnati, OH 45242; 791-3142; www.cos-umc.org.

Community Lighthouse Church of God

Sunday services are 10 a.m. and 6 p.m., Wednesday service is 7 p.m. The church is at 4305 Sycamore Road, Sycamore Township; 984-5044.

Good Shepherd Catholic Church

The church has Roman Catholic Mass with contemporary music Sundays at 4 p.m. The Mass draws worshipers of all ages. Come early to get acquainted with the new songs which begin at 3:45 p.m. Stay after Mass on the first Sunday of each month for food, fun, and fellowship. The church is at 8815 E. Kemper Road, Montgomery; 503-4262.

St. Barnabas Episcopal Church

Save the dates for Vacation Bible School: Thursday, July 19 through July 22. The theme is “SKY: Where kids discover that everything is possible with God.” Jawin’ with John is back. Bring

wine and cheese and speak with Father John in an informal setting. Upcoming dates are from 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Friday, May 25, and Thursday, May 31. The St. Barnabas Youth Choir practices following Holy Communion at the 9:30 a.m. service and ends promptly at 11:15 a.m. All young people are welcome. The St. Barnabas Band practices from 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Sundays. Youthful singers and instrumentalists are needed. The next meeting of the St. Barnabas Book Club is 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, June 6, in the library. The group will discuss the novel “My Father’s Paradise” by Ariel Sibar. Sunday worship services are 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 11:30 a.m. The church is at 10345 Montgomery Road, Montgomery; 984-8401; www.st-barnabas.org .

Sharonville United Methodist Church

There is a traditional service at 8:15 a.m. at 9:30 a.m. there are Sunday school classes for all ages and at 11 a.m. a service of a blend of contemporary and traditional styles of worship. Summer Jam for Adults begins June 3 and lasts through Aug. 12. This will be a time for learning, singing, fellowship and fun. Plans are being made for the annual Vacation Bible School the week of June 17. The theme is “SKY–Everything is Possible with God.” Canines for Christ continues to

LUTHERAN

EVANGELICAL PRESBYTERIAN

5921 Springdale Rd

EVANGELICAL COMMUNITY CHURCH

Trinity Lutheran Church, LCMS Rev. Milton Berner, Pastor Classic Service and Hymnbook

www.trinitylutherancincinnati.com

385-7024

UNITED METHODIST

have training sessions for dogs at 10 a.m. on Saturday mornings. All dog owners are welcome. It is a wonderful experience to see what a comfort their visits are to nursing homes, hospitals and hospices. A bereavement group meets for lunch on the first Thursday of the month. Serendipity Seniors meet for lunch on the fourth Thursday of the month. Visitors and guests are welcome at all services and events. The church is at 1751 Creek Road, Sharonville; 563-0117; www.sharonville-umc.org.

Sycamore Christian Church

Sunday worship and junior worship services at 10:30 a.m. Sunday Bible study for all ages at 9 a.m. Adult and Youth Bible studies each Wednesday at 7 p.m. Women’s Study Group at 6:30 p.m. every second Wednesday of the month. Includes light refreshments and special ladies study. The church is at 6555 Cooper Road, Sycamore Township; 891-7891.

Sycamore Presbyterian Church

Join us in worship at 8:45 a.m., 9:45 a.m. and 10:45 a.m. Sunday School for age 3 to grade 12 meets at 10:45 a.m. Childcare is available in the nursery during the 9:45 and 10:45 services for infants through age 2. Vacation Bible School: “Operation Overboard” will be June 18-22. Space is still available for first through sixth grades. Register online (Children’s Ministries link) or by calling the church office. Sycamore Presbyterian Preschool is enrolling 2012-2013 school year. The church is at 11800 MasonMontgomery Road, Symmes Township; 683-0254; www.sycamorechurch.org.

Sunday School Hour (for all ages) 9:15 - 10:15am Worship Service - 10:30 to 11:45am (Childcare provided for infants/ toddlers) Pastor: Rich Lanning Church: 2191 Struble Rd Office: 2192 Springdale Rd

Worship & Sunday School 10:30 a.m, Bible Study 9:30 a.m. Sundays

Escape for an evening filled with the tastes and sounds of India at the Mayerson JCC at 6 p.m. Sunday, June 10, when the JCC hosts “Bollywood Night for Boomers!” The JCC is at 8485 Ridge Road, across from the Ronald Reagan Highway. Enjoy: » traditional Indian food catered by Amma’s Kitchen (certified kosher), with a wide range of flavors and choices, either mild or spicy. » authentic dancers

from the Indian Cultural Center. » The cash bar will even have a special Star of India drink. The first 50 people who RSVP for Bollywood Night will get a free Star of India drink. Bollywood for Boomers is open to everyone, but J Members enjoy a special cost savings. J Member advantage price is $15; public, $20. Call the JCC at (513) 761-7500 or visit www.JointheJ.org.

Mason, Emma most popular baby names The Social Security Administration has announced the most popular baby names in Ohio for 2011. Mason and Emma topped the list. The top five boys and girls names for 2011 in Ohio were: Boys: Mason, Jacob, Noah, William and Liam. Girls: Emma, Sophia, Ava, Olivia and Isabella The federal government’s top official for baby names, Michael J. Astrue, commissioner of Social Security, announced Sophia and Jacob were the most popular baby names in the U.S. Here are the top 10 boys and girls names for 2011:

Boys: Jacob, Mason, William, Jayden, Noah, Michael, Ethan, Alexander, Aiden, Daniel Girls: Sophia, Isabella, Emma, Olivia, Ava, Emily, Abigail, Madison, Mia, Chloe How does Ohio compare with neighboring Kentucky and Indiana and the rest of the country? Check out Social Security’s website, www.socialsecurity.gov/ OACT/babynames, to see the top baby names for 2011. Social Security’s website has a list of the 1,000 most popular boys’ and girls’ names for 2011 and a list of the top 50 names for twins born in 2011.

542-9025

Visitors Welcome www.eccfellowship.org

Christ, the Prince of Peace United Methodist Church 10507 “Old” Colerain Ave (513) 385-7883 Rev. Mark Reuter Sunday School 9:15am Worship 10:30am - Nursery Available www.cpopumc.org

PRESBYTERIAN Sun Worship 10:00am Childcare Provided 3755 Cornell Rd 563-6447 www.ChurchByTheWoods.org ............................................

“Small enough to know you, Big enough to care”

Monfort Heights United Methodist Church

3682 West Fork Rd , west of North Bend Traditional Worship 8:30 & 11:00am Contemporary Worhip 9:44am

Sharonville Convention Center

Church By The Woods

Community Open House

Taiwanese Ministry 769-0725 2:00pm

3:30pm

Nursery Available * Sunday School 513-481-8699 * www. mhumc.org Spiritual Checkpoint ... Stop In For An Evaluation!

Mt Healthy United Methodist Church

Corner of Compton and Perry Streets 513-931-5827 Sunday School 8:45 - 9:45am Traditional Worship 10:00 - 11:00am Contemporary Worship 11:30 - 12:30 Nursery Available. Handicapped Accessible. "Come as a guest. Leave as a friend".

Mt Healthy United Methodist Church

Corner of Compton and Perry Streets 513-931-5827 Sunday School 8:45 - 9:45am Traditional Worship 10:00 - 11:00am Contemporary Worship 11:30 - 12:30 Nursery Available. Handicapped Accessible. "Come as a guest. Leave as a friend".

Northminster Presbyterian Church 703 Compton Rd., Finneytown 931-0243 Growing Faith, Sharing Hope, Showing Love Sunday Worship Schedule Traditional Services: 8:00 & 10:15am Contemporary Services: 9:00 & 11:30am Student Cafe: 10:15am Childcare Available Jeff Hosmer, Rich Jones & Nancy Ross- Zimmerman - Pastors

Northwest Community Church 8735 Cheviot Rd, by Colerain HS Rev. Kevin Murphy, Pastor 513-385-8973 Worship and Sunday School 10AM Handicap Accessible/Nursery Available

Ice Cream Social

Sharonville Convention Center

Salem White Oak Presbyterian

DATE: Sunday, June 3, 2012 TIME: 2 p.m.— 4 p.m. LOCATION: 11355 Chester Road Bring the family to visit your new Sharonville Con-

Sharonville United Methodist

8:15 & 11amTraditional Service & Kingdom Kids 9:30am Adult & Children’s Sunday School 7:00pm Wednesday, Small Groups for all ages Infant care available for all services

3751 Creek Rd.

513-563-0117

www.sharonville-umc.org

NON-DENOMINATIONAL HIGHVIEW CHRISTIAN CHURCH “Life on Purpose in Community” 2651 Adams Rd. (near Pippin) Worship Assembly-Sunday 10:45am Phone 825-9553 www.highviewchristianchurch.com

UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST FLEMING ROAD United Church of Christ 691 Fleming Rd 522-2780 Rev Pat McKinney

vention Center and enjoy a cool treat. Thank you in

Sunday School - All Ages - 9:15am Sunday Worship - 10:30am

Nursery Provided

advance for bringing a non-perishable food item to support the Sharonville Food Pantry.

St. Paul United Church of Christ 5312 Old Blue Rock Rd., off Springdale

Phone: 385-9077 Rev. Michelle Torigian Sunday Worship: 10:30am Sunday School: 9:15am Nursery Available/Handicap Access www.stpaulucccolerain.org www.facebook.com/StPaulUCC

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Ascension Lutheran Church

Bollywood Night for Boomers at JCC

CE-0000512462


LIFE

MAY 30, 2012 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • B7

Leibowitz wins Ellis Island Medal include U.S. Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, actress Brooke Shields, singer Frankie Valli and other notable leaders of industry, education, the arts, sports and government. Past medalists include six Presidents, numerous Nobel Prize winners and leaders such as Rosa Parks, Dolores Huerta, Muhammad Ali, Bob Hope, Muriel Siebert, U.S. Sen. Daniel K. Inouye and Elie Wiesel. Leibowitz and his fellow medalists will be honored at a May12 gala celebration on Ellis Island hosted by the National Ethnic Coali-

ABOUT HARRY LEIBOWITZ Long before "boomers giving back" became a story, Harry Leibowitz was pioneering a new model of hands-on philanthropy. He grew up in humble beginnings in Brooklyn, – throughout World War II and into the early 1950s his family lived in an old bungalow in Coney Island where 10 families shared the common bathroom facilities. He began working long hours upon becoming a teenager. Through these experiences, he developed an incredible work ethic and an appreciation for the plight of children born into challenging circumstances. Leibowit went on to enjoy a successful business career, serving in senior executive positions at companies such as Procter & Gamble and ESMARK as well as running his own marketing consultancy. His years of business travels around the world gave him a firsthand taste of the plight of children in developing countries and made a lasting impression. In 1996, Leibowitz had a vision for the World of Children Award when he was recovering from cancer surgery at age 55. Watching the Pulitzer Prize announcements on TV, he noted that while there was a Pulitzer for art and literature, a Nobel for the sciences and peace and an Oscar for films, there were no awards for those who were tirelessly serving children in need. That realization was a catalyst for Leibowitz, and he subsequently founded the World of Children Award with vital support from Starr Commonwealth. Leibowitz then pledged to dedicate the rest of his life to creating a prestigious awards program to support social change makers helping children in need around the world. He now devotes all his time to running the World of Children Award - serving as Board Chair and visiting World of Children Award Honorees around the globe along with his wife, Kay-Isaacson Leibowitz, a World of Children Award board member and retired fashion executive who has served at the helm of leading brands such as Banana Republic and Victoria's Secret. Leibowitz’s honors include the Procter & Gamble Alumni Humanitarian Award in 2007, the Reclaiming Youth International Child Advocacy Award in 2006 and the Starr Commonwealth Child Advocacy Award in 1999. Leibowitz and the World of Children Award are featured in Kenneth Cole’s 2008 book, “Awearness: Using Ordinary Resources To Do Extraordinary Things,” and in the 2012 book “The Humanitarian Leader in Each of Us: 7 Choices That Shape a Socially Responsible Life” and most recently in a book about Procter & Gamble Alumni who have made a difference: “When Core Values Become Strategic.”

NEW YORK MANHATTAN--NYC HOTEL $129/2 persons. Singles $124. Suites $139-$159. Lincoln Ctr area, Hudson River views, 18 flrs, kitchenette, 5 mins to midtown, safe, quiet, luxury area. RIVERSIDE TOWER, Riverside & 80th St. Call 1-800-724-3136 or visit: www.riversidetowerhotel.com

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FLORIDA Beautiful Seagrove Beach Rent & Relax. Nr Destin, between famous Seaside & Rosemary Beach. Cozy Cottages to Gulf Front Condos. Web Specials. 1-800-537-5387 www.garrettbeachrentals.com

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DESTIN. Luxury 2 BR, 2 BA oceanfront condos. Heated pool, spas, kids’ pool & tennis. Sleeps 6. Local owner. www.us-foam.com/destin . D- 513-528-9800, E- 513-752-1735

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tion of Organizations. “As a child of immigrants, whose parents and grandparents walked more than 1,000 miles with barely the clothes on their backs for the opportunity to get on a ship and come to the United States, I can think of no greater recognition for the work we all do for children in need than the Ellis Island Medal of Honor,” Leibowitz said. “I am deeply grateful to accept this honor on behalf of all those brave and selfless individuals who have devoted their lives to serving vulnerable children throughout the world”. Established in 1986 by NECO, the Ellis Island Medal of Honor was designed to pay homage to the immigrant experience, as well as for individual achievement. Medals are awarded to U.S. citizens from various ethnic backgrounds whose professional and personal contributions have created a better world. Both the United States House of Representatives and Senate have officially recognized the Ellis Island Medal of Honor and each year’s recipients are read into the Congressional Record.

LEGAL NOTICE Notice is hereby given that on the 20th day of June 2012, at 7:00 a Public Hearing will be held on the Budget prepared by the City of Springdale, Hamilton County, Ohio, for the next fiscal succeeding year ending December 31, 2013. Such hearing will be held at the office of the Council of the City of 11700 Springdale, Pike, Springfield Ohio Springdale, 45246. Kathy McNear Council of Clerk /Finance Director City of Springdale, 1706439 Ohio NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING City The Wyoming Council will hold a on hearing public 18, June Monday, 2012 at 7:30 p.m. in the Council Chambers at 800 Oak Avenue, Wyoming, OH 45215 on legislation Section amending 505.11, Hunting Prohibited, of the Codified Ordinances. The public is invited to attend and comment. requiring Individuals accomo special dations to participate or attend should contact the City Building 72 hours prior to the meeting. Large type copies and other acare commodations reupon available quest. Lynn Tetley City Manager 6864 NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Notice is hereby given that on the 10th day of 7:00 at 2012 July, P.M., a public hearing will be held on the budget prepared by the City of Sharonville for the next succeed ing fiscal year ending December 31st, 2013 Such hearing will be held in the Council Chambers of the City of Sharonville, 10900 Reading Road, Sharonville, Ohio 45241. /s/ Marcia Cross Funk Clerk of Council May 22, 2012 707063

The Evendale Cultural Arts Center presents a C.F. Payne composition workshop June 23 and June 24. The workshop runs from 8 a.m. until 5 p.m. Saturday and begins at 10

a.m. and ends at 6 p.m. Sunday. The registration fee for the two-day workshop is $200. The Evendale Cultural Arts Center is at 10500 Reading Road in Even-

dale. Call (513) 563-1350 or the Evendale Recreation Center at (513) 563-2247, e-mail evendaleculturalarts@ gmail.com or visit www.evendaleohio.org.

CE-0000512405

Former Wyoming resident Harry Leibowitz, who co-founded the nonprofit World of Children Award with his wife, Kay Isaacson-Leibowitz, has been chosen for an award of his own – the 2012 Ellis Island Medal of Honor. This is a recognition given to remarkable Americans who exemplify outstanding qualities in both their personal and professional lives while continuing to preserve the richness of their particular heritage. This year’s Ellis Island Medal of Honor recipients

Evendale presents Payne workshop

Say

to the newest retirement community in Cincinnati, to quality care, to exceptional value—say yes to The Kenwood!

5435 Kenwood Road | Cincinnati, OH The Senior Star advantage: 35 years of financial stability and experience. CE-0000507804


LIFE

B8 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • MAY 30, 2012

POLICE REPORTS EVENDALE

Ave., Cincinnati, operating a motor vehicle while under suspension and two traffic warrant from Hamilton County Municipal Court, May 15.

Reports not available

GLENDALE Arrests/citations Caitlin McDonald, 21, 303 S. Wayne Ave., Cincinnati, warrant for failing to appear in Glendale Magistrate's Court, May 12. Camika Stroud, 23, 2960 High Forest Lane, Cincinnati, warrant for failing to pay fines and costs owed to Glendale Magistrate's Court, May 15. Michael Kestler, 21, 4215 31st

Incidents/investigations Burglary 100 block of E. Sharon Ave., wallets and jewelry taken from residence, no value on items stolen, burglar entered residence through unlocked door while residents were home working in yard, investigation on going, May 12.

F E STIV A l Assumtion Church

STUART SNOW WILL PRESENT AN

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SUNDAY AFTERNOON AT 2:30PM.

THIS SHOW IS BEING SPONSORED BY NIEDHARD/SNOW FUNERAL HOME.

HE WILL ARRIVE BY LIMO WITH AN ESCORT TO THE STAGE.

MT. HEALTHY

FRIDAY, JUNE 8TH - 6PM TO MIDNIGHT SATURDAY, JUNE 9TH - 5PM TO MIDNIGHT SUNDAY, JUNE 10TH - NOON TO 10PM

GREAT FOOD ALL WEEKEND! WE WOULD LIKE TO INTRODUCE BROTHERTON’S FORMERLY KEN’S KITCHEN. FUNNEL CAKES, PORK CHOP SANDWICHES, BLOOMIN’ ONIONS TURTLE SOUP, CORN ON THE COB, BRATS, METTS, AND BACK AGAIN THIS YEAR - DEEP FRIED PICKLES!

LIVE BANDS ALL WEEKEND! FRIDAY - THE IROCS - 8PM-12PM SATURDAY - STUCK IN TIME - 8PM-12PM SUNDAY - TRISH’S TAPPERS & TWIRLERS - 4PM SUNDAY - BACK STREET BAND - 6:30PM

CHICKEN DINNER! HOMESTYLE • HOMEMADE SUNDAY, JUNE 10TH - NOON-6PM ADULTS $9.00 - CHILDREN $4.00

SHARONVILLE Arrests/citations John Rengers, 45, 276 Terwilligers Run, operating vehicle intoxicated at E275, May 13. Anthony Ellison, 45, 2084 Quail St., passing bad checks at 1629 E. Kemper Road, May 11. Demine Anderson, 28, 1532 Wexford, passing bad checks at 1629 Kemper, May 14. Ronald Neal, 27, 11990 Chardon Lane, endangering children at Kemper, May 12. Christopher Gerns, 30, 4353 Victor Ave., drug paraphernalia at 275, May 10. Tony South, 45, 1034 Pen Ridge Road, misuse of credit card at 10900 Reading Road, May 9. Jasniasha Gibbs, 25, 2140 Selim Ave., theft at 12055 Lebanon, May 8. Asiah Hackworth, 19, 1545 Winford Lane, possession of drugs at 10900 Reading Road, May 8.

Incidents/investigations Assault Reported at 11424 Lebanon Road, May 5. Reported at 3254 E. Kemper Road, May 3. Criminal damaging Reported at 100 E. Business Way, May 9. Theft Firearms valued at $2,800 removed at 10118 Breezy Lane, May 12. Credit card removed at 172 Mount Vernon, May 1. Reported at 10918 LeMarie, May 8. At 11679 Chester, May 9. Jewelry of unknown value removed at 7083 Watersedge, May 8. Reported at Tramway, May 14. Reported at, May 11. Medication of unknown value removed at 11755 Mosteller

ABOUT POLICE REPORTS The Community Press publishes the names of all adults charged with offenses. This information is a matter of public record and does not imply guilt or innocence. To contact your local police department: » Evendale, Chief Niel Korte, 563-2249. » Glendale, Chief Dave Warman, 771-7645 or 771-7882. » Sharonville, Chief Mike Schappa, 563-1147. » Springdale, Chief Mike Mathis, 346-5790. » Wyoming, Chief Gary J. Baldauf, 821-0141. Road, May 9. Unauthorized use of motor vehicle Vehicle used without consent at 2439 E. Sharon, May 11.

SPRINGDALE Arrests/citations John Chapman, 37, 1193 Immaculate Lane, open container at I275, May 9. Jeffrey Duke, 46, 11830 Lawnview Ave., disorderly conduct at 11830 Lawnview Ave., May 11. Stephanie Jones, 51, 845 Clark St., theft at 11700 Princeton Pike, May 11. Brett Haley, 23, 1876 Resor Road, inducing panic at 94 Kemper Road, May 11.

Incidents/investigations Assault Victim struck at 1113 Chesterdale Drive, May 9. Burglary Residence entered at 12038 Marwood Lane, May 9. Criminal mischief Vehicle damaged at 492 Maple Circle Drive, May 13. Domestic Female reported at Chesterdale, May 8. Reported at Cedarhill Drive, May 11. Reported at Cedarhill Drive, May

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WYOMING Arrests/citations Michelle Grey, 27231/2 Harris Ave., 42, theft, Congress Run, arrested Galbraith/Woodbine, May 6. Cherie Taylor, 195 Vale Ave., 30, domestic violence, Vale Ave., May 10. Theresa K. Carroll, 8237 Harvest Spring Place, Las Vegas, NV, 32, drug abuse, Galbraith/Congress Run Road, May 12.

Incidents/investigations Break and entering Vacant residence had forced entry and 40 feet of copper taken from basement area, Burns Ave., May 10. Criminal mischief Graffiti placed on Oak Park bathroom, Oak Ave., May 7. Misuse of credit card Resident advised (8) unauthorized charges on PNC Bank Visa credit card totaling $612.20 in Florida, May 11. Theft Chainsaw and blower taken from front yard, Springfield Pike, April 18. Two unauthorized charges placed on resident's credit card in Florida, Burns Avenue, April 16. Male subject entered Wyoming Middle School and took a Schwinn Hybrid Bicycle, value: $100, Wyoming Ave., May 8.

REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS

FIREWORKS

SATURDAY - 10:00PM SUNDAY 2PM-6PM JOSEPH & MCMAKIN, MT. HEALTHY, OHIO

11. Forgery Reported at 230 Northland Blvd., May 8. Menacing Victim threatened at Chesterdale and Chesterwood, May 12. Theft Ipod valued at $200 removed at 320 Glensprings Drive, May 3. Merchandise valued at $340 removed at 900 Kemper Road, May 3. Cell phones valued at $568 removed at 11700 Princeton Pike, May 3. Medications valued at $170 removed at 11315 Princeton Pike, May 7. Ipad and Kindle valued at $786 removed at 800 Kemper Road, May 7. Valve valued at $420 removed at 11700 Princeton Pike, May 8. $510 in services given without receiving payments at 11725 Commons Drive, May 8. Meal not paid for at 50 Tri County Parkway, May 8. Reported at 245 Northland Blvd., May 8. Purse and contents of unknown value removed at 385 Northland Blvd., May 9. Credit card taken and used without consent at 11388 Princeton, May 9. Purse and contents of unknown

value removed at 11700 Princeton Pike, May 11. Reported at 11625 Springfield Pike, May 11. Reported at 11625 Springfield Pike, May 11. Reported at 11725 Commons Drive, May 13. Vehicle window damaged at 11725 Commons Drive, May 13.

EVENDALE

Evendale Office Condominiums LLC to Nizhnik Tatyan A.; $180,000. 3474 Carpenters Creek Drive: Diederich David J. & Diane L. to Queen Amanda M.; $528,500. 3741 Monets Lane: Baravetto John T. Tr & Beth A. Tr to Holekamp Trevor & Rebecca A.; $387,500.

GLENDALE

1072 Morse Ave.: Kirby Patricia A. Tr to Kleiman Donna L.; $225,000.

SHARONVILLE

10587 Thornview Drive: Lavelle Kevin J. & Mary Kathryn Barkley to Davis Ryan C.; $126,000. 11135 Mulligan St.: M3 LLC to Groh Kenneth E.; $122,000.

11780 Percivale Court: Block Mary H. to Maiden Donna S.; $128,500. 200 Crowne Point Place: Colfax Koehler LLC to Cinelect Inc.; $1,650,000. 3519 Beekley Woods Drive: Obrien Thomas A. & Clare C. to Knapmeyer James T. & Kelly; $224,000. 3535 Beekley Woods Drive: Steimer Aimee D. Tr to Perera Johann & Christin A.; $368,000.

SPRINGDALE

243 Balsam Court: Tri State Holdings LLC to Breen-Fisher LLC; $58,900. 243 Balsam Court: Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. to Tri State Holdings LLC; $54,000. 407 Maple Circle Drive: Hart Michael G. to Diefenbacher

Jacob B. & Megan C.; $88,000.

WOODLAWN

247 Joliet Ave.: Hunn Nancy M. to Morris Sherman; $28,000.

WYOMING

110 Ritchie Ave.: Merhar Stephanie to Nybery Denise B.; $170,000. 1529 Springfield Pike: Pinkston Teresa J. to Davis Charlotte S.; $163,200. 227 Ritchie Ave.: Nyberg Christian H. & Denise Bauer Nyberg to Kinderman Peter J. & Chika K.; $325,000. 511 Oliver Court: Blankenship Charles P. & Belinda C. to Weiskopf David A. & Amy E. Susskind; $805,000.

CITY OF SHARONVILLE ORDINANCE 2012-17 AUTHORIZING THE SAFETY SERVICE DIRECTOR TO ENTER INTO A LAW ENFORCEMENT MUTUAL AID AGREEMENT WITH HAMILTON COUNTY, OHIO, ALL OF ITS RECIPROCAL POLICE AGENCIES, DEERFIELD TOWNSHIP, WARREN COUNTY, OHIO AND WEST CHESTER TOWNSHIP, BUTLER COUNTY, OHIO CITY OF SHARONVILLE AMENDED ORDINANCE 2012-21 AMENDING 2012 APPROPRIATIONS FOR THE GENERAL AND CAPITAL FUNDS CITY OF SHARONVILLE ORDINANCE 2012-22-E AN ORDINANCE PROVIDING FOR THE ISSUANCE AND SALE OF NOTES OF THE CITY OF SHARONVILLE, OHIO, IN THE MAXIMUM PRINCIPAL AMOUNT OF $9,410,000, IN ANTICIPA TION OF THE ISSUANCE OF BONDS FOR THE PURPOSE OF PAYING AT MATURITY BOND ANTICIPATION NOTES HERETO (I) COSTS OF FORE ISSUED FOR THE PURPOSE OF PAYING REAL ESTATE ACQUISITION, AND CONSTRUCTION COSTS OF THE CHESTER ROAD PROJECT, (II) A PORTION OF THE COSTS OF RENOVATING AND ENLARGING THE SHARONVILLE CONVENTION CENTER BY CONSTRUCTING IMPROVE MENTS THERETO, INCLUDING EXPANDING PARKING FACILITIES, AND ALL NECESSARY APPURTENANCES, DESIGN DEVELOPMENT AND CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT, (III) DESIGN AND ENGINEERING COSTS FOR THE SHARONVILLE CONVENTION CENTER, AND (IV) COSTS RELATED TO THE CHESTER ROAD IMPROVEMENT PROJECT, AND DECLARING AN EMERGENCY. CITY OF SHARONVILLE AMENDED ORDINANCE 2012-23-E AN ORDINANCE PROVIDING FOR THE ISSUANCE AND SALE OF REFUNDING BONDS OF THE CITY OF SHARONVILLE, OHIO, IN THE MAXIMUM AGGREGATE PRINCIPAL AMOUNT OF $5,610,000, TO REFUND BONDS OF THE CITY ISSUED IN 2003 FOR THE PURPOSE OF PAYING THE COSTS OF CERTAIN PERMANENT IMPROVEMENTS IN THE CITY, AND DECLARING AN EMERGENCY. Kevin Hardman, President of Council. Passed: May 22, 2012. Attest: Martha Cross Funk, Clerk of Council. Approved: Mayor Virgil G. Lovitt II. Please be advised that the complete text of this legislation may be viewed or purchased during regular business hours at the Sharonville Municipal Building, 10900 Reading Rd., Sharonville, Ohio 45241.


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