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TRI-COUNTY PRESS

Your Community Press newspaper serving Evendale, Glendale, Sharonville, Springdale, Wyoming

CELEBRATING

120 YEARS page 3A

$1.00

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 11, 2017

BECAUSE COMMUNITY MATTERS

Glendale moves closer to quiet zone Kelly McBride kmcbride@communitypress.com

GLENDALE – They rumble through the village every 20 minutes. Around the clock. Every day. Trains are part of Glendale’s history and its present. Residents and visitors have grown accustomed to the thunderous sound that interrupts conversation in the Village Square and residences along the tracks that run through the village and cross heavily traveled Sharon Road. But the trains could be silenced, if a plan to create a quiet zone moves forward. Glendale officials had considered establishing a quiet zone in 2000, and again in 2007.

GLENDALE TRAINS BY THE NUMBERS 64 The average number of trains traveling through Glendale every day 22 The average number of minutes between trains rumbling through the village 90 Albion Avenue crossing’s ranking among Ohio’s most dangerous 5,752 Number of railroad crossings in Ohio 110 Noise level of train horn, measured in decibels 85 Decibel level of prolonged exposure that can cause hearing loss 280,320 Number of horn blasts per year in Glendale 1.7 Land area of Glendale, in square miles

KELLY MCBRIDE/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

The Quiet Zone would include security gates at this railroad crossing at Sharon Road.

But the cost was prohibitive, hovering at about $1.3 million, and out of reach for the small village. Over the past couple of years, the cost has gone down, funding is available, and a private donation has brought the project within reach. A quiet zone allows a train to cross an intersection without sounding its horn. To assure safety of vehicles and pedestrians crossing the tracks, the Fed-

eral Railroad Administration requires security gates to be installed. They close the crossing completely, ensuring that vehicles can’t drive around a lowered gate. These quadrant gates span the entire roadway in each direction, completely blocking the flow of traffic. Glendale Mayor Don Lofty said that if the village creates a quiet zone, it will also include a sensor within the crossing gates

which would allow a car to exit if it becomes trapped. The quiet zone crossings would be constructed at Sharon Road and Oak Avenue and would require the closing of the crossing at Albion Avenue. The village would also close the pedestrian closing between the municipal parking lot and Village Square, which crosses the tracks next to the museum building. The path leading pe-

destrians from the lot to the square would be rerouted. The Albion crossing was listed as the 90th most dangerous of Ohio’s 5,700 railroad crossings, because the hilly grade interferes with driver visibility. The concession to close Albion encouraged the Ohio Rail Development Commission, along with CSX Rail, to provide finanSee GLENDALE, Page 2A

American Heritage Girls: Two decades later going strong and growing Sheila A. Vilvens svilvens@communitypress.com

The group may be young, especially when compared to similar organizations, but the American Heritage Girls phenomenon continues to gain momentum. AHG celebrated a major milestone in 2016 when a new troop formed in Delaware, giving the organization a presence in all 50 U.S. states. Today AHG, headquartered in Springdale, includes nearly 970 troops, 45 of which are in the Greater Cincinnati area, with more than 43,000 members, and has averaged a 30 percent growth rate since 2010. Not bad for an organization that formed over a discussion in the home of founder Patti Garibay. Today Garibay lives in Colerain Township. Two decades ago when AHG got its start, Garibay lived in West Chester Township. She said there was never a conscious effort to create a na-

FIRST ‘THING TO DO’: GET THIS APP Get the best of Cincinnati on your phone. Download the Things to Do app on both the Apple App Store and Google Play.

Patti Garibay

tionally recognized organization. The idea for what became AHG simply took shape as a group of like-minded moms gathered around Garibay’s table talking about scouting changes that did not align with their own Christian beliefs. Because of their backgrounds, with other organiza-

tions and professionally, the moms and their daughters were uniquely qualified to build a program of their own that included a Biblical foundation, Garibay said. It wasn’t long before they were receiving phone calls from interested people from as far away as California. Within three years AHG took on a national scope. This was never in the plan. There were times, Garibay said, when she wondered if the group would “last until tomorrow.” “There were times when it was lonely of course. At times it was a struggle. There were times of financial need,” she said. While it was never a dream to expand into a national program, Garibay said it has been fulfilling. “Of course, being a woman of faith, I believe God’s hand had a plan for this,” she said. In its own literature, AHG is described as a “national characSee AHG, Page 2A

THANKS TO ELIZABETH RYAN

Members of the American Heritage Girls out of Immaculate Heart of Mary recently finished work on their Horsemanship badge for Tenderhearts.

Contact The Press News ..........................248-8600 Retail advertising ..............768-8404 Classified advertising .........242-4000 Delivery ........................576-8240 See page A2 for additional information

Vol. 33 No. 18 © 2017 The Community Press ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


NEWS

2A • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • JANUARY 11, 2017

AROUND YOUR COMMUNITIES COLERAIN TOWNSHIP

Colerain grad first Columbus murder victim of ‘17 Columbus police are investigating the capital city’s first homicide of 2017 after a Colerain High School graduate was gunned down not far from campus. Tarak Underiner, 20, was found suffering from several gunshot wounds near a home on Northwood Avenue, located north of Ohio State’s main campus, around 12:30 a.m. Jan. 5. Underiner was pronounced dead at the scene. According to his Facebook, Underiner was an Ohio State student and a Colerain High School

graduate. In The Columbus Dispatch, Underiner is quoted about his involvement in Buckeyes for Concealed Carry in the aftermath of the campus knife attack on Nov. 27. “College campuses and the areas surrounding them present environments rich with potential victims,” Tarak Underiner, an Ohio State student and a member of university’s chapter of Students for Concealed Carry, told a Senate committee, according to the Dispatch. “They’re willing to gamble we’re unarmed and it pays off.” The Dispatch continued, saying Underiner stressed the need for students to be armed and then “read off violentcrime statistics this se-

TRI-COUNTY PRESS

mester for the University District, including 129 assaults and 21 sex crimes.” Guns on campus have been a hot-button issue, especially after Gov. Kasich signing a bill into law last month “allowing university boards to make an exception in campus policy to allow licensed individuals to carry concealed handguns,” according to an Enquirer report. Police said investigators discovered no signs of forced entry at the residence. The victim’s two roommates were questioned, but neither was considered a suspect. Detectives don’t believe the shooting was random. An investigation is ongoing. Brett Milam and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

EVENDALE

Duke Energy pipeline meeting

Advertising

Neighbors Opposing Pipeline Extension, the group opposing a proposed Duke Energy natural gas pipeline through local communities, is hosting another town hall meeting at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 12, at the Evendale Recreation Center, 10500 Reading Road.

To place an ad ............................513-768-8404, EnquirerMediaAdvertising@enquirer.com

Index

Find news and information from your community on the Web Cincinnati.com/communities

News Dick Maloney Editor ......................248-7134, rmaloney@communitypress.com Kelly McBride Reporter ...................544-2764, kmcbride@communitypress.com Sheila Vilvens Reporter ...................248-7139, svilvens@communitypress.com Melanie Laughman Sports Editor .......768-8512, mlaughman@communitypress.com Adam Baum Sports Reporter .............513-364-4497, abaum@communitypress.com Twitter: @adamjbaum

Delivery For customer service ....................576-8240 Stephen Barraco Circulation Manager ....................248-7110, sbarraco@communitypress.com Lynn Hessler District Manager ...........248-7115, lyhessler@communitypress.com

Classified To place a Classified ad .................242-4000, www.communityclassified.com

Content submitted may be distributed by us in print, digital or other forms

Calendar .................6B Classifieds ................C Food .....................6A Police .................... 6B Schools ..................4A Sports ....................1B Viewpoints .............8A

To place an ad in Community Classified, call 242-4000.

No matter where you are in life, Dr. Lane is here for your pursuits. We all want to live a long, healthy life. That goes without saying. And one of the healthiest decisions you can make is to trust The Christ Hospital Physicians with all your women’s health needs. From pregnancy and childbirth to complex gynecological conditions and breast health, our team of expert physicians and staff has dedicated their lives to helping women achieve their optimal health in the most caring and comfortable environment possible. No one knows that better than The Christ Hospital Physicians’ Anthereca Lane, MD. She’s accepting new patients, and is backed by the region’s best nurses, doctors and specialists. Your Christ Hospital Physician is your partner — the person you can count on most to help you navigate every aspect of your health. The Christ Hospital Health Network — we’re here for your pursuits.

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Catherine Ingram is the new state representative for the 32nd House District.

HAMILTON COUNTY

Ingram sworn in as state representative Catherine Ingram (D) was officially sworn in as state representative for the 32nd House District Jan. 3. Ingram, elected to her first House term in November, will serve citizens in parts of south-central Cincinnati. “It is truly an honor to represent the people of the 32nd District and be their voice in Columbus,” Ingram said. “I look forward to getting to work on issues that matter most to our community, like access to quality education – regardless of race or income – and good-paying jobs to ensure a brighter future for all Ohioans.” As a member of the Cincinnati Board of Education for more than 20 years, Ingram served as president in 1996 and vice president in 1995. In 2000,

Ingram earned the prestigious honor of being just one of five board members in the state to be named to OSBA’s All-Ohio School Board. At the state and national levels, she served on OSBA’s Board of Trustees and Executive Committee and the Federal Relations Network. A Cincinnati-native, Ingram earned her bachelor’s degree and master of business administration from the University of Cincinnati. She is an instructor at Northern Kentucky University and also works as a business consultant, seeking to advance key issues facing education as the local, state and federal levels.

What to do with your Christmas tree Hamilton County residents are invited to compost their Christmas trees and holiday greenery by bringing these materials to one of the county’s three yard trimmings drop-off sites. Hamilton County Recycling and Solid Waste District’s free program will accept these organic materials from noon to 3 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 14. Trees and greenery will be composted. Locations for the yard trimmings drop-off sites are: West: Kuliga Park, 6717 Bridgetown Road in

Green Township North: Rumpke Sanitary Landfill, 3800 Struble Road (and Colerain Avenue) in Colerain Township Residents are asked to follow these guidelines: » Whole Christmas trees are accepted; residents should remove all ornaments, tinsel, tree bags, etc. » Brush and tree branches from the yard should be cut into lengths of four feet or less – branches must not exceed one foot in diameter. » Bundle brush and tree branches with twine – bundles must not be heavier than 50 pounds or; » Bring yard trimmings to the location in containers or bags – brown paper bags preferred. » Hamilton County residents only. Bring proof of residency. For more information, call 946-7766 or visit HamiltonCountyRecycles.org.

SPRINGFIELD TOWNSHIP

Conservancy District meets The Millcreek Valley Conservancy District has scheduled a regular board meeting at 9 a.m. Thursday, Jan. 19, at the Springfield Township Administration Building, Allan Paul Room, 9150 Winton Road.

Glendale Continued from Page 1A

cial incentives that would cover $1 million, Lofty said, leaving the village to raise $300,000. “We have a commitment from a private foundation to contribute $50,000 toward the quiet zone,” Lofty said. “As of now, we have received $10,000 of this contribution. We are talking to other foundations for additional contributions. “If, as is likely, not all of the money can be raised from private foundations, there will be a fundraising effort aimed at individuals. All of us hope that the funds can be raised from these sources. If not, the village will be approached to provide any remaining funds from existing village funds. There are no plans to seek a tax increase to pay for the quiet zone.” Lofty, along with quiet zone committee members Robert Kooris and Nancy Macenko, described the importance of establish-

AHG Continued from Page 1A

ter development organization for girls ages 5-18 that embraces Christian values and encourages family involvement.” The desire for a Christian-based organization was what led U.S. Army Dr. Sean Ryan and his wife, Elizabeth, to AHG. The family was stationed in Alaska when their oldest daughter, Mackenzie, was old enough to get involved in an organization. Initially, Elizabeth Ryan wanted Mackenzie to join Girl Scouts. “I was real excited. I was a Girl Scout and loved it,” she said. As she shared this with

THANKS TO NANCY MACENKO

This sign on Willow Avenue is one of about 80 placed in Glendale yards in support of the Quiet Zone.

ing a quiet zone in Glendale. “It’s a real opportunity to improve the quality of life,” Lofty said, citing the 64 trains per day that pass through Glendale at all hours, creating sleep deprivation as they blast their horns when approaching the crossings. The disruptive sound impacts residents’ quality of life, as well as their property values.

If Glendale can raise its $300,000 portion needed to establish a quiet zone, the village would pay $2,000 to $6,000 per year for maintenance of the gates and sensor inspection. Those funds would likely be available in the village budget, Lofty said. Until then, the quiet zone committee is asking for private donations, and will consider fundraisers if necessary.

her husband she was surprised to learn that he had already registered Mackenzie for a local AHG group. “I was really impressed. Usually I’m the one who does this stuff,” she said. “He’s a doctor. He works all the time, but he was very adamant that our child was not going to be in Girl Scouts.” It wasn’t long before Elizabeth Ryan was also involved as a troop leader. Fast forward three years later, the Ryan family lives in Union Township and their school-aged children attend West Clermont School District. They found a new AHG group at Immaculate Heart of Mary in Anderson Township, where both Mackenzie and Ryan could actively be in-

volved. “I just feel they provide such a good, moral grounding for the girls,” Ryan said. “There are good strong Christian values and that’s something I want for my child to absorb. . . I don’t feel you can raise a good, strong Christian child without a little bit of help.” Continued expansion seems to be in the cards for AHG. They continue to receive endorsements such as those recently received from both the Archdiocese in Omaha and St. Louis. As an increasing number of people learn about AHG, the group’s earliest members now having daughters of their own. “I’m excited to see the next generation of girls coming in,” Garibay said.


NEWS

JANUARY 11, 2017 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • 3A

Remke Markets Makes Online Grocery Shopping Convenient Pat Iasillo Over the past decade our world has become more accustomed to shopping online for the products we want. It makes sense not to waste time and effort shopping if we can just as easily click a few buttons to accomplish the same thing. However, there has been some reluctance when it comes to products we like to feel and touch before we buy. We don’t mind purchasing a book online or the latest toy, but some of us like to try on a pair a shoes before we buy them or like to feel the material on an article of clothing. The same thing is even more true when it comes to shopping for food. We want to be

in control when we pick our apples or our lettuce, or a beef roast. Therefore, shopping online for our groceries has met with some resistance. It can also be painful to sort through over 30,000 products to find what we want. That is all changing. Remke Markets has carefully thought through these issues before we offered an online solution to our customers. After all, we have been in business for almost 120 years, partly because we keep the wants and needs of our customers at the top of the list on our approach to the grocery business. That is why we offer something a little different; a personal shopper. Our personal shoppers

are carefully chosen to be as picky as our pickiest customers when it comes to choosing what to put in the basket. They also are people who are anxious to learn just what you like, how you like it, and if they don’t know, they will call you and ask before they choose. We feel confident you will be pleased that your shopper will far exceed your expectations. Couple a personal shopper with the ease of the Remke Mobile Markets website and you have a means of shopping for your groceries that is second to none. With your registration of your Remke Rewards card on our website, you now have access to the top 100 items you normally purchase at your fingertips. You may also like to shop our weekly ad. Now all you need do is click on an item when viewing our ad and presto, it

is on your shopping list. In addition, we have made it simple to shop for anything in our store by using our search bar, or by searching through every department and category. We even have an app available for download on your Apple or Android mobile device, and you can use it to scan the UPC barcodes of the items in your house to add them directly to your list. Once you finish your order, you may choose a pick up time even on the same day! Drive to the store, call or text the phone number on the sign posted in our designated pick up spot, and your order will be brought out and loaded into your car. Scan your credit card and you are on your way. The fee is waived on your first four orders so you have nothing to lose to give Remke Mobile Markets a try!

Now available at Buttermilk, Hyde Park, Skytop, and Turkeyfoot locations. Visit www. remkes.com.

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4A • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • JANUARY 11, 2017

SCHOOLS

TRI-COUNTY

ACHIEVEMENTS | NEWS | ACTIVITIES | HONORS

URSULINE ACADEMY HONOR ROLLS URSULINE ACADEMY These Northwest Press, Hilltop Press and Tri-County Press-area students have earned honor roll and first honors for first quarter of 2016-2017 (to see the entire honor roll, go to Cincinnati.comhttp://cin.ci/2iFb9UR):

FRESHMEN Honor roll - Abigail Adams, Alison Adams, Megan Brokamp, Jenna Brus, Rachel Chen, Sarah Coviello, Hannah Doerger, Elizabeth Horn, Sydney Jacobs, Karley Kessling, Lucy Stackpole, Rachael Wilson, Elizabeth Yauss.

SOPHOMORES Honor Roll - Erin Dudgeon, Amanda

PRESS

Editor: Richard Maloney, rmaloney@communitypress.com, 248-7134

CommunityPress.com

First feast faces

Hagedorn, Allison Hinnenkamp, Catherine House, Jada Jackson, Lauren Maynus, Mikhaela Mueller, Isabella Richardson, Kalynne Schuermann, Maria Spaeth.

JUNIORS First Honors - Jessica Henn, Sarah Horn, Ava Karle, Anne Longo, Rebecca Remke, Madeleine Taylor, Christine Henn, Brittany Phillips.

SENIORS First Honors - Marjorie Alvord, Emily Georgopoulos, Eva Hill, Claudia Johnson, Meredith Karbowsky, Hannah McKaig, Stephanie Mounce, Katrina Raneses, Saunders Swan.

SAINT URSULA ACADEMY HONOR ROLLS SAINT URSULA ACADEMY These Tri-County Press-area students have earned honors for the first quarter of 2016-2017.

FRESHMEN

Reilly, Madeleine Reischel. Second Honors - Elizabeth Uhl.

JUNIORS First Honors - Jordan Overly.

SENIORS

First Honors - Ariel Yoshitomi-Gray.

First Honors - Sarah Teuschl, Emma Weisbrod. Second Honors - Clair Weisbrod

SOPHOMORES First Honors - Kelly Packer, Marion

COLLEGE CORNER Dean’s Lists » Bob Jones University - Kaylie Garrison. » Bucknell University - Quinn Collison.

Graduates » Belmont University - Janey Elliott. » University of Alabama - Adam Chalmers.

On campus

THANKS TO DEANNA BROOKSBANK

Bethany School kindergartners became Pilgrims and American Indians for a re-enactment of the first Thanksgiving. The groups made gifts to present to one another and enjoyed a feast of turkey, ham, vegetables,and fruit. Many art projects helped the students understand life for Pilgrims and American Indians.

Graceland University - Catherine Flem.

ort No mf

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Miami University - These area students spent the summer 2016 semester studying abroad: Selina Davis studied

in Japan; Christopher Grant studied in United States and Bahamas; Elaine Parsons studied in Luxembourg; Steven Trentman studied in United Kingdom; Megan Zimmerer studied in Jordan; Madeline Burke studied in Spain, France and Portugal; Samantha Marshall studied in Luxembourg; Molly Meyer studied in Ghana, and Theresa Roy studied in Luxembourg.

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NEWS

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6A • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • JANUARY 11, 2017

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD THURSDAY, JAN. 12 Art & Craft Classes After School Art Club, 4-5:30 p.m., Art on Fire of Cincinnati, 9336 Colerain Avenue, Kids learn and use variety of mediums, working on different projects each week. Discounts offered when paying monthly. Ages 0-12. $15. Registration required. 923-3473; www.artonfirecincinnati.com. Colerain Township.

To submit calendar items, go to Cincinnati.com/share, log in and click on “submit an event.” Send digital photos to kynews@communitypress.com along with event information. Items are printed on a space-available basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to Cincinnati.com/calendar.

www.sharonvilleculturalarts.org. Sharonville.

Art Exhibits

Dance Classes

Creative Underground Gallery, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., Daryl Urig’s Creative Underground, 430 Ray Norrish Drive, Select contemporary paintings of Daryl Urig. Free. Presented by Daryl Urig’s Creative Underground Gallery. 708-7981; darylurig.com. Springdale. Nature’s Corner, 3-7 p.m., Sharonville Cultural Arts Center, 11165 Reading Road, The Westheimer Gallery. Exhibition highlights beauty of nature with illustrations by Gayle Cobb and photography by Becky Linhardt. Free. Through Feb. 25. 554-1014;

Tippi Toes Dance Class, 4:455:30 p.m., Springdale Community Center, 11999 Lawnview Ave., Incorporates even mix of ballet, tap and jazz over 45-minute class using high-energy music. Ages 4-7. $50 per month. Registration recommended. Presented by Tippi Toes Dance Company. Through May 25. 578-1280; www.tippitoesdance.com/ cincinnati. Springdale.

Exercise Classes Dance Fit, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Keeping Fit Studio, 7778 Colerain Ave., Workout designed for all levels of fitness. For ages

PUZZLE ANSWERS B B C R A D I O

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I S I S O P A H C I G A D O R K E P I R R E D Y E R N V I E S M Y A W A S L O G M E E M O S O N M Z H I A S O N R T T O T E S T T H A H O U O T R

Association of America. 4515139. Springdale.

ABOUT CALENDAR

P A C E S U N R A R E T T E S A G B E E R O S E P O E P A I N H O R N D E O S N I N K D A Y S C U M H E E T M A L I R E I N T I X C D S C S L U L E R E V E P P E R O I D B E T N K S I N A S E N Y R A G A D

R E T C O N P E R J U R E D O S

H A E R D R T Y H A O U U K D S E I S N M P I O I E E V D I B C R E U S U V A N K I E T O N A R A N T

T R O T

S S N S

A L R O K E R

S A N J O S E

E N T R A C T E

S E A M L E S S

16 and up. $5. 720-4142. Colerain Township. Dance Fit, 4:45-5:45 p.m., Keeping Fit Studio, 7778 Colerain Ave., Dance exercise class with strength training for all levels of fitness. For ages 16 and up. $5. 720-4142. Colerain Township. Yoga’sup, 6:30-7:15 p.m., Sharonville Community Center, 10990 Thornview Drive, Fitness for tweens and teens. Ages 10-13. $55 for 5-class series. Registration required. Presented by Healthwell Enterprises. 563-2895; bit.ly/2cU8NxM. Sharonville. Imagination Yoga, 5:30-6:10 p.m., Sharonville Community Center, 10990 Thornview Drive, Uses adventure theme to guide children through kid’s yoga class. Ages 5-9. $55 for 5-class series. Registration required. Presented by Imagination Yoga. 563-2895; bit.ly/1TRKOnd. Sharonville.

FRIDAY, JAN. 13 Art Exhibits Nature’s Corner, 3-7 p.m., Sharonville Cultural Arts Center, Free. 554-1014; www.sharonvilleculturalarts.org. Sharonville.

Clubs & Organizations Military Officers Association of America Meeting, noon to 1:30 p.m., Manor House Restaurant, 600 Maple Trace Drive, General membership meeting, luncheon and induction of new chapter officers. Guests welcome. Speaker Judge (Retired) Rudy Jansen on The Living History Project. Vietnam Service Lapel pins presented to eligible chapter members and guests. $14. Reservations recommended. Presented by Greater Cincinnati Chapter of Military Officers

ASSISTED LIVING

(EMPHASIS ON THE LIVING)

Exercise Classes Dance Fit, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Keeping Fit Studio, $5. 720-4142. Colerain Township.

Music - Classic Rock Quiet Storm, 9:30 p.m. to 1:30 a.m., Club Trio, 5744 Springdale Road, Free. 385-1005. Colerain Township.

SATURDAY, JAN. 14 Art Exhibits Nature’s Corner, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Sharonville Cultural Arts Center, Free. 554-1014; www.sharonvilleculturalarts.org. Sharonville.

Drink Tastings Wine Tasting, noon to 5 p.m., Henke Winery, 3077 Harrison Ave., 7 tastes, souvenir glass. Appetizers and meals available. Ages 21 and up. $10. Reservations recommended. Through Jan. 28. 662-9463; www.henkewine.com. Westwood.

Exercise Classes Dance Jamz, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Emerge Dance Academy, 5882 Cheviot Road, High energy cardio dance fitness class that includes toning exercises. Ages 18 and up. $40 10-class pass, $5 single. Presented by Dance Jamz. 460-6696. White Oak. Dance Fit, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Keeping Fit Studio, $5. 720-4142. Colerain Township. Hip Hop Redefined, 1:15-1:45 p.m., Springdale Community Center, 11999 Lawnview Ave., Part dance fitness and part boot camp, with 30-minutes of circuit training and end with Hip Hop class. Ages 18 and up.First class free. Speak to instructor regarding additional classes. Presented by Springdale Parks and Recreation. 346-3910; www.springdale.org/goplay. Springdale.

Literary - Libraries Our Cincinnati, 1-4 p.m., Westwood Branch Library, 3345 Epworth Ave., Hamilton County residents can share personal stories and memories for inclusion in Our Cincinnati, digital celebration of neighborhoods throughout Hamilton County. Residents should bring in paperbased memorabilia like photos, letters, maps and advertisements to be scanned. Free. Presented by Public Library of Cincinnati & Hamilton County. 369-4474; cincinnatilibrary.org. Westwood.

Music - Rock Amish Mafia, 9:30 p.m. to 1:30 a.m., Club Trio, 5744 Springdale Road, Free. 385-1005; www.clubtriolounge.com. Colerain Township.

SUNDAY, JAN. 15 Exercise Classes Free Workout Every Sunday, 2-5 p.m., Greater Emanuel Apostolic Temple, 1150 W. Galbraith Road, Lower level. Chair exercise and Leslie Sansone’s low-impact, indoor, aerobic workout. Free. Presented by SEM Laurels. 324-6173. Springfield Township. Dance Fit, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Keeping Fit Studio, $5. 720-4142. Colerain Township.

MONDAY, JAN. 16

People do better when they’re active, engaged, and in comfortable surroundings. It also doesn’t hurt to have a safe place with highly trained medical staff. That’s why we’re here. Schedule your visit today.

ASSISTED LIVING AND SO MUCH MORE

Zumba, 6-7 p.m., Keeping Fit Studio, 7778 Colerain Ave., High energy dance fitness class for all levels of fitness. For Ages 16 and up. $5. 720-4142. Colerain Township. Dance Fit, 4:45-5:45 p.m., Keeping Fit Studio, $5. 720-4142. Colerain Township.

Recreation Pickleball, 1-3 p.m., Springdale Community Center, 11999 Lawnview Ave., Participants should wear comfortable clothing and shoes. Program is free and all equipment provided. Ages 21 and up. Free. Presented by Springdale Parks and Recreation. 346-3910; www.springdale.org/goplay. Springdale.

TUESDAY, JAN. 17 Dance Classes

11230 Pippin Road • Cincinnati, OH 45231 513-851-0601 • triplecreekretirement.com • A Trilogy Health Services Community

Tippi Toes Dance Classes, 4-4:45 p.m., Springdale Community Center, 11999 Lawnview Ave., Music, movement, balance and basic ballet and dance steps are introduced in fun, friendly, and positive manner. Class is great for more independent children who can participate

FILE

Imagination Yoga, which uses adventure themes to guide children through a kids yoga class, will be offered 5:30 p.m. to 6:10 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 12, at the Sharonville Community Center, 10990 Thornview Drive, Sharonville. The class is for ages 5 to 9. Cost is $55 for the five-class series. Registration is required. Call 563-2895; visit bit.ly/1TRKOnd.

without parent by their side. Ages 2-3. $50 per month. Registration recommended. Presented by Tippi Toes Dance Company. 578-1280; www.tippitoesdance.com/cincinnati. Springdale.

Exercise Classes Dance Jamz, 10-11 a.m., Emerge Dance Academy, $40 10-class pass, $5 single. 460-6696. White Oak. Dance Fit, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Keeping Fit Studio, $5. 720-4142. Colerain Township. Dance Fit, 4:45-5:45 p.m., Keeping Fit Studio, $5. 720-4142. Colerain Township. Yoga After Work, 5:30 p.m., Farbach-Werner Nature Preserve, 3455 Poole Road, Certified yoga instructor leads class designed for all ages and skill levels. Class moved indoors if weather is inclement. $10 plus valid Great Parks motor vehicle permit required ($10 annual, $3 day). Presented by Great Parks of Hamilton County. 521-7275; www.greatparks.org. Colerain Township.

WEDNESDAY, JAN. 18

Dance Fit, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Keeping Fit Studio, $5. 720-4142. Colerain Township. Zumba, 6-7 p.m., Keeping Fit Studio, $5. 720-4142. Colerain Township. Dance Fit, 4:45-5:45 p.m., Keeping Fit Studio, $5. 720-4142. Colerain Township.

Music - Bluegrass Weekly Wednesday Bluegrass Night, 7-9 p.m., Pit to Plate BBQ, 8021 Hamilton Ave., Hosted by Vernon McIntyre’s Appalachian Grass. Free. 931-9100. Mount Healthy.

THURSDAY, JAN. 19 Art & Craft Classes After School Art Club, 4-5:30 p.m., Art on Fire of Cincinnati, $15. Registration required. 923-3473; www.artonfirecincinnati.com. Colerain Township.

Art Exhibits Creative Underground Gallery, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., Daryl Urig’s Creative Underground, Free. 708-7981; darylurig.com. Springdale. Nature’s Corner, 3-7 p.m., Sharonville Cultural Arts Center, Free. 554-1014; www.sharonvilleculturalarts.org. Sharonville.

Civic Great Parks of Hamilton County Board Meeting, 1 p.m., Winton Woods, 10245 Winton Road, Free. Presented by Great Parks of Hamilton County. Through Dec. 14. 521-7275; www.greatparks.org. Springfield Township.

Dance Classes Tippi Toes Dance Class, 4:455:30 p.m., Springdale Community Center, $50 per month. Registration recommended. 578-1280; www.tippitoesdance.com/ cincinnati. Springdale.

Exercise Classes Dance Fit, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Keeping Fit Studio, $5. 720-4142. Colerain Township.

Dance Fit, 4:45-5:45 p.m., Keeping Fit Studio, $5. 720-4142. Colerain Township. Yoga’sup, 6:30-7:15 p.m., Sharonville Community Center, $55 for 5-class series. Registration required. 563-2895; bit.ly/2cU8NxM. Sharonville. Imagination Yoga, 5:30-6:10 p.m., Sharonville Community Center, $55 for 5-class series. Registration required. 563-2895; bit.ly/1TRKOnd. Sharonville.

FRIDAY, JAN. 20 Art Exhibits Nature’s Corner, 3-7 p.m., Sharonville Cultural Arts Center, Free. 554-1014; www.sharonvilleculturalarts.org. Sharonville.

Exercise Classes Dance Fit, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Keeping Fit Studio, $5. 720-4142. Colerain Township.

Music - Country Whiskey Bent, 9:30 p.m. to 1:30 a.m., Club Trio, 5744 Springdale Road, Free. 385-1005; www.clubtriolounge.com. Colerain Township.

On Stage - Comedy Tomfoolery: Wildly Wicked Musical Revue of Tom Lehrer Novelty Songs, 8-10 p.m., Sharonville Cultural Arts Center, 11165 Reading Road, Revue of Tom Lehrer’s dry, cynical but good-humored attacks on A-bomb, racism, pollution, pornography, military, Boy Scouts and mathematics. Nothing is sacred. Through Jan. 28. Ages 18 and up. $18, $15 military, seniors and students. Reservations recommended. Presented by Tri-County Players. 471-2030; tricountyplayers.org. Sharonville.

SATURDAY, JAN. 21 Art Exhibits Nature’s Corner, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Sharonville Cultural Arts Center, Free. 554-1014; www.sharonvilleculturalarts.org. Sharonville.

Dining Events Comedy Club Night at Pebble Creek, 7-11 p.m., Pebble Creek Golf Course, Restaurant & Event Center, 9799 Prechtel Road, Event Center. Includes comedy show and dinner. Ages 21 and up. $25. Reservations required. 385-4442, ext. 14; pebblecreekgc.com. Colerain Township. Mystery Dinner Series, 7 p.m. Neverland Nowhere Land., Mill Race Banquet Center, 1515 W. Sharon Road, Includes show and dinner. Menu includes prime rib, chicken, lasagna, sides, desserts and beverages. Cash bar. Doors open 6:30 p.m. Ages 18 and up. $35. Reservations required. Presented by Great Parks of Hamilton County. 521-7275 ext. 285; www.greatparks.org. Springfield Township.

Drink Tastings Wine Tasting, noon to 5 p.m., Henke Winery, $10. Reservations recommended. 662-9463; www.henkewine.com. Westwood.


NEWS

JANUARY 11, 2017 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • 7A

Bone broth, purple food trending for new year Broccoli cheddar soup like Panera It was a request I had to fill. “Do you have a recipe for cheddar broccoli soup like Panera?” I looked up a bunch of recipes and found a few that sounded promising. I tried out a couple and adapted only slightly to suit my taste. I used my chicken bone broth. Find a step-by-step photo primer on my abouteating.com site for both the bone broth and this recipe. 2 tablespoons butter 3/4 to 1 cup finely diced onion (not sweet or red) 4 tablespoons melted butter 4 tablespoons flour Dijon mustard - to taste, start with a little and go from there 2 cups half & half 2 cups low sodium, fat free, chicken broth Heaping 3 cups broccoli, chopped - I used frozen, thawed 1 nice carrot, cut into matchsticks, a heaping cup Nutmeg to taste - I grated a whole nutmeg and used a generous 1/4 teaspoon 8 oz. extra sharp or sharp grated cheddar plus extra for garnish Salt and pepper to taste THANKS TO RITA HEIKENFELD

This copycat Panera broccoli and cheddar soup can be made with nutritious bone broth.

Yesterday I walked across the field to I have to chuckle when I read trends. check on my elderly neighbor, John, and Heck, I’ve been trending way before the saw lots of grass-like blades poking through trends hit the news - we’ve been growing the soil. Farmer Bruner sowedhow rye elderberries and Indian/purple corn for right after he harvested pumpkins from the years! same field and that’s what was popping up. There are lots of more interesting food Husband Frank told me it’s called “winter and drink trends for 2017. I’ll be talking rye” since it can germinate through the more about them as we segue into the New snow. I look forward to early spring when it Rita Year. Heikenfeld becomes a field of wavy green. Tip from Rita: why this recipe is Since we’re beginning a new year, let’s RITA’S KITCHEN good for you talk trends for 2017. Guess what one is? Bone broth! Now I’ve been making super nutriBlack rice is whole grain, and used to be called tious bone broth for years the same way my Mom “forbidden rice” since it was eaten only by Empedid. Just basically cooking up a lot of bones with riors and commoners were not allowed to eat it. aromatics to make a healthful stock. No waste was Curry powder contains turmeric, a spice with her motto. anti-inflammatory qualities. The trend is to embrace the “no waste” philosoCinnamon helps lower blood sugar. phy. From root to seed is how chefs are cooking Garlic is good for your heart. now, using everything from the plant in some Cloves contain magnesium, calcium and iron, nutritious way. great for bone and overall health. Another trend is purple veggies and fruit, like Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educaeggplant, purple cauliflower, black rice (yes, it’s tor, Jungle Jim’s Eastgate culinary professional dark purple), elderberries, and even purple corn. and author. Find her blog online at The reason is that the anthocyanin (makes the Abouteating.com. Email her at purple color) in purple plants holds huge amounts rita@communitypress.com with “Rita’s kitchen” of nutrients, fiber and antioxidants. in the subject line.

Cook onion in butter on medium until translucent . Set aside. Make a roux: whisk melted butter and flour over low heat until bubbly and a bit golden, not brown. Whisk in mustard. Whisk in half & half and broth and cook to a simmer about 10 minutes. Add broccoli, carrots and onions. Cook over low heat about 20 minutes. Add nutmeg, salt and pepper to taste. Take off heat and stir in cheese until melted.

Barbara’s Indian-inspired rice The Indian spices elevate this to a new level. Thanks to Barbara D. for sharing. A good recipe to sub in black rice for white. 1/4 cup water 1 (14.5 ounce) can chicken broth 1 cup long grain rice or black rice 1 teaspoon curry powder 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/8 teaspoon paprika 1-2 pinches ground cloves 1 small onion, coarsely chopped

Bring water and chicken broth to a boil. Combine rice, curry powder, garlic powder, cinnamon, paprika, and cloves in a bowl; stir to mix. Add spiced rice and onion to the boiling broth. Cover and cook until rice is tender, about 25 minutes.


8A • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • JANUARY 11, 2017

K1

VIEWPOINTS

TRI-COUNTY

EDITORIALS | LETTERS | COLUMNS | CH@TROOM

Cincinnati.com/communities

CH@TROOM

EMBRACING ALL NEIGHBORS People who give their time and talent for neighbors with no expectation of reward deserve to be recognized (“Neighbors Who Care” Dec. 28). Neighborliness makes the community a better place for all of us. Our inspiring Tri-County neighbors are responding to the needs of others by raising money for good causes, volunteering at schools, donating blood, making prayer shawls for hospital patients, housing people displaced by fire, befriending widowed veterans, and conducting a clothing drive for victims of the Gatlinburg fires. There is, as the parable of the good Samaritan tells us, a broad meaning to the word “neighbor.” There is the nextdoor neighbor, the neighbor down the street, the neighbor in another state and the neighbor in a foreign land. The neighbors who look, talk and worship like us and others who do not. They are all our neighbors. As the parable goes, the Samaritan, a foreigner despised by Jews, does what the priest and Levite would not. In response to the needs of another, he risks the dangers on the “Way of Blood” between Jericho and Jerusalem to help a stranger. Like our Tri-County neighbors, he was a good neigh-

bor. For nearly 50 years, the U.S. Catholic Church has celebrated National Migration Week Mike as a time to Brown reflect on the challenges confronting migrants, including immigrants, refugees, children and victims and survivors of human trafficking. By the end of 2015, nearly 66 million people had been forcibly displaced from their homes by war and persecution, according to the United Nations. Most (41 million) were internally displaced within their homeland, but many (25 million) were refugees or asylum-seekers. More than half of all refugees are children. About 5 million of all refugees worldwide come from Syria, which has been ripped apart by civil war. Over the last five years, the U.S. has admitted 10,000 Syrian war refugees into our population of 320 million people. Canada, with a population of just 35 million, has resettled almost 39,000 Syrian refugees over the last 13 months. In our country, the great melting-pot, the idea of admitting migrants raises con-

PRESS

Editor: Richard Maloney, rmaloney@communitypress.com, 248-7134

cerns about national security, cultural dilution, competition for jobs, and additional burdens on taxpayers. These issues deserve informed discussion and should not be ignored. Nor should we ignore the positive contributions of many immigrants and success stories like that of Steve Jobs, the founder of Apple, whose father, Abdul Fattah Jandali, was a Syrian political refugee. Although bearing false witness against neighbors is condemned in Proverbs, some immigrant groups have been unfairly scapegoated, and some individual immigrants have been threatened and mistreated for the problems they are perceived to cause. During National Migration Week, Jan. 8-14, the U.S. Conference of Bishops is calling on us to move beyond our suspicions of migrants and engage them in a meaningful way so we can see them as neighbors with their own unique stories. Responding to the needs of our migrant neighbors brings its own inherent rewards, but no less important, it helps make this great country even better and stronger for all of us. Mike Brown is a resident of Wyoming.

THIS WEEK’S QUESTION What are you most looking forward to in your community in 2017? Every week we ask readers a question they can reply to via email. Send your answers to rmaloney@communitypress.com with Ch@troom in the subject line.

Jan. 4 question What should be the priorities for President-elect Trump during his first 100 days?

“I believe he will be pretty much unable to set priorities until overcoming the obstacles being thrown in his path as quickly as the outgoing administration can. The efforts to deligitimize everything in his opening decisions will be heralded by the ‘no longer necessary’ press, media blogs and testing by the other world powers. “To start with a $20 trillion debt, repairing damage of the last-minute spitefulness of John Kerry with Israel, and the demand to return to Cold War status with Russia, as proclaimed by Obama, will create a very legitimate possibility of the No. 1 priority to be figuring out how to get out of this job, that he foolishly, but thankfully, sought. So far, his cabinet picks seem to have all been tested in the ‘fires of the unknowns.’ He now must

seek counsel. This job is way to ‘Yuuuge’ to go alone or to believe there are easy solutions. I believe in prayer and know we all need to have real hope.” D.B.

“Trump should get his replacement plan for the Affordable Care Act, which he has claimed will be better, through Congress so more Americans have access to affordable medical insurance. “He should end his bromance with Russian President Putin. As a former top level KGB agent, Putin’s beliefs are what the U.S. fought against and continually denounced during the Cold War portion of the Reagan administration. “Finally, he should cancel his Twitter account or have someone monitor his Tweets so they don’t consistently create controversy, anger or panic among the American people.”

513-268-1186 TRI-COUNTY PRESS

A publication of

7700 Service Center Drive, West Chester, Ohio, 45069 phone: 248-8600 email: tricountypress@communitypress.com web site: Cincinnati.com/communities

Tri-County Press Editor Richard Maloney rmaloney@communitypress.com, 248-7134 Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday See page A2 for additional contact information.

C.S.


JANUARY 11, 2017 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • 1B

SPORTS

TRI- COUNTY PRESS

Editor: Melanie Laughman, mlaughman@communitypress.com, 513-248-7573

HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | RECREATIONAL

CommunityPress.com

Moeller hoops dispatches top talent for Kremer’s 500th Scott Springer sspringer@communitypress.com

THANKS TO WYOMING BASKETBALL

Lonnie Grayson (center) is the only Wyoming starter without a sibling in the lineup. From left are sophomore Joey Edmonds and senior brother Jake Edmonds, Grayson, sophomore Evan Prater and senior brother Garyn Prater.

Wyoming floor general Grayson heads to West Point Scott Springer sspringer@communitypress.com

WYOMING - A four-year varsity basketball player at Wyoming High School is heading to the home of four-star generals. Lonnie Grayson, who recently surpassed 1,000 points in his Cowboy career, will take his arsenal of shots to the U.S. Military Academy in West Point, New York. The two-time Cincinnati Hills League Player of the Year plans to major in business while dunking and dribbling with discipline for the world-renown service academy along the scenic Hudson River.

Several Division II schools were after an early commit from Grayson, who wasn’t quite sold on a fit. A West Point recruiter came to town and invited him to New York after seeing a workout. However, the Black Knights picked up a couple of guard commits during that time. It appeared the Division I opportunity would not work out. Fortunately,one decommitted and another assistant was dispatched to Cincinnati to procure the services of “Leapin’” Lonnie. “He ended up liking me a lot and they offered me,” Grayson said. “After talking with my family and coaches about the

great things and benefits that come with West Point, I decided to commit. It was an exciting and relaxing thing when I committed.” Free of the recruiting pressure, Grayson has led the Cowboys to the top of the CHL standings, where he hopes to snare a fourth straight league title. Wyoming shared the crown with Madeira his freshman year, won outright his sophomore year and shared with Indian Hill last season. After a lopsided loss early in the 2015 campaign to Indian Hill, 61-36, the Cowboys reSee GRAYSON, Page 2B

KENWOOD - Carl Kremer boarded a plane in Florida New Year’s Eve with yet another trophy, 500 career wins as head basketball coach at Moeller High School and a hard-earned smile. The undefeated Crusaders dispatched three national programs, with the last win over Tampa Sickels being the 500th. Not a bad way to end a year. By the second day of 2017, Moeller was in the weight room and hoisting up shots for another challenging weekend of games. That’s how Kremer got to 500 wins, slowly and methodically. He actually doesn’t remember the first win of the string, but vividly recalls the first game, a stinging defeat at the hands of the Forest Park Chargers (Forest Park and Greenhills merged to form Winton Woods in the early ‘90s). “They killed us,” Kremer said, still sounding somewhat disgusted. “They had some really good players back then.” Occasionally, Kremer will have lunch or conversations with players from those early teams. Some have sent their own kids to Moeller. Since his start in 1990, the Crusaders

have won 18 Greater Catholic League championships, 12 district titles, and five regional championships. Moeller has won three state titles under Kremer (1999, 2003, 2007) and was runner-up in 2010. As a program, they could reach 800 wins this season, with the bulk of those coming on Kremer’s watch. “It’s amazing how quickly my career has gone,” he said. “Just the fact that I’ve coached in that many games is kind of amazing.” Moeller has won or shared the last four GCL-South titles and appears to be an early favorite for another based on their non-conference slate. “We have a lot of guys who can do a lot of different things,” Kremer said. “We don’t need one guy to carry us. All of our guys can defend pretty well, rebound pretty well and all five starters can handle the ball. We just have a lot of balance.” Senior Keegan McDowell will play in college at Liberty and leads the Crusaders in scoring. However, the Moeller first five averages anywhere from eight to 15 points per game and any may lead the team on a given night. Junior Isaiah Payton and See KREMER, Page 2B

THANKS TO MOELLER BASKETBALL/STEVE ALBRINCK

Moeller returned to Cincinnati New Year’s Eve with the Battle of the Villages trophy after taking three straight games in Florida.

SHORT HOPS Kevin C. Barnhill Coaches Basketball Showcase

Scott Springer and Adam Baum Community Press staff

Boys basketball » Moeller won the Battle of the Villages tournament in Florida with a 59-41 victory over Tampa Sickels Dec. 30. It was coach Carl Kremer’s 500th career win. Senior Keegan McDowell was named MVP and had 19 points. Senior Riley Voss was Most Outstanding Player, sophomore Miles McBride made the All-Rookie Team and senior Caleb Canter the AllTournament Team. » Wyoming beat Granville Dec. 29, 64-29. Senior Lonnie Grayson had 24 points. The Cowboys mauled Mariemont 76-46 on Jan. 3 as Grayson and sophomore Joey Edmonds had 21 points apiece. Wyoming beat Indian Hill 6457 on Dec. 9. Sophomore Joey Edmonds led the Cowboys with 17 points. Indian Hill was led by junior Colin Shaw with 26. The Cowboys trounced Taylor 85-41 on Dec. 16. Seniors Lonnie Grayson and Jake Edmonds

ALEX VEHR FOR THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Gabrielle Marshall makes a move to the basket for Mount Notre Dame in a loss to McAuley Jan. 3.

had 21 points each. Grayson passed the 1,000 career point mark in the game and was at 1,010 afterward. » Princeton topped Lakota West Jan. 3, 57-34. Darweshi Hunter led the Vikings with 15 points.

» The eighth edition of the Kevin C. Barnhill Coaches Basketball Showcase returns over the Martin Luther King weekend with two days of showcase basketball. On Saturday, Jan. 14, undefeated and top-ranked Moeller and Kettering Alter square off in a neutral site matchup at 8 p.m. in a preview of Southern Ohio playoff basketball. On Monday, Jan. 16, host Little Miami Panthers take on currently undefeated and highlyranked Division IV playoff contenders the Wyoming Cowboys at 8 p.m.. Both days include games showcasing the future varsity stars of each school starting at 4 p.m.. All games will be played at Little Miami High School. Individual day and all-session tickets will be available at the participating schools starting Jan. 9 and will be available at the gate each day. Net proceeds benefit the Kevin C. Barnhill Memorial Scholarship and Community Outreach Fund of

greater Warren County. For more information please call the event hotline at 703-0810 or email williambarnhill2@gmail.com.

1:36.37; 100 back - Prugh (M) 58.12; 100 breast - Phibodeaux (M) 1:06.36; 400 FR - Moeller 3:32.28.

Girls basketball

» Summit Country Day 1,785, Wyoming 1,715 on Jan. 3. High series: SCD–Sutkamp 314. W– Sinigaglia 305.

» Wyoming downed Finneytown 48-29 on Jan. 4. Sophomore Sky Thomas led with 16 points. » Princeton defeated Hamilton 65-50 on Jan. 4. DeAsia Reid led the Vikings off the bench with 14 points and seven rebounds. » Mount Notre Dame lost 4544 to McAuley Jan. 3. Gabrielle Marshall led the Cougars with 16 points.

Girls swimming » The Wyoming girls won the Candy Cane Invite on Dec. 30.

Boys swimming » Moeller 134, Lakota East 35 on Jan. 3. 200 MR - Moeller 1:46.89; 200 free - Beene (M) 1:53.12; 200 IM Theobald (M) 2:06.36; 50 free McCullough (M) 23.66; 100 fly Prugh (M) 56.39; 100 free - Murphy (M) 51.68; 500 free - Bopst (M) 5:32.28; 200 FR - Moeller

Boys bowling

Girls bowling » Wyoming 1,494, Summit Country Day 1,468 on Jan. 3. High series: W–Fritz 356. SCD– Chow 379.

Catching up with college athletes » Dane Mechler, Moeller grad and senior at Louisiana-Lafayette, recently appeared in Sports Illustrated’s “Faces in the Crowd” section on Dec. 26. Mechler won the slalom at the World University Water Ski Championships in Akita, Japan, and a month later tied for the slalom title at the collegiate national championships. He was named USA Water Ski’s men’s athlete of the year.


LIFE

2B • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • JANUARY 11, 2017

Roger Bacon hoops happy to stay the course Adam Baum abaum@communitypress.com

ST. BERNARD - There was a time when “stay the course” served a purely nautical purpose. Later, it became used in wars and battles, before politicians popularized the phrase with their constituents. Today, it can be used by anyone in pursuit of a goal in spite of hardship or adversity. Roger Bacon High School’s boys basketball team has a plan — one that works — but they’ll have to stay the course to reach their destination. “Well, we’re winning,” said coach Brian Neal. “I don’t know if we’re playing well, which, to me, is actually even more gratifying that we’re not playing nearly the way we’re capable of, especially on the offensive end, and we’re still winning games.” The Spartans know better than to panic. “We’ll be fine eventually,” said Neal. “We’ve won eight of nine and out of those eight wins, six of them we’ve shot less than 40 percent and still won. “I always say I don’t want to play my best basketball in December and we didn’t really do that but we still won some games, so I’ll take that.” Roger Bacon has essentially flipped the script from last season, getting it done on the defensive end, while still figuring things out offensively. “We’re light years ahead defensively of where we probably were last year at this time,” Neal said. “Last year we just tried to outscore teams. We were probably ahead offensively last year than where we are now and this year we’re ahead defensively.” It’s a defense that begins in the backcourt with senior Craig McGee and junior Brandon Bibbs. “Defensively … the fifth starter is usually Bibbs and with Craig and Brandon guarding the other two guards on the other team, that’s probably the biggest reason we are where we are defensively,” said Neal. “You mix that in with what Craig does in terms of assists and steals. When he’s on the floor there’s an extension of me out there. He knows what we want; he’s been a varsity player for four years.” McGee averages 10.9 points, 5.3 rebounds, 4.8 assists and 3.2 steals

THANKS TO WYOMING BASKETBALL

Lonnie Grayson is all smiles after reaching the 1,000 point mark of his career against Taylor earlier this season. With Grayson is Wyoming coach Tim Edmonds.

Grayson THE ENQUIRER/SAM GREENE

Roger Bacon guard Craig McGee shoots a jumper Jan. 26 against Fenwick last season.

per game. The Spartans also have three long, athletic pieces in their starting five with seniors James Johnson and Justin Johnson – no relation – and sophomore Alec Pfriem. James, a 6-foot-6 forward, averages 13.2 points and 5.7 rebounds a game. Justin, a 6-foot-4 forward, posts 11.0 points and 3.3 boards a night; while Pfriem, at 6-foot-4, averages 12.0 points, 4.8 rebounds and 2.2 assists. “James has just now started to shoot the ball,” said Neal. “When we went to South Carolina, he had a nice trip in terms of shooting the ball in the way he’s capable of shooting the ball. And he does all the other things like defending the other team’s best post player. He’s our leading rebounder. “Justin has been hurt; he’s been banged up pretty good and he’s not been as effective as he’s capable of because he’s hobbling around out there a little bit. “Alec, in that St. X game, he was the reason we probably won. At times, he shows the inconsistency of a sophomore but he is and will be even better down the road.” Alec’s older brother, Nick, is

usually the Spartans’ sixth man and Neal said he’s been a really important part this season as well. Even with the slow start, Roger Bacon is the No. 2 team in The Enquirer Division III coaches’ poll behind Summit Country Day. Neal said his guys remain focused on improving. “Our guys have a bigger picture in mind,” he said. “They’re not focused on 8-1. I think our message to them is quite simple and I’m not original in this thought – we’ve gotta get better today. Our goal on Friday night is to play the best game we’ve played all year, and on Saturday we’re gonna try to top it … let’s play better than we played last night. “For us, it’s about the growth of each guy and subsequently our team through the course of the season so that come March we are playing our best basketball. Not that we do things revolutionary or any different, (but) we’re okay struggling at the beginning of the year because we know our process works and we know by the end of the year if we stick to our plan we’ll be okay.”

Continued from Page 1B

turned the favor in February with a 70-44 thumping of the Braves to share the CHL lead. This season, they’ve already defeated Indian Hill in the home barn, with the return game set for Jan. 24. “I think we have probably one of our best offensive teams,” Grayson said. “We have a solid scorer in Joey (Edmonds). We have a solid big in Garyn (Prater), who can rebound, and basically all five starters can shoot the ball. On defense, our goal is to hold our opponent around 45.” Grayson is the only one without a sibling in the lineup. Sophomore Joey Edmonds is the younger brother of senior Jake Edmonds and both are sons of coach Tim Edmonds. Senior Garyn Prater’s sophomore brother Evan Prater is the latest addi-

tion to the family affair. The 6-foot-1 Grayson currently leads Wyoming in scoring, rebounding and assists and is second on the team in steals and blocks. On a good night, he gives coach Tim Edmonds around 20 points with seven to 10 rebounds and four assists. Plus, he adds the occasional flare of an exhilarating slam dunk with enough “hops” to perhaps attract the Air Force, let alone the Army. “That’s one of the main things I focused on this off-season, my athleticism,” Grayson said. “It makes it easier for me to score and it’s been a big help on defense.” On Jan. 7, Grayson was named LaRosa’s MVP of the Week for reaching his 1,000-point milestone and other accolades. After a string of road games at Finneytown (Jan. 13), Badin (Jan. 14) and Little Miami (Jan. 16), the Cowboys return home to host Reading Jan. 17.

Kremer Continued from Page 1B

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sophomore Miles McBride are in the backcourt, with versatile Caleb Canter and Riley Voss adding some height at 6foot-4 and 6-foot-5, respectively. Canter is listed as a guard, but leads the league in rebounding and forward Voss shares the lead in assists with guard Payton. Juniors Jeremiah Davenport, Carlos Garcia and Jaxson Hayes are often the first off the bench, with Hayes being the tallest Crusader at 6-foot-8. In the Battle of the Villages tournament in Florida, Moeller defeated Archbishop Stepinac out of New York City, New Mission from Massachusetts and in-state Tampa Sickels. The opener against Stepinac was a trademark GCL slugfest at 40-35 against a team that had just posted 100 points. “We could have ended up in the loser’s bracket, very honestly,” Kremer said. “We were able to pull that out and we played much better the next two nights. It was really great experience going against a lot of pressure and extreme quickness.” McDowell who was award MVP honors, while

THANKS TO MOELLER BASKETBALL/STEVE ALBRINCK

Moeller coach Carl Kremer is congratulated after notching his 500th career win with the Crusaders.

Cornell-bound Riley Voss was Most Outstanding Performer. Canter, who is weighing basketball and baseball offers, made the All-Tournament team and McBride was named to the All-Rookie team. Moeller starts the GCL-South slate with La Salle on Friday, Jan. 13, and then follows that the next day with Alter in the Kevin C. Barnhill Showcase at Little Miami. The following week is St. Xavier on Friday and Springfield on Saturday. There is no padding of the schedule at Moeller, which makes Kremer’s feat all the more amazing. “We really think that helps build us and keeps us sharp for the tournament,” Kremer said.


LIFE

CE-0000666897

JANUARY 11, 2017 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • 3B


LIFE

4B • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • JANUARY 11, 2017

DEATHS Richard Lewis Barnes Richard Lewis Barnes, 92, of Green Township died Nov. 4. He was retired as a sales representative from the CSX Transportation Corp. after more than 42 years of railroad Barnes service, and served with the U.S. Army during WWII having been discharged in 1943 as a staff sergeant. Survived by wife of 69 years Marilyn Louraine (nee Carrigan) Barnes; daughters Linda (Steve) Staat, Patricia (David) Schultze and Karen (Rick) Kurzhals; seven grandchildren; two greatgrandchildren. Preceded in death by parents

Earl and Dorothy (nee Schweitzer) Barnes; Earl Barnes. Memorials to the Alzheimer’s Association, 644 Linn St., Suite 1026, Cincinnati, OH 45203, or VITAS Hospice, P.O. Box 645352, Cincinnati, OH 45264.

Gail M. Campbell Gail M. Campbell, 65, of Springfield Township died Nov. 11. Survived by husband James M. Campbell; children Mariah M. (Ben) Campbell Garretson and Tess M. (Brett) Beard; grandchildren Liam and Ceili Garretson; brother Ronald (Cathy) Rakel; nieces and nephews. Memorials to Susan G. Komen for the Cure, 522 Cincinnati Mills Drive, Cincinnati, Ohio OH or online at www.komen.org.

Frances Consolo

Mary A. Frees

Jerome A. Krismer

Jane T. Moore

Frances Elaine Letsinger Consolo, 80, of Mount Healthy died Nov. 21. She was a longtime teacher at Fairfield High School Survived by Consolo son Thomas (Laura) Consolo; three nieces and one nephew. Memorials to Fairfield Community Foundation in memory of Frances Consolo, 5350 Pleasant Ave., Fairfield, OH 45014, or fairfieldcommunityfoundation.org.

Mary A. Frees, 72, of Colerain Township died Oct. 30. She was a loan officer with Cinfed Credit Union. Survived by husband Edward L. Frees; daughter Vicky A. Frees; grandchildren Lexah Frees and Brandon Frees-Schultz. Preceded in death by parents James and Betty Chandler.

Jerome A. “Jerry” Krismer, 69, of Monfort Heights died Nov. 22. He was a founding faculty member of Cincinnati State’s Horticulture Program and owner of Al Krismer’s Plant Farm. Survived by wife of 38 years Dr. Marianne (nee Zwick) Krismer; children Michael (Heather) and Jeffrey (Nicole) Krismer and Maria (Ben) Foster; grandchild Iain Krismer; brother Albert Krismer. Preceded in death by twin John Krismer. Memorials to Hospice of Cincinnati.

Jane T. (nee Teipel) Moore, 74, died Oct. 26 at Mercy West Hospital. Survived by husband Gary B. Moore; children Michelle (John) Heis of Colerain Township, Kim (Jeff Winkler) Berding, Jenny (Tony) Tirey, Mike, Mark (Julie) and Scott (Christina) Moore; 13 grandchildren; five great-grandchildren; siblings Ann Buerger and William (Mary) Teipel. Preceded in death by brother Robert Teipel. Memorials to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, P.O. Box 1000 Dept. 142, Memphis, TN 38101-9908.

Suzanne M. Hodge Suzanne M. (nee Lucas) Hodge, 74, of Colerain Township died Nov. 11. She was a member of the Forest Park Women’s Club Survived by children Bryan (Stacey) Hodge and Colleen Myers; grandchildren Aidan, Alyssa and Kayla; brother Charles Lucas; Memorials to Hospice of Cincinnati Bethesda Foundation, P.O. Box 633597, Cincinnati, OH 45263. Florence (nee Floss) Holthus, 86, of Mount Healthy died Nov. 22. Survived by husband Burton Holthus; children Gregg (Lisa) Holthus, Jim (Deb) Holthus, and Doug (Lisa) Holthus; grandchildren Jennifer, Jesse (Lisa) and Molly Holthus, Joshua, Benjamin (Brynn) Holthus and Sarah (Chris) Seifert, Megan, Eric and Patrick Holthus; great-grandchildren Graham, Quinn, Audrey Holthus and Olivia Seifert; brother Francis (Marion) Johnson; sister Alyce (Russell) Bolm. Preceded in death by brothers Marion, Wendell and Wayne Johnson; sister Ardyth Fox. Memorials to Christ Lutheran Church, Hospice of Cincinnati, or the Maple Knoll Village Future Care Fund.

John K. McAfee, 56, of Mount Healthy died Nov. 10. He was a member of the Mount Healthy Aerie No. 2193-Fraternal order of Eagles and the El Greeks Social Club. Survived by wife Vicki Doran; chilMerritt dren John McAfee, Adam McAfee, Misty (Richie) McAfee-Pettit and Jason Doran; mother Velma Soult; siblings Margaret McAfee, Harry (Lisa) McAfee, Vickie (John) Hatfield and Billy Soult; grandchildren Jonathon, Madison, Kemper, Kennedy and Ryland; nieces/nephews Melissa McAfee, Shanna Hatfield, Angela Woodall, Amber and Jessica Browning. Preceded in death by father Harry McAfee; brother Ralphie McAfee. Memorials to the National Kidney Foundation (kidney.org)

June Keith

Ruth Merritt

June (nee Bratton) Keith, 82, of Green Township died Nov. 3. Survived by children Kerry (Jodie), Eric and Cathy; grandchildren Kelly (Seth), Jason, Justin (Stephenie), Kara, Ben (Adrienne), Rachel (Nathan), Lindsay, Nick (Amanda) and Matt; 10 great-grandchildren; Keith sisters Dorothy (Bob) Ohrlund and Hazel Godfrey. Preceded in death by husband James Keith Jr.; daughter Debbie Ducker; siblings Nancy Frazier, Ruby Templeton and Clarence Bratton. Memorials to Hospice of Cincinnati or charity of one’s choice.

Ruth (nee Steigelman) Merritt, 88, died Nov. 23. She was a member of Ross Bible Chapel. Survived by children Mike (Kathy) Merritt, Susan (James) Slay and Andrea (Bill) Graessle; sister Shirley Murphy; daughter-inMoore law Christy Merritt; nine grandchildren; 11 great-grandchildren; two great-greatgrandchildren; several nieces and nephews. Preceded in death by husband of 52 years Ralph Merritt; son Eric Merritt; siblings Albert Steigelman, Dorothy Steigelman, Raymond Steigelman, and Betty Pindell. Memorials to City Gospel Mission, 1805 Dalton Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45214.

Florence Holthus

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Rosemary I. Meyer Rosemary I. (nee Brockman) Meyer, 93, of White Oak died Oct. 30. Survived by children Carolyn (Stephen) Hunter and Linda (Robert) Newton; grandchildren Brian (Julie) Newton, Kyle Newton and Jonothan Meyer; great-grandchild Alexandra Rose Newton. Preceded in death by husband Edward D. Meyer; children Steven Meyer, Larry Meyer and Dan Meyer. Memorials to the Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences Student Scholarship, 2139 Auburn Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45219.

Charles J. Schirmann Sr. Charles J. Schirmann Sr., 97, of Green Township died Oct. 31. He was a 1937 graduate of Elder High School and a lifelong member of St. Catharine Church in Westwood. He was an avid tennis player for more than 50 years and he organized the Western Tennis and Fitness Senior League. He was a member of The Purcell Council Knights of Columbus No. 2798. Survived by children Janice (Kenneth) Schmidt, Marianne (Ted) Miller, Nancy Jo (late Steve) Shiels, Chuck (Dianne) Schirmann Jr. and Larry (Bev) Schirmann; 12 grandchildren; 17 great-grandchildren; sister Mary Stevens. Preceded in death by wife of 64 years Rosemary (nee Klosterman) Schirmann; brother Robert (Marilyn) Schirmann. Memorials to the St. Catherine Grace Fund, BAWAC, Boone Adult Worker Activity Center, 7970 Kentucky Drive, Florence, KY 41042, or Hospice of Cincinnati.

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LIFE

JANUARY 11, 2017 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • 5B

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LIFE

6B • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • JANUARY 11, 2017

POLICE REPORTS COLERAIN TOWNSHIP Incidents/investigations Assault Reported on 10000 block of Invicta Circle, Nov. 17. Reported on 8400 block of Colerain Ave., Nov. 21. Reported at 7900 block of Harrison Ave., Nov. 24. Breaking and entering Reported on 3100 block of Elkhorn Drive, Nov. 21. Reported on 9600 block of Colerain Ave., Nov. 23. Reported on 7800 block of Colerain Ave., Nov. 24. Reported on 8500 block of Cheviot Road, Nov. 24. Burglary Reported at 3200 block of Compton Road, Nov. 17. Reported at 3200 block of Gayway Court, Nov. 17. Reported at 12000 block of Westerly Drive, Nov. 17. Reported at 9700 Dunraven Drive, Nov. 18. Reported at 2300 block of Walden Glen Circle, Nov. 19. Reported at 2300 block of Walden Glen Circle, Nov. 22. Reported at 2300 block of Walden Glen Circle, Nov. 23. Reported at 8400 block of Flamingo Lane, Nov. 24. Child endangering Reported on 9600 block of Sacramento St., Nov. 18. Criminal damaging Reported on 7200 block of Creekview Drive, Nov. 18. Tire damaged at 3400 block of Redskin Drive, Nov. 19. Tire damaged at 3300 block of Amberway Court, Nov. 19. Window damaged at 8600 block of Colerain Ave., Nov. 21. Reported on 2800 block of Rockyridge, Nov. 23. Fence damaged at 3300 block of W. Galbraith Road, Nov. 16. Vehicle damaged at 12000 block of Wincanton Drive, Nov. 17. Cable damaged at 2800 block of Rocky Ridge, Nov. 17. Tires damaged at 3300 block of Niagara St., Nov. 19. Windows damaged at 9100 block of Tripoli Drive, Nov. 20. Glass door damaged at 3100 block of Springdale Road, Nov. 20.

Window damaged at 9900 block of Arborwood Drive, Nov. 20. Domestic Reported on Invicta Circle, Nov. 20. Forgery Reported on Colerain Ave., Nov. 22. Rape Reported on Wheatfield Drive, Nov. 23. Reported on Clencrest Court, Nov. 23. Robbery Reported on 11000 block of Hamilton Ave., Nov. 22. Theft Reported on 8400 block of Colerain Ave., Nov. 24. Reported on 2500 block of Byrneside Drive, Nov. 24. Video games valued at $200 removed from 10000 block of Colerain Ave., Nov. 24. Powertools removed from 9400 block of Mapleknoll Drive, Nov. 24. Clothes valued at $88 removed from 9600 block of Colerain Ave., Nov. 23. Reported on 3700 block of Stone Creek Blvd.,. Nov. 23. Ford truck and snow plow removed from 7900 block of Colerain Ave., Nov. 23. Shoplifter reported on 8400 block of Colerain Ave., Nov. 23. Merchandise valued at $82 removed from 8400 block of Colerain Ave., Nov. 23. Paint brushes removed from 9900 block of Colerain Ave., Nov. 16. Purse, camera removed while at 5700 block of Springdale Road, Nov. 22. Shoplifter reported on 8400 block of Colerain Ave. ,Nov. 22. Reported on 7100 block of Colerain Ave., Nov. 22. Bracelet removed from 11000 block of Colerain Ave., Nov. 22. Items removed from 3900 block of Olde Savannah, Nov. 19. Clothing removed from 8400 block of Colerain Ave., Nov. 21. Purse/handbag removed from 11000 block of Hamilton Ave., Nov. 21. Catalytic converter valued at $100 removed from 3000 block of W. Galbraith Road, Nov. 21. Items removed from 9800 block

of Weik, Nov. 21. Catalytic converter removed from vehicle at 3600 block of Blue Rock Road, Nov. 20. Credit cards removed from 9600 block of Colerain Ave., Nov. 19. Phone valued at $200 removed from Springdale Road and Pippin Road, Nov. 19. Wallet and contents removed from 6400 block of Colerain Ave., Nov. 19. $61 in makeup removed from 8400 block of Colerain Ave., Nov. 19. Jordan’s valued at $300 removed from 2800 block of Springdale Road, Nov. 19. Reported on 7100 block of Pippin, Nov. 16. Vehicle removed from 8600 block of Colerain Ave., Nov. 18. $400 removed from 9900 block of Colerain Ave., Nov. 15. TV and speakers valued at $1,500 removed from 3400 block of Hollyglen Court, Nov. 18. Gloves removed from 8400 block of Colerain Ave., Nov. 18. Items removed from 3600 block of W. Galbraith Road, Nov. 18. Reported on 2800 block of Jonrose, Nov. 17. Clothing value at $60 removed from 10000 block of Colerain Ave., Nov. 17. Cologne valued at $100 removed from 9000 block of Colerain Ave., Nov. 17. Purse and contents removed from 5700 block of Springdale Road, Nov. 17.

EVENDALE Incidents/investigations Breaking and entering Reported at Custom Cast and Marbleworks. Nov. 24. Domestic Reported at Walmart, Nov. 19. Misuse of credit card Reported on Nov. 21. Theft Reported at Walmart, Nov. 25. Reported at Walmart, Nov. 19.

FOREST PARK Incidents/investigations Assault Reported on 700 block of Deca-

tur Court, Nov. 20. Burglary Reported at 11000 block of Oakstand Drive, Nov. 23. Criminal damaging Reported on 800 block of W. Kemper Road, Nov. 27. Theft Personal identification removed from 11000 block of Chase Plaza Drive, Nov. 27. Reported on 2200 block of Waycross Road, Nov. 26. Reported on 11000 block of Chase Plaza Drive, Nov. 23. Items removed from vehicle at 1400 block of Longrace Drive, Nov. 19. Reported on 1400 block of W. Kemper Road, Nov. 21. Vehicle removed from 11000 block of Chase Plaza Drive, Nov. 21. Vandalism Reported on 1100 block of W. Kemper Road, Nov. 20.

GLENDALE Incidents/investigations Breaking and entering 800 block of Congress Avenue; John Deere snow blower stolen from shed; unknown when the theft happened; the snow blower is valued at approximately $500; Dec. 29. Burglary 200 block of Washington Avenue; entry to the residence was made through the rear door; the garage was also entered; numerous items were taken including clothes; tools, etc...; victim is compiling a list of stolen items; no value estimate on stolen items at the time of the report; Jan. 2. Theft 800 block of Congress Avenue; standing, propane heater stolen from business; heater valued at approximately $150; stills from the video system had been circulated to news agencies to get information on suspect; nothing else was taken or disturbed at the business; Dec. 25. Theft by deception 100 block of Brandywine; resident received a call from someone he thought was his grand-

son; the “grandson” said that he had been in an accident and was in jail and needed money for an attorney and bail; the “attorney” then called requesting additional money for other expenses; all the money was sent through Wal-Mart and Walgreens; the total amount victim sent was approximately $8,600; victim eventually made contact with his real grandson and discovered that the grandson had not been involved in any accident; Dec. 31.

MOUNT HEALTHY Incidents/investigations Assault Reported at Clovernook and Angela, Nov. 17. Reported at 7700 block of Hamilton Ave., Nov. 20. Breaking and entering Storage unit entered at 7700 block of Hamilton Ave., Nov. 16. Criminal damaging Vehicle damaged at 1500 block of Compton Road, Nov. 21. Domestic Reported on Hamilton Ave., Nov. 16. Reported on Clovernook Ave., Nov. 19. Menacing Reported at 7600 block of Clovernook, Nov. 20. Robbery Reported on 8200 block of Hamilton Ave., Nov. 17. Theft Reported on 7300 block of Hamilton Ave., Nov. 19. iPod removed from 7600 block of Hamilton Ave., Nov. 19. Purse removed from 7600 block of Harrison Ave., Nov. 16. Items removed from vehicle at 1500 block of Compton Road, Nov. 17. Bike removed from 1700 block of Compton Road, Nov. 17. Reported on 7700 block of Hamilton Ave., Nov. 22. Furniture removed from 7400 block of Werner Ave., Nov. 23.

SHARONVILLE Incidents/investigations Assault Reported at 3700 block of

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Creekview Drive, Nov. 3. Breaking and entering Reported on 12000 block of Reading Road, Nov. 16. Domestic Reported on LeMarie Drive, Nov. 2. Reported on Lippleman Road, Nov. 2. Reported on Sharon Road, Nov. 3. Reported on Crescentville Road, Nov. 4. Reported on Kemper Road, Nov. 4. Reported on Plainfield Road, Nov. 6. Reported on Amelia Drive, Nov. 16. Reported on Sharon Park Lane, Nov. 16. Identity fraud Reported on 5000 block of Lord Alfred Court, Nov. 6. Reported on 10000 block of Bridlepath Lane, Nov. 18. Menacing Reported on 4000 block of Sharon Parks Lane, Nov. 4. Reported on 4000 block of Executive Park Drive, Nov. 4. Reported on 11000 block of Prince Lane, Nov. 14. Rape Reported on Kemper Road, Nov. 1. Reported on Hauck Road, Nov. 17. Sexual assault Reported on 11000 block of Timber Ridge Lane, Nov. 20. Theft Reported on 10000 block of Reading Road, Nov. 20. Reported on 11000 block of Chester Road, Nov. 18. Credit card removed from 3200 block of Kemper Road, Nov. 18. Reported on 11000 block of Mosteller Road, Nov. 18. Reported on 10000 block of Crossings Drive, Nov. 18. Reported on 12000 block of Lebanon Road, Nov. 18. Reported on 4000 block of Hauck Road, Nov. 18. Reported on 2200 block of E. Sharon Road, Nov. 18. Reported on 11000 block of Lippleman Road, Nov. 16. Reported on 3400 block of Hauck Road, Nov. 15.

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LIFE

JANUARY 11, 2017 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • 7B

BRIEFLY St. James open house Jan. 22 St. James School in White Oak is hosting its annual open house from 1 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 22. Tours will be given for all interested families. There will be a raffle for a $500 tuition credit for St. James for the 2017-2018 school year for visitors completing a tour of the building. The many programs and activities of the school will be represented throughout the school. There will be activities for the kids to do as well. Information about registration for the 20172018 school year will be given out and registration will open to the public.

EmpowerU announces special event for Martin Luther King Day EmpowerU will host a complete showing of Martin Luther King Jr’s “I Have a Dream” speech 54 years later with reaction from community leaders and audience members. The event is 7 p.m. to 8:30 Monday, Jan. 16, at EmpowerU Studio at Frame USA, 225 Northland Blvd., Springdale. This is a free event, but you must register at www.empoweruohio.org for a ticket.

Upcoming programs at Llanfair Dollars & Donuts – An informal seminar for children of older adults. All programs are 45 minutes in length beginning at 10 a.m. in the Larchwood Pub, 1722 Larch Ave.; Jan. 10, 17 and 24. Topics will include: conservative financial solutions, longterm care coverage and financial planning for your future. Jan. 10: “Don’t Outlive Your Money! Financial Strategies for Creating Lasting Income” Jan. 17: “Protecting Your Assets from Long Term Care Expenses; Tax Traps in Annuities,IRA Required Minimum Distribution & Taxes” Jan. 24: “Long Term Care- An Umbrella of Protection” All programs are limited seating. RSVP early to

Kim Kaser at 513-591-4567 or kkaser@llanfair.oprs.org

Sports stag set The Roger Bacon High School 47th Annual Sports Stag and Hall of Fame Induction will begin at 6 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 19. This year’s special guest speaker is Cincinnati Reds Hall of Famer George Foster. The Hall of Fame inductees are: Tom Schaefer ’68, Steve Norton ’89, Mark Sunderman ’97 and Josh Hausfeld ’02. Larry Gildea ’60 will receive the Bron Bacevich Award. Dan Hoard, voice of the Cincinnati Bengals and UC football and basketball, will be the guest emcee. Various ticket prices are available. Call athletic director Steve Rossi or assistant athletic directorBrandon Spaeth at 513641-1300 to make a reservation or go to www.Rogerbacon.org to register.

Mt. Healthy hiring part-time officers The Mount Healthy Police Department is looking for part-time police officers. The hiring process includes a background check, polygraph and psychological examination. Police Chief Vince Demasi says experienced officers are preferred. Apply in person at 7700 Perry St. Call 513-728-3183 for information.

Sharonville Chamber to recognize champions The Sharonville Chamber of Commerce will be recognizing these exceptional finalists at the Champions of Commerce awards reception at the Sharonville Convention Center Thursday, Feb. 23. Nominations are being accepted in several categories: Economic Impact,Community Service/ Quality of Life, Non-Profit Organization,Entrepreneur of the Year/Entrepreneurial Spirit, Emerging Technologies, Best Start Up, Workforce Investment. Nominations can be submitted at sharonvil lechamber. com.

REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS EVENDALE 9794 Otterbein Road: $150,000; Dec. 2. 3818 Sherbrooke Drive: $391,000; Dec. 8.

GLENDALE 10914 Chester Road: $136,000; Dec. 5. 720 Ivy Ave.: $375,000; Dec. 6. 1 Little Creek Lane: $526,500; Dec. 2.

SHARONVILLE 3887 Creek Road: $114,070; Dec. 2. 5008 Lord Alfred Court: $173,400; Dec. 2. 4086 Mefford Lane: $156,000; Dec. 7. 10472 Wintergreen Court: $120,000; Dec. 5.

733 Linden Ave.: $70,000; Dec. 2. Linden Ave.: $55,500; Dec. 8.

WYOMING 1032 Burns Ave.: $217,000; Dec. 3. 495 Hilltop Lane: $315,000; Dec. 2. 316 Pendery Ave.: $132,500; Dec. 6.

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SPRINGDALE 489 Dimmick Ave.: $87,000; Dec. 6. 489 Dimmick Ave.: $87,000; Dec. 6. 370 Glensprings Drive: $334,000; Dec. 2. 11485 Whallon Court: $108,120; Dec. 5.

YEAR ROUND INSTALLATION! GUARANTEED FREE ESTIMATES

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Now You Don’t!

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2 Weeks Only! NOW THRU JAN. 21st Miracle-Ear Hearing Centers Cold Spring (859) 353-6087 Eastgate (513) 427-0458

Colerain Twp. (513) 427-0332

Cynthiana (859) 359-7403

Erlanger (859) 340-1633

Georgetown (513) 299-8344 Lawrenceburg (812) 718-4090

Hamilton (513) 427-0260 Lebanon (513) 202-4755

Florence (859) 353-6098 Maysville (606) 619-4132

Springdale (513) 427-0346

Middletown (513) 402-1129

Western Hills (513) 427-0054

One More Thing Some parts of the evaluation include the use of a familiar voice, so if you are married, please bring your spouse with you. Call us today to confirm your appointment time!

The Miracle-Ear Advantage: • 100% Satisfaction Guarantee* • 3-year Limited * Warranty** • FREE Lifetime Service • Over 65 Years in Receive 2 Audiotone® Pro Full-Shell ITE Hearing Aids at Business $995 for a limited time only. • Over 1,200 Locations Nationwide

2 for $995 *Limit one coupon per patient at the promotional price during event dates only. Not valid with any other discount or offer. Does not apply to prior purchases. Fits up to 35 db loss. Offer expires 1/21/17.

We Work With Most Insurance Plans

Deal directly with the owner & manufacturer. CE-0000662962

WOODLAWN 10310 Julian Drive: $2,248,000; Dec. 6.

Tiny Micro-Chip Now In The Ear: Available!

513-296-5600

CODE: NP 2 FOR $995 0117 *Hearing tests are always free. Hearing test is an audiometric test to determine proper amplification needs only, not medical exams or diagnoses. If you are not completely satisfied, the aids may be returned for a full refund within 30 days from the completion of fitting, in satisfactory condition. Fitting fee may apply. Valid at participating locations only. See store for details. **Not valid on Audiotone Pro.


LIFE

8B • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • JANUARY 11, 2017

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD PUZZLE

ANSWERS ON PAGE 6A

No. 0108 THE DOWNSIZING OF NATHANIEL AMES

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1 Loops in, in a way 5 Goddess with a throne headdress 9 Tempo 13 Figs. on drivers’ licenses 16 When repeated, a Pacific tourist destination 17 Fish whose name is a celebrity’s name minus an R 18 Old bandleader with an Egyptianinspired name 19 Outrigger projections 20 Things smoked by singer Courtney? 23 Scandalmaker in 2002 news 24 Speed demon 25 Headwear the N.B.A. banned in 2005 26 Game involving sharp projectiles and alcohol 28 Parrot’s cry 29 1950s prez

RELEASE DATE: 1/15/2017

31 “Charlie Hustle is my name/I am banned from Hall of Fame,” e.g.? 33 Fist bump 34 “Yes, ____!” 36 Put a coat on 37 “Eureka!” moments 40 Press Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 4,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year).

42 Cloth colorist 43 Feature of Africa 44 ____ oil 46 Televangelist Joel 48 Alternative to “News” and “Maps” in a Google search 50 Road restriction 51 Pugnacious Olympian 53 Relative of a ferret 54 Cold and wet 55 F.B.I.’s div. 56 Hoopster Steph not playing at home? 60 Riffraff 62 Japanese watchmaker 64 Like Granny Smith apples 65 Endless chore 66 Dickens’s Uriah 68 Sega Genesis competitor, in brief 69 Radiant 71 Intersect 73 The sport of boxing in the 1960s and ’70s, essentially? 75 “Nothing to write home about” 76 Groups with co-pays, briefly 78 Jockey strap 80 “Star Trek: T.N.G.” role 81 Installment 83 Personalized gifts for music lovers 85 Valet in P. G. Wodehouse stories 89 Contemporary hybrid music genre 90 Sots’ sounds

91 Nickname for Louise 93 Feast 94 Sail support 95 In unison 97 Echo effect 99 El operator in the Windy City, briefly 100 Hat for pop singer Corey? 103 Anthem contraction 104 “Uhh …” 105 Show what you know, say 107 “In all probability” 109 Regular 111 Obstinate one, astrologically 112 Two-time Best Actor winner arriving early? 115 Four-star rank: Abbr. 116 Monopoly purchase 117 Singer/songwriter Laura 118 Little foxes 119 Slump 120 ____ cosa (something else: Sp.) 121 Wanders (about) 122 They begin in juin DOWN

1 Original airer of “The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy” 2 Pop competition 3 Something smoked by comic Chris? 4 Hang on to 5 Org. against doping

6 Spindly limbed 7 Shakespeare villain 8 Photo of Canada’s former prime minister Stephen? 9 “Stay ____” 10 Aardvarks, by another name 11 Enter surreptitiously 12 Press lightly, as the brakes 13 He was buried in 1915 and died in 1926 14 Dressage gait 15 Invoice figs. 18 ____ lily 19 Fulminating 21 Dwarf planet more massive than Pluto 22 Atypical 23 Summer hrs. in Phila. 27 Literary device used to address plot inconsistencies 30 Nephrologists study them 32 Spies, informally 35 M.L.K.’s title: Abbr. 38 “Today” personality 39 Shark’s home 41 Close by 43 Egg producer 45 Arctic fliers 47 Blow it 49 Like a handyman’s projects, for short 50 “Anything! Anything at all!” 52 Shade of pink 54 Sword fight, e.g. 56 Filament sites, in botany

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72 Arm muscle, informally 73 ____ drop 74 Miney follower 77 “Idomeneo” 59 Troubles composer 61 Cherry for talk show 79 “All My ____ Live host Chelsea? in Texas” 63 Glimpsed 82 U.N.C. student 67 Forswear 83 Figure at the center 70 Genius of a maze 57 Imprisoned

58 Underhanded use of someone else’s domain name

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84 Tahoe, for one 86 Entourage of a 1990s white rapper? 87 Musical intermission 88 Continuous 90 Flamboyantly successful sort 92 Trampolinist’s wear 96 Start to -scope 97 Cincinnati squad 98 Dude, in British lingo

101 Smallish batteries 102 Long spear 105 Makes “it” 106 Zone 108 “Dark Sky Island” singer 110 Drink sometimes served hot 113 “Snowden” org. 114 ____, cuatro, seis, ocho …

OHIO’S PREMIER CADILLAC DEALER #1 dealer in Cincinnati located in the heart of Montgomery

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Service: 513-891-3533 Mon-Fri 7:30am-6pm Sat 8am-12pm


JANUARY 11, 2017 µ NORTHWEST - COMMUNITY µ 1C

2016 Sales Leaders MEGA VII

MEGA II

Jeanne Rieder Team Over 185 Sales

Jeanne Rieder

Congratulations Jeanne Rieder Team!!

Maria Nicolls

Tina Rieder

Rick Hoeting

MEGA I

Laurie Wissel

Dick Schneider

Lisa Ibold

Mike Wright

Julie Pieczonka

Heather Claypool

Brian Bazeley

Sylvia Kalker

SALES MASTER

Steve Florian

Doug Rolfes

Vicki Schlechtinger

Bill Dattilo

Joe Biggs

Brianne Biggs

Jeanne Haft

Jennifer Hamad

Josette Binder

Joe Darwish

Karen Oswald

Dan Grote

Marily Hoehne

Karen Menkhaus

Art Chaney

Dan Nieman

Deb Drennan

Karen Pangburn

Megan Vollrath

Gwen Bowman

Mike Rolfes

WE MADE THINGS

HAPPEN in 2016...

Call us at 451-4800 for all your real estate needs in 2017! OPEN SUNDAY 11:30-1

Bridgetown - 6975 Summit Lake Dr 10 3 Bdrm/2.0 $109,900 Dir: Harrison Ave. to street. In the circle across from Clubhouse. H-9195

Joe Darwish

OPEN SUNDAY 12-1:30

Colerain East - 2812 Overdale Dr 3 Bdrm/1.1 $126,900 Dir: Pippen to Greenbrook to Overdale. H-9205

Heather Claypool

OPEN SUNDAY 12-2

Price Hill - 2500 Warsaw Ave 3 1 Bdrm/1.0 $54,900 Dir: off Warsaw Ave. H-9187

Bill Dattilo

OPEN SUNDAY 11:30-1

Bridgetown - 4167 School Section Rd 2 Bdrm/1.1 $104,900 Dir: Westwood Northern to North on School Section. H-9200

Steve Florian

OPEN SUNDAY 3:30-5

Covedale - 5111 Sidney Rd 3 Bdrm/1.1 $93,000 Dir: Covedale to Sidney. H-9068

Josette Binder

OPEN SUNDAY 12-1:30

Springfield Twp. - 9645 Leebrook Dr 4 Bdrm/2.1 $194,900 Dir: Winton Rd to Fleming to L on Leebrook located on the end of st in cul-de-sac H-8988

Hoeting-Wissel Team

OPEN SUNDAY 2-3:30

Cheviot - 3855 Delmar Ave 3 Bdrm/2.0 $99,500 Dir: Harrison Ave. to North on Delmar (one way section) by 5/3 Bank. H-9173

Hoeting-Wissel Team

OPEN SUNDAY 2-3:30

Covedale - 4939 Ralph Ave 3 Bdrm/1.1 $79,900 Dir: Off Covedale, between Cleves Warsaw & Sidney H-9108

Sylvia Kalker

OPEN SUNDAY 2-3:30

Westwood - 3614 Fieldcrest Dr 3 Bdrm/2.1 $134,900 Dir: Robb Ave to Parkcrest to Street. H-9145

Jeanne Rieder

OPEN SUNDAY 12:30-1:30

Cheviot - 4290 Selby Ct 2 Bdrm/1.1 $79,500 Dir: Robb to Alex to R on Tangent to Selby. H-9110

Sylvia Kalker

OPEN SUNDAY 2-3:30

Delhi - 5344 Plumridge Dr 4 Bdrm/2.0 $129,900 Dir: Anderson Ferry to Edfel Way (Across from Delhi Middle School) to R on Plumridge H-9179 Dick Schneider

OPEN SUNDAY 3-4:30

Westwood - 2918 Urwiler Ave 3 Bdrm/2.1 $139,900 Dir: Epworth to Urwiler H-9022

Marilyn Hoehne

OPEN SUNDAY 2-3:30

Cheviot - 3853 Ruth Ln 3 Bdrm/1.1 $89,900 Dir: Harrison to School Section to Ruckle to Right on Ruth H9208

Heather Claypool

OPEN SUNDAY 12-1:30

Delhi - 5412 Boutique Ct 4 Bdrm/2.1 $161,900 Dir: Rapid Run to Bandana to Boutique. H-9188

OPEN SUNDAY 12-1:30

Cincinnati - 18 E Fourth St 701 2 Bdrm/2.0 $399,900 Dir: 4th St. between Vine & Walnut. H-9049

Jeanne Rieder

OPEN SUNDAY 11:30-1

Green Twp - 2008 Sylved Ln 2 Bdrm/1.1 $85,900 Dir: Between Sidney & Muddy Creek Roads. H-9133

OPEN SUNDAY 12-1:30

Colerain - 7210 Southwind Ter 2 Bdrm/2.0 $238,000 Dir: Harrison to Athaus, Left on Austin Ridge, left on Southwind. H-9183

Jeanne Rieder

OPEN SUNDAY 2-3:30

Monfort Hts. - 3391 Diehl Rd 16 2 Bdrm/2.0 $83,000 Dir: Heritage Green condominium, off of North Bend Road. H-9204

Dick Schneider

Doug Rolfes

Biggs Team

Colerain - Spacious Two Family w/lrg 2 bdrm apts! 2 new furns, 2 hwhs, WBFP, full bsmt, 2+ car det gar, lot-near shopping, restaurants & highway. $106,900 H-9189

Monfort Hts. - Freshly painted, new carpet, new counter tops. All you need to do is bring your furniture. 2 beds, 2 bath, all appliances stay. NO STEPS! $129,900 H-9186

North College Hill - Opportunity in NCH’s Bus Dist! Ideal for 2 offices: dr off, law firm, etc. Brick bldg. in excel cond. 10 pkg spots! 3150 sq ft per cnty aud. $139,900 H-9114

Doug Rolfes

Dick Schneider

Lisa Ibold


Classifieds

2C Âľ NORTHWEST - COMMUNITY Âľ JANUARY 11, 2017

cincinnati.com

Homes for Sale-Ohio

Kentucky Commission on Human Rights 800-292-5566 H.O.M.E. (Housing Opportunities Made Equal) 513-721-4663

Real Estate

Rentals Springdale: 2 br, 2 ba, no steps. 1 car garage. $1700/mo. Seniors Only. 513-253-2644

B O N D HILL-- 1 BR, quiet, clean, 4 family. Appls incl. Water paid. Laundry & storage in bsmt. No pets, no sec 8. $450+dep. 513-348-0451 Cincinnati Family & Senior Low Income Apts. Section 8. Very nice locations. 1-3 BR Equal Opportunity Housing. 513-929-2402 Harrison-Remodeled Deluxe 1 & 2BR, $600-$710, d/w, a/c, balc, No pets. Sec. dep. 513-574-4400

Destin, FL, Gulf front, 2BR, Condo Rentals, in Beautiful Destin, Local owner. 513-528-9800 Office., 513-752-1735 H

Roselawn Now LeasingOffice & Storefront spaces, newly renovated & updated, 500-5,000 sf, 513-631-0100

DEUFOL Industrial Crating, Warehousing, Logistics Sales, and Business Leader The main purpose of this position is to introduce Deufol in the US market, interact with major industrial, manufacturing and engineered products clients to establish business opportunities and then to work with Deufol to meet the demand within existing sites or by expansion through greenfield or acquisition growth. 10+ years of Industrial Packaging, Warehousing and/or Supply Chain experience. Experience in designing, developing, and delivering technical demonstrations of software solutions, with understanding of existing prospect / client infrastructure, current and future needs, motivation, and timelines. Possess top sales skills as well as modern operational and management skills in industrial export packaging, warehousing and logistics. Demonstrate exemplary verbal and written communication, and presentation skills; ability to tailor communications for technical and non-technical audiences. Strong command presence for both internal and external stakeholders. Qualified candidate send resume to: amber.haas@deufol.com or Mail to 924 S Meridian St. Sunman, In 47041

Avondale, Elmwood, Madisonville & Reading. Refrig, cablelaundry, utils, Wi-Fi, bus, kitchen, a/c, balcony $340 & up. 513-851-0617 HARTWELL/ELMWOODFurnished rooms on busline. $95 to $105/week w/$100 dep. 513-617-7923, 513-617-7924, 513-919-9926

Real Estate

Attn: Amber Haas No Phone Calls Please

Halperns Steak and Seafood Experienced Meat Cutters Needed - Apply at Halperns Steak & Seafood 13151 Apex Dr. Walton, KY

Homes

LIBRARIAN

starting fresh...

Indian Hill Historical Society

Careers

Jobs new beginnings...

Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t put your loved one in a nursing home! Looking for Ft/Pt time, elderly or disabled. Your home or mine. Prefer W side of town. Background & refâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s avail. 513-317-2113 Seeking Detail Oriented CAREgivers Serving DDS (fka MRDD) for imm openings in Ham ilton & Clermony. Co. Includes signing bonus. 513-681-2472 LM or fax: resume to 513-681-0710

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT

Westwood psychiatrist seeking part-time administrative assistant with flexible availability. Rate of pay is highly competitive and negotiable. Email resume to keggerman@fuse.net

Hours are flexible 10 hours per week

Please call 891-1873 or Email: ihhist@cinci.rr.com

LPN/RN Full Time & Part Time Days ALF, Excellent Pay Visit terracecommunity.com Contact Tina at 513-471-3491

To place your ad visit: cincinnati.com/classifieds or search: classifieds

OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY - EFNEP PROGRAM SPECIALIST EFNEP Program Specialist â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Ohio State University â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Job Number 423566 Program Specialist will implement and manage the components of the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) in Hamilton County, Located in Cincinnati, Ohio. Provide functional and administrative supervision over paraprofessional and support EFNEP staff; work with the EFNEP Program Director and County Extension Director to supervise core responsibilities of EFNEP Program Assistants. MS/MA degree in Nutrition, Family and Consumer Sciences, Public Health, or Education is required, or an equivalent combination of education and experience; experience in program planning and administration. OSU is an EEO employer. Applications/Resumes are due by January 15, 2017. Quick Link: http://www.jobsatosu.com/postings/74819

The Cincinnati Enquirer has carrier routes available in the following areas:

Central St. Bernard @ Walnut Hills @ Wyoming @ Avondale East Amelia / Batavia @ Bethel @ Brown County @ Goshen @ Hyde Park @ Madeira/Indian Hill/Milford/Loveland @ Montgomery / Silverton @ Oakley West Colerain Twp. @ Groesbeck @ Harrison Monfort Heights @ Northside Western Hills / Westwood @ Wyoming North Fairfield @ Liberty Township @ Maineville @ Morrow Mason @ Sharonville @ West Chester Kentucky Cold Spring @ Crescent Springs Edgewood Erlanger Florence / Burlington Independence / Taylor Mill Park Hills / Ft. Mitchell Union @ Walton / Verona @ Warsaw Indiana St. Leon @ Lawrenceburg @ West Harrison Must be 18 with a valid drivers license and proof of insurance. If interested please call: 1-855-704-2104 deliveryopportunities.gannett.com/

AUTOMOTIVE MECHANIC Open Exam sign up ends 2/4/17 Makeup to $53,753.31 annually and substantial benefits package. The city of Cincinnati , Fleet Services is seeking Automotive Mechanics to troubleshoot / repair automobiles, Trucks, construction equipment, Fire Pumpers, and nonautomotive equipment. Must have 3 years paid experience in automotive repair work. Valid Ohio class A CDL , OR obtain one during probation period. ASE Automotive certifications preferred. May be required / willing to work shifts other than normal business hours including nights , weekends , holidays. Application and test date details available at the link below. http://agency.governmentj obs.com/cincinnati/default. cfm

Tractor-Trailer Mechanic

Call 513-910-7146

HIRING FOR FT

Housekeeping Positions $350 Sign On Bonus After 60 Days of Employment. Apply online to join our team!

HAND OUT THE CIGARS! Celebrate with a announcement. VISIT CLASSIFIEDS online at cincinnati.com

PRODUCTION ASSOCIATES NEEDED Honda Manufacturing of Indiana APPLY NOW AT:

Indiana.Honda.com/Job-Opportunities PROSPECTIVE APPLICANTS SHOULD:

Mechanic / Maintenance Worker City of Loveland The City of Loveland will be holding a civil service examination for the full-time position of Mechanic/Maintenance Worker. For a full position announcement, employment and test applications and info on the position, visit www.lovelandoh.com/employment , or pick up copies at City Hall, 120 W. Loveland Avenue, Loveland OH 45140. No phone calls, please. Loveland is an equal opportunity employer.

2nd shift, Full-Time needed, light repairs and PM services Sharonville, Oh area

www.carespring.com/employment

Brick Apt Bldg, 2 Apts & Commercial Space., May be converted in to 4 apts. 504 Nowlin Ave, Greendale, IN, $178,500. 812-537-2956, No Realtor Solicitations please

PETS & STUFF

RIDES

HOMES

Homes for Sale-Ohio

All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968 which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, national origin, handicap or familial status or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newpaper are available on an equal opportunity basis.

great places to live...

JOBS

Driver: CDL-A Truck Driver Great Local Route! Get Home Daily, 100% No-Touch Freight Call for Details 844-303-9802 Drivers: $5,000.00 Orientation Completion Bonus! Dedicated! Get Home Weekends! Platinum Orientation flight, with upscale lodging and meals.1 year Class-A Call Today: 855-450-2267 Drivers:, CDL-A: LOCAL Lawrenceburg, IN!! Regional & OTR Home Weekends! Sign-On Bonus!! Excellent Pay, Benefits! Drue Chrisman Inc.: 877-346-6589 x103

Drivers: OPEN HOUSE HIRING EVENT! Dedicated Routes! Home Weekends!! $5,000.00 Orientation Completion Bonus! Platinum Orientation flight, with upscale lodging and meals. 1 year Class-A Come & Apply with Koch Trucking: Fri 1/13 or Sat 1/14 8a-6p Homewood Suites by Hilton 9226 Schulze Dr, West Chester Township, OH 45069 Or Call 855-450-2267 Driver Wanted Highly safe and dependable driver needed in the Eastgate area to transport military applicants to Columbus for processing. Applicants must have a valid operating license with clean driving record, able to pass D.O.T. physical and drug screen, and criminal background check. Being a vet is preferable, but not necessary. Must work well with Military recruiters and applicants. Schedule is Wednesday-Friday, starting pay is $10/hr. Resumes can be faxed to 937-898-5951, or emailed to: msmith@chartervans.com

â&#x20AC;˘ Be committed to working in a fast-paced environment â&#x20AC;˘ Be flexible and open-minded â&#x20AC;˘ Have the ambition to succeed and build products that exceed customersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; expectations â&#x20AC;˘ Be motivated to actively seek new challenges â&#x20AC;˘ Have the ability to take initiative â&#x20AC;˘ Be committed to safety and quality â&#x20AC;˘ Be committed to open communication and teamwork REQUIREMENTS: â&#x20AC;˘ Be willing to work 2nd shift â&#x20AC;˘ Be eighteen (18) years of age â&#x20AC;˘ Provide proof of a High School Diploma or GED â&#x20AC;˘ Reside in one of the 31 counties listed on our website We are committed to recruiting candidates from diverse backgrounds. Honda is an equal opportunity employer. CE-0000664364

BOONE COUNTY SHERIFF MICHAEL A. HELMIG

P.O. BOX 198 BURLINGTON, KY. 41005-0198 Phone: 859-334-2175 FAX: 859-334-2234

Boone County Sheriffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Department Deputy Sheriff Position

The Boone County Sheriffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Department is now accepting applications for the position of deputy sheriff. Applicants must be at least 21 years of age and be capable of passing a physical agility, written, and oral interview testing. Applicants must have a high school diploma (or equivalent), be a citizen of the United States, possess a valid driverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s license, have no felony convictions, have not been prohibited from carrying a firearm and have the physical strength/agility to perform the duties of a peace officer. Candidates must pass post-offer medical and psychological examinations, polygraph testing, drug testing, and an in-depth background investigation. As a condition of employment, recruits must successfully complete an extensive twenty-three (23) week training course in Richmond, Kentucky where they will obtain their Peace Officer Professional Standards (P.O.P.S.) certification. Applications are available for pickup at the Boone County Sheriffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Department located at 3,000 Conrad Lane in Burlington, Kentucky 41005 Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. & Saturday 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. Completed applications must be returned to the Sheriffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Department by Friday, February 17, 2017 by 5:00 p.m. The Boone County Sheriffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Department is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

CE-0000667030

Affordable Firewood Seasoned, Split Hardwood. $185 per Cord, $95 per 1/2 Cord, plus sales tax. Free delivery to most areas around Hamilton County. Stacking available Call Brian at B&B Queen City Tree Service 513-542-7044

FIREWOOD - Kentucky Seasoned Hardwood: cut, split, delivered, dumped- $225/cord. 35+ yrs experience. Call 859-393-5002 LOW PRICED Seasoned & Split Firewood WITH FREE DELIVERY 513-574-3950

Community

Announce announcements, novena... Special Notices-Clas ! ADOPTION: ! Loving Home with Successful Professionals; Laughter, Music, Celebrations await Miracle Baby. Expenses Paid ! 1-800-563-7964 ! ATTENTION GE EVENDALE (1961-70) & Fernald (FMPC) (1951-83) FAMILIES. Did you, your spouse or your parent become ill after working @ GE or Fernald? You maybe entitles to up to $400,000 from the United States. For more information call Attorney Hugh Stephens at 1-800548-4494, even if your claim has been accepted or denied. We assist with claims, dose reconstructions, appeals, impairment ratings, wage loss, health care and home care. No Recovery-No Fee. 2495 Main St, Buffalo, NY.

PRIME SPLIT FIREWOOD Delivered & Stacked 513-275-8565

     VISIT CLASSIFIEDS online at cincinnati.com

CASKETS $300 & URNS $99 ALL CASKETS 16 & 18 gauge metal only $300 & Solid Wood only $500 All funeral homes must accept our caskets. IT"S THE LAW! Buy ahead save thousands, churches, police, firemen, businesses. 8455 Winton Rd in Brentwood shopping Center Call Today 513-383-2785 thecasketcompany.com Dining room set and cabinet with hutch, Drexel seating for 4-10. Hutch with cabinets, drawer space and display shelving, $$1,495.00. (865)368-6497 jjnowiski@aol. com

BOUGHT A NEW CAR?      VISIT CLASSIFIEDS online at cincinnati.com

Service Directory CALL: 513-421-6300 TO PLACE YOUR AD

Assorted

Stuff all kinds of things... Looking to buy porcelain and painted advertising signs, I buy advertising signs. I am looking for large or small signs that are original. Please only signs older than 1970 , $Any . (513)265-4334 filcallc @gmail.com

DONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S TREE SERVICE, LLC

Trees Trimmed Topped & Removed Free Estimates - Insured

896-5695 Proprietor, Don Stroud

CE-0000665359

     VISIT CLASSIFIEDS online at cincinnati.com


JANUARY 11, 2017 µ NORTHWEST - COMMUNITY µ 3C

Public Auction

Sand Casting Foundry and CNC Machine Shop By Order of Court Appointed Receiver

Adopt Me

Pets find a new friend...

Pride Cast Metals, Inc. 2735 Colerain Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio Thursday, January 12, 9:00 am Inspection: Wednesday, January 11, 10-5 Featuring: Sinto FBO-III Flaskless Molding System, New 1998 Inductotherm Powertrak 400-10 Melting Furnace Sand Molding Machines * Beardsley & Piper Speed Muller Harrison Shell Core Machines * Redford Core Blowers Complete Pattern Shop * Foundry Lab Equipment (10) Okuma CNC Turning Centers * VMC’s Doosan & Okuma-Howa Twin Spindle Turning Centers Mills * Lathes * Grinders * Saws * Drills Fork Lifts * Air Compressors * Shop Support Items Thompson Auctioneers, Inc. Steve Thompson, Auctioneer 937-426-8446 * www.thompsonauctioneers.com Ohio License 63199566109

GRAND OPENING Lowest Prices In Cincinnati Great floor model discounts Living Room, Dining Rooms, Mattresses, Bunkbeds, Futons, Electric Adjustable Beds w/ memory foam mattresses. REALLY HOT MATTRESS PRICES 100’s of premium king sets Lots of floor model specials. SHOP US TODAY! First Come---First Served Lowest Prices--Highest Quality 8455 Winton Rd* Brentwood Plaza Call me, BILL, w/ your questions513-383-2785! Mattress & Furniture Express mattressandfurnitureexpress.com Apply online everyone approved. Guaranteed financing, No Credit Check

Electric Hospital Bed , barely used, great cond., removable bed rails. $500 obo 513-954-4213 Quickie QM715 Wheelchair, cost $35,000, will trade for anything. Pronto $450 & GoGo Scooter $495 Invacare IV, $75; 513-886-9960

HANDYMAN Experienced, Reasonable, No Job Too big or Too Small. Call Steve 513-491-6672

TOTAL GYM XLS--With Accessories. Already Assembled. Used 1x. Best offer. 513-312-1592

BUYING-RECORD ALBUMS & CDs, METAL, JAZZ, BLUES, ROCK, RAP, INDIE, R&B & REGGAE. 513-683-6985

CASH PAID for unopened unexpired Diabetic Strips. Up to $35 per 100. 513-377-7522 www.cincytestrips.com

American Bulldogs Pups NKC reg., brindle&white, shots & wormed, $400/obo. 812-593-7012 DOG, Mini Schnauzers, 2 males, 4 females, $1000, 7 weeks , salt pepper, black, white, calm Full AKC (513)526-3138 mpartinlpn@g mail.com PUG PUPPY AKC, Adorable & Energetic, (2) M. Fawn $700; (2) F. Fawn $800; (2) M. Black $800. 513-305-5528 Schnauzer Puppies, Mini - AKC, 9 weeks, shots, wormed, black & silver, Males only. $375. Call 937-205-2305

Automotive # I BUY VINYL RECORDS Rock, Metal, Punk, Indie, R&B, Reggae, etc. We make house calls. 513-428-4695

INSTANT CASH PAID For Baseball Cards Coins, Gold, Silver, Antiques, Old Toys, Watches, Comics, Case Knives Military, Trains, Autographs, Many Others! We Pick-up. 513-295-5634

$$$ PAID for LPs,CDs, CASSETTES-ROCK, BLUES, INDIE, METAL, JAZZ, ETC + VINTAGE STEREO EQUIP, DVDs & MEMORABILIA. 50 YRS COMBINED BUYING EXPERIENCE! WE CAN COME TO YOU! 513-591-0123 Want to Buy Antique Leather Sofa, I am looking for a specific type of sofa that is leather. Has brass buttons and lots of buttons throughout. Please let me know if you have one. It needs to be antique not a newer one. , $Any. (513)265-4334 filcallc@ gmail.com

WAR RELICS US, German, Japanese Uniforms, Helmets, Guns, Swords, Medals Etc, Paying Top Dollar Call 513-309-1347

Rides best deal for you... 2011 FORD FUSION SE : blue, 31k miles, excellent condition. 1 Owner $10,000. 513-675-3979 Audi 2015 A4, Coupe, 58000 mi., 4 dr., Automatic, Black ext., Black int., VIN#WAIJAFAFL2FN042611, 04 Cylinders, FWD, A/C: Front, A/C: Rear, Airbag: Driver, Airbag: Passenger, Airbag: Side, Alarm, Alloy Wheels, Anti-Lock Brakes, CD Player, Cruise Control, Fog Lights, Leather Interior, Moonroof, Power Locks, Power Seats, Power Steering, Power Windows, Premium Sound, Rear Window Defroster, Sunroof, Tinted Glass, Driven 800 expressway miles per week for management position. One owner--all records at Audi dealership. Oil changed every 5000 miles. New radial tires w/ less than 100 miles.-Showroom condition. Email contact for photos, $22,900. Jim Eveslage (513)926-1351 Lexus 1999 RX300, Pearl. 1 owner, Lux. accessories, mint. Test drive, make an offer. Jim: 513-941-4881

2014 BMW C 650 GT, Like New, 875 miles, Silver, includes matching full face helmet, cover, and Battery Tender, $7,250. Edward Strauss (740)645-3172

Garage & Yard Sale

neighborly deals...

Blue Ash OH Estate Sale 5492 Kenridge Dr, Blue Ash, OH 1/13, 1/14 & 1/15 Fri - 9-4, #’s @ 8:45; Sat & Sun 9-4 Contents of Home, Garage & Out building. Large 3 Day Sale! Lots of Misc. Collectibles, Antiques, Old Toys, Old Radios, Old Phonographs, Electronics, Cameras, Stereo viewers, Old Books, Records, Clocks, Lamps, Painted China Hutch, Old Chairs, Drop Leaf Table, Desks, Carpenter Bench Coffee Table, Cast Iron, Violins, Accordion, Key board, Guitar, Lift Chair, Oliver Typewriter & Case, Old P & G items, Popcorn maker, Lots of office supplies, lots of Holiday, Linens, Crafts, Antique tables, Stain Glass, Leaded Glass, Ladders, Garden Tools, Hand Tools, Patio Furniture, Lots of Kitchen Items and Smalls. Still unpacking boxes! Too Much to list, All priced to sell! Info & pics hsestatesales.com or 859-468-9468 Directions - Kenwood Rd Kenridge Dr or Meyers Ln (Parking on Meyers Ln,house is at the end of Meyers Ln)

Garage Sales Cleves-239 S Miami Ave, 45002. (right off Hwy 50). Sat 1/14 & Sun 1/15, 10a-2p: Lg wardrobe, vintage dressers, multiple collectibles, kitchenware, Christmas collection, many toys & games.

Lawrenceburg IN Estate Sale 19753 Ventura Dr Lawrenceburg, IN 1/14 & 1/15 Sat. 9-4, #’s @ 8:45; Sun. 9-4 Contents of home & garage. Walnut Dining Table & Hutch, Curio cabinet, glass door bookshelf, rattan glass top table & chairs, bookshelf, large oak & glass door entertainment center, electronics, barstools, patio bench, electric grill, gas grill, carpet cleaner, leaf blower, Power, hand & yard tools, exercise bike, coll. of adv. signs, mirrors, lamps, nautical theme items, scuba equipment, air compressor, tablesaw, snowblower, misc. kitchen items, too much to list all priced to sell! Info and pics – hsestatesales.com or 859–992-0212. Directions – Route 50 – Stateline Road – L on Alpine Dr – L on Ventura Dr (Hidden Valley Lake)

JANUARY CLEARANCE

50% Off Everything! Thur-Fri Jan 13 & 14 Thur-Fri Jan 20 & 21 10am-4pm The Franciscan Peddler 60 Compton Rd. 45215 All Proceeds benefit the Ministries of The Franciscan Sisters of The Poor

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Garage Sales

PUBLIC NOTICE In accordance with the provisions of State law, there being due and unpaid charges for which the undersigned is entitled to satisfy an owner and/or manager’s lien of the goods hereinafter described and stored at the Uncle Bob’s Self Storage location(s) listed below. And, due notice having been given, to the owner of said property and all parties known to claim an interest therein, and the time specified in such notice for payment of such having expired, the goods will be sold at public auction at the below stated location(s)to the highest bidder or otherwise disposed of on Monday, January 30, 2017 @ 11AM, 11378 Springfield Pike, Springdale, OH 45246, (513)771-5311 Stacy Atkinson 11397 Kenn Rd. Cincinnati, OH 45240 Tools/Appliances, Boxes. Stacy Atkinson 11397 Kenn Rd. Cincinnati, OH 45240 Household Goods/Furniture, Tools/Appliances, Boxes and Totes. Yah’shua T. Yisrael 1076 Schumard Ave. Cincinnati, OH 45215 Household Goods/Furniture, TV/Stereo Equipment, Tools/Appliances, Account Records/Sales Samples. Taylor D. Althammer 4108 Jud Drive Cincinnati, OH 45236 Household Goods/Furniture, TV/Stereo Equipment. 203TRI,Jan11,18,’17#1809691

PUBLIC HEARING The Colerain Township Board of Zoning Appeals will hold public hearings on Wednesday, January 25, 2017 at 6:30 p.m. at the Colerain Township Government Complex, 4200 Springdale Rd., Cincinnati, OH for the following cases: BZA2017-01– 5770 Springdale Rd. – Holthaus Signs representing property owner Obewiler LLC has requested a variance from Section from Section 15.8.3(G)(2) to allow for a wall sign exceeding the maximum allowable height. BZA2017-02 – 5700 Springdale Rd. – Holthaus Signs representing property owner Obewiler LLC has requested a variance from Section 15.8.3(G)(2) to allow for a wall sign exceeding the maximum allowable height and Section 16.2.81 to allow a wall sign on the side of a building not facing a street. The applications may be examined Mon.-Fri., 8 a.m.4:30 p.m. at the Colerain Township Planning & Zoning Dept., 4200 Springdale Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45251. NWP,Jan11,’17#1838899

PUBLIC NOTICE The following legislation was passed at the January 11, 2017 Springdale City Council meeting: ORDINANCE No. 1-2017 ADOPTING THE ANNUAL APPROPRIATION / ESTIMATED RECEIPTS ORDINANCE FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 2017

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ORDINANCE No. 2-2017 AUTHORIZING THE CITY TO ENGAGE THE SERVICES OF AN UNDERWRITER TO ASSIST THE CITY WITH THE ISSUANCE AND SALE OF APPROXIMATELY $8.2 MILLION IN ROAD IMPROVEMENT BONDS FOR PROJECTS THROUGHOUT THE CITY AND DECLARING AN EMERGENCY ORDINANCE NO. 3-2017 AUTHORIZING THE CITY TO ENGAGE THE SERVICES OF BOND COUNSEL TO ASSIST THE CITY WITH THE ISSUANCE AND SALE OF APPROXIMATELY $8.2 MILLION IN ROAD IMPROVMENT BONDS FOR PROJECTS THROUGHOUT THE CITY AND DECLARING AN EMERGENCY Kathy McNear Clerk of Council/Finance Director TRI,Jan11,’17#1847421

Notice of Annual Financial Report Notice is hereby given that copies of the Comprehensive Annual Financial Report of the Northwest Local School District of Hamilton County of Cincinnati, Ohio, for the year ended June 30, 2016 has been completed and is on file in the office of the Treasurer of the Board of Education and open to review at 3240 Banning Road, Cincinnati, Ohio between the hours of 8:00 AM and 4:00 PM. A copy of the report can be viewed on the District’s website. NWP,Jan11,’17#1847668

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