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TRI-COUNTY PRESS

Your Community Press newspaper serving Evendale, Glendale, Sharonville, Springdale, Wyoming

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WEDNESDAY, MAY 28, 2014

BECAUSE COMMUNITY MATTERS

Relay For Life Sharonville dedicated to Will Cox By Kelly McBride kmcbride@communitypress.com

Relay For Life Sharonville is dedicating this year’s effort to a Princeton High School student who lost his life to cancer last year. Will Cox died from pediatric brain cancer at age 18, just after his high school graduation. His father, William Cox, described “a kind-hearted young man that often loved much deeper than the people around him.” “He was always willing to help his friends and family when and if he could.” William Cox established the iWill Awareness Foundation, to raise awareness and funds for pediatric cancer research. The relay will take place at Princeton High School’s track, 11080 Chester Road in Sharonville, beginning at 2 p.m. May 31. The event runs around the clock to June 1. Sharonville Mayor Kevin Hardman will serve as the honorary chairman of the 12th annual event. According to Relay For Life Sharonville representative Larry Roy, the local effort has raised more than $600,000 for cancer research, and this year’s sponsor list includes a company new to Sharonville. Mammotome has donated $5,000 to Relay For Life Sharonville, along with local company ISS Industrial Sorting Services, which made a $1,000 contribution. This year, Frank Marzullo of

Relay For Life Sharonville will be dedicated to Princeton grad Will Cox, left, who met Kobe Bryant in last spring. He died shortly after his high school graduation last year. PROVIDED

Fox 19 and Jeff Thomas of Q102 will walk with the relay on Saturday afternoon. The event begins with a survivors lap, in which cancer survivors take the first lap around the track. It includes a luminaria ceremony after dark, to remember those who have lost their lives to cancer, with candles lit inside personalized bags that are placed around the track. A fight-back ceremony reflects the commitment to the fight against cancer, and calls Relay participants to action. Relay For Life began in 1985, when Dr. Gordy Klatt walked and ran for 24 hours around a track in Tacoma, Washington to raise money for the American Cancer Society, starting a movement that has become worldwide, raising nearly $5 billion.

IT’S COLLECTION TIME Now you can get more for your dollar. In the next seven to10 days your carrier will be collecting for your Tri-County Press. When you pay your carrier the monthly charge of Raymond-Ball $3.50, you will receive a coupon worth $3.50 off a classified ad, Not only will you be helping to supplement your carrier’s income, you will also be saving money doing it. This month we salute Ka-

THE HIGH LIFE A6 Princeton junior going up, up, over expectations.

trina Raymond-Ball. She lives with her parents and sister and has a border collie mutt. She is a sophomore at Princeton High School, where she is a member of the symphonic orchestra and choir. She is also a member of the Northern Kentucky Youth Orchestra. She recently took a trip with her school orchestra to Hawaii and the collections helped me pay for the trip.. For information about our carrier program, call circulation manager Steve Barraco at 248-7110, or email him at sbarraco@communitypress. com.

School spirit and community contribution drive Wyoming High School seniors Marc Akinbi and Cambray Smith. KELLY MCBRIDE/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Akinbi’s Cowboy Crazies puts leadership into play By Kelly McBride kmcbride@communitypress.com

We began the tradition more than a decade ago, and every year the stories continue to inspire. This is our annual salute to members of the Class of 2014 those graduating seniors with a unique story to tell. We call them our Grade A Graduates. School spirit can be a powerful motivator, and one high school senior has found a way to ramp up the fan base among less popular sports at Wyoming High School. Marc Akinbi has created a club that issues points to students who attend sports events, with higher point values to the less popular sports. Prizes are presented to top fans and members of the Cowboy Crazies. It’s an effort encourage Wyoming students to support their classmates. He knows what it feels like to have a spirit section, how it

NO SNEEZE ZONE Rita shares allergy-fighting drink recipe. See column, B3

Lindsay Myers and Mark Mendosa were members of the champion Princeton team that won the 2014 Academic Quiz Team competition. KELLY MCBRIDE/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

motivates the athletes, since Akinbi has been a member of the Wyoming varsity basketball team for the past three years. “As a player, when there are a lot of fans, I play harder,” he

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See AKINBI, Page A2 Vol. 30 No. 37 © 2014 The Community Press ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

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said, “and it’s more fun.” It’s his legacy, he said, a way to improve the student experience. “When you find something

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A2 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • MAY 28, 2014

Akinbi Continued from Page A1

your are excited about, chances are, other people are going to be excited about it, too,” Akinbi said. “Once you put together the idea, and other people who share it, you can accomplish a lot.” It’s that attitude that drove him to complete his Eagle Scout project, in which he led an effort to reconstruct a bridge at Mt. Airy Park in Colerain Township. The Eagle Scout rank requires leadership skills

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to plan and execute a community project, and though it was hard work, Akinbi said it was worthwhile. “I learned that thinking through the hiccups are what make leaders great,” said Akinbi, who will study economics and business administration at Georgetown University in the fall. Cyncie Meis, director of college counseling at Wyoming, describes him as a “very passionate young man who is great at balancing academics and extracurricular activities,” under a calm, laidback exgterior.

FOOD FOR THOUGHT

Kindergartner Jack Wehby sells a bag of lettuce to a customer at the Wyoming Farmer's Market last fall. Students at Vermont School grew produce, including lettuce as a fundraiser to help its sister school in Sierra Leone, Africa. Students raised $550 from the sale of lettuces, as well as bowls they made in art class.PROVIDED

TRI-COUNTY PRESS

Find news and information from your community on the Web Evendale • cincinnati.com/evendale Glendale • cincinnati.com/glendale Sharonville • cincinnati.com/sharonville Springdale • cincinnati.com/springdale Wyoming • cincinnati.com/wyoming Hamilton County • cincinnati.com/hamiltoncounty

News

Richard Maloney Editor ..................248-7134, rmaloney@communitypress.com Kelly McBride Reporter ...................576-8246, kmcbride@communitypress.com Melanie Laughman Sports Editor .......248-7573, mlaughman@communitypress.com Scott Springer Sports Reporter ..........576-8255, sspringer@communitypress.com

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To place an ad ............................513-768-8404, EnquirerMediaAdvertising@enquirer.com

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For customer service ....................576-8240 Stephen Barraco Circulation Manager ....................248-7110, sbarraco@communitypress.com Lynn Hessler District Manager ...........248-7115, lyhessler@communitypress.com

Classified

To place a Classified ad .................242-4000, www.communityclassified.com

To place an ad in Community Classified, call 242-4000.

“Even though it is clear Marc works incredibly hard, he has a knack for making everything look easy,” she said. “This will serve him well.”

Mendoza’s language skills translate to community service Princeton High School’s valedictorian has achieved much more than good grades. Mark Mendoza, who is enrolled in the International Baccalaureate program, is also a member of the debate team, student congress, academic quiz team and president of the foreign language club. His focus is community service through communication, interpreting for members of the community. Skilled in Spanish, Mendoza has translated during parent-teacher conferences at Sharonville Elementary, among other community service events. “For me, the thing about language is it can divide people and it can bring them together,” he said. “When you can’t talk to people, you separate from them. “When parents have a hard time engaging with teachers, getting the opportunity to help with that process in an active way is important. It’s also an opportunity to put his language skills into action. “There is a discrepancy between school and application,” Mendoza said, “and being able to put it into action in a volunteer context is a valuable way to give back and get something out of education.” Mendoza completed his fifth year of Spanish instruction at Princeton last year, and practices at home with his dad, who is from Mexico. He’s also been part of

Index Calendar .................B2 Classifieds ................C Food ......................B3 Life ........................B1 Police .................... B6 Schools ..................A5 Sports ....................A6 Viewpoints .............A8

the school’s academic quiz team for the past four years. “The academic aspect is fun, and competing and succeeding is fun, too,” he said of the championship team. Mendoza encouraged other students to join. “The most important advice I can give them is not to accept paradigm reality as it is,” he said. “Quiz team was going to go away this year. We didn’t have a coach and they were ready to cut the program. We recruited teachers as coaches and lined up with the athletic department.” And they won. In a similar way, Mendoza found himself leading a program that lost its coach. “My sophomore year, the Power of the Pen coach left the district,” he said. “There wasn’t anyone to do it, so I took the initiative and coached the kids.” He’s coached for three years. “It takes people willing to disrupt the status quo, that’s how it happens.” Princeton College and Career Counselor John Beischel describes Mendoza as “beyond bright.” “He is engaging, articulate with a quirky sense of humor,” Beischel said. “Since eighth-grade he has been focused on challenging himself and getting the best out of all his ability. “He has grown into a well-rounded student who focuses not only on his academics but on utilizing his abilities to serve others.” He will take those abilities to California in the fall, where he will study chemical engineering at Stanford University.

Myers sets a rigorous pace

Always on the move, Lindsay Myers is a top student and athlete, who will graduate this year among the top 10 in her Princeton High School class, and will run cross country and track next year at the College of William and Mary. The Sharonville resident is a member of the National Honor Society

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and Princeton’s championship Academic Quiz Team, is involved in Therapy Pets of Greater Cincinnati, is co-editor of Princeton High School’s Odin’s Word, and is the sole female student to represent Ohio as a 2014 U.S. Presidential Scholar. A student in Princeton’s International Baccalaureate program, Myers leads by example, as a quiet leader whose visual impairment is a daily challenge that she shrugs off, not letting it get in her way. “It’s hard for me to see the board in class,” she says, moving on to her real challenge. “Balance is something I’ve struggled with in my life,” Myers said. “I want to get involved in everything. “That’s something you should do, then figure out what you really love,” she said, recalling five years playing cello, then having to give it up for running, and to participate in the school newspaper. She made time to train her dog, Wally, a 9-yearold standard poodle, after researching therapy animals in eighth-grade. “They look forward to seeing us every week,” she said of her visits to Mallard Cove in Sharonville. “It makes you feel good and makes them feel good.” Myers’ quiet leadership can be seen on the cross country trail or track, where she excels. “She’s the most humble person I’ve ever coached, but a tough competitor,” Princeton cross country coach Bob Fritz said. “When she gets rolling, she’s tough to beat. “She’s also the kindest person, always positive,” he said. “She balances her life very well.” Princeton teacher Michele Ritzie has seen Myers’ determination in class. “I have had the honor of working with Lindsay in IB History over the past two years,” Ritzie said. “She is a remarkable student.” Ritzie describes her as a conscientious worker who seeks out answers to her questions. “In the past two years, Lindsay has never mentioned her eye impairment,” Ritzie said. “She does not let her impairment define her, and the work she submits is at par or above the rest of the class. “ I believe that with her work ethic and character, Lindsay’s potential is limitless,” her teacher said. “She truly represents what is great about this generation.”

Community focus has impact near and far

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GRADUATION INFORMATION PRINCETON HIGH SCHOOL

» When: Sunday, May 25 » Where: Cintas Center at Xavier University » How many: 408 students graduating » Valedictorian: Mark Mendoza » Salutatorian: Nada Alaa El-Din Mohamed El-Sayed » Keynote speakers: Students with GPA higher than 5.0, Mark Mendoza, Nada Alaa El-Din Mohamed El-Sayed, Scheile Preston, Hannah Hales and Samantha Marshall

WYOMING HIGH SCHOOL

» When: Saturday, June 7, 6:30 p.m. » Where: Wyoming High School, outside of Pendery Center » How many: 171 students graduating » Valedictorian: Not yet named » Salutatorian: Not yet named

scholarship for leadership, character and service to the community. She’s a member of the service organization Project LEAD, a varsity swimmer and vice president of Model U.N. Smith has participated in service trips to India and Mexico and will head to Haiti this summer to participate in the Heroine Fellowship, to explore international issues from a biblical point of view, then write a thesis based on one of several topics, including women’s rights, refugees, clean water, poverty, and crimes against children, among others. Her driving force: people. Helping them and learning from them. “There is a crucial link between volunteering and intelligent engagement,” Smith said of her service work. “It’s grown out of my passion for helping other people.” Smith participated in the human experience project at Wyoming High School last fall, in which homelessness was explored and experienced through a Shantytown. “That was the event that put everything I learned in high school into one night,” she said. “It had an outward focus.” It’s an outward focus that made a personal impact, and she’s putting into practice her education at Wyoming, in ways that are meaningful. That focus has earned her high marks in school, and praise in the community, Cyncie Meis, director of college counseling at Wyoming said. Her advice to younger students? “If you don’t like something, find a real-life example,” she said of school work that might seem difficult or uninteresting. “There is a reason why we are being taught these things.”

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MAY 28, 2014 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • A3

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A4 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • MAY 28, 2014

BRIEFLY Garden Club meets June 9

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Springdale Garden Club presents “Big Ideas for Small Spaces” at 6 p.m. Monday, June 9, in the Springdale Community Center Room A. Speaker Anita Comarata from White Oak Nursery will discuss how to make the most of your limited garden space, entry way or patio. Visitors welcome for free. Space is limited so call to reserve a seat by Wednesday, June 4. Call Joan Knox, 513-

674-7755, or email joanknox99@fuse.net. There will also be a plant swap. Bring a perennial and swap it for a different plant.

‘Jungle Book Kids’ in Evendale

Evendale Cultural Arts Center and Performing Arts Inc. production of Disney’s “Jungle Book Kids!” comes to the Evendale Recreation Center May 30 and May 31. The Evendale Cultural Arts Center’s young thespians take the stage in this special production at the

Evendale Recreation Center. Show times are 6:30 p.m. and 8 p.m. both days, with matinees at 1 p.m. and 2:30 p.m. Saturday Tickets are $7 and may be bought at the Evendale Recreation Center in advance or at the door. For more information, call 513-563-2247, email susan.gordy@evendaleohio.org or visit online at www.evendaleohio.org .

Pillich at Evendale Starbucks

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ing since 1915. Today it is one of the only schools in the country of its kind, a private school with both day and residential programs for the deaf and for those who need special methods of communication. St. Rita School offers educational and socialization programs to meet the individualized special needs of each child. For more information visit www.srsdeaf.org/ or call 771-7600.

office hours from 7:30 a.m. to 9 a.m. Monday, June 9, at Starbucks, 2520 Cunningham Road. Pillich has open office hours at different locations throughout her district, where residents can come to discuss issues and ideas with her. All are welcome.

St. Rita school kicks off donation challenge

St. Rita School for the Deaf has kicked off a fourweek online Community Challenge with a goal of raising $32,500 to match a gift from Rob Hollaender, owner of Hollaender Manufacturing, a Cincinnati-based manufacturer. The $32,500 gift is the equivalent of one year’s tuition for a student at St. Rita School for the Deaf. Hollaender’s donation has prompted the Community Challenge campaign, encouraging community support for the school. Donate to the campaign by pledging as little as $10 by visiting, http://bit.ly/strita. St. Rita School for the Deaf, in Evendale, has provided education for the deaf and hard of hear-

Sharonville invites kids to Touch A Truck

Sharonville will roll out the Fire Department’s annual Touch A Truck on June 9 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The event will includes vehicles such as fire trucks, ambulances, backhoes, snowplows, dump trucks, SWAT team vehicles and police cars along with military vehicles of all sizes. The name of the event holds true, with visitors invited to touch, honk and climb on the vehicles at the Sharonville Convention Center, 11355 Chester Road.

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MAY 28, 2014 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • A5

TRI-COUNTY

PRESS

Editor: Richard Maloney, rmaloney@communitypress.com, 248-7134

ACHIEVEMENTS | NEWS | ACTIVITIES | HONORS

CommunityPress.com

Making ‘cent’s at Evendale

Several grades at Evendale Elementary celebrated the 100th day of school for the 2013-2014 school year. Students dec-

orated hats and participated in several counting activities throughout the school day.

After spending one hundred days of school with their friends they are still enjoying each other's company. On the left side of the table are Joseph Buchanan, Abby Clemmons, Sam Maloney, on the right are Ben Eckert and Cameron Moyer, Daniel Anderson is in the front. They are all students in Stacy Broenner's class. THANKS TO MARJORIE MILLENNOR

Evendale Elementary second-grade students take a few minutes out from eating their lunch to pose for a photo in their 100th day hats. From left: Lara Goodall, Angel Coffee-Lugo and Marquise Elliott; standing, Connor Rupard, Maura Sansing, Karia Waller, Dylan Coyle, Campbell Seye, EV Fortner, Nora Heard, Drew Ralston and Zach Powers THANKS TO MARJORIE MILLENNOR

Evendale Elementary Students Victoria Smith, Ava Robinson, Alaina McKinney and Brianna Jones. On the right side of the table is La'Darrean Heights. THANKS TO MARJORIE MILLENNOR

These Evendale Elementary kindergarten students are in Stacy Broenner's class. They decorated their hats in the classroom and then proudly wore them to lunch to celebrate with the other students. Students are: Brianna Jones, Cameron Moyer, Sam Maloney, Daniel Anderson, Joseph Buchanan, Abigail Clemmons, Ben Eckert and Matthew Morgan. THANKS TO MARJORIE MILLENNOR

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SPORTS

A6 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • MAY 28, 2014

Editor: Melanie Laughman, mlaughman@communitypress.com, 513-248-7573

HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | RECREATIONAL

TRI- COUNTY

PRESS

CommunityPress.com

Wyoming sends out Plattenburg/Bourbon 2.0 to tennis court By Scott Springer sspringer @communitypress.com

WYOMING — If you think you’ve heard the names Plattenburg and Bourbon, it has come in tennis circles and not the local watering hole. At Wyoming High School, where Gustav “Goose” Plattenburg and Mason Bourbon played in the Division II state tennis tournament, their younger brothers are now following suit. Knowing a winning combination when he sees it, coach Ted Plattenburg has once again teamed up one of his quick, agile sons with a lanky power hitter. Senior Nik Plattenburg and junior Myles Bourbon are the hottest Cowboy duo since Roy Rogers and Trigger. Wyoming reaped the rewards when Plattenburg/ Bourbon 2.0 took the Division II sectional championship at Mason over Seven Hills. Junior Will Carter and sophomore Chris Murray also qualified for the district tournament by taking third-place also against a Seven Hills team. Both pairs were handpicked for the postseason. “This is their decision again,” Ted Plattenburg said of his latest family concoction. “We play good teams here and we went to Columbus and Louisville. They played so well together it made sense to look at a postseason run with them.” On May 22 at the Division II district tournament, Carter and Murray made it to the quarterfinals before falling

to Cincinnati Country Day’s team of senior Patrick Wildman/freshman Kevin Yu. Ironically, the same CCD pair was scheduled to face Wyoming’s Plattenburg/Bourbon May 23. Due to Memorial Day publishing deadlines, the result of the semifinal match with CCD May 23 was unavailable. However, by making the semis, Plattenburg/Bourbon have qualified for the Division I state tournament. Just as it was with the older brothers, Myles Bourbon is considerably taller than Nik Plattenburg. He’s also broader than his older brother Mason. “Myles has about 130 mile per hour serve and a lot of that comes from working in the gym,” Ted Plattenburg said. “That’s up there. Pros are in the 140s. He’s got the size and strength to hit it. I don’t let him do it all the time because he’s playing doubles.” Bourbon was mainly a singles guy all season for Wyoming, while Plattenburg specializes in the two-man game. “Nik and his brother played a lot of doubles,” Ted Plattenburg said. “He was first team last year in doubles. He’s clearly a player that understands the strategy of doubles well.” Without playing favorites, Ted Plattenburg says this latest combo is as good as the last one. The Cowboys saddle up soon for the state tournament, which takes place May 30-31 See TENNIS, Page A7

Princeton High School junior Jordan Barber practices the high jump May 22 in preparation for the district meet May 23. MARK D. MOTZ/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Princeton junior going up, up, over expectations By Mark D. Motz mmotz@communitypress.com

Wyoming senior Nik Plattenburg, left, teamed up with junior Myles Bourbon at the Division II district tournament. SCOTT SPRINGER/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

SHARONVILLE — Up, up and away. Princeton High School junior Jordan Barber not only cleared the high jump bar at 6-foot-2 to win the 2014 Greater Miami Conference championship, but obliterated his own personal best in the process. Which set him up to look toward even loftier leaps. He cleared the league-winning height on his second attempt despite adding four inches to his previous best jump of 5foot-10, a bar the slender 5-foot-9 athlete could walk under with room to spare. “A personal best and league championship all at once,” Barber said. “It felt pretty good. I always wanted to (high jump). I always knew I could jump. I could

touch the rim (on a basketball hoop) since eighth grade.” Yet he didn’t get on the track until his sophomore year or in the jumping pit until this season. Barber said poor grades in middle school kept him out of athletics. And by the time he got to high school and turned around his grades, he tried wrestling as a freshman instead of track. “I just had to get my head screwed on straight,” he said. “Once I got out here, I loved it and decided to stay with it. We’re more of a family here. The coaches are really cool and you get a lot of one-on-one time with them individually.” What does it feel like to soar? “There’s two different feelings,” Barber said. “When you clear and when you don’t clear. When you don’t clear you’re feeling the work, you feel the effort,

and you feel yourself hit the bar. You’re thinking too much. “When you clear and you’re going down on the mat and you look up and see the bar is still there, you don’t really feel anything. It’s just your body taking over. You don’t really think about it.” Barber’s favorite subject in school is social studies. “I like knowing what’s going on in the world, where people are from,” he said. He works as an assistant electrical contractor when he’s not on the track. He also has an interest in photography, shooting Vikings’ sporting events for the yearbook and school newspaper. Princeton boys head coach James Stallings said Barber has been a pleasant surprise and See BARBER, Page A7

PRESS PREPS HIGHLIGHTS By Scott Springer and Mark D. Motz sspringer@communitypress.com mmotz@communitypress.com

Baseball

» In the Division II sectional Wyoming blanked Taylor 10-0 on May 16 behind senior Casey Howell. Junior Sam Izenson was 3-3 and drove in three runs. » In the Division I sectional at Schuler Park, Moeller beat Walnut Hills 9-4 on May 17. Senior Zach Logue struck out eight for the win and junior Bryan Soth was 2-3 with a triple and three runs batted in. In the DI sectional final at Sycamore May 22, Moeller beat Loveland 2-1 on Jordan Ramey’s pinch double and a two-base error. Zach Logue went the dis-

tance for the Crusaders. » Cincinnati Country Day beat Aiken 4-3 in the Division IV sectional tourney May 17. The Indians advanced to face New Miami in the sectional, winning 4-1 in a game begun May 21, postponed by weather and completed May 22. CCD played in the district title game May 23 against Tri-Village High School after early holiday deadlines.. » Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy beat East Clinton 10-0 May 16 in the first round of the Division III sectional tournament play behind Cam Varga’s fourth no-hit pitching performance of the season. The Eagles beat Clermont Northeastern 8-0 May 21 to take the sectional title and advanced to the district championship against Versailles May 23 after early holi-

day deadlines. For results, visit www.cincinnati.com/preps.

Softball

» Mount Notre Dame lost to Seton 5-2 in the Division I sectionals May 16. MND ends the season at 12-11. » Ursuline Academy shut out Glen Este 3-0 for the Division sectional title May 19. The Lions faced Lebanon for the district championship May 23 after early holiday deadlines » For complete tournament results, please visit www.cincinnati.com/preps.

Boys tennis

» At the Division II sectionals in Mason, Wyoming junior Myles Bourbon/senior Nik Plattenburg defeated a duo from Seven Hills 3-6, 6-0, 7-5 for the

championship. Junior Will Carter/sophomore Chris Murray made it to the semifinals and took third place with a win over another pair from Seven Hills. On May 22 at the Division II district tournament, Bourbon/ Plattenburg moved to the semifinals in doubles against Cincinnati Country Day to qualify for the state tournament. » Cincinnati Country Day freshman J.J. Wolf beat senior teammate Asher Hirsch 6-4, 6-2 for the Division II sectional title May 17. Both advanced to the district tournament and reached the semifinals, qualifying for the state tournament, with the possibility of a rematch in the district championship looming. They were scheduled to play semifinal matches May 24 after deadline.

The CCD doubles teams of Patrick Wildman and Kevin Yu beat teammates Chase Tholke and Shaheel Mitra for the sectional doubles title. Both teams qualified for district competition. Wildman and Yu and advanced to the May 24 semifinals and qualified for the state tournament.. » For complete tournament results, please visit www.cincinnati.com/preps.

Track and field

» Princeton competed in the Division I district meet preliminaries at Mason May 21 with the finals set for May 23 after deadline. » At the Greater Catholic League Championships May 16, See PRESS PREPS, Page A7


SPORTS & RECREATION

MAY 28, 2014 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • A7

Niehaus leads youth movement for St. Xavier tennis By Tom Skeen tskeen@communitypress.com

MASON — Youth and excitement has taken over the St. Xavier High School tennis team. Of their seven district qualifiers (three singles players and two doubles teams); five were underclassmen, including three sophomores and a freshman. After playing No. 3 singles as a freshman, sophomore Andrew Niehaus of Sharonville finds himself heading to the Division I state tournament for the first time in his career after reaching the district semifinals May 22. Niehaus coasted to a 6-0, 6-1 victory over TrotwoodMadison’s Mario Rodgers in the opening round of district play before beating Beavercreek’s Trent Hayden 6-4, 6-0 to clinch a state berth. It’s a run coach Russ King wasn’t sure was possible before the season. “I told him in the beginning of the season he was going to get his butt beat,” King said, “but that hasn’t come. He’s won a lot of great matches. He’s still young and he’s not a big kid, so he’ll get stronger in the future. It’s been fun with him this year. He’s a tough kid.” Niehaus has even surprised himself with his play. “I’ve been beating some people I didn’t think I could beat,” the sophomore said. “Going into some matches I thought I was going to lose, but I’ve won a lot of them.” While Niehaus is the lone Bomber to reach the state tournament, freshman Peter Schulteis of Madeira may have shown

Press Preps

Tennis

Continued from Page A6

Continued from Page A6

Moeller won the 4x200 relay. » Wyoming qualified for the regional meet in the boys 4x800 relay by finishing first at the Division II district meet at New Richmond May 22. Also moving on are Terrell Daily II in the long jump at 20’ 10” which gave him third place. Asa Palmer of the Cowboys was fourth at an even 20’. Sophomore Kolan Livingston was second in the discus at141’ 5”. » CCD’s Mantero Moreno-Cheek won the Division III boys district title in the discus with a throw of 117 feet and took the shot put with a toss of 46-foot-6. Junior Kaitlin Harden and freshman Grace Pettengill finished1-2 in the girls 800 meters. Pettengill won the 1,600 meters as well. For complete district meet results, visit www.cincinnati.com/preps.

Nik Plattenburg will move on to Ohio State as a student after his final matches in Columbus, while Myles Bourbon will headline next year’s swingers at Spring Valley Bank Courts in Wyoming. “They’re going to be good next year,” Ted Plattenburg said. “The middle school coach just called me and there’s some kids coming up that are really good. We’ve brought tennis back in Wyoming where we can play a St. X straight up and Sycamore and Mason. That was my goal and the kids responded.”

Boys lacrosse

St. Xavier sophomore Andrew Niehaus hits a serve during his opening match of the Division I district tournament May 22 at the Lindner Family Tennis Center. Niehaus won his first two matches to reach the district semifinals and qualify for the state tournament for the first time in his young career. TOM SKEEN/COMMUNITY PRESS

the most growth. King referred to him as the seventh or eighth singles player at the midpoint of the season before the light bulb came on. Schulteis entered the sectional tournament unseeded before making a run all the way to the finals before losing to Niehaus 6-2, 6-3. The freshman opened the district tournament with a bang, earning a 7-6, 6-4 victory over Centerville’s Tyler Smith, one of the top players out of the Dayton sectional. “I wish I knew (what changed in his game). I’d bottle it,” King said, who led the Bombers to team state titles from 20062009. “All of a sudden he just went up to a high level. Every once in a while it happens. You work your whole career looking for improvements like that.” While not playing in the postseason this season, look for freshman Nick Hutchins of Hyde Park to be a force in 2015. “He’s right there with Peter, just a little behind him right now,” King added. “He plays multiple

sports (golf and cross country), but now he’s promised me he’s going to concentrate just on tennis now.” Sophomore Wagas Tanveer of Mason finished third at sectionals but bowed out in the opening round of districts. While seniors Jay Shanahan of Hyde Park and Matt Momper of Madeira helped the Bombers to their 48th straight Greater Catholic League title, the doubles players have left the program in good hands for the next couple years. With Mason and Sycamore – the top two teams in Southwest Ohio – both graduate some serious talent over the next two years, King is ready to see his Bombers back on top. “You never want to look ahead, not even to the next match, but it’s kind of nice,” he said of his youth movement. “Mason’s graduating some kids and Sycamore’s going to graduate some the following year, so I’m ready to take over.”

» Wyoming beat Oak Hills 19-6 on May 14. The Cowboys won in the Division II OHSLA tournament against CHCA 17-3 on May 22. » Moeller defeated Cranbrook on May 17, 19-16. David Sturgis had four goals. The Crusaders won in the DI OHSLA tournament over Lakota East 19-5 on May 22.

Rugby

» In the state tournament May 17, Moeller beat Indian Springs 12-7.

Boys volleyball

» In the Division I regional final at Roger Bacon, Moeller lost to Elder on May 17 to end their season. The Panthers prevailed 16-25, 25-14, 25-16, 25-20.

College signings

» Cincinnati Country Day School announced its athletic signings May 21: Dominic Isadore, Hanover College, soccer; Shelley Menifee, Northern Kentucky University, track; Kelsey Zimmers , Murray State University, soccer; J.R. Menifee , Wittenberg University, basketball; Patrick Wildman, Claremont McKenna College, tennis; Carson Aquino, Hanover College, football; Kat Mapes, College of Mount Saint Joseph, volleyball and lacrosse; Elijah Engelke, Brown University, rowing; Matt Walton, Wittenberg University, basketball; Katie Barton, Dickinson College, lacrosse; Ashley Streit , University of St. Andrews in Scotland, soccer; and Hanna Gottschalk, Ohio State University, rowing.

Barber Continued from Page A6

valuable asset on a team better known for for sprinters and hurdlers like Halen Witcher and Kevin Rainey. “You have to have some Godgiven ability, which he has a lot of, but as far the technique, you can teach that to anyone,” Stalling said. “It’s pretty special to see how much he’s improved, though, working pretty much by himself.” Though not entirely. Stallings’ enlisted his sister Charen - a former Vikings highjump record holder who went on to jump at Eastern Michigan University - to assist Barber. She’s helped him lengthen his approach to the bar, increasing his speed and momentum, so he can reach his goal of a 6-foot-4 jump and a trip to the regional meet and possibly state. Barber and the Vikings competed in the Division I district meet at Mason May 23 after early holiday deadlines. For complete results from the meet, please visit www.cincinnati.com/preps.

U C H E A LT H O R T H O PA E D I C S & S P O R T S M E D I C I N E

Heather Mitts, TQL score with She Plays, She Wins By Mark D. Motz mmotz@communitypress.com

CINCINNATI — You go, girls. That’s the message three-time Olympic gold medal soccer star Heather Mitts - a Hyde Park native and St. Ursula Academy graduate - hopes to get out as she partners with TQL Urban Race for the She Plays, She Wins program. Greater Cincinnati female athletes ages 13 to 24 have a chance to win $1,000 in scholarship money or uniform vouchers for their teams through the new program. “We believe it’s important to have strong women in the workplace,” Kristine Glenn said, spokeswoman for Total Quality Logistics, with local offices in Milford and Union Township, Clermont County, and Western Hills. “A lot of those women come out of a sports background. This is a chance for girls to tell people what their sports mean to them now and how they will benefit them in the future.” Girls can submit a twominute video or 500-word essay to the TQL Urban

Race page on Facebook (www.facebook.com/ ShePlaysSheWins) answering the question, “How have sports positively impacted your life and how do you think they will affect your future?” Entry deadline is June 20. A panel of Tristate women business leaders will nominate the top five entries in age categories 13 to 15, 16 to 18 and 19 to 24. The public will vote on the winners from July 8 to 18. Mitts was in the eligible age range when she first began making a name for herself on the pitch. She was a sophomore on SUA’s 1993 state championship team that beat Westerville North 4-1 and finished the season 21-1-2. She went on to the University of Florida where she won an NCAA title with the Gators over heavily favored North Carolina in 1998. She played in the 2004 Olympics in Athens, the 2008 games in Beijing and the 2012 London Olympics, winning three gold medals along the way. “I feel like it’s an opportunity to give back,” Mitts said. “I think it’s a very positive thing, obviously,

for girls to have sports in their lives. “There are very few female athletes who are in a position to be a role model and if I can be one of them, that’s great. I want to be.” Glenn said TQL is involved in several charities related to youth athletics. Its annual Urban Race benefits the Reds Community Fund and Marvin Lewis Community Fund, both of which provide opportunities for at-risk youth in the community through sports and education. She Plays, She Wins is just an extension of that involvement. Mitts is now retired and living in Philadelphia with her husband, former NFL quarterback A.J. Feeley, and 3-month-old son, Connor. “Now that I’m retired I have more time to do things like this,” she said. “I have more of a chance to get back to Cincinnati to see family and friends. Mitts said she stays in touch with a lot of the players from the 1993 state championship soccer team from SUA. She will host her annual soccer camp July 19 at Northern Kentucky University.

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VIEWPOINTS

A8 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • MAY 28, 2014

Editor: Richard Maloney, rmaloney@communitypress.com, 248-7134

EDITORIALS | LETTERS | COLUMNS | CH@TROOM

Poor, Franciscan Haircuts From the Heart, Our Lady of the Woods and Tamar’s Place. Karen is the Centennial Barn marketing director, and either she or event coordinator Mayo Woody will be happy to take you on a tour that includes the fascinating history of the Barn from 1896. Thanks to the remarkable renovations by Addison Clipson Associated Architects Inc., today’s Barn is a delightful fusion of 19th century nostalgia and 21st century “green” technology. Original bricks, timbers, floors and walls are accented by geo-thermal heating, aluminum–clad double pane thermally efficient windows, 100-year terne metal roofing and a beautiful staircase. Original stained glass windows hanging on walls throughout the building are a loving bow to the past. Joan Mills is the director of the Associates of The Franciscan Sisters of the Poor, and

The Franciscan Peddler (a shop for the thrifty) operates under her leadership. It opened in December 2013 and was created so the Franciscan Associates would have their own ministry. Joan sees it as a sacred space for all to meet Christ, providing affordable shopping with dignity. Hours are Friday and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Drop your donation off any day of the week. Their donation box is located in the dock area near the shop. They can always use more volunteers, so if you have some time, share it with them. I saw quality items that were very reasonably priced. Jewelry, prom dresses, greeting cards, books, shoes, men’s and religious items and are just a few of the lovely things on hand. The Centennial Barn offers rental space for events, and the information packet has an extensive list of venues the staff is equipped to help you host. Available are a generous

Challenging community to help provide children with gift of communication

St. Rita School for the Deaf is about to enter its 100th year. There is a rich history in this institution, but equally as much is in store to prepare St. Rita for another century. Since 1915, we have welcomed students from the region, providing assistance for the deaf and hard of hearing. Throughout the years, we have enhanced our programs to help children who have other communication challenges like autism, apraxia and Down synGregory drome. We Ernst St. have students COMMUNITY PRESS ranging from 6 GUEST COLUMNIST weeks to 21 years old and approximately 70 percent of our students have additional disabilities beyond hearing challenges. Sign language has been one reason for language and communication success with our students, but our teachers also develop a lesson plan unique to each student and their needs. Using state-of-theart technology, incorporating a variety of approaches to learning, and developing specialized education plans for every indi-

vidual student, ensures that our students not only overcome their obstacles, but surpass expectations and lead full and rewarding lives. St. Rita offers both educational and socialization programs to meet the needs of each and every child. We are one of very few schools in the country that has programs specifically designed for children with apraxia – a speech challenge where an individual can hear, but has trouble saying what he or she wants to say. It is difficult for families to recognize whether or not their child has apraxia and it causes much heartbreak as they watch their child struggle to communicate, without understanding what’s wrong. Our program has not only helped children find their voice, but has given families the absolute joy in hearing their child say precious words like, “I love you.” Petey, a student affected by apraxia has been at St. Rita for the past three years. Petey is able to communicate with sign language, but has advanced even further. Rob Hollaender, who knows Petey’s mom, observed the transformation, “Petey went from not saying anything to becoming a chatterbox – and it’s great.” Rob owns

May 21 question

Where is the best park in the area and why do you think it’s at the top of the list? Every week we ask readers a question they can reply to via email. Send your answers to tricountypress@community press.com with Ch@troom in the subject line.

What’s your favorite summer event in the area? What do you like about it?

“Paddlefest, as it a unique way to see the city and the river, hopefully without getting run over by a barge or go-fast boat. All of the local farmers’ markets.”

Mark Fertitta

Hollaender Manufacturing and has partnered with us to lead a Community Challenge. Hollaender Manufacturing is giving the opportunity to make your gift go twice as far by matching every gift up to $32,500, from now until June 6. Rob wants to share Petey’s accomplishments with the community and generate awareness and funds so that we can continue providing the resources to help children and families like Petey celebrate and create milestones. Every child at St. Rita receives the help and quality education they deserve, regardless of a family’s ability to pay. Forty percent of our students live below the poverty line and every dollar donated to St. Rita goes to tuition assistance. All children deserve a voice, and every one deserves to be understood. How you can help: Support The St. Rita Community Challenge until June 6 by visiting wedid.it/campaigns or www.srs deaf.org and spreading the word to others. Gregory Ernst Sr. is the executive director of St. Rita School for the Deaf. He has been with the organization for 45 years, serving as a teacher, principal and executive director.

TRI-COUNTY

PRESS

A publication of

“The annual July 4th Independence Day Fireworks off Springdale have been great.”

T.D.T.

“Was the favorite @SummerfairCincy? It’s next weekend May 30 - June 1.”

Chris Hoffman

“Summerfair.”

Centennial Barn Marketing Director Karen Amend and Joan Mills, director of the Associates of the Franciscan Sisters of the Poor at the newly refurbished doors of The Centennial Barn, "A space for community and celebration." EVELYN PERKINS FOR THE COMMUNITY

nonprofit discount, and sliding scale pricing for individuals and community groups. Rental fees support Cincinnati community empowerment programs. There are no hidden charges. There are state-of- the-art sound and projection technology, a full catering kitchen and meeting rooms for large or small groups. You have your choice of space to accommodate your event: four different rooms, the full upper level, the full main barn or the veranda. Although you are not required to use them, Karen has a list of caterers and vendors who can supply chairs, tables, all manner of tableware, light, tents, DJs, etc. Centennial Barn executive

director Rose Alema, also wants you to know about free community programs, the community garden plots and upcoming events: On June 13, April Aloisio and the Phillip Burkhead Trio will perform at the free, Arts at the Barn, jazz concert. Animal Blessing Week is planned from Sept. 28-Oct. 4 and the annual Harvest Festival will be Oct. 19. For additional information or to arrange a tour call 513-761-1697 ext. 8105 or log on to www.centennialbarn.org. Evelyn Perkins writes a regular column about people and events in the Tri-County Press area. Send items for her column to 10127 Chester Road, Woodlawn, 45215, or call her directly at 772-7379.

Grading the graders an idea worth considering

CH@TROOM THIS WEEK’S QUESTION

PRESS

CommunityPress.com

Centennial Barn old-fashioned setting for new-age events Karen Amend is a fountain of information about Franciscan Ministries Inc. and the Centennial Barn at 110 Compton Road. A Milwaukee native, Marquette University graduate and former English teacher, Karen moved to Wyoming in 1979. She has four adult children, five grandchildren and four “granddogs.” After working at St. James of the Evelyn Valley School, Perkins she became COMMUNITY marketing direcPRESS COLUMNIST tor at the Franciscan Holistic Health Center. The Franciscan Sisters of the Poor enjoy a long history on their campus beginning at 60 Compton Road. They sponsor six programs: Art For All People, the Centennial Barn, Franciscans for the

TRI-COUNTY

Gail Shotwell Chastang

Should Ohio pass a law that mandates students to grade their teachers? The apparent answer to this question is, yes. After all, students are the direct beneficiaries of everything that takes place within a given teacher’s classroom. How students should grade teachers and what impact their ratings might have on a teacher’s ultimate evaluation are questions under considerNoel H. ation in Taylor COMMUNITY PRESS Senate Bill 229. GUEST COLUMNIST Unanswered questions involve the administration of the student surveys. Does the classroom teacher distribute the surveys in class? Will a building principal conduct the surveys in each teacher’s class? Will students be permitted to complete the surveys outside class? If students, particularly some elementary children who struggle with reading, will they receive assistance? Will the surveys be confined to classroom teachers or extended to include music, art, physical education teachers? What about administrators? Should they become subject to students written assessments as well? Another question receiving attention is the section of the bill that assigns results from students annual surveys to up to 20 percent of a teacher’s evaluation. This is just as unfair as mandating that 50 percent of each teacher’s evaluation be comprised of data extracted from the state’s annual standardized tests. Students’ views of teacher performance are not only desirable but necessary,

394 Wards Corner Road Loveland, Ohio 45140 phone: 248-8600 email: tricountypress@communitypress.com web site: www.communitypress.com

especially over a period of multiple years. In fact Information gleaned from students’ surveys and comments should be a factor in the school administrator’s evaluation of a teacher Skeptically speaking,however, the Ohio State Legislature’s actions to mandate specific content to evaluate teacher performance is an unwarranted effort to further diminish the professional expertise of individual teachers at the expense of its ultimate goal of waging war on teachers’ unions. Despite the public’s resounding rejection of Senate Bill five, the legislature is now conducting one sided negotiations on issues that should be discussed at the local bargaining table. It’s clearly evident that the hallowed conservative principle of local control does not apply to contract negotiations between boards of education and teachers unions. Unfortunately, Ohio has joined other states with Republican dominated legislatures that are attempting to enact laws that limit the rights of teachers and unions that represent them. This survey proposal is just one in a series of legislative efforts to provide boards of education additional power to dismiss tenured teachers without due process. Until the legislature’s partisan composition is changed, its effort to weaken organizations that represent teachers will succeed while standardized test results and data from students’ surveys will have a debilitating influence on students’ ultimate achievement. Noel H. Taylor is a retired administrator, Princeton City School District, and adjunct professor of education, Xavier University. He lives in Sharonville.

Tri-County Press Editor Richard Maloney rmaloney@communitypress.com, 248-7134 Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday See page A2 for additional contact information.


WEDNESDAY, MAY 28, 2014

LIFE

TRI-COUNTY PRESS

PEOPLE | IDEAS | RECIPES

Sisters make medical dynamic duo Sisters Tamara and Tara Hughes have always been close. Just two years apart in age, the two usually had similar likes and interests growing up in Springdale. They never imagined that when they grew up, they would choose complimentary career paths, work together and eventually plan to go into business together. They both work at Georgia Regents University Hospital in Augusta, GA – Tamara, 30, in her third year of residency in obstetrics and gynecology, and Tara, 28, a registered diagnostic sonographer, specializing in high risk Obstetrics and Gynecology. “They have always been close, being the youngest girls in the family,” said their father Howard Hughes. “They managed to end up working together.”

Similar talents, similar likes

The two sisters have shared many things, especially their stellar academic performance, in both high school and college. They both attended Princeton High School, and then Xavier University in New Orleans – for their undergraduate work. They were both academic powerhouses in high school. Tara graduated from high school with an honors diploma; was a member of the National

Springdale sisters Tara and tamara Hughes are now working together, Tamara as a resident in obstetrics and gynecology and Tara as a sonographer specializing in high risk pregnancies, at Georgia Regents University Hospital in Augusta. PROVIDED

Honor Society, Latin Honor Society and Spanish Honor Society. Tamara graduated from high school as a member of the National Honor Society; received the American Red Cross Youth Scholarship and Archdiocese of Cincinnati Scholarship. In college, where they were both pre-med, their stellar academic achievement continued. Tara graduated Magna Cum Laude from with a bachelor of science degree in psychology and a minor in chemistry premed; was on the Dean’s List every semester; and was a member of the Alpha Epsilon National Premedical Honor Society. Tamara, as an undergraduate, was a member of the Alpha Epsilon National Premedical Honor Society, Beta Beta Beta

Biological Honor Society and several other honor societies. “I knew I wanted to be a doctor since I was about 5 or 6 years old,” Tamara said. “I always had a feeling I was going to be a doctor and deliver babies. There was a show that was on in 1995 called ‘A Baby Story’ that followed mothers during their pregnancy through delivery. I watched it every day. I loved that show.” After college, both girls pursued rigorous training programs, but in preparation for different roles in obstetrics andgynecology. Tara headed to Newark, Ohio, where she received her training as a sonographer (or ultrasound technician). She was only one of only 12 students accepted into Central Ohio Technical College. She earned an associate degree in applied science in diagnostic medical sonography. Tamara traveled to Washington, D.C., to attend medical school at Howard University College of Medicine, where she won the Outstanding Service and Leadership Award, and the Howard University Student Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology Award. After medical school Tamara began her residency at Georgia Regents University Hospital in Augusta. She was named Intern of the Year for 2011-2012, an honor given to a first year resident who displays excellence in

OB/GYN specialty, test scores on the OB/GYN exam and the votes of the OB/GYN faculty. When Tara was close to graduating from her two-year program in sonography, she and Tamara began to talk about where she would look for a job. By that time, Tamara was at the end of her intern year of residency, when she heard about a job opening for a sonographer at her hospital.

Back together

“When she was in school in Newark , I always wanted her to come down here,” Tamara said. “I just happened to hear one of the people in the ultrasound department say she was leaving. I told Tara to apply then, in June 2012. “I mentioned that Tara got straight As at both colleges she attended and that she graduated Magna Cum Laude from her bachelor’s degree program, and that she is really hard working. They interviewed her and really liked her.” Tamara and Tara say they love living in the same city again, and working together. “We get a chance to interact during the day,” Tamara said. “Sometimes my patients are scanned by her. “The ultrasound department is just around the corner from the OB/GYN Office at the hospital.” “We both love our jobs,” Tara said. “I like to bop down the hall

and see what Tamara is doing when she is in clinic, and she does the same with me. Sometimes we are mistaken for each other.”

Going into practice

Tamara’s four-year residency will be over July 2015. She plans to join an established OB/ GYN group practice. When she does go into practice herself, she plans to hire Tara as an ultrasound operator. “Because sonograms are so much a part of each pregnancy, many obstetricians buy or lease ultrasound machines and have sonographers on staff,” Tamara said. “It would be great for us to build a practice together.” Tara agrees. Although she performs many other diagnostic scans as a part of her job, her favorite patients are mothersto-be. “I like seeing the pregnant patients,” Tara said. “You only receive two ultrasounds during a normal pregnancy – at the beginning to confirm your baby’s due date, and then at 20 weeks to check the baby’s development. It’s so much fun to share that moment when the mom first sees her baby!” Their dad summed it up when he said, “I’m really proud of my daughters, and the wonderful things they are doing with their lives. “The fact they are working together makes it even more special.”

Cincinnati Woman’s Club raises funds to support President’s Project

T

he Cincinnati Woman’s Club’s 2014 President’s Project honoring Leslie Mowry, president, will fund an after-school soccer league for girls in the fourth-, fifth- and sixthgrades at 25 Cincinnati public schools. It will be managed through the efforts of Activities Beyond the Classroom, a local organization committed to bringing extra-curricular programming to under-served children. The CWC hosted a fundraiser for the President’s Project at the Club April 11 to “Pull the Rug Out and Get the Ball Rolling.” The evening’s program, along with delicious food and drink, featured Desiree Reed-Francois, Senior Associate Director of Athletics at University of Cincinnati, and entertainment from The Walnut Hills High School Senior Ensemble under the direction of Anthony Nims, director of vocal music. Libby Sharrock is chairman of the 2014 President’s Project, and Ruthann Sammarco presided as chairman of the Evening. The 2014 President’s Project Committee members include: Marianne Beard, Mary Ellen Betz, Amelia Crutcher, Joan Dornette, Gail Furthman, Judy Herd, Milly Huffman, Marty Humes, Pat Krumm, Genia Lepley, Dee MacDonald, Judy McKinney, Molly Planalp, Carole Rauf, Diane Sakmyster and Rosemary Schlachter.

Cincinnati Woman's Club President Leslie Mowry (Wyoming) with scholarship recipient Sarah Franklin and Sarah's parents John and Mari Franklin. Sarah is Hughes High School valedictorian and kicker on the football team. PROVIDED

The 2014 President’s Project Committee members Joan Dornette (Villa Hills), Milly Huffman (Wyoming), Cincinnati Woman's Club President Leslie Mowry (Wyoming), Eugenia Lepley (Pleasant Ridge), Pat Krumm (Maineville), Judy Herd (Wyoming) and Committee Chair Libby Sharrock (Beechmont) congratulate one another on a wildly successful event. PROVIDED

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B2 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • MAY 28, 2014

K1

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD THURSDAY, MAY 29

ABOUT CALENDAR

Cooking Classes

To submit calendar items, go to www.cincinnati.com and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to life@communitypress.com along with event information. Items are printed on a spaceavailable basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to www.cincinnati.com and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page.

Today’s Food Trends with Ilene Ross, 6:30-9 p.m., Cooks’ Wares, 11344 Montgomery Road, $45. Reservations required. 489-6400. Symmes Township.

Dance Classes Line Dancing, 5:30-6:30 p.m., Fitness Physiques by Nico G, 9681 Kenwood Road, Music from variety of genres. $10-$15. Registration required. 290-8217; www.fitnessphysiques.net. Blue Ash.

Education Acting Classes, 7-9 p.m., Sharonville Fine Arts Center, 11165 Reading Road, Actors build and expand their skills. Prepare for auditions, improv, cold reads, monologues, character development and agency representation. Ages 18 and up. $20. Presented by Cincinnati Actors Studio. 615-2827; cincinnatiactorsstudio.com. Sharonville.

Exercise Classes Zumba Class, 7-8 p.m., Hartzell United Methodist Church, 8999 Applewood Drive, $5. Presented by Zumba with Ashley. 917-7475. Blue Ash.

Exhibits Antique Quilt Exhibit, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Heritage Village Museum, 11450 Lebanon Road, View museum’s collection of antique quilts. $2, $1 ages 5-11, free ages 4 and under and members. 563-9484; www.heritagevillagecincinnati.org. Sharonville. Vintage Base Ball, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Heritage Village Museum, 11450 Lebanon Road, Exhibit showcasing different styles and eras of baseball equipment of 19th century. Through Sept. 28. $2, $1 ages 5-11; free ages 4 and under and members. 563-9484. Sharonville.

The Mercy Health Mobile Heart Screening unit will be at the Sharonville Kroger from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday, May 30, 12164 Lebanon Road, Sharonville. Several screening packages are available to test for risk of heart attack, stroke, aneurysm and other major diseases. An appointment is required. Call 866-819-0127, or visit www.mercyhealthfair.com. THANKS TO NANETTE BENTLEY will thrive throughout the season. $25. Reservations recommended. 791-3175; pipkinsmarket.com. Montgomery. Grow, Pick, and Eat Your Garden, 7-8 p.m., Pipkin’s Market, 5035 Cooper Road, Garden Center. Simple, creative ideas for using herbs, greens and edibles. Free. Reservations recommended. 791-3175; pipkinsmarket.com. Montgomery.

Literary - Libraries Kid’s Club, 3:30-4:30 p.m., Deer Park Branch Library, 3970 E. Galbraith Road, Arts and crafts, presenters, board games and more. Ages 5-12. Free. 369-4450. Deer Park.

FRIDAY, MAY 30 Exercise Classes

On Stage - Children’s Theater The Jungle Book Kids, 7:30-9:30 p.m., Woodlawn Community Center, 10050 Woodlawn Blvd., Specially adapted from classic film, musical includes favorite Disney tunes. $15. Presented by Cincinnati Black Theatre Company. 241-6060; www.cincinnatiblacktheatre.org. Woodlawn.

On Stage - Comedy

Home & Garden Planting Outstanding Annual Containers, 10 a.m. to noon, Pipkin’s Market, 5035 Cooper Road, Garden Center. Design and plant a summer container that

Good Shepherd, 8815 E. Kemper Road, Room 31. Literature discussion group. Free, donations accepted. Presented by Codependents Anonymous Inc.. Through June 26. 800-0164. Montgomery. Codependents Anonymous, noon to 1 p.m., Blue Ash Presbyterian Church, 4309 Cooper Road, Youth room. Big book/ discussion meeting. Brown bag lunch optional. Open to everyone who desires healthy loving relationships. Donations accepted. Presented by Codependents Anonymous Inc.. 673-0174; www.coda.org. Blue Ash.

Auggie Smith, 8 p.m., Go Bananas Comedy Club, 8410 Market Place Lane, $10-$16. 984-9288; www.gobananascomedy.com. Montgomery.

Support Groups Codependents Anonymous, 7-8 p.m., The Community of the

Yoga Happy Hour, 5-7 p.m., Yoga Fit Boutique, 10776 Montgomery Road, Studio. Invigorating practice modified to accommodate all participants ending in deep relaxation. BYOB and enjoy complimentary healthy snack. Ages 21 and up. $15. 237-5330. Sycamore Township. Small Group Personal Training, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Fitness Physiques by Nico G, 9681 Kenwood Road, Session covers challenges in strength, stability, balance, core and metabolic training. Ages 18 and up. $115 per month. Registration required. 290-8217; www.fitnessphysiques.net. Blue Ash.

Exhibits

Antique Quilt Exhibit, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Heritage Village Museum, $2, $1 ages 5-11, free ages 4 and under and members. 563-9484; www.heritagevillagecincinnati.org. Sharonville. Vintage Base Ball, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Heritage Village Museum, $2, $1 ages 5-11; free ages 4 and under and members. 563-9484. Sharonville.

Health / Wellness Mobile Heart Screenings, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Kroger Sharonville, 12164 Lebanon Road, Several screening packages available to test risk of heart attack, stroke, aneurysm and other major diseases. Appointment required. Presented by Mercy Health. 866-819-0127; www.mercyhealthfair.com. Sharonville.

Karaoke and Open Mic Karaoke With Wendell, 8 p.m., DJ’s Sports Tavern, 380 Glensprings Drive, Karaoke and dancing. Ages 18 and up. Free. Presented by Wendell’s Karaoke. 771-0888; www.payneentertainment.com. Springdale.

On Stage - Children’s Theater The Jungle Book Kids, 7:30-9:30 p.m., Woodlawn Community Center, $15. 241-6060; www.cincinnatiblacktheatre.org. Woodlawn.

On Stage - Comedy

Auggie Smith, 8 p.m. 10:30 p.m., Go Bananas Comedy Club, $10-$16. 984-9288; www.gobananascomedy.com. Montgomery.

Recreation TGIF at Kids First, 6-10 p.m., Kids First Sports Center, 7900 E. Kemper Road, Pizza, indoor swimming and night-time snack. $30, $20 each additional child. Reservations required. Through June 13. 489-7575. Sycamore Township.

SATURDAY, MAY 31 Cooking Classes Healthy Cooking Classes, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., Peachy’s Health Smart, 7400 Montgomery Road, Peachy Seiden discusses nutrition and health while preparing two delicious, simple and easy meals. Ages 18 and up. $30. Registration required. 315-3943; www.peachyshealthsmart.com. Silverton.

gomery Elementary School, 9609 Montgomery Road, Parking lot. Roughly 30 vendors with fresh produce, artisan foods, locallyroasted coffee, handmade fresh bread and baked goods, local bison meat, chicken, beef, sausage, olive oil, music and more. Free. Presented by Montgomery Farmers Market. 560-5064; montgomeryfarmersmarket.org. Montgomery.

Health / Wellness Mobile Heart Screenings, 2-5 p.m., Walgreens Deer Park, 4090 E. Galbraith Road, Several screening packages available to test risk of heart attack, stroke, aneurysm and other major diseases. Appointment required. Presented by Mercy Health. 866-819-0127; www.mercyhealthfair.com. Deer Park.

Home & Garden

Fly Fishing Lessons, 9-11 a.m., Orvis Retail Store, 7737 Kenwood Road, Learn fly-fishing basics. For beginners of all ages. Lessons on fly casting and outfit rigging. Free. Reservations required. 791-2325. Kenwood.

Spring Plant Exchange, 1 p.m., Madeira Branch Library, 7200 Miami Ave., Bring unwanted and excess plants to exchange with fellow gardeners. Ages 18 and up. Free. Registration required. Presented by Public Library of Cincinnati & Hamilton County. 369-6028; programs.cincinnatilibrary.org. Madeira.

Exhibits

Music - Jazz

Antique Quilt Exhibit, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Heritage Village Museum, $2, $1 ages 5-11, free ages 4 and under and members. 563-9484; www.heritagevillagecincinnati.org. Sharonville. Vintage Base Ball, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Heritage Village Museum, $2, $1 ages 5-11; free ages 4 and under and members. 563-9484. Sharonville.

The Hitmen, 8 p.m. to midnight, Tony’s Steaks and Seafood, 12110 Montgomery Road, Free. 6771993; www.tonysofcincinnati.com. Symmes Township.

Education

Farmers Market

Music - R&B Basic Truth, 9-11:30 p.m., Shades of Blue, 10088 Springfield Pike, Free before 8 p.m., $5 until 9 p.m., $10 after 9 p.m. 671-2583. Woodlawn.

Montgomery Farmers’ Market, 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Mont-

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LIFE

MAY 28, 2014 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • B3

Honey cider drink can help allergies Are your allergies kicking in? Mine sure are, and as much work as we have outdoors in the vegetable and herb gardens it’s not, as Martha would say, “a good thing.” My friend and Cincinnati Magazine marketing director Chris Ohmer said it best. “I’m living from tissue to tissue.” Well, Rita I’ve got a Heikenfeld natural RITA’S KITCHEN home remedy that might help Chris and others who are affected by seasonal allergies. I can tell you this: My “potion” sure helps me get through these pollen-laden spring days.

Easy and effective honey cider allergy drink First thing to know: Never give honey to children under the age of 1 year. And if you’re going to make this drink, make it with raw local organic honey and organic raw apple cider. The reason? For the local honey, bees collect pollen from your area and this helps builds up in your system. If all goes right, you could become immune to the pollen in your area. As far as the organic apple cider goes, it’s not refined and distilled and it is thought to block

histamine reactions. It also contains healthy enzymes, vitamins and minerals. It can help lower your cholesterol and blood pressure as well. For every cup of warm or chilled water, stir in: 1 generous tablespoon each local raw honey and organic apple cider vinegar. Add a squeeze of lemon for extra vitamin C if you want. Drink a couple times a day, or more if you’re outdoors a lot. Recipe Hall of Fame: Tony Palazzolo’s version of Frisch’s vegetable soup. I can’t remember which class I was teaching, but a student came up and asked me if I would publish this favorite recipe again. Some of you will recall that Tony’s recipe, as well as my version, are in my Recipe Hall of Fame. “A result of over a dozen attempts, and I think it is very close to Frisch’s,” Tony told me way back when. Tony also noted the soup is best if allowed to rest for 2-3 hours after cooking or next day. I’ve made it with mostly broth and just a bit of water and it is really good that way, too. 4 tablespoons vegetable oil 1 cup onion, diced 1/2 cup each diced: carrots, celery 1/2 cup each frozen vegetables: peas, corn, cut green beans, baby lima beans (can use canned baby limas)

Rita’s honey cider allergy drink.RITA HEIKENFELD FOR THE COMMUNITY PRESS

1 can, 14.5 ounce, diced tomatoes with juice 2 quarts beef broth 1 quart water 1/2 teaspoon each thyme, garlic powder 3/4 teaspoon black pepper 1 cup potato, diced 1/4 cup pearl barley 1/4 cup long grain rice Salt to taste

In a large soup pot, sauté onion, carrot, and celery until onion is soft but not browned, about 10 minutes. Add rest of ingredients except potato, rice and barley. Bring to boil and lower to simmer partially covered for 30-45 minutes. Add potato, rice and barley, bring back to boil,

ing some to crystallize with egg white and sugar. I’ll let you know how they turn out.

lower to simmer partially covered for another 30 minutes or until potato, rice and barley are done. Add salt and pepper. Readers want to know: Are lilacs edible? Yes, as long as they’re “clean” not sprayed, etc. They taste as good as they smell. Right now I’m gather-

Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educator, Jungle Jim’s Eastgate culinary professional and author. Find her blog online at Abouteating. com. Call 513-248-7130, ext. 356.

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LIFE

B4 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • MAY 28, 2014

Photographers encouraged to enter Frame Cincinnati photography contest

A Research Study for People with Moderate Acne

The Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County is pleased to announce its participation in FotoFocus Cincinnati, a monthlong biennial celebration spotlighting independently programmed exhibitions of historical and contemporary photography and lens-based

Testing an Investigational Medication in Volunteers Suffering from Moderate Acne

What The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of an investigational drug for treatment of acne. During this research study the medication will be compared to a placebo (a study agent without the active ingredient). Treatment has to be applied topically to the face once daily for 12 weeks by participants with moderate acne.

The church building is the home of four different ministries. Church By the Woods is a multicultural and multi-ethnic church whose mission is to love and serve God, each other and our neighbors. Sunday worship service is traditional in English and begins at 10 a.m. From 10 a.m. to noon Saturdays, classes in English as a Second Language are offered for ages 14 to 94. Taiwanese Presbyterian Ministry has Sunday traditional worship at 2 p.m. in their language of Taiwanese. On Saturdays they

Details For more information call the Study Manager Ana Luisa Kadekaro at (513) 558-6659 or contact by email at kadekaal@ucmail.uc.edu

CE-0000595512

INDEPENDENT BAPTIST

FRIENDSHIP BAPTIST CHURCH 8580 Cheviot Rd., Colerain Twp 741-7017 www.ourfbc.com Gary Jackson, Senior Pastor Sunday School (all ages) 9:30am Sunday Morning Service 10:30am Sunday Evening Service 6:30pm Wedn. Service/Awana 7:00pm RUI Addiction Recovery (Fri.) 7:00pm

Exceptional living begins at Towerwoods.

Active Youth, College, Senior Groups Exciting Music Dept, Deaf Ministry, Nursery

Enjoy breathtaking views, well-appointed residences, and the comfort and security of community living. The Towerwoods patio homes at Twin Towers blend the best of both worlds into one beautiful neighborhood. You get the privacy of single family living while also enjoying all the advantages of being part of a leading senior living community.

SHARON BAPTIST CHURCH 4451 Fields Ertel Road Cincinnati, OH 45241 (513) 769-4849 gstep77507@aol.com

Services

Sunday School - 10:00 am Sunday Morning - 11:00 am Sunday Evening - 6:00 pm Wednesday - 7:00 pm Evening Prayer and Bible Study

SM

5343 Hamilton Avenue • Cincinnati, OH 45224 • www.lec.org Wyoming Baptist Church

(A Church For All Seasons) Burns and Waverly Avenues Cincinnati OH 45215 821.8430

Twin Towers, a Life Enriching Communities campus, is affiliated with the West Ohio Conference of the United Methodist Church and welcomes people of all faiths. CE-0000579926

You Have To See The New Nature’s Corner New Products - Huge Inventory - Lower Prices

Nature’sCornerGreenhouses 1028 EBENEZER ROAD

513-941-2235

www.naturescornerplants.com

Mon.-Fri. 9-8 • Sat. 9-6 • Sun. 10-5

(70 Varieties to Choose From) Reg. $21.95

LUTHERAN

30

ON SALE FOR $ 1 Gallon Perennials

Faith Lutheran LCMC 8265 Winton Rd., Finneytown www.faithcinci.org

(Over 400 Varieties to Choose From) Reg. $12.95

9

ON SALE NOW $ 95 6-inch Blooming Annuals

Contemporary Service 9am Traditional Service 11:00am

COLOR

Trinity Lutheran Church, LCMS

(Select from Thousands of Pots - No Limit) T Reg. $7.99 to $8.99 INSTAN

Includes: Clothing, Pottery, Statuary, Bird Original coupons only. One coupon Baths, Patio Containers, Hanging Planters per visit. Not valid with other coupons Wrought Iron, Containers, Chemicals or on sale items. Must be presented at time of purchase. Coupon valid 5/01-5/31/2014. 513-941-2235

Nature’s Corner Greenhouses

www.naturescornerplants.com

Exclusively Featuring Garden Girl Women’s Apparel Fairy Gardens & Accessories Picture by Steven Easley Unique Garden Art

6

ON SALE NOW $ 49 1 Quart Perennials

5921 Springdale Rd

Rev. Richard Davenport, Pastor Worship & Sunday School 10:30 a.m, Bible Study 9:15 a.m. Sundays

(Choose from Thousands) Reg. $5.99

Classic Service and Hymnbook

www.trinitylutherancincinnati.com

4

ON SALE NOW $ 79 2 Gallon Potted Rose Bushes

385-7024

UNITED METHODIST Christ, the Prince of Peace

(100’s to Choose From) Reg. $24.95

ON SALE

2 FOR $40

Prices Good Through May 31st

Experience the Magic of Gardening

CE-0000588983

10 OFF

EPISCOPAL

8am Holy Eucharist I 9am Holy Eucharist II 11am Holy Eucharist II Child Care 9-12

10-inch Blooming Hanging Baskets

Any Purchase of $50 or More

Steve Cummins, Senior Pastor Sunday School..............................9:00 am Coffee & Fellowship...................10:00 am Praise & Worship........................10:30 am www.wyomingbc.homestead.com Visitors Welcome!

Christ Church Glendale Episcopal Church 965 Forest Ave - 771-1544 christchurch1@fuse.net www.christchurchglendale.org The Reverend Roger L Foote

Visit Our Website For Specials And More Coupons

00

Sharonville United Methodist Church

There are two traditional services at 8:15 a.m. and 11 a.m.; there is a contemporary service

United Methodist Church 10507 “Old” Colerain Ave (513) 385-7883 Rev. Mark Reuter Sunday School 9:15am Worship 10:30am - Nursery Available www.cpopumc.org “Small enough to know you, Big enough to care”

at 9:30 a.m. There are Sunday School classes and study groups meeting at 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. Registration for Vacation Bible School will continue through June 1. The youth groups are making plans for a trip to Alabama in June. The Bereavement Grou meets for lunch the first Thursday of the month. Serendipity Seniors meet for lunch on the fourth Thursday. The church is at 1751 Creek Road, Sharonville; 563-0117; www.sharonville-umc.org.

UNITED METHODIST

EVANGELICAL PRESBYTERIAN

CHURCH OF THE SAVIOUR

At CHURCH BY THE WOODS

8005 Pfeiffer Rd. Montgomery 791-3142 www.cos-umc.org "What Christians Believe About Jesus" Traditional Worship 8:20am & 11:00am Contemporary Worship 9:40am Sunday School (All ages) 9:40 & 11am Nursery Care Provided

BAPTIST

Come and tour our beautifully redesigned open concept floor plans. Call 513-853-2000 today.

2

offer a ministry on the UC campus. Freedom Church has its contemporary worship service at 10:30 a.m. in English. “It’s Not About Religion; It’s About Relationships;” tinyurl.com/a7yroqe. Seventh Day Adventist Church, has worship on Saturdays at 10 a.m. in Spanish. “Loving, Caring, Sharing God’s Word” The church is at 3755 Cornell Road, Sharonville.

Monfort Heights United Methodist Church

3682 West Fork Rd , west of North Bend Traditional Worship 8:30 & 11:00am Contemporary Worhip 9:45am

Nursery Available * Sunday School 513-481-8699 * www. mhumc.org Spiritual Checkpoint ... Bearing the Love of Christ...for you!

Mt Healthy United Methodist Church

Corner of Compton and Perry Streets 513-931-5827 Sunday School 8:45 - 9:45am Traditional Worship 10:00 - 11:00am Contemporary Gathering: Bible & Conversation 11:30 - 12:30 Nursery Available Handicap Access "Come as a guest. Leave as a friend".

www.churchbythewoods.org 3755 Cornell Rd., Sharonville , Ohio 45241 You have a choice of Ministry: 1. Traditional Sunday Worship at 10:00 AM. Language: English Multi-cultural, multi-generational, and multi-ethnic. 2. Contemporary Sunday Worship with Freedom Church at 10:30 AM. Language: English It’s not about Religion; it’s about relationships! www.freedomchurchcincinnati.com 3. Taiwanese Traditional Sunday Worship st 2:00 PM. Language: Taiwanese, UC Campus Fellowship on Saturdays, www.cincinnatitaiwanese.org 4. Seventh Day Adventist Saturday Worship at 10:00 AM. Language: Spanish Loving - Caring - and Sharing God’s Word Notes: Nursery School is provided at each Worship time English as a Second Language (ESL) is taught on Saturday 10-12 AM. Various Bible Studies are available.

EVANGELICAL COMMUNITY CHURCH

Sunday School Hour (for all ages) 9:15 - 10:15am Worship Service - 10:30 to 11:45am (Childcare provided for infants/ toddlers) Pastor: Rich Lanning Church: 2191 Struble Rd Office: 2192 Springdale Rd

Sharonville United Methodist

8:15 & 11amTraditional Service & Kingdom Kids 9:30am Adult & Children’s Sunday School 7:00pm Wednesday, Small Groups for all ages Infant care available for all services

3751 Creek Rd.

513-563-0117

542-9025

www.sharonville-umc.org

Visitors Welcome www.eccfellowship.org

NON-DENOMINATIONAL

Northminster Presbyterian Church

HIGHVIEW CHRISTIAN CHURCH “Life on Purpose in Community” 2651 Adams Rd. (near Pippin) Worship Assembly-Sunday 10:45am Phone 825-9553 www.highviewchristianchurch.com

VINEYARD CHURCH NORTHWEST Colerain Township Three Weekend Services Saturday - 5:30 pm Sunday - 9:30 & 11:15 am 9165 Round Top Road 1/4 mile south of Northgate Mall 513-385-4888 µ www.vcnw.org

PRESBYTERIAN

703 Compton Rd., Finneytown 931-0243 Growing Faith, Sharing Hope, Showing Love Sunday Worship Schedule Traditional Services: 8:00 & 10:15am Contemporary Services: 9:00 & 11:30am Student Cafe: 10:15am Childcare Available Jeff Hosmer, Rich Jones & Nancy Ross- Zimmerman - Pastors

Northwest Community Church 8735 Cheviot Rd, by Colerain HS Rev. Kevin Murphy, Pastor 513-385-8973 Worship and Sunday School 10AM Handicap Accessible/Nursery Available

Salem White Oak Presbyterian

UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST FLEMING ROAD United Church of Christ 691 Fleming Rd 522-2780 Rev Pat McKinney

Sunday School - All Ages - 9:15am Sunday Worship - 10:30am

Nursery Provided

St. Paul United Church of Christ 5312 Old Blue Rock Rd., off Springdale

Phone: 385-9077 Rev. Michelle Torigian Sunday Worship: 10:30am Sunday School: 9:15am Nursery Available/Handicap Access www.stpaulucccolerain.org www.facebook.com/StPaulUCC

CE-1001637197-01

Church by the Woods

Pay Participants will be paid for their time and travel.

N MAY COUPON

be displayed in the Atrium of the Main Library later this year. Submissions will be accepted in two categories: student (high school and college) and adult. Visit www.cincinnatilibrary.org starting June 1 for full contest rules and details.

RELIGION

Who Children and adults 12 years of age or older with moderate acne may be eligible to participate.

$

art, which will be in October. To celebrate, the library will showcase works from the region’s best photographers. Between June 1 and July 31, photographers can enter our Frame Cincinnati photography competition and the best submissions will


LIFE

MAY 28, 2014 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • B5

YMCA preschool graduation inspires children to think big Graduation dayfor preschoolers at the Powel Crosley Jr. YMCA, 9601 Winton Road in Springfield Township, was May 29. During a brief ceremony 11 preschool students put on a cap and gown and receive a diploma, signaling they are off to kindergarten in the fall. 5-year-old Jared Coffman from Finneytown is already thinking about his life after school. “I want to be a Reds baseball player,” he said. His favorite memories of preschool involve spending time in the dis-

covery center and having fun with his best friend, Marshall. Quinton Davis, a bright-eyed 5-year-old from North College Hill, reflects that he will always remember swimming in the Y water park with his friends. “I want to be a police officer when I grow up,” he added. Meantime, 4year-old Xoe Burlew from Cincinnati looks forward to making more friends at kindergarten. “ I will always remember my preschool teachers and painting with my friends in the art center,”

she said. More than 500 children come to a YMCA of Greater Cincinnati early learning center each day; before they leave, 80-percent test above kindergarten readiness. “At the Powel Crosley Jr. YMCA, we encourage positive play at our preschools, and provide a well-rounded curriculum that is designed for healthy minds and bodies,” said Powel Crosley Jr. YMCA lead preschool teacher Emily DeNoma. “We also offer swim lessons, gymnastics, and music appreciation.”

Kids will ‘feel the learn’ at Brain Camp

Four-year-old Xoe Burlew prepares for graduation day at the Powel Crosley Jr. YMCA preschool program. PROVIDED

For more information about YMCA of Greater Cincinnati early learning opportunities, call 513-362-YMCA or visit the website www.myy. org.

Fight the summer drain on kids’ academic skills by signing them up for Brain Camps at the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County. Camps are part of the Library’s Summer Learning program. They are free, fun and offered at the Main Library and all branches. Call 369-3121 or visit www.cincinnatilibrary. org. Group size is limited for individual attention, so register early. Weeklong Brain Camps at the Main Library are offered from 1-4 p.m. Monday through Friday, at 800

Vine St., in the William Hueneke Homework Center. During these camps, students will enjoy books, group lessons, computer activities, outdoor play, and crafts. Afterward, students in grades kingergarten-12 are invited to the Homework Center from 4-6 p.m. for individual reading and math skill-building assistance. Find more information about Brian Camps, including themes and dates, at http://www.cincinnatilib rary.org/summerlearn/ braincamps.

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LIFE

B6 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • MAY 28, 2014

POLICE REPORTS Records not available.

GLENDALE Arrests/citations (859) 904-4640 www.bryanthvac.com

Tune-Up SPECIAL

$64.95

26 POINT INSPECTION & SAFETY CHECK OF YOUR HEATING or A/C SYSTEM

(859) 904-4640 *Offer expires 6/30/14. Some restrictions may apply. Call for details. Not valid with any other offers or promotion with existing customers.

Ronnie Sneed, 58, 4026 Saint Lawrence Ave., operating a motor vehicle while under suspension, May 16. Donald Toran, 38, 30 Bishopsgate Drive, operating a motor vehicle while under suspension and a warrant from Glendale Mayor’s Court and three warrants from Hamilton County Municipal Court, May 17. Jeremy Farley, 28, 2402 Arlene Drive, operating a motor vehicle while under suspension, May 17. Eric Nelson, 26, 9925 Daycrest Drive, operating a motor

vehicle while under suspension and warrant for failing to pay fines and costs owed to the Glendale Mayor’s Court and four warrants from Hamilton County Municipal Court, May 17. Ricardo Velazquez, 24, 3128 Oberlin Court, operating a motor vehicle without a valid license, May 17. David Givens, 37, 6712 Doon Ave., warrant for failing to appear in Glendale Mayor’s Court, May 20. Johnna Brown, 26, 245 Wood Forge Circle, warrant from Hamilton County Municipal Court, May 21. Andrew Springer, 50, 10974 Ashleigh Court, warrant failing to appear in Glendale Mayor’s Court, May 21.

Darren Talbert, 43, 967 Prairie Ave., operating a motor vehicle without a valid license and warrant from Hamilton County Municipal Court, May 17. Brandon Stuckey, 27, 5824 Argus Road, operating a motor vehicle while under suspension and obstructing official business into Hamilton County Municipal Court; he also had three warrants from the Hamilton County Municipal Court, May 18.

Incidents/investigations Criminal mischief 100 block of Hetherington; graffiti on garage door and gate of residence; happened sometime during the night; no estimate on damage; no suspects at time of report; May 20.

CE-0000590536

SHARONVILLE Arrests/citations Rickson Ladore, 32, 11414 Lebanon Road, operating vehicle impaired, May 5. Tiffany Delavine, 31, 5210 Way Wind Ave., drug abuse, May 5. Victor Berduo, 46, 104 Princeton Square, operating vehicle impaired, May 3. Juvenile female, 14, disorderly conduct, April 30. Juvenile male, 15, inducing panic, April 29. Juvenile male, 13, disorderly conduct, April 29. Clifford Price, 31, 2027 Sundale Ave., aggravated robbery, April 27. Adrian Rice, 23, 3422 Bighorn Court, aggravated robbery, April 27. Jaymes Dutlan, 23, 2324 Cincinnati Princeton Road, aggravated robbery, April 27. Johnny Jones, 44, 118 N. Sutphen Street, drug abuse, June 29. Zach Nolan, 29, 4918 Riverwatch, theft, April 25. Brian Jordan, 20, 7511 Placid Lake Drive, theft, April 22. Corbin Malott, 28, 5938 Trowbridge Drive, disorderly conduct, April 25. Juvenile male, 12, disorderly conduct, April 25. Santonio Lister, 23, 1722 Baymiller, possession, April 20. Joshua Vann, 21, 7698 Chambersburg, drug abuse, April 28. Kyle Erven, 28, 3641 Citation Drive, operating vehicle impaired, April 27.

Incidents/investigations

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Assault, criminal damaging Victim reported at 11000 block of Lebanon Road, April 29. Burglary Reported at 100 block of Mount

SPRINGDALE Arrests/citations Brandon Booker, 30, 797 Danver, driving under the influence, April 26. Richardo Burkey, 28, 1564 W. Galbraith, driving under the

See POLICE, Page B7

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Vernon, April 25. Criminal damaging Vehicle door damaged at 3800 block of Hauck, April 30. Copper piping by AC unit removed at 11000 block Lippelman Road, April 29. Disorderly conduct Reported at 200 Viking Way, April 25. Reported at 200 Viking Way, April 20. Reported at 200 block of Vicking Way, April 29. Inducing panic Reported at 11000 block of Chester Road, April 25. Menacing Victim threatened at 3200 block Kemper Road, April 2. Victim reported at 11000 block Main, April 28. Theft Cell phone valued at $200 removed at 11000 block of Chester Road, May 2. $320 in merchandise removed at 11000 block of Prince Lane, May 3. Tablet of unknown value removed at 2300 block of E. Sharon Road, April 29. $5,000 removed at 3900 block Creek Road, April 17. Vehicle tags removed at 300 block Elljay, April 28. Theft, misuse of credit card Victim reported at 11200 block Chester Road, April 25.

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CE-0000591184

CE-1001804943-01

EVENDALE


LIFE

MAY 28, 2014 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • B7

Police

Brandi Coburn, 33, 11783 Rose Lane, domestic violence, May 5.

Continued from Page B6 influence, April 26. Fran Mendez-Sanchez, 19, 469 Olden Ave., driving under the influence, April 26. Andrew Hall, 23, 870 Williams Ave., drug abuse, identity theft, April 26. Angela Conley, 39, 5139 Giffis Lake Drive, robbery, carrying concealed weapon, April 26. Brandon Williams, 21, 1 Dorothy Court, drug abuse, possession of drug paraphernalia, receiving stolen property, April 27. Ernestine Neely, 63, 1515 Gelhot Drive, theft, April 29. Samuel Ecuyen-Perez, 28, 963 Chesterdale, obstructing official business, resisting arrest, driving under the influence, April 29. Darren Barnett, 29, 16 Cromwell, theft, April 30. Tassie Andrews, 19, 1357 Lindy Ave., complicity, May 1. Lemuel Grayson, 25, 1485 Waycross Road, drug abuse, May 1. Robert Maffey, 55, 208 W. South Street, theft, May 2. Christian O Reiley, 26, 1837 De Armand Ave., receiving stolen property, May 2. Zach Lewis, 16, 12066 Chesterdale, theft, May 2. Andregio Turner, 16, 11690 Lawnview Ave., theft, May 2. Shawn Fox, 49, 959 Mohawk, driving under the influence, May 2. Quentin Wallace, 30, 10092 Daycrest Drive, driving under the influence, May 3. Timothy Johnson, 21, 811 14th Ave., driving under the influence, May 4.

ington Ave., domestic violence, May 2.

Incidents/investigations

Incidents/investigations

Assault Victim struck at 1100 block of Chesterdale, April 30. Criminal damaging Sugar put in gas tank of vehicle at 11000 block of Ramsdale, May 1. Domestic Reported at Ruskin Drive, April 27. Reported at Grandin Ave., April 28. Reported at Chesterwood, April 30. At Rose Lane, May 2. Forgery Victim reported $6,100 removed through fraudulent means at 11700 Princeton Pike, May 4. Menacing Victim threatened at 11000 block of Springfield Pike, April 27. Victim threatened at 11000 block of Princeton Pike, April 29. Theft Reported at 900 block of Kemper Road, April 28. Reported at 11000 block of Springfield Pike, April 29. Phone valued at $850 removed at 11000 block of Princeton Pike, April 29. Credit card used without consent at 11000 block of Springfield Pike, May 1. Shoes valued at $109.98 removed at 900 block of Kemper Road, May 1. License plate missing at 11000 block of Princeton Pike, May 1. Wrench valued at $15 removed at 300 Kemper Road, May 4.

Breaking and entering Detached garage entered and loose change taken from vehicle inside, Worthington Avenue, May 12. Criminal mischief Victim’s residence was egged by unknown subjects, Vermont Avenue, May 5. Identity theft/fraud Victim’s personal information used by unknown subject to file a false tax return, Reily Road,

April 17. Theft Victim’s wallet was taken while at school, Pendery Avenue, April 16. Victim had several items taken from her residence, North Avenue, April 19. Vehicle broken into by force, a nonworking IPod was taken, Hillcrest Drive, April 25. An unlocked vehicle was entered and earrings were taken from the console, Reily Road, April 25. An Apple IPhone was taken from an unlocked vehicle,

Brayton Avenue, April 25. Forced entry made to a locked vehicle, money taken from wallet left inside, Oliver Road, April 25. Money taken from unlocked vehicle, Linden Drive, April 25. IPod was removed after forced entry to the vehicle, Linden Drive, April 25. Two locked vehicles were entered, an IPad was taken from one of them, Meadow Lane, April 27. Unlocked vehicle was entered and a credit card removed, Pendery Avenue, April 27.

Vehicle broken into by force; a purse was taken, Fleming Road, May 2. An unlocked vehicle was entered and $5 in change was taken, Woodbrook Lane, May 2. Forced entry made into a locked vehicle, victim’s wallet was taken, Fleming Road, May 2. A gym bag was taken from an unlocked vehicle, the bag was later found and returned, Woodbrook Lane, May 2. Two vehicles broken into. Loose change, gift cards were taken, Washington Avenue, May 12.

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Arrests/citations Shelina Richardson, 43, Wash-

ABOUT POLICE REPORTS The Community Press publishes the names of all adults charged with offenses. This information is a matter of public record and does not imply guilt or innocence. To contact your local police department: » Evendale, Chief Niel Korte, 563-2249. » Glendale, Chief Dave Warman, 771-7645 or 771-7882. » Sharonville, Chief Aaron Blasky, 563-1147. » Springdale, Chief Mike Mathis, 346-5790. » Wyoming, Chief Gary J. Baldauf, 821-0141.

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CE-0000596028

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LIFE

B8 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • MAY 28, 2014

REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS

DEATHS George Robert Ford

GLENDALE

George Robert “Bob” Ford, 93, of Sharonville died May 16. He worked at Johns-Manville Corporation as an industrial engineer, was a Sunday school teacher and Boy Scout Master, and taught English as a second language. Survived by wife, Jane L. Ford; children Tom (Sue) Ford; step-children Janet (Keith) Arlinghaus; grandchildren Matt (Halle) Ford, Becky (fiance Mike Hanley) Ford, Brian (Meredith) Arlinghaus, Eric (Keshia) Arlinghaus and Sarah (Jason) Gulley; Ford great-grandchildren Kayla and Kenzie Ford, Ellie, Samantha and Freddie Arlinghaus and Jackson Gulley; and friend, Rev. Randy Fannin. Preceded in death by parents George and Ethel Ford; and wife, Ann Guyn Ford. Services were May 22 at Mihovk-Rosenacker Funeral Home, Evendale. Memorials to: Bethesda North Hospital Auxiliary, 10500 Montgomery Road, Cincinnati, OH 45242; or Hospice of Cincinnati, P.O. Box 633597, Cincinnati, OH 45263.

55 Creekwood Square: Barnes, Billie W. to Galbraith, Robert M. & Beth A.; $91,000.

SHARONVILLE

10543 Robindale Drive: Helsley, Teresa D. to Jhabvala, V. Christine A.; $20,000. 10543 Robindale Drive: Jhabvala, Christine A. to Jhabvala, Christine A.; $10,000. 10559 Thornview Drive: Knight, Adam P. to Long, Laura K. & Jonathon R.; $122,293. 11081 Zaring Court: Gentry, Steven G. & Anne F. to Keller, Robert & Heather; $239,000.

SPRINGDALE

13 Boxwood Court: Manning, Shirley N. to Federal National Mortgage Association; $42,000.

WOODLAWN

121 Sheffield Road: Cleavinger, Patricia A. Tr. to Burwinkel, Stephanie Ann & Steven Borchers; $99,500.

WYOMING

410 Oliver Road: Bernish, Karen B. to Manton, Joseph & Angela; $380,000.

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Tri county press 052814