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TRI-COUNTY PRESS

Your Community Press newspaper serving Evendale, Glendale, Sharonville, Springdale, Wyoming

75¢

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 20, 2013

BECAUSE COMMUNITY MATTERS

Sharonville council reinforcing Chester plan By Kelly McBride kmcbride@communitypress.com

Plans to reinvigorate Chester Road past the ongoing Princeton school campus and recently expanded convention center are heading north, where several properties remain vacant. City council is preparing for those plans with an ordinance that would allow Sharonville to take properties through eminent domain, if negotiations warrant the action. The ordinance explains that the action would be for roadway and utility purposes.

“The improvement to Chester Road is a project more than a decade in the making,” Mayor Kevin Hardman said. “The city has the momentum and the economic stability to make a substantial step toward the redevelopment of this corridor. “Portions of private property are necessary to improving the common roadway,” he said. “These infrastructure improvements are directed to increasing the overall value of our newly-branded Northern Lights Corridor and its businesses.” Safety Service Director Ted Mack said negotiations are ongoing, and he didn’t think an ac-

tive force would be needed, though he supports the ordinance. “We are at a point where we cannot have any further delay in this process,” Mack said. Eminent domain gives the power to take private property for public use, with payment to the owner of the property. The first reading of the ordinance took place March 12, with a second reading set for March 26, and a third reading and vote April 9. “While I am confident that private negotiations with the land owners will be fruitful, the city must protect our invest-

Sharonville's Northern Lights project addresses the development of Chester Road, which is peppered with vacant properties, such as this one at Kemper and Chester roads. KELLY MCBRIDE/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

ment and city taxpayers,” Hardman said. “Keeping this project on time and on budget is critical. “Therefore, we must ask council to approve court action in the event that negotiations fail. “

For more about your community, visit www.Cincinnati.com/Sharonville. Get regular Sharonville updates by signing up for our email newsletter. Visit Cincinnati.com/Sharonville.

Students lick Tootsie Pop mystery By Kelly McBride

See a video of the the Princeton project at Cincinnati.com/video.

kmcbride@communitypress.com

The question has been asked countless times, over many years, but too often, impatience has cut short the answer. How many licks does it take to get to the center of the Tootsie Roll pop? Mr. Owl tried to answer the question in a1970 TV commercial, though he gave in to temptation and bit down on the lollipop after just three licks. Three. That was his answer. Princeton High School teacher Brian Lien has posed the question to students in his Engineering Your Future class. It’s an annual assignment that requires the concepts of STEAM learning to research, design, build, test and present a machine that that will answer the question. In its fifth year, Lien’s assignment has the support of Tootsie Roll. Company President Ellen Gordon sends candy for the students to enjoy as they work, and provides the Tootsie Roll lollipops for the project. Students presented their machines in early March, using Tootsie Pops that are mechanically “licked” as a

ART AND ABOUT A5 Princeton students received awards at the Regional Scholastics Art Competition.

CE-0000545389

Students in Princeton High School's Engineering Your Future class, with their Tootsie Roll machines, from left: knelling, Jack Butler and D.J. Svensson; standing, Nick Minnich, Mitchell Adkins, Nick Cocco, Jasmine Davis, Meet Soni and Christopher Buck, KELLY MCBRIDE/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

counter ticks off the number until the chewy chocolate center appears. The number of licks has a wide range, from 400 to even

600, depending on the type of sponge that “licks,” the temperature of the water, and the friction, among other factors. But all students complete

ON THE SAME PAGE James Allsop's retirement means a new chapter of commitment to others. See Evelyn Perkins column, A3

the project using STEAM, the 21st Century learning concepts of science, technology, engineering, arts and math. “We’re trying to encourage

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students to go into the engineering field,” Lien said. “There’s a huge need for engineering, and right now students don’t understand the field by just taking math or science. “This project is interesting and gives them enough experience of the design process,” Lien said. “They start with a problem statement and work through the entire process, to see how it’s done. “It’s real life experience on a project they can be successful with. “We chose it because it’s fun, inexpensive, and students can really understand the math and science behind the gears and gear ratios, which leads to how to calculate torque,” Lien said. “The can see the practical application of those science and math areas into the application of engineering. “By taking this class, they can realize engineering is fun,” Lien said, “and they can make things better for mankind.” For more about your community, visit www.Cincinnati.com/local.

Vol. 29 No. 29 © 2013 The Community Press ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


NEWS

A2 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • MARCH 20, 2013

Evendale in-home daycare could expand Council keeps type A in village code

She already has a license for a type B daycare, which allows her to care for up to six children in her home at 4015 Glendale-Milford Road. Looking to expand her business, Claypool applied for a type A, but was denied by Evendale. The type A license would permit her to care for up to 12 children at a time, which would allow her to hire an employee. Evendale’s code allows for up to eight kids in a residential district, meaning she would have to apply for the type A license, but would be lim-

By Leah Fightmaster lfightmaster@communitypress.com

As unlikely as many believe it to be, larger inhome daycares aren’t ruled out for Evendale. Councilmembers opposed deleting type A inhome daycares as a classification from the code of ordinances. The question was raised in July, when Theresa Claypool asked the village to approve her application for a type A daycare license.

TRI-COUNTY PRESS

Find news and information from your community on the Web Evendale • cincinnati.com/evendale Glendale • cincinnati.com/glendale Sharonville • cincinnati.com/sharonville Springdale • cincinnati.com/springdale Wyoming • cincinnati.com/wyoming Hamilton County • cincinnati.com/hamiltoncounty

News

ited. Until she is granted a variance by the village, she can’t apply to the state for the license. After being denied, Claypool took up the issue with council, and it agreed to review it with the other amendments being considered for the village’s code revision. The amendment to delete type A in-home daycares from Evendale’s code was presented at the March 13 council meeting, which would have prohibited the possibility of the license for a business within the village. She asked for a com-

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For customer service ....................576-8240 Stephen Barraco Circulation Manager ....................248-7110, sbarraco@communitypress.com Lynn Hessler District Manager ...........248-7115, lyhessler@communitypress.com

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that deleting a type A inhome daycare classification from the code would be micromanaging and stifling her ability to expand her business. “We can play ‘what if’ all day long, but it’s probably not going to happen,” she said. Councilman Chris Schaefer said that several retired residents have approached him expressing concern that having more children at the home would disrupt the peace and quiet of the neighborhood, where they spend much of their time.

In the end, council split the vote, forcing Mayor Don Apking to break the tie. His negative vote prevented the amendment from passing, meaning Claypool can still apply for a type A in-home daycare license for within Evendale. However, councilmembers approved a policy requiring an in-home daycare to be 1,000 feet from another residence.

Want more updates for Evendale? Follow Leah Fightmaster on Twitter: @LCFightmaster.

Springdale welcomes public works employee By Kelly McBride kmcbride@communitypress.com

Dick Maloney Editor ......................248-7134, rmaloney@communitypress.com Kelly McBride Reporter ...................576-8246, kmcbride@communitypress.com Leah Fightmaster Reporter ..............248-7577, lfightmaster@communitypress.com Melanie Laughman Sports Editor .......248-7573, mlaughman@communitypress.com Nick Dudukovich Sports Reporter .......248-7570, ndudukovich@communitypress.com Scott Springer Sports Reporter ..........576-8255, sspringer@communitypress.com

promise, saying that everything council told her to do – which includes an inspection by the fire chief and implementing his safety suggestions – has been done. She added that she plans on adding a fence to her yard, as well as several large trees to reduce the noise that neighbors could hear from kids playing outside. “If anyone is bending over backwards (for this license), it’s me,” she said. Councilwoman Catherine Hartman agreed with Claypool, saying

A new employee to Springdale’s Public Works Department received a warm welcome just hours after spending a frigid night, all night, at work. Logan McAvinchey is the newest member of the department, and Public Works Director Jeff Agricola introduced the Glendale resident to elected officials during City Council’s March 6 meeting. “Logan comes highly

recommended from the city of Sharonville, where he worked in seasonal maintenance,” Agricola said of McAvinchey, whose family is in the lawn-care industry, where he learned to manage accounts and helped grow the business. He started work Feb. 21, and in his second week was called to help clear roads during the March 5 snowfall. McAvinchey told city officials he was grateful for the job opportunity. “I promise to work my hardest and do the best

Public Works Director Jeff Agricola, right, welcomes Logan McAvinchey to the department. KELLY MCBRIDE/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

job I can for the city,” he said. “You’re working with one of the hardest working departments in the city,” Councilman Jim

Squires said. “You will be busy.” Follow reporter Kelly McBride at @Kmcbride_CPress.

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Scarlet Oaks seeks craft vendors for show

Vendors are wanted for the Car Expo and Craft Show May 4 at the Scarlet Oaks Career Campus. The community event, the first of its kind at Scarlet Oaks, is open to all. “This event will showcase outstanding automotive craftsmanship and other outstanding handiwork,” organizer Gary Youmans said. Vendors who want to reserve a booth can go to greatoaks.com/scarlet for an application; for more information contact Youmans at youmansg @greatoaks.com or at (513) 612-5893. Booth space rental is $25, or $30 with electricity. Proceeds from the car expo and craft show will benefit student organizations.

Index Calendar .................B2 Classifieds .................C Food ......................B3 Life ........................B1 Police .....................B8 Schools ...................A5 Sports ....................A6 Viewpoints ..............A8


NEWS

MARCH 20, 2013 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • A3

Taking chances to help feed children ties have child substance Wyoming’s James abuse, early sexual acAllsop is a man whose tivity, acting out and retirement means a new chapter in the same book tragedies; Lincoln Heights and Wyoof commitment ming have recentto others. ly suffered teen A board memsuicides. ber of Wyoming While most Youth Services Wyoming children for four years, he seldom experience is now chairs the hunger, the kids in organization. Lincoln Heights Among many are what James services they Evelyn calls food inseoffer are tutorPerkins cure. Through the ing, mentoring, COLUMNIST efforts of Ascencounseling, crisis sion and Holy Trinity intervention and tech Church in Wyoming and support. Their annual St. Simon of Cyrene charity golf outing is Church in Lincoln always fun. Heights over the past James expressed four years, a community deep concerns about the supper provides what emotional needs of all may be the only hot, children, and sees siminutritious meal they get. larities as well as differA lifelong Episcopaences between two lian and past member of neighborhoods where he is active. Both communi- St. Philip Church in Con-

Wyoming resident James Allsop hopes to see you at the April 6 Men of the Valley Vegas Night fundraiser. EVELYN PERKINS/FOR THE COMMUNITY

necticut, James was born in Bridgeport and graduated from Morehouse College in Atlanta. He earned his PhD in clinical psychology from UC and lived in Clifton for 18 years. To our good fortune, James, wife, Deborah, and son Jacob moved to Wyoming 23

years ago. Deborah served on the Wyoming School Board for 16 years and was president for one year. She is the CEO of Families Forward, a United Way Agency. Jacob was featured in the March 6 Tri-County Press. He majors in business administration at Ohio Dominican University in Columbus making his parents proud of his academic achievements. James enjoys gardening, but since the deer think he plants vegetables for their enjoyment, he does more flower than vegetable gardening. He also bikes on a Loveland trail. One of the jobs he performed at Procter and Gamble was executive coaching. These days, he is an independent consultant

in the same field. As he said, “No matter how brilliant and successful, you always need someone to show you your blind spots.” James has become more involved since his retirement from 32 years at P&G. Past chair of Men and Women’s Day at St. Simon Church, he was chosen Man of the Year twice for all his hard work. He was on the church’s vestry for six years and has always shown remarkable energy and compassion in numerous church activities, but is especially focused on the children. Men of the Valley will host a Vegas Night fundraiser to assist the outreach efforts of St. Simon Church. As part of that outreach, the church sponsors drug

awareness programs as well as the community suppers. Vegas Night will be Saturday, April 6, at the UAW Local 647 Union Hall, 10020 Reading Road in Evendale. To quote James, “An exciting evening of games of chance and dancing is on tap, with music provided by Willie C. Tickets for the 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. event cost $15 in advance and $20 at the door. Call Ralph Edwards at (513) 227-0566 for advance tickets. You’ll have a great time while helping those in need.” Evelyn Perkins writes a regular column about people and events in the Tri-County Press area. Send items for her column to 10127 Chester Road, Woodlawn, 45215, or call her directly at 772-7379.

Glendale honors Thacker for service to fire department By Kelly McBride kmcbride@communitypress.com

A former fire official who left his mark on Glendale as chief, and has continued to leave his signature as an instructor for new members, was honored by Village Council and the community. Mayor Ralph Hoop read a proclamation honoring Fire Chief Emeritus Tom Thacker, who began with the department in 1982. The proclamation outlined training courses Thacker had completed at his own expense, earning certifications in fire fighting, emergency medical technician and fire inspector. He was appointed fire chief in May 1996, and served as chief until December 2000, when he was required to step down for medical reasons.

Mayor Ralph Hoop, background, with three terms of fire chiefs, from left, Fire Chief Emeritus Tom Thacker, former Fire Chief Dave Dave Moore, and current Fire Chief Kevin Hardwick. KELLY MCBRIDE/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

“Tom’s dedication to the village was profoundly demonstrated when he declined to accept his fire chief’s salary so that two weekday part-time firefighters could be hired,” Hoop read in the proclamation. To honor Thacker, the fire department and members of the commu-

nity held a reception after the Village Council meeting on March 4, at which former Fire Chief Dave Moore stepped down and new Fire Chief Kevin Hardwick was sworn in. For more about your community, visit Cincinnati.com/Glendale.

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NEWS

A4 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • MARCH 20, 2013

Photos show life along the Loop By Kelly McBride kmcbride@communitypress.com

As diverse as the rivers, lakes and oceans they traveled were the experiences Alan Lloyd an his wife, Jean, enjoyed on their travels of the Great Loop over the past decade. The Milford couple will share their photos March 22, the fourth of eight presentations by local photographers of the Photography Club of Greater Cincinnati.

The Lloyds travel about three or four months each year, and have explored waterways on their 33-foot boat, from Chicago to the Florida Keys, and up the East Coast to New York City and Canada, returning to Chicago to complete the 6,000-mile Great Loop. They navigated rivers, canals, lakes and oceans, cruising the Loop three times, and now working on their fourth.

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“What struck us most about this was the variety of experiences,” Lloyd said. “We travel along various waterways from calm rivers and canals to the Great Lakes, where we are sometimes out of sight of land, or prey to the weather.” They visited places ranging from New York and Chicago to small villages with family restaurants and local festivals, to picturesque anchorages with no trace of human life. He will share those experiences through his photos at the Sharon Woods presentation. “I would like my viewers to appreciate that such a great route is possible,” Lloyd said, “and hundreds of ‘loopers’ make the circuit every

For more about your community, visit Cincinnati.com/Sharonville. Get regular Sharonville updates by signing up for our email newsletter. Visit Cincinnati.com/Sharonville.

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SERIES SNAPSHOT April 5 – “Arches and Canyonlands National Parks” by Mike Rank April 12 – “Backyard Birds” by Mark Kraus, Jerry Fritsch and Allan Claybon April 19 – “English Channel Islands and Normandy Beaches; Echoes of WWII” by Neal Jefferies April 26 – “An Israel Travelogue” by David Feldstein The 2013 Photography Travel Series begins at 7:30 p.m. It is free and open to the public at Sharon Woods’ Sharon Centre, 11450 Lebanon Road in Sharonville. A valid Hamilton County Park District motor vehicle permit is required to enter the park.

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SCHOOLS

MARCH 20, 2013 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • A5

TRI-COUNTY

PRESS

Editor: Dick Maloney, rmaloney@communitypress.com, 248-7134

ACHIEVEMENTS | NEWS | ACTIVITIES | HONORS

CommunityPress.com

"Self Portrait" by Hannah Hales. Several Princeton students have received awards at "Pirate Ship" by Rachel Spiegel. Several Princeton students have received awards at the annual the annual Regional Scholastics Art Competition. The awards of several art media Regional Scholastics Art Competition. The awards of several art media included painting, included painting, sculpture, photography and mixed media. PROVIDED sculpture, photography and mixed media. PROVIDED

Princeton students win art awards By Kelly McBride kmcbride@communitypress.com

Several Princeton students have received awards at the annual Regional Scholastics Art Competition. The students from Princeton High School and Princeton Community Middle School were honored at a ceremony Feb. 22 at the Northern Kentucky Convention Center. The artwork was exhibited at Madison Place. The awards of several art media included painting, sculpture, photography and mixed media. Gold Key Award winners will be judged at the national level. Diana Mikitin was awarded a Gold Key for “Ready For Battle,” in the photography category. She began experimenting with photography this academic year, during AP Studio Art class, Princeton High School art teacher Lindsay Holliday said. Mikitin, who came to the United States from the Ukraine in 1999, dabbled in drawing as a child. Holliday said she approaches visual design problems in unique and surprising ways, citing the theme of “liquid” as the Gold Key Photograph theme. “Diana’s work is always very thoughtful and high quality,” Holliday said. “She is very committed to creating work that is unique and sophisticated.” Hannah Hales won a Gold Key Award for her painting, titled “Self Portrait.” Hales, a junior at Princeton, painted the watercolor of herself painting a watercolor. “Hannah is passionate about art, an exceptional young artist,

COLLEGE CORNER Smucker on Wooster dean’s list

Kyle Smucker, a graduate of Wyoming High School, has been named to the Dean’s List for the fall semester at The College of Wooster. Smucker, a senior sociology major from Wyoming, achieved a grade point average of 3.65 or above.

Dean’s lists

Michelle M. Johnson and Aaron R. Kaufman made the fall dean’s list at Boston University.

"Still Life of a Chair" by Collette Beard. Several Princeton students have received awards at the annual Regional Scholastics Art Competition. The awards of several art media included painting, sculpture, photography and mixed media. PROVIDED

Diana Mikitin’s “Ready For Battle” photography winner. PROVIDED

“ Holliday said. Melia Watkins looked at work by Vincent van Gogh to inspire her painting of her Sperry topsiders, titled “Recreation of the Shoe,” Holliday said of the Princeton senior who also won a Gold Key Award. Princeton High School junior Rachel Spiegel won a Silver Key Award for her painting titled “Pirate Ship.” Before taking Princeton’s IB visual art class, Spiegel had focused on developing her skills in photography, Holliday said. “She has recently started painting and is refining her feel for paint and application of brush strokes to capture the

feeling of light,” Holliday said. “She has an artistic eye and is very creative.” Honorable mention awards went to high school students Colette Beard in mixed media for “Still Life of a Chair” and Liliana Flores-Hernandez in painting for “Virgin of Guadalupe.” Honorable mention awards also were awarded to middle school students Frances Breidenstein for her sculpture “Tiger” and to Asa Jaymer for a sculpture titled “Penguin King.” “I am in awe when I see what they create with the information I give them,” art teacher Loni Becker said. “It is hum-

"Recreation of the Shoe" by Melia Watkins. Several Princeton students have received awards at the annual Regional Scholastics Art Competition. The awards of several art media included painting, sculpture, photography and mixed media. PROVIDED

bling to experience their expressive and technical achievements.” For more about your community, visit www.Cincinnati.com/local.

"Virgin of Guadalupe" by Liliana Flores-Hernandez. Several Princeton students have received awards at the annual Regional Scholastics Art Competition. The awards of several art media included painting, sculpture, photography and mixed media. PROVIDED

TOP SHARONVILLE STUDENTS Sharonville Elementary School recently named its January students of the month. From left: front, Grace Barnes, Reagan Logsdon, Jonathan Richards, Nolan Weber, Jonathan Mil, and Joshua Williams; second row, Briana Alvarez Aranjo, Jorge Mendoza Lopez, Anayelli Diaz Lopez, Carrington Smiley, Alexis Bothe, Jennifer Lopez Lopez, and Lilly Benjamin; back row,Phonte Bailey, Elysha Miller, Louis Farrar, Kymberly Velasquez Escalante, Jayda Derden and Makayla Billiter. THANKS TO CARLA SHROYER


SPORTS

A6 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • MARCH 20, 2013

TRI- COUNTY

PRESS

Editor: Melanie Laughman, mlaughman@communitypress.com, 513-248-7573

HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | RECREATIONAL

CommunityPress.com

FIRST SHOT AT 2013 LACROSSE

Summit’s state reign ends Silver Knights won’t repeat, but program is still among city’s elite By Nick Dudukovich ndudukovich@communitypress.com

Wyoming’s girls lacrosse team gathers before a match last season. THANKS TO PETER LEVICK/WYOMING ROUNDUP BLOGSPOT

Wyoming lacrosse on the horizon By Scott Springer sspringer@communitypress.com

WYOMING — As the weather

slowly turns, high school lacrosse teams are moving from indoor work to outdoors. The following is a rundown of the lacrosse squads in the Tri-County Press area: Wyoming boys’ sixth-year coach Keith Hughes and his Cowboys are coming off a 7-8 season where they finished fourth. Hughes returns Conner Hughes, James McAllister, Adam Eyman, Frank Barzizza, David Moody and Cameron Cramer as starters. Sophomore John Hughes is also one to watch. Hughes and Barzizza are only sophomores, Eyman, Cramer and McAllister are all juniors. “We are a very young team with a great deal of potential to develop,” Coach Hughes said. “I’m looking forward to seeing that happen throughout the season.” The Cowboys begin their season at Mariemont on April 3. Their home opener is against Milford at 7:30 p.m. April 10. The girls of Wyoming girls were 6-10 a year ago. Wyoming’s new girls coach is Kristen Gilwee, a former Ohio State Buckeye goalie. The Cowboys participated in the Sycamore Playday preseason event on March 9 and won all three matches. In the first game, Wyoming beat Sycamore 5-1 as Carly Levick scored twice and M.J. Fischer, Maggie Hughes and Adi Smith had goals. Assists were by Claire Crawford and Fischer. Game No. 2 was a 6-1 win over Walnut Hills. Adi Smith had a pair of goals and Levick, Becky Denson, Sophia Abrams also scored. Haley Stewart had an assist. The third game was a 5-1 win over Fenwick with Smith and Levick both scoring twice and Reilly Simmons adding a goal. Assists were by Denson, Crawford, Marta Stewart and Haley Stewart. The Cowboys start off at Kings on April 2. Their home opener is April 6 against Sum-

mit Country Day.

Ursuline

The Lady Lions return after posting a 10-6 mark last season under head coach Todd Vollmer. Ursuline begins at Anderson March 22, and plays rival St. Ursula in its second match of the year April 4.

Moeller

The Crusaders finished 12-8 last season under fifth-year coach Nate Reed. Moeller returns seven starters including senior captains Quinn Collison, Nolan Frey and Dom Starvaggi. Senior goalie Alex Burgdorf is back as is junior midfielder Sam Hubbard. Hubbard has committed to Notre Dame for lacrosse, but also has several football suitors. Also committed for the Crusaders is Collison to Bucknell, Kreig Greco to Dartmouth, Burgforf to Quinnipiac and junior David Stugris to Robert Morris. “We return a number of starters and talented young players that have a lot of experience and work well together,” Reed said. Notable this season for Moeller is attacker Collison closing in on becoming one of the top five scorers. Also this is the 25th anniversary of Moeller lacrosse - the first high school program in Cincinnati.

St. Xavier

With eight of their 10 starters back from a year ago, things are looking up for second-year coach Nate Sprong and the St. Xavier Bombers’ lacrosse team. Senior Ian King – who will play at Michigan next season – is back following an All-American season in 2012 in which he led his team in scoring. “He makes my job easier,” Sprong said of King. “In addition to being a great scorer, he is a great feeder. He helps make his teammates better players.” Joining King as a team captain are fellow seniors Ryan Berning, Parker Greiwe and Benny Russert. Berning – a defensemen – will play at Richmond next season, while

Greiwe will play defense for Holy Cross in 2014. Russert is a four-year starter in goal and provides rare stability seen in high school sports these days in net. “It’s reassuring for everyone having someone back there basically as a coach of the field who can direct the defense besides being a great stopper,” Sprong said of his goalie. “It’s definitely a confidence booster.” After bowing out in the Division I state quarterfinals last season, Sprong is hoping for more in 2013. “… We are trying to focus on the fundamentals and hopefully we pay attention to the details and the big picture falls into place by the end of the year,” the coach said. “We are optimistic and have an excited group coming back.” The Bombers get things started April 6 against Western Reserve High School.

CHCA boys

At CHCA, coach Brandon Sammons fields an athletic midfield paired with an attack that should put points on the scoreboard. At midfield, Sammons, who is entering his second season, will look for contributions from Nick Marsh, James Gravely and Conner Reynolds. Attackmen Cam Kennedy and Ayrton Kazee should be key offensive players to watch. The defense should be aided with returning starters Kevin Degroft (defender) and Conner Kirbabas (goalie) back on the field this spring. CHCA competes at the Division II level and opens the season against the Dayton Lacrosse Club April 3.

CHCA girls

Catie Hornsby begins her first season of coaching the Eagles as the program continues to grow. According to Hornsby, many of the girls playing this year are playing the sport for the first time in high school. CHCA competes at the Division II level and opens the season at Little Miami April 2.

KETTERING — Sometimes winning the second championship is harder than getting the first. Summit Country Day found that out during its 61-53 loss to Roger Bacon in the regional semifinals at Kettering Fairmont’s Trent Arena March 13. The Silver Knights, which included Springdale resident MaCio Teague, won’t hoist another trophy, but coach Michael Bradley said he is proud of how far the program has come the past few years. In that span, Summit won

the Division III 2012 state title, three district and league championships, while also spending considerable time at the top of state and local polls. “It’s another great year,” Bradley said. “These guys have strung together some of the best seasons Summit’s ever had and I think they’ve done a great job. They really turned the program around.” Senior guard Kevin Johnson has been at the forefront of the Silver Knights’ run to the city’s elite basketball ranks. When Jonson was a freshman, Summit went 10-9. Bradley arrived in 2011, and with Johnson and Antonio Woods in his backcourt, the Silver Knights have gone 71-7 since. Johnson was constantly in foul trouble in his varsity finale, and struggled to find any offensive rhythm, scoring See SCD, Page A7

Summit Country Day junior guard Antonio Woods dribbles the ball up the court past Roger Bacon's Reggie Williams during the Silver Knights' 61-53 loss March 13. NICK DUDUKOVICH/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Roger Bacon’s ‘comeback year’ dedicated to Corcoran By Nick Dudukovich ndudukovich@communitypress.com

KETTERING — After knock-

ing off top-ranked Summit Country Day en route to the Division III regional finals three days earlier, Roger Bacon High School came within a minute of punching its ticket for the state final four. But it wasn’t meant to be, as Versailles outlasted the Spartans 56-53 at Trent Arena March 16. The lead changed 11 times, but the Spartans couldn’t close the game out in the final minutes. While up 51-49, Roger Bacon looked like it was about to come up with key steal. Instead, the ball found its way into the hands of Versailles senior Chad Winner, who launched a deep 3-pointer—a shot Spartans’ coach Brian Neal estimated at 28 feet. Roger Bacon answered when Carlas Jackson, who had a game-high 20 points, hit two free throws to put the Spartans up 53-52. With 30 seconds to play, Versailles came out of timeout and worked some clock before scoring with 13 seconds left. Roger Bacon turned the ball

ONLINE EXTRAS See a video interview with Erik Edwards after the March 13 win. http://cin.ci/15dpWI5

over and was forced to foul. Versailles cashed in both free throws to go up three with 3.5 seconds to play. Carlas Jackson shot a desperation 3-pointer to no avail. “When they are making 28foot bombs on broken plays and we’re missing layups, it’s really one of those things, is it really not meant to be?” Neal said. “You know, you look back, would of, could of, should of, and they made a couple more plays than we did.” Roger Bacon ended the season 24-4 and ranked No. 7 in the Associated Press’ Division III statewide poll. The 24 victories are tied for second most in school history, according to Neal. Senior Jake Westerfeld said the team devoted the season to athletic director Joe Corcoran, who died Feb. 13. “Our season, first of all…will be dedicated to him,” Westerfeld said. After the game, Neal said See BACON, Page A7


SPORTS & RECREATION

MARCH 20, 2013 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • A7

Bacon

PRESS PREPS HIGHLIGHTS Sportsman nominees

The nomination period for the fifth-annual Community Press and Recorder Sportsman and Sportswoman of the Year award is approaching in early April. The CP/CR sports staff seeks starting, stand-out athletes of great character and strong academic standing to represent each newspaper as its Sportsman or Sportswoman of the Year. Readers will nominate these junior or senior athletes via cincinnati.com, names that will be verified through the school as meeting the criteria and placed on ballots for the public’s vote. Readers can vote once a day for their favorite athlete. Winners for 2013 will receive two Reds tickets courtesy of the Cincinnati Reds, a certificate and a story to be published in a late June edition. The nominations and voting are done online at cincinnati-

.com. Neither the articles, nominations forms nor ballots will count against the meter, so you do not have to be a Cincinnati Enquirer/cincinnati.com subscriber to nominate or vote on your favorite candidate. Email mlaughman@communitypress.com with questions.

Underwater hockey

On March 16, the Roger Bacon High School Underwater Hockey Varsity Team finished with 6 wins and 3 losses to finish in third place in the “B” Division of the 34th annual College Royale Underwater Hockey Tournament at the University of Guelph in Guelph, Ontario, Canada. Meanwhile, the Roger Bacon Junior Varsity Team had many hard fought games in round robin and playoff action in the “B” Division. The Roger Bacon Junior Varsity Team finished the day with two wins and six losses.

SIDELINES Youth football registration

Sharonville Youth Football, for residents of the Princeton City School District in kindergarten through sixth grades, is having in-person registration sessions from 10 a.m. to noon, Saturdays, March 30 and April 13, at the Sharonville Recreation Center at the corner of Creek and Thornview roads in Sharonville. Registrations are also being accepted at www. sharonvilleeaglesfootball .com. Register on or before May 1 and receive a $30 discount on participation fees. Visit the website for more information.

Mitts to speak at dinner

Three-time Olympic gold medalist and Cincinnati native Heather Mitts will be the speaker for the 20th anniversary awards dinner for the Greater Cincinnati-Northern Kentucky Women’s Sports Association, Tuesday, April 23, at

the Savannah Center in West Chester. She is a graduate of St. Ursula Academy, where she played high school soccer. Nominations for the awards will be taken through Thursday for the dinner, honoring the individual and team achievements of girls and women in sports in the Greater Cincinnati area. Awards categories include Coach of the Year, College Sportswoman of the Year, High School Sportswoman of the Year, Master’s Sportswoman of the Year, Senior Sportswoman of the Year, Wilma Rudolph Courage Award, Donna deVarona Spirit of Sport Award, Lifetime Service Award, Legacy Award, Special Recognition Award, Administrator of the Year and Mentally or Physically Challenged Sportswoman of the Year. In the last 20 years the Greater Cincinnati-Northern Kentucky Women’s Sports Association has honored more than 260 athletes, coaches, administrators and teams in the Tristate. For more information on the dinner, nominations and tickets, visit www.cincywomensports.org.

Continued from Page A6

he was hurting for his team and school, because the Roger Bacon community had been through a lot with Corcoran’s death. Basketball served as an outlet that rallied the school. “…Playing basketball…and competing with a chance to go to Columbus, certainly kind of (energized) the school,” Neal said. “I don’t know if it was a remedy, but it helped,” Westerfeld added that it was a “comeback year,” as the Spartans beat many of the teams it lost to last season, with victories over Summit and GCL rival Alter standing out. Summit ended Roger Bacon’s season in last year’s regional final. “(Summit) was probably one of the great wins we’ve had, and Alter, because they are still in (the tournament),” Westerfeld said. Neal said he’ll remember the members of the 2012-2013 squad fondly, but knows history remembers the teams that win the big one. “Losing in the regional finals, it’s hard to swallow,” he said.

SCD Continued from Page A6

just five points after averaging 19.3 points per game this season. Bradley knows the future UC Bearcat won’t be remembered for one game. “The kid has had a hell of a career…that’s what I told him,” Bradley said. “He’s earned a college scholarship, won a state title and has 50 wins in two years. This senior

Austin Frentos scored 16 points for Roger Bacon in the regional finals. JOSEPH FUQUA II/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

group - him, Brett Tepe and Jake Rawlings - they’ve done a heck of a job and they’ve put Summit back on the map.” Johnson’s career at Summit is over, but the Silver Knights should continue to be contenders in the foreseeable future. Woods, who has started since he was a freshman, had a game-high 18 points in the Roger Bacon loss. He averaged 14.1 points and 3.7 assists and has basketball scholarship offers from Division I programs, such as Kent State and Miami (not to mention

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VIEWPOINTS

A8 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • MARCH 20, 2013

Editor: Dick Maloney, rmaloney@communitypress.com, 248-7134

EDITORIALS | LETTERS | COLUMNS | CH@TROOM

TRI-COUNTY

PRESS

CommunityPress.com

Universal preschool providing a difference

From birth until age 5, a child’s brain develops more than at any other period in life. The beginning years of a child’s life are critical for building the foundation for success later in school. In this country, just three in 10 4-year-olds are enrolled in high-quality programs that prepare young children with the skills necessary for kindergarten. The Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development estimated the U.S. ranks 28th out of 38 countries for the share of four-year-olds enrolled in early childhood education. In his Feb. 12 State of the Union address, President Oba-

be required to meet ma proposed a new quality benchmarks federal-state partlinked to better outnership to provide all comes for children, low and moderate including: income 4-year-old » state-level stanchildren with highdards for early childquality preschool. In hood education; addition, the proposal » quality teachers expands access to Richard for all preschool classpreschool for middle Schwab class families and COMMUNITY PRESS rooms; » a plan to impleincentivizes full-day GUEST COLUMNIST ment comprehensive kindergarten. (Only data and assessment systems. six in 10 children in the counFunds under the program try have access to full-day may also be used to expand kindergarten.) Under the proposal, the U.S. full-day kindergarten once states have provided preschool Department of Education education for their low and would allocate funds to states moderate income children. based on their share of 4-yearThe president’s proposal olds from low and moderate would also help expand the income families. States would

Help Me Grow provides early intervention services with a developmental delay or In recognition of Developmenqualifying medical diagnosis. tal Disabilities Awareness Month Services include developmental in March, Lighthouse Youth Serscreenings and evaluations, coorvices is reaching out to the comdination of specialized services, munity to increase awareness for and support transitioning from the long-term benefits of early Help Me Grow to an appropriate intervention. While most people early childhood program at age realize that the first three years of three. a child’s development are The fully integrated fundamentally important, early intervention team many are unaware that from Lighthouse and Hamearly intervention for ilton County Developmental infants and toddlers with Disabilities Services indevelopmental delays or cludes a service coordinadisabilities is vital to tor, physical therapist, occuimproving their lifelong pational therapist, speech outcomes. therapist, developmental Lighthouse works in Terri Betts partnership with HamilCOMMUNITY PRESS specialist and behavioral specialist who support the ton County DevelopGUEST COLUMNIST child and child’s family mental Disabilities Sermembers and caregivers in vices to serve as the front a way that is unprecedented. The door to early intervention, providteam addresses each family’s ing comprehensive services for questions and priorities and supfamilies and their children up to ports families from initial referral age 3, so they start preschool through transition to preschool. All healthy and ready learn. Sometimes the initial hurdle for Help Me Grow services are voluntary and free of charge, regardless parents and caregivers is identifyof family income. ing if there is a developmental To inquire about an evaluation delay and where to go to find out. for your own child or to make a We encourage parents and carereferral, please call 513-281-GROW givers who have any concerns to (4769). For more information and a contact us to schedule an evalualist of March events, visit online at tion and possibly create an early www.ohiohelpmegrow.org/. intervention plan for the child. Help Me Grow is a program that provides complete coordinaTerri Betts si the director of Early tion of health and developmental Childhood Services at Lighthouse Youth services for children birth to age 3 Services.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Rocca family says thanks

A great big thank you to the Wyoming community, Wyoming School family and Gregg Rocca family for their tremendous support of the benefit dinner, for the Gregg Rocca San Antonio Sija Library, Guatemala. Once more, the generosity of the Wyoming community exceeded all expectations, and $9,000 will be donated to the library. The level of support by the Wyoming School families, staff, Gregg’s extended family, and the Church of the Ascension and Holy Trinity was remarkable. However, none of this would have been possible without the hard work and generosity of the Wyoming LaRosa’s staff and the Westendorf family. The depth of love, caring and respect for Gregg Rocca, Wyoming Primary Schools counselor, who passed away Feb. 10, was demonstrated in the outpouring of support for the benefit dinner. We thank you. Mary Lynn Roca Hartwell Pat Lehman Wyoming Schools

TRI-COUNTY

PRESS

ABOUT LETTERS AND COLUMNS We welcome your comments on editorials, columns, stories or other topics. Include your name, address and phone number(s) so we may verify your letter. Letters of 200 or fewer words and columns of 500 or fewer words have the best chance of being published. All submissions may be edited for length, accuracy and clarity. Deadline: Noon Friday E-mail: tricountypress@ communitypress.com Fax: 248-1938 U.S. mail: See box below Letters, columns and articles submitted to The TriCounty Press may be published or distributed in print, electronic or other forms.

availability of Early Head Start, which provides early learning opportunities before children begin preschool, as well as voluntary home visiting programs. Home visiting programs enable nurses, social workers, and other professionals to connect families to services and educational support that improves a child’s health, development and ability to learn. The president’s initiative would not start from scratch. The District of Columbia and 39 states have state-funded pre-kindergarten programs. In our hometown, United Way of Greater Cincinnati’s “Success by Six” program is pushing to get Hamilton County’s low-

income children ready to enter school. Getting our youngest off to a great start is the best investment we could make. Having all children entering kindergarten with their academic, social, and emotional skills intact would be a game changer in education. As President Obama said, “Let’s do what works and make sure none of our children start the race of life already behind.” Richard O. Schwab was associate head of school, and middle school head, Cincinnati Country Day School. He is founder of Glendale Organizing For America Community Team.

CH@TROOM March 13 question Do you agree with the Transportation Security Administration’s new rules that will allow airplane passengers to bring pocketknives, golf clubs and other sports items aboard, loosening some of the restrictions created after the Sept.11 terror attacks? Why or why not?

“I join with all of the major U,S, airlines, the Federal Air Marshals Service, the Airline Pilots Association, the Flight Attendants Union and the TSA Screeners Union in objecting to the change in policy allowing knives on planes. It is sheer folly. Even at the limit of 2.36 inches a knife of this size is enough to inflict serious injury to flight crew and passengers alike. The new policy is designed to change the focus of screeners less on objects that TSA director Pistole feels would not bring down a plane and more on 'catastrophic perils.’ He is dead wrong on this one. Focusing on 'catastrophic perils' appears to me to be way above their pay grade. But a two-inch blade is certainly enough to cause a catastrophic situation.” J.V.

“When the rules first went into effect some of the airports would provide mailers so that forgetful folks (like me) could send their favorite pocket knife back to themselves – at their own cost, of course. This process was discontinued and in spite of my best efforts I lost a couple of items that meant a lot to me. “The whole Homeland Security process could be simplified and altered so as not to keep millions of people waiting extensively. If they simply had a reminder at the check-in counter before you send your bags to be loaded it would solve a lot of the problem. “Other countries manage to control terrorism without subjecting their citizens to the abuses of the U.S. process. All our process does is feed into the cultural paranoia which allows the NRA to go on selling guns to people who wind up shooting their family or themselves, diverts billions of dollars from more productive use and generally degrades our quality of life. “I suppose a trivial loosening is a step in the right direction, however small it may be.” N.F.

“The 9-11 suicide terrorists successfully used box cutters because no one suspected the horror of their goals. Once it was known the passengers on one plane overpowered those wielding the box cutters, but it was too late. “It is ridiculous to think that passengers and flight crews can now be coerced by someone with a small pocket knife or golf club.” R.V.

“I have to wonder what was driving this decision. I don't recall a big public outcry over the inability to bring a 9 iron or pocketknife on a plane. “The flight attendants and airline professionals seem to be against this decision, so I would think their opinion should carry the day. “In the meantime, why doesn't the TSA look at doing something that would actually make air travel more convenient, such as allowing a full-size tube of toothpaste or more than a drop of shampoo in our carry on luggage?”

NEXT QUESTION Will Sen. Rob Portman’s support of gay marriage affect his political standing within the Republican Party? How? Will it cause other party leaders to rethink their position? Every week we ask readers a question they can reply to via e-mail. Send your answers to tricountypress@communitypress.com with Chatroom in the subject line.

“I think most of the TSA rules, beyond scanning bags and requiring people to pass through a metal detector, fail to offer any meaningful protection. For example, removal of shoes – most foreign countries do not require this. In the hands of a determined terrorist a pen is as dangerous a weapon as a penknife." J.R.B.

“Knives? No. “Golf clubs? How in the world would those fit in the overhead?” J.K.

“Do I agree with the TSA's proposed relaxation of rules regarding carry-on items? With regard to pocket knives and things of that nature, absolutely not. Remember that the Islamic terrorists used simple box-cutters and like instruments to accomplish their horrible deeds on 9/11. “As to golf clubs, my gosh, why can't you check those as baggage?” Bill B.

“You can stab someone to death with a ballpoint pen. Umbrellas are allowed. Think about how many pieces of sharp metal they contain if disassembled. A broken laptop screen in a gloved hand becomes a jagged knife. The TSA is concentrating on things that can bring down the whole plane. “My understanding is that every other country allows small knives on board so we are coming up to international standards. On a recent flight to Buenos Aires, LAN airlines gave us metal knives with our dinner.” F.S.D.

“No I do not. Maybe if they loosened their grips on after shave, lotions, and other toilet articles, that would be OK with me. But to allow small pocket knives with blades under two inches to be brought on board is asking for trouble. Remember, the box cutters used during the 9-11attacks were at the max in length of one inch, and look at the damage which was done.” O.H.R.

“Since the air marshals, flight attendants, pilots, etc. are all against it, so am I. It doesn't make any sense. Next the NRA will insist on their right to bear arms on planes. “We have to enforce restrictions on society if it is to survive. With over 300 million souls it would not be unthinkable that there are those nutty enough to do damage to the right to life. I for one am willing to leave my pen knife in my drawer at home.” J.Z.

R.W.J.

A publication of

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Tri-County Press Editor Dick Maloney rmaloney@communitypress.com, 248-7134 Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday See page A2 for additional contact information.


LIFE

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 20, 2013

TRI-COUNTY PRESS

PEOPLE | IDEAS | RECIPES

Love in the air at St. Joseph Home

T

he residents of St. Joseph Home are experts at expressing love. This Valentine’s Day, and every day, the smiles from the 48 residents and many respite guests of the home expressed to caregivers an unconditional, genuine love. Though the people who live at St. Joseph Home may not be able to scrawl their name on a valentine or sing a love song, they have found other ways to communicate and show their feelings. St. Joseph Home is a nonprofit residence and respite center for children and adults who have severe to profound developmental disabilities. During the month of February, several volunteer groups spent some time at St. Joseph Home preparing for and celebrating Valentine’s Day. A group of volunteers from Robert Half International helped residents craft valentine cards to share with other residents and their families. These creative volunteers even donated craft materials, and then worked hand-over-hand to cut, glue and decorate original valentines. Staff and families of St. Joseph Home purchased Candy Grams as a way to raise funds for St. Joseph Home’s activities department. More than 600 candygrams were sold for $1 each. A special Valentine’s Day Dance party was held at St. Joseph Home’s Seton Hall Feb. 20. Volunteers from Ursuline Academy and from Northern Kentucky University’s Phi Sigma Sigma sorority assisted at the party. “I think this party was the most fun we’ve ever had,” said Dan Connors, vice president of programming at St. Joseph Home. “Just one example – Madison was surrounded by three high school students all evening, giving high fives and laughing together, and enjoyed hanging out with her peers.” “Having volunteers who are the same age as many of our residents was really fun,” said Amy McMahill, volunteer coordinator. Volunteers gleefully pushed residents in wheelchairs

A special Valentine's Day Dance party was held at St. Joseph Home's Seton Hall Feb. 20. Volunteers from Ursuline Academy and from Northern Kentucky University's Phi Sigma Sigma sorority assisted at the party. PROVIDED

around the room as they danced to a mix of songs chosen by staff. Each resident was given a red rose, and lots of love. Kira Hinkle, community service coordinator for Ursuline Academy, leads a group of regular Ursuline volunteers at St. Joseph Home: “Our students at Ursuline have been moved to the core from their experiences volunteering at St. Joseph Home. It is a wonderful feeling to walk out the door of St. Joseph Home after an evening of volunteering and to hear the girls chatting

with one another about the residents. In just a few short months our girls have formed true relationships and bonds with many of the residents at St. Joseph Home. They look forward to seeing them each visit and are thrilled when their closest St. Joseph Home friends arrive to a scheduled activity. “I’ve found that it is often the little things that show this true connection that has been made – when one of the home’s residents arrived at the Valentine’s Day Dance our girls

greeted her with, 'Oh no! You jut missed the DJ playing Justin Bieber!' as they all know she is an avid fan. It’s through connections, and through meeting and getting to know people from all walks of life that we can break down stereotypes and bring more love into this world. “St. Joseph’s Home epitomizes that reality – and our girls have experienced more love, and broken down more stereotypes through their monthly visits than I could ever have imagined. I am blessed to

participate in this program, and our students are blessed to participate in this program. One of my students ran into me in the hallway and exclaimed, 'St. Joseph’s Home visits are my favorite day of the month!' with a huge smile on her face. How can it get any better than that?” “Our volunteers always tell me that they receive so much more than they give when they come here,” McMahill said. “I know they went home that evening feeling very loved by our residents.”

Evendale, Wyoming girls earn Gold Awards

Thirteen young ladies from Southwest Ohio were honored March 10 at the Girl Scout Gold Award ceremony which kicked Girl Scout Week. The Girl Scout Gold Award is the highest award that Girl Scouts in grades nine to 12 may earn. The efforts put forth to earn this award express a special commitment by the recipient to herself, her community and her future. The required steps for this award are chosen to help Girl Scouts develop 21st century skills, practice leadership, explore a need in the community and the world, and learn more about themselves. Some criterion for the girls’ project includes community involvement outside of the Girl Scout structure, being innovative, project sustainability and taking action to educate and inspire others. Approximately 6 percent of Girl Scouts nationwide earn this award. At least 80 hours have been dedicated to a project over a time span of one to two years. Girl Scout Gold Award recipients include: Stephanie Allaire (Evendale), Kristen Bisig

(Loveland), Lauren Crall (Loveland), Cassidy Duckett (Franklin), Catherine Elsaesser (Wyoming), Jeanette Gourley (Waynesville), Madison Hartshorn (Waynesville), Stacey Marshall (Colerain Township), Kristy Martini (Sunman, IN), Tyler Poirier (Hyde Park), Meghan Kate Tegtmeier (Loveland), Jessica Ann Wells (Guilford, IN) and Clara Young (Waynesville). A look at the Tri-County Press-area Gold Award winners:

Stephanie Allaire

Evendale resident Mount Notre Dame High School senior “Chords for a Cause” Allaire Volunteering at Melodic Connections, a music therapy organization, gave Allaire the idea to help promote the nonprofit’s wonderful outcomes for people with disabilities. She had wanted to know more about music therapy and being that it is a newer profes-

sion, she figured there were others who also wanted to know more about it too. Allaire set to work orchestrating an awareness concert for Melodic Connections and an information table at her high school for students interested in volunteering. She organized this concert, “Chords for a Cause,” at the Sharonville Arts Center that featured local musicians and the students at Melodic Connections. Her recruitment of high school volunteers had an overwhelming response and additionally brought people to the concert to learn more about music therapy – 225 of them! She created marketing materials for Melodic Connections, a volunteer database and brought awareness to the benefits that music therapy provides to the community. A 13-year Girl Scout, Allaire is a Bronze Award and Marian Medal recipient. She is an avid musician who likes to write her own music, play piano and guitar, and sing in the May Festival Youth Chorus and the St. Michael Adult Chorus. She be-

longs to National Honor Society and a theater group at her high school. She plans to study music therapy at Ohio University or the University of Louisville this fall.

Catherine Elsaesser

Wyoming High School senior “Voices: Hearing Girls’ Stories” Passionate about writing Elsaesser and poetry, Elsaesser wanted to turn her love for written expression into a life-changing experience for middle-school girls targeted by the Wyoming Youth Services Bureau. Elsaesser became a certified teacher for writing classes through Women Writing for a Change, and brought her knowledge and expertise to the project by creating lesson plans for a two-hour long class every week for six weeks during the summer. She recruited friends and classmates to facilitate the classes each week using her lesson plans. This resulted in a group of young wom-

en getting the chance to reflect, write, craft and participate in an experience that would not have otherwise been available to them were it not for her project. To cap off the experience, Elsaesser typed an anthology of the writing pieces from class participants that she distributed to Wyoming Youth Services Bureau to share with the community. Volunteer facilitators now have lesson plans that will continue to be utilized in the future to involve even more young women in writing circles that foster friendship and the sharing of one’s voice. Elsaesser is an 11-year Girl Scout who has earned the Girl Scout Bronze Award. She is the recipient of the Wyoming Latin Academic Commitment Award, and is a member of National Honor Society as well as the Latin Honor Society. She participates in varsity golf, Latin Club, the school newspaper, Project LEAD (a service organization) and Generations Together. She plans to study hotel administration and dietetics this fall at either Cornell University or Indiana University.


B2 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • MARCH 20, 2013

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD THURSDAY, MARCH 21

Exercise Classes

Art Openings

Step N2, 5-6 p.m., Springdale Community Center, $5. 3463910. Springdale.

Wolfgang Kruetzer Photography, 6-8 p.m., Maple Knoll Village, 11100 Springfield Pike, Main Street. Sneak peek of new exhibit. Drinks and appetizers. Exhibit continues through May 20. Free. 782-2462. Springdale.

Nature What You Don’t Know About Bees, 7-8:30 p.m., Blue Ash Branch Library, 4911 Cooper Road, Free. Presented by Empower U Ohio. 250-4116; empoweruohio.org. Blue Ash.

Business Seminars Business Connection Luncheon, 11:30 a.m., Elements Conference and Event Centre, 11974 Lebanon Road, Breathe Life into Your Speeches and Presentations. Michael Davis, certified speaking coach, guest speaker. Includes lunch and networking. $35, $25 members. 554-1722; www.sharonvillechamber.com. Sharonville. Step N2, 5-6 p.m., Springdale Community Center, 11999 Lawnview Ave., Step aerobics class consists of choreographed step patterns set to motivating R&B music. $5. 346-3910. Springdale.

Exhibits Antique Quilt Exhibit, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Heritage Village Museum, 11450 Lebanon Road, Exhibit highlights various quilt patterns from 1850-1925, such as “Delectable Mountain,” “Missouri Puzzle” and “Harvest Sun.” Quilts displayed in Hayner House. Exhibit extended through March 29. $2, $1 ages 5-11, free ages 4 and under and members. 563-9484; www.heritagevillagecincinnati.org. Sharonville.

Health / Wellness Lunch and Learn, 11 a.m.-1 p.m., Manor House Restaurant, 600 Maple Trace Drive, Learn more about how to care for aging eyes and some of the issues that can arise with age. With representative from Cincinnati Eye Institute. Free. Reservations required. Presented by Maple Knoll Village. 782-2717; www.mapleknoll.org. Springdale.

Home & Garden Designing Hot Kitchens and Cool Baths, 6:30-8 p.m., Neal’s Design Remodel Gallery, 7770 E. Kemper Road, Project consultants and designers discuss trends in kitchen and bath design. Light fare provided. Ages 18 and up. Free. 489-7700; neals.com. Sharonville.

Recreation Adventure Station, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sharon Woods, 11450 Lebanon Road, Sharon Centre. Two-story play area with a tree, slide, tubes, ladders and interactive activities. Special ball pit for ages 2-5. $2.50 ages 2-12; vehicle permit required. Through April 30. 521-7275; www.greatparks.org. Sharonville.

FRIDAY, MARCH 22 Art Exhibits Wolfgang Kruetzer Photography, 7 a.m.-7 p.m., Maple Knoll Village, 11100 Springfield Pike, Sneak peek of new exhibit. Drinks and appetizers. Exhibit continues through May 20. Free. 782-2462. Springdale.

Dining Events Cruising California Wine Dinner, 6:30 p.m., La Petite France, 3177 Glendale-Milford Road, Gourmet four-course dinner with wines from California paired with each course. $65. Reservations required. 733-8383; www.lapetitefrance.biz. Evendale. Fish Fry, 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Woodlawn Fire Station 96, 10121 Springfield Pike, Fish, fresh-cut blanched French fries, coleslaw and hush puppies. Dinners: $6.50, beverages: 50 cents. 771-0233. Woodlawn.

Exhibits Antique Quilt Exhibit, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Heritage Village Museum, $2, $1 ages 5-11, free ages 4 and under and members. 563-9484; www.heritagevillagecincinnati.org. Sharonville.

Lectures Photography Travel Series, 7:30 p.m., Sharon Woods, 11450 Lebanon Road,”The Great Loop Cruise.” Images of boat excursion from Chicago to Florida Keys, to New York City and to Canada, returning to Chicago to complete a 6,000-mile loop.

Presented by Alan Lloyd. Free, vehicle permit required. 5217275; www.greatparks.org. Sharonville.

Music - Acoustic Bob Cushing, 8:30 p.m., The Century Inn, 10675 Springfield Pike, 771-4816; www.centuryinnrestaurant.com. Glendale.

ABOUT CALENDAR To submit calendar items, go to www.cincinnati.com and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to life@communitypress.com along with event information. Items are printed on a spaceavailable basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to www.cincinnati.com and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page.

SATURDAY, MARCH 30 Art Exhibits

Nick Vatterott, 8 p.m. and 10:30 p.m., Go Bananas, $8-$14. Reservations required. 984-9288; www.gobananascomedy.com. Montgomery.

On Stage - Theater Trifles and the Best Mistake, 7 p.m., St. Paul Lutheran Church ELCA, 106 Maple St., Dinner served before first play. Dessert served before second show. “Trifles” is about a murder almost 100 years ago based on true events. “The Best Mistake” is about a daughter bringing her boyfriend home to rehearse a play and finds out her dad can’t read the script. $15, $7.50 ages 9 and under. Reservations required. Through March 24. 821-0987; www.stpaulreading.org. Reading.

Recreation Adventure Station, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sharon Woods, $2.50 ages 2-12; vehicle permit required. 521-7275; www.greatparks.org. Sharonville.

Special Events HorrorHound Weekend, 5-10 p.m., Sharonville Convention Center, 11355 Chester Road, Horror movie convention featuring celebrity guests, vendors, film screenings and celebrity Q&A panels. With members of the cast of “The Walking Dead.” Weekend pass: $50, $35 advance. Day pass: $25, $20 advance. Free ages 12 and under. 771-7744; www.horrorhoundweekend.com. Sharonville.

SATURDAY, MARCH 23 Art Exhibits British Panoramic, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Gallery Veronique, 5305379; www.galleryveronique.com. Symmes Township.

Home & Garden Designing Hot Kitchens and Cool Baths, 10-11:30 a.m., Neal’s Design Remodel Gallery, Free. 489-7700; neals.com. Sharonville.

Nature Wildflower Hike, 2 p.m., Sharon Woods, 11450 Lebanon Road, Meet at Sharon Centre. Join a naturalist for a hike to learn about late spring wildflowers. Free, vehicle permit required. 521-7275; www.greatparks.org. Sharonville.

On Stage - Theater St. John Passion Play, 7 p.m., Lockland Christian Church, 231 Mill St., Drama of teachings, passion, death and resurrection of Jesus. Non-perishable item donations benefits St. George Food Pantry. Free, donations accepted. Reservations recommended. Through March 29. 859-392-0129; www.stjohnpassionplay.org. Lockland. The Repossessed Woman, 7-9 p.m., Atrium Hotel and Conference Center, 30 Tri-County Parkway, Stratford Theater.

Wolfgang Kruetzer Photography, 7 a.m.-7 p.m., Maple Knoll Village, Free. 782-2462. Springdale.

Exhibits Antique Quilt Exhibit, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Heritage Village Museum, $2, $1 ages 5-11, free ages 4 and under and members. 563-9484; www.heritagevillagecincinnati.org. Sharonville.

Recreation Adventure Station, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sharon Woods, $2.50 ages 2-12; vehicle permit required. 521-7275; www.greatparks.org. Sharonville.

Seminars

On Stage - Comedy Dramatic play of Star Sparks, mega star singer who made millions with her platinum CD. After touring the world and getting fame, Sparks shows her arrogance, even make her maid bows down to her like she is God. When she loses it all, she has to humble herself. $12, $10 advance. Presented by Truly Blessed Productions. 919-3201. Springdale. Trifles and the Best Mistake, 7 p.m., St. Paul Lutheran Church ELCA, $15, $7.50 ages 9 and under. Reservations required. 821-0987; www.stpaulreading.org. Reading.

Recreation Adventure Station, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sharon Woods, $2.50 ages 2-12; vehicle permit required. 521-7275; www.greatparks.org. Sharonville.

Special Events HorrorHound Weekend, 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Sharonville Convention Center, Weekend pass: $50, $35 advance. Day pass: $25, $20 advance. Free ages 12 and under. 771-7744; www.horrorhoundweekend.com. Sharonville.

SUNDAY, MARCH 24 Lectures The State of the Secular Movement, 1-3 p.m., Hannaford Suites Hotel, 5900 E. Galbraith Road, Representing two major secular movement organizations focused on youth, August Brunsman (executive director, Secular Student Alliance) and Amanda K. Metskas (executive director, Camp Quest Inc.) share perspectives on where secular movement in United States is heading in next few years. Free. 404-8191; www.gofigger.org. Sycamore Township.

Nature The Tortoise and the Hare, 3 p.m., Sharon Woods, 11450 Lebanon Road, Sharon Centre. Recount the story and meet the stars. There may even be a rematch. Free, vehicle permit required. 521-7275; www.greatparks.org. Sharonville.

On Stage - Theater St. John Passion Play, 3 p.m., Lockland Christian Church, Free, donations accepted. Reservations recommended. 859-3920129; www.stjohnpassionplay.org. Lockland. Trifles and the Best Mistake, 1 p.m., St. Paul Lutheran Church ELCA, $15, $7.50 ages 9 and under. Reservations required. 821-0987; www.stpaulreading.org. Reading.

Recreation Adventure Station, Noon-5 p.m., Sharon Woods, $2.50 ages 2-12; vehicle permit required. 521-7275; www.greatparks.org. Sharonville.

Special Events HorrorHound Weekend, 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Sharonville Convention Center, Weekend pass: $50, $35 advance. Day pass: $25, $20 advance. Free ages 12 and under. 771-7744; www.horrorhoundweekend.com. Sharonville.

Dave Ramsey’s Financial Peace University, 7-8:30 p.m., Vineyard Community Church, 11340 Century Circle East, Course designed to provide people with tools to gain control of their finances. Ages 18 and up. $100. Reservations required. 671-0422, ext. 335; www.vineyardcincinnati.com/fpu. Springdale.

MONDAY, MARCH 25

THURSDAY, MARCH 28

Art Exhibits

Art Exhibits

Wolfgang Kruetzer Photography, 7 a.m.-7 p.m., Maple Knoll Village, Free. 782-2462. Springdale.

Wolfgang Kruetzer Photography, 7 a.m.-7 p.m., Maple Knoll Village, Free. 782-2462. Springdale.

Clubs & Organizations

Exercise Classes

Cincinnati Toastmasters Club No. 472 Meeting, 7-8:30 p.m., St. Paul Community United Methodist Church, 8221 Miami Road, Public speaking and leadership skills meeting. Family friendly. Free. Through July 22. 351-5005; cincinnati.toastmastersclubs.org. Madeira.

Step N2, 5-6 p.m., Springdale Community Center, $5. 3463910. Springdale.

Community Dance Contra Dance, 8-10 p.m., The Center for the Arts - Wyoming, 322 Wyoming Ave., Wear softsoled shoes. No partner needed. Beginner’s workshop 7:30 p.m. $4, $1 ages 20 and under, free for newcomers. 859-291-6197; www.cincinnaticontradance.org. Wyoming.

Dance Classes Zumba, 6-7 p.m., Fitness Physiques by Nico G, 9681 Kenwood Road, Group Fitness Studio. Latin-based cardio workout. Ages 18 and up. $10-$15. Registration required. 290-8217; www.fitnessphysiques.net. Blue Ash.

Exercise Classes Pilates Plus, 7-8 p.m., Springdale Community Center, 11999 Lawnview Ave., Unique program of strengthening and stretching exercises through slow, mindful and purposeful movements. $5. 346-3910. Springdale.

Health / Wellness Mobile Mammography Unit, 7 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Walgreens Evendale, 3105 Glendale Milford Road, Fifteen-minute screening. Cost varies per insurance plan. Financial assistance available for qualified applicants. Appointment required. 686-3300; www.e-mercy.com. Evendale.

Exhibits Antique Quilt Exhibit, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Heritage Village Museum, $2, $1 ages 5-11, free ages 4 and under and members. 563-9484; www.heritagevillagecincinnati.org. Sharonville.

Films A Deeper Shade of Blue, 7:30 p.m., Springdale 18: Cinema de Lux, 12064 Springfield Pike, Director’s Hall. The story of the evolution of modern surf culture. Not rated; run time: 2 hrs. 30 min. $13.50. 699-1500; www.fathomevents.com. Springdale.

Recreation Adventure Station, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sharon Woods, $2.50 ages 2-12; vehicle permit required. 521-7275; www.greatparks.org. Sharonville.

FRIDAY, MARCH 29

Holiday - Easter Easter Egg Hunt, 10 a.m.-noon, Meadowbrook Care Center, 8211 Weller Road, Egg hunt for ages 10 and under. Featuring visits with Easter Bunny, games, bake sale, entertainment, snacks and more. Professional face painting, $2. Free. 489-2444; www.meadowbrookcare.org. Montgomery. Montgomery Kiwanis Easter Egg Hunt, 10-11 a.m., Montgomery Park, 10101 Montgomery Road, Children released to pick up plastic eggs filled with jelly beans. Some contain mini candy bar that can be traded for stuffed bunny. Free. 910-7068. Montgomery.

Music - Rock Pandora Effect, 9:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m., Win Place or Show, 9933 Cincinnati-Columbus Road, 1960s-current rock music. Ages 21 and up. $5. 777-2920; www.wpssportsbar.com. West Chester Township.

Recreation Adventure Station, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sharon Woods, $2.50 ages 2-12; vehicle permit required. 521-7275; www.greatparks.org. Sharonville.

Special Events WIZ Silver Anniversary Party, 9 p.m.-2 a.m., Sharonville Convention Center, 11355 Chester Road, Performance by Elle Varner, Erica P, DJ Kid Capri and others. Celebrating 25 years of Hip-Hop and R&B. VIP includes: special parking, a designated area in exhibit hall during party and VIP room with cash bar and free appetizers. Possible meet and greet as well. Proper attire is required. $75 VIP, $25. 7717744; www.cincyticket.com. Sharonville.

SUNDAY, MARCH 31 Recreation Adventure Station, Noon-5 p.m., Sharon Woods, $2.50 ages 2-12; vehicle permit required. 521-7275; www.greatparks.org. Sharonville.

MONDAY, APRIL 1 Art Exhibits Wolfgang Kruetzer Photography, 7 a.m.-7 p.m., Maple Knoll Village, Free. 782-2462. Springdale.

Exercise Classes Pilates Plus, 7-8 p.m., Springdale Community Center, $5. 346-3910. Springdale.

Art Exhibits

TUESDAY, APRIL 2 Art Exhibits

Dining Events Fish Fry, 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Woodlawn Fire Station 96, Dinners: $6.50, beverages: 50 cents. 771-0233. Woodlawn.

Exhibits Antique Quilt Exhibit, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Heritage Village Museum, $2, $1 ages 5-11, free ages 4 and under and members. 563-9484; www.heritagevillagecincinnati.org. Sharonville.

Music - Blues

Music - Acoustic Mick Sawyer, 8 p.m.-midnight, The Century Inn, 10675 Springfield Pike, Free. 771-4816; www.thecenturyinn.com. Glendale.

TUESDAY, MARCH 26

On Stage - Comedy

Wolfgang Kruetzer Photography, 7 a.m.-7 p.m., Maple Knoll Village, Free. 782-2462. Springdale.

British Panoramic, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Gallery Veronique, 5305379; www.galleryveronique.com. Symmes Township.

Wolfgang Kruetzer Photography, 7 a.m.-7 p.m., Maple Knoll Village, Free. 782-2462. Springdale.

Sonny Moorman Group, 7-11 p.m., McCauly’s, 6750 FieldsErtel Road, Power blues group from Cincinnati. 489-4047. Sharonville.

Art Exhibits

Adventure Station, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sharon Woods, $2.50 ages 2-12; vehicle permit required. 521-7275; www.greatparks.org. Sharonville.

Adventure Station, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sharon Woods, $2.50 ages 2-12; vehicle permit required. 521-7275; www.greatparks.org. Sharonville.

Art Exhibits

Travel the world without even leaving the county. The Hamilton County Park District presents the 2012 Photography Travel Series on Friday, March 2, 9, 16, 23, April 13, 20 and 27 at Sharon Woods Sharon Centre. These programs offer a unique look around the world with commentary by local photographers. Pictured are photographer Alan Lloyd's “Red Canoes.” THANKS TO ALAN LLOYD

Recreation

Recreation

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 27

Exercise Classes

Lockland Christian Church, Free, donations accepted. Reservations recommended. 859-3920129; www.stjohnpassionplay.org. Lockland.

Tyrone Hawkins, 8 p.m. and 10:30 p.m., Go Bananas, $8-$14. 984-9288; www.gobananascomedy.com. Montgomery.

On Stage - Theater St. John Passion Play, 7 p.m.,

Wolfgang Kruetzer Photography, 7 a.m.-7 p.m., Maple Knoll Village, Free. 782-2462. Springdale.

Exercise Classes Step N2, 5-6 p.m., Springdale Community Center, $5. 3463910. Springdale.

Home & Garden Get the Dirt on Backyard Composting, 7:30-8:30 p.m., Wyoming Civic Center, 1 Worthington Ave., Learn how to balance a compost bin, what materials are compostable and some troubleshooting. Free. Registration required. 946-7734; hamiltoncountyrecycles.org. Wyoming.

Recreation Adventure Station, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sharon Woods, $2.50 ages 2-12; vehicle permit required. 521-7275; www.greatparks.org. Sharonville.


LIFE

MARCH 20, 2013 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • B3

Rita shares Passover brisket, glazed berry tart One of my most memorable catering jobs was preparing a Seder supper for a Jewish family. The research I had to do was daunting since I knew almost nothing about this holy ceremony. I knew the Seder, or Passover meal, relived the story of the Israelites’ deliverance from bondage in Egypt. I knew too the term Passover meant that the angel of death “passed over” those doorposts marked with lamb’s blood, so that the firstborn Rita son would Heikenfeld not be RITA’S KITCHEN slain. My knowledge about what foods to serve was just about nil, so you can imagine the time spent in learning! One of the recipes I used was this one for brisket.

Delicious Passover brisket

Adapted from Zel Schulman’s book “Let My People Eat!” I love this brisket. I like to make mine in a slow cooker. 3 pounds brisket 1 12 oz. bottle chili sauce 1 ⁄2cup dark brown sugar, packed or bit more to taste 1 10 oz. can beef broth 1 really large onion, sliced 1 ⁄4teaspoon ground cloves 2 bay leaves

at least 2-4 hours. Spoon into tart shell, smoothing top. Fruit topping: About 3 cups fresh berries (raspberries, blueberries, blackberries, etc. are good)

Arrange on top of tart, and then glaze. Glaze: Mix together and heat until warm. 1 ⁄3cup apricot preserves 1 tablespoon honey

Brush or pour on top of berries.

Tips from readers’ kitchens

Glazed Three-Berry Tart is a stunning recipe for a holiday dinner or any time you want to have a special dessert that looks a lot harder to make than it is. THANKS TO RITA HEIKENFELD

Put everything in sprayed slow cooker and cook on low 8-10 hours or until tender. Or bake, covered, in preheated 325 degree oven for about 50 minutes per pound. Remove bay leaves.

Glazed Three-Berry Tart

I consider recipes people share with me “food gifts.” And I usually can’t wait to make it for myself and then share with you. That’s how I feel about this tart. I first tasted this at daughter-in-law Jess’ home. She got the recipe

from her friend, Amy Obermeyer. This is a stunning recipe for a holiday dinner or any time you want to have a special dessert that looks a lot harder to make than it is. It does require a tart pan. I’ve adapted the recipe only slightly. Preheat oven to 350. Tart shell: Approximately 9 soft coconut macaroon cookies, crumbled fine (2 cups) 1 cup ground pecans 2 tablespoons butter, softened

Combine macaroons, pecans and butter and

Nominate outstanding senior volunteers

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Quiche recipe a hit

From Debbie Motz: “My husband has made your quiche recipe two

Whip cream until soft peaks form. Set aside. Beat cream cheese and sugar until blended. Add orange juice, vanilla and almond extract. Fold in whipped cream. Chill and to view the contest rules, visit tinyurl.com/ c3qxh3a. Completed nomination forms also can be mailed to Salute to Senior Service, P.O. Box 285, Bellevue, NE 68005.

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⁄2cup whipping cream 8 oz. cream cheese, softened 1 ⁄3cup sugar 1 tablespoon orange juice 2 teaspoons vanilla 1/2teaspoon almond extract (optional, but very good) 1

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press firmly into a 10- to 11-inch tart pan. Bake for 15-18 minutes. Cool. This can be made a day ahead and kept covered in the refrigerator. Filling:

Blender banana bread redo: Jean Heenan made a more healthful version of my blender banana bread. She lowered the sugar to 2⁄3 cup and used cinnamon applesauce instead of oil. She added a cup of fresh blueberries to the bread, as well. “I had to bake it for 1 hour and 10 minutes, and it was delicious,” she said.

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times since the Feb. 27 publishing. We both love the simplicity of the recipe and it is so delicious. Thank you for sharing.”

Can you help?

White chicken chili from Nick & Tom’s Bridgetown Restaurant. Reader Mary Ellen T. visited this restaurant for the first time. “What a treat. The white chicken chili is to die for. Lean meat and no beans.” When Mary Ellen asked if the restaurant would share the recipe, the answer was no, but the chili is available for takeout. So now Mary Ellen hopes someone has a similar recipe.

Fun recipes for Easter

Check out my blog for naturally colored Easter eggs and marbled eggs.

Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educator and author. Find her blog online at Cincinnati.Com/blogs. Email her at columns@communitypress.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Call 513-248-7130, ext. 356.


LIFE

B4 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • MARCH 20, 2013

RELIGION Church by the Woods The Holtsinger Memorial Church and Church by the Woods are joining at Church by the Woods to provide a community Good Friday service at 7 p.m. March 29. All are welcome. The church building is the home of four different ministries. Church By the Woods is a multicultural and multiethnic church whose mission is to love and serve God, each other and our neighbors. Sunday worship service is traditional in English and begins at 10 a.m. From 10 a.m. to noon on Saturdays, classes in English as a Second Language are offered for ages 14 to 94. Taiwanese Presbyterian Ministry has Sunday traditional worship at 2 p.m. in their language of Taiwanese. On Saturdays they offer a ministry on the UC campus. Freedom Church has its contem-

porary worship service at 10:30 a.m. in English. “It’s Not About Religion; It’s About Relationships;” tinyurl.com/a7yroqe. Seventh Day Adventist Church, has worship on Saturdays at 10 a.m. in Spanish. “Loving, Caring, Sharing God’s Word” Nursery School is provided at each church’s worship services. Bible studies are offered by all churches. The church is at 3755 Cornell Road, Sharonville.

St. John United Church of Christ Tickets are $7 in advance and $8 at the door. Children 12-andunder are $4. Proceeds go to the Bob Christophel Memorial Scholarship Fund supporting Reading High School. Seating is limited, so order tickets in advance. Call 821-1740 The church is at 729 Jefferson Ave. in Reading; www.stjohnunitedcc.org; 821-1740.

Sharonville United Methodist Church At 8:15 a.m. there is a traditional service; at 11 a.m. there is a blended service, with contemporary and traditional styles of worship; at 9:30 a.m. there are Sunday School classes and short term study groups with videos. The Diabetes Support group will meet on Thursday evening, March 21 to hear a power point presentation by Dr. Cathy Rosenbaum, CEO of RX Integrative Solutions. She will be sharing information about the role of herbal products in the treatment of diabetes along with traditional medicine. The Otterbein University Concert Choir wll present a concert at 7 p.m. Friday, March 22. The program will include traditional works as well as arangements of gospel music and Creole folk songs from Louisiana. Admission is free, but a free will offering will be collected to

INDEPENDENT BAPTIST

UNITED METHODIST

EVANGELICAL PRESBYTERIAN

FRIENDSHIP BAPTIST CHURCH 8580 Cheviot Rd., Colerain Twp 741-7017 www.ourfbc.com Gary Jackson, Senior Pastor 9:30am Sunday School (all ages) Sunday Morning Service 10:30am 6:30pm Sunday Evening Service 7:00pm Wedn. Service/Awana RUI Addiction Recovery (Fri.) 7:00pm

Christ, the Prince of Peace

At CHURCH BY THE WOODS

United Methodist Church 10507 “Old” Colerain Ave (513) 385-7883 Rev. Mark Reuter Sunday School 9:15am Worship 10:30am - Nursery Available www.cpopumc.org

Active Youth, College, Senior Groups Exciting Music Dept, Deaf Ministry, Nursery

SHARON BAPTIST CHURCH 4451 Fields Ertel Road Cincinnati, OH 45241 (513) 769-4849 gstep77507@aol.com

CHURCH OF THE SAVIOUR 8005 Pfeiffer Rd. Montgomery 791-3142 www.cos-umc.org Palm Sunday "Jesus: The Tragedy of His Victory" Traditional Worship 8:20am & 11:00am Contemporary Worship 9:40am Sunday School (All ages) 9:40 & 11am Nursery Care Provided

Services

Dr. Cathy Johns, Senior Pastor Rev. Doug Johns, Senior Pastor

Sunday School - 10:00 am Sunday Morning - 11:00 am Sunday Evening - 6:00 pm Wednesday - 7:00 pm Evening Prayer and Bible Study VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL June 25 through June 29 Ages 3 to 15 Theme: Amazing Adventures

Monfort Heights United Methodist Church

3682 West Fork Rd , west of North Bend Traditional Worship 8:30 & 11:00am Contemporary Worhip 9:45am

Nursery Available * Sunday School 513-481-8699 * www. mhumc.org Spiritual Checkpoint ... Bearing the Love of Christ...for you!

Wyoming Baptist Church

(A Church For All Seasons) Burns and Waverly Avenues Cincinnati OH 45215 821.8430

Steve Cummins, Senior Pastor Sunday School..............................9:00 am Coffee & Fellowship...................10:00 am Praise & Worship........................10:30 am www.wyomingbc.homestead.com Visitors Welcome!

CHRISTIAN CHURCH DISCIPLES Mt. Healthy Christian Church (Disciples of Christ)

7717 Harrison Ave Mt. Healthy, OH 45231 Rev. Michael Doerr, Pastor 513-521-6029 Sunday 9:00 a.m...... Contemporary Service 9:45a.m...... Sunday School 10:45 a.m........ Traditional Worship Nursery Staff Provided “A Caring Community of Faith” Welcomes You

Corner of Compton and Perry Streets 513-931-5827 Sunday School 8:45 - 9:45am Traditional Worship 10:00 - 11:00am Contemporary Gathering: Bible & Conversation 11:30 - 12:30 Nursery Available Handicap Access "Come as a guest. Leave as a friend".

Sharonville United Methodist

8:15 & 11amTraditional Service & Kingdom Kids 9:30am Adult & Children’s Sunday School 7:00pm Wednesday, Small Groups for all ages Infant care available for all services

3751 Creek Rd.

513-563-0117

EPISCOPAL

www.sharonville-umc.org

Christ Church Glendale Episcopal Church 965 Forest Ave - 771-1544 christchurch1@fuse.net www.christchurchglendale.org The Reverend Roger L Foote

NON-DENOMINATIONAL “Life on Purpose in Community” 2651 Adams Rd. (near Pippin) Worship Assembly-Sunday 10:45am Phone 825-9553 www.highviewchristianchurch.com

LUTHERAN Faith Lutheran LCMC

8265 Winton Rd., Finneytown www.faithcinci.org Pastor Robert Curry Contemporary Service 9am Traditional Service 11:00am

• Saturday: 5:30 and 7pm • Sunday: 9am, 10:30am & 11:59am

Trinity Lutheran Church (ELCA)

11340 Century Circle E., Springdale

Pastor Todd A. Cutter

Trinity Lutheran Church, LCMS 5921 Springdale Rd

Rev. Richard Davenport, Pastor Worship & Sunday School 10:30 a.m, Bible Study 9:15 a.m. Sundays

Classic Service and Hymnbook

www.trinitylutherancincinnati.com

385-7024

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“Growing Closer to God, Growing Closer to Neighbor”

1553 Kinney Ave, Mt. Healthy

542-9025

Visitors Welcome www.eccfellowship.org

PRESBYTERIAN Northminster Presbyterian Church 703 Compton Rd., Finneytown 931-0243 Growing Faith, Sharing Hope, Showing Love Sunday Worship Schedule Traditional Services: 8:00 & 10:15am Contemporary Services: 9:00 & 11:30am Student Cafe: 10:15am Childcare Available Jeff Hosmer, Rich Jones & Nancy Ross- Zimmerman - Pastors

Northwest Community Church 8735 Cheviot Rd, by Colerain HS Rev. Kevin Murphy, Pastor 513-385-8973 Worship and Sunday School 10AM Handicap Accessible/Nursery Available

Salem White Oak Presbyterian

Celebrate Easter at the Vineyard!

Sunday School 10:15

Worship: 8:30 am traditional - 10:45 am contemporary Sunday School: 9:45 am Nursery provided

Sunday School Hour (for all ages) 9:15 - 10:15am Worship Service - 10:30 to 11:45am (Childcare provided for infants/ toddlers) Pastor: Rich Lanning Church: 2191 Struble Rd Office: 2192 Springdale Rd

HIGHVIEW CHRISTIAN CHURCH

8am Holy Eucharist I 9am Holy Eucharist II 11am Holy Eucharist II Child Care 9-12

www. trinitymthealthy.org 513-522-3026

EVANGELICAL COMMUNITY CHURCH

Mt Healthy United Methodist Church

(Located behind Best Buy in Tri-County)

VineyardCincinnati.com (513) 671-0422

UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST FLEMING ROAD United Church of Christ 691 Fleming Rd 522-2780 Rev Pat McKinney

Sunday School - All Ages - 9:15am Sunday Worship - 10:30am

Nursery Provided

St. Paul United Church of Christ 5312 Old Blue Rock Rd., off Springdale

Phone: 385-9077 Rev. Michelle Torigian Sunday Worship: 10:30am Sunday School: 9:15am Nursery Available/Handicap Access www.stpaulucccolerain.org www.facebook.com/StPaulUCC

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BAPTIST

“Small enough to know you, Big enough to care”

www.churchbythewoods.org 3755 Cornell Rd., Sharonville , Ohio 45241 You have a choice of Ministry: 1. Traditional Sunday Worship at 10:00 AM. Language: English Multi-cultural, multi-generational, and multi-ethnic. 2. Contemporary Sunday Worship with Freedom Church at 10:30 AM. Language: English It’s not about Religion; it’s about relationships! www.freedomchurchcincinnati.com 3. Taiwanese Traditional Sunday Worship st 2:00 PM. Language: Taiwanese, UC Campus Fellowship on Saturdays, www.cincinnatitaiwanese.org 4. Seventh Day Adventist Saturday Worship at 10:00 AM. Language: Spanish Loving - Caring - and Sharing God’s Word Notes: Nursery School is provided at each Worship time English as a Second Language (ESL) is taught on Saturday 10-12 AM. Various Bible Studies are available.

ABOUT RELIGION Religion news is published at no charge on a space-available basis. Items must be to our office no later than 4 p.m. Wednesday, for possible consideration in the following edition. » E-mail announcements to tricountypress@ communitypress.com, with “Religion” in the subject line. » Fax to 248-1938. Call 248-8600. » Mail to: Tri-County Press, Attention: Andrea Reeves, Religion news, 394 Wards Corner Road, Suite 170, Loveland, Ohio 45140. help cover tour costs. Maundy Service will be 7 p.m. Thursday, March 28. Good Friday service is 7 p.m. Friday, March 29. Easter services are 8:15 a.m. and 11 a.m. Sunday, March 31. Visitors are welcome at all services and events. The church is at 1751 Creek Road, Sharonville; 563-0117.

Women Voters president keynote speaker at luncheon Alice Schneider of Wyoming helped finalize the luncheon event that is the League of Women Voters’ main fundraiser for the year for the LWVCA Education Fund. It is by this event that the League raises the revenue to continue its mission of providing non-partisan candidate and issue information and keep the activities of the LWVCA Education Fund going. Elisabeth MacNamara, national president of the League of Women Voters, was the keynote speaker at this year’s Susan B. Anthony Luncheon Feb. 23. MacNamara, LWV member since 1983 and retired district attorney in charge of the juvenile court division in DeKalb County, GA, spoke about “Making Democracy Work.”

VILLAGE OF EVENDALE ADOPTED ORDINANCES AND RESOLUTIONS The following ordinances and resolutions were adopted by the Council of the Village of Evendale at its Regular Council Meeting on March 12th, 2013. ORD. #12-64 AN ORDINANCE AMENDING THE EVEN DALE CODE OF ORDINANCES BY REPEALING PART TWELVE, TITLE TWO IN ITS ENTIRETY, REPEALING PART FOUR TEEN, TITLE SIX, CHAPTER 1460, SIGNS, IN ITS ENTIRETY, AND ORDAINING NEW PART TWELVE, TITLE TWO, PLANNING AND ZONING CODE, FOR THE VILLAGE OF EVENDALE, AND DECLARING AN EMERGENCY. ORD. 12-63 AN ORDINANCE ADOPTING THE "EVEN DALE DESIGN GUIDELINES", AND DECLARING AN EMERGENCY ORD. #13-04 ORDINANCE AUTHORIZING THE MAYOR TO EXECUTE AND CARRY OUT A CONTRACT TO PURCHASE PROPERTY AT 9740 READING ROAD AND DECLARING AN EMERGENCY. ORD. #13-05- Second Reading ORDINANCE AUTHORIZING THE MAYOR TO EXECUTE AND CARRY OUT A CONTRACT TO PURCHASE PROPERTY AT 9746 READING ROAD AND DECLARING AN EMERGENCY. RES. # 13-03 A RESOLUTION CONSENTING TO THE EXECUTION OF AN AMENDMENT TO THE ENTERPISE ZONE AGREEMENTS EXECUTED BETWEEN THE HAMILTON COUN TY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSION ERS, SAEC/KINETIC VISION, INC. AND DYNAMIC SIGHT PROPERTIES, LTD. AND DECLARING AN EMERGENCY ORD. #13- 09 APPROVING AN ADDITIONAL APPROPRIA TION IN THE EVENDALE COMMONS TIF FUND TO PAY AUGUST 2012 TAX DUE AND DECLARING AN EMERGENCY RES. #13-04 A RESOLUTION SUPPORTING THE APPLI CATION BY THE GORMAN HERITAGE FARM FOUNDATION FOR AN IMPACT 100 GRANT ORD. #13-10 ORDINANCE AUTHORIZING THE MAYOR TO EXECUTE AND CARRY OUT CAPITAL ASSET PURCHASES AS DESCRIBED IN THE ATTACHMENT TO THE 2013 BUDGET APPROVED IN ORDINANCE 12-59 AND DECLARING AN EMERGENCY. ORD. #13-11 ORDINANCE AUTHORIZING THE MAYOR TO ENTER INTO AN AGREEMENT ON BEHALF OF THE VILLAGE OF EVENDALE WITH DAVID STARK REGARDING TUITION REIMBURSEMENT AND DECLARING AN EMERGENCY. ORD. #13-12 ORDINANCE AUTHORIZING THE MAYOR TO ENTER INTO AN AGREEMENT ON BEHALF OF THE VILLAGE OF EVENDALE WITH CHARLES W. RIELAGE REGARDING TUITION REIMBURSEMENT AND DECLAR ING AN EMERGENCY. ORD. #13-07 APPROVING ADDITIONAL APPROPRIA TIONS IN THE GENERAL FUND FOR TUITION REIMBURSEMENT AND DECLARING AN EMERGENCY ORD. #13-13 ORDINANCE ESTALISHING THE POSITIONS OF BUILDING DEPARTMENT CLERK, PAM MORIN AND RECREATION SPECIALIST 2, NANCY HAGNER AS FULLTIME AND DECLARING AN EMERGENCY. ORD. #13-14 APPROVING AN ADDITIONAL APPROPRIA TION IN THE GENERAL FUND TO COVER ADDITIONAL SALARY AND BENEFITS FOR TWO EMPLOYEES MOVING FROM PART TIME TO FULL TIME AND DECLAR ING AN EMERGENCY 1752978

Since its beginnings in 1920, the year that women gained the right to vote, LWV has been a non-partisan organization dedicated to education about candidates and issues. MacNamara described the organization’s goal as “ensuring an electoral process that is open to all, and is free, fair and accessible.” The LWV of the Cincinnati Area uses money from its Education Fund to create and distribute educational publications, including They Represent Us, an annual directory of public officials in Hamilton County, and The Who and What of Elections, a voter’s guide of candidates for office and ballot issues. The Cincinnati Area LWV’s voter education program also includes providing a speakers bureau with representatives from both sides of an issue and voter registration efforts to ensure that all eligible persons can participate in elections. Cincinnati Mayor Mark Mallory and Chris Monzel, president of the Hamilton County Board of Commissioners, proclaimed Saturday, Feb. 23, as Elisabeth MacNamara Day .

NOTICE TO CIVIL ENGINEERS LEGAL ADVER TISEMENT FOR REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS The Village of Glendale, through the office of the Village Administrator, will receive sealed proposals and qualifications for water, wastewater and storm water consulting engineering services. Qualified firms will have broad expertise in a range of civil engineering specialties, including capital improvement design and construction management, citizen engagement, water, wastewater and storm sewer systems, site and subdivision development plan review, regulatory compliance issues, mapping and surveying, geographic information systems (GIS) , water and storm water modeling, grant writing, and project planning. Five (5) copies of proposal statements are due to the Village of Glendale by 4:30 p.m. on Friday, April 5, 2013. Postmarked packages arriving later than this time will not be accepted. The Request for Qualifications may be examined and obtained at: Village of Glendale Office 30 Village Square Glendale, OH 45246 Phone: (513) 771-7200 On-line at: www.glendaleohio.org This Request for Qualifications does not commit the Village to award a contract, to pay any costs incurred in the preparation of a response to this request, or to procure or contract for services or supplies. The Village reserves the right to accept or reject any or all submittals received as a result of this request, or to cancel in part or in its entirety this Request for Qualifications, if in the best interest of the Village to do so. 1001752761


LIFE

MARCH 20, 2013 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • B5

‘Deathtrap’ at Glendale Lyceum By Kelly McBride kmcbride@communitypress.com

A troupe of Glendale thespians will take the stage in a “who’ll do it” that has enjoyed longrunning success on Broadway. The local play, produced and directed by Joe D’Amato, stars Jim Wesselman, Robyn Allgeyer, Jay Wheeler, Jack Murray and Mike White. Ira Levin’s “Deathtrap” is comedy-thriller about a writer who has been unsuccessful at the box office, and is struggling to write his next play. When he reads a play he believes will be a hit, he plans to steal the script and kill the author. The writer’s wife anticipates his plan and tries to convince him to work with the other author and split the profits. The plot becomes compli-

Jack Murray, from left, Jim Wesselman, Robyn Carey Allgeyer, Mike White and Jay Wheeler rehearse "Deathtrap" at the Glendale Lyceum. THANKS TO ROBYN CAREY ALLGEYER

cated when a psychic arrives and becomes suspicious. The comedy will be performed at the Glendale Lyceum theater, 865 Congress Ave., at 7:30 p.m. Friday, March 22.

LEGAL NOTICE "Public" Auction Compass Self Storage For Liens On Storage Units at all sites listed below, Thursday, April 11, 2013. Starting At 9:30AM Compass Self Storage Formerly 747 Self Storage 9343 Princeton Glendale Rd. Hamilton, OH.45011 513.874.7005 532 - Sims, Lenise 745 - Deans, Bruce The goods in this Auction are being sold under the Judicial Lien Act. The goods are generally described as household goods and / or business related items unless otherwise noted. COMPASS SELF STORAGE reserves the right to accept or reject any and all bids. The payment terms of the sale are cash only. Complete terms of Auction will be posted day of sale at the Auction Site. Auctioneer Joseph C. Tate as Executive Administrator. 1752095

Admission is $10, and tickets can be bought at the door. For more about your community, visit Cincinnati.com/Glendale.

Maple Knoll hosts Medicare forum Pro Seniors and the Ohio SMP Project present a Medicare Fraud Prevention and Consumer Protection Forum at Maple Knoll Village Auditorium, 11100 Springfield Pike, 4 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, March 20. This event will feature an audience participation panel discussion at 5 p.m. for seniors and families to learn more about Medicare and Medicaid fraud issues, identity theft and senior scams.

One out of every seven Medicare dollars goes to fraud, waste and abuse, and that costs taxpayers $60 billion. Experts will be on hand from Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine’s office, the Ohio Department of Insurance, the FBI, the Office of Inspector General Health and Human Services, Social Security, Pro Seniors and others. The panel discussion will be recorded by WMKV Public Radio (89.3 FM) for later airing

and as a public service online at www.wmkvfm.org. Catholic Charities of Southwest Ohio and the Caregiver Action Network are also partnering with Pro Seniors in the event. The entire event is free and open to the public. There is ample free parking on site.

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LIFE

B6 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • MARCH 20, 2013

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No purchase necessary. Open to legal residents of Ohio, Kentucky and Indiana who are 21 years or older and have a valid driver’s license at the time of entry. To enter, or for official rules, go to www.facebook.com/CincinnatiEnquirer


LIFE

MARCH 20, 2013 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • B7

YMCA, Jersey Mike’s make a difference The YMCA of Greater Cincinnati is joining forces with Jersey Mike’s Subs restaurants throughout the area for the third annual March Month of Giving fundraising campaign. Money donated at local Jersey Mike’s restaurants will help the Y transform the lives of individuals throughout Greater Cincinnati by supporting their needs and helping them reach their fullest potential. During the month of March, customers can

make a donation to the YMCA of Greater Cincinnati at any area Jersey Mike’s restaurant. On Wednesday, March 27, all local Jersey Mike’s restaurants will donate100 percent of the days sales to help the Y help those who need it most in our community. “The money raised will provide scholarships to help kids learn how to swim, provide them with a healthy lunch, and help families achieve their health and wellness

goals,” said YMCA of Greater Cincinnati President and Chief Executive Officer Sandy Walker. Last year’s Month of Giving campaign raised nearly $858,000 for 74 different charities nationwide. Local participating Jersey Mike’s locations include: 11409 Princeton Pike, Springdale. For more information about the Month of Giving campaign, visit the websites www.MyY.org or JerseyMikes.com/mog.

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REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS SHARONVILLE

10455 Wintergreen Court: Hale John P. to Cutter Jennifer Lee Anna; $70,000. 10965 Reading Road: Yanez Patrick to Osos Investments LLC; $63,000. 11190 Maple St.: Eagles Wing Properties LLC to Schmidt David C.; $120,000. 3160 Kemper Road: Electronic Eye Inc. to Klusty Sign Storage LLC; $490,000. 3520 Beekley Woods Drive: Kai Yan Wong & Peggy to Gaffey Mary C.; $230,000. 3841 Malaer Drive: Infinity Ventures LLC to Frishkorn Clayton Richaed; $111,500 . 4976 Lord Alfred Court: Gall Jayne M. to Trak Properties LLC; $113,500.

ABOUT REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS Information is provided as a public service by the office of Hamilton County Auditor Dusty Rhodes. Neighborhood designations are approximate. 5373 Barony Place: Latvala Thalia M. & Charlotte A. to Latvala Thalia M.; $76,500.

SPRINGDALE

1098 Pilgrim Place: Doyle Jack H. & Luella F. to Good Value Realty Ltd.; $35,000.

12005 Marwood Lane: Silbert Daniel M. to Geisler James S.; $84,000. 532 Observatory Drive: Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. to Stainton Beverly A.; $42,250.

WOODLAWN

10136 Chester Road: Reynolds Walter to Fifth Third Mortgage; $32,000. 170 Novner Drive: I.M.W. Co. Ltd. to Dsc Holdings Ltd.; $240,000.

WYOMING

239 Ritchie Ave.: Sheerajin Lauren to Connock Laura M.; $381,000. 50 Central Terrace: Noll Lief A. to Sherrajin Lauren A.; $270,000.

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LIFE

B8 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • MARCH 20, 2013

POLICE REPORTS EVENDALE Arrests/citations Pia Hall, 20, 3300 Buell Road,

assault at 2801 Cunningham, Feb. 19. Cheylon Ginyard, 34, 5769 Glengate Lane, theft at 2801 Cunningham, Feb. 18. Faith Evans, 56, P.O. Box 11096, theft at 2801 Cunningham, Feb. 23.

INCIDENTS/ INVESTIGATIONS

Theft Credit card and $60 removed from locker at 10765 Reading Road, Feb. 23.

LEGAL NOTICE The Board of Zoning Appeals of the City of Wyoming, Ohio hereby gives notice that a public hearing will be held on Tuesday, April 9, 2013 at 6:00 p.m. in the City Building Council Chambers, 800 Oak Avenue, Wyoming, OH 45215 to hear and decide the following appeal request: A request for a permit to construct an addition to the existing home at 114 Congress Run Road, Wyoming OH 45215 was denied as the proposal violates the provisions of Section 1153.04(a)(1) of the City of Wyoming Codified Ordinances which regulates front yard setback requirements. City of Wyoming Board of Zoning Appeals 1752805

GLENDALE Arrests/citations

Nahshon Mosley, 25, 955 Steffens St., Cincinnati, operating a motor vehicle while under suspension; March 8. Jose Cotto, 33, 3029 Featherstone Drive, Cincinnati, warrant from Forest Park Mayor's Court; March 9. Rigoberto Molina, 28, 6804 Fairpark Ave., Cincinnati, operating a motor vehicle without a valid license; March 9. Calvin Talley, 27, 5643 Viewpoint Drive, Cincinnati, traffic warrant from the Hamilton County Municipal Court; March 10. Ousmane Ly, 30, 5719 Singlebriar Court, Norcross, traffic warrant

from the Hamilton County Municipal Court; March 10. Willie Lindsey, 42, 3220 Colerain Ave., Cincinnati, operating a motor vehicle while under suspension; March 10. Rigoberto Gomez, 27, 3123 Oberlin Court, Cincinnati, operating a motor vehicle without a valid license; March 10.

Incidents/investigations None reported.

SHARONVILLE Arrests/citations Adam Schlachta, 18, 535 Clo-

verdale, drug abuse at 11080 Chester Road, Feb. 23. Devin Burton, 21, 8843 Genada, drug abuse at 11689 Chester Road, March 1. Lajoy Egland, 22, 10352 Ramona Ave, drug possession at Red Roof Inn, March 1. Tas McCall, 22, 9910 Oxford Court, operating vehicle intoxicated at Crowne Point and East Sharon, March 2. Darnel Payton, 27, 1562 Section Road, possession at Travelodge, Feb. 28. Ethan Ballard, 22, 6771 Stone Valley Court, possession of drug paraphernalia, Feb. 26.

Burglary Residence entered items valued at $5,969 removed at 3782 Creekview Drive, Feb. 21. Criminal trespassing Reported at 399 Cambridge Drive, March 1. Forgery Reported at 19 Triangle, Feb. 28. Menacing Victim threatened at 11850 Conrey Road, Feb. 27. Passing bad checks, theft Reported at 1629 E. Kemper, Feb. 7. Theft Debit card removed at 9 Yorktown, Feb. 28.

Incidents/investigations

DEATHS Phyllis Ducate Phyllis (nee Baumann) Ducate, 87, of Sharonville died March 2. Survived by children Merida (Richard) D’Augustine and Lauren (Vincent) LeFante; grandchildren Jason LeFante and Laine and Grant D’Augustine; and great-grandchild, Dominick. Services were March 16 at Mihovk-Rosenacker Funeral Home, Evendale. Memorials to: Hospice of Cincinnati, P.O. Box 633597, Cincinnati, OH 45263.

Charles F. Schneider Charles F. Schneider, 93, died March 10. He was a US Army veteran. Survived by children Charles

CITY OF SHARON VILLE ORDINANCE 2013-15 AMENDING 2013 APPROPRIATIONS FOR THE VARIOUS FUNDS Vicki Hoppe, President of Council. Passed: March 12, 2013. Attest: Martha Cross Funk, Clerk of Council. Approved: Mayor Kevin Hard man. Please be advised that the complete text of this legislation may be viewed or purchased during regular business hours at the Sharonville Municipal Building, 10900 Reading Rd., Sharonville, Ohio 45241. 3084

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Kathleen M. Strotman Kathleen M. (nee Reardon) Strotman, 71, died March 7. Survived by husband, Don Strotman; children Mike (Debbie), Tom (Julie), Maureen (Jeff), Denny (Jen) Strotman and Mary (Rich) Diemar; 27 grandchildren; and siblings Maurice Reardon and Mary Reardon. Services were March 11 at St. Vivian Church, Finneytown. Memorials to; Cincinnati Right to Life, 1802 W. Galbraith Road, Cincinnati, OH 45239.

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(Peggy) Schneider Jr., William (Dianne), Joseph (Patsy), Richard (Teresa), Thomas (Jenalyn) Schneider and Mary Ann (Dino) DiStasi; 14 grandchildren; and 11 great-grandchildren. Preceded in death by wife, Anna Dreyer Schneider; and siblings Anna Schneider, Sr. Mary (Helen) Vigil OFM, Sr. Rose (Betty) Teresa FM, Rita Amschler, Gloria Almond and Cletus Schneider. Services were Marcy 16 at St. Martin of Tours Church, Cheviot. Memorials to; West Park Resident Activity Fund, 2950 West Park Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45238; or Hospice of Cincinnati, 4310 Cooper Road, Cincinnati, OH 45242.

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