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SOUTH KENTON RECORDER

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Independence and Taylor Mill 50¢

THURSDAY, JUNE 28, 2012

TIME FOR FAIR The Kenton County Fair starts July 16

BECAUSE COMMUNITY MATTERS

Circuit Court Clerk eyes new office Middleton looks at Independence By Amy Scalf ascalf@nky.com

INDEPENDENCE — Kenton County Circuit Court Clerk John Middleton would like to trade his old office space on Stevenson Road in Erlanger for room in the Independence City Building’s

lower level, but some city council members are opposed. Middleton and Independence Mayor Chris Moriconi brought the potential lease to Independence City Council during the regular meeting Monday, June 4. Moriconi said moving Middleton’s office to the city building at 5409 Madison Pike would “bring people out here who ordinarily wouldn’t be” and said they could visit shops and restaurants be-

fore or after driver license testing. The lease would also bring $2,000 a month in rent, and Moriconi said he would want to be able to renew or end the lease on a yearly basis. Middleton said seven people would be moving from the Stevenson office: Five of his employees and two from the Kentucky

Kenton County Circuit Court Clerk John Middleton hopes to move from the current location on Stevenson Road in Erlanger to an updated location in Independence. AMY SCALF/ THE

See CLERK, Page A2

COMMUNITY RECORDER

INDEPENDENCE PLANS JULY FOURTH CELEBRATION Parade starts Saturday, July 7 at 3 p.m. By Amy Scalf

By Libby Cunningham

ascalf@nky.com

INDEPENDENCE — The city’s twoday celebration of the Independence day holiday will take place on Friday and Saturday, July 6 and 7. Festivities begin at 5 p.m. on Friday, when carnival rides and festival foods will be available in Memorial Park. A silent auction and a raffle will be held in the Senior Center from 5 to 9:30 p.m. The Mike Heile Band, a three-piece classic rock group, will take the stage of the amphitheater at 7 p.m. At 10 p.m. Friday, Vito’s Fireworks will test the fireworks display for the following evening, according to Parks and Recreation Department Director Nita Brake. “It’s not a real display, it’s just a test,” she said. Brake said she expects up to 150 participants for the annual Fourth of July parade, which will begin at 3 p.m. Saturday. The three-mile parade route stretches from Summit View Middle School to Memorial Park. “We expect several different fire trucks, from all over Northern Kentucky, because it’s the 75th anniversary of the Independence Fire Department,” said Brake. “Plus, it’s an election year, so between the fire trucks and all the politicians, it should be a big parade, probably one of the biggest parades we’ve ever had.” To participate in the parade, call Brake at 859-356-5302. The carnival starts Saturday at 4, when the rides and booths at Memorial Park will open. At 7 p.m., the Cef Michael Band will perform country music at the amphitheater until around 9:45. Shuttle buses will be available

Lcunningham@nky.com

Fireworks, carnival rides, festival foods and live musical entertainment are all on the schedule for the Fourth of July Celebration in Indepedence on Friday and Saturday, July 6 and 7. FILE PHOTO from Summit View Middle School at 8 p.m. before the fireworks display. For more information about the bus schedule, call Capt. Tony Lucas at 859-356-2697.

ART FOR ALL

RISING STARS

Cincinnati’s Taft Museum of Art brings art to Kenton County though a new program. A4

Autistic students shine in Reality Tuesday art display. B1

Unique, Educational, Cultural, Family Fun!

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Children’s Home hosts World Choir event

The annual fireworks display, sponsored by LaRosa’s and Skyline of Independence, the city of Independence and Vito’s Fireworks, will begin at 10 p.m.

COVINGTON — The Children’s Home of Northern Kentucky is built on the foundation of building bridges, so it’s fitting that the Free Friendship concert the organization is hosting at its Devou Park location will overlook the John A. Roebling Suspension Bridge that connects Covington to Cincinnati. On July 7, the concert, which is part of the World Choir Games, will be held at 4 p.m. A free event, it features three children’s choirs that are participating in next month’s World Choir Games and will bridge what the home does for area children to residents, said Rick Wurth, vice president for development. The “Melodia” Children’s Choir from Russia, The Morten Boerup Choir from Denmark and the St. Micheal’s Children Choir, from Sharonville, Ohio, are set to perform. “It’s going be an unusual and exciting venue, because the front of the Children’s Home in Northern Kentucky here in Devou Park, we have one of the most stunning views in the region,” he said. “The most exciting part of the view is that from our front lawn, you can see almost every bridge that connects Northern Kentucky to Ohio.” The Children’s Home was funded by Amos Shinkle, who also funded the John A. Roebling Suspension Bridge, Wurth said, adding that the location is fitting for the group’s mission. “The Children’s Home of Northern Kentucky can build bridges for better futures for abused, neglected kids,” Wurth said. Grilled food and beverages will be available for purchase and concert-goers should bring blankets to sit on, he said. The Children’s Home is asking those interested to reserve tickets at http:// chnkfriendshipcon cert.eventbrite.com.

Contact us

Vol. 1 No. 52 © 2012 The Community Recorder ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

News .........................283-0404 Retail advertising .......513-768-8196 Classified advertising ........283-7290 Delivery .......................781-4421 See page A2 for additional information

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NEWS

A2 • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • JUNE 28, 2012

Local teen puts focus on distracted driving ascalf@nky.com

INDEPENDENCE — As a wireless consultant, Tyler Spegal has been the go-to guy for people seeking mo-

SOUTH KENTON RECORDER

Find news and information from your community on the Web Covington • nky.com/covington Independence • nky.com/independence Taylor Mill • nky.com/taylormill

News

Michelle Shaw Editor ..........................578-1053, mshaw@nky.com Amy Scalf Reporter ............................578-1055, ascalf@nky.com Melanie Laughman Sports Editor ............513-248-7573, mlaughman@nky.com James Weber Sports Reporter ................578-1054, weber@nky.com

Advertising

Melissa Martin Advertising Manager ........513-768-8357, mmartin@enquirer.com

Delivery

For customer service .........................781-4421 Sharon Schachleiter Circulation Manager .........................442-3464, sschachleiter@nky.com Melissa Lemming District Manager ..........442-3462, mlemming@nky.com

Classified

To place a Classified ad ......................283-7290, www.communityclassified.com

To place an ad in Community Classified, call 283-7290.

Northern Kentucky

JUNIOR VOLLEYBALL Volleyball Boot Camp is designed to get you ready for

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also a police Explorer with the Independence Police Department and a Northern Kentucky University student majoring in criminal justice. Spegal saw the increase in distracted driving automobile accidents and decided to research it further. With help from his employer, David Cain, who owns the Sprint Wireless Store in Independence, Spegal’s efforts will be shared with as many as 10 million people in July through Sprint’s nationwide distracted driving information campaign. “According to the United States Department of

Clerk Continued from Page A1

State Police. “I’m dead set against leasing out any municipal office space,” said city council member Jim Bushong. He said the building was built to let

Index Calendar .................B2 Classfieds .................C Food ......................B4 Life ........................B1 Police .................... B6 Schools ..................A5 Sports ....................A6 Viewpoints .............A8

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driving and is a serious problem in today’s society,” said Spegal. “Driving while distracted is a dangerous activity for anyone, but even worse for teen drivers,” he said. Spegal said parents and teen drivers can search for applications that help fight distracted driving, such as one that uses geolocation capabilities to lock down phones when the device is moving faster than 10 mph. Cain and Spegal will attend the Independence Fourth of July celebration at Memorial Park to help spread the message locally. Cain said his booth may have a distracted-driving

Transportation, driving while texting on a cellular device increases your chances of Spegal being in a vehicular accident by more than 23 times as compared to not texting,” said Spegal. He also quotes a statistic provided by the University of Utah that says using a cell phone while driving delays a driver’s reaction as much as having a blood alcohol level of .08 percent. “Texting is just as dangerous as drinking and

the city offices grow and expand as needed. “We may wind up trying to lease somewhere ourselves.” City Administrator Dan Groth said he expected growth in the areas of the police department or public works, not in administration, and said three city employees would be displaced by the new tenant. Groth also estimated that Middleton’s office would bring approximately 50 vehicles a day, or 250 a week. City council member Donna Yeager questioned where those people would park, and said, “I would be against it.” She also said she thought having a tenant would “be a disadvantage to us.” “It would be for your citizen’s benefit for that service to be here,” said Middleton. “I’d like to be in the city of Independence.” City council member Mike Little said he thought bringing in a tenant would take “away ex-

pansion possibilities for the future,” and that ending the lease might be difficult. “I don’t think it’s worth the trade-off,” he said. City councilman Chris Reinersman said, “From an investment point of view, it’s a good deal,” but conceded that “once it’s in the budget, it’s hard to get out.” Reinersman said maybe more services could come to Independence. “I would like to see more county services out here,” he said. “ Establishing this foothold can lead to to better things.” Middleton said that he didn’t know what might happen next. “Everyone could go to Covington to get their driver license,” he said. “I think Independence is the place to be. I’d like to be here, but if that doesn’t work out, then we’ll have to find another way to serve the citizens of the county.”

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simulated vehicle, and a give-away thumb band, much like a silicone wristband, that fits on a thumb to remind drivers to “Focus on driving.” “We know firsthand the dangers of distracted driving, especially as it pertains to cell phones, so this is part of our corporate goodwill and community involvement. It’s imperative for us to share this information with others,” said Cain. “Tyler is representative of the target market that is the greatest violator, teens aged 16 to 20. They’re more apt to listen to him than they are to listen to me.”

County fair starts July 16 By Libby Cunningham Lcunningham@nky.com

INDEPENDENCE — The opening of the William E. Durr Exhibit Hall marks some of the new things residents can expect at this year’s Kenton County Fair. Starting on July 16 and running through July 21, the fair offers a variety of events and exhibitions for attendees. The Durr Exhibit Hall will feature educational classes, such as “See a Bug and Learn What to Do” on July 16 and “Cake Decorating Using Fondant to Tell Your Story” on July 19. “A lot (the programming) is fair-themed and kind of 4-H related educational programs,” said Sarah Kloentrup, who handles media relations for the fair. Another new event to look forward to is a country music night, she said. “With some younger artists in the area,” she said, “they’ve experienced some success. We are having them perform for us on Monday (July 16),” she said. There will also be some new family-friendly activities, including a visit from circus troupe Circus Mojo on July 19. “It’s a local group, they perform and they get kids involved,” Kloentrup said. “It’s hands on, they do tutorials on how to do some smaller circus acts.” Traditional favorites will be back as well, such as animal shows and tractor pulls. “There’s always the Demolition Derby on Wednesday night (July 18),” she said. “There’s always the tractor pulls (July 20 and 21.)” A full schedule of the fair is available at www.kentoncounty fair.com

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The Kenton County Fair runs July 16-21. FILE PHOTO


NEWS

JUNE 28, 2012 • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • A3

BRIEFLY

Register for self-defense seminar

TAYLOR MILL — Park

Christi and Robert Titmus of Independence paint a fire hydrant as part of Community Service Days for Duke Energy employees and their families in 2008. The district is always looking for volunteers to paint hydrants in the community. For more information, call Firefighter John Seitz at 859-356-2011. THANKS TO INDEPENDENCE FIRE DISTRICT

County may swap speeding ticket for safety course ascalf@nky.com

COVINGTON — First-

time traffic offenders may be able to take a safety course at home instead of paying their ticket, fines and court costs through a new diversion program instituted by Kenton County Attorney Garry Edmondson. With the County Attorney Traffic Safety program drivers who commit minor offenses can pay $150 for the course and avoid court costs, fines and fees. The program is only for first-time minor violations.

of the Courts, $75 to the County Attorney’s office, and the remaining $50 goes to Advent for managing the system. The offender has 90 days to complete the course, then takes a test that determines whether the offense is dismissed or if Edmondson will reinstate the charges.

Edmondson said other counties offer similar programs, which were “created to alleviate the crowded court dockets while educating minor offenders that it’s best to change their bad driving behavior.” If Edmondson determines the offender and the charge qualify for the program, he’ll send a letter referring the offender to the Prosecutor Traffic Safety Program and an enrollment form. The form and $150 payment are mailed to Advent Financial Systems, which mails the course materials. The $150 fee pays $25 to the Administrative Office

Butterflies presentation planned in Ft. Mitchell

cards to use at local businesses. Cards cost $5 and the discounts are good until May 1, 2013. Cards can be purchased from any Explorer or at the Taylor Mill Police Department, 5227 Taylor Mill Road. Proceeds from card sales will fund uniforms and competitions for the group. For more information, call 859-581-1192.

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By Amy Scalf

Place Community Center at 5614 Taylor Mill Road will host a Self-Defense Seminar at 7 p.m. Thursday, June 28. The class will focus on basic self-defense strategies for all age groups and will include some demonstrations led by Master Chris Christy of Christy’s Taekwondo Street Defense. The class is free to all individuals, but registration is limited due to occupancy restrictions. For more information or to register, call 859-5813234.

Highland Cemetery invites Northern Kentuckians to learn about beautiful bugs. On Thursday, June 28, from 6:30-7:30 p.m. naturalists Judy Burris and Wayne Richards will allow attendees to see butterflies up close and learn about them during a Butterflies in Your Backyard presentation. Reservations can be made by calling 859-3313220 or emailing office@highland cemetery.com.

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NEWS

A4 • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • JUNE 28, 2012

Art For All brings paintings to N. Ky. By Libby Cunningham Lcunningham@nky.com

On a sunny Wednesday in Covington, a man walking along Scott Street stopped outside the Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, and cocked his head at a painting seemingly plopped in the lawn in front of the building. After wondering aloud about what would happen to the art piece as soon as inclement weather roared in, he walked on, with others unknowingly following in his footsteps. They too displayed the same kneejerk reaction to the painting “A Woman with a Cittern and a Singing Couple at a Table” by Pieter de Hooch. “We are excited to hear people happen upon them

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“Robert Louis Stevenson,” a painting of the author of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, is at the Kenton County Public Library in Erlanger. The artist is John Singer Sargent. LIBBY CUNNINGHAM/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

troit Institute of Art and the National Gallery in London, England. It’s funded by the Haile U.S. Bank Foundation. “We thought our 80th anniversary was a nice time to remind people of this collection and that it really belongs to them,” Suit said. By taking high-quality photographs of favored pieces, then creating replica frames and coating the shots with automotive paint, the paintings are expected to survive the elements. Pieces are popping up in Northern Kentucky, with paintings at the Erlanger branch of the Kenton County Public Library, the Notre Dame Urban Education Center in Covington, Devou Park and Florence Freedom ballpark, to name a few. “We’re thrilled we were asked to be part of this,” said Becky Kempf, public relations coordinator at the Boone County Public Library, which has paintings at the Burlington and

like that and sort of do a double-take,” said Tricia Suit, manager of marketing and communications with Cincinnati’s Taft Museum of Art. The Taft hopes the sightings become common. In honor of the museum’s 80th birthday, the Art for All program has placed replicas of favorite pieces throughout Northern Kentucky and Greater Cincinnati. The project is based on similar efforts by the De-

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Union branches. “In Boone County we don’t have a cultural center per se, and any time we can help bring art to our community we’re excited.” At the Kenton County Public Library’s Erlanger branch, adult programming librarian Venus Moose said the art work is often noticed.

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“A lot of people will look at the piece and ask about it,” she said. “The most popular question is if it’s weather-proofed.” The reaction at the Carnegie is similar, based on what executive director Katie Brass has heard. “Just last week somebody asked me how long the piece of art was going to

be outside and was it going to be damaged,” she said. The art will last until the end of September, Suit said, with presentations about the works the third Sunday of July, August and September; Northern Kentucky’s will be on Sept. 16. “There’ll be a map of the museum on that day,” Suit said, which “shows where reproductions in Northern Kentucky are in the gallery. If you see the one in Erlanger, we’ll show you where to find it in the gallery.”

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NEWS

JUNE 28, 2012 • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • A5

Police work to combat heroin epidemic Northern Kentucky heroin-related arrest on the rise By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com

Police agencies throughout the county are working to deal with, and stop, what has become an epidemic in this area. In the past couple years, cases, arrests and deaths involving heroin have steadily been on the rise, with its reach touching people throughout the county. “It’s something that’s reached epidemic propor-

tions, and unfortunately that epidemic in centered in Boone, Kenton and Campbell counties,” said Bill Mark, director of the Northern Kentucky Drug Strike Force. Currently, heroin accounts for 63 percent of arrests in Northern Kentucky, with the region leading the state in heroin-related arrests. In the local police departments, the number of heroin-related cases have continued to increase.

VICTIMLESS CRIME For some people, heroin use is thought of as a victimless crime, but police say the recent issues facing the area have shown that not to be the case. Fromme said while using heroin may not directly hurt someone else, like an assault or murder, what happens because of the heroin use does. “Drug use has really affected the amount of theft we’ve been having throughout this area,” Fromme said. “A lot of thieves that have been caught have had drug problems.” Whitford said in one case, a woman caught stealing told officers in the interview about how she has tried to get off heroin, and how the physical pain and sickness from withdrawals almost killed her.

For most addicts, they need to find money to do the drug in the morning to get out of bed, during the day to not feel sick and at night to be able to sleep, Whitford said. “It’s just a vicious cycle” Whitford said. “Most addicts will do anything for (heroin).” Newport Corporal Paul Kunkel said he deals with the effects of the area’s heroin problem all the time. Beyond the thefts and robberies committed by addicts needing money for heroin, the affect the addiction has on their families, particularly their kids, is very evident. Kunkel said all too often, he deals with juveniles in the city who are getting into trouble and stealing, whose parents are in and out of jail and rehabilitation for drugs.

“The complexity of crimes facing the police department and the tsunami of heroin-related drug cases are quickly consuming the police department’s current resources,” said Bellevue Police Chief Wayne Turner. In Fort Thomas, Lieutenant Rich Whitford said a lot of cases and arrests they are dealing with are related to drugs, in particular, heroin. “Heroin is definitely the drug of choice right now

EDUCATION KEY FOR FUTURE In Newport, the city is bringing back the DARE program to teach children about drugs and the dangers of doing them. “Education is the key,” Collins said. “We need to show these kids what we’ve learned and how these drugs can affect their lives.” Parents who know what signs to look for, like things going missing from their home and needle marks on their children’s arms, have a better chance of getting their children help. “Parents need to keep an eye out for this and catch it before it’s too late and they lose their child,” Whitford said. “I’ve seen too many parents go through overdoses and deaths, and it’s just horrible.”

because it’s so readily accessible and cheap,” Whitford said. “It’s unbelievable what an epidemic it has become.” Cities like Fort Thomas and Newport, that are easily and quickly accessible from Interstate-471, have been dealing with drug users passing through the area who pull off into the cities to do their drug before getting back on the road. Newport Police Chief Tom Collins said police

have known for a while that the Newport Pavilion parking lots are a hotspot for people to pull over and use drugs. Newport has had about 60 heroin arrests so far this year, compared to 73 for all of last year, Collins said. Compared to when he started his policing career in 1977, heroin and its users have changed a lot. “Back then, you never saw heroin, and if you did, it was a major deal,” Collins said.

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SCHOOLS

A6 • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • JUNE 28, 2012

SOUTH KENTON

RECORDER

Editor: Nancy Daly, ndaly@nky.com, 578-1059

ACHIEVEMENTS | NEWS | ACTIVITIES | HONORS

CommunityPress.com

Cov Cath to award 15 scholarships Community Recorder Covington Catholic High School will award 15 scholarships for the 2012-2013 school year to the following students: Logan Boyle, Benjamin Darpel, Andrew Epplen, Chris Fagin, Adam Flynn, Austin Flynn, Mitchell McKnight, Ryan Massie, Nathan Montelisciani, Sam-

Heritage Bank awarded scholarships to Kenton County students. Front row, from left: Tolulope Mejolagbe, Allison Cheesman, Jenna Sharp and Ian Dollenmayer. Back row: Gary Wilmhoff, Herbert Booth, Joanna Loomis, Evan Dulaney and Gary Griesser. PROVIDED

Heritage Bank awards scholarships Community Recorder Heritage Bank recently awarded scholarships to local students for college tuition. All public, private, and parochial high schools in Boone and Kenton counties were eligible to submit one finalist. Awards were given to students who demonstrated high academic achievement, record of community service, high personal values and character traits, and strong work ethic. Dr. Herbert Booth, chair of this year’s Heritage Bank scholarship committee, said, “Each year the regional high schools produce better and better prepared students. They are very presentable, articulate and knowledgeable. It is always an honor to meet and have the oppor-

tunity to interact with these students that give me hope for these future leaders for the region and the nation. We must also congratulate their parents, their teachers and their communities for the opportunities given them to mature into such promise.” The students completed an extensive application packet, and were interviewed by a panel of Heritage Bank board members. Gary Wilmhoff, owner of Florence Hardware, served as a judge for this year’s program. “It was an honor to participate in the Heritage Bank Annual Scholarship Awards,” Wilmhoff said. “This is an event that I always look forward to, and this year’s applicants were among the finest group of students that I can remember in recent years.” The $1,000 scholarship recipi-

ents of the 2012 awards are: Alison Brannon, Florence, senior, Boone County High School Ian Dollenmayer, Independence, senior, at Covington Catholic High School Tolulope Mejolagbe, Elsmere, senior, Lloyd Memorial High School Tad Simpson, Hebron, senior, Conner Senior High School Other finalists were awarded $150 each for their accomplishments. Those recipients included: Allison Cheesman, Notre Dame Academy; Evan Dulaney, Dixie Heights High School; Joanna Loomis, Beechwood High School; Anny McArtor, St. Henry High School; Page Miller, Ryle High School; Kaylnn Schwamb, Cooper High School; and Jenna Sharp, Villa Madonna High School.

uel Romes, Peter Schaefer, Austin Stacy, Nicholas Stegman, Nathan Sucher and Lucas Timmerman. These students earned scores that placed them in the top 10 percent of all the students that took the High School Placement Test (HSPT) at Covington Catholic High School in December 2011.

Aubrey Rose Foundation awards scholarships Community Recorder The following eighth-grade students were awarded $500 from the Aubrey Rose Foundation to apply toward their private high school tuition this fall: » St. Agnes School student Coire Ayres will attend Coving-

ton Catholic High School. » Blessed Sacrament Elementary student Bridgette Hunt will attend Notre Dame Academy. » St. Paul School student Myah Steffen will attend St. Henry Distinct High School. Winners were chosen based on written essays.

BOYAJIAN GRADUATES

Dollenmeyer wins national scholarship Community Recorder Ian Dollenmeyer, a recent Covington Catholic graduate and member of the National Honor Society, has been named one of 150 state finalists in the National Honor Society Scholarship from NASSP. These 150 NHS State Finalists were first chosen from among nearly 6,000 applicants.

Participating high school National Honor Society chapters from across the country nominated two senior high members to Dollenmeyer compete in this year’s program. Finalists were selected on the basis of their leadership skills,

participation in service organizations, clubs and other student groups at school and in the community; and their academic record. As a regional winner, Dollenmeyer is recognized as one of the top 150 NHS members in the nation this school year. Dollenmeyer plans to attend the University of Dayton in the fall and to major in English.

National College campus director Carole Reed-Mahoney presents graduate Evelyn Boyajian of Independence with the Josephn E. Hurn Award. The Hurn award is given to an outstanding student in an accounting or business administration program. Boyajian received an associates degree in accounting. THANKS TO DEBBIE BURKE

COLLEGE CORNER Bailey named to dean’s list

Christina Nicole Bailey of Edgewood was named to the Clemson University spring semester dean’s list. The list includes students who achieve a grade-point average between 3.50 and 3.99 on a 4.0 scale. Bailey is majoring in chemistry.

Kenton residents named to dean’s list

The following Kenton County students were named to the Bellarmine University spring semester dean’s list: Covington: Taylor Rains. Crescent Springs: Katherine Ransdell. Lakeside Park: Patrick Krumme, Matthew Jeffrey and Nicholas Hushebeck. Fort Mitchell: Louis Hehman, Emily Roebker, Kathleen Chal, and Carly Holthaus. Independence: Nathan McKinney. Morning View: Maggie Har-

per. Villa Hills: Rachel Eyckmans. The list includes students who receive a grade-point average of 3.5 or above on a 4.0 scale.

Dorman named to dean’s list

Matthew Dorman of Lakeside Park was named to the Northern Kentucky University spring semester dean’s list. The list includes students who achieve a grade-point average of 3.6 or greater for the semester.

Duncan named a top freshman

Heather Duncan of Fort Mitchell was named one of the top freshman scholars in the School of Environment and Natural Resources at Ohio State University. Duncan was awarded at the College of Food, Agriculture and Environmental Sciences Recognition Program May 10. She was one of three freshmen acknowledged for their outstanding aca-

demic achievement. Duncan is majoring in environmental science.

from Samford University. Luckman earned a doctor of pharmacy.

Giesbrecht, Kappes win award

Kenton residents named to dean’s list

Kirsten Giesbrecht of Villa Hills and Emily Kappes of Independence won the 2012 St. Michael’s College Book Award for Academic Achievement with a Social Conscience. Giesbrecht is a student at Villa Madonna Academy. Kappes is a student at St. Henry District High School. The award recognizes students who demonstrate a commitment to leadership in volunteer service and academic achievement. They received the book “First They Killed My Father: A Daughter of Cambodia Remembers,” by Loung Ung, a 1993 St. Michael’s College graduate.

Luckman graduates

Katelyn Elizabeth Luckman of Villa Hills graduated cum laude

The following Kenton County residents were named to the Western Kentucky University dean’s list: Covington: Logan H. Eckler, Mitchell W. Wood, William E. Storrs and Emily A. Greenwood. Crescent Springs: Lauren D. Anderson and Jonathan M. Meyer. Edgewood: Jordan N. Bradfield. Lakeside Park: Frances J. DeVita. Erlanger: Allison M. Groneman. Elsmere: Allison N. Martin. Independence: Heather N. Barhorst, Jordan S. Vorst, Andrew J. Schuler and Elyssa N. Carmony. The list includes students who have a grade-point average of 3.4 to 3.79 in a 4.0 scale have at least

12 hours of coursework that semester.

Kenton residents named to president’s list

The following area residents were named to the Western Kentucky University president’s list. Covington: Rachel E. Gumble, Alicia M. DiTommaso, Katie M. DiTommaso, Christina M. Barth, Jesse D. Cornelius, Amanda J. Barth and Jocelyn F. Moss. Taylor Mill: Emma J. Pemberton, Michelle L. Child, Alicia L. Beach, Jenna M. Lehkamp and Jacob W. Frantz. Fort Wright: Jordan M. Jones. Villa Hills: Micah L. McClendon. Fort Mitchell: Rebecca L. Trimbur and Elisabeth M. Pilger. Edgewood: David M. Thomas, Mary K. Greenwood and Caroline E. Culbreth. Erlanger: Noah C. Onkst. Independence: Robert T. Cloar, Emily M. Braunwart, Sarah M. Keene, Salena M. Lisner and Miranda A. Cruse.


SPORTS

JUNE 28, 2012 • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • A7

SOUTH KENTON

RECORDER

Editor: Melanie Laughman, mlaughman@communitypress.com, 513-248-7573

HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | RECREATIONAL

CommunityPress.com

Summer starts with spring memories

The spring season had several highlights for schools in the South Kenton Recorder coverage area. Here are some of the best moments from the varsity teams.

Scott sophomore Matt Johnson, right, edges Dixie Heights sophomore Trey Simmons to win the 100 at the Kenton County championship meet April 11. JAMES WEBER/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Trey Pinkelton of Simon Kenton starts the triple jump in the NKAC meet April 12. JAMES WEBER/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Simon Kenton senior Courtney Morgan delivers to a Mason County batter. Morgan set or tied several school records for the Pioneers, who were district runner-up. JAMES WEBER/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Scott sophomore A.J. Berk qualified for state in singles in the Ninth Region tennis tournament May 7-11. JAMES WEBER/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Simon Kenton senior Ryan Mullen tries to get out Cooper junior Chris Setser at third base in their April 6 game. JAMES WEBER/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Holy Cross' Holly Butts (shown) and Ashley Kunzelman won a three-set match over St. Henry in the first round at the regional tourney. JAMES WEBER/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Simon Kenton senior Ethan Hargett hits a shot during his win at second singles April 12 at home against Newport Central Catholic. JAMES WEBER/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Scott junior Dani Strong gets the running out at second base during a softball loss to Brossart. JAMES WEBER/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Holy Cross senior Kyle Fuller throws a pitch to Ryle. Fuller was one of the top pitchers in Northern Kentucky this season. JAMES WEBER/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Former Scott High School softball coach and athletic director Al Rust was honored May 11, as the school's softball field was named after him in a pregame ceremony. Rust threw out the first pitch at the renovated facility. JAMES WEBER/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER


VIEWPOINTS A8 • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • JUNE 28, 2012

SOUTH KENTON

RECORDER

Editor: Nancy Daly, ndaly@nky.com, 578-1059

EDITORIALS | LETTERS | COLUMNS | CH@TROOM

CommunityPress.com

Celebrate the noble experiment First in war, first in peace, first in the hearts of his countrymen, George Washington, born in relative affluence, resisted the monarchy of his past from England to embrace the democracy of the newborn United States of America. He was our first General of the Army of the newly formed rebellion by the Continental Congress. He was first in peace as he brought about the surrender of the British commander Cornwallis. The first in the world of commerce and conquest, the British Empire was pre-eminent in the world. George Washington is first in the hearts of his countrymen. He was and is the eternal model for this new idea of democracy. It may seem simple now, but then he was charting new ground with almost each new

step he took. He surrounded himself with the best and brightest who worked together for the common good of the new nation. Herbert He was first to Booth assume comCOMMUNITY mand, to craft a RECORDER GUEST COLUMNIST peace, and to purchase his place in the pantheon of princes in our collective consciences. John Adams was second, but not to those who knew him well. He was irascible, outspoken, and often ignored because of his strong opinions and will. He was one of our first ambassadors to France and to England. He was one who crafted the peace treaty with England to end the Revo-

Mental health a big VA concern U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric Shinseki often reminds us: As the tide of war recedes we have the opportunity, and the responsibility, to anticipate the needs of returning veterans. As these newest veterans return home, we must ensure that they have access to quality mental health care in order to successfully make the transition to civilian life. Last year, Veteran Affairs provided specialty mental health services to more than 1.3 million veterans – a 35 percent increase since 2007 in the number of veterans who received mental health services at Veteran Affairs. That’s why it was recently announced that Veterans Affairs will add an additional 1,600 mental health staff professionals and an additional 300 support staff members nationwide. The Cincinnati Veterans Affairs Medical Center had already increased its staffing to meet the current demand for mental health services so we received two new positions to enhance our services. These efforts to hire more mental health professionals build on our record of service to veterans. President Obama, Shinseki and Cincinnati Veteran Affairs leaders have devoted more people, programs, and resources to veteran mental health services. Veteran Affairs has increased the mental health care budget by 39 percent since 2009. What’s more, we’ve increased the number of mental health staff members by 41 percent since 2007. That means today, we have a team of professionals that’s 20,590 strong – all dedicated to providing much-needed direct mental health treatment to veterans. While we have made great strides to expand mental health care access, we have much more work to do. The men and women who have had multiple deployments over a decade of combat have carried a tremendous burden for our country. That’s why Shinseki has challenged the department to improve upon our progress and

identify barriers that prevent veterans from receiving timely treatment. As we meet with veterans here in Cincinnati, Linda we learn firstSmith hand what we COMMUNITY need to do to RECORDER GUEST COLUMNIST improve access to care. Shinseki has sought out the hardest-to-reach, most underserved places – from the remote areas of Alaska to inner city Philadelphia – to hear directly from veterans and employees. We’re taking action to reach out to those who need mental health care instead of waiting for them to come to us. Our mission is to increase access to our care and services. We’ve greatly increased the number of Veterans Readjustment Counseling Centers (Vet Centers) throughout the country. We’ve also developed an extensive suicide prevention program that saves lives every day. Our team at the Veteran Crisis Line, for example, has fielded more than 600,000 calls from veterans in need and helped rescue more than 21,000 veterans who were in immediate crisis. That’s 21,000 veterans who have been saved. The mental health of America’s veterans not only touches those of us at Veteran Affairs and the Department of Defense, but also families, friends, co-workers and people in our communities. We ask that you urge veterans in your communities to reach out and connect with Veteran Affairs services. To locate the nearest Veteran Affairs facility or Vet Center for enrollment and to get scheduled for care, veterans can visit Veteran Affairs’ website at www.va.gov. Immediate help is available at www.veteranscrisisline.net or by calling the crisis line at 1-800-273-8255 (push 1) or texting 838255. Linda Smith is the director of the Cincinnati Veteran Affairs Medical Center.

SOUTH KENTON

RECORDER

A publication of

lutionary War. He was our second president and first vicepresident of this new United States. Yes, Thomas Jefferson was third in the line of presidents of this new nation, but he lives in the minds of many as the principal author of the Declaration of Independence. He was chosen to author the Declaration of Independence. Several changes in his original document were made by Congress, but the historical authorship goes to Jefferson. President Thomas Jefferson believed in the republic but acted as a despot when he fortuitously bought the Louisiana Purchase from the French for $15 million without any consultation with or consent of Congress. He will sit as one in the pantheon of presidents and in

the hearts and minds of his countrymen. All which brings us to the Fourth, the Fourth of July, of course. On this day we celebrate the founding of our nation, the independence declared from England, and the noble experiment which has lasted into three centuries. This is not to demean our fourth president, James Madison, who is the primary author of our Constitution and our Bill of Rights. What our founders brought forth that allows us to celebrate our Fourth of July, Independence Day, has been purchased and prized by many that have followed in their footsteps. Jefferson said that the nation’s liberty is purchased by the blood of patriots, and that our freedom requires eternal vigi-

lance. No generation of our last century was able to escape the defense of our heritage and human values. We can only pray that those who follow us will not forget there is no cheap victory nor peace without price. In remembrance of our past, we must also honor the fallen who paid the ultimate price that our nation might live and prosper. Let our praises ring forth as we celebrate another Fourth of July. And let us all be constantly aware that our mutual future resides in us, you and me, are the future of our great and noble experiment in the governance of mankind. Pray that we will be worthy. God bless the United States of America! Dr. Herbert R, Booth is a Boone County resident.

BENE SERVES AS PAGE

Kenton Elementary fifth-grader Colin Bene, son of David and Jennifer Bene, served as Sen. Damon Thayer's page. THANKS TO LRC PUBLIC INFORMATION

Grandpa, why did you fight for freedom? Grandpa was stunned by his granddaughter’s question. He replied: “Sweetheart, I fought to make sure you have the opportunity to be free.” “But Grandpa, Americans don’t want to be free,” she said. “We want the government to take care of us. Grandpa, are you sure you even won the war? Did you fight so we couldn’t say ‘Merry Christmas’ or have a nativity scene at school? Did you fight so our school’s Christmas tree would be replaced with a holiday tree? Did you fight so we couldn’t pray in school? Did you fight so we could celebrate ‘Earth Day’ instead of Christmas Day? "Did you fight so the government would remove the Ten Commandments from public property? Did you fight so a principal in New Your City could ban the song ‘God Bless the USA’ from a kindergarten graduation program? Did you fight so our government could worry more about meatless Mondays than what students learn? “Did you fight so our libraries could provide free cartoon movies and books about vam-

pires and murderers at the expense of their neighbors? Did you fight so the TSA could fondle your Tom grandkids at Wurtz the airport? Did you fight COMMUNITY RECORDER GUEST so our governCOLUMNIST ment could control and regulate our water, air, food, education, healthcare and businesses? Did you fight so only 12 percent of high school seniors would be proficient in U.S. history? Did you fight so our government could control where you’re permitted to smoke outside of the battlefield? “Did you fight so the government could require you to get permission to cut down a tree on your own property? Did you fight so government could tell you what kind of light bulb you could buy? Did you fight so foreign invaders could freely enter our country and live off the American taxpayers? Did you fight so the government could make us dependent on

228 Grandview Drive, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017 654 Highland Ave., Fort Thomas, KY 41075 phone: 283-0404 email: kynews@communitypress.com web site: www.nky.com

foreign oil? Did you fight so the government could prohibit kids from working on their family’s farms? Is that what you fought for Grandpa? “See Grandpa, you didn’t need to go to war. Didn’t you hear? America’s uneducated voters surrendered to the Marxists, socialists and Communists a long time ago. America’s freedoms are just an illusion. The government controls everything. It must be OK with Americans because no one fought back.” Grandpa was shocked by his granddaughter’s heartbreaking speech. With tears in his eyes he said: “Sweetheart, I didn’t fight for any of those things. You’re right. I didn’t need to go to war in a foreign country. I was fighting the wrong enemy. I should have been fighting the enemies of freedom inside America.” It’s time we teach our children that Independence Day is about minimal government with maximum freedoms so we may pursue our American dreams. Now that’s worth fighting for! Tom Wurtz of Fort Mitchell is president of Tom Wurtz Consulting.

South Kenton Recorder Editor Nancy Daly ndaly@nky.com, 578-1059 Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday See page A2 for additional contact information.


THURSDAY, JUNE 28, 2012

LIFE

SOUTH KENTON RECORDER

PEOPLE | IDEAS | RECIPES

AUTISTIC STUDENTS

STAR

IN LOCAL ART DISPLAY By Amy Scalf ascalf@nky.com

P

ARK HILLS — Even when

it’s cloudy, stars are on display at Reality Tuesday Cafe during the month of June. Artwork from students of Rising Star Studios, a program of New Perceptions in Northern Kentucky, is featured along the coffee shop walls. The young creatives of Rising Star Studios share not only a love of art, but a diagnosis on the autism spectrum: autism, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, Asperger’s syndrome, and pervasive developmental disorder. Alex Bonar, 21, has two pieces in the display. She especially likes her drawing, “Donkeys,” which shows Patricia and Samantha, her two donkeys given to her for Christmas 2010. “I like it because I like it,” said Bonar, of Lakeside Park. She admitted it makes her feel proud to see it on the wall in a public place. She also likes to draw pictures of her family, who are featured in an untitled watercolor work also displayed at the cafe. Bonar said she has fun at Rising Star Studios, and has enjoyed the art and photography classes as well as learning how to cook and do yoga. Her mother, attorney Bar-

bara Bonar, is a board member for the program and also a customer at Reality Tuesday who helped introduce the studio to cafe manager Traci Gregg. “The business itself is community-focused by its nature. It fits us and we like standing behind the artists. They each have their own stories,” said Gregg. “We love having the Rising Star shows here.” She said the cafe features displays from different organizations, such as Notre Dame Academy. “It’s always different,” she said. Gregg said the cafe’s art manager Tim Gold, of Independence, organizes and arranges the displays. “He’s got the eye for art,” she said. “He’s a longtime artist as well.” The Rising Star Studio show includes 12 works of different styles and media of various sizes, ranging from $25 to $60. All the artwork is for sale and 100 percent of the proceeds are split equally between the student artist and the program. Rising Star Studios coordinator Brenda Zechmeister said the funds received by the program offset costs for paper, paints and framing. “We do get frames donated but we do have to pay for glass. Because of the type of art we do, which is mostly on paper, it’s nicer to have them matted

This photograph, “Love My Sunshine” by Nick Burns, is among the works displayed by Rising Star Studios at Reality Tuesday Cafe in Park Hills. THANKS TO RISING STAR STUDIOS

Several multimedia artworks, like this one by Paul Rothan, by artists from Rising Star Studios are on display during June at Reality Tuesday Cafe in Park Hills. AMY SCALF/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

and framed and behind glass,” she said. “We have plenty of artworks to frame if we had the glass. I broke down and bought frames from the store this time. We were hoping some glass would appear. Unfortunately, it’s cheaper to buy a frame with glass than it is to get glass cut.” Zechmeister said the students love seeing their work on display, and artworks are featured throughout the year at other events throughout the Greater Cincinnati area. “We appreciate Reality Tuesday doing that for us,” she said. The students featured in this show are aged 9 to 21, but the program is open to young people aged 3 years and older. “In the summer, we do get students from Cincinnati, but the majority of our students are from the three counties, Kenton, Campbell and Boone, just because it’s after school

Alex Bonar is one of the Rising Star Studios artists featured at Reality Tuesday Cafe during the month of June. AMY SCALF/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

and it can be challenging to come further,” she said. Classes offered during the six-week summer session this year include gardening, independent living and social skills, karate, photography, computers, mixed media art, mosaics, music, painting and drawing, and yoga. Classes are different every term. Rising Star Studios has served more than 100 families

since the program was started in 2005 to offer programming designed to promote participants’ social, emotional and physical health and support and educate families. “The overall quality of their lives is improved as they learn to function more independently,” according to the website, www.risingstarstudios.org.


B2 • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • JUNE 28, 2012

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD FRIDAY, JUNE 29 Art Centers & Art Museums Funny Mirrors, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Artisans Enterprise Center, 27 W. Seventh St., Works by artists Jeff Casto, Billy Simms and Helena Cline. Curated by Katie Rentzke. Asks questions about values we hold as individuals and how those values play out in society. Free. 859-292-2322; www.covingtonarts.com. Covington.

Art Exhibits Color Wheel in the Brain: The Art and Life of Dr. Wolfgang Ritschel, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Behringer-Crawford Museum, 1600 Montague Road, Celebrate life and work of Dr. Wolfgang Ritschel through artist’s visionary blending of color, sight and perception in his paintings, stained glass pieces and sculpture. $7, $6 seniors, $4 children. Through Aug. 12. 859-491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

An Independence Day Celebration will be 3-10 p.m. Saturday, June 30 at Tower Park in Fort Thomas. For more information, call 859-781-1700 or visit www.ftthomas.org. Pictured is Jim Heuple looking in the window of a 1934 Lincoln V-12 featured at last year's car show during the event. FILE PHOTO

Exercise Classes Summer Yoga Classes, 3:304:30 p.m., Behringer-Crawford Museum, 1600 Montague Road, $32 per person per four-week session. Registration required. 859-491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

Holiday - Independence Day Union Celebrates America Parade and Fireworks, 6-10:30 p.m., Union Community Building, 10087 Old Union Road, Music by Gundpowder Acoustic Society at 6:30 p.m. and 113th US Army Band Dragoons at 8 p.m. Free U.S. flags to first 1000 people. Free. Registration required for parade participation. Presented by City of Union. 859-384-1511; www.cityofunionky.org. Union.

Music - Concerts Upset Victory, 8 p.m. Doors open 7 p.m., Madison Theater, 730 Madison Ave., Standing only on the main floor. $8. 859-4912444; www.madisontheateronline.com. Covington.

Music - Jazz New Sleepcat Band, 7:30 p.m., Dee Felice Cafe, 529 Main St., Directed by Bill Gemmer and features John Von Ohlen. 859261-2365; www.deefelice.com. Covington.

Music - Rock Saving Stimpy, 10 p.m., Peecox, 635 Donaldson Highway, $5. 859-342-7000; www.peecox.com. Erlanger.

Music - World Manuel, 7-10 p.m., Argentine Bean Bistro and Wine Bar, 2875 Town Center Blvd., Chilean guitarist performs upbeat music from Spanish guitar to American classics. Free. 859-426-1042. Crestview Hills.

Recreation The Northern Kentucky Poker Tour, 7-10 p.m., Bistro 737, 7373 Turfway Road, Nightly qualifier. Winner receives certificate to semi-finals. Cash and prizes including seat to 2013 WSOP in Las Vegas including airfare/ hotel/spending money. Ages 21 and up. Free for spectators. Presented by The Northern Kentucky Poker Tour. 440-2180559; www.playnky.com. Florence.

ABOUT CALENDAR

The Music and Dance Art Exhibit will be on display July 2-31 at Art on the Levee in Newport. For more information, visit www.artonthelevee.com. Pictured is "Old City Tango" by Anya Gerasimchuk. THANKS TO ART ON THE LEVEE 859-491-2444; www.madisontheateronline.com. Covington.

Music - Jazz New Sleepcat Band, 7 p.m., Dee Felice Cafe, 859-261-2365; www.deefelice.com. Covington.

Music - Latin Jorge Wojtas, 7-10 p.m., Argentine Bean Bistro and Wine Bar, 2875 Town Center Blvd., Free. 859-426-1042; www.argentinebean.net. Crestview Hills.

Music - Rock Saving Stimpy, 10 p.m., Peecox, $5. 859-342-7000; www.peecox.com. Erlanger.

Recreation The Yearlings Stallions Co-ed Golf Outing, 11:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Shotgun start 1 p.m., A.J. Jolly Golf Course, 5350 Ky. 27, Lunch at registration, 18-hole scramble format, beer, soft drinks, snacks, gifts, games and prizes. Benefits I Have Wings Breast Cancer Foundation. $80. Presented by The Yearlings. 513-315-1662; www.theyearlings.org/ events.html. Alexandria. Fort Thomas Classic Car Show, 3-7 p.m., Tower Park, 950 S. Fort Thomas Ave., Accepting 1979 and older cars, trucks, fire trucks, boats and motorcycles. Registration begins 2 p.m. Beer, wine, games, 100-game cornhole tournament and DJ. Music by Hot Wax Band at 7 p.m. Fireworks at 10 p.m. Free. Presented by City of Fort Thomas. 859-750-9532; www.ftthomas.org. Fort Thomas.

Tours Rural Treasures Farm Tour, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Benton Farms, 11896 Old Lexington Pike, Free. Presented by Benton Family Farm. 859-485-7000; www.bentonfamilyfam.com. Walton.

Saturday, June 30

SUNDAY, JULY 1

Art Exhibits

Art Exhibits

Color Wheel in the Brain: The Art and Life of Dr. Wolfgang Ritschel, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Behringer-Crawford Museum, $7, $6 seniors, $4 children. 859-4914003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

Color Wheel in the Brain: The Art and Life of Dr. Wolfgang Ritschel, 1 p.m.-5 p.m., Behringer-Crawford Museum, $7, $6 seniors, $4 children. 859-4914003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

Benefits

Pets

Kentucky Baron’s Ball: Stetson and Stilettos, 6-11:30 p.m., Turfway Park, 7500 Turfway Road, Dinner, dancing, country music, live and silent auctions and more. Ages 21 and up. Benefits American Cancer Society. $100. Reservations required. Presented by American Cancer Society Northern Kentucky. 859-372-7885; www.acskentuckybaronsball.org. Florence.

Pits Rock Northern Kentucky Fun Walk, 4:15-5 p.m., Tractor Supply Co., 5895 Centennial Circle, Open to responsible pit bull owners willing to walk their well-behaved pit bulls together in public parks to show positive side of the breed. Free. Presented by Pawzitive Petz Rescue. Through Oct. 28. 859-746-1661. Florence.

Music - Concerts Sam Bush, 8 p.m. Doors open 7 p.m., Madison Theater, 730 Madison Ave., Mandolin musician. $20. Presented by WNKU.

Special Events Humanity Outpost, 1 p.m. Opening ceremony., World Peace Bell Center, 425 York St., Sculptural celebration of peace and humanity. Cultural event to revitalize communities through the celebration and apprecia-

To submit calendar items, go to www.NKY.com and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to life@communitypress.com along with event information. Items are printed on a space-available basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to www.NKY.com and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page.

tion of the arts. Presented by Malton Art Gallery. 513-3218614; humanityoutpost.com. Newport.

Funny Mirrors, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Artisans Enterprise Center, Free. 859-292-2322; www.covingtonarts.com. Covington.

Community Dance

Karaoke and Open Mic Open Mic Night, 7:30 p.m., The Pub Crestview Hills, 2853 Dixie Highway, With Mike Liggett. 859-426-7827; www.experiencethepub.com/crestview-hills. Crestview Hills.

Music - Pop

Duplicate Bridge, 11:30 a.m.-3 p.m., Elsmere Senior Center, 179 Dell St., Lower Level. Open to all players. Family friendly. $5. Presented by Boone County Bridge Center. 859-391-8639; www.boonecountybridgecenter.com. Elsmere. The Northern Kentucky Poker Tour, 7-10 p.m., KJ’s Pub, 2379 Buttermilk Crossing, Nightly qualifier. Winner receives certificate to semi-finals. Cash and prizes including seat to 2013 WSOP in Las Vegas including airfare/hotel/spending money. Ages 21 and up. Free for spectators. Registration required. Presented by The Northern Kentucky Poker Tour. 440-2180559; www.playnky.com. Crescent Springs.

Rural Treasures Farm Tour will be held 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday, June 30. Featuring Benton Family Farm, Broken M Farm, Dinsmore Historic Farmstead, Eagle Bend Alpaca Farm, First Farm Inn Bed and Breakfast, Kinman Farms, Potter Ranch, Schwenke Farms, Verona Vineyards, Wheelrim Alpacas, Thistlehair Farm, Sandyland Acres, McGlasson Farms, and Sandy Run Stables. For more information, visit www.boonecountyfarmtour.org. Pictured is the Thistlehair Farm located on Big Bone Church Road near Burlington. THANKS TO MARY KATHRYN DICKERSON free. Presented by Equipped Ministries. 859-802-8965; www.facebook.com/equippedministries. Independence.

Karaoke and Open Mic Open Mic/College Night, 6 p.m.-1 a.m., Mahogany’s Coffee House and Bar, 3715 Winston Ave., Hosted by Pete Wallace. Free. 859-261-1029. Latonia.

Music - Bluegrass Northern Kentucky Bluegrass Band, 9 p.m.-midnight, Zola, 626 Main St., Free. 859-261-7510. Covington.

Tuesday, July 3

Music - Jazz

Art Centers & Art Museums

Mike Darrah, 7 p.m., Dee Felice Cafe, 529 Main St., Pianist. 859-261-2365; www.deefelice.com. Covington.

Funny Mirrors, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Artisans Enterprise Center, Free. 859-292-2322; www.covingtonarts.com. Covington.

Art Exhibits Color Wheel in the Brain: The Art and Life of Dr. Wolfgang Ritschel, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Behringer-Crawford Museum, $7, $6 seniors, $4 children. 859-4914003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

Community Dance Line Dancing, 7-9 p.m., Lookout Heights Civic Club, 1661 Park Road, Holly and Bernie Ruschman, instructors. Beginners welcome. Smoke-free. Family friendly. $6, $3 for first-timers. Presented by H & B Dance Co.. 859-727-0904. Fort Wright.

Health / Wellness Weight Loss Class, 6:30-7 p.m., Hickory Grove Baptist Church, 11969 Taylor Mill Road, $60 for 12-week membership. First class

Color Wheel in the Brain: The Art and Life of Dr. Wolfgang Ritschel, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Behringer-Crawford Museum, $7, $6 seniors, $4 children. 859-4914003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington. Katalyst Talent Agency Open Call, 4-7 p.m., Katalyst, LLC, 3037 Dixie Highway, Suite 214, All experience levels seeking representation with Katalyst. First come, first served. Requirements at website. Family friendly. Free. 859-581-4555. Edgewood.

Art Centers & Art Museums

Recreation

Art Exhibits

Auditions

Monday, July 2

Millionaires, 7 p.m. With Nathan Ryan. Doors open 6 p.m., Madison Theater, 730 Madison Ave., $12. 859-491-2444; www.madisontheateronline.com. Covington.

Funny Mirrors, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Artisans Enterprise Center, Free. 859-292-2322; www.covingtonarts.com. Covington.

Recreation The Northern Kentucky Poker Tour, 7-10 p.m., All In Cafe, 480 Erlanger Road, Nightly qualifier. Winner receives certificate to semi-finals. Cash and prizes including seat to 2013 WSOP in Las Vegas including airfare/ hotel/spending money. Ages 21 and up. Free for spectators. Presented by The Northern Kentucky Poker Tour. 440-2180559; www.playnky.com. Erlanger.

WEDNESDAY, JULY 4 Holiday - Independence Day Park Hills Fourth of July Festival, 2-7 p.m., Sisters of Notre Dame, 1601 Dixie Highway, Games for children and adults, petting zoo, pony rides, entertainment, flea market, silent auction, food and major raffle of $2,590. Benefits Notre Dame

Urban Education Center. Free. 859-392-8228. Covington. Independence Day at Creation Museum, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Creation Museum, 2800 Bullittsburg Church Road, Free admission to all retired members of the military. A state-of-the-art 60,000-square foot museum of the Bible. $24.95 ages 13-59, $19.95 ages 60 and up, $14.95 ages 5-12; $7 planetarium. 800-778-3390; www.creationmuseum.org. Petersburg.

Karaoke and Open Mic Karaoke, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Pike St. Lounge, 266 W Pike Street, Hosted by Bree. 513-402-2733. Covington.

Music - Jazz Mike Darrah, 7 p.m., Dee Felice Cafe, 859-261-2365; www.deefelice.com. Covington.

Music - Rock Birdbrain Crash, 10 p.m.-1 a.m., Sidebar, 322 Greenup St., Country/rock music. Ages 21 and up. Free. 859-431-3456. Covington.

Recreation The Northern Kentucky Poker Tour, 7-10 p.m., Saddle Club, 2487 Dixie Highway, Nightly qualifier. Winner receives certificate to semi-finals. Cash and prizes including seat to 2013 WSOP in Las Vegas including airfare/hotel/spending money. Ages 21 and up. Free for spectators. Presented by The Northern Kentucky Poker Tour. 440-2180559; www.playnky.com. Fort Mitchell.

THURSDAY, JULY 5 Art Centers & Art Museums

SwinGallery, 8-11:30 p.m., Step-N-Out Studio, 721 Madison Road, All ages. No partner required. Free beginner East Coast Swing lesson 8-9 p.m. Dancing to music by DJ 9-11:30 p.m. Family friendly. $5. Presented by SwinGallery. 513-2909022; www.swingallery.com. Covington.

Festivals Newport Motorcycle Rally, 5-11 p.m., Festival Park Newport, Free. 859-912-2509; www.newportmotorcyclerally.com. Newport.

Music - Acoustic The Turkeys, 10 p.m.-2 a.m., Zola, 626 Main St., Folk rock. Free. 859-261-7510. Covington.

Music - Bluegrass Music@BCM: Comet Bluegrass All Stars, 6-9 p.m., BehringerCrawford Museum, 1600 Montague Road, $5. 859-491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

Music - Choral Friendship Concert, 2:30 p.m., Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport (CVG), 2939 Terminal Drive, Free performance by World Choir Games participants. Free. Presented by 2012 World Choir Games. 513977-6363; www.2012worldchoirgames.com. Hebron. Friendship Concert, 7:30 p.m., Newport on the Levee, 1 Levee Way, Free performance by World Choir Games participants. Free. Presented by 2012 World Choir Games. 513-977-6363; www.2012worldchoirgames.com. Newport.

Music - Jazz Lee Stolar Trio, 7 p.m., Dee Felice Cafe, 529 Main St., 859261-2365; www.deefelice.com. Covington.

Recreation The Northern Kentucky Poker Tour, 7-10 p.m., Buffalo Wings & Rings, 2440 High St., Nightly qualifier. Winner receives certificate to semi-finals. Cash and prizes including seat to 2013 WSOP in Las Vegas including airfare/hotel/spending money. Ages 21 and up. Free for spectators. Presented by The Northern Kentucky Poker Tour. 440-2180559; www.playnky.com. Crescent Springs.


LIFE

JUNE 28, 2012 • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • B3

Many spices are living links to biblical times

and proceeds will benefit the NKU Center for Environmental Education’s K-12 and community programs. Awards and prizes will be announced at the celebration ceremony along with raffles and educational booths, which are available for sponsorships. For more information, contact Steve Kerlin at 859572-6380 or kerlins1@nku.edu.

Community Recorder

Rita grows basil in a cast iron kettle she inherited from her mother. THANKS TO RITA HEIKENFELD

MORE ABOUT BIBLE HERBS AND SPICES!

Cooking with Rita on Cincinnati.com Hear Rita live each week Thursday at 7:20 a.m. on the Sonrise Morning Show/Sacred Heart Radio on 740AM (check site out for more stations).

This bean salad is chock full of ingredients mentioned in the Bible. THANKS TO RITA HEIKENFELD. colicky babies; mint tea for digestion and in spritzers to refresh and cleanse the air; cilantro/ coriander (analogous to Biblical manna) for removing heavy metals from the body. Flax, out of which linen was made, helps lower cholesterol and cinnamon helps stabilize blood sugar. Bay (athletes were crowned with bay) shows promise in research for diabetes and heart health and is used in steam facials. You could say they’re good for body and soul!

“Bible” bean salad

I adapted this from a chick pea salad daughterin-law Jessie shared. Perfect for that July 4 gathering. Note all the Bible foods and herbs included: vinegar, olive oil, cumin, garlic (which

was eaten as a vegetable during Bible times), oregano, beans, onions and, of course, salt. Remember Lot’s wife turned to salt. Healthy, too. Dressing: Go to taste on this, adding more vinegar, etc. if you like. ¼ cup red wine vinegar ½ cup olive oil 1 teaspoon cumin or more to taste ½ teaspoon chili powder or more to taste 2 teaspoons garlic 1 teaspoon dried oregano Salt to taste Red pepper flakes to taste (optional go easy on these)

Salad: 3 cans beans: your choice, drained and rinsed 1 bunch green onions, chopped

3 tomatoes, chopped Handful chopped parsley 2-4 ribs celery or more to taste, diced 1 large bell pepper, diced

Whisk together dressing ingredients. Set aside while mixing salad ingredients. Pour dressing over salad. Toss gently to blend.

The Northern Kentucky University Center for Environmental Education will partner with Vision 2015 and the Covington Neighborhoods, Parks and Recreation Department to host a guided river tour of the Licking River on June 30 at 9 a.m. The tour, called "Rediscovering the Licking River," is a paddle boat tour to help educate the public on the importance of two local initiatives. The Licking River Watershed is an organization that works to protect, improve and restore the waters for the Licking River basin by promoting water quality monitoring, public education and citizen action. The Licking River Greenway is an effort to create an urban greenway from the mouth of the Licking River to the Interstate-275 loop. The seven-mile tour will begin at Knotty Pine of the Bayou (6302 Licking Pike, Cold Spring) and conclude with a celebration at the Covington Landing. The cost per participant is $20

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Did you know that many of the common herbs and spices we use today have Biblical Rita roots? Heikenfeld I have RITA’S KITCHEN always been fascinated with the historical significance of Biblical herbs and spices so often mentioned throughout the Old and New Testaments. They’re living links to our past, and many of the trendy herbs and spices common to cuisines all around the world trace their roots to Biblical and pre-Biblical times. Even before people could write, they used herbs and spices to season and preserve their foods. The people of Bible days were herbalists out of necessity. Herbs and spices were also used in cosmetics, dyes and medicines. All households, whether rich or poor, cultivated an herb garden and the plants were highly valued. My own Lebanese cooking and healing heritage is rich with facts and folklore regarding herbs of Bible days. I remember my parents telling stories of their families who immigrated from “the old country,” Lebanon. Mint, one of the tithing herbs, was carefully nurtured during the long voyage to America. We used Bible herbs and spices in everyday cooking in our traditional Lebanese household. All nine of us children learned at an early age how to distinguish oregano (the hyssop of the Bible) from marjoram, which mint was to be picked for kibbee, and how many sprigs of thyme it took for a kettle full of dolmathas. (Thyme grew wild in the Jerusalem hills). Some of the herbs doubled as medicines, as well. Mom gave us anise tea for cramps, and babies recovering from illness were given barley water sweetened with honey and anise. Barley was a popular grain during Bible days and honey was the main sweetener. She came upon this naturally, learning from her mother holistic ways to heal. To this day, my Aunt Margaret still cooks with Bible herbs and spices. She is in her 90s and going strong! One of my most prized possessions is the huge ancient cast iron “spider” kettle that I inherited from my mother. She grew enough herbs for our family of 11 in that kettle. It now sits in a place of honor in my garden, and my “hobbit”/ basil grows happily there. (The legend is that basil sprang up in the ground near Christ’s tomb after the resurrection). I ask the Lord to bless her as I scatter seeds on the surface, patting them into the soil with bare hands. There is a burgeoning interest in holistic health and aromatherapy, and many herbs and spices mentioned in the Bible are included in natural remedies. There is dill, another tithing herb, for “gripe water” to soothe

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LIFE

B4 • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • JUNE 28, 2012

Fighting off cucumber beetles Question: Last year, my cucumbers and cantaloupes wilted and died before they yielded any fruit. How can I prevent that from happening again this year? Answer: When those plants wilt and die in the garden, it’s usually due to a bacterial wilt disease that’s spread by cucumber beetles. Striped and spotted cucumber beetles can cause serious losses in cucumbers, muskmelons, and watermelons in Kentucky. Cucumber beetles are a major concern to muskmelon and cucumber growers because they carry and spread the bacteria that results in

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the eventual death of those cucurbits. Striped cucumber beetle adults feed mainly on Mike foliage, Klahr pollen and HORTICULTURE flowers of CONCERNS several vegetables and flowers, but their feeding on melon rinds late in the season may reduce fruit quality. Larvae of these insects feed on roots and stems, but this damage is minimal compared to the potential losses due to bacterial wilt. Striped cucumber beetles are yellow-green with three black stripes down the back and are 1/4 inch long. The spotted cucumber beetle (whose larvae is also known as the southern corn rootworm), is also a 1/4 inch

long beetle, yellow-green with 12 black spots on its back. The first symptom of bacterial wilt on cucumber and muskmelon is a distinct flagging or wilting of lateral and individual leaves. Beetle feeding is not always obvious on wilted leaves. Soon, adjacent leaves and finally the entire vine will wilt. The wilting spreads as the multiplying bacteria move within the vascular system of the plant. Eventually, the entire plant wilts and dies. There is nothing you can do to save an infected plant. The only way to avoid bacterial wilt is to prevent the beetles from feeding on the plant. Fruit produced on a wilting plant will be of poor quality. One way to determine if bacterial wilt has infected a plant is to cut the stem and squeeze both cut ends. A sticky

sap will ooze from the water conducting tissues of the stem. If you push the cut ends of the stem together and slowly pull them apart, you will be able to see a roping effect of stretchy sap if bacteria are present. This sap contains millions of bacteria. Begin cucumber beetle control as soon as the cucumber or melon seedlings emerge. For the home gardener, plants can be protected when they are small by mechanical means. Row covers, screens or cones put on early over small plants are effective means of excluding cucumber beetles in home plantings. Chemical controls may also be used, including Malathion, Sevin (on cucumbers), and Bug-B-Gon. Mike Klahr is the Boone County extension agent for horticulture.

UPCOMING CLASSES & EVENTS: *** “Families in the Garden”, Thursday, June 28, 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon. Meets at the Boone Co. Arboretum. Free, but please register calling 859-5866101, or enroll on-line at www.ca.uky.edu/boone *** “Vegetable Gardening 101”, Tuesday, July 3, 1:00-2:00 pm. Meets at the Boone Co. Arboretum. Free, but please register calling 859-586-6101, or enroll on-line at www.ca.uky.edu/boone *** “Enhancing Landscape Design with Garden Art: Mosaic Workshop”, Thursday, July 12, 9:00 am to 3:00 pm, $15 fee includes lunch and materials. Call 859-5866101 to register, or for more information

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JUNE Union Celebrates America Parade and Fireworks, June 29 6-10:30 p.m., Union Community Building, 10087 Old Union Road, Union. Music by Gunpowder Acoustic Society at 6:30 p.m. and 113th U.S. Army Band Dragoons at 8 p.m. Free U.S. flags to first 1,000 people. Presented by city of Union. Free. Registration required for parade participation. 859-384-1511; www.cityofunionky.org.

Independence Celebration, June 30 3-10 p.m. Saturday, June 30, Tower Park in Fort Thomas. Classic Car Show 3-7:30 p.m.; Classic Car Parade 7:45 p.m.; Beer booth 3-10 p.m.; Games, inflatables, food and beverages; Hot Wax Band 7-10 p.m.; and fireworks at 10 p.m. 859-7811700, www.ftthomas.org.

JULY Independence Day Celebration, July 3 5-10 p.m. Tuesday, July 3, Florence Government Center, 8100 Ewing Blvd., Florence. Rides, food, a raffle, kids zone, demonstrations, music, concludes at 10 p.m. with fireworks. Presented by city of Florence. Free.

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2-7 p.m., Sisters of Notre Dame, 1601 Dixie Highway, Covington. Games for children and adults, petting zoo, pony rides, entertainment, flea market, silent auction, food and major raffle of $2,590. Benefits Notre Dame Urban Education Center. Free. 859-392-8228.

Sisters of Notre Dame Fourth of July Festival, July 4 2-7 p.m. Wednesday, July 4, Sisters of Notre Dame, 1601 Dixie Hwy., Park Hills. Games for children and adults, petting zoo, pony rides, entertainment, flea market, silent auction, food, $2,590 raffle. Supports the Notre Dame Urban Education Center and the Sisters Mission in Uganda. 859-392-8228 or 859-3928229.

America’s Celebration – Newport Motorcycle Rally, July 4-8 Noon-11 p.m. Wednesday, July 4, 5-11 p.m. Thursday, July 5, 5-11 p.m. (Cincinnati Reds fireworks) Friday, July 6, noon-11 p.m. Saturday, July 7, noon-7 p.m. Sunday, July 8, Newport Riverfront. Motorcycle awards given at 5 p.m. Saturday. www.newportmotorcyclerally.com.

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LIFE

JUNE 28, 2012 • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • B5

New Perceptions to host autism events Rising Star Studios, a program of New Perceptions in Northern Kentucky, is excited to collaborate with the Autism Society of Greater Cincinnati on Autism Conversations, a series for families who have children with autism. “After the Diagnosis: Understanding Autism Spectrum Disorders and Moving Forward,” will be 5:30-7 p.m. Monday, July 23, at New Perceptions, 1 Sperti Drive, Edgewood. Parents of preschool and early school-aged students can come to learn more about the symptoms and characteristics associated with autism spectrum disorders, common treat-

No matter where you purchase your fresh products how you care for them when you get them home will affect their keeping quality. FILE PHOTO

How to store fruits, vegetables to use the item. Wash your produce in cold, running water. It is generally not a good idea to allow Diane items to Mason soak in EXTENSION water. NOTES If the produce has a thick skin, you can scrub it with a vegetable brush to remove all soil. Otherwise, carefully rub the outer skin of the items to dislodge any soil that might be on them. It is important to wash fruits and vegetables prior to use even if the outer peel will be removed. Germs and bacteria can be easily transferred from the outer layers to the edible

portions. Tomatoes, pears, peaches and nectarines should be kept at room temperature until fully ripe so they can become sweeter. After they are fully ripe, use them or store them in the refrigerator. Most vegetables are best if used within a reasonable time after harvest. Celery, cabbage, carrots and bell peppers will keep a week or two in the refrigerator vegetable drawer. Taking some time to properly store items will help you save money and allow you to enjoy the fresh vegetables and fruits of the season.

addresses two symptoms that distinguish autism: difficulties in social interaction and communication. Each event encourages social interaction and understanding through an arts activity. Simpler art activities will be available, as well, for those too young for mosaics. Admission is $10 per family. Art activities will be held 5–7 p.m. Reservations are requested for both events. Call 859-344-9322, ext. 15 or e-mail info@risingstarstudios.org.

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Community Recorder The Behringer-Crawford Museum in Covington is participating in a program that provides free admission to its facilities for active duty military personnel and their family members through Labor Day. Known as a Blue Star Museum, the organization is among 1,500 total across the U.S. participating in the program, a collaboration of

Diane Mason is county extension agent for family and consumer sciences at the Boone County Cooperative Extension Service.

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Many of us are buying more fresh fruits and vegetables as more items come into season. You can already find some locally grown produce at the local farmers markets. Nothing quite beats the thrill of buying fresh from a market. However, no matter where you purchase your fresh products how you care for them when you get them home will affect their keeping quality. Knowing what to store on the counter and what to refrigerate can make a big difference in the taste of the end product. As a general rule, produce should not be washed until just prior to use. Unless there are large clumps of wet or damp soil on the product wait until you are ready

ment approaches, services and supports within the community, and the grieving and coping process experienced by parents and caregivers. Both parents and professionals will be providing their experiences and perspectives. There will be a question and answer session following the presentation. Parents may bring their children as there will be activities especially for them. For ages 8 and up, Rising Star’s mosaic artist, Jane Bresser, will help students work cooperatively and creatively to craft beautiful mosaic art to be installed outside New Perceptions. This event is part of Rising Star’s Arts & Socialization Series, which

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LIFE

B6 • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • JUNE 28, 2012

Summer Reading program gets a messy start INDEPENDENCE — Food was flying at the William E. Durr branch of the Kenton County Public Library on Saturday, June 9, for a giant food fight. The messy celebration was part of the library’s kick-off to the summer reading program. The Durr Library has summer reading programs for children, teens and adults throughout the summer for participants to earn great prizes. For more information, visit www.kenton.lib.ky.us or call 859-962-4030.

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Children's Services Coordinator Joel Caithamer struck a cheesy pose with the Stanley family, including mom Amber, dad Adam, Drake and Isabella following the William E. Durr Branch of the Kenton County Public Library's food fight. THANKS TO THE KENTON COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY

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LEGAL N OTICE Dollar General Partners, a general partnership, mailing address 100 Mission Ridge, Goodlettsville, TN 37072, hereby declares its intention(s) to apply for malt beverage retail beer license(s) no later than July 6, 2012 at these sites, all doing business as 40 Dollar General: Cave Run Drive, Er41018 KY langer, and 5056 Madison Pike, Independence, The 41051. KY Principal (owner(s); Officers and DirecPartLimitied tors; ners; or Members are Dollar follows: as General Partners will and by acting be through its general partners DG Strategic VI, LLC, a Tennessee limited liability company, whose officers are William C. Bass, Chief Executive Officer, John W. Feray, Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer and Robert R. Stephenson, Secretary, all with the mailing address 100 Mission Ridge, Goodlettsville, TN 37072 and DG Promotions, Inc., a Tennessee corporation, whose officers are William C. Bass, Chief Executive Officer, John W. Feray, Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer and Robert R. Stephenson, Secretary and whose Directors are David M. Tehle and Susan Lanigan, all with the mailing address 100 Mission Ridge, Goodlettsville, TN 37072. Any person, association, corporation, or body politic the protest may the of granting license(s) by writing the Office of Alcoholic Beverage Control, 1003 Twilight Trail, Frankfort, KY 406018400, within 30 days of the date of this legal publication. 1712834

MARRIAGE LICENSES Mikel Meyer, 24, of Edgewood and Robinson Quast, 25, of Cincinnati, issued June 1. Amanda Waibel, 21, of Hebron and Nelson Ball, 25, of Covington, issued June 1. Kristy Siler, 31, and James Cox Jr., 34, both of Cincinnati, issued June 1. Leigh Krampe, 27, and Ian Hoopes, 27, both of Crescent Springs, issued June 4. Diana Fernbach, 33, and Joseph Mosley, 41, both of Independence, issued June 4, 2102. Ashley Wurzbacher, 19, and Steven Haven, 20, both of Alexandria, issued June 4. Stephanie Rolfsen, 37, and Dustin Haggard, 37, both of Ludlow, issued June 4. Jessica Brandner, 22, Independence and Chad Ford, 22, of Florence, issued June 4. Natalie Cook, 23, of Florence and Dennis Harris, 23, of Covington, issued June 4. Danielle Nahari, 23, and Devin Leonard, 24, both of Cincinnati, issued June 5. Lacey Cain, 26, and Bryan Bauer, 27, both of Walton, issued June 5. Chastity Scroggin, 23, of Covington and Matthew Ficke, 23, of Independence, issued June 5. Julie Shay, 31, and Matthew Greassle, 28 both of Hebron, issued June 5. Ginger McCardle, 28, and Samuel Brubaker, 35, both of Fort Wright, issued June 6. Nancy Sams, 50, and Ronald Forest, 54, both of Elk Horn, issued June 6. Laurie Bailey, 46, and Michael Campbell, 45, both of Independence, issued June 6. Michelle Weigand, 24 and Thomas Lamott Jr., 29, both of Cincinnati, issued June 6. Tammy Miller, 35, and Kevin Williams, 39, both of Florence, issued June 6. Rhonda Thomas, 45, of Florence and Dennis Ransdell, 60, of Villa Hills, issued June 6. Valissha Taylor, 42, and James Harrison, 48, both of Cincin-

nati, issued June 7. Alicia Hoffman, 25, and David Sandoval, 26, both of Newport, issued June 7. Cassandra Kowal, 25, and Jeffrey Schabell, 41, both of Lakeside Park, issued June 7. Christina Gray, 25, and Trevor Ingram, 49, both of Norwood, issued June 7. Aracelia Ayala, 49, of Mason and Donald Hookom III, 48, of Lexington, issued June 7. Melanie Kleier, 30, of Villa Hills and James Vickers, 31, of Collierville, issued June 7. April Wilsey, 25, of Independence and Brett Blevins, 29, both of Independence, issued June 11. Theresa Grimsley, 36, and Kevin Brandenburg, 38, both of Cincinnati, issued June 11. Amberlee Farmer, 28, and William Hopkins, 29, both of Independence, issued June 11. Margaret Witham, 57, and Wayne Bodytko, 49, both of Latonia, issued June 11. Judy Sauter, 65, and Audrey Worthington, 77, both of Latonia, issued June 11. Julie Nielander, 23, of Taylor Mill and Craig Emerson, 23, of Erlanger, issued June 12. Ashley Rich, 19, of Alexandria and Michael Hurst, 21, of Covington, issued June 12. Sarah Stoneburner, 26, and Justin Tillson, 24, both of Columbus, issued June 13. Misty Nipper, 29, and Mark Whalen, 31, both of Covington, issued June 13. Jamie Rose, 29, of Los Angeles and Drew Anman, 36, of Newburgh, issued June 13. Chelsea Vargas, 23, and Christopher Webster, 28, both of Covington, issued June 13. Melodie Amos, 22, and Steven Ninichuck, 27, both of Fort Wright, issued June 13. Lindsey Norvell, 19, and Jacob Hildren, 20, both of Independence, issued June 13. Cassandra Mercer, 21, and Ridge Adams, 19, both of Covington, issued June 14. Sheila Adams, 47, and Calvin Adams, 42, both of Independ-

ence, issued June 14. Kaula Gullion, 22, of Walton and Jeremiah Clark, of Taylor Mill, issued June 14, 2012, Jeanetta Neff, 76, of Carrollton and Charles Lindamood, 74, of Hillsboro, issued June 14. Melissa Johnson, 26, and Gregory Sullivan, 31, both of Batavia, issued June 14. Jessica Russell, 28, and Brendan Hall, 27, both of Columbus, issued June 14. Folakemi Akinbiyi, 28, of Itasca and Gregory Carmichael, 62, of Covington, issued June 14. Nicole Darling, 21, and Charles Brown, 23, both of Cincinnati, issued June 14. Amie Noll, 25, of Edgewood and Steven Thieme, 27, of Fort Wright, issued June 14. Amanda Gibson, 29, and Joseph Gentry, 24, both of West Harrison, issued June 15. Stacey Seiter, 30, and Burl Allen Jr., 36, both of Independence, issued June 15. Tracey Goshade, 45, and Hans Grouw, 54, both of West Chester, issued June 15. Julia Maury, 30, and Matthew Lahue, 35, both of Lakeside Park, issued June 15. Charmaine Roberts, 54, of New Lebanon and Kevin Curl, 52, of Florence, issued June 15. Alicia Wight, 25, and William Bramback Jr.,27, both of Fort Wright, issued June 15. Jessica Dunning, 21, and Patrick Burke, 26, both of Erlanger, issued June 15. Jessica Krumpelman, 24, and Brody Gregg, 24, both of Lafayette, issued June 15. Shannon Madicsi, 39, and Robert Essell, 52, both of Cincinnati, issued June 15. Ashlie Berling, 27, of Park Hills and Joshua Lyons, 25, of Florence, issued June 15. Melissa Grote, 33, and Chad Peters, 41, both of Cincinnati, issued June 15. Mariama Sall, 39, and Ibrahima Wone, 47, both of Cincinnati, issued June 18.

POLICE REPORTS INDEPENDENCE Arrests/citations Lolena F. Wehby, 40, 1423 Walton Nicholston Pike, public drunkenness at 1423 Walton Nicholson Pike, June 8. Rachel L. Davis, 22, 12010 Southridge Lane, DUI at Ky. 17 & McCullum Pike, June 7. Jennifer A. Cross, 35, 10623 Pepperwood Drive, executed warrant for theft by deception at 10623 Pepperwood Drive, June 10. Darrin L. Browder Jr., 27, 880 Lafayette Ave., executed Kenton County warrant for

ABOUT POLICE REPORTS The Community Recorder publishes the names of all adults charged with offenses. The information is a matter of public record and does not imply guilt or innocence. improper equipment at Industrial Road, June 9. Robert S. Neudigate, 19, 8816 Richmond Road, executed Kenton County warrant for driving with suspended license at Astoria Court, June 11. Robert S. Neudigate, 19, 8816 Richmond Road, executed Boone County warrant for

license to be in possession and failure to wear seat belts at Astoria Court, June 11. Robert S. Neudigate, 19, 8816 Richmond Road, executed Boone County warrants for unlawful transaction with minor, marijuana possession, possession of drug paraphernalia at Astoria Court, June 11. Tammy R. Jones, 43, 6984 Hwy. 467, executed Pendleton County warrant for theft by deception at Industrial Road, June 11.

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Robbery Cell phone and medications stolen at 883 Regal Ridge Road, June 16. Theft Heat exchange unit stolen at 933 Still Meadow Lane, June 12. Pistol stolen at 10785 Autumnridge Drive, June 13. $148,923 stolen by use of bad checks at 4944 Old Madison Pike, June 13. CD player faceplate and iPod stolen from car at 1186 Constitution Drive, June 15.

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Burglary Television stolen at 5126 Taylor Mill Road, June 9. Fleeing police, identity theft Man used false name, ran from police at Taylor Mill Road, June 14. Identity theft Woman's name used falsely to set up cable service at 676 Walnut St., June 16.


LIFE

JUNE 28, 2012 • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • B7

DEATHS Richard Arlinghaus

ABOUT OBITUARIES

Richard H. Arlinghaus, 77, of Fort Wright, died June 14, 2012. He served in the Navy, was the founder of Arlinghaus Electric, and fan of the Cincinnati Reds, Bengals and University of Kentucky basketball. Four brothers, Ed, Gene, Norman and Jim; and three sisters, Betty, Mary, and Anna Mae, died previously. Survivors include his wife, Millicent Arlinghaus; children, Kimberly Davis, Jay Arlinghaus and Terri Schoenfeld; eight grandchildren; 14 great-grandchildren; and siblings, Leo, Paul, Robert, Joe, Ken and Martha Arlinghaus. Entombment was at Mother of God Cemetery Mausoleum. Memorials: St. Elizabeth Hospice, 483 South Loop Drive, Edgewood, KY 41017.

Basic obituary information and a color photograph of your loved one is published without charge by The Community Press. Please call us at 283-0404 for more information. To publish a larger memorial tribute, call 513-2424000 for pricing details. For the most up-to-date Northern Kentucky obituaries, click on the “Obituaries” link at NKY.com. children; brother, Earl Cox of Independence; and sister, Helen Whitley of Covington. Interment was at Floral Hills Memorial Gardens.

Marshall Deatherage Marshall “Ray” Deatherage, 75, of Elsmere, died June 20, at Villaspring in Erlanger. Two brothers, Allen and Paul Deatherage, died previously. Survivors include his daughter, Kelly Comp of Erlanger; son, Eric Daniel of Walton; brother, Charlie Deatherage of Elsmere; sister, Irene Howard of Independence; and two grandchildren. Burial was at Sand Run Cemetery in Hebron. Memorials: American Stroke Association, 5211 Madison Road, Cincinnati OH 45227.

Mary Blackburn Mary A. Blackburn, 61, of Erlanger, died June 14, 2012, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. She was a retired librarian from Whites Tower Elementary and worked part-time in the Walmart deli. Her parents, Charles and Lucille Walter and sister, Ailheen Walter, died previously. Survivors include her husband, Russell of Erlanger; son, Doug Blackburn of Elsmere; daughter, Lucy Powers of Erlanger; brothers, Dr. Paul Walter of Madisonville, Ky., and Randy Walter of Grassy Creek, Ky.; and five grandchildren. Burial was at Forest Lawn Cemetery. Memorials: St. Elizabeth’s Hospice, 1 Medical Village Drive, Edgewood, KY 41017.

Velmetta Dicus Velmetta Dicus, 70, of Ellenton, Fla., formerly of Independence, died June 15, 2012, at the Manatee Memorial Hospital in Bradenton, Fla. She was a member of the Lakeside Christian Church and worked many years as a waitress. Her husband, Charles Wilbur Dicus, died previously. Survivors include her sons, Robert Drake, Robin Drake, and Rick Drake; father, Ercil Walthers; brother, Don Steiger; four grandchildren; and one greatgrandchild. Entombment was at Forest Lawn Memorial Park in Erlanger. Memorials: Kenton County Animal Shelter, 1020 Mary Laidley Drive, Covington, KY 41017.

Frank Cox Frank Cox, 71, of Independence, formerly of Taylor Mill, died June 18, 2012, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. He was a retired farmer. His daughter, Vickie McGlennon, died previously. Survivors include his sons, Earl Taylor of Ludlow and Kurtis Taylor of Milford; 14 grand-

George Dunn

George Edward Dunn, 78 of Morning View, died June 17, 2012, at his residence. He was retired from Conrail as a railroad engineer, a U.S. Army veteran, a member of Morning View United Methodist Church, Bradford Lodge No. 123 and the Scottish Rite, and a former board member of the Kentucky Farm Bureau. A sister, Norma Jean England, died previously. Survivors include his wife, Martha Williams Dunn; daughters, Cynthia Dunn Spivey of Satellite Beach, Fla., Laurie Wolsing of Morning View and Donna Dunn of Maryville, Tenn.; son, Jeffrey Dunn of Morning View; sister, Deborah Endress of Independence; and four grandchildren. Memorials: Morning View United Methodist Church, 4006 Rich Road, Morning View, KY 41063 or Hospice of the Bluegrass, 7388 Turfway Road, Florence, KY 41042.

Edward Jordan Edward S. “Ted” Jordan, 80, of Independence, died June 18, 2012, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. He was a graduate of Newport Catholic High School, a U.S. Army veteran, and a pipefitter for Cincinnati Pipefitters Local 392. Survivors include his wife, Jean Reed Jordan; daughters, Lisa Guess of Alexandria, Amy Halderman of Crittenden, Karen Thoerner of Covington and Lori Jordan of Burlington; sons, Jerry Jordan of Morning View, Tim Jordan of Crittenden and Eric

See DEATHS, Page B8 CE-0000510773

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LIFE

B8 • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • JUNE 28, 2012

DEATHS Continued from Page B7 Jordan of Independence; 14 grandchildren; and nine greatgrandchildren. Burial was at Floral Hills Memorial Gardens. Memorials: Family of Ted Jordan Chambers and Grubbs Funeral Home, 11382 Madison Pike, Independence, KY 41051 or the Alzheimer’s Association, Greater Cincinnati Chapter, 644 Linn St., Suite 1026, Cincinnati, OH 45203.

Tommy Mallory Tommy Mallory, 58, of Corinth, died June 15, 2012, at his residence. He was a driver for Silgas, a farmer, a member of the Corinth Community Worship Center and

International Boar Goat Association, a former member of the Northern Kentucky Goat Producers and enjoyed fast pitch softball. His parents, Bradford and Frances Rogers Mallory and brother, Todd Mallory, died previously. Survivors include his wife, Jane Riddle Mallory; son, Bradley Warren Mallory of Corinth; and sisters, Terri Davis of Florence and Taffie Caudill of Erlanger. Burial was in the Corinth Cemetery.

Marie Mayne Marie Mayne, 85, of Richwood died June 21, 2012, at Select Specialty Hospital in Fort Thomas.

She was a sales clerk for JCPenney in Newport and a member of Latonia Baptist Church. Seven siblings died previously. Survivors include her husband, Walter Mayne; daughters, Linda Vaught of Union and Karen Scheyer of Erlanger; brother, Melvin Riley of Frankfort; and four grandchildren. Interment was in Floral Hills Memorial Gardens in Taylor Mill. Memorials: Latonia Baptist Church, 3800 Church St. Latonia, KY 41015.

H. Don Noel H. Don Noel, 70, of Covington, died June 20, 2012, at his residence. He was a retired steel worker for Interlake and Newport Steel

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Co., a past president of Local 1870 United Steel Workers and a member of Covington Moose Lodge No. 1469. His wife, Jeraldine Bradley Noel, and a brother, David Noel, died previously. Survivors include his son, Donald E. Noel of Covington; daughter, Kimberly Neil of Sayler Park, Ohio; three grandchildren; four great-grandchildren; brothers: James Noel of Independence, Kenneth Noel of Covington and Barry Noel of Florence; sisters, Evelyn Pugh of Phoenix, Airz.; Wanda Dunaway and Barbara Marksberry, both of Florence, and Judy Richardson and Sharon Noel, both of Latonia. Interment was at Highland Cemetery in Fort Mitchell.

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Elizabeth M. “Betty” Osterhage, 77, of Villa Hills, died June 18, 2012, at Madonna Manor Nursing Home in Villa Hills. She was a homemaker. Her husband, William Jr., died previously. Survivors include daughter, Barbara Rawe of Fairfield, Ohio; sons, William J. Osterhage III of Fort Wright, John P. Osterhage of Villa Hills; brother, Paul King of Bellevue; and six grandchildren. Interment was at St. Stephen Cemetery in Fort Thomas. Memorials: St. Charles Care Center, 500 Farrell Drive, Covington, Ky. 41011; Madonna Manor, 2344 Amsterdam Road, Villa Hills, KY 41017; or the Alzheimer’s Association, 644 Linn St., Suite 1026, Cincinnati, OH 45203.

Marty Pohlgeers Marty Pohlgeers, 72, of Fort Wright, died June 14, 2012. She was a registered nurse. Survivors include her husband, Ed Pohlgeers; children, Angie Gerrein, Jeff Pohlgeers, Kevin Pohlgeers and Amy Pohlgeers; five grandchildren; and brother Henry Sellmeyer. Memorial: Redwood Rehabilitation Center, 71 Orphanage Road, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017 or Good Samaritan Foundation Class of ‘61 Scholarship Fund 375 Dixmyth Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45220.

Elaine Tiemeier Elaine Viola Tiemeier, 91, of Alexandria, died June 15, 2012, at Highlandspring of Fort Thomas. She was a cashier and accountant for Super X Drugs. Her husband, George “Yatz” Tiemeier, a daughter, Sue Ann Dorgan; three brothers, Charles Spreter, Harry Spreter and Morris Spreter; and sister, Florence Myers, died previously. Survivors include sons, Kenneth Tiemeier of Newport and Don Tiemeier of Alexandria; daughter, Linda Boimann of Erlanger; 11 grandchildren; and 28 great-grandchildren. Burial was in the St. Joseph Cemetery in Cold Spring.

Fay Wilham Fay Sanders Wilham, 95, of Latonia, died June 20, 2012, at Villaspring Health Care in Erlanger. She was a nursery worker, church cook and choir member at Madison Avenue Baptist Church in Covington, and enjoyed crocheting, quilting and working the election day poll. Her husband, Garnett Wilham, died previously. Survivors include her sons, Leo Wilham of Florence, Ron Wilham of Keller, Texas, and Ted Wilham of Taylor Mill; seven grandchildren; and four greatgrandchildren. Interment was in Highland Cemetery in Fort Mitchell. Memorials: Madison Avenue

Baptist Church, 10 East Robbins St., Covington, KY 41011.

Richard Williams Richard “Richie” Williams, 41, of Independence, died June 16, 2012, at his residence. He worked at International Paper as a press operator, and enjoyed music, going to concerts, collecting knives, the Duke Blue Devils, the San Francisco 49ers and the Chicago Cubs. Survivors include his mother, Sharon Landers of Florence; father, Rich Williams of Erlanger; stepparents, Gordon and Brenda Landers of Independence; son, Braxton Woollum of Independence; sister, Kim Dorning of Union; stepsisters, Sue Embry of Covington; Kathy Kittrell of Pensacola, Fla., and Donna Faher of Independence; and stepbrother, Wayne Landers of Independence. Burial was in Union Rice Cemetery. Memorials: Family of Richard Williams c/o Chambers and Grubbs Funeral Home.

Dorothy Winter Dorothy M. Winter, 94, formerly of St. Charles Care Center in Covington, died June 17, 2012, at Carmel Manor Nursing Home in Fort Thomas. She was a retired bookbinder with American Bookbinding Co. in Cincinnati, and a member of the Sacred Heart Christian Mothers & Christian Neighbors Clubs and St. Anthony Alter Society. Her husband, Robert Winter and three brothers, Scott, Leonard and Bob Reusing, died previously. Survivors include her daughter, Sister Elaine Marie Winter of S.N.D in Covington; son, Tim Winter of Melbourne; three grandchildren; and two greatgrandchildren. Burial was at St. Stephen Cemetery in Fort Thomas. Memorials: Sisters of Notre Dame, 1601 Dixie Hwy., Covington, KY 41011.


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