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TRI-COUNTY PRESS

Your Community Press newspaper serving Evendale, Glendale, Sharonville, Springdale, Wyoming

CELEBRATING

120 YEARS

3DAYSales Event •2/17 •2/18 •2/19

See page 3A for details!

$1.00

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2017

BECAUSE COMMUNITY MATTERS

City extends medical pot ban Kelly McBride kmcbride@communitypress.com

THE COMMUNITY PRESS/JENNIE KEY

Springfield Township assistant administrator Chris Gilbert walks residents of the Wyoming Point neighborhood through the assessment process at a neighborhood meeting.

Springfield Twp. residents to pay for own street repairs Jennie Key jkey@communitypress.com

SPRINGFIELD TWP. – Your road is fixed. Here’s the bill. Residents of some township neighborhoods have clamored for road repairs, and township officials are willing to make them. But township officials say from now on, residents will have to help share the financial load of infrastructure repairs in their community.

The township’s last road levy passed in 1997, which generated $483,893 last year. After four failed road levy requests from 2006 to 2008, officials decided they needed to find a different solution to the funding problem for road repairs. The township adopted a five-year infrastructure plan last year, which includes: » continuing township funding of its sidewalk program, » pursuing state grant money to re-

place streets in failed condition, » and continuing to use existing road funds, general funds and county grants to continue repairing township streets. The plan also requires a change in priorities. The township wants to make intermediate repairs on streets in good and fair condition to keep them from sliding into poor condition. And to address as many streets as possible as quickly as

SHARONVILLE – Sharonville has extended its moratorium on the establishment of medical marijuana dispensaries, to allow officials to continue to study the issue and determine how the city will regulate any fuLukas ture retailers. City Council voted to continue the moratorium for 180 days following a previous six-month ban. That moratorium had been established in advance of House Bill 523 taking effect on Sept. 8. Safety Service Director Jim Lukas said Sharonville’s Planning Commission and City Council will decide whether to prohibit permits for the cultivation, processing or sale of marijuana. This discretion is allowed under Ohio law. “The decision could also be made to allow certain aspects with amendments to our zoning code,” Lukas said. “The state is not finished with establishing their guidelines yet and there are those who believe that the provision which allows cities to prohibit these uses may be challenged in court. We will continue to monitor the above and discuss it further with our Plan-

See STREET, Page 2A

See POT, Page 2A

West Fork Park getting makeover in 2017 Jennie Key jkey@communitypress.com

Green Township trustees set their sights on West Fork Park for improvements in 2017. The park is home to the Holiday Playland, a large, wooden play structure built by community volunteers and Kiwanis support during a weeklong event in September 1999. Township Administrator Frank Birkenhauer says the playground is becoming hard to maintain. “Some of the bolts are stripped and they just spin when you try to tighten them,”

he said. “And the upkeep is becoming expensive.” What the township has in mind for the Monfort Heights park is a complete reboot: Demolish the existing playground, regrade the site and install a more accessible, safer playground at the park. Birkenhauer says the rebuild will cost the township more than $500,000. “But we will get a quality playground that is more useable than what’s there now,” he said. Safety features for playgrounds have improved considerably since the treated wood

structure was built. The new playground will feature a safer ground cover than the mulch currently used. And the equipment is more usable for youngsters with disabilities. “It’s going to be very nice,” Birkenhauer said. Green Township Trustee Triffon Callos says that as homes in the neighborhood across the street are sold to families with younger children, the playground will be a highdemand facility. And the recent construction of sidewalks con-

BEST APP IN THE JUNGLE

See FORK, Page 2A

JENNIE KEY/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

The wooden Holiday Playground at West Fork Park is set for a makeover this year. Officials plan to replace the old wooden structures, likely at the end of the summer.

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NEWS

2A • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • FEBRUARY 15, 2017

Pot Continued from Page 1A

ning Commission and City Council for their thoughts in the near future.” HB 523 was signed June 8, with an effective date of Sept. 6, though details about how medical marijuana would be licensed, cultivated and dispensed are still being worked out. It established a Medical Marijuana Control Commission, which will administer the Medical Marijuana Control Program.

Fork Continued from Page 1A

necting the school, library

The program will allow patients, with a physician’s recommendation, to use medical marijuana for a qualifying medical condition. The patient, any caregivers and the physician must be registered through the program. Personal use of medical marijuana is not allowed, and it can’t be smoked or used in any combustible way. It will be available through oils, tinctures, plant materials, edibles and patches. The program also specifies that it can’t be made or sold in a way that’s attractive to children.

The zoning of dispensaries has been left up to local municipalities, but none can be located within 1,000 feet of a school, church, public library, public park or public playground. Those regulations also apply to cultivators, processors and laboratories. While marijuana is classified as a Schedule 1 controlled substance, medical marijuana has been classified as a Schedule 2. This means it has no currently acceptable medical use or safety process, and has a high risk of abuse.

and playground make West Fork Park a walkable destination in Monfort Heights. Callos said the township will wait until August

to begin work, to keep the park available for youngsters during the summer play season. Other park improvements on the books for 2017 in Green Township include new restrooms at Veterans Park and a pickle ball court at Bicentennial Park. Birkenhauer said the bathroom project will cost about $200,000 and the new pickle ball courts will cost about $25,000. “Pickle ball is apparently really popular,” he said. “And we have a perfect place for courts at Bicentennial Park.”

NORTHWEST PRESS TRI-COUNTY

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News

Find news andEditor information from your community on the Web Richard Maloney ................248-7134 or 853-6265, Cincinnati.com/communities rmaloney@communitypress.com Jennie Key Community Editor ..........853-6272, jkey@communitypress.com News Laughman Sports Editor ......768-8512, mlaughman@communitypress.com Melanie Dick Maloney EditorReporter ......................248-7134, rmaloney@communitypress.com Adam Baum Sports ...........513-364-4497, abaum@communitypress.com Kelly McBride Reporter ................... 544-2764, kmcbride@communitypress.com Twitter: @adamjbaum Sheila Vilvens Reporter ...................248-7139, svilvens@communitypress.com Advertising Melanie Laughman Sports Editor .......768-8512, mlaughman@communitypress.com To place an ad...........................513-768-8404, Adam Baum Sports Reporter .............513-364-4497, abaum@communitypress.com EnquirerMediaAdvertising@enquirer.com Twitter: @adamjbaum

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Content submitted may be distributed by us in print, digital or other forms Content submitted may be distributed by us in print, digital or other forms To place an ad in Community Classified, call 242-4000. To place an ad in Community Classified, call 242-4000.

Continued from Page 1A

possible, the township is now using assessments for homeowners on the streets needing repair to pay for the work. The township keeps tabs on the condition of the streets it is responsible to maintain. Townships are not responsible for state routes such as Winton Road, or county roads, such as Galbraith Road or Daly Road. “If it has lane markings, it’s probably not a township street,” said Chris Gilbert, assistant administrator for Springfield Township. The pavement inventory indicates the township has 120 streets in poor condition and it would cost $34.29 million to rebuild all of them. There are 160 in fair condition, with a $4.45 million price tag for restoration. That difference in cost is why officials say it is important to keep streets from deteriorating into poor condition. It costs so much more to restore them at that level. The township has 97 streets classified as good and 23 ranked as new.

How will this work?

Delivery Advertising For customer To place an adservice...................853-6277 ............................513-768-8404, Sharon Schachleiter EnquirerMediaAdvertising@enquirer.com Circulation Manager ..................853-6279, sschachleiter@communitypress.com Delivery Mary Jo Schablein ForDistrict customer service ....................576-8240 Manager.......................853-6278 Stephen Barraco Mary Jo Puglielli Circulation Manager ....................248-7110, sbarraco@communitypress.com District Manager.......................853-6276 Lynn Hessler District Manager ...........248-7115, lyhessler@communitypress.com

Street

Index Calendar .................6B Classifieds ................C Food ....................10A Police .................... 8B Schools ..................6A Sports ....................1B Viewpoints ............12A

Property assessments will be equal to 50 percent of total project cost. Gilbert said the township wants to keep the cost equal to a 1.5-mill or 2mill levy. Here’s what happens. Springfield Township officials identify homeowners with access to streets in a particular neighborhood that need work and invite them to a meeting. At that meeting, officials explain the financial background, lay out the project, recommend a level of repair and share how much the

JENNIE KEY/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Springfield Township has 92 miles of road to maintain, and the condition of streets ranges from new to poor.

work will cost and what the assessment would be for each homeowner. It’s an annual cost, spread out over time on the homeowner’s property tax bill. Gould said the length of the assessment is tied to the useful life of the improvement. If the improvement will only last four years then it will be a four-year assessment. Currently, the township has one project with a four-year assessment, two with eight-year assesments, and the remaining are 10 years because that is the maximum allowed by state law. Once the process and project are explained, the residents are charged with collecting signatures on a petition that agrees to shoulder the assessment. Ohio law says an assessment requires 51 percent of titled property owners must sign an agreement before the assessment can be levied for this kind of work. If the neighborhood can’t collect signatures from more than half of the homeowners, the township will move on to another community. There was some dissent about the proposal at a recent meeting with Wyoming Point Place residents, but the major-

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Response to new assessments has been positive Kim Flamm, projects, events and communications coordinator for the township, said response to the new assessments has been positive. The township plans six neighborhood projects with assessments as part of the funding and signatures are in place for five of the six. The Millbrook subdivision is still collecting signatures. Public Works Director Mike Gould said with 236 homeowners, it is taking longer to collect the necessary signatures in that neighborhood, but he was confident that project will be approved by more than half of the homeowners. “That’s our biggest assessment project to date,” he said. “But residents have accepted this. It puts control back in the hands of the residents and it’s going to help us address our streets before they get to failing condition. That saves money. It costs seven times as much to address a failing street as it does to preserve pavement in fair condition. “We have a five-year infrastructure plan. That’s how we are setting our priorities from now on,” he said. “Going forward, all of our street projects will have an assessment component.”

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ity signed the petitions for the assessment to go through. Opponents felt they already pay taxes and said the township should pass a levy to pay for street repairs. Many felt like Ken Krebs, who lives in the neighborhood. He said he thinks the assessment program is a good way to get township streets into good condition. “I think it’s a good way to make sure our street gets fixed,” he said. “I really have no problem with it.”

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NEWS

FEBRUARY 15, 2017 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • 3A

Keeping Your Resolutions with Remke Markets Pat Iasillo Matthew 17:20 : For truly, I say to you, if you have faith like a grain of mustard seed, you will say to this mountain, ‘Move from here to there,’ and it will move, and nothing will be impossible for you. If you ever belonged to a gym, you know at the beginning of January, the gym so full you can hardly find room to sweat. You also know then that the crowd thins out considerably by the end of January. It seems there is a mysterious force of nature on January 1st that compels people to run on treadmills, lift weights and jazzercise to reshape themselves. January 1st is followed by a magical date later in January when the populace is reminded they have better

things to do than pull muscles. Here are a few quotes I found about New Year’s resolutions: Jay Leno said, “Now there are more overweight people than average weight people so overweight people are now average which means, you have met your New Year’s resolution!” “My resolution is to stop hanging out with people who ask me about my New Year’s resolutions.” “This year I resolve to make better bad decisions.” “My New Year’s resolution is to stop procrastinating. I am not starting until next week though.” Why do we make resolu-

CELEBRATING

tions? More importantly, why do we make resolutions we do not keep? We must be missing something. It seems all we really need to do is to understand the process and we can achieve anything. I went on a search for wisdom and searched Amazon to see if there is any wisdom out there we are missing. I did a search using “self-help books.” There were 783,466 results! Are there really 783,466 people out there who have more knowledge than we have and are so smart they are able to get a book published so the ignorant masses can become better people? I think not. I think most of the authors are people who failed to keep most of their resolutions except one; write a book. It is my humble opinion we make the achievement of a goal far too complicated. It basically boils down to two things; visualization and do-

ing. You don’t need to buy a book. This is free information! Visualize what you want. By visualize, I don’t mean seeing it one time and then moving to get it done. I mean to think about it every day. In fact, obsess about it. You should wake up thinking about it and eventually the thought will permeate every part of your day. Eventually, you will do. Make sure the steps are small. Walk around the block today, walk around two blocks tomorrow. Stop smoking for a few hours today, add another hour on every day. Keep visualizing! What does this have to do with Remke Markets? If eating and being healthier is your goal, we are your solution. Putting more fruits and vegetables in your diet will go a long way to change how you look and feel. A number of years ago, Remke Markets was voted the best fresh produce in the city. We didn’t get

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that title by accident. We have buyers and produce managers who know their business and we will put their skills up against anyone. If natural and organic foods are your forte, we have a complete line in almost every category in our store. If you need help, just ask. We take pride in being your neighborhood grocery with knowledgeable and friendly associates. We would be glad to help.

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NEWS

4A • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • FEBRUARY 15, 2017

AROUND YOUR COMMUNITIES COLERAIN TOWNSHIP

giving out and installing free car seats to area families in need. Two bays of Station 25 on Springdale Road were able to handle six child car seat installations at a time. A total of 45 children’s car seats were installed, along with 12 additional car seat inspections to assist 53 families in the Greater Cincinnati area. Fire officials said Toyota and Cincinnati Children’s Hospital helped to make the event possible.

Cleanup planned A group of volunteers organized by Colerain Township resident Lora Dakin is planning its first neighborhood cleanup from 1 to 4 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 18, weather permitting. Rain date is Saturday, Feb. 25. Search for “Volunteer Clean Up Group East Side Colerain Twsp.” under groups on Facebook and ask to join for information on the location of the group’s first cleanup event.

Coffee with the chiefs

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Colerain firefighters spent the morning Feb. 3

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These main streets are cleared first by using all three trucks in unison to clear streets quickly: Hamilton Avenue, Clovernook Avenue, Stevens Avenue, Compton Road. Bernard Avenue, Forest Avenue, Adams Road, Kinney Avenue, Park Avenue, Harrison Avenue, Seward Avenue and Perry Street. City crews will apply salt and/or liquid calcium chloride on the main streets, intersections, school zones, streets with hills and curves. During snow events, residents are asked to use off-street parking which enables the city snow plow crews to clear the streets more efficiently.

FOREST PARK

Business of the month The Economic Development Commission has selected Forest Park Internal Medicine and Pediatrics, a division of Mercy Health, as the January 2017 Business of the Month in Forest Park. The commission cited Mercy’s investment to renovate a vacant building at 11550 Winton Road. Several physicians have already moved into the 7,400-square-foot building, keeping the growing medical practice in Forest Park.

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rain Township to ask questions and discuss concerns every month at a local business. Other representatives from the township available to answer your questions. This month’s coffee will be from 9 to 11 a.m. Friday, Feb. 17, at Tag’s Cafe, 5761 Springdale Road.

The city of Forest Park and the Forest Park Parks and Recreation Commission present the 25th annual Gospelfest beginning at 6 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 25, at Dayspring Church, 1060 Smiley Road. This year’s theme is “One Community, One Family.” For more information call 595-5252

GREEN TOWNSHIP

Checks are in the mail Green Township offi-

NORTHWEST SCHOOLS PROVIDED

Colerain Firefighter Doug Rolf prepares a child car seat for installation.

cials reminded residents involved in the Williams vs. Duke Energy class action lawsuit to keep an eye out in the mail for a settlement check. Officials said the checks are arriving in residents mailboxes in a tearoff mailer with smaller than normal checks attached. “These can easily be discarded as junk mail,” the warning said.

two snow emergencies were called. During regular work hours, the public works department and police department determine when streets become unsafe and require attention. After regular work hours, the police department calls in snow plows when conditions become unsafe. The city is divided into three sections with a snow plow in each section. Priority is given to the main streets, intersections, school zones, streets with hills and curves. The main streets are cleared first. The secondary streets and subdivisions are given equal attention after the main streets and school zones are cleared.

MOUNT HEALTHY

Snow policies A snow emergency may be called in the city of Mount Healthy when four to six inches of snow or more inches is forecast. In the past three years, officials said only

Intradistrict transfers The transfer of students out of their attendance areas is permissible under intradistrict open enrollment policy and administrative procedures in the Northwest Local School District. An application form for the 2017-2018 school year is available at the Houston Educational Service Center, 3310 Compton Road, beginning April 10 and must be received by 4 p.m. April 28. Applications are to be completed by the custodial parent/ guardian. Proper identification is required. Applications will not be accepted or processed after this deadline. Notification letters will be mailed by June 16.

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NEWS

FEBRUARY 15, 2017 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • 5A

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6A • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • FEBRUARY 15, 2017

SCHOOLS

TRI-COUNTY PRESS

Editor: Richard Maloney, rmaloney@communitypress.com, 248-7134

ACHIEVEMENTS | NEWS | ACTIVITIES | HONORS

CommunityPress.com

SCHOOLS NOTEBOOK Colerain Middle School » » Six members of the Colerain Middle School Orchestra were selected and performed with the OMEA DISTRICT 14 Junior High Honors Orchestra. This is a prestigious event for the top middle school orchestra members in the greater Cincinnati area. They rehearsed and performed last month at Winton Woods High School with Guest conductor Patrick Barrett. The pieces they played were: Romeo and Juliet Overture, One Hand One Heart, Jupiter from the Planets, and Ancient Aires and Dances.Violinists are Analu Gehner, Jon Woytseck, Morgan Akers, Skylar Gottschall, and cellists are Mawuli Nevis and Jacob Beavers » Livi Keenan, Connor McClelland, Christopher Ebner, Hannan Gilbert, and Justin Rettig were selected to THE Ohio State University Middle School Honor Band.

DePaul Cristo Rey High School » Calling the Cristo Rey model, “the coolest thing,” Ohio Gov. John Kasich honored DePaul Cristo Rey High School and the two other Ohio Cristo Rey schools with the Governor’s School Innovation Award. DePaul Cristo Rey was recognized, along with Cristo Rey Columbus and Saint Martin de Porres (Cristo Rey Cleveland), in a ceremony at the Ohio Statehouse. There were seven schools and districts statewide recognized by the governor; DePaul Cristo Rey was the only Cincin-

THANKS TO KRISTA RAMSEY

PROVIDED

DePaul Cristo Rey President Sister Jeanne Bessette, Mount Healthy resident Joseph Whittle ’17, and Principal Andrew Farfsing after the Governors School Innovation Award ceremony.

nati-area school honored. In recognizing the Cristo Rey schools, Kasich called the urban education model of college-prep academics and Corporate Work Study, “the coolest thing.” He said that all the schools recognized “take risks” and “prepare students for the knowledge economy.” He said that he hopes these schools inspire “education envy” across the state. At the awards ceremony, a student from each Ohio Cristo Rey school helped explain the Cristo Rey model and answer questions from the governor. DPCR senior Joseph Whittle of Mount Healthy’17 said, “Our school is in its sixth year of operation and all three of our first graduating classes, including mine, have achieved 100 percent college acceptance. I have applied and been accepted to 15 universities; I will be the first in my family to go to college, in addition I will graduate from high school with four years of corporate work experience. This year

Finneytown Secondary Campus November Students of the Month are: Asani Denson-Peeples, ninth grade; Storm Hyden, seventh grade; Joe Ward, 12th grade; Allie Bingham, 10th grade and Megan Haarlammert, eighth grade. Missing from the photo is Centenual Gordon, 11th grade.

I work at Wellington Orthopedic and Sports Medicine – Mercy, getting exposure and experience for my future career as a pediatric surgical oncologist.”

Finneytown schools » There are new three ‘Rs’ in the Finneytown Local School District: reading, writing and research. At Brent Elementary, the district’s primary students start doing research while they learn to read. First-grader Justice Androne speeds into Brent Elementary School’s computer lab, plops down at a terminal, slips on a headset and sets to work researching cougars. Within minutes, Justice learns that cougars can jump 15 feet, arrive in litters of one to six, and live up to 20 years. Using video and audio clips, he hears a cougar’s roar and watches one nimbly navigate mountain cliffs. When he’s finished with his research, he learns how to cite his sources and print out his first report.

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Pretty remarkable since, at age six, Justice is still learning to read. The software behind this is PebbleGo, a kid-friendly, searchable data base designed for students in kindergarten through Grade 3. It uses pictures and graphics to steer kids through articles, video and audio clips, games and short projects. The text is simple and includes a read-aloud feature so children can begin connecting letters and words to sounds. New vocabulary words are color-coded; students click to learn what habitat or nocturnal means. They learn why and how to cite their information sources. “Especially today – when information is thrown at them 24/7 – young students need to learn how to navigate that information and find out what they really need,” says Brent media specialist Lauren Martin, who brought the program to the school using a PTA grant. “I let the students explore the site at first and try out the different

features. Later on we do more targeted research, connected to writing they’re doing in class. They can become researchers from kindergarten.” » The Finneytown Secondary Campus continued a tradition that has been in place for more than 25 years, as it hosted its annual Senior Citizens Brunch and Holiday Concert in December for 40 local residents. National Honor Society members served brunch and enjoyed conversation with the guests, and the high school orchestra and chorale performed holiday songs. The brunch dates back to 1990. It was started by home economics teacher Ramona Leist, whose students prepared and served the meal as a way to give back to the community. Leist, who retired in 1997, has attended every brunch except one. Now Barb Reichle, secretary to the Secondary principal, coordinates the event. » For the second year in a row, Whitaker Elementary School has been awarded a Target Field Trip Grant. The $700 award will send fourth-graders to Caldwell Nature Center for two programs. Fossils, Soils and Cincinnati Geology will include study of the rock formation, soil types and other forces that have shaped Cincinnati, as well as a creek hike to find fossils. Ecology: What is the Connection will introduce students to food chains and food webs and explore how organisms survive in their ecosystem. Whitaker Elementary has reSee SCHOOLS, Page 7A

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FEBRUARY 15, 2017 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • 7A

SCHOOLS NOTEBOOK Continued from Page 6A

cently received a number of grants and donations, including a ServeOhio grant to renovate the school courtyard and awards to start a girls’ mentoring program and a Mindful Music Moments program. » Finneytown High School junior Alexander Eberhardt has received one of the state’s top honors for high school musicians. Alexander has been named to the Ohio Music Education Association’s 2017 All-State Band. To compete for AllState Band selection, students must prepare multiple recordings of solo pieces, scales and warmups and submit them to be judged. Between two and 11 students across the state are accepted for each instrument. For trombone, Alexander’s instrument, only one applicant in 10 was chosen. In February, Alexander and the All-State Band will head to Cleveland where they will perform at the OMEA professional conference. Andrew has previously been a member of the Cincinnati Symphony Youth Orchestra and the Cincinnati Youth Jazz Orchestra. » Whitaker Elementary School recognized 21 area military veterans and raised more than $1,100 for Honor Flights at its fourth annual Celebrating Our Veterans. The conflicts the veterans served in spanned from the Korean War to the recent conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq. For the veterans, the

day brought the chance to be recognized, to share the time and site of their service, and to receive thanks and handshakes as they wove through halls lined with applauding Whitaker students. For the students, it was a chance to meet real heroes and to understand what sacrifices people in their community have made for their country. Funds raised from the three previous cookouts have sent 15 veterans to Washington D.C. to visit their military monuments. The event is organized by teachers Janelle Sowders and Doug Dirr and supported by Whitaker staff members and families. - By Krista Ramsey

Northwest schools “It has definitely been a whirlwind, but an amazing one,” Carlos Boyd, Jr. said, reflecting back on a month filled with milestones. His 18th birthday alone would be cause for celebration, but this senior at Butler Tech’s Northwest Career Center in Colerain Township added two accomplishments to his resume that are downright “presidential.” The first came in late November when he was e lected president of state officer team for Ohio Business Professionals of America (BPA), an organization for students pursuing careers in business, information technology and related fields. The second honor came few short weeks later, when the Ohio Association for Career and Tech-

THANKS TO PAULETTA CROWLEY

From left are Peter Clark, instructor, and Carlos Boyd Jr., with Ohio Department of Education Superintendent Paolo DeMaria

nical Education named Boyd as one its five semifinalists for the United States Presidential Scholars Program. Boyd was formally recognized during a ceremony in Columbus on Jan. 18. The program, established in 1964 and administered by the U.S. Department of Education, is described as “one of the nation’s highest honors for high school students” in the U.S. “A lot of careers intrigued me like lawyer, doctor, and pharmacist, but when I came (to Butler Tech) and heard about a career path in business, I knew that was for me,” Boyd said. “I am the business-type for sure, because I love the business environment. In it, I feel professional, I look professional, and that makes me feel good about myself and makes me feel confident in who I am and what I’m doing.” In the meantime, his college acceptance letters have started rolling in. At this point, he’s heard from approximately 15 colSee SCHOOLS, Page 8A

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8A • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • FEBRUARY 15, 2017

SCHOOLS NOTEBOOK Continued from Page 7A

leges. He is still sorting through scholarships and what makes the most sense as he plans to major in business and minor in finance.

Summit Country Day » Two mock trial teams from The Summit Country Day School won their trials at the district level and placed high enough to move on to the regional competition. Both of The Summit’s varsity teams, Blue and Silver, were two of 48 teams from 20 schools to compete in the Hamilton

County District of the statewide mock trial competition. Summit Blue placed sixth overall, and several members of each team won individual awards. Senior Matt LaMacchia of Symmes Township and sophomore Aaron Bialon of Hamilton Township in Warren County won Outstanding Attorney awards, while Outstanding Witness awards went to seniors Liam Lindy of Anderson Township, Carter Fee of Anderson Township and Dee Pierre of College Hill. Students on the Blue team are: Evan Baker of Union Township in Clermont County, Pierce Kreider of East Walnut

THANKS TO LEAH FIGHTMASTER

The Summit Country Day School Blue mock trial team placed sixth overall at the Hamilton County District competition and advanced to the regional level. The Summit's other varsity team, Silver, also advanced to regionals. From left: Evan Baker, Hope Thomson, Liam Lindy, Ruku Pal, Carter Fee, Cat Alway, Matt LaMacchia and Pierce Kreider.

Hills, Matt LaMacchia, Ruku Pal of West Chester Township, Hope Thomson of Pleasant Ridge, Liam Lindy, Carter Fee and Cat Alway of Hyde Park. Students on the Silver

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milch of Union Township in Clermont County and Dee Pierre. To advance to regionals, a team must win both rounds of the district competition. The teams argued the 2017 mock trial case of Pat Justice v. CAT

News et al., a case about defamation of a public official by a news station in which Gov. Pat Justice argues that he lost his reelection following a false news story. The Summit’s teams have been preparing since September to argue both sides of Gov. Justice’s claims as to whether the news station showed reckless disregard for the truth. The Summit’s mock trial teams are coached by local attorneys Rebecca White, Julie Hein, Gabe Kurcab and 2007 alumna Meaghan Fitzgerald. Social studies teacher Kelly Cronin is the moderator. The Summit has advanced at least one team to the regional level 11 times out of the last 12 years.

Seventh-grade - Karina Ahangkari, Alyona Amend, Ella Beverly, Calyn Bransford, Cydni Brooks, Elizabeth Cain, RobertThomas Denike, Nathan Deuitch, Gabriella Dibble, Nathaniel Heath, Abigail Jeffries, Benjamin Jeffries, Audrey Kimnach, Elizabeth Koehne, Prabina Magar, Riley Miller, Hannah Moore, Kierra Morris, Kay Nicht, Michael Nicht, Natalie Oudomsouk, Sophia Palmer, Katherine Petersen, Robert Reeb, Neville Reed, Maksim Revelle, Aidan Rice, Drew Ruffner, Erin Ruth, Jessica Sanders, Emily Schmidtgesling, Laxmi Tamang, Anna Tenhundfeld, Emmaline Tudor, Ophelia

Woosley. Eighth-grade - Olivia Angert, Alyssa Becksfort, Jillian Becksfort, Anja Bell, Ryan Canterbury, Zoe Casselman, Hope Cleghorn, Zion Denson, Falilou Dionna, Andrew Finch, Daylon Fischer, Joshua Gauche, Morgen Grover, Jonathan Grubbs, Megan Haarlammert, Allise Helmes, Brennan Jones, Jenna Koopman, Joy Krabis, Alexander Laird, Amelia McMahan, Daniel Perry, Olivia Perry, Maria Seith, Owen Sena, Cameron Spriggs, Margaret Traubert, Shima Upreti, Leonardo Van Heeswijk, William Webb, Alexander Zestermann. Freshmen - Talia Ahlers, Julia Deuitch, Renisicia Essex, Kelsey Kershner, Maveira Kutolbena, Alexandra Lee, Joan Luken, Jacob Martin, Jesus Martin, Sumanta Rai, Emily Schwegman, Paige Sedgwick, Liberty Wilson, Zachary Wuorinen. Sophomores - Jaden Barber, Cooper Burton, Chloe Caton, Le’Nizia Chapell, Parlad Chhetri,

Caitlyn Hammond, Jacob Huff, Marlon Johnson, Hunter JulifsGiffin, Luke Kellett, Camille Kershner, Anna Matzko, Colin McLaren, Alexis Orue, Subash Tamang. Juniors - Julia Brueggemeyer, Matthew Dauterman, Eleonora De Marchi, Solomon Efetevbia, Hunter Figgs, Ballard Foster, Shelby Hatton, Lilyana Hursh, Zachary Kreamelmeyer, Madison Martens, Leslie Noble, Carissa Ruffin, Jack Ryan, Natasha Silva, Joel Steimle, Neru Tamang, Allison Towner, Calvin Viola. Seniors - Annalise Barber, Zephaniah Brookins-Yisrael, Kathryn Deitsch, Lily Earlywine, Martha Gakunju, Heather Gast, Joseph Gerbus, Denver Humphries, Sanchez Manuel, Faty Ndiaye, Tyler Rasp, MacRichard Risma, Pratima Sapkota, Adam Schwegman, Ashleigh Smith, Savannah Spangler, Jacob Stump, Denise Tepe, Sila Upreti, Joseph Ward, Kirstin Wobig, Alissa Wuorinen.


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10A • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • FEBRUARY 15, 2017

Little helpers create muffin recipe Blueberry banana muffins

I could blame a visit from the church ladies for the reason I left the butter out of a muffin recipe I’m sharing today. But I won’t, because even if they didn’t stop to visit I might have forgotten the butter anyway. That sometimes happens when I’m baking with the little ones. (And truth be told, it happens once in a while even when I’m by myself!). My granddaughters, Emerson, 4 years old and Ellery, 2, wanted to make banana muffins. That was fine with me since the bananas were too Rita ripe to eat so they were perfect for Heikenfeld making muffins. “Can we put some blueberries in RITA’S KITCHEN too?” Emerson asked. My reply was “Sure, why not.” So the banana muffins turned into blueberry banana muffins and even without the butter, they were yummy, not as tender as usual, but A-OK!

Muffins are an excellent item to make with kids, since the batter doesn’t require much mixing, good for their short attention span. For step-by-step photos, check out my abouteating.com site. 1-1/2 cups flour 1 teaspoon baking powder 1 teaspoon baking soda 1/2 teaspoon salt Handful or so blueberries (opt) 2-3 very ripe bananas, mashed smooth 3/4 cup sugar 1 egg 1/3 cup butter, melted

Preheat oven to 350. Spray muffin pans. Whisk flour, baking powder, soda and salt together. and if adding blueberries, stir them in gently. In a separate bowl, combine bananas, sugar, egg and melted butter together. Pour flour mixture on top and mix just until dry ingredients are incorporated. Mixture will still be a bit lumpy. Don’t over mix since that may create tunnels in the baked muffin, and they will be less tender. Scoop into pans about 2/3 full. Bake 25 minutes or so until top springs back when lightly tapped.

Readers want to know When is a shoulder a butt? In spite of what the name implies, pork butt comes from the front leg of the pig. It got its name from the wooden barrels, called butts, that it was once packed in. Not only that, the term originated in Boston and that’s why you sometimes hear pork butt called Boston butt. The butt is cut from the upper half of the shoulder on top of the leg, the bottom half of the shoulder is called a picnic roast closer to the foot. Fresh pork butt is the same as fresh pork shoulder. That’s what I use in goetta. What is a French vegetable peeler?” I love this gadget. It’s a “y” shaped peeler and it makes it easy to get very thin, wide slices from zucchini, carrots, etc...

Can you help? Spaghetti, acorn squash and stuffed eggplant recipes needed. Patricia Tierney, a Northwest reader, is looking for ways to cook these nutritious veggies. Any ideas you have would be greatly appreciated for this adventurous cook.

Reduced calories in rice: clarification I wanted to clarify the information included in my column about reducing the amount of calories in rice by adding coconut oil. Here’s what Dr. Oz has to say about cooking 1 cup rice, which contains about 200 calories, and adding coconut oil:

Tip from Rita’s kitchen THANKS TO RITA HEIKENFELD

Emerson Heikenfeld shows off the banana blueberry muffins she helped create.

Add teaspoon of coconut oil to rice Coconut oil contains healthy fats that can change the composition of the starch in rice to reduce calories. Rice is made up of both digestible and resistant starches, and coconut oil increases the resistant starch levels of rice – meaning that fewer calories will be digested. Simply add the coconut oil to the boiling water and then add in the rice. Cool and reheat the rice The process of heating up already-cooled rice makes its resistant starch increase even more to cut out at least 100 calories from your serving. After you precook your rice, let it cool in your refrigerator for about 12 hours. Then reheat it before you serve it. Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educator, Jungle Jim’s Eastgate culinary professional and author. Find her blog online at Abouteating.com. Email her at rita@communitypress.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line.

Always add fresh fruit to dry ingredients to prevent them sinking to the bottom during baking.

Lois Maas’ spinach salad dressing For Mitch, a Milford reader. “I lost the recipe for a spinach salad dressing that had horseradish mustard in it. We really liked it. Can you find it again?” Yes, I can! The recipe originated with Lois Maas, a Cherry Grove reader. Well, this isn’t exactly Lois’ recipe. “My sister gave it to me,” she said. If I remember correctly, Lois makes a spinach salad with hard boiled eggs, bacon and Pepperidge Farm stuffing croutons on top. The recipe here is only slightly adapted. Put everything in blender and blend until well mixed: 2/3 cup canola oil Up to 2/3 cup sugar 1/3 cup wine vinegar or more to taste 3 tablespoons horseradish mustard (Plochman’s is always good) 1 teaspoon salt 1 medium onion

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FEBRUARY 15, 2017 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • 11A

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TRI-COUNTY

EDITORIALS | LETTERS | COLUMNS | CH@TROOM

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Thoughts on bread “Some people come into our lives and quickly go. Some stay for a while, leave footprints on our hearts, and we are never, ever the same.” Flavia Weedn Erna and her husband, Alfred, had been our “old country,” German neighbors for years. I loved hearing both their German accent and their willingness to share German traditions/culture with us. Erna’s passion is cooking, as she is considered a gourmet chef, cooking for numerous famous people including a past United States president, George H.W. Bush. A picture of them standing together after dinner is framed on her living room wall. Erna has a heart of gold and always is cooking for neighbors. Her mom in her eighties lived close by; her specialty was baking oven homemade bread. Oma, which is a Dutch word for grandma, always stopped by our house with one of her famous loaves each baking day on her way to Erna’s. This was a genuine old country custom of sharing bread/food with neighbors. After Oma died, I was inspired by her to continue the oven stone bread baking and giving loaves to our neighbors. Another bread baking friend shared a wonderful book on baking old crusty artisan bread. It’s been about four years now in the persistent attempt to make that perfect bread dough. Many loaf receivers will tell you some have been better than others, but nevertheless enjoy the total homemade bread baking process and the especially sharing with others. My wife continues to remind me that baking is a science and you need to follow exactly what the recipe says. I’m convinced this is true, but I love to challenge it as I add a little here and there, just to add excitement of the

PRESS

Editor: Richard Maloney, rmaloney@communitypress.com, 248-7134

unknown to the experience. I still find it a little wild to understand the role of yeast in the bread baking process. I often hold up the yeast bag to study these little guys. They look like tiny brown worm-like seeds that seem to move as I add water. Now I know some people reading this might squirm a little on this Wes Adamson description, but if you COMMUNITY PRESS look up yeast it is deGUEST COLUMNIST scribed as: “a one-celled fungus that converts sugar and starch into carbon dioxide bubbles and alcohol.” All this chemistry is happening in one bread pan. Besides of course, the sweet comforting taste of warm buttered bread is the aroma of freshly baked bread filtering thru the house. I read somewhere that in a study, they found that fresh baking homemade bread aroma has the power to make people kinder, putting them into a more positive mood. Wow, the unbelievable power of homemade bread. The beginning article quote speaks to my story as how one person entered my life, influencing me forever. Each one of us has experienced this. But the most important part is not on the receiving end, but the action role of being apart of people lives, improving them forever. Wes Adamson is a resident of Wyoming. His book: “Imagination By Moonlight: Living life boldly and successful,” is available on Amazon. Proceeds from books sold are dedicated to programs for homeless youth.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR What happened to American/family values? The woman who wrote to ask “What happened to American/ family values?” Feb. 1 has a bad case of TDS (Trump Derangement Syndrome). With barely a week in office, the writer confidently predicts and bemoans Trump’s entire four years in office. She reveals her insecurities by espousing a whole list of spurious Progressive Democrat talking points. Newsflash: The “working people of America” elected Trump and are pleased that he is moving forward on the promises made during the campaign. Keeping your promises – how is that for an American value? Robert L. Clippard Colerain Township

Thanks for the humor I always anticipate the “thud” on my front Colerain Township porch - this week’s Northwest Press has arrived. I quickly review the front page then immediately turn to the “Viewpoints” section and hope to find a contribution again from the very prolific Green Township liberal, Ms. Ann Thompson. Why? Simple. As the Press papers do not have a comic section and, since one needs a good laugh now and then, I enjoy reading Ms. Thompson’s convoluted left wing humor. For the past eight years, we conservatives have been asking the same question she presented, “What happened to American/family values?”

President Trump has only been in office three weeks and already the liberals have painted him the demon who has taken away our money and values. What poppycock. If the liberals would start behaving like adults, get out of the street and stop blocking traffic and commerce, throwing hissy fits, stop the useless demonstrations which often result in the destruction of personal property, and finally get over the fact they lost, perhaps we could get on with making this country great again. I suggest you become a subscriber to the nonpartisan Judicial Watch; their reports and findings make for very interesting reading as they unravel many of the Washington improper and often, illegal shenanigans carried out these past eight years by both Democrats and Republicans alike. Keep an open mind, but beware - you may not like what you read. Charles T. Homer Colerain Township

New Oak Hills levy I read in the front page article of the Press for Feb 1 Oak Hills seeking a levy. The treasurer, Steven Bain, is quoted as saying , “We believe the district has been great stewards of the taxpayers’ dollars”. I remembered an article about the Spanish immersion program being started. Bless Mr. Google. In the article, assistant Superintendent Tim Cybulski said when the proSee LETTERS, Page 12A

CH@TROOM Feb. 8 question Do President Trump’s recent orders involving border security and immigration make the country more safe or less safe? Why?

“Anything that controls the flow of possible terrorists is a help. I am totally nonplussed with the comments of noncitizens of the U.S. being ‘denied’ their ‘Constitutional rights.’ Anyone who believes Sharia (a theocratic judicial system) has a place in the United States certainly hasn‘t read the Constitution. “It is sad that we will make errors, that inconvenience some, while protecting the many. For those who die because we don’t let them in, it is a comment on the ‘other’ systems, not ours. Yes, there are horrible regimes throughout the world. We need to fight them any time they threaten our well being. ‘Death to America’ is one of those sayings that seems to pretty clearly express a threat. “Saudi Arabia and Syria, both could house refugees, but refuse to acknowledge the Christians are worthy of protection. The U.N. continues to push the concept that, since all the refugees want to be in Western societies, Western societies have an obligation to provide all the money and comfort, regardless of the stated goals of the terrorists. Israel understands this. Australia understands this. Germany is awakening to their error.” D.B.

“President Trump’s foreign policy decisions seem to be isolating the United States from Europe and even Australia. That doesn’t make me feel better. Also his lack of including the countries of Egypt and Saudi Arabia in his seven country immigration stoppage seemed odd. “However it was pointed out to me that he has business dealings in those two countries so he wouldn’t want to alienate those governments. “That makes me feel less safe because I get the feeling he is not above placing Trump before country and therefore

TRI-COUNTY PRESS

THIS WEEK’S QUESTION Major League Baseball is considering a rules change that would allow teams to issue an intentional walk without throwing a pitch. Is this a good idea? What other rules changes would you like to see baseball make? Every week we ask readers a question they can reply to via email. Send your answers to rmaloney@communitypress.com with Ch@troom in the subject line.

Trump before citizen. “No matter what happens to the regular, run-of-the mill-citizens, I know that President Trump and his family will be fine. To feel safe I will just imagine I am from the new, blustery, tangerine-tinged presidential lineage.” C.S.

“Will Trump’s immigration move make the country more or less safe? The answer is both. Many people feel our borders have been far too porous for far too long and that needs to be fixed. However, there are many true refugee families that need to get out of their countries due to ongoing war and emigrate legally to a safer country such as ours. However, the baddest of the bad, ISIS, the radical Islamist terrorist group, realize that the large migration of refugees (mostly into Europe) is a perfect cover for infiltrating evil-doers into other societies where they can unleash more unspeakable atrocities. Using this cover to do the same in the US can be very useful to their evil-doing plans. “Trump’s plan can help minimize this potential. However, he and his team have given this move zero thought into unintended consequences, which, among other things, has led to an awful lot of civil unrest. Bottom line: we are a little safer, however, radical Islam wins a round in the process.”

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NEWS

12A • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • FEBRUARY 15, 2017

Princeton strike lingers 50 years later While winding down from the end of year holiday celebrations, the phone rang at 9 p.m. Jan. 23, 1972. The call was not a Happy New Year’s wish. Instead the purpose of the Princeton CO administrator’s call was a directive to report to the district’s transportation office the followNoel Taylor ing morning at 6 a.m. COMMUNITY PRESS Fifty-four school bus GUEST COLUMNIST drivers had just declared a strike, while 18 of their colleagues indicated that they would not join them. District administrators were being summoned to ride “shotgun” on the 18 buses scheduled to operate the next day. To no one’ surprise talks between representatives of Princeton’s bus drivers association and the board of education had reached impasse. As a result the majority of drivers opted for the fateful decision to strike. The primary issue of disagreement was the board’s refusal to recognize the bus driver’s union as the representative of all classified employees. In preparation for the work stoppage Princeton’s director of transportation and other administrators had developed an emergency transportation plan that involved busing students from their neighborhood schools to Princeton Junior High School, Princeton High School and the Robert E. Lucas Schools. Routes were also devised to transport elementary school students who lived more than two miles from their local neighborhood school. When drivers and administrators reported for duty the next morning, they were greeted with icy temperatures and blowing snow. The day’s first run was between the neighborhood schools and Princeton High School. Aboard one of three buses headed to Stewart Elementary, no one knew exactly what to expect in terms

of picket lines, harassment, etc... In fact a deep sense of apprehension prevailed since many of the striking drivers lived in the Stewart community. Upon arrival the drive into the school was blocked by striking bus drivers. After the three buses came to a halt on Conrey Road, the CO administrator on the lead bus was the first to confront the drivers. Since access to the building was blocked, he proceeded to read a three page no trespassing order. Not one word was spoken as he dutifully read through the document. In the early days of the strike tensions mounted in all communities and district facilities. As soon as the strike was declared, all of the drivers who chose to stand with the union were terminated by the school district. At that time Ohio’s Ferguson Act specifically prohibited public employees from conducting a work stoppage. After Princeton’s board of education invoked the Ferguson Act the district actively sought replacements for the 54 vacancies that had been created. As the days passed new drivers were trained and employed and the number of buses used to transport students increased. In the aftermath Princeton did not re-employ any of the terminated bus drivers. Some found driving opportunities in surrounding districts, while others simply moved forward with their lives. Although students were temporarily inconvenienced by the strike, they recovered far more quickly than the general Princeton community. Even though the strike occurred almost 50 years ago, it’s shadowy vestiges of acrimonious feelings still linger within various corners of the community today. Noel Taylor is a former Princeton City Schools administrator and a resident of Sharonville.

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Seeing through new eyes On Jan. 7, I interviewed a person very much like yourself; he is a sighted person. I learned a few secrets from him about what he thinks of sighted people and how they treat people who are blind. In so many words, he thinks people who are blind far too often get a raw deal Joyce Rogers from their sighted COMMUNITY PRESS peers. Later, I will let GUEST COLUMNIST you in on the secret of what my interviewee advises you to do. Michael Wigle, my interviewee, is the manager of Information technology at the Cincinnati Association for the Blind and Visually Impaired. Michael is really excited about and happy with his job, especially, in the last couple of years because his agency is taking a new look at what it does. Sighted staff members on all levels are seeing people who are blind or visually impaired as people like themselves who need jobs and who can do jobs, and they are devoted to making good things happen even more so than in the past. CABVI is putting more emphasis on contracting with private corporations such as the Kroger Company to place qualified people who are blind in supervisory and management positions. That is indeed a big jump from what I saw fifty years or so ago. I met a CABVI employee with a graduate degree who made brooms for his living. Seeing with new eyes is a winning position for everyone.

Michael, who has worked at CABVI for 17 years, advises other sighted people to get over their fear of being blind because “your fear cripples you and excludes people who are blind from your life.” I agree that blindness can be scary, but it does not have to be. Michael, who is a U.S. citizen by choice rather than by birth, has something else to tell the rest of us citizens by birth. He says he loves the U.S. Constitution because it essentially is the people telling the U.S. Government what it cannot do. Maybe, you never thought of the U.S. Constitution in that way, and maybe, you never realized that people who are blind or visually impaired are exactly the same as you. If you suddenly became blind, would you still be you? To put the matter another way, if you, a sighted person, were in a totally dark room with a person who is blind; who would be more functional? In other words, is the disability in the person or in the attitude and the environment? I say it is in the attitude and environment because those factors can be changed. In the words of St. Francis, maybe we need to see through new eyes and “change what can be changed.” What are you willing to do to change inappropriate attitudes and environments for people who are blind? What are you willing to do to include people who are blind in your life and welcome them and treat them as people you want to know? Yes, some of us you may still not want to know, and I will be the first to agree with you. (Smiles!) Joyce Rogers is a resident of Covedale.

Letters

thinking. Elaine Hickey Green Township

Continued from Page 11A

gram is fully expanded there will need to be six to 12 teachers for the programs at Delshire and Springmeyer. Cybulski said he estimated the best-case and worst-case scenarios for the costs of the program. Staffing costs could be $0 to $1.26 million, aide costs could be $90,000 to $150,000 and recruiting cost is estimated at $20,000. “There have been minimal costs to the district in terms of staffing so far. The $1.26 million is the worst case, if we have to hire three to six new teachers at all the buildings. We were charged with sharing the best to the worst-case scenarios,” Cybulski said. I find a disconnect here. Good stewardship of taxpayer funds and possibly spending an unknown amount on a program just doesn’t synch with me. My kids both graduated from Oak Hills and received great educations. The teachers were great and deserve it all. I have never voted against a school levy. But I find it difficult to reconcile the district asking for money while implementing a program where the costs are undetermined. Just asking … Mark Haller Green Township

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Thank you, Ann Thank you, Ann Thompson, for having the courage to publicly state what I, and I hope many others, are privately

Ann, in what world are you living? In response to Ann Thompson’s question “What happened to American/family values?” I can only say: “In what world are you living?” Her comments RE: Trump and the new administration are talking points right out of the radical leftist playbook. It is documented that radicals have been paid/recruited by Democrats and Soros to riot. Excuse me, but the people who backed the Margaret Sanger eugenics operation are radical leftist globalists. Is she that unaware that Sanger’s goal was to eliminate the black race? Is she that unaware the Hillary R. Clinton was “honored” to accept the Sanger “award?” Is she unaware of the slaughter by “Doctor” Gosnell, whose office had baby remains piling up and the case against him not publicized? What dream world is she living in? Trump is this country’s last chance to push back against the massive corruption that has left the inner cities in their current state, that has eviscerated the middle class, has allowed encroachment by the undocumented up to even the boundaries of Green Township. I would recommend for her an alternate to the fake news of which she partakes. Jean Hodge Green Township

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FEBRUARY 15, 2017 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • 1B

SPORTS

TRI- COUNTY PRESS

Editor: Melanie Laughman, mlaughman@communitypress.com, 513-248-7573

HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | RECREATIONAL

CommunityPress.com

SHORT HOPS Adam Baum and Scott Springer Community Press staff

Boys basketball » Wyoming mashed Madeira 86-38 on Feb. 3. Senior Lonnie Grayson led the Cowboys with 26 points. The Cowboys routed Finneytown 79-44 on Feb. 7. Grayson scored 21 points and became the school’s all-time scoring leader. » La Salle downed Lebanon on Feb. 7, 59-36. Riley Haubner had 18 points for the Lancers and C.J. Fleming had 19. » Princeton beat up Lakota West 74-37 on Feb. 7. Darweshi Hunter led the Vikings with 21 points and Darius Bazley added 16. » Roger Bacon topped Purcell Marian 48-29 on Feb. 7. James Johnson led the Spartans with 16 points and Alec Pfriem added 14.

PRINCETON BOYS HOOPS START FINDING RHYTHM Adam Baum abaum@communitypress.com

SHARONVILLE - After playing the first 11 games without Darius Bazley, one of the nation’s top recruits in the 2018 class, Princeton High School’s boys basketball team has won six of its last eight games since Bazley’s return. Bazley, a 6-foot-8 Ohio State commit, was forced to sit out the first 11 games after transferring from Finneytown over the summer. Since his return, the Vikings have been on a tear with wins over Mason, Lakota East and Fairfield twice. Head coach Leon Ellison, in his first season at Princeton, said his team is moving in the right direction, but they’re still not there yet. “Actually, I don’t think we got off to a rough start; kind of just like I envisioned it,” said Ellison. “I came in setting the tone, benching certain guys, setting certain expectations, setting the bar pretty high on these guys and pretty much just concentrating on the defensive end … we really didn’t pay any attention to offense. “We really worked on creating an identity. This is my first year here and I really wanted to set the identity out strong and get these guys used to how I play. So, we kind of ignored the offensive side and it took awhile for those guys to get used to it — the toughness — getting used to the pace and the effort they had to put into it. It took awhile for us to grasp those concepts, but once we grasped them we’re starting to play well. “We’re nowhere near where I’d like us to be, but we’re starting to play well.” To start the season, the Vikings were forced to find their footing without one of their best players. Ellison said his team, and certainly Bazley, could have spent that time getting acclimated and comfortable with one another. But, what Bazley brings each night is a legitimate triple-double threat. “He’s just a stat stuffer,” Ellison said of Bazley, who in eight

Girls basketball » Wyoming beat Taylor 36-29 on Feb. 6. Junior Lindsay Stewart had 13 points. The Cowboys beat Deer Park 53-35 on Feb. 8 as Sky Thomas had 13 points and 15 rebounds. » Princeton lost to Mason on Feb. 8, 61-45. The Vikings were led by Malika Wildon’s 10 points. The Vikings beat Lakota East 46-31 on Feb. 4.

Boys swimming and diving » Wyoming was second at the CHL meet Feb. 4. Carson Burt was named Swimmer of the Year and Dave Elliott Coach of the Year. Connor Williams was the 50 freestyle champion, Burt won the 100 and 200 freestyle events setting CHL records in both. Wyoming also won the 200 freestyle relay (Brocker, Williams, Derge, Burt) and the 400 freestyle relay (Brocker, Jordan, Jurell, Burt). At the Southwest Ohio Division II Sectional Diving Meet at Keating Natatorium Feb. 6: 1. Donnelly (Wyoming) 444.85, 2. Mondello (Talawanda) 396.65, 3. Gerimshuck (Wyoming) 336.25, 4. Lowe (Wyoming) 222.

Girls swimming and diving » Wyoming was second at the CHL meet Feb. 4. At the Southwest Ohio Divi-

TONY TRIBBLE/FOR THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Princeton’s Darweshi Hunter drives to the basket during the Flying to the Hoop Classic on Jan. 10.

See HOOPS, Page 2B

See HOPS, Page 2B

The Wyoming band of brothers marches on Scott Springer sspringer@enquirer.com

MICHAEL NOYES FOR THE ENQUIRER

Wyoming senior Jake Edmonds shoots the ball over Jacob McFarland of Madeira.

WYOMING - It is one of the more unique neighborhoods around and has drawn a variety of families for years. It sits just a few miles past the Hamilton County Fairgrounds and an array of used car lots. Not far from some industrial areas, the occasional train can be heard during a lull in the action on a high school football Friday. It is Wyoming, home of Wyoming High School and the Cowboys. Its popularity has attracted many successful families whose names fall off your tongue in rapid succession when you speak of Wyoming athletics. It’s doubtful one could skip a rock without hitting someone named Marty, Rogers or O’Gara. In football and basketball the last two seasons, more familiar names have cropped up in Ed-

monds and Prater. Seniors Jake Edmonds and Garyn Prater have mastered catching footballs so well, they will continue to do so at Marian University and Ohio State, respectively. Jake’s sophomore brother, Joey, has thrown some of those passes and caught a few himself from Northwesternbound quarterback Andrew Marty. Garyn’s freshman brother, Evan, can also fire a tolerable spiral. Now, with Tim Edmonds coaching the basketball ‘Boys to another successful season, the starting lineup is loaded with DNA and tops the Cincinnati Hills League standings. Helping 6-foot-6 senior Garyn Prater in the post is 6-foot-4 freshman (and presumably still growing) Evan Prater. The three-guard offense features the CHL’s top scorer in West Point-signed Lonnie Grayson. Dishing and driving along Grayson are the Edmonds brothers.

“It’s really been an awesome experience,” Tim Edmonds said. “Not many get to coach their kids at this level. I’ve certainly treasured every moment I’ve had with them.” This is far from nepotism as both have been varsity contributors since they were freshmen in football and basketball. Jake Edmonds is second in the league in assists, and the Praters are shooting nearly 60 percent from the field. With Grayson good for nearly 22 points per game, Garyn Prater hits around 16, with Joey Edmonds at 14. Jake and Joey Edmonds have played together in some form since Joey was in kindergarten. “We’ve always been playing together in the back yard or AAU teams,” Jake Edmonds said. “It’s always been fun. He (Joey) was always pretty good.” They admit a ride home after a Wyoming loss might not be See BAND, Page 2B


LIFE

2B • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • FEBRUARY 15, 2017

Princeton football coach McLaughlin heads to La Salle Adam Baum abaum@enquirer.com

Pat McLaughlin is headed back to the Greater Catholic League South. La Salle announced Feb. 10 that McLaughlin, who spent last season as the head Pat coach at McLaughlin Princeton, will be the next head football coach on North Bend Road. “It was a hard decision, a decision that my family and I thought long and hard about,” said McLaughlin on a phone call as he headed to La Salle Friday afternoon. “We have developed great relationships at Princeton and there’s a lot of great people there, a lot of great kids there and only being there for a year made it a much tougher decision.

But, going back to the GCL, the faith part of it, the all-boys school part of it, was something we prayed a lot about and something I really envisioned myself being a part of for the rest of my career.” McLaughlin graduated from Moeller in 1996, then went on to play quarterback at the University of Dayton. McLaughlin began coaching as a graduate assistant at the University of Memphis, before becoming an assistant at Haywood High School (Tenn.) and eventually returning to Moeller as an assistant from 2006-14. Prior to this past season at Princeton, where he led the Vikings to a 6-4 season – the first winning season for Princeton since 2011 – McLaughlin was the head coach for two seasons at Reading. In three seasons as a head coach, McLaughlin’s

combined coaching record is 19-12. At La Salle, he replaces Jim Hilvert, who recently left for the head coaching job at Baldwin Wallace University. The Lancers have won three consecutive Division II state titles and are coming off the first outright GCL South title in school history. “It’s a great time (to be joining La Salle),” McLaughlin said. “(Principal) Aaron Marshall and (athletic director) Keith Pantling, what they’ve done with the program and the vision they have for the school, the football program, and just the school in general and the academic part of it, it just seems like La Salle is doing a lot of things right now to garner attention and football seems to be a part of it and I look to just continue to add onto the tradition.” McLaughlin informed his former Princeton

players at a team meeting Friday. “I talked with Dr. Tucker today, the superintendent at Princeton, Mr. Burton, Mr. Ogdan, the principal, and Gary Croley, the AD ... they’ve been phenomenal throughout the process. I’ll finish school at Princeton, then I’ll go over after school and do the lifting part at La Salle. I’ll start in the summer and start teaching at La Salle next year,” said McLaughlin. In short time, McLaughlin will find himself standing on the sideline facing his former team, the Crusaders. “Well, I guess it would be foolish to say I haven’t (thought about it), but I believe we play Colerain Week 1 and that will be our attention and focus all the way up until Week 1 and the rest of the season we’ll focus on one week at a time,” said McLaughlin.

Moeller TE Dotson makes impact on US national team Scott Springer sspringer@enquirer.com

KENWOOD - The weekend before he signed to play college football for Michigan State, Moeller High School’s Matt Dotson was near Disney World. There was no beach or Mickey Mouse ears involved, though, as Dotson was actually playing his final high school game. Selected as part of the U.S. U-19 National Team, Dotson was part of an allstar squad that beat Canada, 33-11. As part of the festivities, the Crusader tight end was able to carry the American flag onto the field at the Disney/ ESPN Wide World of Sports Complex. The game was Jan. 28 and was streamed on ESPN3. “It was a lot of fun,” Dotson said of the experience. “It was a good learning opportunity and a

ALEX VEHR FOR THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Matt Dotson catches a touchdown pass for Moeller.

good way to represent my country. We won and I should have had two touchdowns, but I only had one. It was an overall great experience.” Dotson finished with two catches for 58 yards, including his second quarter 36-yard touchdown reception. “I knew about half of

the guys from other camps,” Dotson said. “It was fun meeting a bunch of new guys and the coaching staff. All of the run schemes and passing schemes were all pretty simple.” Ironically, Matt’s final two prep victories have come against Canadian teams as Moeller’s home finale last October was against Royal Imperial, also from over the northern border. He had three catches for 117 yards in that one with a couple of scores. Though Moeller suffered through a 4-6 season last fall, Dotson had 25 catches for 448 yards and six scores. Over his three years on varsity he had 43 catches for 702 yards and 10 touchdowns, even though he shared the spot with Ohio State’s Jake Hausmann his sophomore and junior seasons. Michigan State coach

Mark Dantonio, who knows a thing or two about tight ends, sought Dotson and got an early commitment from the former No. 89 of the blue and gold. Locally, Dantonio coached future NFL players Brent Celek and Connor Barwin as tight ends at the University of Cincinnati. Not many colleges tried to “flip” him as he made it clear he was 100 percent committed to going to East Lansing and Michigan State. “He definitely knows how to develop tight ends and puts them in the right type of offense,” Dotson said of Dantonio. Early indications are Dotson could play right away and he’s been busy bulking up his body. From a 6-foot-6, 215-pound sophomore, he has turned into a 240-pound senior.

EASTERN CORRIDOR PUBLIC OPEN HOUSE Thursday, March 9, 2017 4 p.m. to 7 p.m.

Miami Valley Christian Academy 6830 School Street, Newtown, OH 45244 Review results of technical studies and public feedback for the area between the Red Bank Corridor and the I-275/SR 32 Interchange (Eastern Corridor Segments II and III). This information will be used to plan future transportation improvements. No formal presentation will be held. Ohio Department of Transportation (ODOT) representatives will be available to answer questions and discuss the material being shared.

Visit

www.EasternCorridor.org for more information

The Public Open House is ADA accessible. For special assistance services, contact Andy Fluegemann at (513) 933-6597 or Andy.Fluegemann@dot.ohio.gov by Feb. 27, 2017. The environmental review, consultation, and other actions required by applicable Federal environmental laws for this project are being, or have been, carried out by ODOT pursuant to 23 U.S.C. 327 and a Memorandum of Understanding dated December 11, 2015, and executed by FHWA and ODOT.

Eastern Corridor Segments II and III Study Area

Hoops Continued from Page 1B

games now leads the Greater Miami Conference in rebounds (11.3), assists (4.4) and blocks (3.0) per game, to go with 11.1 points per night. “He’s not gonna be a kid who’s gonna come in and get you 30 or 40 (points) a night. He’s gonna come in and give you almost a triple-double every night. He’s shown it on several occasions already. He’s gonna rebound it, he’s gonna assist, and he’s gonna score. He’s a team player. “We played a pretty tough schedule those first 11 games and with a group of guys who are young. I had three freshmen playing legitimate varsity minutes; to go 6-5 was kind of a feat for those guys.” In Bazley’s absence, as well as after his return, the Vikings were uplifted by junior Darweshi Hunter, who’s currently second in the GMC in scoring with 18.2 points per game, junior Dominic Pierce and freshman Darion Henry. Ellison said of Hunter, “He’s just bought in. He’s listening. He’s a kid with a lot of talent, but he had to improve his consistency on the floor, and this year he’s been very consistent.” Pierce has been used a little differently this season, and it seems to be paying off. “He’s a kid who I think was top of the league last year in rebounding and blocked shots at 6-foot-3, but he

was playing around the rim a lot,” said Ellison of Pierce. “I’ve kind of transitioned him to the perimeter and he’s a guy who’s really bought into guarding. “Like the rest of these guys, I keep putting the emphasis on playing defense … and the toughness it takes to be a really good defensive team.” Henry, averaging 6.5 points and 5.3 rebounds per game, is quickly becoming a big recruit for the Vikings, as is Hunter, said Ellison. “He’s a freshman and he’s started almost every varsity game,” said Ellison. “He’s a 6-foot-4, 230-pound freshman who’s gonna be a monster in the next couple years.” Princeton, at 12-7 overall and 8-5 in the GMC as of Feb. 9, still has three challenging regular season games left against Oak Hills, Mason (Feb. 14) and Hamilton (Feb. 17). When the tournament rolls in, the Vikings could be playing their best basketball of the season. “It’s one thing to be tough physically, we’ve gotta be tough mentally,” said Ellison. “We’re gonna be in some environments and some situations, especially with the way our schedule is, we’re gonna be put in adverse situations and we’re gonna have to be mentally tough enough to get through those things and keep that defensive mindset. “The one thing that’s consistent in basketball — if you’re guarding, you’ll be in every game.”

Hops

Painter 371.

Continued from Page 1B

» Princeton 2,145, Lakota West 1,740 on Feb. 9. High series: P-Carpenter 359. LWCumberland 350.

sion II Sectional Diving Meet at Keating Natatorium Feb. 6: 1. Storer (Wyoming) 328.60, 2. Middendorf (Badin) 239.90, 3. Wissman (Badin) 175.95.

Boys bowling » Princeton 2,504, Lakota West 2,349 on Feb. 9. High series: P-Simmons 470. LW-

Band Continued from Page 1B

cheerful, but say their dad has always tried to keep the basketball talk to a minimum with the home life being separate. After this season, the Edmonds and Praters will also be separate with seniors Jake and Garyn moving on to college football. “It’s going to be weird not playing with him, but I have a good role model to look up to,” Joey Edmonds said. The Praters have also played on the same squads before and have made an impact on the gridiron and the hardwood. “When we were little, we played on the same summer Friar’s Club team,” Evan Prater said. Added Garyn Prater, “He was pretty good, so I had to throw him the ball.” The unrelated Wyoming starter, Lonnie Grayson, has seen this season coming as he has

Girls bowling

Wrestling » At the Greater Miami Conference Championships Feb. 4 at Lakota East, Oak Hills finished third, Colerain eighth and Princeton ninth.

also been a four-year player. He played for then-coach Matt Rooks when Jake was a freshman and has started since Tim Edmonds was moved from assistant to head coach his sophomore year. “We’re out there just playing,” Grayson said smiling. “I don’t think they focus on passing to their brothers. We’re just playing and sharing the ball.” The formula has worked as Wyoming has won or shared the last three CHL crowns and should win another this season barring a major upset. “I’ve never seen a team like this before,” Garyn Prater said. “We’re so close and we have lots of talent in our starting five and coming off the bench. I think we can make a nice run if we just keep doing what we’re doing.” The regular season “family affair” ends Feb. 17 against Deer Park, before postseason play starts.


LIFE

FEBRUARY 15, 2017 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • 3B

BRIEFLY Bluebird Bakery offers tea room experience The Bluebird Bakery in Glendale will host a retro tearoom and book signing on Saturday, March 11, from noon to 3 p.m. “Lost Tea Rooms of Downtown Cincinnati” by Cynthia Beischel is a recipe book that includes a historical perspective of tea rooms in the first half of the 20th Century. The bakery will feature several items from the book, including Pogues Mulligatawny Soup, The Netherland Salad, Lazarus Lemon Carrot Bread, McAlpin’s Apple Pie Cake and Shillito’s Cheesecake. Beischel’s book will also be available for sale.

Parent workshop The Northwest Local School District offers a free informational parent workshop from 6 to 8 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 16 focusing on “Executive Function and ADHD: Promoting Consistent Behavior at Home.” The workshop will be at the Houston Educational Service Center, x3310 Compton Road, in the conference room. A free light dinner is provided. Childcare is currently unavailable. An RSVP is required to Parent Mentor Vicky Coleman. Call 513-2058773, 513-522-6700 x 4905 or email her at vcoleman@nwlsd.org.

Fiddler on the Roof Finneytown High School presents the musical “Fiddler on the Roof,”

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on Thursday, Feb. 16, Friday, Feb. 17 and Saturday, Feb. 18, 7:30 p.m., at the Performing Arts Center on the Secondary Campus, 8916 Fontainebleau Terrace, 45231. Tickets are $10 for students, $12 for adults. On Friday, Feb. 17, enjoy dinner before the show, from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m., in the Multi-Purpose Room on the Secondary Campus. Advance-purchased tickets are $5 for ages 4-grade 6; $8 for grade7-adult; children 3 and under free. Ticket information for both events is at www.finneytown.org.

Sharonville PD meets certification requirements The Sharonville Police Department has adopted and implemented state standards established by the Ohio Collaborative Community-Police Advisory Board as part of the state’s efforts to strengthen community and police relations.

More than 400 agencies employing more than 23,000 officers (or 70 percent of all law enforcement officers in Ohio, including agencies and officers in most of Ohio’s metropolitan areas) are either certified or in the process of becoming certified by meeting standards for the use of force, including deadly force, and agency recruitment and hiring. The standards are the first of their kind in Ohio and were developed by the Collaborative in August 2015. The state has partnered with the Buckeye State Sheriffs’ Association and the Ohio Association of Chiefs of Police to help certify Ohio’s nearly 1,000 law enforcement agencies on a process to ensure that they are in compliance with Ohio’s new standards. The first list of all Ohio compliant agencies will be published in March 2017. See BRIEFS, Page 4B

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LIFE

4B • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • FEBRUARY 15, 2017

Briefs Continued from Page 3B

Springdale tea party March 19 The planning for the 2017 Springdale Garden Club’s annual tea party is complete. This year’s event has a “Breakfast at Tiffany’s” theme.The event will take place 2:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Sunday, March 19, at the Springdale Community Center, 11999 Lawnview Ave., Springdale. Seating is limited seating, and prepaid reservations are due by March 12. Tickets are $15 for people’s age 12 and up, $5 children ages 4 to 11 with 3 and under free. In keeping with the theme you are encouraged to dress in 1960 period dress although that is not a requirement for attending. The event fea-

DIRECTORY

TO PLACE YOUR AD EMAIL: cin-classifieds@enquirer.com CALL: 513.768.8184 or 513.768.8189

FRIENDSHIP BAPTIST CHURCH 8580 Cheviot Rd., Colerain Twp 741-7017 www.ourfbc.com Gary Jackson, Senior Pastor Sunday School (all ages) 9:30am Sunday Morning Service 10:30am Sunday Evening Service 6:30pm Wedn. Service/Awana 7:00pm RUI Addiction Recovery (Fri.) 7:00pm Active Youth, College, Senior Groups Exciting Music Dept, Deaf Ministry, Nursery

Trinity Lutheran Church, LCMS 5921 Springdale Rd

Rev. Richard Davenport, Pastor Worship & Sunday School 10:30 a.m, Bible Study 9:15 a.m. Sundays

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Mt. Healthy United Methodist Church

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Corner of Compton and Perry Streets 513-931-5827 Sunday School 8:45-9:45am Traditional Worship 10:00-11:00am

2929 Springdale Road 45251 Phone#(513) 742-9400 Sunday School - 9:45am Sunday Morning Service - 11:00am Bible Study Thurs. - 7:00pm Pantry Tuesday - 11am-2pm

Nursery Available Handicap Access “Come as a guest. Leave as a friend.”

FLEMING ROAD United Church of Christ

Christ Church Glendale Episcopal Church 965 Forest Ave - 771-1544 christchurch1@fuse.net info@christchurchglendale.org The Rev. John F. Keydel, Jr. 8am Holy Eucharist I 9am Holy Eucharist II 11am Holy Eucharist II Child Care 9-12

691 Fleming Rd 522-2780 Rev Pat McKinney

Sunday School - All Ages - 9:15am Sunday Worship - 10:30am

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Northminster Presbyterian Church

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703 Compton Rd., Finneytown 931-0243 Growing Faith, Sharing Hope, Showing Love Sunday Worship Schedule Traditional Services - 8:00 & 10:30am Contemporary Services - 9:00am Student Cafe: 10:15am Childcare Available Nancy Ross- Zimmerman - Pastors

tures door prizes; beautiful themed Raffle Baskets; ’60s period hat & dress competition; children’s craft table and homemade treats and tea. Special speaker this year is Cynthia Beischel, author of “Lost Tea Rooms of Downtown Cincinnati.” She will have a table of her books for purchase. Current book is tax included for $23.53. She accepts cash or checks. We are a non-profit organization that conducts beautification projects throughout the City of Springdale. Proceeds from the annual tea party fund these project, some of which are a school garden program with the first-graders at Heritage Hill and Springdale elementary schools. In 2016 we added a new program called the Springdale Amateur Garden Awards contest. Gardens throughout the city are judged on design, plant material and being well maintained. Awards are given to our city’s best. Look for more information on this and other events at the Springdale Community Center and or contact Joan Knox, 6747755, or e-mail joanknox99@fuse.net.

Bunco at Springdale Community Center Springdale Parks and Recreation will host a Bunco game on Tuesday, Feb. 21 at 1 p.m. at the Springdale Community Center, 11999 Lawnview Ave. The event is free and open to Bunco enthusiasts as well as beginners welcome.

Colerain Booster Sports Stag The Colerain Boosters will sponors the group’s annual sports stag Thursday, Feb. 16, at Receptions in Western Hills, 3302 Westbourne Drive. Guest speaker will be new UC football coach Luke Fickell. Social beings at 6 p.m., followed by dinner at 7:30 and the program, which begins at 8:15 p.m. Tickets are $50. Call Denny Hirsch at 404-5679, or the Colerain High School Athletic Department for ticket information.

Bee there Forest Park Women’s Club meets at 7 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 16, at the Forest Park Senior Center, 11555 Winton Road. Richard Stewart, a sixth-generation, farmer will discuss beekpeeping. He will talk about bees with a focus on planting gardens that are pollinator friendly.

High school presents ‘A Little Princess’ Winton Woods High School’s spring musical is “A Little Princess,” with music by Andrew Lippa and lyrics by Brian Crawley. Performances are Friday, April 28, and Saturday, April 29, at 8 p.m., and Sunday, April 30, at 2 p.m. All family-friendly performances take place in the David Bell Performing Arts Center at the high school. The musical is based on the 1905 children’s novel of the same name and is the story of Sara Crewe, who is sent to boarding school in London as her fa-

ther travels to Africa. Sara uses her imagination to make friends, even as she copes with a dour headmistress and an unexpected change in fortune. The drama director for the musical is Michelle Kozlowski, musical directors are Joe Whatley and Beth Miller, technical director is Emily Russell, choreographer is Melody Nordmoe, orchestra conductor is Felipe MoralesTorres, and costumer is Kaitlin Otto. This year’s student director is Alex Kress, student musical director is Alyya Scott and dance captains are Jordan Braswell and Celeste Hackmann.

Junior newspaper carriers needed Hey kids! Become a Community Press carrier and earn your own spending money and still have time for other fun activities since delivery is just once a week on Wednesday. It’s your own business where your neighbors rely on you to deliver information about their community. You’ll learn valuable business skills and gain experience in customer service and money management. You’ll also be able to earn bonuses, and possibly win prizes. Call 853-6277.

Annual pancake breakfast in Glendale The Glendale Fire Department and Firefighters Association will present the village’s 26th annual pancake breakfast from 7:30 a.m. to noon Saturday, April 22. Members of Glendale

Heritage Preservation, which previously organized the event, will be among the volunteers. A $5 donation is requested for the meal, which will be served at the town hall, 80 E. Sharon Ave. Children under age 6 eat free.

Spotter and weather safety training Springfield Township hosts “Spotter/Weather Safety Training” classes offered by CincinnatiHamilton County Homeland Security and the National Weather Service. The program is designed for radio operators, emergency management, public safety officials and concerned citizens. The course is offered on Thursday, Feb. 23, and Thursday, April 27, at the Grove Banquet and Event Center, 9158 Winton Road. The classes will begin at 6:30 p.m. and will be approximately three hours in duration. You need only attend one session. The course is provided free of charge and funded through the weather service. Deadline to register for this course is five days prior to the program start. Register online at goo.gl/ forms/dwgkMMePAU.

Springdale plans to spruce up Spruce Up Springdale is set for Saturday, April 29, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. The event, aimed at community pride, focuses on residential properties, as well as public spaces. The event will conclude with a cookout at the Community Center picnic area. See BRIEFS, Page 10B

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6B • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • FEBRUARY 15, 2017

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD THURSDAY, FEB. 16

and swing with professional ballroom dancer Malinda McCullough. Learn Swing, Waltz, Latin and Tango. No partner necessary. Ages 18 and up. $10. Presented by Malinda McCullough. Through May 26. 563-1350; www.evendalearts.org. Evendale.

Art & Craft Classes After School Art Club, 4-5:30 p.m., Art on Fire of Cincinnati, 9336 Colerain Avenue, Kids learn and use variety of mediums, working on different projects each week. Discounts offered when paying monthly. Ages 0-12. $15. Registration required. 923-3473; www.artonfirecincinnati.com. Colerain Township.

Drink Tastings

Art Exhibits

FILE PHOTO

Creative Underground Gallery, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., Daryl Urig’s Creative Underground, 430 Ray Norrish Drive, Select contemporary paintings of Daryl Urig. Free. Presented by Daryl Urig’s Creative Underground Gallery. 708-7981; darylurig.com. Springdale. Nature’s Corner, 3-7 p.m., Sharonville Cultural Arts Center, 11165 Reading Road, The Westheimer Gallery. Exhibition highlights beauty of nature with illustrations by Gayle Cobb and photography by Becky Linhardt. Free. Through Feb. 25. 554-1014; www.sharonvilleculturalarts.org. Sharonville.

Dance Classes Tippi Toes Dance Class, 4:455:30 p.m., Springdale Community Center, 11999 Lawnview Ave., Incorporates even mix of ballet, tap and jazz over 45-minute class using high-energy music. Ages 4-7. $50 per month. Registration recommended. Presented by Tippi Toes Dance Company. Through May 25. 578-1280; www.tippitoesdance.com/ cincinnati. Springdale.

Exercise Classes Zumba, 7-8 p.m., Springdale Community Center, 11999 Lawnview Ave., Wear comfortable workout attire and gym shoes. Bring water. $5. Presented by Deb’s Fitness Party. 205-5064; www.debsfitnessparty.com. Springdale. Dance Fit, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Keeping Fit Studio, 7778 Colerain Ave., Workout designed for all levels of fitness. For ages 16 and up. $5. 720-4142. Col-

A free Community Pancake Breakfast will be served 10 a.m. to noon Feb. 18, at Mount Healthy United Methodist Church, 7612 Perry St., Mount Healthy. On the menu are Pancakes, sausage, fruit and games and crafts. Everyone is welcome. Call 931-5827. erain Township. Dance Fit, 4:45-5:45 p.m., Keeping Fit Studio, 7778 Colerain Ave., Dance exercise class with strength training for all levels of fitness. For ages 16 and up. $5. 720-4142. Colerain Township. New Horizons ChiKung (QiGong )/ TaiChi, 9:30-11 a.m., Gather Studio, 6110 Hamilton Ave., $50. Preregistration discounts available. Presented by Harmonic Pulse Wellness. 4051514; www.harmonicpulsewellness.com. College Hill.

Health / Wellness Heart Health, 2-3 p.m., Springdale Community Center, 11999 Lawnview Ave., American Heart Association will discuss how Heart disease is leading cause of death each year. Learn proper heart health. Register by Feb. 14. Ages 21 and up. Free. Registration recommended. Presented by Springdale Parks and Recreation. 346-3910. Springdale.

Holiday - Black History Month Underground Community: How Blacks Settled in Historic Glendale, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., Glendale Heritage Museum, 44 Village Square, Exhibit chronicles black families who arrived in Glendale before 1855. Through Feb. 25. Free. Presented by Glendale Heritage Preser-

vation. 771-4908. Glendale.

Nature Dinosaurs: Our Fossilized Friends, 10:45 a.m., 1 p.m., 4 p.m., Glenwood Gardens, 10397 Springfield Pike, Highfield Discovery Garden. Learn about dinosaurs. $2 per person, valid motor vehicle pass required. Presented by Great Parks of Hamilton County. 771-8733; www.greatparks.org. Woodlawn.

Youth Sports Registration for Spring Sports, 9 a.m. to 9 p.m., Springdale Community Center, 11999 Lawnview Ave., Soccer, t-ball, coach pitch, knothole baseball, softball. Members can register now. Non-members can register from Feb. 1. Ages 7-18. Fees vary by sport. Registration required. Presented by Springdale Youth Boosters. 346-3910. Springdale.

FRIDAY, FEB. 17 Art Exhibits Nature’s Corner, 3-7 p.m., Sharonville Cultural Arts Center, Free. 554-1014; www.sharonvilleculturalarts.org. Sharonville.

Dance Classes Beginner Ballroom Dance Class, 8-9 p.m., Evendale Cultural Arts Center, 10500 Reading Road, Upper Art Studio. Waltz

Wine Tasting, 6-8 p.m., Marty’s Hops & Vines, 6110 Hamilton Ave., Sample 4-5 wines accompanied by light bites. Live entertainment at 9 p.m. Ages 21 and up. $15 per person. 681-4222; martys-hopsandvines.com. College Hill.

Exercise Classes Dance Fit, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Keeping Fit Studio, $5. 720-4142. Colerain Township.

Films Disney Family Favorites, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Springdale 18: Cinema de Lux, 12064 Springfield Pike, Catch beloved Disney classics Alice in Wonderland, Aladdin, Frozen and Dumbo on big screen. $6. Presented by Showcase Cinemas - Tricounty. 617-375-9700. Springdale.

Lectures William Wells: Settler, Soldier, Indian Agent First Person Program, 7-8:30 p.m., Heritage Village Museum, 11450 Lebanon Road, Meet figures from history in this First Person series. Steve Preston portrays local settler William Wells. Ages 15-99. $20, $17 members. Reservations required. 563-9484. Sharonville.

Music - Blues Jay Jesse Johnson Band, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m., The Show on 42, 9933 Cincinnati Columbus Road, Free. 777-2920; www.jayjessejohnson.com. West Chester.

Nature Dinosaurs: Our Fossilized Friends, 10:45 a.m., 1 p.m., 4 p.m., Glenwood Gardens, $2 per person, valid motor vehicle pass required. 771-8733; www.greatparks.org. Woodlawn.

Youth Sports Registration for Spring

ABOUT CALENDAR To submit calendar items, go to Cincinnati.com/share, log in and click on “submit an event.” Send digital photos to kynews@communitypress.com along with event information. Items are printed on a space-available basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to Cincinnati.com/calendar.

Sports, 9 a.m. to 9 p.m., Springdale Community Center, Fees vary by sport. Registration required. 346-3910. Springdale.

SATURDAY, FEB. 18 Art Exhibits Nature’s Corner, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Sharonville Cultural Arts Center, Free. 554-1014; www.sharonvilleculturalarts.org. Sharonville.

Dining Events Chocolate, Champagne and Candlelight, 7-10 p.m., Raffel’s Banquet Hall, 10160 Reading Road, Sharonville mayor Kevin Hardman emcees evening. Chocolate dessert buffet along with selection of champagne, wine, soft drinks, and appetizer

buffet. DJ and live band. Ages 21 and up. $35 per person. Reservations required. Presented by Heritage Village Museum. 563-9996; bit.ly/2dmNvwW. Evendale. Mystery Dinner Series, 7 p.m. Blood of the Vampire., Mill Race Banquet Center, 1515 W. Sharon Road, Includes show and dinner. Menu includes prime rib, chicken, lasagna, sides, desserts and beverages. Cash bar. Doors open 6:30 p.m. Ages 18 and up. $35. Reservations required. Presented by Great Parks of Hamilton County. 521-7275 ext. 285; www.greatparks.org. Springfield Township.

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LIFE

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LIFE

8B • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • FEBRUARY 15, 2017

POLICE REPORTS (Editor’s note: Cincinnati Police Department no longer sends reports to Community Press.)

Reported at Walmart, Jan. 13.

COLERAIN TOWNSHIP

Incidents/investigations

FOREST PARK Aggravated menacing Reported on 6000 block of W. Kemper Road, Jan. 4. Reported on 1000 block of Parkridge Court, Jan. 6. Criminal damaging Reported on 12000 block of Chesterdale, Jan. 7.

Incidents/investigations Breaking and entering Reported on 3400 block of Niagara St., Jan. 3. Criminal damaging Reported on 3100 block of Elkhorn Drive, Jan. 8. Disorderly conduct Reported on 8100 block of Colerain Ave., Jan. 5. Robbery Reported on 2300 block of Walden Glen Circle, Jan. 10. Theft 8400 block of Forest Valley Drive, Jan. 10. Reported on 2800 block of Townterrace Drive, Jan. 10. Reported on 8400 block of Colerain Ave., Jan. 9. Vehicle removed from 9400 block of Pippin Road, Jan. 7. Reported on 3100 block of Lapland Drive, Jan. 6. Shoplifter reported on 9500 block of Colerain Ave., Jan. 7. Reported on 3500 block of Redskin Drive, Jan. 7. Shoplifter reported on 9000 block of Colerain Ave., Jan. 7. Pictures valued at $293 removed from 9900 block of Colerain Ave., Jan. 5. Shoplifter reported on 8400 block of Colerain Ave., Jan. 5. Shoplifter reported on 9000 block of Colerain Ave., Jan. 6. Shoplifter reported on 8400 block of Colerain Ave., Jan. 6. Items removed from 9600 block of Colerain Ave., Jan. 6. Shoplifter removed from 8200 block of Pippin Road, Jan. 7. Reported on 8700 block of Wuest, Jan. 5. Cell phone removed from 8400 block of Colerain Ave., Jan. 7. Books valued at $370 removed from 6400 block of Colerain Ave., Jan. 7. Reported on 9000 block of Colerain Ave., Jan. 7.

GLENDALE Incidents/investigations Property damage 300 block of Oak Road; vehicle ran into building after a short pursuit byWoodlawn Police Department; no estimate on any damage done to building; driver of the vehicle was arrested and charged by Woodlawn Police Department; Feb. 2. Theft from vehicle 100 block of Creekwood Square; owner discovered that her vehicle’s contents had been gone through; the only thing removed from the vehicle was a blanket; the blanket was recovered; blanket was recovered a short distance away atop another vehicle; unknown when the incident happened; no damage was done to the vehicle; Feb. 5.

GREEN TOWNSHIP Incidents/investigations Abduction/kidnapping Reported at 6400 block of Werk Road, Jan. 29. Alcohol violation Reported at 4300 block of Westwood Northern Blvd., Jan. 26. Assault Reported at 3800 block of West Fork Road, Jan. 24. Reported at 3300 block of Emerald Lake Drive, Jan. 28. Breaking and entering Reported at 5400 block of North Bend Road, Jan. 24. Reported at 2100 block of Anderson Ferry Road, Jan. 30. Burglary Reported at 4100 block of Race Road, Jan. 26.

EVENDALE Incidents/investigations Theft

Reported at 5400 block of Northcrest Lane, Jan. 26. Reported at 3600 block of Rackacres Drive, Jan. 27. Reported at 5400 block of Bluesky Drive, Jan. 27. Reported at 5000 block of Casa Loma Blvd., Jan. 28. Reported at 5700 block of Werk Road, Jan. 29. Reported at 3300 block of Wheatcroft Drive, Jan. 30. Criminal damaging/vandalism Reported at 6200 block of Colerain Ave., Jan. 24. Reported at 3300 block of Mercy Heath Blvd., Jan. 28. Domestic trouble Reported at 5400 block of Joey Terrace, Jan. 24. Reported at 5200 block of Sidney Road, Jan. 25. Reported at 3500 block of West Fork Road, Jan. 25. Reported at 5400 block of Joey Terrace, Jan. 26. Reported at 3700 block of Eyrich Road, Jan. 26. Reported at 4000 block of School Section Road, Jan. 27. Reported at 5400 block of Northcrest Lane, Jan. 27. Reported at 6600 block of Hearne Road, Jan. 27. Reported at 4400 block of Grove Ave., Jan. 27. Reported at 3500 block of Robroy Drive, Jan. 28. Reported at 5100 block of North Bend Road, Jan. 28. Drug offense Reported at 3600 block of Muddy Creek Road, Jan. 24. Reported at Prosperity Place/ Ferguson Road, Jan. 25. Reported at 3100 block of Jessup Road, Jan. 26. Reported at 6500 block of Harrison Ave., Jan. 27. Reported at 5800 block of Glenway Ave., Jan. 27. Reported at 5600 block of Kirby Ave., Jan. 28. Reported at 3600 block of Muddy Creek Road, Jan. 29. Reported at 5300 block of North Bend Road, Jan. 29. Reported at 2100 block of Anderson Ferry Road, Jan. 29. Reported at 6500 block of Harrison Ave., Jan. 30. Reported at Glenmore Ave., Jan.

30. Identity fraud Reported at 5800 block of Countryhills Drive, Jan. 24. Reported at 5500 block of Vogel Road, Jan. 24. Reported at 4500 block of Clearwater Place, Jan. 25. Reported at 5300 block of North Bend Road, Jan. 25. Reported at 2800 block of Robers Ave., Jan. 28. Reported at 3600 block of Boomer Road, Jan. 30. Reported at 2900 block of South Road, Jan. 31. Missing - critical Reported at 3900 block of North Bend Road, Jan. 26. Missing child Reported at 5400 block of Edalbert Drive, Jan. 25. Reported at 3300 block of Jefferson Ave., Jan. 28. Recovered stolen vehicle Reported at 2600 block of Harrison Ave., Jan. 25. Robbery Reported at 6200 block of Glenway Ave., Jan. 25. Sex offenses Reported at 5100 block of Rybolt Road, Jan. 29. Sexual assault - person injured Reported at 6700 block of Harrison Ave., Jan. 24. Squad run - aided Reported at 3900 block of Harvest Ridge Drive, Jan. 25. Theft Reported at 5700 block of Signal Pointe Drive, Jan. 24. Reported at 7400 block of Bridge Point Pass, Jan. 24. Reported at 5700 block of Harrison Road, Jan. 25. Reported at 5800 block of Cheviot Road, Jan. 26. Reported at 3400 block of Harrison Ave., Jan. 27. Reported at 5700 block of Harrison Ave., Jan. 28. Reported at 6300 block of Glenway Ave., Jan. 28. Reported at 3300 block of Wheatcroft Drive, Jan. 30. Reported at 3900 block of Biehl Ave., Jan. 30. Reported at 5000 block of Rybolt Road, Jan. 30. Reported at 3900 block of Gary Court, Jan. 30.

Reported at 2200 block of Townhill Drive, Jan. 31. Theft - shoplifting Reported at 6500 block of Harrison Ave., Jan. 25. Reported at 5300 block of North Bend Road, Jan. 25. Reported at 5500 block of Bridgetown Road, Jan. 27. Reported at 6400 block of Colerain Ave., Jan. 28. Reported at 5700 block of Harrison Ave., Jan. 29. Reported at 6500 block of Harrison Ave., Jan. 30. Reported at 6500 block of Harrison Ave., Jan. 31. Trespassing Reported at 5800 block of Colerain Ave., Jan. 27. Unauthorized use of a motor vehicle Reported at 6600 block of Glenway Ave., Jan. 26. Vehicle fire Reported at 5300 block of North Bend Road, Jan. 29. Welfare check Reported at Colerain Ave./Blue Rock Road, Jan. 24. Reported at 5700 block of Sprucewood Drive, Jan. 24. Reported at 1600 block of Brunnerwood Drive, Jan. 25. Reported at 3500 block of Westport Court, Jan. 26. Reported at 3500 block of Robroy Drive, Jan. 28. Reported at Hutchison Glen Drive/Hutchinson Road block of, Jan. 29. Reported at 1800 block of Devils Backbone Road, Jan. 29.

Reported on W. Galbraith, Dec. 31. Reported on Niagara St., Jan. 1. Reported on Parrish Ave., Jan. 4. Reported on Prospect Place, Jan. 8. Reported on Hamilton Ave., Jan. 8. Reported on Simpson Ave., Jan. 9. Menacing Reported on Bising Ave., Jan. 4. Theft Reported on Hamilton Ave., Jan. 11. Reported on W. Galbraith Road, Jan. 9. Reported on Hamilton Ave., Jan. 8. Reported on Savannah Ave., Jan. 8. Reported on W. Galbraith Road, Jan. 7. Reported on Hamilton Ave., Jan. 7. Reported on W. Galbraith Road, Jan. 2. Reported on Centerridge Ave., Jan. 2. Reported on Joseph Court, Dec. 31. Reported on Hamilton Ave., Jan. 1.

See POLICE REPORTS, Page 9B

ABOUT POLICE REPORTS Community Press publishes incident records provided by local police departments. All reports published are public records. To contact your local police department: » Springfield Township, 729-1300 » Mount Healthy: 7283183 » North College Hill, 521-7171 » Greenhills, 825-2101 » Forest Park, 595-5220.

NORTH COLLEGE HILL Incidents/investigations Breaking and entering Reported on Hamilton Ave., Jan. 1. Criminal damaging Reported on Sundale Ave., Jan. 1. Reported on Catalpa Ave., Jan. 1. Reported on Hamilton Ave., Jan. 2. Domestic Reported on Cordova Ave., Jan. 2. Reported on Dearmand Ave., Jan. 2. Reported on W. Galbraith, Jan. 2.

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*Model 1864: $159/Mo. – 36 Month Lease with $1,899 due at lease signing. Includes $1,090 Customer Down Payment + First Month’s Payment $159 + $650 Acquisition Fee. $1,000 Toyota Financial Services Subvention Lease Cash must be applied toward due at signing – which reduces $2,899 due at signing to $1,899 due at signing. Adjusted Capitalized Cost is $18,478 based on dealer participation. $175 security deposit waived to qualified buyers subject to approved credit through Toyota Financial Services. 36-month payments total $5,724 – **0% for 72 months to well qualified buyers through Toyota Finance - $13.89 per $1,000 borrowed. Model 4430: $199/Mo. – 36 Month Lease with $2,299 due at lease signing. Includes $1,450 Customer Down Payment + First Month’s Payment $199 + $650 Acquisition Fee. Adjusted Capitalized Cost is $23,580 based on dealer participation. $225 security deposit waived to qualified buyers subject to approved credit through Toyota Financial Services. 36-month payments total $7,164. **0% for 60 months to well qualified buyers through Toyota Finance - $16.67 per $1,000 borrowed. Model 7594: $230/Mo. – 36 Month Lease. Adjusted Capitalized Cost is $30102 based on dealer participation. Subject to approved credit through USBank - $.25 per mile overmiliage, and $395 disposition fee. 36-month payments total $8280. All offers good on Tier I PLUS only and exclude state and local taxes, tags, registration and title, insurance, and $250 doc fee. Offers expire 2/28/17. #1 Toyota Dealer in CINCINNATI METRO for Sales Satisfaction Scores in 2014, 2015, 2016. Based on Toyota Motor Sales PLS customer survey results.


LIFE

FEBRUARY 15, 2017 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • 9B

POLICE REPORTS

REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS COLERAIN TOWNSHIP

Continued from Page 8B

SHARONVILLE Incidents/ investigations Breaking and entering Reported on 2500 block of Annuity Drive, Jan. 2. Reported on 3500 block of Verbena Drive, Jan. 5. Burglary Reported on 11000 block of Algiers Drive, Jan. 3. Domestic Reported on Sharondale Road, Jan. 4. Fraud Reported on 10000 block of Wintergreen Court, Jan. 3. Menacing Reported on 11000 block of Reading Road, Jan. 8. Rape Reported on E. Sharon Road, Jan. 6. Theft Reported on 11000 block of Lebanon Road, Jan. 8. Merchandise removed from 12000 block of Lebanon Road, Jan. 7. Items removed from 11000 block of Mosteller Road, Jan. 6. Reported on 3200 block of Sharon Road, Jan. 6. Trailer removed from 2300 block of Kemper Road, Jan. 3. Mailbox removed from 11000 block of Sharonwoods Court, Jan. 4.

ABOUT REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS Information is provided as a public service by the office of Hamilton County Auditor Dusty Rhodes. Neighborhood designations are approximate.

Colerain Ave.: $2,156,163; Jan. 4. 7979 Eagle Creek Road: $260,000; Jan. 3. 2467 Eclipse Court: $33,250; Jan. 5. 3882 Enterprise Circle: $103,500; Jan. 5. 11690 Greenhaven Court: $48,000; Jan. 3. 9946 Greenriver Drive: $120,000; Jan. 5. 9493 Haddington Court: $56,000; Dec. 30. 8265 Livingston Road: $106,640; Jan. 4. 2634 Ontario St.: $49,500; Jan. 5. 2985 Overdale Drive: $117,000; Jan. 5. 3261 Paprika Court: $117,000; Jan. 4. 8340 Pippin Road: $145,000; Jan. 5. 8354 Pippin Road: $145,000; Jan. 5. 9225 Silva Drive: $153,200; Jan. 4. 3004 Snowvalley Court: $114,000; Dec. 30. 8531 Sunlight Drive: $85,600; Jan. 4. 9509 Amarillo Court: $18,000; Jan. 21. 9918 Arborwood Drive: $72,100; Jan. 25. 2793 Brampton Drive: $46,500; Jan. 25. 10213 Crestland Court: $88,513; Jan. 24. 9622 Crosley Farm Drive: $40,000; Jan. 23. 9631 Crosley Farm Drive: $46,500; Jan. 24. 3426 Dolomar Drive: $142,000; Jan. 26. 8581 Forrest Valley Drive: $293,455; Jan. 23. 6728 Gaines Road: $141,000; Jan. 26. 2981 Galbraith Road: $98,000; Jan. 24. 6837 Grange Court: $45,000; Jan. 25. 3241 Harry Lee Lane: $119,000; Jan. 23. 8268 Haskell Drive: $38,000; Jan. 21. 10244 Hawkhurst Drive: $43,500; Jan. 23. 2550 Highgrove Court: $50,000; Jan. 25. 7258 Jamerine Court: $21,250; Jan. 25. 3373 March Terrace: $69,269; Jan.

21. 3460 March Terrace: $114,000; Jan. 25. 3180 Preserve Lane: $48,000; Jan. 26. 9821 Regatta Drive: $72,400; Jan. 23. 3795 Ripplegrove Drive: $58,500; Jan. 20. 2583 Royal Glen Drive: $32,444; Jan. 26. 2761 Sandhurst Drive: $460; Jan. 20. 8715 Sarahs Bend Drive: $179,900; Jan. 23. 3105 Sovereign Drive: $85,000; Jan. 26. 9184 Tansing Drive: $229,000; Jan. 24. 6256 Twinwillow Lane: $255,000; Jan. 26. 8024 Valley Crossing Drive: $49,141; Jan. 23. 11950 Waldon Drive: $84,900; Jan. 23.

COLLEGE HILL 6290 Banning Road: $6,482,239; Jan. 3. 6290 Banning Road: $3,241,120; Jan. 3. 6344 Heitzler Ave.: $61,000; Jan. 5. 7715 Bitteroot Lane: $78,900; Jan. 26. 1317 Cedar Ave.: $124,900; Jan. 25. 6385 Savannah Ave.: $43,500; Jan. 20. 6385 Savannah Ave.: $47,900; Jan. 20.

EVENDALE 2875 Sharon Road: $4,056,500; Dec. 30. Sharon Road: $621,500; Dec. 30.

FOREST PARK 575 Brunner Drive: $114,500; Jan. 3. 11774 Cedarcreek Drive: $57,000; Jan. 4. 795 Frontier Court: $59,900; Jan. 5. 11274 Hanover Road: $176,000; Jan. 5. 1434 Waycross Road: $93,000; Jan. 3. 1589 Waycross Road: $100,000; Jan. 4. 788 Exmoor Drive: $58,725; Jan. 25. 958 Havensport Drive: $85,000;

MUSKETEER FANS

Jan. 20. 11418 Kary Lane: $78,674; Jan. 26. 11547 Ravensberg Court: $97,000; Jan. 20. 788 Exmoor Drive: $58,725; Jan. 25. 958 Havensport Drive: $85,000; Jan. 20. 11418 Kary Lane: $78,674; Jan. 26. 11547 Ravensberg Court: $97,000; Jan. 20.

1554 Compton Road: $30,000; Jan. 26. 7309 Forest Ave.: $170,000; Jan. 20. 7311 Forest Ave.: $170,000; Jan. 20. 9300 Rambler Place: $44,000; Jan. 21.

GREEN TOWNSHIP

NORTH COLLEGE HILL

5869 Bridgetown Road: $64,900; Jan. 21. 5065 Casa Loma Blvd.: $47,324; Jan. 24. 5874 Childs Ave.: $101,500; Jan. 25. 3575 Constitution Court: $215,000; Jan. 25. 5860 Gaines Road: $227,000; Jan. 23. 5432 Heather Court: $126,000; Jan. 25. 2893 Kleeman Road: $174,000; Jan. 20. 3613 Lakewood Drive: $107,000; Jan. 25. 5157 Leona Drive: $120,000; Jan. 20. 5485 Michelles Oak Court: $67,000; Jan. 21. 5205 North Bend Road: $380,000; Jan. 26. 5464 North Glen Road: $26,975; Jan. 25. 5464 North Glen Road: $80,925; Jan. 25. 5811 North Glen Road: $130,000; Jan. 25. 5207 Peterborough Drive: $366,453; Jan. 26. 5439 Robert Ave.: $121,000; Jan. 24. 6245 Sharlene Drive: $155,000; Jan. 25. 6427 Springmyer Drive: $190,000; Jan. 26. 5532 Surrey Ave.: $100,000; Jan. 25. 5534 Surrey Ave.: $100,000; Jan. 25. 6849 Taylor Road: $65,000; Jan. 25. 4039 Wildcherry Court: $149,900; Jan. 25. 6109 Woodhall Drive: $260,000; Jan. 25.

6473 Betts Ave.: $52,000; Jan. 3. 8401 Bobolink Drive: $70,000; Jan. 4. 1480 Larann Lane: $111,650; Dec. 30. 1812 Dallas Ave.: $42,000; Jan. 26. 1706 De Armand Ave.: $54,000; Jan. 24. 6541 Meis Ave.: $40,950; Jan. 26. 6837 Richard Ave.: $140,000; Jan. 23. 6385 Savannah Ave.: $43,500; Jan. 20. 6385 Savannah Ave.: $47,900; Jan. 20.

MOUNT AIRY 2502 North Bend Road: $130,000; Jan. 3.

5560 Fox Road: $131,885; Jan. 23.

MOUNT HEALTHY

SHARONVILLE 1617 Continental Drive: $134,000; Jan. 3. 3 Crowne Point Drive: $9,495,000; Jan. 5. 11737 Lebanon Road: $350,000; Jan. 5. 1711 Continental Drive: $86,251; Jan. 20. 10744 LeMarie Drive: $81,000; Jan. 24. 4159 Sweetgum Court: $110,000; Jan. 20.

SPRINGDALE 480 Cloverdale Ave.: $130,000; Jan. 4. 330 Glensprings Drive: $2,100,000; Dec. 30. 11885 Lawnview Ave.: $108,000; Jan. 5. 100 Tri-County Parkway: $950,000; Jan. 5. 12159 Benadir Road: $118,000; Jan. 20. 11717 Chesterdale Road: $4,351,340; Jan. 26. 400 Glensprings Drive: $1,500,000; Jan. 26. 1035 Ledro St.: $55,000; Jan. 25. 1035 Ledro St.: $59,000; Jan. 25.

SPRINGFIELD TOWNSHIP

1626 Aspenhill Drive: $96,439; Jan. 5. 2250 Banning Road: $6,482,239; Jan. 3. 2250 Banning Road: $3,241,120; Jan. 3. 11902 Brookway Drive: $195,000; Dec. 30. 1913 Creswell Drive: $152,000; Jan. 3. 559 Fleming Road: $220,000; Jan. 3. 7832 Gapstow Bridge : $150,000; Jan. 5. 9648 Leebrook Drive: $220,000; Jan. 4. 1272 Madeleine Circle: $83,000; Jan. 5. 12025 Mill Road: $167,000; Jan. 5. 2200 Pacora Drive: $48,000; Jan. 3. 1248 Section Road: $11,450; Dec. 30. 712 Silverhedge Drive: $190,000; Jan. 5. 10620 Stargate Lane: $168,900; Jan. 3. 10659 Stonewood Court: $163,500; Jan. 4. 1542 Summit Road: $15,000; Dec. 30. 1548 Summit Road: $15,000; Dec. 30. 10570 Wellingwood Court: $134,900; Jan. 5. 9339 Bridgecreek Drive: $139,753; Jan. 24. 9558 Crestbrook Drive: $15,000; Jan. 25. 1785 Fallbrook Lane: $67,130; Jan. 20. 1346 Hartwood Drive: $80,000; Jan. 25. 1193 Hempstead Drive: $54,000; Jan. 26. 9637 Kosta Drive: $117,500; Jan. 23. 9139 Peachblossom Court: $146,000; Jan. 25. 1012 Pinehollow Lane: $135,000; Jan. 26. 10494 Springrun Drive: $140,500; Jan. 23. 6209 Stella Ave.: $32,100; Jan. 21.

WOODLAWN 631 Marion Road: $44,925; Jan. 3.

WYOMING 1051 Burns Ave.: $189,000; Jan. 4. Rolling Hills Drive: $147,340; Dec. 30. Victoria Court: $147,340; Dec. 30.

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LIFE

10B • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • FEBRUARY 15, 2017

Tiny Micro-Chip Now In The Ear: Available! Now You See It...

RELIGION Augsburg Lutheran Church An Ash Wednesday worship service will be offered at 7 p.m. Wednesday, March 1. The church is at 11676 Hamilton Ave., Cincinnati; 825-2240.

Christ Church Glendale

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Sunday services are 8 a.m., 9 a.m. and 11 a.m. All are welcome. The church is at 965 Forest Ave., Glendale; 771-1544; www.christchurchglendale.org.

Lincoln Heights Missionary Baptist Church Service times for both the adults and youth will begin each Sunday at 10 a.m. For more information, contact the church at 772-5422, ext. 11.

About religion Religion news is published at no charge on a space-available basis. E-mail announcements to areeves@communitypress.com.

NEIGHBORS IN THE NEWS Wright takes new position at DPCR Springfield Township resident Larisa Wright has joined the DePaul Cristo Rey staff as full-time college success coordinator. DPCR may now be the only local high school with a full-time staff person dedicated to seeing its graduates successfully complete college. Wright’s role is to support the schoolwide goal that “all students will graduate from high school and college.” She serves as the main point of contact for all DPCR alumni who are in college – building relationships with them as well as with the colleges and universities they attend to ensure each student’s successful journey to college graduation. Her role with students begins while they are still enrolled at DPCR, and includes teaching lessons within the College Readiness class required of all students. The position was

created to assist mostly firstgeneration college students meet the challenges and opportunities they face during their higher educational experience. Wright has worked in higher education for the past Wright 10 years. Most recently she was the learning specialist coordinator for Miami University’s Scholastic Enhancement Program and had previously served as coordinator of multicultural affairs at the College of Mount St. Joseph, as a student support services graduate assistant at Wright State University, and as a resident assistant at Spelman College. She holds a bachelor’s degree in sports leadership and management from Miami University and a master’s degree in educational leadership from Wright State University.

2017 pollen and mold season begins The Southwest Ohio Air Quality Agency provides a public service each year of counting and reporting local pollen and mold data. 2017 counts were scheduled to begin Feb. 13, weather dependent. Counts are performed Monday through Friday. The sampler is at the Agency’s office and it captures a sample one minute in each 10 minutes for a 24-hour period. The results are posted on the agency’s website and social media platforms. Residents who suffer from allergies may find the counts helpful for tracking symptoms that correspond with the prevalent allergens of that day. Molds tend to be more active during the wet, rainy periods of spring and again in the fall as nature decays before winter. “During late April and early May, we see a rise in pollen from hickory, pine, oak and walnut trees,” monitoring and analysis

supervisor Anna Kelley said. “Ragweed is the primary pollen allergen in the fall, usually appearing in late August through most of September.” There are steps allergy-sufferers can take to ease their symptoms. One of the easiest tactics is to avoid being outdoors in the morning when pollen counts tend to spike. It may be helpful to take a shower at the end of the day to remove pollen and mold from one’s hair and skin. Additional suggestions can be found in the Agency’s free, downloadable brochure, Living With Allergies. The Southwest Ohio Air Quality Agency works with government agencies, businesses, communities and citizens to achieve and maintain healthy air quality for Southwest Ohio. For more information, visit the Southwest Ohio Air Quality Agency online at SouthwestOhioAir.org or interact with us on Facebook and Twitter.

Briefs

Michigan’s reigning Boogie n’ Blues heavyweight, Ball left the practice of law in 2001 to pursue a life in music. With recent appearances on Fox 2 News Detroit’s “The Nine Show” and Channel 20 News Detroit’s “Concert on the Qub,”, and back from a year-end Pacific coast tour, Ball is called a “nationally emerging boogiewoogie master.” He will perform 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 25, at Evendale Cultural Arts Center, 10500 Reading Road. Admission is free. For more information, call 513-563-1350. For a preview visit boogiewoogiekid.com.

Continued from Page 4B

A Feb. 2 planning meeting, at 7 p.m. at the municipal building, is open to the public. For more information, call Marjorie Harlow at 671-6916, Dan Shroyer at 581-6300 or Carolyn Ghantous at 3284046.

Evendale welcomes Youtube star with 3.7 million views Matthew Ball, aka “The Boogie Woogie Kid,” is the attorney-turnedmusician whonow has more than 3.7 million YouTube views and counting.


LIFE

FEBRUARY 15, 2017 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • 11B

DEATHS Alan D. Bicknaver

Rose M. Thome

Alan D. Bicknaver, 87, of White Oak died Dec. 27. He was a graduate of Ohio State University, president of Bix Box Co., a 35-year manager of the Hamilton County Fair in Carthage, and a member of the Board of Directors of the Ohio State Fair. Survived by children Beverly Langford, Becky (Michael) Bicknaver Creager and Beth (Jim) Morrow; nine grandchildren; seven great-grandchildren; brother Robert (Jan) Bicknaver. Preceded in death by wife Shirley M. Bicknaver. Memorials to the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital 3333 Burnet Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45229.

Rose M. (nee Branno) Thome, 103, of North College Hill died Nov. 15. She was a resident of NCH for 60 years, a parishioner of St. Margaret Mary for 72 years, member of Secular Franciscans, St. Anthony Fraternity for 55 years, and one of the founding members of the NCH Community Senior Center. Survived by children Frank V. (Luba) Thome, Roger D. (Mary Sue) Thome and Maria “Terrie” (Vince) Costello; 17 grandchildren; 30 great-grandchildren; many nieces and nephews. Preceded in death by husband of 69 years Robert R. Thome; children Robert L. (Mary Ellen) Thome and Roberta (Edward) Fisher. Memorials to NCH Community Senior Center, 1586 Goodman Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45224; St. Margaret Mary Church, 1830 W. Galbraith Road, Cincinnati, OH 45239, or the Hospice of Cincinnati, 4310 Copper Road, Cincinnati, OH 45242.

Paul A. Busam Paul A. Busam MD, 90, of Mount Healthy died Dec. 30. He was a WWII Army veteran and a member of Old St. Mary Church. Survived by children Edward (Pamela) Busam, John (Tracy) Busam, Marianne (Paul) McDonough and Paula (Christopher) Hass; 15 grandchildren; eight great-grandchildren. Preceded in death by wife of 44 years Roselyn E. (nee Heiselman) Busam. Memorials to Oratory-In-Formation of St. Philip Neri, 123 E. 13th St., Cincinnati, OH 45202, www.spncincinnati.com.

Have a ball getting back on your feet

Kathleen A. Vinje Kathleen A. (nee Weber) Vinje, 69, of Green Township died Nov. 26. Survived by husband of 48 years Gerald J. Vinje; children Kimberly and Gregory Vinje.; grandchildren Jacob, Ella and William Vinje.; several other relatives and friends. Memorials to Hospice of Cincinnati, P.O. Box 633597, Cincinnati, OH 45263, or to Stray Animal Adoption Program (SAAP), P.O. Box 72040, Newport, KY 41072.

Thomas A. Helmers

Ted Williams

Thomas A. Helmers, 87, of Green Township died Nov. 28. He was an Elder High School and Xavier University graduate. He served in the Army in Germany. Survived by wife of 59 years Jackie (nee Griese) Helmers; children Amy (Starr Ford) Cortez and Thomas (Diane) Helmers; grandchildren Chris Cortez and Erik Helmers; brother Earl (Lee) Helmers Helmers; many nieces, nephews, relatives and friends. Preceded in death by son Danny Helmers; siblings Edwin (Ceil), Don (Mary) and Ralph (Marlene) Helmers. Memorials to Our Daily Bread, P.O. Box 14862, Cincinnati, OH 45250.

Ted Williams, 67, of Mount Healthy died Dec. 26. He was a Vietnam War Navy veteran, and a member of Corpus Christi Catholic Church. Survived by wife of 45 years Cheryl (nee Stolz) Williams; children Dan (Shannon) Williams and Angie (Dave) Gerde; grandchildren Emilee, Katelyn, Evan, Trenton and Maddox; siblings Henry (Billie) Williams, Michael Williams (Sandy) Williams and Rick (Lisa) Williams; numerous nieces, nephews and other family. Preceded in death by sister Irene Reddington. Memorials to the National Kidney Foundation or to Corpus Christi Catholic Church.

When surgery is on the horizon, take the first step to a successful recovery by scheduling a short-term stay in the Private Rehab Suites at Twin Towers. We make the experience enjoyable with a state-of-the-art rehabilitation gym, customized therapy plan, private accommodations with a private bath and dedicated rehabilitation therapists. It’s all part of the exceptional everyday experiences you’ll find at Twin Towers. Schedule your short-term stay at (513) 382-7785.

HOW TO SUBMIT OBITUARIES Basic obituary information and a color photograph of your loved one is published without charge by The Community Press. Most notices are submitted by the funeral homes. We no longer provide forms. Please include the specific community in which the person lived, so we can make sure we publish it in the correct paper. Because of space, we may limit publication to the paper which covers the community in which the person lived. Email to rmaloney@communitypress.com and bbeasley@communitypress.com. To publish a larger memorial tribute, call 242-4000 for pricing details. Because of the number of notices we receive, it may be several weeks before a notice is published.

5343 Hamilton Avenue | Cincinnati, OH 45224 | www.lec.org Twin Towers, a Life Enriching Communities campus, is affi liated with the West Ohio Conference of the United Methodist Church and welcomes people of all faiths. CE-0000670205

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LIFE

12B • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • FEBRUARY 15, 2017

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD PUZZLE

ANSWERS ON PAGE 6B

No. 0212 DO THE SPLITS

1

BY LYNN LEMPEL / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ

51 Greenhorn on the force 1 Topic for Dr. Ruth 7 Reimbursed expense 54 Horse for hire for a commuter, 55 Result of a serious maybe wardrobe malfunction at the 14 As yet beach? 19 Sound system? 57 Hit one out 21 Major export of 58 Clean with a Florida pressurized spray 22 Blue hue 60 First name in 23 Berate some guy for daredevilry getting too much 61 Turbid sun? 62 Weighty matters? 25 Like most “Quo 63 He can be seen at Vadis” characters the western end of 26 Altar spot the National Mall, 27 “A bit of talcum / Is informally always walcum” 64 Pens for hens writer 65 Toast word 28 Banquet 67 M, on a form 29 For whom Nancy was 69 March movement first lady 73 It may deliver a 30 Gives an order punch 32 Remain undecided 74 Scientist’s dilemma 33 Fabric from flax regarding work vs. 34 Bearded animal play? 37 Suggestion to a bored 76 “My only love sprung short-story writer? from my only ____!”: Juliet 40 Book reviewer?: Abbr. 77 Entry 43 Having less heft 79 Wild revelry 45 Swinging Ernie 80 Archives material 81 Gist 46 35-nation alliance, briefly 82 Sight at Tanzania’s Gombe Stream 47 Drive-____ National Park 48 Fasten 83 Gist 49 Kids’ TV character 84 It’s a drain who refers to himself in the third 85 Entry on an I.R.S. person form: Abbr. 86 Dismaying Online subscriptions: Today’s announcement about puzzle and more disaster aid? than 4,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords 91 What’s right in front ($39.95 a year). of the tee? ACROSS

92 Photographer Arbus 94 Old gang weapons 95 Heart of the matter? 97 Bit of cushioning 99 Arrears 100 Glitch 101 “Waterloo” band 105 Corroded 106 Roker’s appeal before gastric bypass surgery? 109 Turn aside 110 Bad look 111 Five-alarmer 112 Irritable 113 Spreadsheet contents 114 Dripping DOWN

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1 Tour grp. since 1950 2 Breakfast chain 3 Disapproving sounds 4 Gather 5 “What’s the ____?” 6 Alito’s Supreme Court predecessor 7 Creature on the movie poster for “The Silence of the Lambs” 8 With 34-Down, longtime public radio host 9 Some space vehicles 10 It must turn over to start 11 Docket 12 With 42-Down, “Frosty the Snowman” singer 13 Super suffix? 14 Pacific island wrap 15 Worry of stratospheric proportions

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34 See 8-Down 35 W. Hemisphere treaty of 1994

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61 London tea accessory 63 Fleshy-leaved succulent 52 Way to go: Abbr. 64 1950s French 53 Pricey French president René fashion label 65 Steamed seafood dish 66 Abductor of 55 Club cousins Persephone 56 Utah’s ____ State 67 Exhibitor at 1863’s University Salon des Refusés 59 Cap similar to a tam- 68 Something easy, so o’-shanter they say 51 Talk wildly

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75 High hairdos 78 Jeer 80 Take some shots 83 Annoys

84 Ad-agency output 86 Devil-may-care 87 “Aha!” 88 Mystical doctrine 89 Talk wildly 90 Gaming trailblazer 93 Sluggish 96 Having no room for more 97 Fuel from a fen 98 Building’s rain diverter

99 Sobel who wrote the Pulitzer-nominated “Galileo’s Daughter” 100 Editor’s override 102 One with a lot of tweets 103 Treat for a dog 104 Presently 106 Supplied 107 Parliamentary support 108 Corp. bigwig

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41 Was a busybody

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49 Timeline sections

14

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39 Certain rod

47 Conveyance for soldiers

13

28 32

48

65

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33 Those who need sound memories, per Montaigne

11

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10

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18 Tear apart 20 Plunger alternative

9

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17 Desiccated ____ Sea

8

Beautiful Luxury Sedan, Tan Leather, Sunroof, PW, PL, CD, Alum. Wheels, 23K Miles

$17,988 BUDGET BUYS

VANS

2013 Dodge Avenger SE .........................................$12,475 2006 Dodge Grand Caravan...................................... $6,955 2005 Mini Cooper........................................... $1,995 White, Auto, A/C, PW, PL, Alu. Wheels 34K Miles, #G8061

Magnesium, Alum. Wheels, V6, StowNGo

Grey, Auto, A/C, CD, PW, PL 39 MPG HWY, #G8138

Black, V6, Auto, A/C, 3rd Row Seating, Great Family Vehicle, #G8176

Silver, Auto, Alloy Wheels, High Miles, Cheap Mini!!

2003 Chevrolet Silverado Pickup .................. $4,995 2015 Honda Civic LX ..............................................$14,972 2010 Chrysler Town & Country Touring.................... $9,885 Ext Cab, Auto, PS, PB, Runs Good, Wood Haulin Special

2013 Ford Escape SE..............................................$17,885 2010 Dodge Grand Caravan SXT. ............................ $10,775 Silver, Auto, A/C, Sunroof, PW, PL, 22K Miles, #F8077

Silver, V6, StowNGo, PW, PL, Alum. Wheels, #G8040

2013 Honda Accord EX-L........................................$17,975 2013 Chrysler Town & Country Touring.................. $19,883 Coupe, 15K Miles, Auto, A/C, Sunroof, Blind Spot Display, Leather. Like New

Gold, V6, Leather, DVD, Rear Backup Camera, Vacation Ready! #G8122

2016 Chevrolet Malibu LT. ......................................$17,985 2014 Chrysler Town & Country Touring L ............... $22,495 Black, Auto, A/C, PW, PL, Alu. Wheels, 8K Miles, # G8214

Grey, V6, PW, PL, P Seat, Rear Back Camera, Heated Seats, Great Family Vehicle, #G8113

2005 Mercury Mariner Premier ..................... $5,995 4x4, V6, Alum Wheels, Running Bds, Sunroof, Local Trade

2009 Ford Fusion SEL.................................... $7,988 V6, Auto, Leather, Sunroof, #G8207

2007 Ford Mustang Premium ........................ $7,988 V6, Blue, Coupe, Auto, #G8220

2007 Saturn Sky Convertible ........................ $7,995

Silver, 5 Speed, A/C, Low Miles

2014 Chevrolet Traverse ........................................$21,985 2015 Chrysler Town & Country Touring.................. $23,775 2012 Dodge Caliber SXT ................................ $8,988

White, V6, 3rd Row Seat, PW, PL Alu. Wheels, Front Wheel Drive. One Owner, #G8163 Red, V6, Alum. Wheels, PW, PL, Rear DVD, 16K Miles, Stow N Gov, #G8184

5QT Oil & Filter Change

$24.95

Most vehicles. Some restrictions apply. Expires 2/28/17.

1065 OHIO PIKE

JUST 3 MILES EAST OF I-275, EXIT #65 CE-0000669333

www.joekiddauto.com

Friendly and Courteous Salesmen

Gray, Auto, A/C, PW, PL, Alum. Wheels

CAR GOT THE SHAKES? CompleteFrontEndAlignmentService

$49.95

Most vehicles. Some restrictions apply. Expires 2/28/17.

513-752-1804 SALES HOURS: Mon-Thu 9-8 • Fri 9-6 • Sat 9-5:30


Classifieds

FEBRUARY 15, 2017 µ NORTHWEST - COMMUNITY µ 1C

cincinnati.com

Homes of Distinction

B BO UYER UG HT

3334 HARRY LEE LANE Are you in the market for a new home this spring? If so, let The Deutsch Team show you the amazing homes that are available right now.We were able to find this nice home for our buyers.All you have to do is call us and let us find a home sweet home for you. Don’t waste any more time call the team that works hard to find exactly what you are looking for in a home. Tom Deutsch, Jr.

West Shell

513-460-5302

Rumpke continues to grow!

For a multi-family property management company in NO.KY.

Now Hiring CDL Drivers Cincinnati, OH

Roll Off Drivers

Responsible for delivering, removing and hauling roll off waste containers to and from customer sites.This is a physically demanding job that requires extensive physical exertion.

Must have a good work ethic, knowledge of electrical and plumbing required. Previous experience in multi-family environment a plus. Salary based on experience. Health care and vacation provided Applicant must have valid driver’s license and own transportation. We are a drug free work place.

Pre-Employment Testing EOE • No phone calls please

Apply online:

www.RumpkeJobs.com

CE-0000669759

Homes for Sale-Ohio

great places to live...

Kentucky Commission on Human Rights 800-292-5566 H.O.M.E. (Housing Opportunities Made Equal) 513-721-4663

CHECK OUT CLASSIFIED online at cincinnati.com

Homes for Sale-Ohio

Homes for Sale-Ohio

CE-0000670156

Real Estate

Rentals All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968 which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, national origin, handicap or familial status or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newpaper are available on an equal opportunity basis.

Recycling Drivers

Responsible for servicing assigned route(s) with the collection and hauling of acceptable recycling materials to a recycling plant. This is a physically demanding job that requires extensive physical exertion.

Steady work with competitive pay, benefits & 401(k)

CALL 859-431-7337 FOR APPOINTMENT.

Homes for Sale-Ohio

PETS & STUFF

RIDES

To place your ad visit: cincinnati.com/classifieds or search: classifieds

Maintenance Worker

VISIT: cincinnati.com/classifieds TO PLACE YOUR AD

COLERAIN TOWNSHIP

HOMES

JOBS

Avondale 1BR Apt, wall to wall carpet, refrig, range, breakfast bar, NO PETS. $450/mo. 513-847-4551 Bondhill: 1BR, 4 family, heat & hot water paid, laundry/storage in basement, No pets. $425/mo + deposit. 513-825-4157 513-305-6818

Covedale area, equip’d kit, recently remodeled 1Br on busline, $350/mo 513-347-2100

Harrison-Remodeled Deluxe 1 & 2BR, $600-$710, d/w, a/c, balc, No pets. Sec. dep. 513-574-4400

Westwood- 1 & 2 BR Apts from $425. Section. 8 OK. Lndry. 1st mo. $200. No application fee. 513-826-6851

EASTGATE BEECHWOOD VILLA No security Deposit required $100 move in gift card Beautiful 2 bedroom units, conveniently located near shopping and schools. Playground, laundry, computer center. HEAT & WATER PAID $545/monthly rent. 513-528-2263 Email: beechwoodmgr@lhp.net

Mt Washington- 4 Fam, 2BR, 1Ba, $550, heat & water incld, Clean quiet building 513-231-8690

Westwood newly renovated 2BR-1BAMain Flr duplex bldg, no pets or smoking, $650. 513-316-2498

Price Hill- 2BR, $550/mo; 1BR, $475, no pets, 513-451-3191 Sayler Park-1 BR , no pets, $465/mo. 513-451-3191

Cincinnati Family & Senior Low Income Apts. Section 8. Very nice locations. 1-3 BR Equal Opportunity Housing. 513-929-2402

Green Township 1BR, heat & water furn’d, equip kit, $450/mo+$450/dep 513-922-0484

Homes for Sale-Ohio

Homes for Sale-Ohio

WESTERN HILLS/COVEDALENICE 2 BR, 1 BA, HEAT PAID, SECURE ENTRY & CAMERAS, BALCONY, WALKIN CLOSET. $645. RAPID RUN TERRACE APTS., 4666 RAPID RUN RD. 513-378-0540

Homes for Sale-Ohio

Destin, FL, Gulf front, 2BR, Condo Rentals, in Beautiful Destin, Local owner. 513-528-9800 Office., 513-752-1735 H Springdale: 2 br, 2 ba, no steps, 1 car gar, $1200/mo. & $1600/mo 513-253-2644

Homes for Sale-Ohio

SERVING OHIO, INDIANA & KENTUCKY

OPEN SUNDAY 12-2

Bridgetown - 5596 Karen Ave 2 Bdrm/1.0 $105,000 Dir: Bridgetown Rd. or Lawrence Rd. to Aurora or Moonridge to street. H-9226

OPEN SUNDAY 2-3:30

Cincinnati - 18 E Fourth St 701 2 Bdrm/2.0 $374,900 Dir: 4th St. between Vine & Walnut. H-9049

OPEN SUNDAY 12-1:30

Delhi - 434 Debonhill Ct 4 Bdrm/3.0 $149,900 Dir: Anderson Ferry to Cannas to L on Happy R on Sultana & R on Street. H-9210

OPEN SUNDAY 2-3:30

Delhi - 5120 Old Oak Trl 44 2 Bdrm/2.0 $51,900 Dir: Anderson Ferry north of Delhi Pike to Old Oak Trail H-9234

OPEN SUNDAY 2-3:30

Monfort Hts. - 5535 Samver Rd 3 Bdrm/2.0 $129,900 Dir: North Bend (Near LaSalle H.S.) to North on Street. H-9190

OPEN SUNDAY 12-1:30

Monfort Hts. - 3391 Diehl Rd 16 2 Bdrm/2.0 $83,000 Dir: Heritage Green condominium, off of North Bend Road. H-9204

OPEN SUNDAY 12-1:30

Westwood - 3031 Werk Rd 3 Bdrm/3.1 $249,900 Dir: Werk Rd. between Boudinot & Epworth (directly across from Mother of Mercy High School). H-9227 Jeanne Rieder

Mike Wright

Jeanne Rieder

Jeanne Rieder

Jeanne Rieder

Jeanne Rieder

Biggs Team

Addyston - Great opportunity, built as driving range. Many possible uses. Top of Pro shop is 2 BD apt, 2 other areas that could be rental. 22 Acres. $179,900 H-9229

Bridgetown - Build 5900 to 8000 sq ft office bldg. 47 pkg spaces, great location, possible bank use also. 1.2 acres. Great development possibilities. $235,000 H-7123

Bridgetown - Bus./Retail high visibility for sale. Just under 8000 SF total space /w room for office, showroom,. Visible sign from Harrison Ave. $275,900 H-8823

Colerain - Exquisite 5 BR Estate on 5 AC lot w/view of lake w/ fountain. Meticulously maintained. Too many amenities to list. Fin bsmt w/pub style bar. $390,000 H-9091

Colerain - Lg 4 Bd 2 Sty. Updates include kit, wind, furn, roof. Fin LL w/study, fam rm w/ wbfp & wood pegged flrs. 2 car oversized gar. Pav stone patio $174,900 H-9128

Delhi - 1300 Sq. Ft. office space. 1 private restroom, 2 common. About 7 steps, 20 common parking spots. Great space. Recently remodeled. Lease H-9232

Steve Florian

Steve Florian

Hoeting-Wissel Team

Vicki Schlechtinger

Heather Claypool

Colerain East - Updated 3 bdrm level entry ranch! New kit w/ plenty of cabinets! Family room w/walk out to private yard in cul-de-sac! Newer windows & roof! $59,900 H-9175 Lisa Ibold

Green Twp - Mixed use property 5000 SF Comm Bldg, 5 sep bays. 20’ flr to ceil hts. 3000 SF office by sep users. 2-4 Fam bldg. total 8-1 bd apts. $499,900 H-9083

Groesbeck - Great Brick Ranch on a quiet cul-de-sac. New carpet, freshly painted, new windows, all appliances stay. Move in ready! Fen in lev backyard. $79,900 H-9184

Miami Twp - .688 AC lot on Shady Ln. Public sewer/water/gas/ cable/elec. Front view is Twp. Green space. Walk to Aston Oaks Golf Course & Restaurant. $39,900 H-8004

Miami Twp - Att Investors, 1.15 AC Comm Prime lot in booming Miami Heights, Zoned office but potential rezone, current rental inc from 2 homes, must see $475,000 H-8090

Miami Twp - Prime 4+ acres adjoins Neuman Golf Crse/Miami Hgts Rec Center! Zoned for 28 ranch condos! All util avail/MSD apprd. Alternative use poss. $475,000 H-6733

Miami Twp - Beautiful, level, cleared 1/2 acre lot in prime location. Bring your own Builder. $29,900 H-9013

North College Hill - Opportunity in NCH’s Bus Dist! Ideal for 2 offices: dr off, law firm, etc. Brick bldg. in excel cond. 10 pkg spots! 3150 sq ft per cnty aud. $139,900 H-9114

Steve Florian

Jeanne Haft

Julie Pieczonka

Julie Pieczonka

Jeanne Rieder

Lisa Ibold

Lisa Ibold

Northside - Great Investment Opportunity! 3-Family in Northside. 2 bdrm & 1 bdrm units. Open floor plans w/equipt kitchens. Near I-74 and busline. $98,000 H-9101

Reading - Great condition, & makes money. Set up for All-inclusive Little Living, 4 residents, private quarters. Rentals total $2545/mo. On bus line. $124,900 H-9034

Westwood - This property features 2 store fronts with 2-1 bedroom apts. Also includes all inventory with license’s. $190,000 H-9206

White Oak - Zoned office 2500 sq ft per auditor. 3 office spaces, garage, 2 bedroom apt. Large parking lot in rear. Well maintained. $129,900 H-9103

WhitewaterTwp-Single-Familybuilding lot, 4.9 wooded acres, peaceful, tranquil setting offers seclusion yet near shopping & highway. $43,500 H-9119

Bill Dattilo

Sylvia Kalker

Springfield Twp - Wow! 4 bed, 2 full & 2 half baths on cul-de-sac wooded lot! Features include 18x13 3 Season Rm with skylights, hdwd flrs and 2 car garage. $194,900 H-8988 Hoeting-Wissel Team

Megan Vollrath

Heather Claypool

Mike Wright

Whitewater Twp - Over 8900 SF would make excellent retail site. Property unzoned. Sewer avail. Include bldg to left along frontage. 140 ft front. on Rt. 128 $240,000 H-8968 Steve Florian

Hoeting-Wissel Team


2C µ NORTHWEST - COMMUNITY µ FEBRUARY 15, 2017

COME GROW WITH US!

GROUP LEAD WARSAW, KY • ALL SHIFTS AVAILABLE!

We are seeking detail-oriented, problem-solvers to perform leadership duties to ensure all of our employees are trained properly and working safely and efficiently

• Fork Truck and Material Handler experience is a plus• Must be

• High School diploma / GED and 3 years’ distribution experience required • Leadership experience required• Must have proficient computer skills, communication and reportingskills, and math skills

able to work overtime as necessary

Apply online today at: Jobs.DormanProducts.com

Dorman Products is an Equal Opportunity Employer (EOE) and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, gender, age, veteran status, political affiliation, sexual orientation, marital status odisability (in compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act) with respect to employment opportunities. The Cincinnati Enquirer has carrier routes available in the following areas:

Central St. Bernard @ Walnut Hills @ Wyoming @ Avondale East Amelia / Batavia @ Bethel @ Brown County @ Goshen @ Hyde Park @ Madeira/Indian Hill/Milford/Loveland @ Montgomery / Silverton @ Oakley West Colerain Twp. @ Groesbeck @ Harrison Monfort Heights @ Northside Western Hills / Westwood @ Wyoming North Fairfield @ Liberty Township @ Maineville @ Morrow Mason @ Sharonville @ West Chester Kentucky Cold Spring @ Crescent Springs Edgewood Erlanger Florence / Burlington Independence / Taylor Mill Park Hills / Ft. Mitchell Union @ Walton / Verona @ Warsaw Indiana St. Leon @ Lawrenceburg @ West Harrison Must be 18 with a valid drivers license and proof of insurance. If interested please call: 1-855-704-2104 deliveryopportunities.gannett.com/

Foster Care Case Manager Provide case management services to children in foster care in the Cincinnati, OH area. Requires travel, on-call rotation & flexible hours to meet the needs of children & families. Degree and current state of Ohio LSW, LPC, or MFT license required. Foster care, mental health, or child welfare experience preferred. www.buckeyeranch.org EEO AA Employer

Real Estate

Homes

Civil Engineering Designer

Evans CivilPro Engineers, LLC, in Mason, OH area seeking Civil Engineering Designer with 5+ years experience in Private Development, Stormwater, Roadway and Public Sewer & Water design.

starting fresh... 2BR in Wyoming, $88,000 Hardwood fl oors. Call for more details. 513-415-0299

Salary is commensurate with experience and qualifications. Please email resume to ECPE.HR@gmail.com EOE

Careers

Jobs

HARTWELL/ELMWOODFurnished rooms on busline. $95 to $105/week w/$100 dep. 513-617-7923, 513-617-7924, 513-919-9926

Step by Step Packaging needs Detailed, quality-minded associate to join our team. 8-4 shift. Mandatory background check and drug screen. Call Jim at 513-247-0133 to

   

Janitorial Part time evening cleaners needed in the Newtown, Sharonville, Anderson areas. 2-7 hrs per night depending on location. IDEAL FOR COUPLES! Call 513-315-0218 Part-time Housekeeper or Janitor Flexible day time hours Starting $10-$12/hour Apply On Site 5300 Hamilton Ave. Cin., OH 45224 513-541-5252 (College Hill)

ASSEMBLER / PACKER NEEDED

Comfortable clean environment.

new beginnings... Office Space 500-2,000 sq. ft 10 mins to downtown on bus line, ideal for any professional & below market rent Call Now 513-532-0857

Sr. VP, FP&A, Vantiv LLC, Symmes Twp. OH. Req. BS in acct’g, actur. sci., fin. or bus. admin. + 120 mo. progressively responsible exp. in FP&A, corporate finance, or related broad-based financial mgmt, incl. 72 mo. in a senior leadership role. Also req: CPA; excellent organizational& problem-solving skills; proven expertise attracting, motivating & retaining top talent in a developmental culture that fosters excellence; & an entrepreneurial spirit & comfort working w/in fast-paced, rapidly changing environment. Apply at www.vantiv.com/careers .

Experienced Roofer/Helper Great Pay and Benefits Must have driver’s license. Call: 513-821-2985

MA/LPN/RN Needed for busy allergy practice. PT available in our Western Hills offices Please send resume to: caac.sll@bizcinci.rr.com

discuss job if interested.

ISI CLASSIFIEDS online at cincinnati.com Bakery Help Needed Production Help (AM Hours) Sales Help- (Late mornings/ Early Afternoons) Apply in person- 3805 Shady LN, NORTH BEND, OH 45052

Compassionate Person will care for your loved one in their home. Experienced and dependable. Can do 24 hours. 513-304-1130

Find your new home today Stress-free home searches

powering real estate search for over 365 newspapers

©2014 HomeFinder.com, LLC. All rights reserved

Equal Housing Opportunity

CHECK OUT CLASSIFIED online at cincinnati.com


FEBRUARY 15, 2017 µ NORTHWEST - COMMUNITY µ 3C General Auctions

General Auctions

Auction**ABSOLUTE AUCTION**Auction EXERCISE EQUIPMENT Moved For Convenience of Auction to: 1296 St Rt 28, Loveland, OH 45140 SAT., FEBRUARY 25, 2017 Starting 10:00AM CYBEX EQUIP : Seated Leg Curl, Leg Extension, Seated Leg Press, Hip Abduction, Dual Axis Overhead Press, Back Extension, Torso Rotation, Arm Extension, Lateral Rise, Dual Axis Chest Press, Arm Curl Machine, Ab Crunch, Fly Machine, Dual Axis Row/Rear Delt and Dual Axis Pull Down Machine; Hammer Strength ISO Wide Chest & Lateral Front Pull Down, Behind Neck Press, Dead Lift Machine; (4) SciFit Hill Climb Machines w/Electronic Readout; (6) SciFit AC5000 Treadmills w/Electronic Readouts; (2) Endurance B3R Recumbent Cycles; Sports Art 8007 Elliptical Trainer; Weight Benches; Stereo Systems; Exercise Balls, etc. SEE AUCTIONZIP.com, AUCTIONEER #6832 For Pictures TERMS: We Will Accept Cash, Local Check, Visa, MC & Discover w/Picture ID. All Items Must Be Paid In Full At Conclusion Of Auction. A 13% Buyer’s Premium In Effect. If You Pay By Cash Or Check, We Will Give You A 3% Discount On The Buyer’s Premium. All Items Sold "AS IS", Please Rely On Your Own Inspection. 2 Day Removal. DIRECTIONS: I-275 to Exit #57 (Milford/Blanchester) Go East Toward Blanchester 2.7 Miles to Auction on Left. Watch For Signs. Court Ordered Receivership Auction, Licking County Court of Common Pleas, Case # 2014CV01031 Frank McCullough, Auctioneer (513) 831-4866 Winter Equip & Truck Auction Sat, February 25th @ 9am Cincinnati Auction Facility Warren Co. Fairgrounds 665 SR 48 Lebanon, OH 45036 Commercial Trucks, Trailers, AG Tractors, Implements, Lawn & Garden, Construction Excavating, Mining Equip., Wagon Loads of Small Tools & More! Auction Units accepted until Weds, Feb. 22nd @5pm Auctionzip.com #6240 www.dunndealauctions.com Secured Creditors 674 Sales LLC Consignors Owners

Well est. medical delivery co. sks. dependable, honest, non smoker PT independent contractor w/ van or SUV for mostly evening 4:30-8:30 delivery. Must pass bkground checks and drug screen. 513-841-1159

Commercial INSIDE SALES REP Sentimental Productions, video publishing company, Seeking Inside Sales Representatives Part-Time, 20 hours/week, hourly + commission. Sales experience required, no telecommuting. Call 513-244-6542

$1500 WEEKLY MINIMUM PAY! MAKE $82,500 A YEAR! Dedicated Out and Back Runs! Health. Dental. 401K Benefits! Late Model Equipment. Required: Class A CDL, Hazmat, Tank, TWIC & Passport, 2 YRS Tr/Tr Exp. & Clean MVR Required. Call Barb: 855-971-7817

Drivers, CDL Class A or B: TruckMovers, New Singles from Williamstown, WV Be Your Own Boss!! truckmovers.com/apply Call: 1-855-225-8483

Your Source

Garage Sales

Legals

neighborly deals...

2 Burial Plots-Bridgetown Cemetery, Green Twp. Call for more info. 513-532-7366

CASKETS $300 & URNS $99 ALL CASKETS 16 & 18 gauge metal only $300 & Solid Cherry & Oak Wood only $500 All funeral homes must

accept our caskets. IT"S THE LAW! Buy ahead save thousands, churches, police, firemen, businesses. 8455 Winton Rd in Brentwood shopping Center

opportunites, lease, Invest...

Batavia Ohio Office Space on Craigslist, or Facebook and search James One Investments or call 513-732-0028 ... ask for Jim Roselawn Now LeasingCommercial Store front Spaces, newly renovated & updated, 500-5,000 sf. Drs office, veterianrly offce, clothing store, tax office. 513-631-0100

Assorted

Stuff

CASH PAID for unopened unexpired Diabetic Strips. Up to $35 per 100. 513-377-7522 www.cincytestrips.com

I BUY OLD Stereo Equipment. Recording studio gear, musical instruments, etc. (513) 473-5518 # I BUY VINYL RECORDS Rock, Metal, Punk, Indie, R&B, Reggae, etc. We make house calls. 513-428-4695

INSTANT CASH PAID For Baseball Cards Coins, Gold, Silver, Antiques, Old Toys, Watches, Comics, Case Knives Military, Trains, Autographs, Many Others! We Pick-up. 513-295-5634

Garage Sales IRS REFUND SPECIALS Living Room, Dining Rooms, Mattresses, Bunkbeds, Futons, Electric Adjustable Beds w/ memory foam mattresses. REALLY LOW MATTRESS PRICES FAST DELIVERY 100’s of premium king sets Lots of floor model specials. SHOP US TODAY! Lowest Prices---Highest Quality 8455 Winton Rd* Brentwood Plaza Call BILL, w/ your questions 513-383-2785! Mattress & Furniture Express mattressandfurnitureexpress .com Apply online everyone approved. Guaranteed financing, No Credit Check

WANTED - All motorcycles pre-1980. Running or not, any condition. Cash paid. Call 845-389-3239 or email: cyclesndmore10@gmail.com

WAR RELICS US, German, Japanese Uniforms, Helmets, Guns, Swords, Medals Etc, Paying Top Dollar Call 513-309-1347 Yard and Outdoor 2012 TORO 16HP 48" TBar walk behind w/2 wheel velke, great shape! Asking $2,200. 513-503-8695

Adopt Me

Pets 1994 NEW HOLLAND 3930 WITH QUICK TACH LOADER ,1800 hours 50 Hp $2100 Call me:2162453480

all kinds of things... HANDYMAN Experienced, POSTAGE STAMP SHOW Free admission, Four Points Sheraton 7500 Tylers Place, off exit 22 & I-75, West Chester, OH., Feb 18 & 19, Sat 10-5 & Sun 10-3. Buying, selling & appraising at it’s best! Beginners welcome. www.msdastamp.com

for the latest...

Call Today 513-383-2785 thecasketcompany.com

MEDICAL DELIVERY

Business Call 614-946-6853 for more info

Great Buys

Reasonable, No Job Too big or Too Small. Call Steve 513-491-6672

BUYING-RECORD ALBUMS & CDs, METAL, JAZZ, BLUES, ROCK, RAP, INDIE, R&B & REGGAE. 513-683-6985

CHECK OUT CLASSIFIED online at cincinnati.com

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION Public Hearing Regarding Glendale Quiet Zone Application The Village of Glendale Planning and Historic Preservation Commission has scheduled a special meeting in order to conduct a public hearing on Monday, March 20, 2017 at 6:00 pm at the Glendale Town Hall, second floor, 80 E. Sharon Avenue, Glendale, OH 45246. The purpose of the hearing is to receive public input regarding the Glendale Quiet Zone Application submitted on February 6, 2017. The public is encouraged to attend and participate. All documents are available for viewing during regular business hours at the Village Office, 30 Village Square, or from the Village website at www.glendaleohio.org “Railroad Quiet Zones” tab from the home page. For additional assistance, please contact the Village office at 513771-7200. TRI,Feb15,’17#1918290

All Ohio’s REPTILE Sale & Show Buy, sell, trade! Sat, Feb. 18, 9a-3p Adults $5. 10 & under $1 NEW LOCATION Franklin County Fairgrounds 5035 Northwest Pkwy Hilliard, OH 43026 614-459-4261 / 614-457-4433 http://allohioreptile shows.webs.com

Dogs, AKC Registered Lab Pups, males and females, $$400 to $600, 7 weeks old, Silver, Charcoal, Blacks and Whites, calm Beautiful Lab Pups....Mom is silver..Dad is Charcoal. Gonna be big dogs. Shots... micro chipped and wormed...Ready to go to good homes. Limited Registration..Full Registration available.... Call or text. 812-209-9337 (812)209-9337 larrbear_54 @yahoo.com Golden Retreiver Puppies AKC-$900, 5-Females, 2Males, 1st shots, vet ckd, POP, 812-655-9412 or 513-379-1329

find a new friend... AKC Lab Pups, silver/chocolate & other colors available, utd on vaccines & deworming, vet exam, health tested parents, Health & Hip Guarantee, $900-1200. Located in Center, KY. Can meet closer. www.carterfarm labs.com (270)565-2583

Havanese Bichon puppies ($900) AKC registered (nonshedding and hypoallergenic). They have been vet checked w/first shots and dewormed. (513)633-0027 j ackzon360@gmail.com Lab puppies, Champ bloodlines, shots, wormed, Yellow, Blk & Choc, 7wks, $400-$600. 513-344-0324

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION PUBLIC AUCTION In accordance with the provisions of State law, there being due and unpaid charges for which the undersigned is entitled to satisfy an owner and/or manager’s lien of the goods hereinafter described and stored at LifeStorage "formerly Uncle Bob’s Self Storage" location(s) listed below. And, due notice having been given, to the owner of said property and all parties known to claim an interest therein, and the time specified in such notice for payment of such having expired, the goods will be sold at public auction at the below stated location(s)to the highest bidder or otherwise disposed of on Monday, February 27, 2016 @ 11AM, 11378 Springfield Pike, Springdale, OH 45246, (513)771-5311 Lexis Laster 105 Ridge Drive, Fairfield, OH 45014 Household Goods/Furniture, TV/Stereo Equipment. DeShaun Johnson 11414 Lebanon Rd. Apt. 4 Cincinnati, OH 45241 Household Goods/Furniture, Tools/Appliances, Office Furniture/Machines/Equipm ent, Account Records/Sales Samples. TRI,Feb8,15,’17#1861599

Mini Poodles- 4 mos. old 2 black, Males, shots, $300. 513-462-3804 poodlesdw73 @yahoo.com PUG PUPPY AKC, Pug Puppy AKC, 1 F, Fawn, 1- M, Black, $700. 513-305-5528 Yorkie Puppies,CKC, 2 Females, small Vet chk, 1st shots & wormed, tails docked, $600 cash only. 513528-0278 Yorkies, Yorkie Poos, Poodles, Chihuahua pups, $375-$600. Vet chkd, s&w. Blanchester, OH 937-725-9641

Automotive

Rides best deal for you...

Wanted - A used 12-15 passenger van, 4-5 yrs old to be donated, We are a 501(c)3 corporation, Your donation is tax deductible. Please contact Tim Weber, Sea Scout Ship 717 B.S.A. 859-750-2402

FIND GOOD HELP!   ISI CLASSIFIEDS online at cincinnati.com

Garage & Yard Sale VISIT: cincinnati.com/classifieds TO PLACE YOUR AD

Great Buys

Garage Sales

Garage Sales neighborly deals...

Westwood/45238 - Moving Sale, Sat. Feb 18, 9am-2pm, 5785 Timrick Ct, Entire Household & more!

UPDATED ALL DAY.

Cin. OH Estate Sale 8332 Jadwin St Cincinnati OH 45216 2/17 & 2/18/17 Fri-9-4; #’s @ 8:45; Sat-9-4 Contents of home & basement. Salt crock bowls & pitchers, granite ware, old quilts & linens, Poppytrail pottery, 1922 baseball uniform (Elkart, Indiana) ant. Infant’s clothing, dolls & books. Furs costumes, craft, floral & sewing items, kitchen gadgets, old clocks, lamps, pictures, pocket watches, Hummels, foreign coins, CUTCO knives, old wood boxes, some tools, rocker, misc. chairs & tables, room screens, stools, lots of misc. items. Great Sale, too much to list-all priced to sell. Info & picshsestatesales.com or 859468-9468.DirectionsGalbraith Rd - Jadwin St

Union, KY Estate Sale 2540 St. Charles Cir Union, KY 41091 2/18 & 2/19/17 Sat-9-4; #’s @ 8:45; Sun-1-5 Short Notice Estate Sale Cherry Thomasville bedroom set, leather sofa & chairs, mid century bedrooms, signed & numbered prints. Oak office furniture, bookcases, patio set, fur coats, dining room set, tools, 1950s playboys, barware, Waterford, silver, washer & dryer, costume jewelry, Old fishing tackle, old saddle, plus more items too much to list – all priced to sell! Info & pics – hsestatesales or 859–468–9468 directions – Highway 42 – old Union Road – Orleans Blvd – 3rd St in circle – Marcais Dr- St Charles Cir

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4C µ NORTHWEST - COMMUNITY µ FEBRUARY 15, 2017

ONLY CARS.COM HELPS YOU GET THE RIGHT CAR, WITHOUT ALL THE DRAMA.


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