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TRI-COUNTY PRESS

Your Community Press newspaper serving Evendale, Glendale, Sharonville, Springdale, Wyoming

WEDNESDAY, MAY 29, 2013

75¢ BECAUSE COMMUNITY MATTERS

Theater sets stage for Goff Princeton senior found found support By Kelly McBride kmcbride@communitypress.com

T

heater is where Caroline Goff found her comfort zone. The Sharonville resident, who has a mild form of autism, transferred to Princeton High School as a sophomore, leaving a nearby district after being bullied. “It can be different being a kid with autism,” Goff said. “I was bullied and lost a lot of friends. “Coming here, I was terrified.” It was in the theater program that she found her support system, and her new friends. “I like the people in theater,” Goff said. “They’ve helped me overcome a lot. “Somebody’s always there to listen.” That became even more important when her father died suddenly in October. “I saw who I could go to,” she said. “That’s what I love about theater. “They went right into action when I got that call about my dad.” See GRADS, Page A2

Princeton High School graduate Caroline Goff, who enjoys working in theater, will study nursing or social work in college. KELLY MCBRIDE/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Book sale from private collection to benefit Glendale pavilion By Kelly McBride kmcbride@communitypress.com

John Kohnle was an avid collector of books, all kinds of books. Over the years, he amassed a collection that approached 1,000, lining the wall of his Glendale living room, floor to ceiling. It’s a collection that his widow, Sherri Kohnle, has decided to donate to help raise funds for a project that she knows would have been important to her husband. This decision didn’t come easily for Sherri, for whom the collection is a dear reminder of her husband. Donating the books to the Harry Whiting Brown Community Center, to be sold to raise money toward the construction of the Glendale Performance Pavilion, is fitting, Sherri said. “John was an avid collector of books,” she said. “He loved history, so he has a good collection of books about the Civil War, the World Wars, the history of the monarchs, Russia, Germany. “He also loved biographies and autobiographies, and had a great selection of celebrities, politicians and religious studies. See BOOKS, Page A3

STRONG FOUNDATION A4 Evelyn Perkins introduces you to the people behind Wyoming Youth Services.

Sherri Kohnle will donate her husband's extensive book collection to raise funds for the Glendale performance pavilion. THANKS TO SHERRI KOHNLE

SIX STAR SERVICE Wyoming Youth Services has dedicated people who are the backbone of the organization. See story, photos , B1

Contact The Press

News ..........................248-8600 Retail advertising ..............768-8357 Classified advertising .........242-4000 Delivery ........................576-8240 See page A2 for additional information

COLLECTION TIME Now you can get more for your dollar. In the next seven to 10 days your carrier will be collecting for your Tri-County Press. When you pay your carrier the monthly charge of $3.50, you will receive a coupon worth $3.50 off a classified ad, Not only will you be Denson helping to supplement your carrier’s income, you will also be saving money doing it. This month we salute Nicholas Denson. Nicholas attends Wyoming Middle School and has played for both the school football and swim teams. He also plays lacrosse and the cello. Nicholas such of his paper route earnings and donates to the Heiffer Project for developing agricultural programs and Wyoming High School Relay for Life team, which benefits cancer research and support programs. For information about our carrier program, call circulation manager Steve Barraco at 248-7110, or e-mail him at sbarraco@communitypress.com.

Vol. 29 No. 39 © 2013 The Community Press ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


NEWS

A2 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • MAY 29, 2013

Grads Continued from Page A1

Goff, who is also involved in choir and enjoys chemistry and anatomy studies, holds a 3.9 GPA. She plans to study nursing or social work at either Wright State University or the University of Cincinnati. Goff shrugs off her impressive GPA, pointing to the social challenges she

has overcome, and continues to face. “Sometimes it’s hard because people don’t understand,” she said. “I’ve learned to look at my friends differently and with some, I realize how blessed I really am.” Princeton College and Career Counselor John Beischel considers Goff an inspiration. “She has not allowed her disability to define her,” Beischel said. “She has worked hard to devel-

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Wyoming High School senior Caleb Lewis plans to study biotechnology at Harvard University. KELLY MCBRIDE/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

op into a young woman who is active in her school and her community. “She has been very committed to theater but also to community service, and has remained optimistic even as she had to deal with the loss of her father. “She has an indomitable spirit that is infectious and inspiring.”

Caleb Lewis Wyoming High School Acting and writing allow Caleb Lewis to express himself, but his leadership and volunteerism stand out as an example to others. The Wyoming High School senior will attend Harvard University in the fall, with plans to study

TRI-COUNTY PRESS

Find news and information from your community on the Web Evendale • cincinnati.com/evendale Glendale • cincinnati.com/glendale Sharonville • cincinnati.com/sharonville Springdale • cincinnati.com/springdale Wyoming • cincinnati.com/wyoming Hamilton County • cincinnati.com/hamiltoncounty

News

Dick Maloney Editor ......................248-7134, rmaloney@communitypress.com Kelly McBride Reporter ...................576-8246, kmcbride@communitypress.com Leah Fightmaster Reporter ..............248-7577, lfightmaster@communitypress.com Melanie Laughman Sports Editor .......248-7573, mlaughman@communitypress.com Nick Dudukovich Sports Reporter .......248-7570, ndudukovich@communitypress.com Scott Springer Sports Reporter ..........576-8255, sspringer@communitypress.com

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Melissa Martin Territory Sales Manager.................768-8357, mmartin@enquirer.com Lisa Lawrence Sales Manager ..........................768-8338, llawrence@enquirer.com

Index Calendar .................B2 Classifieds ................C Food ......................B3 Life ........................B1 Police .................... B5 Schools ..................A5 Sports ....................A6 Viewpoints .............A8

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For customer service ....................576-8240 Stephen Barraco Circulation Manager ....................248-7110, sbarraco@communitypress.com Lynn Hessler District Manager ...........248-7115, lyhessler@communitypress.com

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To place an ad in Community Classified, call 242-4000.

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biotechnology. As he wraps up his high school years, with a 4.56 GPA, he said he’ll miss some special friends he has made. They’re part of Generations Together, a collaboration between Wyoming High Schools and the city’s Senior Commission, which established the partnership program several years ago. Lewis was paired with an elderly couple whom he visits each week. He helps with computer tasks and other household chores, and he benefits from the wisdom of a previous generation. “Spending time with them, I’ve learned to value each day you’re given,” he said. It’s just one of the many activities that Lewis fits into his busy schedule. He served as student council class vice president and is a member of the track team. He’s involved in Project Lead, as well as drama and writing, serving as the editorial editor of the school paper. “I love the idea of being prolific and artistic, and putting a piece of myself on paper,” he said. “When you do that, you have the ability to connect with people.” Lewis also volunteered at Good Samaritan Hospital as a greeter, and worked on a Sister Cities

project on cultural awareness. It’s a delicate balance, he said. “The challenge is spreading myself too thin,” Lewis said. “You want to give your entire self to everything.” Wyoming High School Principal Aaron Marshall said Lewis has been an exemplary student. “Caleb has shown leadership in the classroom and beyond,” Marshall said. “Caleb’s standards for himself are second to none.” Geno Madison Princeton High School Moving to Glendale was a choice that Geno Madison made as a teenager, after a hardship most could never imagine. His parents had been killed when he was just 13, and for two years, he boarded a Greyhound bus and traveled alone to Glendale, to visit his aunt Mary Veasay. “I had to find a new path or comfort zone,” Madison said. The village is where he made his new home, and as a sophomore Madison in high school, he transferred to Princeton and became a Viking. It was at Princeton where he played defensive end and outside linebacker on the football team and holds a nearly 3.0 GPA. He will attend Thomas More College in Crestview Hills, Ky., in the fall, where he will play football for the Saints and study to beSee GRADS, Page A3

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NEWS

MAY 29, 2013 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • A3

Grads Continued from Page A2

come a teacher, perhaps an intervention specialist. “Now I can say I’m doing great things,” Madison said. “My parents were killed when I was 13, so I look at life one day at a time.” He credits his relationship with God. “My belief system got stronger,” Madison said. “I’ve learned it’s a challenge no matter where I am in life. “My hardest challenge is that I don’t have biological parents,” he said. “I’d give up everything to have my parents back.” Princeton College and Career Counselor John Beischel holds Madison as an example to others who have faced hardship. “Geno is the most optimistic student that I have met in many years,” Beischel said. “He is always upbeat, full of energy and laughter. At heart, I believe he is a preacher and he has the spirit and enthusiasm of a person who wants to inspire and encourage others to believe in themselves. “He is a leader and a role model for many younger students.” Jelani Parrish Princeton High School Hard work, last-minute changes and competition served as fuel for Jelani Parrish, who savors the performance as well as the victory. The Princeton High School senior, who won the student of the year award at the Ohio Mock Trial Association competition in the spring, faced a challenge that perhaps no other student tackled.

As the attorney for the prosecution in the local competition, Parrish prepared his Parrish argument. The night before Princeton was to compete, his classmate who was to be the attorney for the defense couldn’t attend. The team had to represent both sides, so Parrish stepped in, arguing as attorney for both the prosecution and defense. It’s unheard of, according to Jim O’Connor, chairman of Princeton’s social studies department. To punctuate his accomplishment, Parrish won as outstanding prosecuting attorney. It’s that level of dedication and ability that sets Parrish apart, O’Connor said of his student, who will attend Carnegie Mellon University in the fall. Parrish’s list of activities is as varied as the skills needed to argue both sides of a trial: » a cappella choir, where he sings bass; » orchestra, where he plays string bass; » football, where he plays safety; » track and field, where his events have included long jump, high jump, discus and pole vault; and » he’s part of the Viking Student Leaders, was a National Achievement finalist and refereed youth soccer. Still, Parrish said, “I don’t get into more than I can handle.” “I’m a competitive person,” he said. “I’m laid back, but when I’m in a competition, I don’t enjoy losing. “My favorite part is the

final payoff of a performance,” he said. “With any competitive event, you work to perfect your craft and present a finished product.” O’Connor said Parrish is always willing to accept challenges. “You ask him to help, he says yes, and he’ll do his best.” Emily Sullivan Wyoming High School On the stage or behind the scenes, Emily Sullivan puts all of her energy into the task. As a teen, she has already been to the New York stage. The Wyoming High School senior recently participated in the National Shakespeare competition and is involved in the school’s theater program. She also plays piano and cello, and will attend Indiana University in the fall, as a Wells Scholar. Sullivan is part of the writing collaborative Women Writing For a Change. “I feel like I have different parts of myself being fulfilled,” she said. “It’s satisfying.” Sullivan and her family also cook meals for Tender Mercies, a Sullivan program that provides food, shelter and other services for those who are mentally ill and homeless. Wyoming High School Principal Aaron Marshal said Sullivan has made an impact on the school. “Emily’s contributions to Wyoming High School are immeasurable,” Marshal said. “Emily will leave behind an outstanding legacy.”

Books “Books on the great cities of the world, and a large selection of fiction, non fiction and politics,” Sherri said. “Books on composers, baseball and other sports.” She will donate all of them, except a collection of classics, to be sold June 8, 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. in the chapel and on the lawn of the Harry Whiting Brown Community Center.

Donations can also be made by calling HWB at 771-0333 or e-mail hwbcenter@yahoo.com. The pavilion will be the site of concerts, plays, speakers and other performances in Glendale. The money raised through the sale of the books will offset the cost of building the pavilion at the HWB center, 205 E. Sharon Ave., estimated at $40,000 after the donation of time and talent from several contributors.

John Kohnle, of Oakwood, Ohio, was a Marine who fought in the South Pacific, earning a Silver Medal and Bronze Medal. He was president and chairman of the board of Monarch Systems in Dayton Ohio. He was a three-term president of the Dayton Philharmonic, and cofounder of Dayton Public Radio. John Kohnle died on Sept. 30, 2009, at the age of 86.

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NEWS

A4 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • MAY 29, 2013

Building community from the youth up

Wyoming Youth Serworker who earned her vices has incredibly master’s degree in social dedicated people who work and psychology are the backbone of the from UC. Meghan Shelorganization. No amount ton is a licensed counselof technology will ever or with a master’s dereplace the human gree in social work. The touch. service learning Kimberly coordinator is AnBraun Houser gie Reichert-Heshas been the ter who did such a executive direcwonderful job tor for the past involving the stueight years and a dents in identifyresident of Wyoing graves at ming for 10 Beechgrove CemeEvelyn years. Her hustery. band, Peter, grew Perkins WYS is an inCOLUMNIST up in Wyoming teresting organizawhile she grew tion with a unique up in Glendale. They array of free services. moved to Wyoming from When Kim began workHartwell and their two ing at there, she found sons, ages 10 and 7, enthat parents were talked joy the benefits of the to, but not the children. outstanding Wyoming Some had been making school system. bad choices and not usKim is an indepening their time in the best dently licensed social way. The community

Wyoming Youth Services Director Kimberly Braun Houser at her desk, busy planning for the future. EVELYN PERKINS/FOR THE COMMUNITY PRESS

became concerned and knew their children needed a support system outside the parents. The program focuses on prevention, support and volunteerism to

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benefit the entire community. It doesn’t duplicate, but rather provides services with guidance counselors. Counseling is the core service. They work with kids in all capacities – in schools, offices, with St. James of the Valley School groups, crisis intervention and support for staff and students. Parents need to know they were not alone with their child’s particular problem. As Kim says, “We are not perfect; no one person knows it all.

We muddle through, so we need to provide support for each other. WYS is the clearing house for information and needed support in a community fashion.” The program is designed so parents can attend at no cost and get the same service as with a psychologist. There is a huge prevention component to help kids and the family stay on track regarding bullying, safe Internet use, alcohol and drugs, etc. It is based on the Search Institute framework of 40 Developmental Assets, which identifies the characteristics kids need to survive and develop into successful contributing adults. WYS community forums especially target prevention, using a community-centered approach where all are committed and share a philosophy. Angie has a splendid after-school program for the Middle School, and a school break program for two hours a day over the summer so as to engage students in innovative learning. They embrace technology, but

reinforce values. There is much emphasis on service in the high school Angie works hard to develop service opportunities for the middle school such as when the “Make It Happen” program packaged food for hungry children at the Freestore Foodbank. The objective is so that when they get to high school, the students are eager to invest their time wisely. Kim’s vision is to create a culture of volunteerism in Wyoming for the entire community so their children will take those values with them into the adult world. There is much more information on their two Facebook pages: Wyoming Youth Services tells about the programs and “Who B-U?” is about prevention.

Evelyn Perkins writes a regular column about people and events in the Tri-County Press area. Send items for her column to 10127 Chester Road, Woodlawn, 45215, or call her directly at 772-7379.

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SCHOOLS

MAY 29, 2013 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • A5

TRI-COUNTY

PRESS

Editor: Dick Maloney, rmaloney@communitypress.com, 248-7134

ACHIEVEMENTS | NEWS | ACTIVITIES | HONORS

CommunityPress.com

Third-graders at Sharonville Elementary are ready for the Family Movie Night to begin. With refreshments, pillows and stuffed animals are Alyssa Smith, Rebecca Switzer and Emma Carpenter. THANKS TO CARLA SHROYER

First-grader Oscar Sandy, second-grader Shakhzod Tilyayev, fifth-grader Edvin Marquin-Ortiz and second-grader Makenna Carrigan search for the best book selection after the Sharonville Family Movie Night presentation. THNKS TO CARLA SHROYER

A movie experience Sharonville Elementary held a family movie night. Students and their families brought blankets and pillows and enjoyed a popcorn bar and refreshments. The coloring contest winners were announced before the movie and raffle tickets were handed out to all students present to receive a new book after the movie. For more photos, click here. The following students won a certificate, a book and a $10 gift card to Barnes and Noble for the Heroes coloring contest: » kindergarten: Cynthia Aparicio and Drea’ von Andrews; » first-grade: Cheyenne Bouldin and Savannah Fetick; » second-grade: Ema Carter, Alisha Barnes and Ijahliah Caldwell; » third-grade: Damaya Washington, Sincere HoustonWhite and Bayleigh Zimmer; » fourth-grade: Markayla Bell; » fifth-grade: Lily Hall and Malorie Huddleston.

Sharonville Elementary School fourth-grader Madelyn Sherwood, third-grader Alexis Bothe and fourth-grader Rachel Hammonds settling in for the Sharonville movie feature in the school cafetorium. Many students and their families enjoyed the evening out. THANKS TO CARLA SHROYER

Students and their families are spread out with blankets and pillows to watch the feature movie at the Sharonville Family Movie Night in the cafetorium. THANKS TO CARLA SHROYER

WELL-MASKED INTENTIONS

Sharonville Elementary second-grader DaÕnely Castaneda and her brother are ready for the Sharonville Family Movie Night to begin. TheyÕre already enjoying their refreshments from the popcorn bar. THANKS TO CARLA SHROYER

Wyoming student Linn wins Overture award By Kelly McBride

kmcbride@communitypress.com

Wyoming High School junior Olivia Linn has won the Creative Writing Overture Award for her poetry. The award includes a $3,000 scholarship. “I am delighted that Olivia won the OverLinn ture Award, but am not especially surprised," English teacher Keith Lehman said. "Olivia is an outstanding writer, who has devoted her-

Bethany School sixth-graders celebrated Mardi Gras with a parade and a party. King cakes helped choose this year's king and queen and crepes rounded out the menu. Annie Jackson peeks through her mask. THANKS TO SCOTT BRUCE

Sharonville Elementary first-grader Evelyn Gregory and fourth-grader Madelyn Sherwood choose a new book from the raffle after Family Movie Night while some of the teachers look on. THANKS TO CARLA SHROYER

self to developing an authentic writing voice. "She has written with Women Writing for (a) Change and she was a cherished member of the Power of the Pen team in junior high. Her poetry has been published in the high school's creative writing and art magazine, and has received gold keys from the Scholastic Art and Writing competition. "I look forward to reading more of her work, and seeing what she achieves as a writer,” Lehman said. “I first had the opportunity to read Olivia’s poetry when she was a student at the middle

school," orchestra teacher Laura Coomer said. "One of her poems brought me to tears because of the emotion and the depth of her writing. "I have been following her work ever since," she said. "Her latest piece is the story of Icarus as told from a young woman's perspective. "It, too, expresses power and emotion. "Olivia is a gifted poet. I am so pleased that she received the Overture Award as recognition of her talent.” For more about your community, visit www.Cincinnati.com/Wyoming.

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SPORTS

A6 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • MAY 29, 2013

Editor: Melanie Laughman, mlaughman@communitypress.com, 513-248-7573

HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | RECREATIONAL

TRI- COUNTY

PRESS

CommunityPress.com

Cowboys’ ride ends in final Wyoming ends 20-9 in successful season By Scott Springer sspringer@communitypress.com

WYOMING — In their quest to return to the regional finals in Division II as they did last year, coach Chris Fiehrer’s Wyoming Cowboys had to get past Clermont Northeastern on May 23 in the sectional final. Wyoming came into the game 20-8, which was three games more than they won all of last season when they advanced to the regional final in Dayton before falling to St. Francis De Sales. However, the 2013 tournament run was snuffed out by a hot CNE Rocket team that sent the Cowboys home with a 4-1 loss. With an abundance of junior talent, particularly in pitching, the odds of seeing Wyoming right back in the tournament hunt in 2014 are very strong. Part of Wyoming’s success this spring was the awakening of junior Will Marty’s bat. A .256 hitter a year ago, Marty came into the CNE game at .493, just shy of Max Kadish’s .494 in 2012. In the Cincinnati Hills League, the Wyoming slugger/ quarterback trailed only Madeira’s much-celebrated Andrew Benintendi. “If I’m being honest, yeah, we were a little surprised at the way he swung the bat,” Fiehrer said. “When we graduated Kadish, we worried about who was going to fill that three-hole. We put Will in that spot and he’s really flourished. All of his accolades have been for football, but he’s a very good baseball player.” Parker Chalmers was just behind Will Marty at .469 and Sam Izenson was at .341. Both are part of five sophomores on the squad. “You forget that Parker was with us as a freshman,” Fiehrer said. “At the top of the lineup, he’s been a catalyst. Even when he’s making outs, he gives us quality at-bats.” The junior class features Wyoming pitching with Casey Howell leading in ERA, Michael Kelly in wins and Henry Moore contributing on the mound and

Shortstop Parker Chalmers stretches to catch a throw from pitcher Michael Kelly. Offensively, the sophomore has been Wyoming’s top hitter. ROD APFELBECK/FOR THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Wyoming’s Henry Moore fields a grounder during the Cowboys’ 4-3 win over Bethel-Tate on May 16. ROD APFELBECK/FOR THE COMMUNITY PRESS

at the plate with a .329 average. Sophomore Tucker Marty, Will’s cousin, also finished 3-0 on the bump. Those who follow the CHL are well aware of the Cowboys’ pitching depth. “It’s exciting,” Fiehrer said. “We have such a good junior class and the thought of having them all as seniors gets me excited about next year. They’re all pretty serious about baseball.” Wyoming’s departing seniors are Daniel Gilbert, Kyle Guggenheim and Hayden Sharp. To thank them for their accom-

plishments, Fiehrer recently took the trio to Outback Steakhouse. “You always need good seniors on your team, whether they play a lot or not play a lot,” Fiehrer said. “You want good kids that provide good leadership and those three guys have done that for us.” Next year’s bill might due a little more damage to Fiehrer’s wallet as six of this season’s talented juniors are slated for a carnivorous celebration in May 2014.

Wyoming second baseman Sam Izenson makes a leaping catch for the third out in the top of the seventh to secure the Cowboys’ 4-3 win over Bethel-Tate on May 16. With the victory, Wyoming advanced to play Clermont Northeastern May 23, past print deadline. ROD APFELBECK/FOR THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Viking baseball trying to right ship New coach faced challenges in year 1 By Mark D. Motz mmotz@communitypress.com

SHARONVILLE — What some view as an insult, others take in stride. Coaches need to know the difference and when to push what players’ buttons. That’s just one of the challenges Princeton High School varsity baseball coach Rick Wilson faced in his first year at the Vikings helm. Another - and one that probably more directly contributed to a 6-21 season - would be playing in the Greater Miami Conference, regularly facing the likes of nationally ranked Mason.

“In a nutshell they brought me in for some stability,” Wilson said. “I’ve been the third head coach in four years for the seniors, which has been really tough on them. I know the senior year only comes along once in a lifetime and I wanted to be able to look myself in the mirror and say I did all I could to do right by those kids. “We showed improvement in terms of wins and losses and we really laid a foundation. It’s going to take a couple or three years to be where we can consistently compete with the Masons in our league.” “We haven’t been winning conference games at any level and we did that on all three levels (freshman, JV and varsity) this year. There certainly are a

lot of positives looking ahead.” One of them may come in the form of a scrawny, scrappy sophomore infielder-outfielder-pitcher named Joey Krause, who goes about 5-foot-6 and 135 pounds. “He came out and he looked like the bat boy on a lot of our competitors’ teams,” Wilson said. “He just wasn’t very big. He took what I said to him about that not as a slight, but took it as motivation to go out and work. He really exemplified that.” Krause - a natural lefty, but who writes with his right hand knows pointing out reality isn’t an insult. “It didn’t hurt my feelings,” he said. “It’s true. I really wanted to play varsity and thought I deserved to play. I had to work

hard and be flexible to stay on the team.” He wound up with a lot of innings at first base and as pitcher. “I like first base just because you get a lot more action there,” Krause said. “It’s really where most of the plays in the infield wind up. “But I’d really rather pitch than anything. Right now I’m more of an off-speed pitcher. I can’t throw it by anybody yet.” Wilson said players like Krause and others who will return will have ample opportunity for coaching and conditioning in the off season. He also plans to help develop more youth baseball in the area. “We have to build up our community baseball if we’re going to compete,” he said.

“Mason, Sycamore, those guys have been playing together for years by the time they get to high school and it shows. We have to get the little guys interested in Princeton baseball. “I’ve been a player-development guy. When I was a summer coach I would be a team for four or five years. We’d really identify areas for improvement and address them over time.” Krause said Wilson and the Vikings are on the right track. “I feel like we have the talent,” he said. “We have a really good future. We lost a lot of close games this season. In those kind of games, they can go either way and you have to put yourself in position for it to go your way. We’re learning that.”


SPORTS & RECREATION

MAY 29, 2013 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • A7

MND record-holding scorer enters hall of fame

SIDELINES Aqua Zumba Springdale Parks and Recreation is offering Aqua Zumba classes on Thursday from 6:30-7:30 p.m. and Saturday from 11 a.m. to noon, beginning June 6 and 8 at the Springdale Community Center pool, 11999 Lawnview Ave. Keep cool with this high energy no impact workout. Class fees for Springdale residents is $25 for five classes or $30 for non-residents. Walk-ins: $7 per class for Springdale residents or $8 for non-residents. Call instructor Pat Cox at 385-6111.

Golf classic Since its opening in May 1938, the Sharon Woods Golf Course has provided a beautiful and challenging 18-hole game. Players are invited to be part of history by taking part in the 75th Anniversary Golf Classic Tournament Saturday, June 1. The tournament is an 8 a.m. shotgun start and includes two-person better ball, both gross and net divisions. There will be an optional skins game, both gross and net. A putting contest will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. The cost is $75 per team and includes prizes and lunch. Registration and payment can be made online at greatparks.org/golf/tournaments or by calling Sharon Woods Golf Course at 769-4325. The tournament is part of a week-long celebration, May 27–June 2, which includes contests, giveaways, golf specials and more. Visit greatparks.org/golf/sharon-woods for details. Sharon Woods Golf Course is located at 11355 Swing Road, Sharonville. A valid Hamilton County Park District Motor Vehicle Permit ($10 annual; $3 daily) is required to enter the park.

Mel Thomas, the all time leading scorer in the history of Mount Notre Dame’s basketball program, was inducted into the school’s Hall of Fame April 18. MND’s 2004 state championship-winning basketball team was also recognized at the event. Thomas was co-captain of that 2004 MND team that finished the season with 28 wins and no losses, sweeping to the Division 1 State Championship. The team finished ranked number one or two in the nation by numerous publications. Individually, Thomas was named: » Miss Ohio Basketball as the state’s top female player; » Co-player of the Year and first-team All-State by the Associated Press; » Grange Insurance

renowned women’s basketball program at the University of Connecticut. A three-time Big East Academic All-Star, she finished her career ranked fifth in UConn history in three-pointers and led the team to a Final Four appearance in her senior year. She published a book, “Heart of a Husky,” which

Congratulating Mel Thomas, second from right, on her induction into the Mount Notre Dame High School Athletic Hall of Fame are, from left, Mark Schenkel, MND athletic director; Dr. Scott Rogers, coach of the 2004 MND state championship team of which Thomas was a co-captain; and Lindsay Turpin-Howard, team manager of the 2004 squad. THANKS TO JIM KAPP

Most Valuable Player of the 2004 state championship game; » McDonald’s AllAmerican, playing in the all-star game in Oklahoma City; » Player of the Year for

Do You Have Ulcerative Colitis?

Is it hard to control your symptoms using your current medication?

the Girls’ Greater Cincinnati League and the Cincinnati Enquirer; » Second-team AllAmerica by Parade magazine. Thomas received a full scholarship to play for the

What

This study will evaluate whether the study medication, budesonide MMX®, is safe and effective in people with ulcerative colitis that is not well controlled using anti-inflammatory medications known as 5-aminosalicylic acids (5ASAs). Budesonide MMX®, is approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA). This study is looking to see whether budesonide MMX® (given by mouth as tablet) and 5-ASA medication used together can better control the symptoms of ulcerative colitis.

TOURNAMENT BRIEFS Baseball » Wyoming’s season ended May 23 with a 4-1 loss to Clermont Northeastern in the Division II tournament. The Cowboys finished second in the Cincinnati Hills League and were 20-9 overall.

Regular season baseball

» Wyoming defeated Roger Bacon 5-4 on May 20.

Track and field

» Princeton High School qualified several athletes out of the Division I district meet at Ma-

son to compete at regionals. Boys included Kevin Rainey (110 hurdles), Halen Witcher (400), the 4x100 relay and the 4x400 relay. Girls included Samia Bell (100) and Lindsey Myers (3,200). » Wyoming High School qualified several athletes out of the district meet to compete at regionals, including Kolan Livingston (discus).

short 6-5 to end their season at 8-9.

Who

Personnel matters

Adults 18-75 years old who have been diagnosed with mild or moderate ulcerative colitis (UC) and continue to have symptoms even when taking a 5-ASA medication (such as Asacol® and Lialda®) to treat UC.

» Pending school board approval Wyoming athletic director Scott Kaufman will be hired as athletic director/assistant principal at Lakota East High School effective Aug. 1.

Pay

Participants will be compensated for time and travel. All medication will be provided at no cost to participants.

Holiday deadlines

Because of Memorial Day deadlines, some tournament results were unable to be included in print. You may check results from the various sports on www.cincinnati.com/preps.

Boys lacrosse

» Wyoming beat Kettering Alter 17-2 in opening round tournament action May 22. The victory put the Cowboys against Turpin on May 24. In that contest, the Cowboys fell

Details

For more information, contact Lauren Plageman at 513-558-5529 or lauren.plageman@uchealth.com

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VIEWPOINTS

A8 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • MAY 29, 2013

Editor: Dick Maloney, rmaloney@communitypress.com, 248-7134

EDITORIALS | LETTERS | COLUMNS | CH@TROOM

TRI-COUNTY

PRESS

CommunityPress.com

Tax code abuse is the real scandal Everyone has heard of the Tea Party. Does everybody know that while Tea Party groups were fighting against taxation, they were applying to the Internal Revenue Service for tax exempt status? Huge numbers of entities with “Tea Party” in their name or description applied to the IRS (right during an election) for 501(c)(4) tax exemption. The focus of the current IRS/Tea Party flap should not just be about IRS scrutiny, but more importantly should be about abuse of the tax code. The IRS has admitted to grouping Tea Party supporting groups for review. What isn’t being reported is that the IRS also scrutinized progressive groups. In fact, the liberalleaning “Emerge America” had its 501(c)(4) status changed.

Does that sound like None of the Tea Party a description of the Tea groups was required Party? to change. The idea that these A prized tax status Tea Party groups are from the IRS is being social welfare organizadesignated as a social tions is ludicrous. The welfare, tax free overriding purpose of 501(c)(4) organization. these groups is to influThis status permits Richard ence elections, making acceptance of secret Schwab donations. COMMUNITY PRESS them ineligible for The Internal Reve- GUEST COLUMNIST 501(c)(4) tax exempt status. nue Code Section Melanie Sloan, executive 501(c)(4) states: “501(c)(4) director of Citizens for Reorganizations are generally civic leagues and other compa- sponsibility and Ethics in Washington (CREW) said, nies operated exclusively for “Let’s not be sidetracked. The the promotion of ‘social welreal problem is that phony fare’...501(c)(4) organizations 501(c)(4) groups are exploiting are not permitted direct or the tax laws to protect donors indirect participation or inwho don’t want to be held actervention in political camcountable for vicious, deceitpaigns on behalf of or in oppoful, political ads. Hopefully sition to any candidate for this scandal will put these public office.”

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Incentives improve skilled nursing care

Gov. John Kasich has received recent coverage in speaking to the need to prevent falls and take other quality-based steps to ensure healthy aging in Ohio. I applaud his efforts on this as it is in line with skilled nursing facilities across the state that are committed to providing, and continually improving, quality care to Ohio’s rapidly growing population of seniors. To do this, these facilities need help. Recognizing this, legislators in the Ohio House of Representatives included incentive payments for nursing facility quality into the 2014-2015 state budget bill, which I and our profession urge the Ohio Senate and governor to retain. Gov. Kasich and his administration have said that, over time, they hope to raise the bar of quality so that all skilled nursing facilities in Ohio deliver the highest levels of quality care in the nation, a commitment shared by legislators. This is a laudable goal, but it will not be attained without incentives that reward quality performance. I urge the General Assembly and governor to keep the quality payments as proposed in the final budget. Ohio’s not-for-profit long-term care facilities, including Maple Knoll Village here in Hamilton

We welcome your comments on editorials, columns, stories or other topics. Include your name, address and phone number(s) so we may verify your letter. Letters of 200 or fewer words and columns of 500 or fewer words have the best chance of being published. All submissions may be edited for length, accuracy and clarity. Deadline: Noon Friday E-mail: tricountypress@ communitypress.com Fax: 248-1938 U.S. mail: See box below Letters, columns and articles submitted to The Tri-County Press may be published or distributed in print, electronic or other forms.

County, are committed to delivering the highest quality of care to our residents, many of whom are among our community’s most vulnerable. We take this mission to heart because we are taking care of someone’s mother, father, aunt, uncle, sister, brother, husband or wife. All of the people we take care of deserve, and should expect, high quality care. James M. Formal Maple Knoll Communities Inc.

POLITICALLY SPEAKING Comments from local leaders about issues in the news:

The job is not finished

“Although the unemployment number has fallen slightly, it does not paint the full picture of the current state of our hurting economy. What the topline numbers don’t tell you is that our labor force participation rate remained at the lowest level since 1979, meaning millions still have yet to see a real recovery and have given up hope of new opportunity. “ I introduced the bipartisan CAREER Act to address ineffi-

ciency and redundancy in federal job training programs in order to furnish participants with the skills needed by employers and incentivize better performance among training providers. Ensuring that America’s workers are equipped with the skills required to obtain jobs currently open in the market is one important step toward putting people back to work. “I will continue to push for progrowth tax, entitlement and regulatory reform needed for robust economic growth and job creation.” – U.S. Sen. Rob Portman, reacting to the April jobs report

TRI-COUNTY

PRESS

A publication of

calling their 501(c)(4) status into question? » How can we put a stop to the abuse of tax filing status for overtly political purposes? The IRS would have been remiss had it not paid special attention to groups, rife with duplicity and concealment, masquerading as “social welfare” entities. If the name of your socalled “social welfare” group stands for Taxed Enough Already, you probably deserve and should expect extra scrutiny from the IRS. Richard O. Schwab was associate head of school, and middle school head, Cincinnati Country Day School. He is founder of Glendale Organizing For America Community Team.

CH@TROOM May 22 question

ABOUT LETTERS AND COLUMNS

obscure but politically significant groups on the public’s radar.” We need to be asking the right questions about all aspects of 501(c)(4) enforcement. And, Congress isn’t. » Why does an IRS regulation allow these groups to work “primarily” (a vague term) for social welfare when the statute clearly requires them to engage in such activity “exclusively?” » Why is the IRS allowing excessive political action by 501(c)(4) groups? » Why is the IRS allowing political action groups to pose as “social welfare” groups? » Do any of these so- called “social welfare” organizations perform any function that is not basically political? If the answer is no, why isn’t the IRS

Do you think IRS officials targeting of conservative groups is a onetime mistake or does a culture of abusing its power exist within the organization? Why or why not?

“I think people are giving the IRS too much credit for targeting conservative groups. They are generally overworked and underfunded and do not have a lot of spare time to pursue political agendas. “Groups with certain keywords in their names, like the ones allegedly targeted, have abused the tax system for years by claiming to be charities when, in fact, they were political lobbying organizations. “It is my belief that they were ‘profiling’ these groups for audit for legitimate purposes. This was likely a well intentioned, but bungled move on their part. “As a CPA practicing before the IRS, I deal with them frequently and, for the most part, they are sincere government employees trying to do a difficult job. When they do their best, everyone hates them and when they back off, Congress investigates them for not catching the tax cheats.” F.S.D.

“Tough call. I do believe there is politics involved in the decision to flag these groups. Nevertheless, the IRS is a huge, cumbersome bureaucracy. “I think ineptitude, uncertain guidelines and direction and the ‘snail’s pace’ movement of any government entity also played a part. “Don’t get me wrong, I am not an Obama supporter. I think, however, the Republicans can get a lot of mileage out of this (and I don’t blame them). When the shoe’s on the other foot the same thing happens.” T.B.

“I got politically active in early 2009, including participating in Tea Party events, writing letters to the editor and emailing and calling politicians of both parties on matters important to the Tea Party. “In late 2009 my personal tax return for 2007 was audited, the first and only time I have ever been audited. My return for 2007 contained nothing very unusual as compared to any other year. “Of course, I can't prove it, but I absolutely believe that I was targeted as a result of my political activities. I have heard comments

NEXT QUESTION Do you think Congress should approve the bill that would allow the nation's 11 million unauthorized immigrants to apply for U.S. citizenship, while also providing significant new investments in border security? Why or why not? Every week we ask readers a question they can reply to via e-mail. Send your answers to tricountypress@communitypress.com with Chatroom in the subject line.

from other conservatives who had similar experiences with the IRS. “By the way, after many hours of work to answer all the IRS questions I did not owe them anything.” T.H.

“I think this is just another example of the government's trying to suppress the conservative movement in order to insure the success of its socialist agenda items. Strike fear in the hearts of the people and they will shut up, allowing things as heinous as the Third Reich to occur. “It's starting to happen here and everything is being couched in the positive rationale that 'it's for the common good.' Even the seemingly beneficial reverse mortgages are just another way for the feds to grab up land that would otherwise go to the heirs of the elderly people who are just using this tactic as a way to reduce their living costs. “When the government starts overstepping its legal bounds, legislating every aspect of our lives and the choices we used to be free to make we know that tyranny has arrived. Both political parties are guilty of this. “It's time to reclaim our Constitution and get back to the honor and dignity that this country once had. We need a new, strong third party filled with uncorrupted politicians who can stop the insanity before we find ourselves living in the USSR (United States Socialist Republic). It didn't work in the original USSR and it won't work here, at least not while older Americans who remember our God-given freedoms are still alive. “Unfortunately, our system of education is promoting the socialist, liberal agenda and the younger generation thinks that this is the way to go. I miss the 'old' America ... a country in which people worked hard for a living and would rather die than to live off of

394 Wards Corner Road Loveland, Ohio 45140 phone: 248-8600 email: tricountypress@communitypress.com web site: www.communitypress.com

the sweat of another person's brow. “Liberal, social policies destroy this desire to work hard and they also destroy morality, ethics, and common decency.” C.H.

“Oh, I am sure this is a political motivated move of the current administration on part of the IRS. Being the history of a bully, the IRS in the most part has been more user friendly these past few years.” O.R.

“I think it is a one-time mistake based on poor oversight. “However, since the Tea Party mantra is anti-tax, and not wanting to pay anything back to the country, I don't mind that they were being investigated. “If any group would seek to abuse a non-profit status to further their political agenda it would be the Tea Party.” I.P.

May 15 question Should Ohio’s legislature pass a right-to-work law? Why or why not?

“Right to Work is a pleasant but misleading title for a very dangerous piece of legislation. The result will actually be to weaken and eventually starve the most important sources of worker’s rights in our nation’s history, our labor unions. “It will not attract living wage jobs or improve working conditions. It will only ensure that corporate CEOs continue to put profits before people. As employees, it is not in our best interest to risk lower wages, disappearing benefits and unsafe working conditions simply to avoid the price of union dues. Will we sell our silence for so little? If this legislation is such a great deal, then why is it the big corporations who are donating big money to help our Republican lawmakers pass it, and not the workers?” K.M.

“Yes! Locally, Ohio needs a right-to-work law so that we are attractive for businesses to operate here as compared to our similar neighboring states Michigan and Indiana that have right-towork laws. Globally, we need this law so that foreign investment in manufacturing and jobs will want to come to Ohio.” Charles Tereck

Tri-County Press Editor Dick Maloney rmaloney@communitypress.com, 248-7134 Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday See page A2 for additional contact information.


WEDNESDAY, MAY 29, 2013

LIFE

TRI-COUNTY PRESS

PEOPLE | IDEAS | RECIPES

Bodman Pavilion at Maple Knoll Village, 11100 Springfield Pike, received a Six Star Award. PROVIDED

SPRINGDALE RESTAURANTS EARN

SIX STAR AWARDS By Kelly McBride kmcbride@communitypress.com

The Springdale Health Department has presented its annual food safety honor award program for local restaurants. The 2013 Six Star Award winners are: » Beecher Place at Maple Knoll Village; » Bodman Pavillion at Maple Knoll Village; » Breeze Manor at Maple Knoll Village; » Blue Agave Mexican Grill; » Chick-Fil-A; » Jimmy Johns; » Main Street Cafe at Maple Knoll Village; » Manor House Restaurant; » Ponderosa; » Riley’s Restaurant; and » SMOQ. “Springdale has many excellent food services and would like to honor the very best with the Six Star Honor Award,” Health Commissioner Cammie Mitrione said. “This award honors excellence in food safety by considering several factors including the results of routine health inspections and current food safety training.

Criteria for the award include: » fewer than two critical violations during routine Health Department inspections per license year (March 1, 2011 – Feb. 29, 2012); » no follow up inspections per license year; » no smoke-free violations per license year; » In good standing with other city of Springdale agencies; » have a valid food license according to the requirements of the Ohio Revised Code for one full license year and renewed license by due date; and » educational requirements: persons-in-charge (manager, supervisor, owner) – show proof of ServSafe. “The Springdale Health Department recognize these restaurants in Springdale that have earned the Six Star Award and acknowledges their efforts to maintain a level of excellence in food safety which keeps food safe and prevents food-borne illness,” Mitrione said.

Chick-Fil-A received Springdale's Six Star Award. PROVIDED

For more about your community, visit www.Cincinnati.com/Springdale.

Ponderosa Steakhouse, at 11560 Princeton Pike, received a Six Star Award. PROVIDED

Jimmy John's, at 11493 Princeton Pike, received a Six Star Award. PROVIDED


B2 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • MAY 29, 2013

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD THURSDAY, MAY 30

double taxation from Don Spurlock and Bob McManus of Safe Money America. Free. Presented by Safe Money America. Through June 8. 829-3733; www.safemoneyamerica.com. Sharonville. Manny Awards, 5:30-8:30 p.m., Sharonville Convention Center, 11355 Chester Road, Committed to recognizing manufacturing industry’s greatest accomplishments. Honor local companies for their innovation and best practices. Keynote speaker: Greg Morris, GE Aviation. $65. Reservations required. 771-7744; www.cincymagazine.com. Sharonville.

Art Exhibits Material Matters, 10 a.m.-7 p.m., Gallery Veronique, 11324 Montgomery Road, Juried show featuring a broad range of styles from realistic imagery to abstractions, as well as 2-D and 3-D pieces. Free. 530-5379; galleryveronique.com. Symmes Township.

Business Seminars Blogging 101 for Business, 10-11:30 a.m., Dimalanta Design Group, 4555 Lake Forest Drive, No. 650, With Ernie Dimalanta, founder of Out-&-Out Marketing and owner of Dimalanta Design Group, and Wendy Hacker, PR and social media consultant of Dimalanta Design Group. Learn about blogging and how it can help you grow your business. $10. Reservations required. 588-2802. Blue Ash. Blogging: Stay Relevant and Engaged, 10-11:30 a.m., Dimalanta Design Group, 4555 Lake Forest Drive, No. 650, Overview on most popular blogging platforms available, learn blogging techniques and best practices and create your own editorial calendar. Ages 18 and up. $10. Reservations required. 588-2802; blogging5-30.eventbrite.com. Blue Ash.

Cooking Classes Asian Fusion Tapas with Yen Hsieh, 6:30-9 p.m., Cooks’ Wares, 11344 Montgomery Road, Linking many distinct flavors of Orient together while highlighting individual aspects of each. $45. Reservations required. 489-6400. Symmes Township.

Dance Classes Line Dancing, 6-7 p.m., Fitness Physiques by Nico G, 9681 Kenwood Road, Music from variety of genres. $10-$15. Registration required. 290-8217; www.fitnessphysiques.net. Blue Ash.

Exercise Classes Fitness BootCamp, 6-7 p.m., Glendale New Church, 845 Congress Ave., $10. Registration required. 772-4565; concreteandiron.com. Glendale. Pilates Playground, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Fitness Physiques by Nico G, 9681 Kenwood Road, Works entire body through series of movements performed with control and intention. $15. Registration required. 290-8217; www.fitnessphysiques.net. Blue Ash. MELT Method, 10:30-11:30 a.m., Fitness Physiques by Nico G, 9681 Kenwood Road, Unique handsoff bodywork approach that helps prevent pain, heal injury and erase negative effects of aging and active living. $10-$15. Registration required. 290-8217; www.fitnessphysiques.net. Blue Ash. Yoga/Pilates Infusion, 5-6 p.m., Fitness Physiques by Nico G, 9681 Kenwood Road, Contemporary blend of flowing yoga movements and core-centric Pilates sequences. $10-$15. 290-8217; www.fitnessphysiques.net. Blue Ash. Step N2, 5-6 p.m., Springdale Community Center, 11999 Lawnview Ave., Step aerobics class consists of choreographed step patterns set to motivating R&B music. $5. 346-3910. Springdale.

Health / Wellness Wellness Myths and Misunderstandings, 7-8 p.m., FIT Montgomery, 9030 Montgomery Road, Suite 18, Topic: Fat Headed People Rule. Coordinated discussion group to explore health and wellness discoveries found in latest peer-reviewed medical journals. Ages 18 and up. $5. 823-2025; wellnessmyths2013.eventbrite.com. Sycamore Township. OPTIFAST Weight Loss Program Information Session, 7-8 p.m., Weight Management Solutions, 8001 Kenwood Road, Free. Registration required. 956-3729; www.e-mercy.com. Sycamore Township.

On Stage - Comedy Nate Bargatze, 8 p.m., Go Bananas, 8410 Market Place, Comedian. $8-$14. 984-9288; www.gobananascomedy.com. Montgomery.

Senior Citizens Open House, 2-4 p.m., Maple Knoll Village, 11100 Springfield Pike, Free refreshments and tours. For seniors. Free. 7822488. Springdale.

Education

The free Summer Concerts on the Green returns to the Harry Whiting Brown Community House, pictured, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday, June 1, 305 E. Sharon Ave., Glendale, with the OK Ramblers, playing traditional country music. Bring picnic food and beverages. For information, call 771-0333. TONY JONES/THE COMMUNITY PRESS Support Groups Codependents Anonymous, 7-8 p.m., The Community of the Good Shepherd, 8815 E. Kemper Road, Room 31. Literature discussion group. Free, donations accepted. 800-0164. Montgomery. Codependents Anonymous, Noon-1 p.m., Blue Ash Presbyterian Church, 4309 Cooper Road, Youth room. Big book/ discussion meeting. Brown bag lunch optional. Open to everyone who desires healthy loving relationships. Donations accepted. 673-0174; www.coda.org. Blue Ash. Everyone Needs Support: The Need to Talk, 7-8:30 p.m., St. Michael Church of Sharonville, 11144 Spinner Ave., Learn true value of caregiver support groups. 929-4483. Sharonville.

FRIDAY, MAY 31 Art Exhibits Material Matters, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Gallery Veronique, Free. 530-5379; galleryveronique.com. Symmes Township.

Exercise Classes Fitness BootCamp, 6-7 p.m., Glendale New Church, $10. Registration required. 772-4565; concreteandiron.com. Glendale. Small Group Personal Training, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Fitness Physiques by Nico G, 9681 Kenwood Road, Strength movements to build lean muscle, cardio bursts to keep your heart racing, personal training direction and supervision to lead you to fitness goals. Ages 18 and up. Registration required. 290-8217. Blue Ash.

Festivals All Saints Parish Festival, 6 p.m.-midnight, All Saints Church, 8939 Montgomery Road, Entertainment, games and raffle. Hot dogs, hamburgers, cheeseburgers, fries, gyros, funnel cakes, spring rolls and pizza available for purchase. Alcohol available for purchase with wristbands. Free. 792-4600; www.allsaints.cc. Sycamore Township.

On Stage - Comedy Nate Bargatze, 8 p.m. and 10:30 p.m., Go Bananas, $8-$14. 984-9288; www.gobananascomedy.com. Montgomery.

Senior Citizens I Only Have Eyes For You, 6:30-8 p.m., Sycamore Senior Center, 4455 Carver Woods Drive, Music by Nelson Henning. Dancing and entertainment. Cash bar available and light refreshments provided. Benefits Sycamore Senior Center. Couple: $20, $15 advance; single: $15, $10 advance. Reservations required. Through June 28. 984-1234; www.sycamoreseniorcenter.org. Blue Ash.

SATURDAY, JUNE 1 Art Exhibits Material Matters, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Gallery Veronique, Free. 530-5379; galleryveronique.com. Symmes Township.

Exercise Classes Fitness BootCamp, 8-9 a.m., Glendale New Church, $10. Registration required. 772-4565; concreteandiron.com. Glendale.

Farmers Market Montgomery Farmers Market, 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Montgomery

ABOUT CALENDAR To submit calendar items, go to www.cincinnati.com and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to life@communitypress.com along with event information. Items are printed on a spaceavailable basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to www.cincinnati.com and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page. Elementary School, 9609 Montgomery Road, Vendors grow/ produce what they sell. More than 20 vendors offering vegetables, fruits, herbs, meat, eggs, honey, goat’s milk products, coffee, olive oil, hummus, cheese and baked goods. 9844865; www.montgomeryfarmersmarket.org. Montgomery.

MONDAY, JUNE 3 Art Exhibits Material Matters, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Gallery Veronique, Free. 530-5379; galleryveronique.com. Symmes Township.

Business Meetings

All Saints Parish Festival, 5:30 p.m.-midnight, All Saints Church, Free. 792-4600; www.allsaints.cc. Sycamore Township.

eWomenNetwork Accelerated Networking Luncheon, 11 a.m.-1:30 p.m., Embassy Suites Blue Ash, 4554 Lake Forest Drive, Learn to open yourself and your brand up to getting energized. $45. Registration required. 403-0301. Blue Ash.

Music - Concerts

Cooking Classes

Music at Ascension, 7:30 p.m., Ascension Lutheran Church, 7333 Pfeiffer Road, Sanctuary. Stars of Tomorrow Concert. Free, donations accepted. 793-3288. Montgomery.

Bones Burgers: a Mobile Monday Class with Bones Bonekemper, 6:30-9 p.m., Cooks’ Wares, 11344 Montgomery Road, All sandwiches made-to-order with focus on grass-fed angus beef hamburgers. $40. Reservations required. 489-6400; www.cookswaresonline.com. Symmes Township.

Festivals

Music - Country Summer Concerts on the Green: OK Ramblers, 6-9 p.m., Harry Whiting Brown Community House, 205 E. Sharon Ave., Traditional country music. Bring picnic food and beverages. Free. 771-0333. Glendale.

Nature Free Firsts Appreciation Days, 7 a.m.-8 p.m., Sharon Woods, 11450 Lebanon Road, Residents can enjoy any park without the need for a motor vehicle permit, while enjoying a host of other free and discounted activities. Dress for weather. Family friendly. Free, no vehicle permit required. 521-7275; www.greatparks.org/freefirsts. Sharonville.

On Stage - Comedy Nate Bargatze, 8 p.m. and 10:30 p.m., Go Bananas, $8-$14. 984-9288; www.gobananascomedy.com. Montgomery.

Recreation Montgomery Kiwanis Fishing Contest, 9-11 a.m., Swaim Park, Zig Zag and Cooper roads, Fishing contest for ages 1-15. Cash prizes for first fish caught each half hour in each age group. Bring rod and bait. Free. 910-7068. Montgomery.

SUNDAY, JUNE 2 Benefits A Russian Summer’s Night, 4-11:30 p.m., Peterloon Estate, 8605 Hopewell Road, Gourmet Russian dinner in gardens, music by Fotina Naumenko, vodka tasting and live auction. Ages 21 and up. Benefits St. George Russian Orthodox Church. $200. Reservations required. 633-5361; www.stgeorgeroc.org. Indian Hill.

Festivals All Saints Parish Festival, 3-10 p.m., All Saints Church, Free. 792-4600; www.allsaints.cc. Sycamore Township.

On Stage - Comedy Nate Bargatze, 8 p.m., Go Bananas, $8-$14. 984-9288; www.gobananascomedy.com. Montgomery.

Exercise Classes Fitness BootCamp, 6-7 p.m., Glendale New Church, $10. Registration required. 772-4565; concreteandiron.com. Glendale. Pilates Plus, 7-8 p.m., Springdale Community Center, 11999 Lawnview Ave., Unique program of strengthening and stretching exercises through slow, mindful and purposeful movements. $5. 346-3910. Springdale.

Excel Basics, 6 p.m., Deer Park Branch Library, 3970 E. Galbraith Road, Learn and practice using basic functions of Microsoft Excel 2007. Cover basic formatting and working with simple functions. Knowledge of keyboard and mouse is required before taking class. Ages 18 and up. Free. Registration required. 369-4450. Deer Park.

Exercise Classes Step N2, 5-6 p.m., Springdale Community Center, $5. 3463910. Springdale.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 5 Art Exhibits Material Matters, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Gallery Veronique, Free. 530-5379; galleryveronique.com. Symmes Township.

Literary - Libraries Teen Board Gaming, 2:30-4 p.m., Deer Park Branch Library, 3970 E. Galbraith Road, Teens and tweens play board games of their choice. Games played most often are Apples to Apples, Scrabble, Forbidden Island, Zombie Fluxx, Uno and Skip-Bo. Ages 11-18. Free. Through Sept. 25. 369-4450. Deer Park.

On Stage - Comedy Funniest Person in Cincinnati Contest, 8 p.m., Go Bananas, 8410 Market Place, Aspiring comedians perform. Amateur and semi-pro categories. Rated: PG-18, language or sexual content. Contest continues through August. Ages 18 and up. $5. Reservations required. 984-9288; www.gobananascomedy.com. Montgomery.

Recreation Golf for Beginners, 6:15-7:15 p.m., Sharon Woods Golf Course and Stonewood Banquet Center, 11355 Swing Road, Weekly through July 3. Prepares new or beginner golfers to feel more comfortable with fundamentals. Ask about other sessions. Ages 18 and up. $99. Registration required. Through June 8. 556-6932; www.uc.edu/ce/ commu. Sharonville.

THURSDAY, JUNE 6

Summer Camps - Arts

Art Exhibits

Summer Modern Dance Workshop, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Otto M. Budig Academy -- Blue Ash, 11444 Deerfield Road, Daily through June 7. Adult dancers buff up training for five straight days with four classes per day. Ages 18 and up. $48-$395. Registration required. 494-6526; www.mamluftcodance.com/ summer. Blue Ash.

Material Matters, 10 a.m.-7 p.m., Gallery Veronique, Free. 530-5379; galleryveronique.com. Symmes Township.

Summer Camps - Nature Gorman Heritage Farm Camps, 9:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m., Gorman Heritage Farm, 10052 Reading Road, Seedlings Camp. Session 1. Daily through June 7. Ages 5-7. Campers discover workings of family farm, work with animals and explore the garden. Drop off campers 9:15 a.m., and pick up campers 2:30 p.m. Family farm tour on Fridays only 2 p.m. Dress for weather. $215, $175 members. Registration required. 563-6663; http://www.gormanfarm.org/ camp. Evendale.

TUESDAY, JUNE 4 Art Exhibits Material Matters, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Gallery Veronique, Free. 530-5379; galleryveronique.com. Symmes Township.

Business Seminars Social Security Seminar, 10:30 a.m.-noon 6:30-8 p.m., Holiday Inn Cincinnati I-275 North, 3855 Hauck Road, Learn basics of Social Security and how you can control your benefits and avoid

Cooking Classes Girls’ Night In with Ilene Ross, 6:30-9 p.m., Cooks’ Wares, 11344 Montgomery Road, Learn how to make your parties a success from start to finish. Ilene shows how to prepare, cook and serve mouthwatering menu, perfect for any gathering. $40. Reservations required. 489-6400; www.cookswaresonline.com. Symmes Township.

Exercise Classes Fitness BootCamp, 6-7 p.m., Glendale New Church, $10. Registration required. 772-4565; concreteandiron.com. Glendale. Step N2, 5-6 p.m., Springdale Community Center, $5. 3463910. Springdale.

Festivals St. Gertrude Parish Festival, 6-8 p.m., St. Gertrude Parish, 7630 Shawnee Run Road, Entrance at 6551 Miami Ave. Food available: all festival favorites, plus fish, egg rolls and grilled chicken. Goetta beer, wine, Mike’s Lemonade and margaritas with wristbands available for purchase. Benefits St. Gertrude Parish. Free. 494-1391; www.stgertrude.org/festival. Madeira.

Health / Wellness Pathways Connect, 7-8 p.m., Bilog Coffee, Tea & Gelato, 1212 Springfield Pike, Meet like-

minded community members. Topics include wellness and nutrition, child development, birth and pregnancy, and more. First Thursday of each month. Free. Registration required. 931-4300. Wyoming.

Home & Garden Designing Hot Kitchens and Cool Baths, 6:30-8 p.m., Neal’s Design Remodel Gallery, 7770 E. Kemper Road, Project consultants and designers discuss trends in kitchen and bath design. Light fare provided. Ages 18 and up. Free. 489-7700; neals.com. Sharonville.

On Stage - Comedy Eddie Gossling, 8 p.m., Go Bananas, 8410 Market Place, $8-$15. Reservations required. 984-9288; www.gobananascomedy.com. Montgomery.

On Stage - Theater Shrek The Musical, 7:30-10 p.m., Blue Ash Amphitheater, 4433 Cooper Road, Based on Oscar-winning DreamWorks film that started it all. Outdoor amphitheater, bring seating. $8. Through June 15. 871-7427; esptheater.org. Blue Ash.

Support Groups Codependents Anonymous, Noon-1 p.m., Blue Ash Presbyterian Church, Donations accepted. 673-0174; www.coda.org. Blue Ash.

FRIDAY, JUNE 7 Art Exhibits Material Matters, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Gallery Veronique, Free. 530-5379; galleryveronique.com. Symmes Township.

Art Openings Ohio Valley Camera Club Photo Exhibit, 6-8 p.m., Maple Knoll Village, 11100 Springfield Pike, Includes food/drinks and music. Artists on hand and artwork is for sale. Free admission. 782-2462; www.mapleknoll.org. Springdale.

Exercise Classes Fitness BootCamp, 6-7 p.m., Glendale New Church, $10. Registration required. 772-4565; concreteandiron.com. Glendale.

Festivals St. John the Evangelist Festival, 6 p.m.-midnight, St. John the Evangelist Church, 7121 Plainfield Road, Variety of food, games, bid-n-buy, basket raffle, gambling and rides. Free. 7913238; www.stjohndp.org. Deer Park. St. Michael Parish Festival, 6-11:30 p.m., St. Michael Church of Sharonville, 11144 Spinner Ave., Music by Naked Karate Girls. Rides, specialty foods and games. Family day Sunday with touch-a-truck and more. Raffle with chance to win $50,000. Free. Through June 9. 554-6377; www.stmichaelfestival.net. Sharonville. St. Gertrude Parish Festival, 6-11:30 p.m., St. Gertrude Parish, Free. 494-1391; www.stgertrude.org/festival. Madeira.

Literary - Libraries Anime Club, 6-8 p.m., Deer Park Branch Library, 3970 E. Galbraith Road, Watch anime, draw manga, play Yu-Gi-Oh and interact around these favorite pastimes. Ages 13-18. Free. Through March 7. 369-4450. Deer Park.

On Stage - Comedy Eddie Gossling, 8 p.m. and 10:30 p.m., Go Bananas, $8-$15. Reservations required. 984-9288; www.gobananascomedy.com. Montgomery.

On Stage - Theater Shrek The Musical, 7:30-10 p.m., Blue Ash Amphitheater, $8. 871-7427; esptheater.org. Blue Ash.

SATURDAY, JUNE 8 Art Exhibits Material Matters, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Gallery Veronique, Free. 530-5379; galleryveronique.com. Symmes Township.

Business Seminars Social Security Seminar, 10:30 a.m.-noon, Holiday Inn Cincinnati I-275 North, Free. 829-3733; www.safemoneyamerica.com. Sharonville.


LIFE

MAY 29, 2013 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • B3

Corn bread and detox bath – both make you feel good When I put in requests for ingredients in one bowl and recipes, I usually just put blend. Pour into a greased them in once, maybe twice. If 8-inch round or square pan and bake 25 minutes, until I don’t get a response from you or have nothing in my golden brown. files, I go on to the next request. But this one from Mark Cornbread from scratch Burnhimer has touched my Check out my Cooking with heart in a way that I am askRita blog for this recipe. Go to ing, once again, if any of you Cincinnati.Com/blogs. can help. Mark told me: “AfBuffet broccoli salad ter a minor health Broccoli was on sale issue, my caregiver at the grocery and I had had shared with me a craving for this salad. that he and his wife It’s not low fat or low really missed Zino’s sugar, but it’s always the and that he would be first to go on the buffet eternally happy if table. Rita someone had some of Salad Heikenfeld the old restaurant Mix together: recipes, including the RITA’S KITCHEN 1 large head of broccoli, cut Zino Burger. Have into florets (if stems are tender, you got anything that might use them, too, sliced thinly) resemble that in your file? I’d Generous 1⁄2 cup chopped red onion like to pay back someone for 2 cups shredded cheddar cheese the excellent care I received 1 ⁄2 pound bacon, cut up and while I was not at my best.” sautéed Mark has continued to follow up, asking if I’ve received Dressing anything. So if any of you can Whisk together: come even close, or can get 1 cup mayonnaise the recipe, do let me know. 1

Rita says her broccoli salad is always the first to go on buffet tables. THANKS TO RITA HEIKENFELD.

⁄2 cup sugar ⁄4 cup red wine vinegar or more to taste (I usually add more)

Kit Whiteman’s corn bread

1

“I’m such a fan and read your recipes every week. Here’s my recipe for corn bread. So quick and easy and tastes good, too,” Kit said. She’s right on all three counts. 1 box Jiffy Yellow Cake mix 1 box Jiffy Corn Bread mix

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Follow package directions for each box. Place all

Pour dressing over salad ingredients. Toss well. When serving, dig deep so that you get all the goodies that tend to fall to the bottom.

Tonya Fischer’s detox bath

using Epsom salts. I met Tonya during a presentation I did at Macy’s corporate offices on healthy living. She works with Executive Chef Rick Toennis. Rick and Tonya believe, as I do, in Mother Nature’s healing powers. She told me about a soothing detox bath she enjoys, and I asked her to share the recipe. “When I’m not feeling so good or after a long day at work or workout, I soak in this bath,” Tonya told me. I’m going to make this myself and soothe the sore muscles I now have after our car got hit with a 200-pound deer.

ginger 1 cup apple cider vinegar 10-20 drops Eucalyptus spearmint oil, or just Eucalyptus oil

⁄3 cup Epsom salt ⁄3 cup sea salt 1 ⁄3 cup baking soda 1 tablespoon powdered/ground

Tips from Tonya

1

After I shared recipes for natural scrubs, etc., I had more requests for natural bath soaks, especially ones

1

Sea salt: Helps leach out toxins, soothes open sores or blemishes. Baking soda: Balances an overly acidic system, softens water, skin and helps eliminate chlorine. Ginger: Increases circulation, opens pores, makes you sweat. Vinegar: Restores acidalkaline balance, softens skin, helpful for acne. Massage oil: Relaxes body and senses.

Draw a bath with water as hot as you stand it. As tub fills, add all ingredients. Water will turn yellow/orange but don’t worry. Soak for about 40 minutes. While soaking, drink 24 oz. ice water. If you want, rub skin gently (always toward your heart) to stimulate lymphatic system and help clean out toxins. Dry off and drink another 24 oz. water as soon as possible, then relax.

Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educator and author. Find her blog online at Cincinnati.Com/blogs. Email her at columns@communitypress.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Call 513-248-7130, ext. 356.

Epsom salt: Makes you sweat, reduces inflammation, relieves muscle aches.

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LIFE

B4 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • MAY 29, 2013

RELIGION Ascension Lutheran Church

The congregation’s first Father’s Day Gift Drive for First Lutheran Church in downtown Cincinnati is in progress. Paper bags brightly decorated by the Sunday School students will be filled with needed men’s items. Filled bags will be delivered to First Lutheran in time for Fathers’ Day. For more information call the church office. “Splash in God’s Word!” VBS is scheduled for July 8-12. Activities include games (with water), science, cooking, crafts and videos. Hours are 9:30 a.m. to noon. Children in the community are invited to join in the fun. Call 793-3288 to make reservations. Healing Touch Ministry is offered on the fourth Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. Please call the church office at 793-3288 for more information. Summer worship is at 10 a.m. Ascension is at 7333 Pfeiffer

Road, Montgomery; 7933288.

ABOUT REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS

Blue Ash Presbyterian Church

Please contribute canned tuna to Northeast Emergency Distribution Services for the month of May. The BAPC bowling group meets at Crossgate Lanes at 9:45 a.m. every Thursday. Jacob’s Ladder is the theme for Sunday School (pre-K through 12th-grade); these classes are taught after the children’s sermon in the worship service. Sunday worship services are at 10:30 a.m. Nursery care is available. Sunday sermons are recorded and available at www.bapc.net. The church is at 4309 Cooper Road; 791-1153; www.bapc.net.

Brecon United Methodist Church

The church offers worship services on Sundays at 8:30 a.m. and 10:45 a.m. Sunday

Information is provided as a public service by the office of Hamilton County Auditor Dusty Rhodes. Neighborhood designations are approximate. School is at 9:30 a.m. Sundays. Samaritan Closet hours are 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday. Samaritan Closet offers clothing and food to people with demonstrated needs. Bread from Panera is available on Thursdays and Saturdays. The Samaritan Closet is next to the church. The church is at 7388 E. Kemper Road, Sycamore Township; 489-7021.

Church by the Woods

The church building is the home of four different ministries. Church By the Woods is a multicultural and multiethnic church whose mission is to love and serve God, each other and our neighbors. Sunday worship

INDEPENDENT BAPTIST

UNITED METHODIST

EVANGELICAL PRESBYTERIAN

FRIENDSHIP BAPTIST CHURCH 8580 Cheviot Rd., Colerain Twp 741-7017 www.ourfbc.com Gary Jackson, Senior Pastor Sunday School (all ages) 9:30am 10:30am Sunday Morning Service Sunday Evening Service 6:30pm Wedn. Service/Awana 7:00pm RUI Addiction Recovery (Fri.) 7:00pm

Christ, the Prince of Peace

At CHURCH BY THE WOODS

BAPTIST SHARON BAPTIST CHURCH 4451 Fields Ertel Road Cincinnati, OH 45241 (513) 769-4849 gstep77507@aol.com

Services

Sunday School - 10:00 am Sunday Morning - 11:00 am Sunday Evening - 6:00 pm Wednesday - 7:00 pm Evening Prayer and Bible Study VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL June 25 through June 29 Ages 3 to 15 Theme: Amazing Adventures Wyoming Baptist Church

(A Church For All Seasons) Burns and Waverly Avenues Cincinnati OH 45215 821.8430

Steve Cummins, Senior Pastor Sunday School..............................9:00 am Coffee & Fellowship...................10:00 am Praise & Worship........................10:30 am www.wyomingbc.homestead.com Visitors Welcome!

EPISCOPAL Christ Church Glendale Episcopal Church 965 Forest Ave - 771-1544 christchurch1@fuse.net www.christchurchglendale.org The Reverend Roger L Foote 8am Holy Eucharist I 9am Holy Eucharist II 11am Holy Eucharist II Child Care 9-12

“Small enough to know you, Big enough to care”

CHURCH OF THE SAVIOUR 8005 Pfeiffer Rd. Montgomery 791-3142 www.cos-umc.org "Going All In: My Mind" Traditional Worship 8:20am & 11:00am Contemporary Worship 9:40am Sunday School (All ages) 9:40 & 11am Nursery Care Provided

Dr. Cathy Johns, Senior Pastor Rev. Doug Johns, Senior Pastor

Monfort Heights United Methodist Church

3682 West Fork Rd , west of North Bend Traditional Worship 8:30 & 11:00am Contemporary Worhip 9:45am

Nursery Available * Sunday School 513-481-8699 * www. mhumc.org Spiritual Checkpoint ... Bearing the Love of Christ...for you!

Corner of Compton and Perry Streets 513-931-5827 Sunday School 8:45 - 9:45am Traditional Worship 10:00 - 11:00am Contemporary Gathering: Bible & Conversation 11:30 - 12:30 Nursery Available Handicap Access "Come as a guest. Leave as a friend".

Sharonville United Methodist

8:15 & 11amTraditional Service & Kingdom Kids 9:30am Adult & Children’s Sunday School 7:00pm Wednesday, Small Groups for all ages Infant care available for all services

3751 Creek Rd.

513-563-0117

www.sharonville-umc.org

NON-DENOMINATIONAL

Faith Lutheran LCMC

HIGHVIEW CHRISTIAN CHURCH “Life on Purpose in Community” 2651 Adams Rd. (near Pippin) Worship Assembly-Sunday 10:45am Phone 825-9553 www.highviewchristianchurch.com

Sunday School 10:15

Trinity Lutheran Church (ELCA) “Growing Closer to God, Growing Closer to Neighbor”

www. trinitymthealthy.org 513-522-3026

1553 Kinney Ave, Mt. Healthy

Worship: 8:30 am traditional - 10:45 am contemporary Sunday School: 9:45 am Nursery provided

Pastor Todd A. Cutter

Trinity Lutheran Church, LCMS 5921 Springdale Rd

Rev. Richard Davenport, Pastor Worship & Sunday School 10:30 a.m, Bible Study 9:15 a.m. Sundays

Classic Service and Hymnbook

www.trinitylutherancincinnati.com

385-7024

EVANGELICAL COMMUNITY CHURCH

Mt Healthy United Methodist Church

LUTHERAN 8265 Winton Rd., Finneytown www.faithcinci.org Pastor Robert Curry Contemporary Service 9am Traditional Service 11:00am

www.churchbythewoods.org 3755 Cornell Rd., Sharonville , Ohio 45241 You have a choice of Ministry: 1. Traditional Sunday Worship at 10:00 AM. Language: English Multi-cultural, multi-generational, and multi-ethnic. 2. Contemporary Sunday Worship with Freedom Church at 10:30 AM. Language: English It’s not about Religion; it’s about relationships! www.freedomchurchcincinnati.com 3. Taiwanese Traditional Sunday Worship st 2:00 PM. Language: Taiwanese, UC Campus Fellowship on Saturdays, www.cincinnatitaiwanese.org Saturday 4. Seventh Day Adventist Worship at 10:00 AM. Language: Spanish Loving - Caring - and Sharing God’s Word Notes: Nursery School is provided at each Worship time English as a Second Language (ESL) is taught on Saturday 10-12 AM. Various Bible Studies are available.

VINEYARD CHURCH NORTHWEST Colerain Township Three Weekend Services Saturday - 5:30 pm Sunday - 9:30 & 11:15 am 9165 Round Top Road 1/4 mile south of Northgate Mall 513-385-4888 µ www.vcnw.org

Sunday School Hour (for all ages) 9:15 - 10:15am Worship Service - 10:30 to 11:45am (Childcare provided for infants/ toddlers) Pastor: Rich Lanning Church: 2191 Struble Rd Office: 2192 Springdale Rd

542-9025

Visitors Welcome www.eccfellowship.org

PRESBYTERIAN Northminster Presbyterian Church 703 Compton Rd., Finneytown 931-0243 Growing Faith, Sharing Hope, Showing Love Sunday Worship Schedule Traditional Services: 8:00 & 10:15am Contemporary Services: 9:00 & 11:30am Student Cafe: 10:15am Childcare Available Jeff Hosmer, Rich Jones & Nancy Ross- Zimmerman - Pastors

Northwest Community Church 8735 Cheviot Rd, by Colerain HS Rev. Kevin Murphy, Pastor 513-385-8973 Worship and Sunday School 10AM Handicap Accessible/Nursery Available

Salem White Oak Presbyterian

UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST FLEMING ROAD United Church of Christ 691 Fleming Rd 522-2780 Rev Pat McKinney

Sunday School - All Ages - 9:15am Sunday Worship - 10:30am

Nursery Provided

St. Paul United Church of Christ 5312 Old Blue Rock Rd., off Springdale

Phone: 385-9077 Rev. Michelle Torigian Sunday Worship: 10:30am Sunday School: 9:15am Nursery Available/Handicap Access www.stpaulucccolerain.org www.facebook.com/StPaulUCC

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Active Youth, College, Senior Groups Exciting Music Dept, Deaf Ministry, Nursery

United Methodist Church 10507 “Old” Colerain Ave (513) 385-7883 Rev. Mark Reuter Sunday School 9:15am Worship 10:30am - Nursery Available www.cpopumc.org

service is traditional in English and begins at 10 a.m. From 10 a.m. to noon on Saturdays, classes in English as a Second Language are offered for ages 14 to 94. Taiwanese Presbyterian Ministry has Sunday traditional worship at 2 p.m. in their language of Taiwanese. On Saturdays they offer a ministry on the UC campus. Freedom Church has its contemporary worship service at 10:30 a.m. in English. “It’s Not About Religion; It’s About Relationships;” tinyurl.com/a7yroqe. Seventh Day Adventist Church, has worship on Saturdays at 10 a.m. in Spanish. “Loving, Caring, Sharing God’s Word” Nursery School is provided at each church’s worship services. Bible studies are of-

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Wyoming City a will hold Council on hearing public 17, June Monday, 2013 at 7:30 p.m. in the Council Chambers located at 800 Oak Wyoming, Avenue, 45215 on the OH Special Use Permits for day care and nursery school facilities in the City, the group home facility, the Interfaith Hospitality Network and the Twins’ House Bed and Breakfast. The public is invited to attend and comment. Individuals requiring special accommodations to paror attend ticipate should contact the City Building 72 hours prior to the meeting. Large type copies and other accommodations are upon reavailable quest. Lynn Tetley City Manager 3305

LEGAL NOTICE Notice is hereby given that on the 19th day of June 2013, at 7:00 a Public Hearing will be held on the Budget prepared by the City of Springdale, Hamilton County, Ohio, for the next fiscal succeeding year ending December 31, 2014. Such hearing will be held at the office of the Council of the City of Springdale, 11700 Springfield Pike, Ohio Springdale, 45246. Kathy McNear Clerk of Council /Finance Director City of Springdale, 1763054 Ohio NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING City Wyoming The Council will hold public hearings on Monday, June 17, 2013 at 7:30 p.m. in the Council Chambers at 800 Oak Avenue, Wyoming, OH 45215 on legislation amending Section 1177.05 of the Planning and Zoning Code regardnon-conforming ing residential uses and on legislation amending Sections of Chapter 11 of the Planning Cod. Zoning and The public is invited to attend and comment. Individuals reacspecial quiring commodations to participate or attend the contact should 72 Building City hours prior to the meeting. Large type copies and other acare commodations reupon available quest. Lynn Tetley 3299 City Manager

fered by all churches. The church is at 3755 Cornell Road, Sharonville.

Church of the Saviour United Methodist

Vacation Bible School is 9:30 a.m. to noon June 24-28; and 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. July 22-26. Sign up online at www.cos-umc.org. Disciple Bible Study registration is available for the 2013-2014 year. Call the church for details. Weekday Summer Camps are 9-11:30 a.m., Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays. Afternoon session is available on Tuesday. Camps are in session June 3-Aug. 6. Register on-line at www.cos-umc.org. The annual rummage sale is at 7 p.m. May 30 and 9 a.m. May 31. The church is at 8005 Pfeiffer Road, Cincinnati, OH 45242; 791-3142;www.cos-umc.org.

Sharonville United Methodist Church

At 8:15 a.m. there is a tradi-

tional service; at 11 a.m. there is a blended service, with contemporary and traditional styles of worship; at 9:30 a.m. there are Sunday School classes and short term study groups. Plans are being made for Vacation BIble School June 16-20. Registrations should be made by May 31. The Bereavement Support Group meets for lunch on the first Thursday of every month. The Serendipity seniors meet for lunch on the fourth Thursday of every month. The church is at 1751 Creek Road, Sharonville; 563-0117.

Sycamore Christian Church

Sunday worship and junior worship services at 10:30 a.m. Sunday Bible study for all ages at 9 a.m. Adult and Youth Bible studies each Wednesday at 7 p.m. Women’s Study Group at 6:30 p.m. every second Wednesday. The church is at 6555 Cooper Road, Cincinnati; 891-7891.

Red Cross Leadership Development Center for youth at Xavier Area teens can develop their leadership skills this summer at the Leadership Development Center (LDC), an annual program offered by The Cincinnati Area Chapter of the American Red Cross for 120 youth participants at Xavier University July 18 to July 21. LDC is a four-day, three-night leadership conference for teens age 13 to 16 who will enter grades eight to 11 in the fall. Now in its 30th year, LDC 2013 will continue a tradition of introducing participants to new ideas about leadership, diversity, team-building, communication skills and how they can contribute to the mission of the Red Cross. A key feature of the program is that classes and presentations are designed and presented by teen and young adult

counselors, who are themselves in high school or college, and graduates of LDC. Leadership games, structured experiences and guest speakers are also on the camp agenda – all selected with a goal of helping youth recognize their leadership potential and encouraging them to act upon it. “The motto for LDC is ‘Youth empowering youth - to lead and to serve,’” said Trish Smitson, CEO of the Cincinnati Area Chapter. “Campers tell us that they really do come away from LDC with skills and confidence to become leaders in their schools and communities, and of course we encourage them to put their skills to use right here at the Red Cross.” For more information or to apply, visit http:// bit.ly/10lOyLB.

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LIFE

MAY 29, 2013 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • B5

POLICE REPORTS EVENDALE Arrests/citations Latoya Spain, 22, 2525 Victory Parkway, theft at 2801 Cunningham Drive, May 2. Karon Mallory, 53, 41 Versailles, theft at 2801 Cunningham Drive, May 6. Lori Horsley, 29, 2324 Glenside Ave., theft at 2801 Cunningham Drive, May 1. Laytoya Spain, 22, 2525 Victory Parkway, theft at 2801 Cunningham Drive, May 2. Lauanai Williams, 18, 5468 Bahama Terrace, theft at 2801 Cunningham Drive, May 3. Juvenile male, 17, theft at 2801 Cunningham Drive, May 3. Danleane Reese, 32, 3223 Cumminsville, theft at 2801 Cunningham Drive, May 3. Shanda Cotton, 32, 65 Aljoy Court, theft, possession of drugs at 2801 Cunningham Drive, May 2.

Incidents/investigations Criminal damaging Reported at 9910 Reading Road, May 6. Misuse of credit card Reported at 2801 Cunning-

ABOUT POLICE REPORTS The Community Press publishes the names of all adults charged with offenses. This information is a matter of public record and does not imply guilt or innocence. To contact your local police department: » Evendale, Chief Niel Korte, 563-2249. » Glendale, Chief Dave Warman, 771-7645 or 771-7882. » Sharonville, Chief Aaron Blasky, 563-1147. » Springdale, Chief Mike Mathis, 346-5790. » Wyoming, Chief Gary J. Baldauf, 821-0141. ham, May 5. Theft Vehicle removed at 2787 Cunningham, May 2.

GLENDALE

bash Ave., Cincinnati, felony forgery and felony receiving stolen property; arrest was result of an investigation of stolen checks; May 17. Delon Simpson, 23, 5789 Lantana Ave., Cincinnati, warrant for failing to pay fines and costs owed to the Glendale Mayor's Court; May 18. Derrick Mobley, 37, 451 Dewdrop Circle, Cincinnati, traffic warrant from Hamilton County Municipal Court; May 19. Sanchez Foster, 31, 1541 Baymiller Walk, Cincinnati, operating a motor vehicle while under suspension; May 22. Joseph Hedges, 43, 1190 Lincoln Ave., Cincinnati, four traffic warrants from Hamilton County Municipal Court; May 22.

Incidents/investigations Criminal damage 100 block of Village Square;

See POLICE, Page B6

Premier Social Security Consulting credits NSSA program with explosive growth Premier Social Security Consulting of Sharonville has experienced explosive growth since rolling out its National Social Security Advisors training certification program nationwide in January. The company provides a two-day, Social Security advisor training class for CPAs, financial advisors, insurance agents, Enrolled Agents and other professional advisors so they can in turn counsel their own clients on the best way to access Social Security benefits in order to optimize lifetime income. The program is believed to be the only one of its kind in the nation.

The NSSA course is being offered at an introductory price of $295 for training through May. After May, the price rises to $995 for the two-day session. Both prices include a year of continuing support and monthly webinars with Premier on Social Security issues. The National Underwriter Co. will prepare and administer the NSSA exam beginning in June. Certification is provided by the National Social Security Association. Local training dates for the NSSA program will be May 29, May 30, June10, June11in Cincinnati, Oct. 7 and Oct. 8. For more information on the company’s individ-

Arrests/citations Carrie Baker, 28, 1412 Wa-

Laffalot Camps set summer schedules Laffalot Summer Camps will be at: » Blue Ash Recreation Center (June 10-14 and June 17-21); » Tri-Health Pavilion (July 15-19); » Mayerson JCC (June 10-June 14); » St. Columban School

(June 10-14 and July 8-12). The cost per camper is $115. Camp runs from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. For more information and a complete listing of 2013 Laffalot Summer Camp locations visit www.laffalotcamps.com.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Notice is hereby given that on the 9th day os July, 2013 at 7:00 P.M., a public hearing will be held on the budget prepared by the City of Sharonville for the next succeeding fiscal year ending December 31st, 2014. Such hearing will be held in the council chambers of the City of Sharonville, 10900 Reading Road, Sharonville, OH 45241. Marcia Funk, Clerk of Council, May 18, 2013 1001762977 LEGAL NOTICE Dr. Daniel Friedberg announces his retirement from Pediatric Care, Inc. effective July 1st, 2013. Dr. Friedberg served the communi ty for 46years. He is pleased to be able to leave his patients’ healthcare needs in the capable hands of his practice partners at Pedia tric Care. If you have any questions please contact the Winton Road office at 513-9316357. 1762738

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ual Social Security counseling services or the NSSA certification program, go to http://bit.ly/11hPbMB. Contact Kiner at mkiner@mypremierplan .com or 513-351-5707.

LEGAL NOTICE In accordance with the provisions of State law, there being due and unpaid charges for which the undersigned is entitled to satisfy an owner and/or manager’s lien of the goods hereinafter described and stored at the Uncle Bob’s Self Storage location(s) listed below. And due notice having been given to the owner of said property and all parties known to claim an interest therein, and the time specified in such notice for payment of such having expired, the goods will be sold at public auction at the below stated location(s) to the highest bidder or otherwise disposed of on Monday, 6/17/13 11AM. 11378 Springfield Pike, Springdale, OH 45246 513-771-5311 Corey Stroble 593 Brunner Dr. Cincinnati, OH 45240 Household goods, furniture, boxes, appliances, TV’s or stereo equipment, office furniture. Teria Seales 932 W. 52nd Drive Apt. M341 Merrillville, IN 46410 Household goods, boxes, TV’s or stereo equipment Erin Combs 41 Poplar St. Cincinnati, OH 45216 Household goods, furniture, boxes, account records. Bridget Brown 205 West 68th Street 1st Floor Cinti, OH 45216 Household goods, furniture, boxes, TV’s or stereo equipment, bags. Betty Davis 44 Providence #78 Fairfield, OH 45014 Boxes, clothes, jewelry. 1762364

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LIFE

B6 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • MAY 29, 2013

POLICE REPORTS

Joshua Walker, 22, 2487 Paris St., possession of drugs, trafficking, possession of drugs at 1029 Dowlin, May 11. Kobi Marvin, 23, 482 Merrymaid Lane, theft at 1629 E

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Route 727, littering at Hauck Road, May 6. Leonard Johnson, 22, 2760 W. North Bend, disorderly conduct at 400 Crown Point Drive, May 5. Courtney Davis, 23, 12 Intervine Place, disorderly conduct at 2241 Crowne Point, May 5. Davon Butler, 24, 1451 Hill Crest, disorderly conduct at 2265 E. Sharon, May 5. Isaiah Tye, 28, 1624 E Crescentville, open container at 11585 Chester Road, May 7. Quentesia Ventin- Prooff, 34, 116 E. Shild St., possession of drugs at Travelodge, May 5.

Incidents/investigations Breaking and entering Camera, utensils, tikes car of unknown value removed at 1429 E. Kemper Road, May 4. Fence cut at 11608 Reading Road, May 9. Burglary Residence entered and PS3 valued at $300 removed at 10857 Sharondale, May 5. Criminal damaging Twisted wires of unknown value removed at 11262 Lebanon Road, May 8. Domestic violence Reported at Chester Road, May 10. Reported at Hauck Road, May 7. Misuse of credit card Reported at 12164 Lebanon

Road, May 11. Theft $100 removed at 1508 E Kemper, May 2. Merchandise of unknown value removed at 12035 Lebanon Road, April 30. Points valued at $3,600 removed at 11160 Dowlin, May 1. Battery charger of unknown value removed at 11157 Chester Road, May 9. Fuel valued at $7 removed at 2225 E Sharon Road, May 6. Table and chairs valued at $370 removed at 11939 Tramway, May 1. Theft by deception Reported at 1 Freightliner, May 6. Theft, criminal damaging Ipod charger and headset valued at $200 removed at 11633 Timberridge, May 11.

SPRINGDALE Arrests/citations Juvenile female, 14, vandalism, burglary at 12105 Lawnview, May 9. Melissa Maynard, 23, 2512 Sheridan Drive, theft, May 9. Terrill Hunter, 45, 1314 Chesterwood Court, domestic violence at 1314 Chesterwood Court, May 11.

Incidents/investigations Criminal damaging Reported at 11700 Princeton Pike, May 11.

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Criminal mischief TV broken at 1161 Chesterdale, May 12. Domestic Reported at Princeton Pike, May 9. Reported at Princeton Pike, May 8. Menacing Victim threatened at 2310 Charing Way, May 8. Theft Gas drive off at 11620 Springfield Pike, May 12. Cell phone valued at $650 removed at 11700 Princeton Pike, May 11. Gym bag removed at 11700 Princeton Pike, May 10. Reported at 260 Northland Blvd, May 10. Merchandise of unknown value removed at 11700 Princeton Pike, May 10. Yoga pants valued at $586 removed at 11700 Princeton Pike, May 9. Merchandise valued at $527 removed at 11700 Princeton Pike, May 9. Merchandise valued at $2,235 removed at 11700 Princeton Pike, May 9. Merchandise valued at $6,803 removed at 11755 Commons Court, May 9. Mower valued at $350 removed at 677 Hillgrove Court, May 9. Iphone valued at $1,000 removed at 505 Kemper Road, May 9.

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Arrests/citations

phernalia at Tramway, May 7. Dawn Huber, 33, 3929 Stockbridge, drug abuse at Tramway, May 7. Dawn Huber, 33, 3929 Stockbridge, drug paraphernalia at Tramway, May 7. Michael Huber, 36, 3929 Stockbridge, drug paraphernalia at Tramway, May 7. Regina Allen, 20, 10917 Ohio Ave., open container at Sharon and Mosteller, May 8. Lynette Johnson, 25, 447 Dewdrop, obstructing official business, disorderly conduct at 2241 Crowne Point, May 5. Ernesto Perezluiz, 32, 2280 Highland Ave., operating vehicle impaired at Reed Harman, May 7. Barbie Prather, 38, 6336 Ohio

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SHARONVILLE

Kemper, May 11. Brandon Caldwell, 28, 2747 Gatewood, misuse of credit card at 12164 Lebanon Road, May 11. Sheena Reid, no age given, 8853 Daly Road, drug abuse at 11180 Dowlin, May 11. Lawrence Davis, 25, 2661 Westwood Northern Blvd., drug abuse at Hawthorne Suites, May 11. Lisa Cruz, 47, 10598 Sarazan Court, domestic violence at 10598 Sarazan Court, May 8. Benjamin Rosen, no age given, 4020 Hauck Road, drug abuse at 4020 Hauck Road, May 7. Christopher Towning, 30, 7257 Dymmick Road, littering at 11880 Reading Road, May 8. Michael Huder, 36, 2021 S. Teralta Circle, drug para-

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three screens were cut sometime during the night; no estimate on damage; no entry was made to the building; investigation ongoing; May 18. Recovered firearm 500 block of East Sharon Avenue; a loaded firearm was found on driveway to residence; firearm was collected and is being processed for latent evidence; May 18.

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LIFE

MAY 29, 2013 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • B7

REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS Evendale Office Condominiums LLC to Sbif Holdings LLC; $298,495. 3651 Moorhill Drive: Backscheider A.J. to Barnes Ronald A. & Kate M. White; $200,000.

GLENDALE

1099 Jefferson Ave.: Cahill Donald M. to Cole Taylor Bank; $170,000.

SHARONVILLE

3972 Kemper Road: Budkie James E. to Banton John G. & Emma B.; $149,000. 4106 Wenbrook Drive: Neville Daniel A. to Winkelman Robert L. & Beverly L.; $275,000. 4234 Beavercreek Circle: Bianchini Joseph L. III & Ann M. to Citimortgage Inc.; $50,000. 4685 Fields Ertel Road: Hermes Andrew M. to Walsh Joseph T. & Elizabeth; $164,000. 5252 Londonderry Drive: Corcoran Patrick to Montag John E.; $116,500.

SPRINGDALE

Crescentville Road: First Financial Collateral Inc. to Crossings In The Park Six LLC; $805,000. Crescentville Road: First Financial Collateral Inc. to Crossings In The Park Six LLC; $805,000. Crescentville Road: First Financial Collateral Inc. to Crossings In The Park Six LLC; $805,000. Crescentville Road: First Financial Collateral Inc. to Crossings In The Park Six LLC; $805,000. 204 Edinburgh Lane: First Financial Collateral Inc. to Crossings In The Park Six LLC;

ABOUT REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS Information is provided as a public service by the office of Hamilton County Auditor Dusty Rhodes. Neighborhood designations are approximate. $805,000. 206 Edinburgh Lane: First Financial Collateral Inc. to Crossings In The Park Six LLC; $805,000. 210 Edinburgh Lane: First Financial Collateral Inc. to Crossings In The Park Six LLC; $805,000. 220 Edinburgh Lane: First Financial Collateral Inc. to Crossings In The Park Six LLC; $805,000. 226 Edinburgh Lane: First Financial Collateral Inc. to Crossings In The Park Six LLC; $805,000. 307 Bern Lane: First Financial Collateral Inc. to Crossings In The Park Six LLC; $805,000. 313 Bern Lane: First Financial Collateral Inc. to Crossings In The Park Six LLC; $805,000. 405 Lisbon Lane: First Financial Collateral Inc. to Crossings In The Park Six LLC; $805,000. 406 Lisbon Lane: First Financial Collateral Inc. to Crossings In The Park Six LLC; $805,000. 408 Lisbon Lane: First Financial Collateral Inc. to Crossings In The Park Six LLC; $805,000. 409 Lisbon Lane: First Financial Collateral Inc. to

Crossings In The Park Six LLC; $805,000. 410 Lisbon Lane: First Financial Collateral Inc. to Crossings In The Park Six LLC; $805,000. 416 Lisbon Lane: First Financial Collateral Inc. to Crossings In The Park Six LLC; $805,000. 420 Lisbon Lane: First Financial Collateral Inc. to Crossings In The Park Six LLC; $805,000. 504 Salzberg Lane: First Financial Collateral Inc. to Crossings In The Park Six LLC; $805,000. 506 Salzberg Lane: First Financial Collateral Inc. to Crossings In The Park Six LLC; $805,000. 508 Salzberg Lane: First Financial Collateral Inc. to Crossings In The Park Six LLC; $805,000.

WYOMING

Woodruff Lane: Brookstone Homes LLC to Browne Frederick R.; $340,115. 213 Brocdorf Drive: Saunders Kenneth E. & Barbara J. Games to Mellish Alan & Bonnie; $319,900.

33 Burns Ave.: Spongaugle Stephen J. to Goodall Sharon L.; $257,500. 40 Oliver Road: Grant Carolyn Tr to Shaffer John J. & Regina M.; $229,000. 41 Charlotte Ave.: Longman Michael E. & House Channon M. to Amstutz Joshua J. & Meghan E. Maloney; $127,000. 550 Woodbrook Lane: Gibson Mary H. Tr to Brinkman Joseph G. & Robin J.; $380,000. 642 Grove Ave.: Walton Jeffrey A. & Lynn M. Danen to Wyles Margaret A. J. & Matthew P. D.; $178,800 .

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Ralph “Sam” Martin, 91, of Sharonville died May 19. He was a World War II US Army veteran. Survived by husband of 67 years, Geraldine (nee Dryman) Martin; brother, Robert Martin; and many nieces and nephews. Preceded in death by siblings Ellen, George and James Martin. Services were May 24 at Sts. Peter and Paul Church, Reading.

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Thomas Joseph Schmidt, 72, of Sharonville died May 17. Survived by wife, Carol (nee Lehman) Schmidt; children Chris (Connie) Schmidt and Julie (Adam) Bradford; grandchild, Gabe; sister, Judith (Donald) Bruno; and nieces and nephews. Services were May 22 at St. Michael Catholic Church, Sharonville. Memorials to: St. Joseph Home, 10722 Wyscarver Road, Cincinnati, OH 45241; or St. Michael Church, 11144 Spinner Ave., Sharonville, OH 45241.

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EVENDALE

-----------------------------------------------------CITY OF SHARONVILLE ORDINANCE 2013-26 ORDINANCE CODIFIED AMENDING CHAPTER 917 (GOLDEN VIEW ACRES) TO PROHIBIT SMOKING IN THE PREMISES -----------------------------------------------------CITY OF SHARONVILLE ORDINANCE 2013-30 AMENDING 2013 APPROPRIATIONS FOR THE GENERAL FUND -----------------------------------------------------CITY OF SHARONVILLE ORDINANCE 2013-31-E AN ORDINANCE PROVIDING FOR THE ISSUANCE AND SALE OF NOTES OF THE CITY OF SHARONVILLE, OHIO, IN THE MAXIMUM PRINCIPAL AMOUNT OF $3,000,000, IN ANTICIPATION OF THE ISSUANCE OF BONDS FOR THE PURPOSE OF PAYING AT MATURITY BOND ANTICIPATION NOTES HERETOFORE ISSUED FOR THE PURPOSE OF PAYING A PORTION OF THE COSTS OF RENOVATING AND ENLARGING THE SHARONVILLE CONVENTION CENTER IMPROVEMENTS BY CONSTRUCTING EXPANDING INCLUDING THERETO, PARKING FACILITIES, AND ALL NECESSARY APPURTENANCES, AND DECLARING AN EMERGENCY. -----------------------------------------------------CITY OF SHARONVILLE ORDINANCE 2013-32-E AN ORDINANCE PROVIDING FOR THE ISSUANCE AND SALE OF BONDS IN THE AGGREGATE PRINCIPAL AMOUNT OF $4,275,000 FOR THE PURPOSE OF DISCHARGING AT MATURITY BOND ANTICIPATION NOTES OF THE CITY HERETOFORE ISSUED FOR THE PURPOSE OF PAYING A PORTION OF THE COSTS OF (I) DESIGN AND ENGINEERING FOR IMPROVEMENTS TO CHESTER ROAD AND ACQUISITION OF RIGHT OF WAY IN CONNECTION THEREWITH, AND (II) CONSTRUCTION OF CERTAIN PERMANENT IMPROVEMENTS TO CHESTER ROAD, TOGETHER WITH ALL NECESSA RY APPURTENANCES THERETO, AND DECLARING AN EMERGENCY. ----------------------ABOVE LEGISLATIONS: Vicki Hoppe, President of Council. Passed: May 14, 2013. Attest: Martha Cross Funk, Clerk of Council. Approved: Mayor Kevin Hardman. Please be advised that the complete text of this legislation may be viewed or purchased during regular business hours at the Sharonville Municipal Building, 10900 Reading Rd., Sharonville, Ohio 45241. 972


LIFE

B8 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • MAY 29, 2013

MITSUBISHI

GRAND OPENING

SALES EVENT

BRANDNEW2013LANCERES, GTANDSPORTBACK

BRANDNEW2013OUTLANDERSPORTS ANDOUTLANDER TAKE YOUR PICK!

3,000OFF

3,000OFF

$

$

HURRY!

2013OUTLANDER SPORTES 5 SPEED, A/C, PW, PL, 18” ALUMINUM WHEELS

MSRP $19,995 DISC. $2,000 REBATE $1,000

SALE PRICE

THESE OFFERS END 6/1/13

16,995

$

SALE PRICE

MSRP $17,850 DISC. $2,000 REBATE $1,000

14,850

$

2013 LANCERES 5 SPEED, A/C, PW, PL, CD

#D1012

#D4501

2 FLORENCE FREEDOM TICKETS WITH TEST DRIVE...YOU PICK THE GAME!

AMERICA’S#1SELLING VEHICLESONSALENOW!

2010 TOYOTA CAMRY LE CHOOSE FROM 7, LOW MILES LOADED WITH EQUIPMENT, 30+ MPG

15,885

$

2010 HONDA ACCORD BURG., AUTO AC, PW, PL

14,985

$

2011 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY GOLD, V6, ALUM

WHEELS, PW, PL, REAR BACKUP CAMERA, CD

18,775

$

SALES HOURS: Mon-Thu 9-8:30 Fri 9-6 • Sat 9-5:30

www.joekiddauto.com

2012 FORD MUSTANG CONVERTIBLE RED, V6, AUTO, A/C, LEATHER, READY FOR SUMMERTIME..... WAS $23,988 NOW

$21,985 2012 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN V6, STOWING, PW, PC, CD #C8132 ...................... WAS $22,995 NOW $20,985 2012 MITSUBISHI ECLIPSE CHOOSE FROM 2, AUTO, A/C, PW #C8149................... WAS $16,488 NOW $15,885 2011 DODGE CARAVAN CREW V6, AUTO, A/C, PW, PL............................................. WAS $20,988 NOW $19,985 2011 CHEVROLET HHR LT RED, AUTO, A/C, PW, CD ................................................. WAS $13,988 NOW $13,485 2011 JEEP COMPASS AUTO, A/C, PW, PL, CD, LOW MILES #C8169 ........................ WAS $16,988 NOW $16,285 2010 MAZDA 6i GRAND TOURING, RED, LEATHER, SUNROOF, LOADED, 29K MILES........... WAS $17,488 NOW $16,885 2010 FORD FOCUS SES BLACK, AUTO, A/C, SUNROOF, 11K MILES #D8085 .................... WAS $15,295 NOW $14,882 2010 CHEVROLET COBALT SILVER, AUTO, A/C, PS, PB #C8092 ............................... WAS $11,988 NOW $11,685 2010 FORD FUSION 4 CYL, AUTO, A/C, LEATHER, NICE #C8139............................... WAS $16,988 NOW $16,285 2010 FORD ESCAPE XLT 4X4, V6, AUTO, A/C, CLEAN............................................... WAS $18,988 NOW $17,972 2009 CHRY. TOWN & COUNTRY TOURING BLACK, V6, AUTO, PW, PC #C8080 ........ WAS $17,988 NOW $16,985 2009 MAZDA CX7 AUTO, A/C, LEATHER, SUNROOF, 57K MILES ............................... WAS $17,988 NOW $17,285 2007 PONTIAC G6 RED, SUNROOF, V6, ALUM WHEELS #C8170 .............................. WAS $10,995 NOW $10,688 2004 DODGE RAM 2500 SLT HEMI, 4X4, QUAD CAB, CHROME TUBES ................... WAS $14,595 NOW $13,988 2003 NISSAN 350z ORANGE, AUTO, A/C, LEATHER, ALUM WHEELS......................... WAS $14,995 NOW $14,588 1998 CHEVROLET CORVETTE RED, REMOVABLE GLASS TOP, 5.7V8, 6 SPEED #C80572........................................WAS $14,995 NOW

$13,988

BUDGET BUYS!

2008 NISSAN SENTRA AUTO, A/C,PW,PL .............................................................................................. $9,985

2007 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY HAUL THE FAMILY, V6, AUTO, A/C ........................................... $9,985

2006 TOYOTA CAMRY LE SILVER, AUTO, A/C, GREAT SCHOOL CAR ............................................ $8,995 2001 CHEVY BLAZER 2 DR, AUTO,PS,PB................................................................................ ONLY

$3,885 2002 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN V6, AUTO, A/C, PS .............................................................. ONLY $4,675 1992 FORD TEMPO COUPE ONE OF A KIND, 42K MILES, COLD A/C .................................................. $4,485

513-752-1804

1065 OHIO PIKE JUST 3 MILES EAST OF I275, EXIT #65

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