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“Together” “Together” is the theme for Developmental Disabilities Awareness Month 2011. Starlight Programs and other related organizations celebrate Developmental Disabilities Awareness Month in March, and invite you to consider the true meaning of this year’s theme, “Together”.

Statewide, and across the nation, organizations devoted to serving individuals with developmental disabilities are planning special events in March to raise public awareness of the many abilities people have, regardless of disability. “Together” encourages people to understand that when people with disabilities

are welcomed into local neighborhoods, workplaces, houses of worship, and schools, everyone wins. This is a time when our organization focuses on encouraging the public to better understand the individuals we serve. During ‘Developmental Disabilities Awareness Month’, I want to

encourage people to learn more about the almost 400 children and adults in this community who are served by Starlight Programs; and to recognize that all of us have talents and abilities that we can offer to make this a better place to live. It is a great pleasure to partner with the Times Recorder to bring many of

our stories to you in this supplement. If after reading these stories, you have any questions or would like more information about Starlight Programs, please contact me at 740-453-4829 or jhill@muskingumdd.org. “Together” we can accomplish so much more.

John E. Hill, Superintendent

Early Intervention – The Foundation for Lifelong Learning The Starlight Early Intervention Program (EI) provides services for children from birth through two years of age and their families. There is no cost to this program. Children with concerns are referred for evaluation by Help Me Grow (HMG). Help Me Grow will assist the family with the development of an Individual Family Service Plan (IFSP). Starlight Early Inter-

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vention is a provider of services for Muskingum County. Children who receive services have been identified with a developmental delay by an evaluation team. The team will evaluate all areas of development including speech and language, cognitive, social/ emotional, fine and gross motor skills and self help. After enrollment in Starlight EI, staff members work as a team to meet the needs of children and parents. Service options include home based and school based through individual or group daytime or evening sessions. Service options and frequency are determined through discussions with families. Parent involvement and participation are central to the program. Family routines and schedules give children the best opportunities to practice the skills they need. The team provides the families with information they can use at home so they can continue to be their child’s best teacher. Starlight’s EI Team includes four disciplines, the early intervention specialist, speech therapist, physical therapist and occupational therapist. A vision specialist is available as needed. The EI specialist will coordinate therapies, develop a devel-

opmental program, and assess any areas with an emphasis on cognition and social-emotional skills. They will take an educators role to help families become more knowledgeable and confident in working with their child. Speech therapy is provided to determine the child understands of language and the child’s ability to express language according to their developmental age level. The physical therapist (PT) will focus on how the child uses their large muscles as they develop walking, sitting, and movement skills. PT will assist the families in making referrals for orthopedic needs, such as braces, or adaptive equipment, such as a wheelchair. Occupational therapy (OT) is directed to improve the child’s “occupation” (the things that occupy a child’s time) such as playing, eating and sleeping. These things usually involve using the hands and eyes, so OT’s design activities and exercises to help babies and toddlers develop hand use, functional vision skills and beginning self-care skills. It is not unusual to see the OT show up when it is time for a child to take off their coat, eat, or fingerpaint. A doctor’s prescription is needed for OT and PT services. All the therapists give parents

“EI Specialist, Eileen Liles directs Carson Chaney along with his mother and sisters”

“Tamara Chaney assists her son, Carson, during an Early Intervention session focused on giving parents the skills to develop their child’s abilities” and early intervention specialist’s ideas to improve skills that can be used routinely throughout the day. Visits are designed to model strategies for parents to promote skills through play and functional activities. Information and recommendations on appro-

“Twins, Anna and Hannah A. play with Kalen during EI Transition class” priate toys and adaptive equipment are provided. Six months prior to the child’s third birthday there is a transition process to determine if the child is eligible for a preschool program. Parents are guided to help their child make a smooth transfer to an appropriate pre-

school program for 3-6 year olds. The team at Starlight understands that the first few years of a child’s life lay the foundation for lifelong learning. Muskingum County special needs children have a strong support system with Starlight Early Intervention Program.


Page 3 Working Together to Ensure the Health and Safety of Individuals with Developmental Disabilities Assuring the health and safety of individuals receiving services from the Starlight Programs is an important job responsibility of each staff member employed, as well as service providers under contract with the program. The required reporting and taking steps necessary to protect health and safety are based upon the Incidents Adversely Affecting Health and Safety Rule from the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities as specified in the Ohio Administrative Code 5123:2-17-02. There are many types of abuse and/or neglect that individuals with developmental disabilities may experience. This informa-

tion is being provided in order to make you aware of how to get help and what to report when a person with developmental disabilities is thought to be involved in incidents that adversely affect their health and safety. These incidents may include but are not limited to the following: physical abuse (physical pain or injury), verbal abuse (language or gestures that threaten, insult or show disrespect), mental abuse (harassing or humiliating an individual), sexual abuse (inappropriate touching or sexual gratification), neglect (failure to provide food or medical/personal care), rights abuse (when basic client rights are ignored) and

finally, misappropriation or theft (obtaining the property of an individual without their consent). Individuals with developmental disabilities are at a greater risk that others for all types of abuse and neglect. According to research, most people with disabilities will experience some form of sexual abuse in their lifetime. At least 20 percent of females and 5 to 10 percent of males are sexually abused every year in the United States. Although these figures are disturbingly high, people with developmental disabilities are at an even greater risk, with more than 90 percent experiencing sexual abuse at some point in

their lives. Forty-nine percent will experience 10 or more abusive incidents (Valenti-Hein & Schwartz, 1995). Other studies suggest that 39 to 68 percent of girls and 16 to 30 percent of boys will be sexually abused before their eighteenth birthday. The likelihood of rape is staggering: 15,000 to 19,000 of people with developmental disabilities are raped each year in the United States (Sobsey, 1994). If you are aware of an individual (child or adult) with developmental disabilities who is being abused or neglected, please report this information as soon as possible to Kathy Shesky, Unusual Incident Coordinator, at 740-

453-4829 during business hours (weekdays between the hours of 8:30 a.m. and 4:00 p.m.) On evenings, weekends or holidays call our emergency number at 1-800-881-8790. Reports of abuse or neglect can be made

The Adult Day Program The purpose and mission of Muskingum Starlight Industries’ (MSI) Adult Day Program is to provide individuals with disabilities the option of non-vocational programming and activities if they are unable to, or choose not to work. Starlight currently serves thirty individuals with seven staff members. The Adult Day Program offers a wide variety of activities and services on the campus including motor and social skills training, arts and crafts education, and sensory stimulation; as well as community-based activities and services including community outings and inclusion, and adult daily living skills. Motor skills training includes activities such as exercise, walking, gardening, nature appreciation, and other long-term projects to promote strength and stamina. Social skills training includes games, puzzles, reading, storytelling, computer skills, fine motor projects and other activities which promote social skills, acceptance and inclusion. Arts and crafts education uses

simple crafting and art projects, exploring the creative side of individuals with developmental disabilities and giving them an opportunity to express themselves through art. Sensory stimulation was developed to provide a variety of opportunities for building skills in the area of sensory perception such as aromatherapy, relaxation techniques, visual stimulation, fine motor skills, music therapy, cognition therapies, and opportunities to create and sharpen thought processes, decision making, and choice. Our community-based activities and services include involving individuals in a variety of field trips

within the community, based on the individual’s choice and specific need. We provide opportunities to support several local businesses as well as outside locations. In order to help our individuals learn by experiencing, we offer adult daily living skills and habilitation with the purpose of providing a variety of activities to promote and sharpen skills in the area of

daily living. Muskingum Starlight Industries’ Adult Day Program is located at 1330 Newark Road (directly across from Subway). Our hours of operation are Monday – Friday 9:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. All questions regarding the Adult Day Program should be directed to Larry Wheeler, Director of Adult Services at 740-453-4622.

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“Together….. We Can Accomplish More” The Muskingum County Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities Program, better known as Starlight Programs, began in January of 1959 through the dedication of a group of parents who wanted educational services for their children that were excluded from public school. The original group of parents involved were Bruce and Martha Brannon, Bernard and Irene Goldstein, Harold and Ethel Newcome, Dorothy Patterson, Lou and Pauline Sentivany, and Nellie Wilson. They began by forming the Muskingum County Council for Retarded Children with the purpose of educating the public and justifying the need for their children to have educational/ training services. The first class started in February 1959 at Jefferson Elementary School in Dresden, Ohio. The class had 7 students, a teacher and an assistant. The classroom was donated by the TriValley Local School District. A parent donated an automobile and the classroom teacher was responsible for transporting the students to and from school. In September of 1959, it was necessary to open another classroom and it was held at Central Presbyterian Church in Zanesville while continuing the original class in Dresden. A carryall bus was donated by the Downtown Kiwanis Club to provide part of the transportation. The following fall (1960) it was decided to consolidate the program so it could be centrally located. The program was transferred to a building provided by the Good-

will Industries and a third class was added. The classrooms were cleaned, painted and maintained by the parents. Transportation was improved by adding a 24-passenger bus that was again donated by the Downtown Kiwanis Club. In the summer of 1961, it became necessary to obtain an even larger facility to accommodate four classrooms for forty eight students, 4 teachers, and 4 teacher assistants. Mr. Harry Kirke was employed by the program as administrator and a building was donated by the Newton School (now the Maysville Local School District) in East Fultonham. The transportation fleet was

increased to 4 buses with one being provided by the Council and the other by the County Commissioners. In September of 1963, a fifth class was added bringing the total enrollment to sixty students. It was obvious to the parents that the building in East Fultonham was unable to accommodate the rapid growth of the program. The program was financed by parent directed fund drives, community contributions, inkind facility donations, state reimbursement from the Department of Mental Hygiene and tuition from the local school

districts. In the Fall of 1961, State legislation shifted the responsibility for the Muskingum County Mental Retardation Program to the Child Welfare Board under the financial direction of the Muskingum County Board of County Commissioners. The Muskingum County Council for Retarded Children utilized a “Light of Life” Campaign to fund the many financial needs of the growing program. Parents under the direction of Marguerite Fitz visited every community in the county (often going door to door) to acquire support for the program in the form of a levy to be placed on the ballot that would build a new facility to house the program. The Muskingum County Commissioners donated land adjacent to the County Home and placed a 1.4 mill construction levy on the ballot in November of 1963. This levy passed and the new facility on Newark Road was dedicated on November 15, 1964. The need was justified to the community; the voters responded and a dream came true. The above article is an excerpt from A BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY OF MUSKINGUM COUNTY, OHIO PREPARED BY THE MUSKINGUM COUNTY GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY MUSKINGUM COUNTY DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES PROGRAM – Information compiled and written by Caribeth Legats, January 15, 2005.

“Together” Look How Far We’ve Come … Starlight Programs now provides many services for 400

Muskingum County residents with developmental disabilities. Starlight School services children/young adults from 0-21 years of age through the Early Intervention Program, preschool program and school age classes. Muskingum Starlight Industries (MSI) provides employment services through the community, transitional, and sheltered workshop. MSI also operates the Starlight Café located in the MAPT Bus Station on Main Street in downtown Zanesville. The Adult Day Program provides opportunities for those individuals who do not work to help them socialize, learn new skills, and maintain those skills. The Service Coordination Department assist individual and their families in accessing needed services. The Transportation Department maintains routes covering all areas of Muskingum County, traveling almost 206,000 miles per year with a fleet of seventeen buses. Our program is funded through federal, state and local levy dollars. “Together” our future is brighter!

Page 4


Page 5

Developing Learning Skills at Preschool

is preferred to adult assistance when appropriate to encourage more typical relationships, social skills and communication. Starlight has an accessible garden that students help in planning, wedding and harvesting. Nutrition is promoted as they taste new vegetables. The intensity of services provided within the Starlight environment makes this an ideal setting. Gym class is directed by Dwayne Liles, Adapted Physical Education teacher you assesses motor abilities and adapts or adjusts the activities so that all students can participate. Speech therapy will develop the plan for the child to learn to communicate in the classroom

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environment and the home. The Speech Language Pathologist (SLP) supports language understanding, pre-literacy, social skills and pronunciation skills. Some students begin to learn alternative communication techniques such as picture symbols, sign language and verbal output devices. Physical Therapy (PT) is involved to work with the teacher and assistants to make independent walking, sitting, movement between positions, in and out of wheelchairs and regular

chairs part of the daily routine. PT also adjusts special equipment, provides evaluations for braces, wheelchairs and other adaptive equipment. Occupational therapy helps students with the things that occupy their time â&#x20AC;&#x201C; play, eat, coats on/offâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; and in general activities that require eye-hand coordination. Occupational therapist work directly with students during meals, class projects, sensory motor tasks, and creative movement sessions. They also provide teachers with consult, follow-up activities, skill kits and equipment. The onsite school nurse attends to both complex and simple medical needs. Starlight Preschool benefits the community by beginning to build skills that will benefit the students as adults. Preschool teacher, Missy Luckhaupt adds â&#x20AC;&#x153;This program provides extra help and services to children who need it and it provides a quality learning environment with a lesson in diversity for others.â&#x20AC;? Karen Linser, OTR/L, states, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Starlight preschool provides an opportunity like no other for our students. Many times developmental issues can be addressed so well that the student can go on to a regular school with no IEP (individualized educational

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plan). For many students preschool provides a safe, happy and predictable, structured environment which helps them do things they might otherwise not have an opportunity to try. It often helps parents see their children as more capable and independent.â&#x20AC;? When you begin

life as a student you learn how to view yourself. There are no handicaps â&#x20AC;&#x201C; only different ways to do things. At Starlight we will not consider being helpless or dependent, but we will learn to say â&#x20AC;&#x153;I can do this!â&#x20AC;?

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Wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t we all like to go back to the happy, carefree days where playing nicely with others was our dayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s goal? If you were in preschool at Starlight, you would be in one of three classrooms. Each of the three classrooms has twelve children, ages 3-6. Eight of the children have been identified as having special needs such as delays in speech, motor skills, or learning. Four students in the class are typically developing partners. Preschool teacher, Sarah Paul explains, â&#x20AC;&#x153;All the students work together â&#x20AC;Ś. They are all friends.â&#x20AC;? Teacher assistant, Jane L. shares, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bringing children together at such a young age helps them understand differencesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s okay that you are differentâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; we all have different needs and different abilities.â&#x20AC;? Preschoolers participate in a wide variety of activities â&#x20AC;&#x201C;some are â&#x20AC;&#x153;school-likeâ&#x20AC;? and others are more developmental and exploratory. They follow a routine preschool day: Breakfast, free time, physical education, and circle with music, calendar and reading time, table time with art projects, outside play, lunch, nap, centers, snack, and dismissal. Free time choices are emphasized as part of the learning process. Teachers direct the day so that state developed curriculum and standards are incorporated. Each classroom also has a teacher assistant who helps to promote independence through all the daily routines such as eating, zipping, and toileting. Starlight students are encouraged to become more independent in skills related to learning. The structure is geared to provide the least intrusive assistance that is needed. That may include changes to the school environment, such as putting toys on a low shelf for a child that cannot stand up or providing special crayon holder to grasp the crayon. Assistance of another child

         

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Page 6

Students Rewarded for Their Efforts The curriculum at Starlight School includes teaching students to become good citizens. This is accomplished by providing a variety of reward items, activities, and experiences throughout the school day to encourage students to follow the structure of the classroom and get along well with their classmates. Teachers use many strategies to do this including giving stickers, stamps, high fives, praise, preferred activities and special responsibilities. In addition, students have access

to the token store. Students earn tokens throughout the day for good behavior and use the tokens to “purchase” things they want at the token store. The store is filled with fun items such as pop, pretzels, t-shirts, crayons, markers, tablets, backpacks, bubblehead figurines, etc. The more tokens students have to spend, the more valuable the items they can purchase. Depending on their skill level, students may use a checking account system instead of tokens

and more expensive items can be put on layaway for future purchase. Many skills are taught as part of going to the token store. Students are taught to take turns, wait in line, count out their tokens, make decisions on what to buy, and learn the relative value of items that can be purchased. Students gain an appreciation for working hard to manage their behavior and being rewarded for their efforts. This is a valuable life skill that will stay with students long after they graduate.

“Mitchell M. deciding what he wants to buy with his tokens”

Rob, an Inspiration to Peers & Staff

Rob Brown is one of those people you meet once in your lifetime. He excels in an area that too few of us think much about. In everything he does, Rob gives his all. But the thing that sets him apart is the fact that when he is asked to do something, he just does it. He never frowns or says “I don’t want to”; he just delivers with a smile. The positive outlook he has is something you have to see to believe. Rob is a student at Starlight school where he also works with the custodians cleaning the lunch room and emptying trash. “Rob never says no” says Pat Fisher, a custodian at Starlight. “Rob knows his job and he works hard” says Jack Nelson also a custodian at Starlight. Both Fisher and Nelson were amazed on how fast Rob catches on. His eagerness to work and good humor makes him a fine person to work with. In the classroom, Rob has earned the respect of his teacher

“Rob cleaning cafeteria tables” and classmates for his willingness to help when needed. Mrs. Reinbeau says, “Rob will attempt to complete any task you ask of him.” and “He inspires those around him to do better.” Rob enjoys learning about famous people as well as counting, reading, and especially cooking. At home Rob likes to work, ride his bike, and take walks whenever he can.

Parent Involvement is Key in Student’s Success Parent involvement in Starlight Programs is critical to student success. Matthew and Lisa Smith are parents of two Starlight students. Anthony, age 7 is in Mrs. Tharp’s School Age Class 1 and Ethan, age 5 is in Mrs. Luckhaupt’s preschool class this year. Anthony and Ethan, both have the diagnosis of Down syndrome and have been attending Starlight since they were adopted into the Smith family: Anthony at 9 months and Ethan at birth. Lisa shares that Anthony learning to communicate with sign language has helped their family. For Ethan, who has had heart problems, she states, “Ethan has always been a fast learner…that he lives, walks and talks is an amazement to me.” Lisa tells other parents with children who have special needs, “Children with special needs love purely and simple. They do not judge you if you are rich or poor, black or white, fat or thin. They want to be happy and to love. Our children help us to appreciate

and see the simple things … As far as frustrations go; it is more of being frustrated for them … we feel bad for them when people look at them as lesser … we get frustrated when they are sick. It is scary thinking about Ethan’s heart and pacemaker. My heart breaks for Anthony when he gets so upset because it is hard for him to make you understand what he needs. No matter what the issue, we are very thankful for all our children. We are thankful for the chances they have in this county and this country.” As Lisa and Matthew describe how Starlight has helped their boys learn and grow, they summarize, “Starlight is more like a family to us. We could not do this as parents without their help.”

“Anthony and Ethan Smith at Down Syndrome buddy Walk with Columbus Crew”

“Anthony and Ethan Smith with family and Gabba Gabba”


Page 7

Remarkable Teachers Make A Difference

CNN had an inspiring report on an intercity school whose students were excelling despite handicaps of poverty and homelessness. The principal said, “The students succeed for two reasons: The expertise and hard work of the classroom teachers and parent support.” This is also true of the success behind Starlight School Age students. Let us take a moment to meet the experienced professionals who write the lesson plans, direct teacher assistants, and make sure learning happens. The teacher for School Age 1 (ages 5-9), the youngest group of students, is Jessica Tharp. She graduated as valedictorian of Muskingum College Class of 2006, with a bachelors of science in early childhood education. She is currently working on her Masters Degree in Special Education. Her classroom is a “respectful, positive, encouraging, supportive, fun and structured learning environment”. It is full of life, including crabs, butterflies, and ladybugs depending on the science of the day. Mrs. Tharp shares that her intervention specialist master’s coursework has kept her up-to-

date with the current and best practices in a culture of educational change. She has been inspired by her mother’s example as a special education teacher. She adds, “Our students provide the community with the invaluable awareness that children and adults with developmental disabilities are able to do many great things in school and life.” School Age 2 (ages 10-13) is taught by Dora Orr, intervention specialist, graduate of Cedarville College for grades 1-8, Ohio State for K-3, and Muskingum College. She says her training from fellow teachers and mentor program at Starlight School helped her develop the most as a teacher. Mrs. Orr shares “I love the memories of students performing for programs such as talent shows and holiday programs. I love to see the students achieve something, such as learning to tie their shoes, reading their first book, or even learning to use their own name stamp.” She adds, “Starlight school reaches students that could easily be left out of the main education line. With our intense instruction in life skills with a focus on work skills, Starlight gives opportunities to

our students for community or sheltered workshop jobs.” It would surprise no one who knows her that Mrs. Reinbeau (pronounced rainbow) wanted to be a teacher for as long as she could remember. She teaches School Age 3 (ages 14-17). She says her students have taught her “acceptance, patience, respect, endurance, tolerance and perseverance.” She brings colors of life to her young teen-age students through active use of sign language and energetic projects, including all aspects of recycling and learning about teamwork. She has a bachelor’s degree in grades 1-8 and is certified in Special Education grades K-12, with 28 years of teaching experience. Jodi Drake is the instructor for the oldest students in the school; School Age 4 (ages 18-21). She has been active in providing vocational training skills including the development of the “Upper Level Café”, a food cart where students prepare and sell lunch. Jodi shares why she wanted to be a teacher explaining, “I was diagnosed with a learning disability at a young age. I am dyslexic and ADHD. If it were not

“Mrs. Orr helps Lara Kramer learn to read” for the wonderful teachers I had as a child who believed in me, I would not be where I am today. So I wanted to make sure to pass on the love and understanding I received to other children.” Mrs. Drake has a Bachelor of Science degree in Special Education in the areas of Specific Learning Disabled, Developmentally handicapped, moderate-severeprofound retardation/multihandicapped and severe behavior handicapped. Mindy Rush has the title of lead teacher. She assists the

classroom teachers with writing Individualized Educational Reports and completing State Alternate Assessments, as well as overseeing the daily routine and special events for the school age program. Mrs. Rush has a Bachelor of Science in Family and Child Development from OSU with graduate classes through Bowling Green State University, Kent State, Ashland University, Muskingum College and Ohio University. She is considered highly qualified in special education, math, English and gen-

eral education, for grades 4-6. She has served Starlight school for 30 years and recounts her favorite memory “having a student tell me, while on a field trip, that people would think I was his mom.” When asked why she thinks Starlight School benefits the community she stated “Starlight provides a setting in which even the most severely involved students are given a chance and support to succeed. It is a school that celebrates each step!”

Building Character through Venturing In January of 2010 the first Venture Crew was started at Muskingum Starlight Industries (MSI). It is hard to believe that we have completed our first year. Venturing is the young adult program of the Boy Scouts of America for men and women. It is designed to build character, promote citizenship, and develop physical and mental fitness. This year we have eight members who meet the second and fourth Thursdays of each month. Our group is Venture Crew #152. In the coming year we hope to add new members and advisors to the crew.

The crew starts each meeting with the Pledge of Allegiance and the Venture Oath. Meetings also include a fun activity, game or outing. A few of these have been making medicine bags and learning what they are used for, leather and bead necklaces and key rings. We have been reading about how the Native Americans helped the pioneers when they settled in America. Another part of Venturing is activities that benefit others and the crew has been saving pop tabs for Ronald McDonald House, and painted a bookcase for the Next Chapter Book Clubs at MSI. Recently

for the meeting we did open fire cooking and learned to play Bocce Ball. Our outings have included trips to Putnam Landing to feed the ducks, Putnam Hill Park to see the view of Zanesville, Zane Grey Museum for a picnic lunch, and Deerasic Park for a Fishing CUBE (Creating Understanding by Experiencing), hayride, and picnic with the Deerasic Park staff. We also attended Day Camp at the Boy Scout Reservation where we experienced archery, rifle shooting, swimming and crafts. We have designed and are working on tie-dye shirts for our

“Learning archery at Venture Crew Day Camp at the Boy Scout Reservation”

Venture Crew, and putting our pictures for the year together in a scrapbook. There are a lot of fun memories and many new friends we want to share with others. The crew chose Pioneering as their first project. We have started by learning about pioneering in the past and discussing safety guidelines. Next, we will learn to tie different knots and splice rope. We look forward to a second great year with new members, new adventures and lots of fun learning together!


Page 8

Muskingum Starlight Industries Sheltered Workshop Muskingum Starlight Industries (MSI) is a sheltered workshop for adults that employs 13 staff members and 103 enrollees. The workshop is open five days a week, Monday through Friday, year-round. It is even open on snow days when the school is cancelled for those individuals who can provide their own transportation. The enrollees get a paycheck every other Friday, and pay taxes just like everyone else. Some enrollees attend the workshop five days a week while others have a reduced schedule to meet their individual need. The workshop’s focus is on sheltered employment. The enrollees can do a wide variety of jobs. They take pride in their work and want it to be of good quality. If they find the slightest flaw in

a part, they set it aside because they are so particular; they don’t take short cuts. When asked what their favorite part of the workshop is, they had a variety of answers. Richard E., Cody B., and Tom F. said they like making money. Shirley M. said she likes seeing her friends, and Will F. and Ann P. said they like everything about the workshop. When asked, what is your favorite job at the workshop? The majority said tile (diamonite). Barb G. stated she likes to do The Chamber of Commerce mailing, Ryan B. and Nancy W. said cardboard, and Vonda R. said she likes to work on cargo nets. Mike S. said that it doesn’t matter to him as long as he’s working. Production tasks enrollees complete include collating,

bagging-packaging, labelingpackaging, assembling, cutting buckles off cargo nets, stapling, and attaching lids to bottles. They also shred and recycle newsprint, magazines, office paper and cardboard. MSI can pick up your recycling for a $10 pick-up fee or you can bring it to the workshop. Shredding is $0.17 per pound. MSI has many local businesses that we work with on a regular basis. American Light, Avon, General Graphics, Six County Core, and The Chamber of Commerce just to name a few. We also work with businesses outside of Muskingum County. Some of the companies are General Electric in Louisville, Kentucky, Cerco Diamonite in Shreve Ohio, Southeast Diversified Industries in Cambridge Ohio, Miba Bear-

ings LLC in McConnellsville Ohio and Riverview Productions in Gallipolis Ohio. On a typical day at MSI, enrollees arrive at the workshop around 9:00 a.m. and leave around 3:00 p.m. Many either ride the Starlight Programs’ or MAPT buses, while some are transported by their home staff or guardians. Once they arrive, they go to the job board to see what job they are assigned to for the day and report to that area. The job board also shows them what staff they will be working with. Unfortunately, we do not have enough work for everyone every day, so if an enrollee is not on a paid job on a particular day, they participate in a CUBE (Creating Understanding by Experiencing) activity instead. So, the enrollee

“Barb G and Cindy H working on cargo nets.” checks the CUBE board and finds their picture to see which CUBE activity they are assigned for that time period. The enrollees work or participate in a CUBE activity until 11:00 a.m. then they have lunch for a half hour and free time for another half hour. Free time offers a variety of activity choices, for example: socializing with co-workers, doing puzzles, watching TV, listening to music, playing a variety of games with

staff, and looking at magazines. Depending on the weather, enrollees can choose to go outside to eat their lunch and during free time they can participate in outdoor games like corn hole, or just enjoy some fresh air in the courtyard. At 12:00 p.m. they return to work or CUBE activities until 2:30 p.m. when they gather their belongings and prepare to go home.

Starlight Café – Preparing for Community Employment The Starlight Café, located on 224 Main Street in downtown Zanesville, opened its doors to the community on August 16, 2010. The principle of the Starlight Café is not only to be a success in the community , but most importantly to provide our individuals who are enrolled at Muskingum Starlight Industries (MSI) an opportunity to learn new job skills and prepare them to work in other community-based jobs in the future. The MSI staff supplies job coaching and supervision in order to help the individuals grow and improve their skill set. Jessica M. is an employee at the Starlight Café. If you ask her how she feels about working at the Café, you will see an instant smile come across her face. While she has done volunteer work before, the Café is only the second

paying job that she has ever had. It is easy to see when she shows up for work each day just how much she enjoys it. Plus, she is learning valuable job skills that will help her in her goal of obtaining a community-based job. Her fundamental duties include pre-shift prep, preparing food for orders, and basic cleaning. She has also learned how to close the restaurant and just recently started learning to operate the cash register. Jessica was asked what her favorite part of working at the Café was, and she replied, “Everything! But if I had to choose, it would be making the food.” Not only has the Café given Jessica a paycheck, it has helped her learn to focus her energy, which is what her parents were hoping for. According to her mother, the Café has helped Jessica’s self-esteem, and all she

“Jessica M preparing a boxed lunch at the Starlight Café” talks about when she gets home is what she learned and what she did. Jessica is well on her way to having most of the skills necessary to go to the next step, but we are glad to have her with us at the Café until then!

When Jessica takes the next step in working independently in the community, Starlight’s Community Employment Services will be there to ensure she is successful. Job coaching will be provided to help her learn the tasks

required. As she becomes more independent, the job coach will gradually reduce the time spent with her. However, Starlight will continue to check on Jessica with regular phone calls and visits to her and the employer to discuss her progress and assist with any areas of concern that may arise. Starlight offers assistance with many areas that may include: finding transportation to work, finding proper apparel for the particular job, instruction in work ethics, and finding medical, financial or counseling services. As a part of the Community Employment Services, Jessica will have the opportunity to join the approximately 40 other individuals in monthly Job Club activities. Monthly events are scheduled to give individuals the chance to socialize and share what they are doing. Their favor-

ite activity is the Annual Community and Transitional Employment Banquet that is held to honor those who have taken a big step and are willing to work in the community and the employers that have so willingly given them the opportunity to be employed tax-paying citizens. If you would like additional information regarding Community Employment Services, please call Rita Stanbery or Tim Duff at 740453-3544. If you would like to place an order for breakfast or lunch, the Starlight Café phone number is 740-450-7100. You can also find order forms on our website at www.muskingumdd.org. Walkins are welcome too! Hours are 8:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. on Monday, Tuesday and Friday and 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Wednesday and Thursday.


Page 9 Challenging Students to Learn Through New Experiences Starlight School adapts the academic curriculum to the studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s abilities. Classroom strategies often involve repetitive practice of skills, but learning through new experiences is also vital to student education. Fieldtrips help the students interact with what theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re learning, assemblies bring worlds of new experiences into the school, and festivals offer opportunities to practice motor and social skills in a real-life setting. The special events at Starlight School challenge the students to problemsolve, interact with others and to think in new ways. There are several special events that occur during each school year. Before a special event is planned, teachers and specialists look at the individual needs of the students and topics of curriculum. Some of the events include swimming at the Fieldhouse, a weekly dance program taught by volunteer dance instructors from the Genesis Dance Academy and game nights with local middle school students to meet new friends and learn new game skills. Students from other schools are invited to share ideas, talents and activities. The Tri-Valley Choir sings during the Holidays, Nathan Zangmeister has played his guitar and sang at music class and the Zanesville Blue Devil Baseball team demonstrated skills on the field behind our school. We are always looking for visitors to open up our world and expand our thinking. In September this year, school age classes had a field trip to McDonaldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s farm. They went through the maze, rode the hay wagon, petted the animals, had a weiner roast and picked their own pumpkins. In October, there was a Fall Festival in the gym. Each class prepared a booth where skills were put to the testâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;bowling, bean bag toss, fishing, limbo and Jack-a-Lantern piĂąata were featured fun. In November, each class voted on a

food dish and prepared it for a School wide Thanksgiving feast. Table decorations made by the students were a source of pride. December is a holiday month everywhere and Starlight is no different. School agers enjoy a fieldtrip to the mall and dollar store for lunch and shopping for a gift exchange present for their friend. High School Students from Mid East Joint Vocational visit twice to â&#x20AC;&#x153;Adopt a Childâ&#x20AC;? visiting to get to know the child and visiting with gifts and a party. Older Starlight students assist with party decorations, refreshments and clean-up. There is an emphasis on learnâ&#x20AC;&#x153;Gary Howdyshell pets the Columbus Zoo ing to give to others in the way alligator. Starlight visits the Zoo annuallyâ&#x20AC;? of service throughout the year. Mrs. Reinbeauâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s December service project was having her class play carols on the bells for other groups, including Headstart preschool. December also means a holiday program and this year the program featured â&#x20AC;&#x153;Holidays around the worldâ&#x20AC;? where small groups presented information through music and dance about other countries. A New Yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Party opens the year with opportunities for dancing, painting a large wall mural with the year on it and preparing food by following picture recipes. The rest of the year usually brings an assembly from the Columbus Zoo whom teaches about and bring small exotic animals that most of us would never see up close. Spring will hopefully bring â&#x20AC;&#x153;A weekly dance program is taught by volunteer instructors from a Talent Show assembly which students prepare songs, skits, Genesis Dance Academyâ&#x20AC;? dances, etc. and the charge for admission goes to Operation Feed. When school is winding down, q䟟ڟŽ <Ä&#x2019;|ŽŸğĹ&#x201E; the annual Hot Dog Relay winds Ä&#x2019;ſŸğĹ&#x201E; ĹšÂ&#x203A;|Ĺś|Ĺ&#x2019;ĂŞÄ&#x2019;Ä&#x2030; us up as students run to put |Â&#x203A;á +Ä&#x2019;Âź ÂźÄ&#x192;Ä&#x2019;ÚêĹ&#x2019;ĂŞÄ&#x2019;Ä&#x2030; `Äź|Â&#x203A;á +Ä&#x2019;Âź condiments on the dog as they TÄ&#x2019;Ä&#x2030;ÂŽĹ&#x201E;Š <|Ä&#x2030;ÂŽ ZÂ&#x203A;Äź|ĤŸğĹ&#x201E; compete with other teams. Mrs. ڟ|ğêÄ&#x2030;Ă&#x2013;Š |Ĺ&#x201E;ÂźÄ&#x192;ÂźÄ&#x2030;Ĺ&#x2019;Ĺ&#x201E; Ă&#x2013; `Äź|Â&#x203A;Ĺ&#x2019;Ä&#x2019;ÄźĹ&#x201E; Reinbeauâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s class is presently ZĂŞĹ&#x2019;Âź ŸŜŸÚÄ&#x2019;ĤÄ&#x192;ÂźÄ&#x2030;Ĺ&#x2019; VÄ&#x2019;Â&#x203A;á `ÄźĹ&#x;Â&#x203A;áĹ&#x201E; holding the champion trophy. BÄ&#x2019;Ĺ&#x2019;Ä&#x2019;Äź &Äź|ŽŸğ The APE teacher will organize a VÄ&#x2019;ÂŽÄ&#x2030;Ÿź qÄŞ qÄ&#x2019;Ä&#x2019;Žš|ğŽ field day with surprises of athletic challenges. The cook, Marcia F,Ä&#x201C;ǨǨǨǨĆ?ĂťĆ&#x2022;ĆŽĂťĆ&#x2022; ŸÚÚ ÄŚĹ&#x152;Ă&#x201D;Ć&#x192;ħ Ă&#x201E;Ä&#x153;Ä&#x17D;ĂŠÄ&#x17D;Ă&#x2018;Ä&#x153;Ă&#x2018;

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Floâ&#x20AC;? Owen, organizes an annual â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jimmy Buffetâ&#x20AC;? day where one can actually see a cheeseburger dancing in the paradise called Starlight School. Students from Rosecrans Key Club have been active in decorating and dancing with Starlight students during this event. The creative staff is

always looking at what the students need to learn though real life practice. At Starlight School; fieldtrips, assemblies, and fun stimulate brains and motivate hearts.

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The Heart of Art Program The Heart of Art program at Muskingum Starlight Industries (MSI) is committed to providing individuals with developmental disabilities the opportunity to explore their creative side and express themselves through art. We have been full of activity in the art department creating with different mediums; painting, working with clay, fabrics, and completing pencil and marker drawings. Through working with individuals in the art department, we have discovered some extremely talented artists. We are very excited with products they are currently creating. Some of our artists enjoy painting their interpretation of pictures they see, while others design their own. Several individuals have been creating wall hangings by hand stitching fabrics that have been donated or

“Painting by Susan C” found in fabric sample books. The Heart of Art recently attended the Ohio Association County Boards’ (OACB) 27th Annual Convention held in Columbus. Our artwork was displayed with the opportunity to be sold. Artist, Susan C, attended the convention with several staff members. In the early stages of developing the art program Susan wanted no part of it; but

Page 10

now she really enjoys going to art on the days she is not working. On the way to the show, Susan talked about what she liked about the Art Department. She responded very enthusiastically, “I love art. I love to paint trees with backgrounds and sunsets. I painted an apple, a cross for my preacher, and a flag. ” On the return trip, Susan commented

“Painting by Michelle B”

“Susan C ‘Night Scene’ painting”

on how much she enjoyed the show and hoped to attend next year. While at the show Susan displayed several paintings that people admired and she even sold one that night. We continue to design new products and are always looking for places to display and sell our artwork. To view art samples, please check out the Starlight

“Susan C at the Ohio Association of County Boards of DD Art Show held December 2010 at the Easton Hilton” Programs website at www.muskingumdd.org or join us at the Starlight Café, 224 Main Street

for the First Friday Art Walk. For more information, please call Nancy Wills at 740.453.4622.

Learning through Creating Understanding by Experiencing (CUBES) For the past several years, Muskingum Starlight Industries (MSI), like most businesses, has experienced a decline in the work available for our enrollees. To fill that void, individuals participated in learning a variety of new tasks referred to as work skills training. However, after participating in these activities for years, it became clear that people were tired of them and ready for change. On 8/21/09, the workshop had a “Good Bye Work Skills” party and made a commitment to provide interesting and enriching activities when paid work was not available. The enrollees voted to call these CUBE’s or Creating Understanding by Experiencing. The participating individuals help decide what they would like to learn through CUBE activities,

and are typically assigned to groups based on their personal needs & interests, or by choice. Typically, there are 23 different CUBEs running at various times

throughout the day (depending on production needs) including Art, Music, Computer, Weather, Magic, Games, NASCAR, Healthy Lifestyles, American Idol, Beauty,

“Enjoying a lunch break while at Quarter Horse Congress”

Times Recorder, and Volunteering. The enrollees have started their own newspaper, reporting on topics and individuals that interest them, and they publish this monthly. It has been over a year since the CUBEs started and the response has been very good. For the past several months, we have been fortunate that more work has been available, and the CUBEs are run less frequently; however they continue to help make downtime interesting and stimulating. Individuals enjoy the choices and opportunities they now have and have even started offering suggestions about what topics they want made into a CUBE. Thank you to the Nisonger Center, Boy Scouts, and our volunteers for helping us provide

“Michelle M participating in Library Day” great opportunities to our individuals. A special thanks to Diane Williams from the Coshocton CBDD, who provided unlimited encouragement during our startup process.

If you have any questions or suggestions, please call Kelly Jackson at 740-453-4622.


Page 11 Starlight School Seniorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Story of Success Teresa Blue, mother of Starlight Schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s senior, Kevin Blue is a parent volunteer and regular face at Starlight School. Kevin will graduate from Starlight School this spring. Kevinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mom is just like any other mother of a senior student. When the weather was bad and Kevin worried that his school field trip would be cancelled, she explained, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I just want him to have all the experiences he can before he graduates.â&#x20AC;? Kevinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s parents, Teresa and George Blue, have been a part of the Starlight family since Kevin was diagnosed with autism at age four. They are active in making others aware of the increasing number of children diagnosed with autism. Kevin has received occupational therapy, speech therapy, physical therapy and specialized classroom instruction services.

Teresa states â&#x20AC;&#x153;He is in an environment where he is nurtured, encouraged and celebrated.â&#x20AC;? Teresa shared some of her favorite memories of Kevinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time at Starlight: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Kevin has always had an aversion to being wet. If he had a drop of water on his shirt, he would insist on changing it. Starlight has a program that provides swimming instruction at the Fieldhouse. It took a lot of coaxing but eventually, he was persuaded to dip a hand and then a foot, until he was in the pool completely. A couple of summers ago, Kevin had the opportunity to spend time in the Fieldhouse pool with one-on-one instruction. When they realized it was Kevin and that his progress in the pool was hard earned, they let him attend at no charge. Now he canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t wait for swimming trips and can engage

in ball toss and simple walking races with his classmates.â&#x20AC;? Kevin was always frustrated by his attempts to ride his bicycle. His parents would break their backs bending down and helping him make the rotations to propel it forward (and isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t this what we do as parents with so many of lifeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s challenges.) The adapted physical education teacher, Mr. Liles, called to invite Teresa to the gym and she cried with joy to see Kevin riding an adult-three-wheeled bicycle around the gym on his own; and with the help of the Family Support Services, he now has one at home and another lifelong leisure activity to enjoy. Teresaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s advice to parents who have a child with a developmental disability would be to â&#x20AC;&#x153;Let go of your expectations, and celebrate every accomplishment. Knowledge is power, so educate yourself on your childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s disability. A therapist once told me to take time for myself and my husband. He said that our son would be better for it. We could not have had better advice.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;You are your childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best advocate and no one can do it better. Make sure you have plenty of patience, tolerance, acceptance, and LOVE.â&#x20AC;?

Enclaves Provides Opportunities to Work at Community Jobsites At Muskingum Starlight Industries (MSI), enclaves are one of the production services we provide. Workshop enrollees, plus a supervisor, leave the workshop and go to the community jobsite to complete the work for the business. In this case, the jobsite is in the basement of the Richard Hixson Government building. While there, we photocopy old records and put them on microfilm. The MSI employee actually runs the photo machine and does the work; while the supervisor and Records Center staff are available to help when needed. According to Mitzi Shook, Records Coordinator, this service helps to preserve and archive their most valuable records dating back as far as 1804. This is a huge service; keeping records safe, usable, and available to the public. When asked what they like about this particular job, Jeff F. said he likes taking the pictures, Brenda W. likes making new friends, Lydia N. likes the

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Michael S scanning old records at the Records Center in the Richard Hixson Government Buildingâ&#x20AC;? job and taking pictures, and Mike S. said nothing special, he just likes the job. Other enclave services offered by MSI include recycling, janitorial duties, lawn care, stripping die cuts, dishwashing, and repackaging/relabeling. For more information, or to discuss how MSI enclaves could become a valuable asset to your business, please call Tim Smith at 740-453-4622.

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Starlight Programs

Page 12

Service Coordination and Community Service Department The Service Coordination and Community Services Department of Starlight Programs serves individuals with developmental disabilities. Promoting choice, independence and community integration for the individuals served. Working together with the individual, their family and other important people to the individual, the Service Coordinator identifies the support needed and works to link the individual to services. Any individual, their family, or others providing services may make a request for services to Starlight Programs. Eligibility is determined for each person based on if they have a qualifying disability and functional limitations in major life areas have been identified in the Ohio Eligibility Determination Instrument (OEDI). Functional limitations assessed include mobility, self care, language, self direction, etc. The OEDI is administered by a Service Coordinator who has been trained by The Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities. Participation with Starlight Programs is voluntary unless the individual is being abused or neglected. Should an individual not be determined eligible for Starlight Programs, alternative services that may be appropriate will be shared with the individual and their family. Once an individual has been

determined eligible for services, a Service Coordinator then begins to develop a relationship with the individual and their community of support. The Service Coordinator assists the individual in navigating through the often confusing system of agencies, providers, doctors, teachers, etc. The Service Coordinator has many responsibilities such as assessing and evaluating the individualâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s need for services, providing information and referrals as requested by the individual, monitoring services and ensuring the rights of the individual are understood and protected. The Service Coordinator assists individuals in accessing medical, social, educational and other needed services and helps in developing a budget for those services. Starlight Programs is required to develop an Individual Service Plan (ISP) to reflect the services the individual is linked to and identify the desired outcomes for them. The ISP is developed in cooperation with the individual served along with their community of support (ISP Team). The ultimate goal is to link the individual to services, develop skills, surround with support in such a manner for each individual to reach their most independent potential. Starlight Programs Service Coordination/Community Ser-

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individuals with a developmental disability. A Service Coordinator may be reached during business hours (8:30 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 4:00p.m.); Monday through Friday at 740.453.4829; during evenings, weekends and holidays at 800.881.8700. If you would like additional information regarding Service Coordination/Community Services, please contact Dee Fountain at 740.453.4829.

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Muskingum County Starlight Programs