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SOUTH KENTON RECORDER

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Independence and Taylor Mill

THURSDAY, MAY 16, 2013

75¢

KEEPING HEALTHY BEES B1

BECAUSE COMMUNITY MATTERS

Property owners oppose annexation By Amy Scalf ascalf@nky.com

Independence resident Todd Goodridge, who owns property affected by the city's proposed annexation, spoke out opposing the ordinance at the May 6 city council meeting. AMY SCALF/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

INDEPENDENCE — Despite property owners’ objections, Independence City Council members unanimously approved an ordinance announcing the intent to annex almost 60 acres along the city’s southern edge. The ordinance, which had its first reading under former Mayor Chris Moriconi in April, was approved during the May 6 meeting presided over by Mayor Donna Yeager. Attorney Gailen Bridges spoke on behalf of the property owners, and encouraged council not to “embarrass themselves through this process and save themselves a lot of trouble.” City Council member Chris Reinersman said leaders wanted to be “proactive” about having the property ready for potential future developers.

“This is an area of the city that’s ripe for development,” he said. “We’d like to at least reap some of the benefits from the tax advantages. For a lot of people, it might as well be Independence. It’s just a stone’s throw.” At the previous meeting, Moriconi had said there were no actual residences on the property to be annexed, just the First Baptist Church and Regency Manor Nursing Home. The other properties don’t include residences. Property owner Todd Goodridge said city sewer hasn’t reached those properties, and they are practically across the street from Kenton County Police Department and Dispatch Center, so he wasn’t concerned about emergency services. “The biggest advantage to the city is to get tax dollars,” he said.

Regency Manor administrator Kelli Bailey said being annexed would not be “cost-effective” for them. She was also concerned that employee paychecks would be adversely affected. City Council member Carol Franzen asked if they could annex the rest of the property without Regency Manor’s parcel, but without it, the property would no longer be continuous, as required by statute. City attorney Jed Deters said, “The property owners have 60 days to file a petition to challenge the annexation. If enough [people] sign the petition it goes on the ballot.” According to the Kentucky League of Cities, online at www.klc.org, “After the second reading, the ordinance must be published along with a notice indicating the right of resident voters and property owners

within the area to be annexed to petition in opposition to the annexation within 60 days of the ordinance’s publication. To be adequate, the petition must contain the names of 50 percent of the resident voters or owners of real property in the identified area.” The regulation says if the “sufficient petition” reaches the county clerk and is certified "by the second Tuesday in August preceding a regular election, the question of annexation shall be put to a vote by the residents of the area to be annexed at the regular election.” Annexation fails if 55 percent or more voters oppose the addition, and the city can’t try to annex that property again for five years. If no petition is presented, council will have a second ordinance formally annexing the property.

Aseere takes council spot By Amy Scalf ascalf@nky.com

April Deeds nominated her husband, Samuel, who is now one of five finalists for Crown Royal’s annual “Your Hero’s Name Here“ contest to have the Indianapolis Brickyard 400 named in his honor. AMY SCALF/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Vet needs online votes to make race dream come true By Amy Scalf ascalf@nky.com

INDEPENDENCE — The U.S. Marine Corps took Samuel Deeds around the world, but the veteran needs your vote to take him to a special victory at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway. Deeds is a lifelong NASCAR fan and a retired gunnery sergeant who was injured by an improvised explosive device in Iraq in 2005. He is also one of five finalists for Crown Royal’s annual “Your Hero’s Name Here” contest to have the Indianapolis Brickyard 400 named in his honor. As a finalist, Deeds and his wife, April, will enjoy a VIP experience at the Brickyard 400 during the weekend of

July 28. Votes cast at http:// yourherosnamehere.nascar.com/ by Sunday, June 9, are the only way to get his name on the event and let him hand the trophy to the race winner. Voters must be 21 or older, and can vote once a day from each device they use. The race is the culminating event of the Crown Royal Heroes Project, an ongoing commitment to recognize everyday heroes. Military veterans and first responders are eligible for the contest. Even after saving lives in Iraq and in the United States, Deeds isn’t comfortable being called a hero. Deeds was sent home after he shielded two other Marines from an IED explosion, an act

which saved their lives but broke his leg and peppered his body with shrapnel. In 2008, Deeds was enjoying a day on the beach with his family on the North Carolina coast, while he was on convalescent leave from one of the 40 surgeries he’s endured since his blast injury. Despite being warned not to exert himself, he went into the water to rescue a woman caught by the riptide as well as two men who attempted to save her but got caught as well. Deeds refused rescue until the others were taken ashore. “I don’t feel like I did anything extraordinary,” he said. “In Iraq, part of being an infantry leader is preservation See DEEDS, Page A2

INDEPENDENCE — Bill Aseere was appointed to fill the vacant Independence City Council seat during a special meeting May 13. Aseere, the Independence LaRosa’s general manager and a city resident since 2005, was unanimously appointed to serve Mayor Donna Yeager’s unexpired council term, which she left to fill in for former Mayor Chris Moriconi. Aseere said he has looked up to Moriconi. “I feel humble and glad that I can follow in the footsteps of someone I admire so much. Chris Moriconi is one of my biggest mentors. It’s ironic I’m given this opportunity because of his departure. I appreciate him and everything he’s done,” he said. A 1994 Northern Kentucky University graduate with a degree in political science, Aseere said he has always wanted to participate in city government, and he intends to

run in the 2014 election. “I’m looking forward to leading the people of the city and making good decisions for the city,” he said. One other candidate, Darrel Herald, was interviewed in closed session during the special meeting. Herald, who also intends to run in the 2014 election, is a PNC Equipment Finance vice president. He said he went for the appointment “because I love Independence and wanted to serve the community.” Yeager said choosing between the two was difficult for council members. “They both were wonderful candidates,” she said. “I know council had a very hard decision. They would have liked to have seven council members and not have had to make that decision.” The next Independence City Council meeting will take place at 7 p.m. Monday, June 3. Want to continue the conversation? Tweet at @AmyScalfNky

New Independence City Council member Bill Aseere is sworn in by City Attorney Jed Deters during a special meeting May 13. AMY SCALF/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

SPRING SOUP

MAKING THE CUT

Rita shares a recipe for morel mushroom bisque. B3

Mike recommends annual pruning for trees with fireblight. B4

Contact us

News .........................283-0404 Retail advertising .......513-768-8338 Classified advertising ........283-7290 Delivery .......................781-4421 See page A2 for additional information

Vol. 2 No. 47 © 2013 The Community Recorder ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


NEWS

A2 • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • MAY 16, 2013

Independence event planned to honor military By Amy Scalf ascalf@nky.com

INDEPENDENCE — Kenton County’s veterans wanted a party to celebrate the past, present and future of the U.S. military, so they made one. During Armed Forces Appreciation Day, free events are planned all day Saturday, May 18, at Memorial Park, 2001 Jack Woods Parkway. “Memorial Day is a solemn occasion, and we

Index Calendar .................B2 Classifieds ................C Food ......................B3 Life ........................B1 Police .................... B7 Schools ..................A4 Sports ....................A6 Viewpoints .............A9

wanted a party, so this is separate,” said Bill Schneider. He said donations will be accepted for the Family Readiness Center and the Memorial Oaks Veterans and First Responders Memorial. “It’s a way for the city of Independence to recognize and support our Armed Forces just by coming out on a beautiful afternoon. We will have some real heroes out here,” he said. Moon Brothers American Legion Post 275 Commander Wayne Lohmoeller said he’d like to see the celebration become an annual event. The event will include displays of vintage World War II Jeeps and troop transports, as well as modern-era vehicles and equipment, along with a modern bivouac area by

SOUTH KENTON RECORDER

Find news and information from your community on the Web Covington • nky.com/covington Independence • nky.com/independence Taylor Mill • nky.com/taylormill

News

Michelle Shaw Editor ..........................578-1053, mshaw@nky.com Amy Scalf Reporter ............................578-1055, ascalf@nky.com Melanie Laughman Sports Editor ............513-248-7573, mlaughman@nky.com James Weber Sports Reporter ................578-1054, jweber@nky.com

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For customer service .........................781-4421 Sharon Schachleiter Circulation Manager .........................442-3464, sschachleiter@nky.com Melissa Lemming District Manager ..........442-3462, mlemming@nky.com

Classified

To place a Classified ad ......................283-7290, www.communityclassified.com

To place an ad in Community Classified, call 283-7290.

the 1204th Aviation Battalion of the Kentucky National Guard. Army, National Guard and Air Force recruiters are scheduled to be present. Independence veteran Bob Snow will display his extensive collection of historic military uniforms. American Legion Riders from Moon Brothers Post 275 will participate in an Armed Forces Appreciation Ride. Registration begins at 10 a.m. Riders will leave at noon and return around 3 p.m. Registration cost is $10 for a bike and $15 with an additional rider. A memorabilia auction featuring military and sports items and other collectibles will take place in the Senior and Community Center from 5 to 6:30 p.m.

American Legion Riders, like David Brotherton, will participate in a motorcycle ride to support veterans and Independence's Memorial Oaks project during Armed Forces Appreciation Day on Saturday, May 18. FILE PHOTO

“There will be a lot of stuff going on,” said Schneider. “Everyone

Music will be in the air throughout the afternoon, with music from the Noyz Boyz from 3-5 p.m. “It’s going to be good, family-friendly entertainment,” said Schneider. Several artists and groups will take the stage at the Donna Yeager Amphitheatre from 6:30 to 8 p.m. Entertainer Thomas Cox will host the performances, which will include singers Ashley Bates Jace, Courtney Flege and Steve McDaniel, Saxophonist Doug Teague and choirs from Hickory Grove Baptist Church and Simon Kenton High School.

Want to continue the conversation? Tweet at @AmyScalfNky

will find something they like and they’ll be entertained.”

Scouts brush up on community service By Amy Scalf ascalf@nky.com

INDEPENDENCE — Boy Scouts Troop 360 is painting the town yellow. They’re painting fire hydrants for the Independence Fire District as a community service project. According to Firefighter John Seitz, having volunteers paint hydrants allows fire district members to continue their duties and provides significant cost savings to the community. Having the hydrants painted also provides higher visibility

during emergencies. The district comprises almost 2,000 hydrants, 1,500 of which need to be painted. During the past three years, Seitz said more than 350 hydrants have been painted by local volunteers. He said individuals or groups are expected to gather four to seven crews of one to three people each, who will paint hydrants in a designated area, which is typically1030 hydrants. Members of Independence’s Boy Scout Troop 360 plan to continue painting the hydrants through-

Deeds Continued from Page A1

Saturday May 18, 10AM-3PM Test drive a car at Fuller Ford to help ArtWorks create a mural celebrating Cincinnati Fire Firefighters!

of life. I wouldn’t change anything I did that night. That day on the beach, I couldn’t let a man drown in front of his family.” He received the Navy Marine Corps medal, the U.S. Navy’s highest noncombat decoration for heroism.

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out the summer. Plus, they kind of like it. “I liked the painting be“It says ‘Heroism’ on the medal and I can’t stand it, but I’ll accept it,” he said. Deeds tries to attend at least one NASCAR race every year, and has always been a fan. “I think if my name gets on that thing, half of my family will faint. They’re all NASCAR fans,” he said. “One of my dreams was to get involved with NASCAR as

an official, but my injuries have stopped me from doing that. This would be almost as good.” “If he does win, I can’t wait to see his happiness and the big smile that won’t go away the whole time he’s there. I’m going to videotape him and watch it over and over,” said April, who nominated him without his knowledge.

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Firefighter John Seitz oversees Troop 360 Boy Scouts, including Griffyn Todd, Nate Cremeans and Zachary Bennett, as they paint a Walnut Avenue fire hydrant. THANKS TO TAMMI

cause it is a good deed, makes the fire hydrants look new and most of all it helps the fire department quickly find the hydrants when there is a fire,” said Zachary Bennett, assistant senior patrol leader. Volunteers need to provide their own paintbrushes and wire brushes, transportation and proof of insurance. The Independence Fire District will provide hydrant paint, safety vests, a map of the area where they will be working and a meeting place, if needed. For more information, call Seitz at 859-356-2011.

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NEWS

MAY 16, 2013 • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • A3

BRIEFLY Catch on to All Pro Dads

FLORENCE — Several Northern Kentucky schools, All Pro Dad and the Florence Freedom are teaming up for family fun. All Pro Dad, a national program that provides education and entertainment for fathers and their children, will share a demonstration and a game of catch at 4:45 on Saturday, May 18, prior to the Florence Freedom Game at 6:05 p.m. Participants should bring baseballs and their own gloves. Attending the program is free with purchase of a regular $8 ticket per person at the gate. Florence Freedom Ballpark is located at 7950 Freedom Way, Florence. For more information, call 859-594-4487.

Private clinic to open in county building

COVINGTON — A clinic for Kenton County and City of Covington employees will open Wednesday, May 22, on the first floor of the Kenton Fiscal Court building, 303 Court St. The CTK Health and Wellness Center, operated by CareHere, will provide employees and their dependents with primary care and occupational health services and dispense generic brand prescriptions. A ribbon-cutting ceremony will take place at 10 a.m. on Tuesday, May 21.

Lakeside Park hosts yard sale

LAKESIDE PARK — The city of Lakeside Park will have a communitywide garage sale from 8 a.m. to noon Saturday, May 25. A list of participants will be on the city website, www.cityoflakesidepark.com. Hard copies of the list will be available on the City Building porch, 9 Buttermilk Pike, from Thursday, May 23, until Saturday, May 25. Participants should register before Tuesday, May 21, to be included on the list. For more information, call 859-341-6670.

Taylor Mill to host yard sale

TAYLOR MILL — Taylor Mill’s communitywide yard sale will take place between 8 a.m. and 1 p.m. on Friday and Saturday, May 17 and 18. Residents hosting yard sales are required to purchase a $2 permit. Participating addresses will be listed at www.taylormillky.gov. For more information, call the city offices at 859581-3234.

Zumba comes to Taylor Mill

TAYLOR MILL — Zumba instructor Lori Deutscher will lead two classes in the popular dance exercise class on Wednesdays beginning May 29, at the Taylor Mill Firehouse, 5225 Taylor Mill Road. A six-week session of “Learning the Moves” will be held from 6-6:30 p.m. at a cost of $25. The hourlong regular Zumba class will start at 6:45 and cost $45 for six weeks.

Visit the city website, www.taylormillky.gov, or call 859-581-3234 for more information.

Substance abuse help available at St. E

EDGEWOOD — St. Elizabeth Healthcare patients with substance abuse issues can now participate in the chemical dependency consultant program. Treatment team members may request a free consultation from a chemical dependency educator for any patients in emergency or inpatient services. St. Elizabeth also offers an intensive outpatient program for adolescents and adults with dependency issues during morning and evening sessions. For more information or to receive a free consultation, call the St. Elizabeth Edgewood Behavioral Health intake line at 859-301-5966.

Cancer Society planning for winter

FORT MITCHELL — The American Cancer Society is bringing back its formal gala with the 2013 Winter Ball. The event is to be held from 6-11:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 23, at Marriott RiverCenter, 10 W. Rivercenter Blvd., Covington. Tickets cost $125 per person or $1,250 for a table of 10. Sponsorship opportunities are available. For more information about the 2013 Winter Ball, call 859-372-7885 or visit www.striderswinterball.org.

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SCHOOLS

A4 • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • MAY 16, 2013

SOUTH KENTON

RECORDER

Editor: Nancy Daly, ndaly@nky.com, 578-1059

ACHIEVEMENTS | NEWS | ACTIVITIES | HONORS

CommunityPress.com

NKU welcomes incoming freshmen Community Recorder

Northern Kentucky University welcomes the class of 2017, which includes: Covington: Aubrey Adams, Benjamin Cook, Sarah Duncan, Andrew Gergel, Zachary Martin, Abby Moore, James Morelock, Kirby Owens, Kaitlyn Payne, Trevor Rhodes, Marquis Rice, Emily Snow, Michaela Terry, Krystal Victor, Cody Wildeboer, Karla Wilson, and Aric Wren. Crescent Springs: Mya Eubank, Samantha Hackman, Daniel Kirtman, Michael Spurlock, and Jacob Von Handorf. Crestview Hills: Brandon Ballman, Dylan Boone, Megan Krumpelman, and Andrew Piccirillo. Edgewood: Alexis Ayala,

Anna Crosthwaite, John Frisch, Andres Gasper, Alexander Hovel, Courtney Hutchison, Jenna Litzler, Stefanie Nussbaum, Nick O’Brien, Lillian O’Bryan, Eric Olano, Nick Otte, Jacob Rauckhorst, Chandler Taennis, Griffen White, Christine Wolking, and Elizabeth Wolking. Elsmere: Joshua Ashley, Susanne Christ, Bethanie Cox, Jasmin Cruz, Paige Goulette, Katelyn Nash, Ashley Phillips, Maria Rojas, and Samantha Siemer. Erlanger: Nejmo Adem, Sarah Allgeyer, Alexis Bates, Robert Bundy, Hannah Ferguson, Ian Lape-Gerwe, Cole Simmons, Austin Smith, and Pete Yerace. Fort Mitchell: David Banta, Simon Bihl, Meliah Blair, La-

chezar Dzhorgov, Jakob Lasorella, and Zachary Robinson. Fort Wright: Rhiannon Bass, David Myers, and Jared Swanson. Independence: Alexandra Antrobus-Allgeier, Jonathan Bach, Nathan Bach, Taylor Barhorst, Christopher Barnett, Kayla Beetem, Jenna Bilz, Shelby Bishop, Megan Brown, Summer Buchanan, Aaron Caldwell, Sydney Caudill, Shania Cuellar, Dylan Daily, Matthew Damon, Jamie Draud, Jeremy Duffield, Andrew Eilers, Adam Erwin, James Fruchtenicht, Hunter Gerig, Erica Hancock, Chase Moriconi, Samuel Nie, Patrick Nielsen, Brittany Parker, Evan Patrick, Megan Pearson, Jake Peterson, Derick Polston, Sydney Preisler, Jessica Pritchard,

Kerstin Regan, Austin Roberts, Lucas Stone, Megan Tribble, Faith Volkering, Madison Williams, and Cassidy Wright. Lakeside Park: Tristan Johnson. Latonia: Dakota Robbins. Morning View: Kaylynn Jackson. Park Hills: Molly Kruse. Ryland Heights: Jared Simpson and Garrett Wright. Taylor Mill: Alec Booth, Kristen Carter, Kristina Fischer, Connor Gillespie, Karly Haubner, Tyler Stoeckel, Steven Vandergraff, and Zachary Wagner. Villa Hills: Austin Beck, Jordan Drees, Danielle Eldridge, Christopher Kasee, Jason Kline, Eleanor Kremer, Wayne Leeke, Jason Wagner, and Austin Wesley.

AUTHOR SHARES PIG’S TALE AT WHITE’S TOWER Urges students to believe in themselves By Amy Scalf ascalf@nky.com

INDEPENDENCE — Once upon a time, children’s book author Kim Norman visited Kentucky for the very first time. White’s Tower Elementary students and staff listened to and talked with Norman, who has had books published by Dial, Dutton, Sterling and Scholastic. She told students about learning patience, as it took five years to publish her most recent book, “I Know A Wee Piggy,” and she wrote 25 drafts for her first book, “Jack of All Tails.” More about Norman and her books can be found online at kimnormanbooks.com. Norman said she has been on 35 school visits so far this year, more than half of which required longdistance travel from her home in Virginia. She said she’ll keep traveling, because she loves the time she spends with children. “I like to ask them questions and hear their answers. I probably ask them more questions than they ask me,” she said. “They’re so creative and they come up with good ideas.” Norman worked at a community newspaper for 12 years as a graphic designer, and began writing books so she could read her children books she liked as much as they did. She spoke to several classes at White’s Tower, comparing their school writing assignments to her work writing books. Norman encouraged them to overcome their “internal evil editors” and believe in themselves.

Want to continue the conversation? Tweet at @AmyScalfNky

The Cincinnati Arts Association’s annual Student Art Show is on display in the Aronoff Center’s Fifth Third Bank Theater, Seventh and Main Street, in downtown Cincinnati, through Sunday, May 12. Exhibition hours are 4-8 p.m., Friday; noon to 5 p.m. Saturday; and 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday. The Student Art Show fea-

Baine joins Mountain March

Sixteen Eastern Kentucky University ROTC cadets, along with five cadets from the University of the Cumberlands, recently participated in the Mountain Man Memorial March in Gatlinburg, Tenn. Dylan Baine, Independence, was among the group. The 26.2-mile trek through the city and into Smoky Mountains National Park is an event to honor fallen soldiers and their families. Each team carries a gold star flag signed by the family, as well as a photograph and biography of the soldier. The cadets participating in the marathon and half-marathon (running and rucking) spent weeks training before classes, sometimes as early as 3 a.m.

XU rewards Lakeside Park resident

Emma Gripshover, of Lakeside Park, has received a Presidential Scholarship from Xavier University. The daughter of Theresa Koester and Daniel Gripshover, she will graduate from Covington Latin High School this spring, and is active in National Honor Society, soccer and track.

Kenton students enter honor society

The following local residents recently were initiated into the Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi: Emilie Brinkman, of Crescent Springs, was initiated at Miami University. Krista Noll, of Fort Mitchell, was initiated at Butler University. Amanda Young, of Edgewood, was initiated at the University of South Florida. Membership in Phi Kappa Phi is by invitation-only to the top 10 percent of seniors and graduate students and 7.5 percent of juniors.

Students named to BGSU dean’s list

Nicole Mlinarik, of Crescent Springs, and Allison Rosh, of Edgewood, made the dean’s list at Bowling Green State University for the Fall 2012 semester. To qualify, students must earn a grade-point averages of 3.5 or better on a 4-point scale.

Brown joins honor society

Children’s book author Kim Norman talks and listens to questions during a visit to White’s Tower Elementary on May 7. AMY SCALF/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

SCHOOL NOTES Student art displayed downtown

COLLEGE CORNER

tures 88 entries, including student works from Mary, Queen Of Heaven Elementary in Erlanger. The show is free and open to the public.

Franxman accepted into GSA program

The Kentucky Center Governor’s School for the Arts recently announced that Highlands High School student Lindsey Franxman has been

accepted for the 2013 summer program. The program is an intense three-week summer residential program for Kentucky’s finest young artists held on the campus of Transylvania University in Lexington. Students will have the opportunity to live in a supportive learning environment and study with a group of distinguished teaching artists while participating in the program.

The Governor’s School for the Arts was established in 1987 as a program of The Kentucky Center for the Arts and Kentucky Department of the Arts. GSA provides hands-on opportunities in nine art forms including architecture, creative writing, dance, drama, instrumental music, musical theater, new media, visual art and vocal music. Franxman lives in Crestview Hills.

Taylor Brown, of Fort Mitchell, is among 45 students from Heidelberg University inducted into Alpha Lambda Delta, a national honor society that recognizes academic excellence among first-year students. Brown is a freshman majoring in athletic training. To qualify, students must have achieved a 3.5 or better grade-point average during their first year.

Thomas named outstanding senior

Western Kentucky University’s Gordon Ford College of Business recently had its 16th annual Recognition Dinner. David Thomas, of Edgewood, earned the Outstanding Senior in Financial Management, and the Robert W. Jefferson Outstanding Graduating Senior awards.


NEWS

MAY 16, 2013 • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • A5

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NEWS

A6 • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • MAY 16, 2013

Farmer’s new venture brings in the cheddar By Amy Scalf ascalf@nky.com

Milk from Eddie Gibson's herd of 50 dairy cows is being used to produce three different cheeses in Kentucky. AMY SCALF/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

5

$

WALTON — Got cheese? Dairy farmer Eddie Gibson is asking a new question these days. Gibson has a herd of 50 Holstein dairy cattle whose milk is usually sold by the gallon in supermarkets, but now that milk is being used to produce a variety of cheeses, made in Kentucky. Gibson runs Ed-Mar Dairy on Walton-Nicholson Road. He was looking for a different way to get products into consumers’

homes. “I was just trying to find something else to do with the milk,” said Gibson. He decided cheese was the answer. Gibson said it takes 400 gallons of raw milk to make 360 pounds of cheese, which is processed by Patrick Kennedy of Stone Cross Farm in Taylorsville. He said using an offsite processor lets him see “what it will be like without making a huge investment upfront.” The first batch of EdMar Dairy’s Farmstead Cheese was ready in March. Gibson is selling three varieties of his cheese at Northern Kentucky farmers markets and direct to the consumer on his website, www.ed-mardairy.com. Gibson sells two varieties of Banklick Cream, which is a Cotswold, or creamy white cheddarlike cheese. One variation, Banklick Pub, includes onion and chive flavors. The third cheese is Maddie’s Gold, an original Double Gloucester, which is a traditional unpasteurized semi-hard yellow cheese comparable to cheddar. He hopes to generate

interest among local restaurants and specialty shops that promote and sell locally produced items. “If you live in Kenton County, it’s as local as you can get,” he said. Andrea Dee, Kenton County Extension Agent for horticulture, is “excited” about Gibson’s new product. “Eddie is one of the only remaining dairy men in the county. We know this county historically was home to many dairies from our extension archives, but that is not the case anymore mainly due to the intense lifestyle running a dairy takes. Eddie and his family are wonderful people and allow hundreds of visitors to tour their state-of-theart facility each year on the Farm Harvest Tour,” she said. “I think Ed-Mar’s product is such a great addition to the county’s local food resources, as everyone loves cheese.” Gibson said he hasn’t had a product to sell during Kenton County’s Farm Harvest Tour, but he’ll have the cheese out this year. Want to continue the conversation? Tweet at @AmyScalfNky

each

Another way to help kids!

Ed-Mar Dairy's cows are fed a nutrient-rich mix that helps them produce higher-quality milk. AMY SCALF/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Purchase Good Housekeeping: Blend It! or Party Food cookbooks or The Pout-Pout Fish printed tote – only $5 each!

For more information on Kohl’s community giving, visit Kohls.com/Cares. Kohl’s Cares ® cause merchandise is not eligible for discounts or other promotional incentives. The Pout-Pout Fish Text copyright © 2008 by Deborah Diesen, Pictures copyright © 2008 by Dan Hanna, All rights reserved. The Pout-Pout Fish in the Big-Big Dark Text copyright © 2010 by Deborah Diesen, Pictures copyright © 2010 by Dan Hanna, All rights reserved. Party Food copyright © 2007 Publications International, Ltd. Good Housekeeping: Blend It! copyright © 2003 by Hearst Communications, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Ed-Mar Dairy's cheeses: Maddie's Gold, Banklick Cream and onion-and-chive-flavored Banklick Pub are available online or at Northern Kentucky farmers markets. AMY SCALF/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER


SPORTS

MAY 16, 2013 • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • A7

Editor: Melanie Laughman, mlaughman@communitypress.com, 513-248-7573

HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | RECREATIONAL

SOUTH KENTON

RECORDER

CommunityPress.com

Scott tennis makes great strides Girls finish with 10-3 record By Adam Turer presspreps@gmail.com

Scott senior Andrea Porter throws the shot. JAMES WEBER/THE COMMUNITY

Simon Kenton freshman Tucker Mueller throws the discus. JAMES

RECORDER

WEBER/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Eagle track throws its weight around By James Weber jweber@nky.com

KENTON COUNTY — The throwing team at Scott High School is deep enough that its third-best discus thrower probably would have won a regional medal last week. As it is, the Eagles had plenty of hardware in throwing venue at Dixie Heights High School during the 3A regional track meet May 11. Scott won two regional championships and several medals in the four throwing events, both the boys and girls shot put and discus. They lead the Eagle contingent into this year’s Class 3A state meet Saturday, May 18, at the University of Louisville. Scott senior Jake Groeschen led the way, winning his first regional championship in the discus. His throw of 147 feet, 2 inches was 19 feet ahead of second place. “It’s awesome,” he said. “It’s a great honor. I felt strong. The weather was a little cool, but the wind was helping us out a little bit.” Groeschen has been throwing since eighth grade and only

Scott’s Brooke Katinic throws the shot. She was regional champion. JAMES WEBER/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Simon Kenton sophomore Grant Vercheck throws the discus. JAMES WEBER/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

reached about 70 feet his first few times throwing the disc. His best mark is 155 feet, and matching that could net him a state championship. “I want to win,” he said. “I’ll settle for second if I have to, but I want to win.” Better technique has helped him get to this point. “It took a while,” he said. “In five years I still don’t have it

down. My ending is bad but it takes a while.” One of Scott’s top overall students in the Class of 2013, Groeschen will return to the UofL next year to study engineering and eventually get his masters. He hasn’t decided if he will walk on to the track team there. Groeschen’s brother Clay, a junior, finished fourth at 118-10.

“We throw good in practice,” Jake said. “I like having him with me. He throws better than I was at his age so I’m excited to see what he can do.” Junior Kameron Crim finished second in shot put. Crim, a Division I football prospect and strong post presence in basketball, couldn’t compete in discus because each team can only enter two athletes. Jake Groeschen was seventh in shot put. In the girls throwing venue, Brooke Katinic won the shot put with 30 feet, 5.5 inches. Andrea Porter was fourth in the discus and Katinic fifth. Among other results, Jeremy Jackson was third in the 800. Collin Meyers was second in the high jump Follow James on Twitter @RecorderWeber

TAYLOR MILL — Scott High School’s girls tennis team went into the 2013 season unsure of what to expect. The Eagles graduated their top singles player from a year ago. The team knew it would have to rely on some young players and newcomers. The Eagles exceeded expectations, posting a10-3 record. Freshman Abby Hillmann led the way, stepping in at first singles. Hillmann posted a 10-3 mark, earned the seventh seed in the region, and advanced to the regional quarterfinals. Sydney Hancock posted a perfect 13-0 mark at second singles. She made great strides from her eighth-grade season to her freshman year. “I was very proud of her consistent play and her hard work in the offseason,” said head coach Joan Sturgeon. “She is very interested in improving her game.” Another freshman, Allie Bishop, split time at third singles and first doubles for the Eagles. Seventh-grader Jordan Tapp also played some third singles and some first doubles. Bishop and Tapp teamed up to play first doubles at the regional tournament, advancing to the quarterfinals. Despite their youth, Bishop and Tapp never shied away from more experienced competition. “Allie is a very competitive player who played a lot of big matches for us this year,” said Sturgeon. Jenna Webster became the team’s veteran leader, despite it being her first year playing tennis for Scott. The junior played first doubles and second doubles. Her willingness to move down to second doubles to make room for Bishop at first dou-

See TENNIS, Page A8

PRESS PREPS HIGHLIGHTS By James Weber jweber@nky.com

This Week’s MVP

» Scott throwers Jake Groeschen and Brooke Katinic for winning regional track titles.

Sportsman voting

From May 2-23, Community Recorder readers can vote one time a day through cincinnati.com/preps for the Sportsman and Sportswoman of the Year. The story will be located on the right side of the page. It will contains an individual link for each ballot at the bottom of the story. Just click on the newspaper name. You do not have to be a subscriber to the Enquirer or cincinnati.com to vote; it will not count against the maximum-allowed stories for non-subscribers. However, you must register

for the free account (also known as a Share account), which will be necessary to view the ballots and vote. Winners will be notified after May 23 and before stories on the winners run in the June 26-27 issues. Technical questions can go to nhurm@enquirer.com and everything else can go to mlaughman@nky.com .

Coaching news

» Villa Madonna Academy is currently seeking applicants for head boys golf coach for the 2013 season. At this time, there is not a guaranteed teaching position associated with the position. Interested applicants should send via e-mail a letter of interest and resume with references. Contact: Athletic Director Larry Cox at lcox@villamadonna.net. » Ryle High School has selected David McFarland as its

new boys basketball coach. McFarland becomes the fourth head coach in the 21-year history of the Raiders. David, a Boone County High School graduate, was an assistant coach at Dixie Heights High School the past three seasons. McFarland had a stellar high school career at Boone County (2001-05), earning NKAC Defensive Player of the Year awards in 2004 and 2005. McFarland, a four-year starter for the Rebels, ranks (10th in steals and ninth in assists in KHSAA history). McFarland also played collegiately at NKU (2005-09) under current head coach Dave Bezold. David was also a four-year starter at NKU and team captain. He won the prestigious Thomas J. Kearns Career Achievement Award at NKU in 2009. This award is given annually to NKU athletes that display academic excellence, athletic ability, character and

leadership.

Baseball

» District tournaments begin the week of May 19. Brackets weren’t set at press time. » Covington Catholic entered play May 14 with a 19-11 record, hoping to get its 20th win this week to extend its 25-year streak of 20-win seasons. » Holy Cross beat its Louisville namesake 12-1 May 11. Connor Callery had three hits and three RBI. Mike Hewitt and Vinnie Pangallo also had three hits each. » Scott beat Cooper 3-2 May 11. Seth Robinson had two RBI. » Simon Kenton beat Campbell County 3-0 May 7. Sean Lawrence improved to 4-1on the mound. Grant Wassom had a double and two RBI.

Softball

» District tournaments begin

the week of May 19. Several brackets weren’t set at press time. » Notre Dame beat Simon Kenton. Haylee Smith hurled a three-hit shutout and drove in a run for the Pandas. Laura Finke had two hits. » NDA beat Dixie Heights 11-8 and 7-0 May 11 in the Strike Out Cancer series. Haylee Smith had four hits and six RBI in the first game and improved to 12-2 on the mound in the second. Abby Jones, Amanda Meagher, Maddie Rose and Mickie Terry all had two-RBI games during the doubleheader. NDA entered play May 14 with a 20-7 record.

TMC Notes

» Thomas More College swept the Presidents’ Athletic Conference Softball Player and See HIGHLIGHT, Page A8


SPORTS & RECREATION

A8 • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • MAY 16, 2013

Kenton County offers variety of golf programs The Kenton County Parks Department offers a variety of golf programs this spring. » “Get Golf-Ready in Five Days” classes are 5:30-7 p.m. Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday evenings through June. » The Junior Golf League begins Monday, June 10. The PGA Junior Golf Academy begins Wednesday, June 12. Participating junior golfers receive discounts on green fees and range baskets throughout the sum-

mer. » “Ladies Lessons, Lunch and Margaritas” Saturdays feature golf clinics, lunch and cocktails. Cost is $25 per person; limit 10 students per session. » Ladies Instructional League is a five-week session, 3:30-5 p.m. Sundays. » Individual lessons also are available, with hourly rates and junior rates. For more information, email jason.laible@kentoncounty.org or call 859371-3200.

Highlight

with 13 doubles, three home runs, 28 RBI and 29 runs scored.

Community Recorder

Continued from Page A7

Coach of the Year Awards and had five Saints named All-PAC by the conference’s head coaches. Junior third baseman Alex Walter was named the PAC Player of the Year and earned first team AllPAC honors. Head Coach Lindsay Bramhall has guided the Saints to a 24-17 overall record and a 12-6 record in the PAC. Joining Walter on the All-PAC first team was junior pitcher Ronni Burns and freshman pitcher/outfielder Mamee Salzer (Erlanger, Ky./St. Henry). Salzer is second on the team in batting with a .376 average

GREAT SCOTTS!

Scott High School honored three senior baseball players who will play the sport at the next level. From left are: Jordan Pike (College of Mount St. Joseph), Pete Ohmer (Asbury), Brenden Wells (Asbury). The ceremony was May 7 at Scott in Taylor Mill. JAMES WEBER/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

SIDELINES Walk to Defeat ALS

The Campbell County Red Devils organization, member of the Northern Kentucky Youth Football League, is registering youth for football and cheerleading. Registration dates include 6-8 p.m. Friday, May 17, and 2-4 p.m. Saturday, May 18, at Pendery Park in Melbourne. Football fees are $120; cheerleading fees are $175. Each registrant receives 100 raffle tickets to sell for $1 each to offset the costs. For more information, visit www.freewebs.com/ reddevilsfootball/

The third-annual Northern Kentucky Walk to Defeat ALS, or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, often called Lou Gehrig’s disease, is Saturday, May 18, at Turfway Park, 7500 Turfway Road in Florence. Registration and a silent auction begin at 8:30 a.m. A ribbon-cutting ceremony and the one-mile walk begin at 10 a.m. The walk will begin at Turfway’s paddock and progress around the grounds. Walkers can register online at http://webky.alsa.org. All walkers who raise $75 or more will receive a Walk to Defeat ALS T-shirt.

Freedom season opens Thursday

» The Florence Freedom, coming off a Frontier League championship series appearance in 2012, return to the field for the first time in 2013 this week when the regular season opens at University of Cincinnati Medical Center Stadium on Thursday. Game time for Thursday and Friday is scheduled for 6:35 p.m. Saturday night’s start is slated for 6:05 p.m. Gates open to UCMC Stadium one hour prior to game time.

Tennis Continued from Page A7

bles was just one example of her leadership. Webster consistently sacrificed individual glory for the greater good of

or call Coach Wagner at 859442-9914.

Scott volleyball

Junior high football

The Scott High School volleyball camp is 9 a.m. to noon, May 28-31, for boys and girls in grades 3-9 (exceptions can be made for age and skill level). Directed by head coach Andrea Sullivan and members of the Scott volleyball team, as well as past players. Cost is $65. Call Sullivan at 859-816-6364, email andrea.sullivan@kenton.kyschools.us.

Newport Central Catholic High School invites all boys entering the sixth, seventh, or eighth grade in the fall of 2013 to play on its junior high football team. Contact coach Jeff Brauley at Jeffrey.Brauley@ubs.com, or 859-572-0203.

Newport Central Catholic hosts a volleyball camp, 6-8 p.m. June 10-13, for girls in grades

Newport Central Catholic is hosting a football summer camp for students in grades 3-8, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. June 19-21. Cost is $75. Visit ncchs.com to register,

the team, setting an excellent example for her younger teammates. “Jenna is a team player who was an amazing leader on the team,” said Sturgeon. Kaitlin Wessel played as a sixth-grader, took a break, and came back to

the team as a freshman. She played mostly second doubles and showed improvement throughout the season. The 10-3 finish bodes well for the future. Most importantly, Sturgeon is looking forward to her entire roster returning

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VIEWPOINTS

MAY 16, 2013 • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • A9

SOUTH KENTON

RECORDER

Editor: Nancy Daly, ndaly@nky.com, 578-1059

EDITORIALS | LETTERS | COLUMNS | CH@TROOM

CommunityPress.com

Tell us more about your news interests News has been defined many different ways over the years. Charles Dana, a 19th century American journalist, said famously, “When a dog bites a man, that is not news, but when a man bites a dog that is news.” Former Washington Post Publisher Philip Graham somewhat high-mindedly called news “a first rough draft of history.” A tongue-in-cheek definition sometimes tossed around newsrooms says, “News is whatever happens to or near an editor.” While there may be a grain of truth in that line (we’re human, after all), it turns the way news ought to be regarded squarely on its head. The news we report every day should be a smart mix of information people in our audience want and need. Or put differently, a blend of stories that are most important and interesting to readers. Striking the right balance is

no easy task. It requires us to know the people we serve and have a sound grasp of their shifting news interests and the content – Steve Wilson local, state, COMMUNITY national and RECORDER GUEST COLUMNIST world – they prefer. To gain a better sense of those preferences, we want to hear from more readers and reach out to more groups in Northern Kentucky. We would like to have the chance to speak to organizations or engage with them in whatever way can be useful. Gaining a solid grasp of people’s constantly changing news interests is a challenge in any market, and that’s especially true for The Kentucky Enquirer. While our primary local news focus will always be on

Northern Kentucky, as part of Greater Cincinnati we need to report the news from north of the Ohio River that people here want to read. We offer it all online, but selecting what will fit in the newspaper often requires tough choices. And in covering Northern Kentucky, the task is complicated by the region’s unusually large number of cities and towns. We have to weigh how much attention to give a city council controversy, for example, that may matter a lot to the residents of that particular community but little to the large majority of readers. While our primary goal is learning more about your views of the news we should be reporting, we also will be glad to talk about the ways the news industry has been changing in recent years – both at The Enquirer and nationally. From meeting the growing demand for digital delivery to the recent switch to our new

Don’t close book on local libraries Tom Wurtz used harsh words in his column last week – “confiscating millions of dollars,” “taxing scam,” “stole millions from taxpayers.” You would think Mr. Wurtz was talking about Bernie Madoff, instead he was talking about the Kenton County Public Library. Mr. Wurtz’s column would lead you to believe the Kenton County Public Library Board of Trustees is a greedy group of rogue individuals plotting and scheming to hijack as much money as possible from county taxpayers. In reality, the library set the tax rate starting in 1979 based on directives given to it by the Kentucky Department of Libraries and Archives. Those directives were based on the law passed by the Kentucky General Assembly (KRS Chapter 132) which stated that all taxing districts should use the compensating rate when setting tax rates instead of raising taxes through a petition. The library has been operating in good faith, as instructed, according to the same formulas and procedures as other taxing entities and as libraries all across the state have done for the past 35 years. Seventy-nine other

library systems in Kentucky are set up and funded the same way as the Kenton County Public Library. Joan Thamann If Judge Summe’s rulCOMMUNITY RECORDER GUEST ing against the COLUMNIST library stands, which there is a very real possibility that it will, the library will have to revert back to the 1979 tax rate. This would reduce the library’s operating revenue by almost 50 percent. The result will be drastic reductions in library services. Some of the branches will probably close. Hours will be limited. Technology upgrades will stop. Many of its educational programming and community outreaches will be abolished. Yes, our property tax bill will be lowered but at what cost to our community? If those filing the lawsuit against the library are looking to save taxpayers money, they are barking up the wrong tree. Check with any financial counselor on how to cut your monthly expenses and almost all will tell you to utilize your local library. My family of six

visits the library almost weekly. There we have access to over 550,000 books, CDs, newspapers, magazines, movies and video games. We usually come home with 10-20 different books, two to three different CDs, and maybe a movie or two. How much would it cost my family to buy all of that? How much would it cost for me to enroll my four children in classes to receive the same quality education that they get for free during their weekly story times and play art classes? The amount of money my family saves by using the libraries’ many resources greatly outweighs the amount of property tax we would save. In these already tough economic times, how much greater will this lawsuit cost those who truly depend on the library for free access to technology, educational programs, and job-seeking assistance? This lawsuit does much more harm than good. As a community, we need to fight to make sure this lawsuit doesn’t close the books on our local libraries. Joan Thamann is a mother of four who resides in Fort Wright.

print edition, the Enquirer is evolving in ways to better serve readers. We can discuss current trends and answer your questions. But most of all, we would like to know more about the news you want and need. Depending on your interests, I hope you will contact me or four other journalists here to get together with your group. They are: » Amanda Van Benschoten, Kentucky Enquirer news columnist (avbnky@nky.com). » Josh Pichler, Enquirer columnist on leadership and entrepreneurs (jpichler@enquirer.com). » Richard Skinner, Enquirer sports reporter for Northern Kentucky (rskinner@nky.com). » Nancy Daly, senior editor of the weekly Community Recorders, distributed in most of Campbell, Kenton and Boone counties (ndaly@nky.com). We look forward to hearing

Van Benschoten

Pichler

Daly

Skinner

from you and learning how The Enquirer can do a better job of providing more of the news you care about most. Steve Wilson is editor of the Kentucky Enquirer. Reach him at swilson@nky.com.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR Bowling team thanks businesses, individuals

The Simon Kenton Bowling Team had a fundraiser on April 29 at Super Bowl in Erlanger with great success. Thanks to the donations, we made over our goal. The bowling team would like to take this opportunity to thank the following businesses and individuals for their support and donations. State Farm Insurance agent Joel Bergantino, McDonald’s Independence, John Phillips, Dominach Taekwondo Academy, Valvoline Independence, Buffalo Wild Wings, Chambers & Grubbs Funeral Homes, Kroger’s Independence, Frisch’s Independence, Independence Oaks Apartments, Family EyeHealth Center, Olive Garden, America Window Cleaning, Dixie Chili, McDonald’s Fort Wright, Subway Fort Wright, Kenton County Sheriff Chuck Korzenborn, Lisa Kutzman, James Hampton, Fleet Tire & Auto Service, Walgreens Independence, Independence Lumber, Penn Station, La Piñata, Papa John’s, Texas Roadhouse, Arby’s Fort Wright, Barb Ries, LaRu LanesGlen, Super Bowl Erlanger, Skyline Independence, Bob Sumerel Tire, Al Childers, Steve and Jamie Bowling, Brandon

Bowling, Nicole Zippin, Troy Baker, Aaron Allen, Dennis Friedman and SK parents for the baked goods. Special thanks to the individuals that helped make the fundraiser a success: Mary Horn, Gina Bowling, Vicki Becknell, Sarah Martin, Coach David Hampton and Coach Jeremy Ziegler. Paula Crone Fundraiser coordinator Florence

ABOUT LETTERS AND COLUMNS We welcome your comments on editorials, columns, stories or other topics important to you in the Recorder. Include your name, address and phone number(s) so we may verify your letter. Letters of 200 or fewer words and columns of 500 or fewer words have the best chance of being published. All submissions may be edited for length, accuracy and clarity. Deadline: Noon Friday E-mail: kynews@ communitypress.com Fax: 859-283-7285 U.S. mail: See box below Letters, columns and articles submitted to the Recorder may be published or distributed in print, electronic or other forms.

WHEN THEY MEET Kenton Fiscal Court

Meetings: Second Tuesday at 9 a.m. at Independence Court House, 5272 Madison Pike Meetings: Fourth Tuesday at 9 a.m. at Kenton County Courthouse, 303 Court St., Covington Address: 303 Court St., Covington Phone: 859-392-1400 Judge-executive Steve Arlinghaus Commissioner Beth Sewell, First District Commissioner Jon Draud, Second District Commissioner Kris Knochelmann, Third District http://www.kenton county.org

Crescent Springs City Council

Meetings: Second Monday at 7 p.m. Address: 739 Buttermilk Pike Phone: 859-341-3017 Mayor: Jim Collett

www.crescent-springs.ky.us/

Crestview Hills City Council

Meetings: Second Thursday at 7:30 p.m. Address: 50 Town Center Blvd. Phone: 859-341-7373 Mayor: Paul Meier http://www.crestviewhills.com

Edgewood City Council Meetings: First and third Mondays at 6:30 p.m. Address: 385 Dudley Road Phone: 859-331-5910 Mayor: John Link http://www.edgewoodky.com/

Erlanger City Council

Meetings: First Tuesday at 7 p.m. Address: 505 Commonwealth Ave. Phone: 859-727-2525

SOUTH KENTON

RECORDER

A publication of

Mayor: Tom Rouse http://www.friendshipcity.com/

Elsmere City Council

Meetings: Second and fourth Tuesdays at 7:30 p.m. Address: 318 Garvey Ave. Phone: 859-342-7911 Mayor: Marty Lenhoff http://www.cityofelsmere.com/

Fort Mitchell City Council

Meetings: First and third Mondays at 7 p.m. Address: 2355 Dixie Hwy. Phone: 859-331-1212 Mayor: Chris Wiest http://www.fortmitchell.com/

Fort Wright City Council Meetings: First Wednesday at 6 p.m.

Address: 409 Kyles Lane Phone: 859-331-1700 Mayor: Joe Nienaber Jr. http://www.fortwright.com

Lakeside Park City Council

Meetings: Second Monday at 7 p.m. Address: 9 Buttermilk Pike Phone: 859-341-6670 Mayor: David Jansing http://www.cityoflakesidepark.com

Park Hills City Council

Meetings: Second Monday at 7 p.m., Griffin Center, 1550 Dixie Hwy. Address: 1106 Amsterdam Road Phone: 859-431-6252 Mayor: Don Catchen http:www.cityofparkhills.net

Villa Hills City Council

228 Grandview Drive, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017 654 Highland Ave., Fort Thomas, KY 41075 phone: 283-0404 email: kynews@communitypress.com web site: www.nky.com

Meetings: Third Wednesday at 7 p.m. Address: 720 Rogers Road Phone: 859-341-1515 Mayor: Mike Martin http://www.villahillsky.org/

Erlanger/Elsmere School Board Meetings: Second Thursday of the month at 7 p.m. Address: 500 Graves Ave. Phone: 859-727-2009 Superintendent: Kathy Burkhardt http://www.erlanger.k12.ky.us/

Kenton County Schools

Meetings: First Monday at 7 p.m. Address: 1055 Eaton Drive Phone: 859-344-8888 Superintendent: Terri Cox-Cruey http://www.kenton.k12.ky.us/

South Kenton Recorder Editor Nancy Daly ndaly@nky.com, 578-1059 Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday See page A2 for additional contact information.


NEWS

A10 • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • MAY 16, 2013

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THURSDAY, MAY 16, 2013

LIFE

SOUTH KENTON RECORDER

PEOPLE | IDEAS | RECIPES

Beekeeper Carl Knochelmann shows off some of his bees. KAMELLIA SMITH FOR THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

The pleasures of beekeeping A beekeeper shares some tips for healthy bees By Kamellia Soenjoto Smith Recorder Contributor

E

DGEWOOD — Carl Knochel-

mann lifts the top of his hive and honey bees soon fill the air. “It sounds like a busy airport,” he says. With a device that looks like a skinny teapot he blows white smoke on the bees to help calm them. His hive stands at the corner of his backyard in Edgewood. Those who don’t know would probably mistake it as a dresser with three drawers. Around 30,000 bees live there. “It’s a strong hive,” he says. “There can be as many as 60,000 in the summer.” A bee lands on his arm. “Look, it’s carrying pollen,” he says. The bee stands still as if it wants to show off its hard work. On one of its hind legs is a sac of yellow pollen. “It’s from a dandelion.” This bee is one of the worker bees, infertile females charged with many jobs, ranging from guarding and cleaning the hive to foraging for nectar and pollen. They also feed the queen, the mother of all the other bees in the hive. Male bees are called drones. They do nothing but eat and wait to mate with the queen, after which they immediately die. In recent years there have been reports about a strange phenomenon with honeybees known as Colony Collapse Disorder. More than half of the honeybees in the U.S. died this spring. “No one really knows why,” Knochelmann says, but he suspects it might be caused by issues with pesticides. The European Commission just voted to enact a ban on a class of pesticides thought to be

TO LEARN MORE The Northern Kentucky Beekeepers Association is an organization of beekeeping enthusiasts. Their next meeting is June 4 at the Campbell County Environmental Center from 7-9 p.m. Visit nkybeekeepers.com for more information.

harming the global bee population. Knochelmann is glad that the mysterious malady didn’t hit his bees. “Knock on wood. I have not had any problems with wax moths or hive beetles either,” he continues. “If you have a strong hive, bees can take care of themselves really well.” He started beekeeping in the 1980s but then stopped for awhile. He’s been at it again for the past 10 years as a member of the Northern Kentucky Beekeepers Association. “I like to treat them organically,” he says, sharing a tip that helps bees clean and groom each other. “Take some granulated sugar and put it in a food processor so you make your own powder sugar.” The next step is to use a shaker to pour the sugar all over the bees. “Make them look like Casper the Ghost,” he says, recalling a character from an old cartoon series. “Sometimes bees won’t check each other out unless they’ve got sugar on them,” he continues. “First, they’ll eat the sugar, which is good, and if there are any mites growing on them, they’ll help pick those things off.” Bees play a vital role in the production of food and fruits. The U.S. Department of Agriculture states that over 80 percent of the world’s flowering plants require a pollinator

An inside look at Knochelmann’s hive. KAMELLIA SMITH FOR THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

A honey bee carries a load of pollen. KAMELLIA SMITH FOR THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

to reproduce, including almonds, apples, onions and citrus fruits. And bees are the most efficient pollinator. “It’s amazing what they do,” Knochelmann explains. He enjoys the honey they produce and gives it away to family and friends. But he takes more pleasure in watching how the bees operate. “When it starts getting cold, they crowd around the queen and vibrate

their bodies to generate heat. They want to keep the temperature inside the hive at around 70 degrees.” Another thing that amazes him is how hives can multiply. “Somewhere along the line somebody says ‘hey let’s make another queen and split the hive.’” As many as half the bees can leave the hive in what is called a swarm. “This is the season of bee swarms,” he points out. Last year a bee swarm was found in Taylor Mill. But it wasn’t in a tree, it was on the ground. Knochelmann was called. He brought an empty hive and herded the swarm into it. “If you want to start a hive, a bee swarm can mean free bees for you,” he says. It costs around $80 to buy enough bees to start a hive. For Knochelmann the appeal of beekeeping is simple. “They’re pets that basically feed themselves and take care of themselves,” he laughs.


B2 • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • MAY 16, 2013

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD FRIDAY, MAY 17

House Revival, 111 E. Sixth St., Song-singing, record-making, globetrotting project penned and put forth by alt-folk tunesmith Mark Charles Heidinger. $12, $10 advance. 859-431-2201; www.southgatehouse.com. Newport.

Art Exhibits Disruptors: QRtifacts by Peiter Griga, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Artisans Enterprise Center, 27 W. Seventh St., Guest curated by Morgan Cobb. Interactive exhibition exploring intersection of fine art and disruptive technology featuring local entrepreneurs. Free. Through May 24. 859-2922322. Covington.

Senior Citizens

Friday Night Open Dance, 7:30-10 p.m., The Ritz Ballroom Dance Studio, 8150 Mall Road, Group dance class starts at 7:45 p.m. Open dancing starts at 8:30 p.m. Ages 18 and up. $5 group class, $5 party. 859-371-1151. Florence.

Bingo, 12:30-3 p.m., Elsmere Senior Center, 179 Dell St., 859-727-2306. Elsmere. Bingo, 12:30-2:30 p.m., Walton Multipurpose Senior and Community Center, 44 N. Main St., Presented by Walton Senior Activity Center. 859-485-7611. Walton. Walk @ Walton, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Walton Multipurpose Senior and Community Center, 859485-7611. Walton.

Dining Events

WEDNESDAY, MAY 22

Community Dance

New York Style Shabbat, 7-9 p.m., Metropolitan Club, 50 E. RiverCenter Blvd., Featuring popular ethnic flavors made famous in Manhattan, including an Italian pasta bar, Latin and Asian entrees and Jewish deli desserts. Cash bar. Ages 21 and up. Free. Registration required. Presented by Access: Social Events for Jewish Young Professionals Ages 21-35. 513-3730300; www.jypaccess.org. Covington.

Exercise Classes Jazzercise Classes, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Jazzercise Crescent Springs Center, 519 Enterprise Drive, $34 for unlimited monthly classes. 859-331-7778; jazzercise.com. Crescent Springs.

Festivals Maifest, 5-11:30 p.m., MainStrasse Village, Main Street, Arts and crafts booths, German and international foods, music, children’s play area, amusement rides, street chalk art contest and more. Music on four stages. Presented by MainStrasse Village Association. 859-491-0458; www.mainstrasse.org. Covington.

Music - Concerts Juvenile, 8 p.m. With Hypnotize Minds’ Lord Infamous. Doors open 7 p.m., Madison Theater, 730 Madison Ave., Terius Gray, stage name Juvenile, is a rapper. Ages 18 and up. $30. 859-4912444; www.madisontheateronline.com. Covington.

Music - Jazz The John Von Ohlen, 7:30 p.m., Dee Felice Cafe, 529 Main St., 859-261-2365; www.deefelicecafe.com. Covington.

Music - R&B Basic Truth, 9:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m., KJ’s Pub, 2379 Buttermilk Crossing, 859-344-1413; basictruth.webs.com. Crescent Springs.

Recreation Neighbors in Need Golf Outing, 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Kenton County Golf Course, 3908 Richardson Road, Benefits less fortunate members of Northern Kentucky community. Ages 21 and up. $100. Registration required. Presented by Society of St. Vincent de Paul of Northern Kentucky and Faith Community Pharmacy. 859-512-0966; www.svdpnky.org. Independence.

SATURDAY, MAY 18 Benefits Double Vision 4: Art Auction Gala, 7:30-11 p.m. VIP cocktails 6:30-7:30 p.m. Music by DJ Mowgli and Pones INC., The Carnegie, 1028 Scott Blvd., Featuring works of more than 30 artistic collaborations. Called art auction, silent auction, cocktails, hors d’oeuvres and entertainment. Benefits Visionaries and Voices, nonprofit arts agency serving and promoting artists with disabilities. $50 VIP cocktail hour and preview party; $35 DV4 only. Presented by Visionaries and Voices. 513-6524552; www.visionariesandvoices.com. Covington.

Exercise Classes Jazzercise Classes, 8-9 a.m. and 9:30-10:30 a.m., Jazzercise Crescent Springs Center, $34 for unlimited monthly classes. 859-331-7778; jazzercise.com. Crescent Springs.

Festivals Maifest, noon-11:30 p.m., MainStrasse Village, 859-491-0458; www.mainstrasse.org. Covington.

The 34th Annual MainStrasse Village Maifest is May 17-19. THANKS TO DONNA KREMER Music - Concerts Of Montreal, 8 p.m. With Wild Moccasins. Doors open 7 p.m., Madison Theater, 730 Madison Ave., Indie pop band. $12. 859-491-2444; www.madisontheateronline.com. Covington.

Music - Jazz Karl Dappen on Sax, 7-10 p.m., Argentine Bistro, 2875 Town Center Blvd., Variety of music from jazz to soft rock. Free. 859-426-1042; argentinebistro.com. Crestview Hills.

Runs / Walks Walk to Defeat ALS, Lou Gehrig’s Disease, 10 a.m., Turfway Park, 7500 Turfway Road, Registration and silent auction begins 8:30 a.m. Ribboncutting ceremony and one-mil walk starts 10 a.m. Trek begins at paddock area and travels around park grounds. All walkers raising $875 or more will receive an official event T-shirt. Benefits ALS Association Kentucky Chapter. $75 for walkers. Registration required. Presented by ALS Association Kentucky Chapter. 800-406-7702; www.alsaky.org. Florence.

SUNDAY, MAY 19 Antiques Shows Burlington Antique Show, 8 a.m.-3 p.m., Boone County Fairgrounds, 5819 Idlewild Road, More than 200 vendors with antiques, vintage jewelry and furniture, primitives, architectural elements, mid-century collectibles, American and memorabilia. Early buying, 6-8 a.m. with $5 admission. $3, free ages 12 and under. Presented by Burlington Antique Show. 513-922-6847; www.burlingtonantiqueshow.com. Burlington.

Exercise Classes Jazzercise Classes, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Jazzercise Crescent Springs Center, $34 for unlimited monthly classes. 859-331-7778; jazzercise.com. Crescent Springs.

Festivals Maifest, noon-9 p.m., MainStrasse Village, 859-491-0458; www.mainstrasse.org. Covington.

Karaoke and Open Mic Karaoke, 9 p.m., Molly Malone’s Irish Pub and Restaurant, 112 E. Fourth St., With DJ Will Corson. $10 buckets and $4 grape and cherry bombs. Ages 21 and up. Free. Through Aug. 28. 859-4916659. Covington.

On Stage - Comedy Live Bait Comedy, 7:30 p.m. With Sweett Biscut Improv Group, Tim Black, Carla Brittain, Patricia Bowling, Curt Repka, Vincent Gulino, Goober and Angelo Catanzaro., The Loft, 100 W. Sixth St., $5. 859-431-1839. Covington.

MONDAY, MAY 20 Art Exhibits Disruptors: QRtifacts by Peiter Griga, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Artisans Enterprise Center, Free. 859-2922322. Covington.

Exercise Classes Jazzercise Classes, 8-9 a.m., 9:30-10:30 a.m., 4:30-5:30 p.m., and 6-7 p.m., Jazzercise Crescent Springs Center, $34 for unlimited monthly classes. 859-3317778; jazzercise.com. Crescent Springs.

Karaoke and Open Mic Open Mic, 9 p.m.-2 a.m., The Southgate House Revival, 111 E.

ABOUT CALENDAR To submit calendar items, go to www.NKY.com and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to life@communitypress.com along with event information. Items are printed on a space-available basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to www.NKY.com and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page.

Sixth St., The Lounge. Awardwinning open mic features singer-songwriters, comedians, marimba players, storytellers and more. Ages 21 and up. 859-431-2201; www.southgatehouse.com. Newport.

Music - Bluegrass Bluegrass Jam Session, 8 p.m., Molly Malone’s Irish Pub and Restaurant, 112 E. Fourth St., All bluegrass pickers invited to participate. Free. 859-491-6659; mollymalonesirishpub.com. Covington.

Music - DJ Cincinnati DJ Battles, 9 p.m.-2 a.m., Toro on the Levee, 1 Levee Way, Drink specials. Open to all DJs. DJs must register. Ages 21 and up. Free. 859-652-7260; www.torolevee.com. Newport.

Music - Indie Mutts, 8-11:30 p.m., The Southgate House Revival, 111 E. Sixth St., Keyboard-centric, mercurial band often described as a unique blend of Tom Waits and Nirvana. Ages 18 and up. $8, $6 advance. 859-431-2201; www.southgatehouse.com. Newport.

On Stage - Theater Barebones Staged Reading Theatre Series: Lobby Hero by Kennith Lonergan, 7:30-10 p.m., The Carnegie, 1028 Scott Blvd., Auditorium. When Jeff, a luckless security guard, is drawn into a murder investigation, loyalties are strained to the breaking point. Through Jeff’s tightly wound supervisor, an attractive rookie cop and her seasoned partner, truth becomes elusive and justice costly. Free, alcohol available. Presented by Unity Productions. 513-227-6299; www.unityproductionsohio.weebly.com. Covington.

first-timers. Presented by H & B Dance Co.. 859-727-0904. Fort Wright. Open Tuesday Night Dances, 7:45-10 p.m., The Ritz Ballroom Dance Studio, 8150 Mall Road, Open dancing and group class. $5 for group and $5 for dance. 859-371-1151; www.theritzstudio.com. Florence.

Exercise Classes Cardio Dance Party!, 7:30-8:30 p.m., Locomotion on the Levee, 1 Levee Way, $10 drop-in. Presented by Cardio Dance Party. 513-617-9498; www.cardiodanceparty.com. Newport. Jazzercise Classes, 8:30-9:30 a.m., 9:30-10:30 a.m., 4:30-5:30 p.m., and 6-7 p.m., Jazzercise Crescent Springs Center, $34 for unlimited monthly classes. 859-331-7778; jazzercise.com. Crescent Springs. Zumba, 1-2 p.m., Boleros Dance Club, $7, $6 advance. 859-3795143; www.bolerosdanceclub.com. Florence.

Health / Wellness Eat Healthy, Be Active, 6:30-8 p.m., Boone County Extension Environmental and Nature Center, 9101 Camp Ernst Road, In six-week series: discover healthier eating, weight loss and physical activity tips to improve your overall health and wellbeing in a peaceful, outdoor setting. Ages 21 and up. Free. Registration required. Presented by Boone County Cooperative Extenson Service. 859-586-6101; www.ca.uky.edu/boone. Union.

Literary - Libraries Bike Rodeo, 6 p.m., Walton Branch Library, 21 S. Main St., Explore obstacle course and learn bike safety with Florence Police Department. Bring bike and helmet. 859-342-2665. Walton.

Senior Citizens

Museums

Yoga Fitness for Seniors, 12:30 p.m.-1:30 p.m., Walton Multipurpose Senior and Community Center, 44 N. Main St., Presented by Walton Senior Activity Center. Through Oct. 7. 859-4857611. Walton.

Tot Tuesdays, 10:30-11:30 a.m., Behringer-Crawford Museum, 1600 Montague Road, Story, craft and activity. Included with admission. 859-491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

TUESDAY, MAY 21 Art Exhibits Chris Felix, 11 a.m.-9 p.m., Art on the Levee Gallery, 859-2615770; www.artonthelevee.com. Newport. Disruptors: QRtifacts by Peiter Griga, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Artisans Enterprise Center, Free. 859-2922322. Covington.

Clubs & Organizations Triangle Toastmasters Meeting, 7-8:30 p.m., Campbell County Fiscal Court, 1098 Monmouth St., Become a confident, more effective speaker. Free. Presented by Triangle Toastmasters. Through July 16. 859-6523348; triangle.toastmastersclubs.org. Newport.

Community Dance Line Dancing, 7-9 p.m., Lookout Heights Civic Club, 1661 Park Road, Holly and Bernie Ruschman, instructors. Beginners welcome. Smoke-free. $6, $3 for

Music - Acoustic Roger Drawdy, 8 p.m., Molly Malone’s Irish Pub and Restaurant, 112 E. Fourth St., Irish music. Free. 859-491-6659; mollymalonesirishpub.com. Covington. The Chuck Brisbin Duo, 6-10 p.m., Buckhead Mountain Grill, 35 Fairfield Ave., Free. 859-4917333; www.thetunaproject.com. Bellevue.

Music - DJ Devout Wax, 8 p.m.-1:30 a.m., The Southgate House Revival, 111 E. Sixth St., The Lounge. Vinyl night. Margaret and Jonathan spin eclectic wax. Including an all spin-by-request set, bring your own records. Also, local/regional-only set. Ages 21 and up. Free. 859-4312201; www.facebook.com/ DevoutWax. Newport.

Music - Indie Vandaveer, 8-11:30 p.m. With the Seedy Seeds., The Southgate

Art Exhibits Chris Felix, 11 a.m.-9 p.m., Art on the Levee Gallery, 859-2615770; www.artonthelevee.com. Newport. Disruptors: QRtifacts by Peiter Griga, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Artisans Enterprise Center, Free. 859-2922322. Covington.

Civic Northern Kentucky Tea Party, 6-7:30 p.m. With Garry Edmondson, Kenton County attorney., PeeWee’s Place, 2325 Anderson Road, Presented by Northern Kentucky Tea Party. 859-9926615. Crescent Springs.

Education

Walton Senior Activity Center. 859-485-7611. Walton.

THURSDAY, MAY 23 Art Exhibits Chris Felix, 11 a.m.-9 p.m., Art on the Levee Gallery, 859-2615770; www.artonthelevee.com. Newport. Disruptors: QRtifacts by Peiter Griga, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Artisans Enterprise Center, Free. 859-2922322. Covington.

Education Classical Conversations Homeschool Information Meeting, 7-8:30 p.m., Boone County Main Library, 1786 Burlington Pike, Learn about providing structure and community that enables you to lead your students in classical learning. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-342-2665. Burlington.

Exercise Classes Cardio Dance Party!, 7:30-8:30 p.m., Locomotion on the Levee, $10 drop-in. 513-617-9498; www.cardiodanceparty.com. Newport. Jazzercise Classes, 9:30-10:30 a.m., 4:30-5:30 p.m., and 6-7 p.m., Jazzercise Crescent Springs Center, $34 for unlimited monthly classes. 859-331-7778; jazzercise.com. Crescent Springs. Zumba Fitness, 6:30 p.m., Independence Senior and Community Center, 2001 Jack Woods Drive, $30 six-week session, $7 drop in. Registration required. 859-356-6264; www.cityofindependence.org. Independence. Zumba, 1-2 p.m., Boleros Dance Club, $7, $6 advance. 859-3795143; www.bolerosdanceclub.com. Florence.

Enrollment Information Session, 3-4 p.m., Gateway Community and Technical College Covington Campus, 1025 Amsterdam Road, Room C 202. Learn about admissions, financial aid, academic programs, advising and how to enroll. Ages 18 and up. Free. Presented by Gateway Community and Technical College. 859-441-4500; gateway.kctcs.edu/Admissions. Covington.

Farmers Market

Exercise Classes

Literary - Libraries

Jazzercise Classes, 9:30-10:30 a.m., 5-6 p.m., and 6-7 p.m., Jazzercise Crescent Springs Center, $34 for unlimited monthly classes. 859-331-7778; jazzercise.com. Crescent Springs. Zumba, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Diamond Dance Academy, 5030 Old Taylor Mill Road, No dancing skills required. $5. 859-814-8375; diamonddanceky.com. Taylor Mill. Zumba, 8-9 p.m., Boleros Dance Club, $7, $6 advance. 859-3795143; www.bolerosdanceclub.com. Florence. Zumba for Beginners, 6-7 p.m., Boleros Dance Club, 8406 U.S. 42, $7, $6 advance. 859-3795143; www.bolerosdanceclub.com. Florence. Zumba Gold, 6 p.m., Florence Branch Library, 7425 U.S. 42, Slow-paced, low-impact version of regular Zumba, perfect for anyone with physical limitations or just starting out an exercise program. $3. 859-342-2665. Florence. Jimmi Jamz Fitness, 1-2 p.m. and 7-8 p.m., Boleros Dance Club, $7, $6 advance. Registration recommended. 859-3795143; www.bolerosdanceclub.com. Florence.

Digital Photography, 7 p.m., Boone County Main Library, 1786 Burlington Pike, Learn tricks to taking great photos digitally. With Jerry Fritsch from Tri-State Photographic Society. Registration required. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-342-2665. Burlington. Bridge, noon-3 p.m., Scheben Branch Library, 8899 U.S. 42, 859-342-2665. Union. Yoga, 6 p.m., Scheben Branch Library, 8899 U.S. 42, This class is suitable for all levels! Join Karen Landrum, RYT, for this basic/ beginner yoga practice that offers a holistic approach to maintaining a healthy weight with increased flexibility, more stamina & lean muscle! Please bring a yoga mat & small handheld or wrist weights to improve lean muscle tone (weights are optional). $25 fee per month. Call Boone County Parks at 334-2117 to register. 859-3422665. Union.

Literary - Libraries Chess Club, 7 p.m., Florence Branch Library, 7425 U.S. 42, 859-342-2665. Florence. Come Sail Away, 6:30 p.m., Florence Branch Library, 7425 U.S. 42, Travel high seas and make boat to take home. 859342-2665. Florence.

Music - Acoustic Shantel Leitner, 10 p.m., The Southgate House Revival, 111 E. Sixth St., Singer/songwriter from Atwood, Kansas. Free. 859-4312201; www.southgatehouse.com. Newport.

Music - Jazz Mike Darrah, 7 p.m., Dee Felice Cafe, 529 Main St., Pianist. 859-261-2365; www.deefelice.com. Covington.

Dixie Farmers Market, 2-6 p.m., Erlanger Baptist Church, 116 Commonwealth Ave., Presented by City of Erlanger. 859-727-2525; www.ci.erlanger.ky.us. Erlanger.

Music - Cabaret Don Fangman, 6:30-9 p.m., Knotty Pine On The Bayou, 6302 Licking Pike, Don Fangman sings Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, Tony Bennett, Neil Diamond, Michael Buble and Andrea Bocelli. Free. 859-781-2200. Cold Spring.

Music - Concerts Live at the Levee, 7-10 p.m. Music by Sponge., Newport on the Levee, 1 Levee Way, Riverwalk Plaza. Summer concert series. Free. 859-815-1389; www.newportonthelevee.com. Newport. The Boom BAP and Back Pack Tour, 9 p.m. Doors open 8 p.m., Madison Theater, 730 Madison Ave., With BPos, Brady Glenn, Bandu cci and The Wheels. $15, $10 advance. 859-491-2444; www.madisontheateronline.com. Covington.

Music - Country

Face To Face, 8 p.m. With Teenage Bottlerocket, Blacklist Royals and Joshua Black Wilkins. Doors open 7 p.m., Madison Theater, 730 Madison Ave., $20. 859-491-2444. Covington.

Original Hillbilly Thursdays, 10 p.m.-2 a.m., The Southgate House Revival, 111 E. Sixth St., The Lounge. Country, bluegrass, Americana and old fashioned hillbilly music. Different artist each week. Includes 50 cents off Jack Daniels. Ages 21 and up. Free. 859-431-2201; www.southgatehouse.com. Newport.

Senior Citizens

Music - Jazz

Euchre Tournament, noon-2 p.m., Walton Multipurpose Senior and Community Center, 44 N. Main St., Presented by

Lee Stolar Trio, 7 p.m., Dee Felice Cafe, 529 Main St., 859261-2365; www.deefelice.com. Covington.

Music - Rock


LIFE

MAY 16, 2013 • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • B3

Spring morels make elegant bisque

Normally I keep a pretty clean home. But this time of year, the house cleaning gets pushed further down on my to do list. I never know when I have to leave to pick morels, those delicious and gourmet wild mushrooms, along with ramps, which are wild leeks. And right now the wild watercress is growing abundantly in the creek. So for several Rita weeks the Heikenfeld house is RITA’S KITCHEN less than perfect but our tummies are more than happy.

Morel mushroom bisque

My best friend, Carol Spry Vanover, lives in Indiana and has a secret place where she goes mushroom hunting. Last week she found a bunch of morels and made this wonderful bisque from a recipe she found online. “It was divine!” Carol said. Tom, Carol’s husband, raved about it and even Tom’s mom, Aggie, liked it. “Mama Aggie was skeptical, never having eaten morels or fresh herbs. I used fresh thyme instead of dry,” Carol said. Mama Aggie called it an “elegant rich people’s meal.” Funny, what is gourmet today was really common food way back when. You can purchase fresh morels and other wild offerings at some groceries or farmers’ markets. ⁄2 cup butter

1

1 cup flour 1 cup dry rice cereal for infants, plain or flavored 3 tablespoons oil Cold water or juice, start with 1⁄3 cup

Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Mix flour and cereal. Stir in oil. It will be lumpy. Gradually stir in liquid, enough to make soft dough. Roll out on lightly floured surface to about 1⁄8-inch thickness. Bake on ungreased sheet 10-12 minutes. Store covered at room temperature.

Rita picks her own morels. Cremini make a good substitute if you can’t find morels. THANKS TO RITA HEIKENFELD. 1 tablespoon minced garlic 1 large onion, diced 8 ounces fresh morel mushrooms, sliced 1 tablespoon chicken soup base 1 tablespoon flour 2 cups water 2 cups whipping cream 1 ⁄8 teaspoon ground dried thyme, or fresh thyme to taste Salt and pepper to taste

substitute for morels.

Melt butter over medium heat. Stir in garlic, onion and morels; cook, stirring frequently, until onions have softened and turned translucent, about 5 minutes. Stir in base and flour; cook for 1 to 2 minutes. Pour in water and cream; bring to simmer, and cook 5 minutes. Puree half the soup in very small batches. Return puree to pot. Cook on low 10 to 15 minutes. Season with thyme, salt and pepper.

6- to 7-inch pie pan or equivalent size casserole Pie dough to line plate 2 ⁄3 cup half and half 2 large eggs, lightly beaten, room temperature Salt and pepper, start with a couple dashes each Shredded cheese, your favorite, a generous 1⁄2 cup

Tip from Rita’s kitchen

No morels? Cremini mushrooms make a good

Quiche for two

After my master recipe for quiche was put in the paper, I had several requests from readers who wanted to make quiche for two. Here’s a good recipe I adapted from the “Cook’s Illustrated Cooking for Two” cookbook.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Whisk everything but cheese together. Stir in cheese and blend. Pour into pan until it reaches about 1⁄2 inch from top. Bake until lightly browned, and the center is a bit jiggly. A knife inserted about 1 inch from the edge should come out clean

after 40 minutes or so. Serve slightly warm.

Tip from Rita’s kitchen

Add some sautéed bacon or ham to filling.

Someone asked about my demographics. Judging from my mail and calls, my readers are across the board, from kids to young adults to those of us who are more mature. Here’s a recipe from one of the young adults. Eric likes to make homemade teething crackers for his little ones. “I don’t get in the kitchen much but I make these easy crackers,” he said. I made these with orange juice instead of

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Snezana Nikolic, 41, of Belegrade and Thomas Mattix, 50, of Columbus, issued April 29. Jessica Bruener, 25, and Josiah Young, 28, both of Newport, issued April 29. Lakeyta Rayford, 32, and Cales Hoffmann, 31, both of Covington, issued May 1.

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Mitchell, issued April 26. Michelle Lawson, 25, and Derek Clendening, 25, both of Erlanger, issued April 26. Tara Johnson, 35, and Ian Zellner, 27, both of Cincinnati, issued April 26. Melinda Whitehead, 37, of Glassgo and Rashad Spillman, 36, of Lexington, issued April 29.

water for our youngest grandchild, Emerson, and smeared a bit of homemade jam on them for her.

Teething crackers for baby

MARRIAGE LICENSES Melanie Anicka, 34, and Christopher Hazlewood, 28, both of Ludlow, issued April 19. Iralee Whitcomg, 58, and John Archer, 54, both of Cincinnati, issued April 19. Julie Velaquez, 35, and Thomas Wilson, 46, both of Circleville, issued April 19. Jennifer Huley, 31, and Jason Reeves, 31, both of Covington, issued April 19. Megan Napier, 24, and Dominic Lucente, 24, both of Massillon, issued April 19. Rachel Lantry, 24, of Ludlow and Daniel Berkmeier, 22, of Hebron, issued April 19. Sarah Ruppert, 24, of New York and John Kleimeyer, 25, of Cincinnati, issued April 19. Amy Roll, 25, of Crescent Springs and Chad Watkins, 30, of Lawrenceburg, 30, issued April 19. Michelle Hoagland, 39, and Paul Dischner, 49, both of Cincinnati, issued April 19. Samantha Scott, 23, and Courtney Head, 33, both of Independence, issued April 22. Ashley Tucker, 23, of Covington and Brent Jefferson, 22, of Louisville, issued April 22. Melissa Barker, 41, and Bobby Baker, 39, both of Covington, issued April 22. Shmeka Smith, 25, and Jonathan Kennedy II, 32, both of Cincinnati, issued April 22. Falon Dunn, 28, and Benjamin Longland, 31, both of Cincinnati, issued April 23. Dorothy Foster, 51, and Kevin White, 42, both of Cincinnati, issued April 23. Georgie Smith, 35, of Cincinnati and Richard Wadsworth, 32, of Louisville, issued April 23. Laura Wendling, 30, and Regan Hagestad, 32, both of Hermosa Beach, issued April 23. Pamela Tiemeyer, 42, and Gary Kammerer, 43, both of Park Hills, issued April 25. Joy Thorton, 55, of Covington and James Obel, 58, of Southgate, issued April 26. Angela Chestnut, 44, and Nicholas Mayer, 34, both of Fort

Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educator and author. Find her blog online at Cincinnati.Com/blogs. Email her at columns@communitypress.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Call 513-248-7130, ext. 356.


LIFE

B4 • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • MAY 16, 2013

Fireblight hurts plant branches Question: Some of the branches on my pear and crabapple trees are turning black at the tips. Should I cut out these dying branches? Answer: There is a bacterial disease called “Fireblight” that is now killing back the branches of various landscape plants including pears (ornamental flowering Mike pears like Klahr Bradford HORTICULTURE and ArisCONCERNS tocrat), fruiting-type orchard pears, apple, crabapple, Mountainash, hawthorn, serviceberry and Pyracantha. If your plants suffer each year from this disease, you should implement a scheduled yearly sanitation pruning program each March, while

the tree is still dormant. Sanitation for fire blight is continued by thoroughly examining trees at least once a week from the time blossoms appear in spring until early August. If pruning is to be done during the growing season it must be done just as symptoms are appearing; otherwise it is best to let the disease run its course. Pruning fire blight out of trees during the growing season creates a risk of increased disease spread. In many cases, pruning can be put off until the following March. However, if the disease is serious in young trees and tree structure is at risk, immediate pruning might be warranted. Break or cut infected parts off 6 to 8 inches below the lowest point of visible infection. If removal is made by cuts, avoid spreading bacteria by disinfesting blades of cutting tools

t and Him Crucified Jesus Chris We believe there are people who:

1. Want plain Bible teaching only 2. Want their children in real classes where the Bible is taught 3. Want to worship to glorify God and not to be entertained.

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We pray that you are one of those people. Visit with us at The Northern Ky. Church of Christ 18 Scott Dr. • Florence, KY (859) 371-2095 Sunday: Morning Worship - 9:45am Evening Worship - 6:00pm Wednesday evening Bible Study - 7:30 www.nkcofc.com We have electronic Bible Study tools available for your use.

ADEPT CADETS

COMING UP Arboretum Spring Plant Sale: 9 a.m. to noon Saturday, May 18, Shelter 1, Boone County Arboretum, 9190 Camp Ernst Road, Union. Find some real bargains on annuals, perennials, vegetable transplants, shrubs and trees at this annual fundraiser for the Boone County Arboretum. If you would like to donate plants or garden supplies for the sale, please call Laura W. at 859-586-6101. Trees & Shrubs for Year-round Color & Beauty: 9:30-11:30 a.m. Tuesday, May 21, Boone County Extension Office, Burlington. Free, but please call 859-586-6101 to register, or enroll online at www.ca.uky.edu/boone

between each cut with one of the following: 70 percent alcohol, 10 percent solution of household bleach, Pine-sol, or 5 percent Lysol (you can just use Lysol spray if you want). Before moving on to something else, remove diseased material from the vicinity of the trees and burn, bury or otherwise dispose of it. Be sure to wash household bleach or Pine-sol from your tools when finished to prevent rust. If you are replanting or replacing trees, select fireblight-resistant cultivars. Select diseaseresistant crabapples such as Bob White, David, Dolgo, Donald Wyman, Liset, Professor Sprenger, Robinson, Sentinel, Strawberry Parfait, Sugartyme and Sargent Tina. Fireblight-resistant edible apples that do well in Boone County include Prima, Liberty, Nova Easygro and Sir Prize. Avoid apple cultivars such as Jonathan, Yellow Transparent, Gala, Ben Davis, Granny Smith, Jonagold, Melrose, Mutsu, Paulared, York Im-

perial, Lodi, Idared, Braeburn, Fuji and Rome Beauty, which are all very susceptible to fire blight. Edible pear cultivars that are resistant to fireblight include Magness, Maxine, Seckel, Moonglow, Potomac, Harrow Sweet and Honey Sweet. You should avoid Bartlett, Comice, Anjou, Clapp’s Favorite and Bosc pears, which are very susceptible to fire blight and should not be planted. Ornamental flowering pear (“Callery Pear”) cultivars should not be planted at all because they are very invasive as birds spread the fruits into the wild, where they dominate and crowd out more desirable native species. Check with your local nurseries for good replacements for the callery pears. Use nitrogen fertilizers very sparingly around fire blight-susceptible pear, apple and crabapple cultivars. Tender, succulent, new growth that results from too much nitrogen or overwatering encourages development of the disease. Mike Klahr is the Boone County extension agent for horticulture.

COMMUNITY CHURCHES

Open Door Community Church 3528 Turkeyfoot Rd. Erlanger, KY 41018 (859) 341-8850 • www.ODKY.org

Service Times

Sunday: 10:30am • Wednesday: 6:30pm CE-1001737247-01

Kenton Success Academy Cadets presented the colors at the Cincinnati Reds game April 21. The Kenton County School District Success Academy is an educational opportunity founded in the values and traditions of the military. The program assists and challenges students through real-world applications, teamwork and community relationships, enabling them to demonstrate academic and leadership skills to achieve life goals and successful citizenship. Pictured, from left, Austin Turner, 18, Dixie Heights High School, Justin Scarborough, 17, Simon Kenton, Xavier Tews, 17, Simon Kenton, and Joshua Crowder, 18, Dixie Heights. THANKS TO TERESA WILKINS

Winter Ball date set Community Recorder

It’s time to dust off that tux or ball gown because the American Cancer Society is bringing back its formal gala with the 2013 Winter Ball. This festive event, chaired by Nancy Wright, unites the community together for a great time while also contributing to the fight against cancer. In addition, the American Cancer Society and the Winter Ball Trustee Committee will be honoring Dr. Doug Flora of Oncology Hematology Care for his work in the field of oncology. The 2013 American Cancer Society Striders

BUSINESS UPDATE Scooter Media hires Jackson

Scooter Media, a new communications agency in Northern Kentucky, has hired Sara Jackson as its vice president of client services. Jackson brings more than 13 years of public relations and marketing experience to Scooter Media. Prior to joining the agency she worked with the Cincinnati Bengals, Sanitation District No. 1, and the Kenton County School District. She most recently worked with Scooter Media as a consultant. Jackson is a graduate of Northern Kentucky University. She resides in Independence, with her two daughters.

Kisker joins elite group

May the Scared Heart of Jesus be adored, glorified, loved and preserved throughout the world now and forever. Sacred Heart of Jesus pray for us. St Jude help of the hopeless pray for us. FS

Winter Ball will feature live entertainment, auctions, dancing, and a fashion show by Fabulous-Furs. The gala will be on Nov. 23 at Marriot RiverCenter from 6-11:30 p.m. Tickets are available. Cost is $125 per person or $1,250 for a table of 10. This year’s winter ball Trustee Committee consists of Tammy TewBesterman, Tammy Burns, John Dunn, Doug Flora, Lori Hawkins, Karis Hawkins, Patty Heeb, Bonnie Moore, Paula Smiley and Nancy Wright. For more information or tickets to the Winter Ball, call 859-372-7885 or visit www.striderswinterball.org.

Douglas Kisker, a private wealth adviser with Ameriprise Financial, has earned membership in the company’s Diamond Ring Club. The Diamond Ring Club is comprised of less than 7 percent of the Ameriprise financial adviser force. Advisers earn this

If you have questions about your pension, 401(k) or profit sharing plan, call the

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distinction by achieving years of consistently high performance that includes an Kisker exceptional commitment to financial planning and superior client service. Being a part of the Ameriprise Financial Diamond Ring Club is considered a career milestone achievement; Kisker was one of only 48 advisers to achieve this status in 2012. Kisker works at 2890 Chancellor Drive in Crestview Hills.

Ruchhoft joins Christ Hospital staff

The Christ Hospital Outpatient Center of Fort Wright recently welcomed Elizabeth Ruchhoft, M.D., of the Christ Hospital Physicians-GyRuchhoft necology to its staff. Dr. Ruchhoft is boardcertified in obstetrics and gynecology. Her areas of interest include menopause and menopausal transition, abnormal uterine bleeding, minimally invasive surgery, adolescent gynecology, basic treatment of urinary incontinence, and general gynecology. Dr. Ruchhoft is a member of the North American Menopause Society and the current president of the Cincinnati Ob/Gyn Society. Hours are 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Mondays, in Suite E1.


LIFE

MAY 16, 2013 • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • B5

Motorcycle safety stressed in May Community Recorder

In recognition of May as Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month, the Kentucky Office of Highway Safety reminds motorists and motorcyclists to “share the road” conscientiously and courteously to help prevent motorcycle crashes, which remain one of the most prevalent causes of death and injury on Kentucky roadways. In addition to stressing the mutual responsibilities shared by all users of the road, the campaign will include increased enforcement by local police throughout May to make sure motorcyclists, and drivers of all vehicles, are obeying state and local laws. “Safety is a mutual responsibility for motorists and motorcyclists alike,” KOHS Director Bill Bell said. “Motorcyclists are 30 times more likely to

die in a crash than passenger vehicle occupants, so whether you are driving the family sedan, an SUV, a school bus, a delivery van or an 18wheeler, drivers should always be on the lookout for motorcyclists. Drivers must be aware that a motorcycle, as one of the smallest vehicles on the road, can be ‘hiding’ in your vehicle’s blind spots. Always check blind spots, use mirrors and signal before changing lanes or making turns. “Motorcyclists have responsibilities too,” Bell said. “Riders should obey all traffic laws and be properly licensed, alert to other drivers, conspicuous at all times, never ride impaired or distracted, and always wear a Department of Transportation-compliant helmet and other protective gear.” This safety advice is

particularly timely as motorcycle fatalities nationwide in 2011 showed a continued increase to 4,612. Motorcycle fatalities accounted for 14 percent of total highway deaths for the year despite motorcycle registrations representing only about 3 percent of vehicles in the nation. The KOHS offers the following tips for drivers to help keep motorcyclists safe on our roadways: » A motorcycle is a vehicle with all of the rights and privileges of any other motor vehicle. The person under that helmet could be a mother, brother, doctor or friend; » Always allow a motorcyclist the full lane width – never try to share a lane; » Perform a regular visual check for motorcycles by checking mirrors and blind spots before entering or exiting a

lane of traffic, and at intersections; » Always signal your intentions before changing lanes or merging with traffic; » Don’t be fooled by a flashing turn signal on a motorcycle – motorcycle signals are often not selfcanceling and riders sometimes forget to turn them off. Wait to be sure the motorcycle is going to turn before you proceed; » Allow more following distance – three or four seconds – when behind a motorcycle to give the motorcyclist time to maneuver around obstacles in the roadway, or stop in an emergency; » Pay attention. “Our message to all drivers and motorcyclists is: Help to share in the responsibility of keeping all road users safe, and do your part by safely sharing the road,” Bell said.

Carole and Bill Holmes, of Fort Thomas, left, and Beverly and Gene Bare, of Columbia-Tusculum, were among the guests at the Great Food for a Great Cause dinner. THANKS TO JAMIE EIFERT

National Exemplar hosts dinner, benefit Community Recorder

For the 20th year in a row, the National Exemplar hosted “Great Food for a Great Cause” to support Cancer Support Community Greater Cincinnati-Northern Kentucky (formerly The Wellness Community). After approximately 220 friends of CSC dined at the Mariemont restaurant, manager Lisa Hopkins, executive chef and operating partner Sean Daly, and chef Brandon Fortener pre-

sented a $3,150 donation to CSC executive director Rick Bryan to help fund the nearly 250 programs a month that CSC offers completely free of charge to people with cancer, their families and friends, and cancer survivors as they fight the disease. Dating back to the first CSC benefit dinner in1994, the National Exemplar has donated more than $53,000 to help underwrite the organization’s programs of support, education, and hope.

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The Comet Bluegrass All-Stars will perform at 7 p.m. Thursday, May 16, at the Behringer-Crawford Museum. FILE PHOTO

Music@BCM presents Comet Bluegrass All-Stars Community Recorder

Music@BCM presents the Comet Bluegrass AllStars Thursday, May 16, at the Behringer-Crawford Museum in Covington’s Devou Park, 1600 Montague Road. The Comet Bluegrass All-Stars began in1996 as a house band at Northside’s iconic pub, The Comet. Their popularity

soared as they opened for nationally known acts such as Blue Highway, Ricky Skaggs and Sam Bush. They have won several Cincinnati music awards including Cammys for “Best Bluegrass/Folk Band” in 2000, 2001 and 2002, and Cincinnati Entertainment Awards for “Best Bluegrass/Folk Band” in 2001, 2002 and

2004. The band will perform as the second event in the 2013 Music@BCM series, which features an eclectic mix of concerts, ranging from brass to the blues to the bayou. The series of Thursday night concerts runs through Aug. 1. The doors open at 6 p.m. for food and drinks, and the concert runs from 7 to 9 p.m.

Almost Summer! Christmas & Gifts

We have a great selection of unique Graduation and Wedding Gifts. Our new personalized signs are perfect gifts for the graduate or wedding couple. Check out our new fairy garden and outdoor garden accessories. We have set the tables with our new honey bee and coffee home décor items. Check out our new website at www.sleighbellschristmas.com

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HOME INSTEAD SENIOR CARE TO HOST A FREE SEMINAR TO HELP ALL WAR-TIME VETERANS AND THEIR WIDOWS RECEIVE PENSION BENEFITS TO PAY FOR ELDER CARE SERVICES Home Instead Senior Care is offering 2 FREE seminars to help all veterans obtain pension benefits to pay for the cost of elder care. They will be offered as follows: Wednesday, May 22, 2013, at 5:30 p.m. – Boone County Library in Burlington Thursday, May 23, 2013, at 5:30 p.m. – Campbell County Library in Fort Thomas The guest speaker for the seminar will be Brad Cannon. Mr. Cannon is the owner of Home Instead Senior Care, and has worked in geriatrics for the past 17 years. Approximately 33% of all seniors in this country are eligible to receive a special pension from the Department of Veterans Affairs. This little-known special pension provides up to $2,053 per month for Veterans and their surviving spouses to pay for the cost of elder care services. To be eligible, the Veteran must have at least 90 days of active duty service with at least 1 day beginning or ending during a period of war. Additionally, the Veteran, or their surviving spouse, must require the assistance from another person in performing the activities of daily living such as eating, bathing, dressing, undressing or taking care of the needs of nature. The special pension can be used to pay for home services to assist the Veteran, or their surviving spouse, with the activities of daily living. There is no place like home, and with this special pension, Veterans and their surviving spouses can stay at home and receive the care they need. The VA typically does not tell eligible Veterans about this special pension. In fact, the VA does little to help Veterans obtain this special pension. If you believe that you may be eligible for this special pension, you need to attend this seminar. Space is limited, so please RSVP by calling Home Instead Senior Care at 859-282-8682. CE-0000555886


LIFE

B6 • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • MAY 16, 2013

Strong families support and build strong communities Recent research from the Search Institute has identified 21 assets or characteristics of a strong family. Strong families support and build strong communities. Strong families engage in positive communication. Family members respect one another, listen and speak respectfully. They also support and encourage one another to pursue their dreams and goals. Strong families eat meals together most days of the week. The food does not have to be fancy or labor intensive. It is,

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however, important for the family to sit together, talk, and share time. Strong Diane families Mason also share EXTENSION activities NOTES and time together on a regular basis and have traditions and customs. A tradition or custom might include the family gathering for a specific holiday meal, or one family member getting to use a special plate on their birthday. Those individuals in strong families all know and understand the basic family expectations. An expectation may be that youth are home before dark, that family members not engage in harmful health habits, or that a portion of all money received is given to a charity. The expectations may also include guidelines and discussions about tough or sensitive issues.

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Families that are strong solve problems and deal with challenges together. All members of the family work together to manage daily commitments and schedules. When issues arise, the family agrees on a course of action and all members work to resolve the issue. Finally, strong families are involved in the communities and neighborhoods. They have support from a variety of people and groups and interact positively with others. Take some time to sit with your family and discuss the positive things you do. Assess whether there are areas you might work to improve on as a group. Make a pact as a family to improve in one or more areas. Commit to reviewing your goals on a regular basis. Only strong families can work to create strong communities. Diane Mason is county extension agent for family and consumer sciences at the Boone County Cooperative Extension Service.

Manage arthritis with Walk With Ease program May is National Arthritis Month Community Recorder

As part of National Arthritis Month, the Kentucky Department for Public Health and the Kentucky Department for Aging and Independent Living are encouraging Kentuckians to take part in the Walk With Ease Program. Walk With Ease is a walking program to reduce pain, discomfort and improve the quality of life for people with arthritis and other chronic diseases. Research has consistently shown that walking for exercise improves arthritis pain, fatigue, strength, balance and quality of life. Yet, according to a report released today by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 70 percent of Kentuckians with arthritis walk less than the recommended 90 minutes a week and 55 percent do not walk at all. “National Arthritis Month gives us an opportunity to recognize the

high prevalence of arthritis in Kentucky and encourage more people suffering from arthritis to participate in Walk With Ease,” said Dr. Stephanie Mayfield, DPH commissioner. “Physical activity relieves arthritis pain, and this program provides the necessary resources and support individual’s need to get started and continue to consistently manage the disease.” Walk With Ease is a guided program developed by the Arthritis Foundation that assists participants in developing successful walking routines and helps them stay motivated to continue walking. The program emphasizes support, information and tools to help individuals meet their physical activity goals and is specifically designed for people with arthritis and other chronic conditions. “We are very excited about being able to offer the Walk With Ease program to Kentuckians free of charge,” said Deborah Anderson, DAIL commissioner. “Arthritis is extremely common in

Kentucky, where one in three adults is affected by the disease. Still, many don’t realize the impact of arthritis can be lessened with regular physical activity.” According to DPH and CDC, the majority of arthritis sufferers in Kentucky are people between the ages of 18 and 64, or “working adults.” Over half of this population reports being limited in the amount or kind of work they can do. Walk With Ease is being offered to Kentucky Employee Health Plan members and to other Kentuckians at no cost thanks to a grant from the CDC. Online registration is available at chfs.ky.gov/wwe or by contacting Grider at Kentucky.Arthritis@ky.gov or 502-5647996, ext. 4433. After registering, participants receive a book in the mail to guide them through the process of starting and maintaining a customized walking program. Program participants praise Walk With Ease for being user friendly and offering flexibility.

Berea Craft Festival celebrating 32 years Community Recorder

The Berea Craft Festival, ranked 57th in the nation by Sunshine Artist Magazine, will celebrate its 32nd anniversary July 12-14 at Indian Fort Thea-

tre in Berea. The event includes more than120 artists from 15 different states, as well as several educational demonstrations including broom-making, vegetable yarn-dyeing, blacksmith-

ing, chair-making, pottery and jewelry. There will also be music, traditional dancing and a booth for children to explore their own creativity. Festival hours are 10

a.m. to 6 p.m. each day. Admission is $6 for adults, $5 for seniors, and children younger than 12 are free. For more information, go online at www.bereacraftfestival.com.


LIFE

MAY 16, 2013 • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • B7

N. Ky. Knights know the right moves By Amy Scalf

More than 240 students signed up to play in the Knights of Northern Kentucky Scholastic Chess Tournament on Saturday, April 20, and four of the top winners participate in the Kenton County Public Library's Chess Club.

ascalf@nky.com

ERLANGER — After serious practice at the Kenton County Public Library, some of Northern Kentucky’s youngest knights won trophies for proving their mettle in competition. Four members of the Erlanger Library’s Chess Club scored in the top 25 percent of the Knights of Northern Kentucky Scholastic Chess Tournament held at Scott High School Saturday, April 20. More than 240 students from kindergarten through 12th grade competed in the regional tournament. Justin Horn and Chris Stockman earned first and second place, respectively, among the 48 players in grades six through 12. Colin Renner, a thirdgrader from Fort Wright Elementary, placed 18th among kindergarten through third-graders. Six-year-old Ethan Perriman, a Beechgrove Elementary first-grader, has been playing chess for four months and scored sixth place in his group. Ethan loves playing chess, and his favorite part about the Knights tournament was winning his trophy. “I think all kids should play because it’s so fun and everybody gets to win,” he said. “There’s no crying, and it’s a fair game.” His grandfather, Mark Chandler, plays chess with Ethan, and takes him to the library chess club so he has more opportunities. “It’s great because there aren’t that many clubs in northern Kentucky,” said Chandler. “Really, the only way to get better is by playing better players. It’s not about winning. If you beat the same person all

THANKS TO

Director of the Knights of Northern Kentucky Scholastic Chess Tournament Linda Fritz received this note from Ethan Perriman before he signed up to play in the competition. THANKS TO LINDA FRITZ

Justin Horn won first place for students in grades six through 12 at the Knights of Northern Kentucky Scholastic Chess Tournament. He has participated in the Kenton County Public Library's Chess Club for five years. THANKS TO LESLIE GOSSER

After playing chess for four months, Ethan Perriman, 6, earned sixth place at the Knights of Northern Kentucky Scholastic Chess Tournament at Scott High School on Saturday, April 20. THANKS TO MARK CHANDLER

the time, you’re not going to get better because you’re not learning anything. You need to play

different people.” He said Ethan is set to play a tournament in Columbus, Ohio, in May, and another at the Boone County Library from 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, May 4. The tournament is for kindergartners through adults. For more information, call 859-2923393. Horn, age 13, has been playing chess for about five years, according to his mom, Leslie Gosser. She said he started playing when the chess club first formed at the Covington branch of the Kenton County Public Library. She’s glad that the library club members did so well at the tournament.

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MARK CHANDLER

“It’s really impressive for a small noncompetitive program,” Gosser said. “I really appreciate that because chess clubs can be very competitive and high pressure.” She also said part of the club’s charm involves the organizer, Paul Cernut, and his team of volunteers. “They’re very enthusiastic and welcoming,” said Gosser. “I love playing at the library,” said Ethan. “I love the teacher. He gives good directions and lets us switch to play with different people.” Cernut, an assistant cataloguer at the Kenton County Public Library’s administrative offices, said the compliments were “flattering,” but his joy was “to see the kids take off and do really well.”

“I think I do reasonably well at communicating with the kids about the rules and fundamentals of the game. It’s important to know the rules really well, then learn more techniques as you grow and develop in the game,” he said. He goes to the Erlanger library, 401 Kenton Lands Road, from 3:30 to 5:30 each Tuesday for the chess club, which is open to children and teens only. “It’s good for people of any age,” he said. “I like being able to see kids learn the game. It's a great game to learn, and it has a very rich history. Once you learn, you know it for a lifetime and you can pass it on to their children. It's nice to see the kids grow and develop. Most of them come every week and you can see

them progress.” More information about the event can be found at knightschess.org.

Want to continue the conversation? Tweet at @AmyScalfNky

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LIFE

B8 • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • MAY 16, 2013

POLICE REPORTS INDEPENDENCE Arrests/citations Aaron J. Smith, 28, 244 Ridgeway Ave., public drunkenness, disorderly conduct at Centennial Blvd., April 27. Matthew A. Pence, 33, 2515 Anderson Road, executed Campbell County warrant at Madison Pike, April 28.

Rochell E. Farley, 42, 4187 Elder Court, No. 4, executed Boone County warrants at 4187 Elder Court, No. 4, April 29. Daniel Blaine, 20, 109 Schira Court, executed bench warrant at Briarwood Drive, April 26. Jeremy L. Lillie, 42, 104 Valleywood Court, shoplifting at 3960 Turkeyfoot Road, May 1.

ABOUT POLICE REPORTS The Community Recorder publishes the names of all adults charged with offenses. The information is a matter of public record and does not imply guilt or innocence.

DEATHS Jeffrey Alley

rN WANt more Northe KeNtucKY NeWS?

Jeffrey Brian Alley, 43, of Elsmere, died April 27, 2013, at his home. He was an assistant for U-Haul in Elsmere. Survivors include his son, Travis Alley; daughter, Ashlea Alley; brothers, Charles Alley of Florence, and David Alley of Elsmere. Memorials: David Alley care of Bank of Kentucky.

Ronald Baker

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Ronald William Baker, 57, of Erlanger, died April 26, 2013, in Cincinnati. He was a maintenance man for CCL Printing. Survivors include his father, Thorton Baker; girlfriend, Sidney Jaung; brother, Randy Baker; and sisters, Pam Ross and Debbie McCarthy. Burial was at Alexandria Cemetery.

Christie Bishop Sr.

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Christie Bishop Sr., 77, of Independence, died May 5, 2013, at St. Elizabeth Florence. He was an Air Force veteran, former warehouseman for Sambo’s, attended New Banklick Baptist Church, and loved UK basketball and working in the yard. Survivors include his wife, Linda Goldsberry Bishop; daughters, Diana Bishop and Karen Bishop; sons, Christie Bishop Jr., Jeffrey Scott Bishop, and Mark Bishop; sister, Rose Jackson; brothers, Arnold

ABOUT OBITUARIES Basic obituary information and a color photograph of your loved one is published without charge by The Community Press. Please call us at 283-0404 for more information. To publish a larger memorial tribute, call 513-2424000 for pricing details. For the most up-to-date Northern Kentucky obituaries, click on the “Obituaries” link at NKY.com. Bishop and James Bishop; three grandchildren and two greatgrandchildren. Interment was at Walton Cemetery. Memorials: American Cancer Society, 297 Buttermilk Pike, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017.

John Buechel John “Jack” C. Buechel, 66, of Cincinnati, died May 4, 2013, at his home. He was a Covington Catholic High School graduate, loved following politics and tinkering with items that needed repair. His wife, Linda Buechel; daughter, Doris Jean Ball; brother, Mark Buechel; and father, Walter Thomas Buechel, died previously. Survivors include his sons, John Buechel Jr. of Cincinnati; Anthony Sumner of Dayton; daughter, Emma Jane Sward of Cincinnati; mother, Juanita Rose Buechel of Covington; brother, Thomas Buechel of Newport; sisters, Emma Grayson of Erlanger, and Alice Brendel of Covington; and seven grandchildren.

Interment was at Mother of God Cemetery in Fort Wright.

Jeffery Eastin Jeffery B. Eastin, 57, of Erlanger, died at his residence. He worked at Ronan Engineering in Florence for more than 25 years. His father, Tom Herron, died previously. Survivors include his mother, Jane Herron; sons, Clinton Joseph Taylor and Jeffery Thomas Eugene Eastin; sisters, Cathy J. Herron and Tammy L. Eastin; brother, Conrad B. Eastin; and four grandchildren. Memorials: charity of the donor’s choice.

Richard Fossitt Richard Fossitt, 52, of Independence, formerly of Bellevue, died May 8, 2013, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. His parents, Richard H. Fossitt Sr. and Ann Springer Fossitt; and stepsister, Betty Engle, died previously. Survivors include his wife,

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LIFE

MAY 16, 2013 • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • B9

DEATHS Continued from Page B8 Carol; daughters, Chastity Ballard and Theresa Lake; sisters, Kim Goley; stepsisters, Terri Watkins; and six grandchildren.

Ruth Gooch Ruth Black Gooch, 86, of Fort Mitchell, died April 30, 2013, at her residence. She was a homemaker, former administrative assistant with the Southern Ohio College, lifelong member, deacon, and Sunday School superintendent of Madison Avenue Christian Church, member of the Phillip Bruckner D.A.R. chapter, past president of the Beechwood Independent Schools PTA, past president of the Fort Mitchell Garden Club, member of the Fort Mitchell Country Club, and 1944 graduate of Holmes High School. Her husband, Marshall Henry Gooch, and sister, Mary Louise Rose, died previously. Survivors include her son, Dr. Mark H. Gooch of Fort Mitchell; daughter, Lori Tackett of Union; sister, Margy Ann Vanderbank of Dataw Island, S.C.; and five grandchildren. Interment was at Highland Cemetery in Fort Mitchell. Memorials: Children’s Hospital, 3333 Burnet Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45229.

Charles Little Jr. Charles Clay Little Jr., 77, of Butler, died May 9, 2013, at the home of his daughter. He worked for F.H. Lawson Co., American Tool and DHL. Survivors include his wife, Faye; daughter, Susan Brown of Edgewood; two grandsons and one great-granddaughter. Burial was at Highland Cemetery in Fort Mitchell. Memorials: St. Elizabeth Hospice, 483 S. Loop Road, Edgewood, KY 41017.

Gerald Lunsford Gerald M. Lunsford, 76, of Florence, died May 3, 2013, at St. Elizabeth Florence. He was a graduate of Boone

County High School and Eastern Kentucky University, spent several years teaching music in Kentucky public schools, worked for the Internal Revenue Service, was church organist and member of the choir at Erlanger United Church, was active in the United Methodist Men’s Organization, and was the 2013 recipient of the Mayo Taylor Award, an annual award given by the Erlanger United Methodist Church to recognize the outstanding contributions made by individuals on behalf of the church. Interment was at Forest Lawn Cemetery in Erlanger. Memorials: United Methodist Committee on Relief (checks payable to Kentucky Conference Treasurer), P.O. Box 1529, Crestwood, KY 40014.

Thelma Martin Thelma E. Martin, 102, of Erlanger, died May 3, 2013, at her residence. She worked as a registered nurse at St. Luke Hospital for more than 40 years, was a member of Bethany Lutheran Church and several senior citizen groups, volunteered at Erlanger-Elsmere United Ministries and once won the Volunteer of the Year Award for the Erlanger Senior Citizens. Her daughters, Joyce Riedlin and Beverly Baker; her grandson, Vernon Riedlin; and several brothers and sisters, died previously. Survivors include five grandchildren, 13 great-grandchildren, and 14 great-greatgrandchildren. Interment was at Highland Cemetery in Fort Mitchell. Memorials: Bethany Lutheran Church, 3501 Turkeyfoot Road, Erlanger, KY.

Kenneth Marz Kenneth Raymond Marz, 53, of Newport, died May 4, 2013, at his residence. His parents, Clifford and Mary Jane Marz, died previously. Survivors include his brothers, Bill Marz of Louisville, and

David Marz of Edgewood; sisters, Janet Hughes and Barbara Fellabaum of Newport, and Sandy Adams of Florence.

Harley McDaniel Jr. Harley G. McDaniel Jr., 88, of Independence, died May 4, 2013, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. He was retired from Newport Steel, was a member of St. Barbara Church in Erlanger, and was a Navy veteran of World War II. His wife, Maureen A. “Marty” McDaniel, died previously. Survivors include his stepson, Bob Hall of Independence; brother, Bob McDaniel of Kansas; and longtime caregiver, Betty Harmon of Independence. Memorials: St. Barbara Church, 4042 Turkeyfoot Road, Erlanger, KY 41018.

Raymond Miley Raymond “Todd” Miley, 50, of Ludlow, died April 27, 2013, at Christ Hospital in Cincinnati. He was a warehouse manager for Closson’s Fine Furniture, a skilled artist who won many art competitions and awards, and avid fan of baseball and the UK Wildcats. His parents, Robert and Bonnie Miley; and brothers, Joe Miley and Terry Miley, died previously. Survivors include Carol Wagner of Ludlow; daughter, Andrea Evans of Fort Mitchell; siblings, Janet Moore of Florence, Jayne Stoeckle of Fort Mitchell, Lynda White of Florence, Stephen Miley of Ludlow, David Miley of Orlando, Fla., and Robert Miley of Orlando, Fla.; and two grandchildren. Interment was at Highland Cemetery in Fort Mitchell. Memorials: Todd Miley Memorial Fund care of Ronald B. Jones Funeral Home, 316 Elm St., Ludlow, KY 41016.

Jessie Parks Jessie David Parks, 70, of Taylor Mill, died May 6, 2013, at his residence. He was a retired steel cutter

for Cincinnati Steel. Survivors include his son, Byron Parks; daughters, Theresa Harmeling and Laura Stamper; brother, Rev. John Sparks; sister, Cornie Shephard; six grandchildren and four great-grandchildren.

Darell Perkins Darell “Mark” Perkins, 52, of Covington, died May 5, 2013, at his residence. He was a self-employed website designer, member of Central Church of the Nazarene, and loved fishing, hunting, and his family. His father, Charles Perkins Jr., died previously. Survivors include his sons, Matthew Charles Perkins of Dayton, and Marcus Anthony Perkins of Columbus, Ohio; mother, Violet Solomon of Erlanger; brother, Charles William Perkins of Spokane, Wash.; sisters, Lois Louise Hadsell of Sarasota, Fla., Sylvia Annette Breier of Morrow, Ohio; and two grandchildren. Memorials: Central Church of the Nazarene, 2006 Pieck Drive, Fort Wright, KY 41011.

Robert Phelps Robert S. Phelps, 88, of Erlanger, formerly of Florence and Norwood, Ohio, died May 6, 2013, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. He was a World War II veteran, retired machine operator with Husky Burndy Co., and attended Greenview Baptist Church. His sisters, Hilma J. Edwards and Doris Boyd Crawford; and brother, Tommy Lee Phelps, died previously. Survivors include his wife Evalene Phelps of Erlanger; son, David Phelps of Jefferson City, Mo.; daughters, Charlotte Ploetner of Bagdad, and Beverly Simon of Florence; six grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. Burial was Mount Zion Cemetery in Hail. Memorials: Mount Zion Cemetery Fund, 3269 Poplarville Road, Hail, KY 42501; or

Greenview Baptist Church, 1050 Burlington Pike, Florence, KY 41042.

Mark Plummer Mark Alan Plummer, 53, of Augusta, died May 5, 2013, at the Markey Cancer Center. Survivors include his daughter, Stacy Plummer; three brothers, Kevin Plummer of Augusta, Keith Plummer of Augusta, and Michael Plummer of Fort Mitchell; sisters, Sally Bratton of Augusta, and Sarah Plummer of Augusta; lifelong friend, Sue; and two granddaughters. Burial was at Highland Cemetery. Memorials: the RyAnn and Addison Cooper Scholarship Fund care of US Bank.

Evelyn Schmitt Evelyn Loud Schmitt, 94, of Erlanger, formerly of Verona, died May 2, 2013, at her daughter’s home. She was a retired employee with Wadsworth Electric in Covington, was a member of Concord Baptist Church of Verona, and holds the record at Miami International Airport as the oldest skydiver, having done so at the age of 82. Her husband, Fred G. Schmitt, died previously. Survivors include her son, Robert Gordon Schmitt of Ludlow; daughters, Joy Brewer of Independence, and Carol Schmitt of Erlanger; 10 grandchildren, 15 great-grandchildren and three great-greatgrandchildren. Interment was at Highland Cemetery in Fort Mitchell. Memorials: St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, 262 Danny Thomas Place, Memphis, TN 38105-1905.

Carol Schooler Carol Schooler, 71, of Taylor Mill, died May 6, 2013, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. She was a longtime member of Latonia Baptist Church and a former choir member. Her husband, Don Schooler, died previously.

Survivors include her daughter, Lori Hill of Milford, Ohio; son, Don Schooler Jr. of Independence; and granddaughter, Ashley Schooler. Interment was at Highland Cemetery. Memorials: American Cancer Society, 296 Buttermilk Pike, Fort Mitchell, KY; or Latonia Baptist Church, P.O. Box 15103, Covington, KY 41015.

Betty Schrader Betty Schrader, 86, of Fort Mitchell, died May 6, 2013, at the Baptist Village in Erlanger. She worked as a supervisor with the Drawbridge Inn in Fort Mitchell and as a hostess at the Hilton in Florence, and enjoyed cooking German specialties and crocheting. Her husband, Everett Schrader, and daughter, Judy Webster, died previously. Survivors include her children, Richard Schrader of Westfield, N.J., and Marcia Schrader of Fort Mitchell; five grandchildren and four greatgrandchildren. Interment was at Forest Lawn Memorial Park in Erlanger. Memorials: Baptist Village, 2900 Riggs Road, Erlanger, KY 41018.

Amy Workman Amy Dennie Workman, 42, of Falmouth, died May 8, 2013, at her home. She worked as a cashier at Marathon in Falmouth, and she was a member of the First Baptist Church of Falmouth. Survivors include her parents, Billy and Debbie Dennie; son, Quentin Miles Dennie; daughter, Kailee Rochelle Workman; sister, Kelly Grisik of Taylor Mill; brother, Todd Dennie of Falmouth; and one granddaughter. Interment was at Morgan Cemetery in Pendleton County. Memorials: Recovery Works, 3107 Cincinnati Road, Georgetown, KY 40324.

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LIFE

B10 • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • MAY 16, 2013

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