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SOUTH KENTON

BEST FRIENDS FOREVER B1

Adam Proctor and Joe Craig. LIBBY CUNNINGHAM/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Samson and Delilah

THURSDAY, JANUARY 19, 2012

Sometimes, the things you read in the Bible end up on stage at the Kentucky Symphony Orchestra. The KSO has teamed up with the University of Kentucky Opera Theatre for a complete concert presentation of Camille Saint-Saens’ “Samson and Delilah.” This will be the fifth opera the KSO has done in concert since 2000. News, A3

An amazing race On television, The Amazing Race takes people around the world through a series of increasingly difficult challenges to win luxurious prizes, a wad of cash and a variety of unforgettable experiences. On a Wednesday night in January, Woodland Middle School’s version of the race took 168 participants through 15 logic puzzles, offering the chance for extra credit, a significantly smaller wad of cash, free pizza and the opportunity to exercise creative problem-solving skills that could last a lifetime.

Schools, A6

‘Our Great Journey’ “Our Great Journey,” originally published by Tom McGoy of Villa Hill in 2009, is the story of his wife’s cancer. He wrote it because “that’s the way I keep her with me.”He wants to keep her sense of hope alive as well, so he now gives copies of the book to near strangers and people he said he knows will benefit from the story. “I do it because I think it’s a good story, I am proud of the book and I am proud of my wife,” he explained. “I mean that sounds like B.S. but it’s really the truth.” Life, B1

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Neighbor law outlined in seminar By Amy Scalf ascalf@nky.com

FORT MITCHELL — As a practicing attorney for 40 years and Kenton County attorney for almost half that time, Garry L. Edmondson knows his way around the neighbohood. He presents a series of local legal lectures throughout the year for organizations and businesses, and will discuss neighbor law during a seminar at 6 p.m. Thursday, Jan.

19, at the Northern Kentucky Planning Commission Chambers, located at 2332 Royal Drive in Fort Mitchell. The session also serves as continuing education credit hours. For more information call Edmondson 859-331-8980. Edmondson says hundreds of county residents have attended the neighbor law semi-

nar during the past 15 years. “It’s frequently asked questions people have about everyday life,” he said. “It answers a lot of those questions and gives people insight on what it takes to be a good neighbor.” Property rights are addressed during the two-and-ahalf-hour seminar, including issues such as joint driveways, overgrown trees and easements. “I can’t tell you how many times I’m asked about this type of information,” said Dan

Local liquor store lands new owners

By Amy Scalf ascalf@nky.com

ascalf@nky.com

INDEPENDENCE — When the Franks family took over Community Liquors in December, they decided to make a few small changes without affecting the old-fashioned local atmosphere that has made the store a popular hangout for decades. Independence residents Mark and Monica Franks purchased the business to install their oldest son, Chris, as the store’s general manager, but have also added new signage, as well as a built-in bar, flat-screen television and a new table to the community hub at 12006 Madison Pike. “It’s more than a liquor store,” said Chris, who joined the U.S. Air Force after graduating from Holy Cross High School. A quick search on the Multiple Listing Service landed them at Community Liquors, which was established in 1989. Mark said Monica keeps financial records for the store in addition to her job as a registered nurse at Saint Elizabeth Medical Center. At his main job, Mark is executive vice president for the Greater Cincinnati-Northern Kentucky Apartment Association. Because they have lived here for several years, the family is already very active at Saint Cecelia Roman Catholic School . “We just want to keep that country store feel that’s been here,” said Mark. “Folks come in, have a beer or two, and spend some time talking to friends before they head home.” Rod Updike has been stopping by Community Liquors before driving home to Crittenden for 20 years, and he likes the improvements. “It’s just quaint and quiet, a nice little place,” said Updike, who said four generations of his family have visited the business. The store is open from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Mondays through

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New signage has been added outside Community Liquors, in addition to the bar, table and flat screen television inside this South Kenton gathering place. BY AMY SCALF/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER Thursdays, from 10 a.m. until 11 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, and noon until 6 p.m. on Sundays. Community Liquors features a drivethrough window, and is a regular liquor Chris, Mark and Monica Franks enjoy the new bar and store that television area at Community Liquors in stocks a varie- Independence. BY AMY SCALF/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER ty of wines, liquors and beers, and will special- to drink responsibly, and, of order beverages . The business course, we want our customers to also serves bottled beer and malt be 21 and over. We are focused on liquor, but not hard liquor or providing a business that is active and takes a positive role in mixed drinks. “And we don’t want to,” said the community. We care about Mark. “Of course we want people this community.”

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Groth, Independence city administrator, when he announced the upcoming event during a City Council meeting. Because one of the county attorney’s duties is to educate the community on legal rights and responsibilities, Edmondson frequently presents this seminar, along with similar informative legal sessions geared toward seniors, agriculture, schools, families, government records and rental properties.

Independence starts series of zoning code updates

By Amy Scalf

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INDEPENDENCE — Five years of city planning, volunteers’ time and residents’ concerns have been tied up in the Independence Zoning Code update, and it will all be presented during the next three months of Independence City Council meetings. The Northern Kentucky Area Planning Commission’s recommendations from the 2007 Small Area Study have been taken through public meetings . Mayor Chris Moriconi said he expects the council to send decisions and any revisions to the NKAPC in April or May, which will be returned in 90 days to be approved around August. He expects more public hearings. Andy Videkovich, NKAPC senior planner, discussed details of the Downtown Independence Zone and the Design Review Board. The Downtown Independence Zone, which stretches between Locust Lane and Independence Station Road, comprises two subdistricts: Courthouse Square and what they’re calling the “Transition Corridor.” More discussion among council members came during the presentation of the Design Review Board, which is recommended to have a five-member board, appointed by the mayor and approved by council. Videkovich said all designs didn’t need to go through the design board for approval. He also said appeals of the Design Review Board would go to city council, and if the applicant still wasn’t satisfied, those decisions could be appealed in circuit court. Council member Carol Franzen said the board sounded “redundant” and thought the idea would cost the city money. Seve Councilman Chris Reinersman said he saw it as a way to “keep details from bogging down council.”

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NEWS

A2 • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • JANUARY 19, 2012

SOUTH KENTON

RECORDER

Find news and information from your community on the Web Covington • nky.com/covington Independence • nky.com/independence Taylor Mill • nky.com/taylormill

News

Michelle Shaw Editor ..........................578-1053, mshaw@nky.com Amy Scalf Reporter ............................578-1055, ascalf@nky.com Melanie Laughman Sports Editor ............513-248-7573, mlaughman@nky.com James Weber Sports Reporter ................578-1054, weber@nky.com

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BRIEFLY Index Calendar .................B2 Classfieds .................C Food ......................B4 Life ........................B1 Police .................... B9 Schools ..................A6 Sports ....................A7 Viewpoints .............A9

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Col. Tim King (ret.) and U.S. Army Reseve Brig. Gen. David Smalley update the military insignia for Col. Joan Ruttle-King during her swearing-in ceremony on Friday, Jan. 13 in Covington. BY AMY SCALF/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Family celebrates milestones By Amy Scalf ascalf@nky.com

Friday the 13th isn’t a bad day for the Ruttle family, especially this year. Although this closeknit Fort Mitchell-based family is sometimes separated by thousands of miles, they came together in a Covington courtroom Friday to celebrate three special events: A military promotion, a wedding anniversary and their matriarch’s birthday. Kenton District Judge Ann Ruttle swore in her sister U.S. Army Reserve Col. Joan RuttleKing to her new military title on the 16th anniversary of her wedding to retired Col. Timothy King as they and a crowd of friends and family members also celebrated the 88th birthday of their mother, Jane Ruttle. “Friday the 13th is pretty glorious for me,” said Joan. She thanked her husband, father, grandfather, uncles, cousins and other family members who have served in the United States military, and also thanked her family in general. “This ceremony is not about me. My achievements are your achievements,” she said. Joan also thanked the 932nd Forward Surgical Team,

Kenton County District Judge Ann Ruttle swore in her sister Col. Joan Ruttle-King during a ceremony at the Covington Judicial Center on Friday, Jan. 13, which is their mother, Jane's, 88th birthday. BY AMY SCALF/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER the medical group she commanded in Iraq during 2009 and 2010, and said she went there “to care for the world’s best military men and women. I wear this rank because of their sacrifices.” “What a day. I think it’s historic,” said Ann, who also presided over Joan’s swearing in as a lieutenant colonel. “It’s such a special day for the family. I’m so happy.” Former Fort Mitchell City Council member Beth Ruttle Rose said their family values military and community service. “For me to see my baby sister pull the rank of

a colonel, I couldn’t be any prouder, and it really means so much for us to be here together on this day,” said Beth. “It’s a very emotional, very proud day. I’m not at all surprised that she’s made it.” “Joanie has always done very well,” said Jane Ruttle, who was serenaded with the traditional birthday song after the ceremony. “My children spent our whole lives going to school and serving their community and their country. They’re always doing something.” Joan’s mentor, Brig. Gen. David Smalley, flew in from Memphis, Tenn.,

to participate in the event. “What an unbelievable day,” said Smalley. “Being a general officer, I have to give a lot of orders I don’t particularly like, so it’s outstanding when I can do a promotion and do awards, especially such a special event in front of family.” Smalley said he was “so impressed with this young lady” and her determination, leadership and perseverance. He gave Joan his personal military coin and gave one to her mother, and thanked them both. Smalley called Joan “a great soldier, great leader and a great mentor.”

Housing market improving Community Recorder The Greater Cincinnati metropolitan statistical area was named to the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) Improving Market Index (IMI). January’s index saw the number of markets listed as improving double as the housing market climbs out of the recession into recovery. The index is based on metropolitan areas that have shown improvement in housing permits, employment and house prices for at least six consecutive months. Northern Kentucky is the first

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area included in the IMI since NAHB began tracking improving markets coming out of the housing recession. “Our local housing industry is excited and cautiously optimistic about the future of housing here in our hometown,” said Brian Miller, executive vice president for the Home Builders Association of Northern Kentucky. “The market is beginning to pick up and that is a welcomed sign. We are seeing housing permits increase on a year over year basis without the support of tax credits for the first time since the recession began. Our remodelers, the area’s cream of the crop, are seeing remodeling permit applications soar to levels unforeseen since the recession and we are experiencing real health in the number of multifamily and condo-

minium permits being issued,” Miller said. “We are cautiously optimistic that we are beginning to see a real sustained outlook for growth in the future. We are predicting modest growth in the near future for housing due to an improvement in construction activity and improved consumer sentiment in new home communities,” Miller said. Miller added that housing prices ave bottomed out and homebuyers and homeowners are beginning to become actively engaged in the market. “We have weathered the storm as one of the top 10 largest HBA’s in our federation of hundreds across the nation and we look forward to growth in the future” he concluded. A complete list of all 76 metropolitan areas currently on the IMI is available at www.nahb.org/imi.


NEWS

JANUARY 19, 2012 • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • A3

Ky. Symphony performing biblical opera ssalmons@nky.com

Sometimes, the things you read in the Bible end up on stage at the Kentucky Symphony Orchestra. The KSO has teamed up with the University of Kentucky Opera Theatre for a complete concert presentation of Camille SaintSaens’ “Samson and Delilah.” This will be the fifth opera the KSO has done in concert since 2000 and the fourth time collaborating with the Opera Theatre, KSO music director James Cassidy said. The production will be held at 8 p.m. Friday, Jan. 20, at Florence Baptist Church at Mt. Zion and will be followed by a performance at 3 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 22, at the Singletary Center in Lexington. Tickets are $28 for “A” seats and $23 for “B” seats.

The Kentucky Symphony Orchestra and University of Kentucky Opera Theatre's 2007 performance of "La Boheme" at Lexington's Singletary Center. The two groups will join forces again for two performances of "Samson and Delilah." The first is set for 8 p.m. Friday, Jan. 20, at Florence Baptist Church at Mt. Zion. THANKS TO JIM FAUSZ Prices for the ”B” seats are reduced to $18 for seniors and $10 for students. Tickets can be purchased by calling 859-4316216 or by visiting www.kyso.org. “It’s an Old Testament story,” Cassidy said. “To do that at Florence Baptist

Church makes some sense.” The operatic version, however, focuses “more on the idea of Delilah trying to get Samson and not all of the things Samson had (done),” he said. It’s an interesting show with some “very pretty mu-

sic,” Cassidy said. Even though the singing is in French, English translations will be projected so the audience can follow the story, he said. Bellevue resident and nationally renowned mezzo soprano Stacey Rishoi sings the role of Delilah

while tenor Michael Hendrick of Baton Rouge tackles the role Samson. "It’s kind of nice to pull artists together and share that with UK’s talents and put it all together,” Cassidy said. This performance is also a chance for the KSO to do something they haven’t done before, he said. While KSO shows are “always different anyway,” Cassidy says a typical concert will normally have several different selections. An opera, he said, is a continuously sung story. “When you strip away all the effects and the big lighting and the sets and the costumes, you’re actually focusing more on the music itself – what the composer wrote in that story ...

than you are the pageantry of the opera,” he said. According to Cassidy, this is a return to how the piece was first performed in America. It can be said the opera is the “ultimate art form,” bringing in visual arts, acting, singing and dancing, Cassidy said. Whereas, when it’s done as a concert, the audience is listening more and focusing more on the music. “I think this is an interesting way to hear it,” Cassidy said.

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Rule change affects tattoo artists said Dr. Lynne M. Saddler, district director of health. Northern Kentucky is the first region of the state to pass such regulations. Officials with the Kentucky Department for Public Health are considering similar standards. Ohio and Indiana already require blood-borne pathogen education. Approximately 12 licensed tattoo and body piercing studios in Boone, Campbell, Grant and Kenton counties will be affected by the regulations, and were notified by letter of the requirements. Each

artist operating at the studio will be required to obtain the certification. Regulations will be enforced beginning 90 days after passage. A fee of $50 to cover the cost of the program will be charged for attending the health department’s class, including certification. Health department certifications will be valid for three years. Artists may also receive a similar training from another agency, such as the Red Cross, provided that it meets the requirements set forth by the regulation, and has been

approved by the health department as such. Those who obtain approved class training from another source will be charged a $15 certification fee. For information on the classes, call 859-341-4151. Limited ear piercing studios, where ear lobes are pierced using a gun device, are exempt from the training requirements. For a complete list of certified tattoo and body piercing studios in Northern Kentucky, visit http:// www.nkyhealt h.org/certifiedtatoo.

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Anyone providing tattoos or body piercing in Northern Kentucky will be required to document that he or she has received training on blood-borne pathogens, under new regulations passed by the Northern Kentucky District Board of Health on Dec. 7. The rules are designed to protect customers and artists from diseases transmitted through the blood, including Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C and HIV. “Artists at these studios are using medical instruments to pierce the skin,”

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NEWS

A4 • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • JANUARY 19, 2012

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The Diocese of Covington admits students of any race, color, and national or ethnic origin. For additional information on Catholic education opportunities in the Diocese of Covington please call (859) 392-1530 or visit us online at www.covingtondiocese.org.

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NEWS

JANUARY 19, 2012 • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • A5

ST. HENRY SCHOOL Preschool.0+ - Grade (")!)0,.-% 1*0$/- 8#$'&

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SCHOOLS

A6 • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • JANUARY 19, 2012

SOUTH KENTON

RECORDER

Editor: Nancy Daly, ndaly@nky.com, 578-1059

ACHIEVEMENTS | NEWS | ACTIVITIES | HONORS

CommunityPress.com

Woodland Middle event challenges thinking skills By Amy Scalf ascalf@nky.com

The staff of the Tatler, an online newpaper which started Jan. 11 at Lloyd Memorial High School. LIBBY CUNNINGHAM/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Lloyd students take their news online By Libby Cunningham Lcunningham@nky.com

ERLANGER — Trudging to the tune of an authoritative bell students take their seats in Mary Brady’s classroom. But the students gliding into the classroom aren’t the only things streaming. Talking amongst themselves they’re friendly and informative; fitting because they are the student-journalists of Lloyd Memorial High School’s The Tatler, a student news source that’s gone viral. The chatter among the newsies is telling because they’re the voice of the students, a responsibility they are making more vocal. “(People say) ‘Oh, it’s OK, you go to Lloyd, we understand,’” editor-in-chief Tony Otten explained, as he meticulously toyed with the website. “I don’t understand where we get a reputation

of being a mediocre school.” Typically the students produce a newspaper about twice a month. Crisp, folded Xeroxed copies full of news that matters to Erlanger-Elsmere students, stacked with college tips and editorials on things that matter to the teens, such as cellphone use in school and the dress code. But, the format needed to be more current, and the staff, with the help of a computer coordinator, found the cure. Initially sports caused the jump to a digital newspaper, which launched on Jan. 11, Otten said. “The online is the solution we came up with to solve the problem of immediacy,” he said. “We haven’t established a pattern yet because it’s (just) started.” Despite a slower start, he said the staff is “trying to update every few days, especially during basketball season.” Otten hopes the upstart will

give the school recognition. “Lloyd doesn’t have the reputation it deserves based on its coaches and teachers,” he said. The Tatler’s online format follows how many high schoolers get their news, online. Students cite social media tools like Facebook or Twitter as secondary sources, mainly for the reporting of “drama.” “It’s the easiest to get to,” said Morgan Morrison, staff member, who checks the Internet for the news. The accessibility of online news is something that students should pick up on. “Most of the time it’s effective,” said Staci Stewart, who also serves on staff. “... It’s a story about Erlanger, that’s where they live. Written by students and for students.” For more on what’s going on in your community visit NKY.com/Erlanger.

Howell races to perfect attendance By Libby Cunningham

COLLEGE CORNER Kenton students graduate from IWU

Lcunningham@nky.com

ELSMERE — Vets, teachers, pro athletes, nurses, doctors, designers and physicists. Dressed in a rainbow of polo shirts, fourth-grade students connected all of the professions together with a single concept: Showing up. “When you grow up and if you want to go to college or want to go to work they see if you went to school every day,” said Ashley Pewett confidently. “Because it’s important because you want to learn so you know everything.” Her classmates agree with her sentiments and it shows. For six weeks no one has missed a single day at Howell Elementary School. Arizona Diggs made sure she came because she said that means “I could have a good education when I grow up and go to a good college.” Despite the large number of students coming to school in the past six weeks, absence is still a trend, said Christi Bramlett who took over as a secretary in August. Her love for the students filled the room when she entered, to help Dianna Burke’s class celebrate their victory, lending some sun to a dreary winter day. “We needed something different,” Bramlett said. “And I know the kids are tied up in video games and TV. Looking to do some kind of incentive. Reward kids.” Although attendance was down to 95.8 percent in December for the school, versus 96 percent in October and 97 percent in September (November numbers

TAYLOR MILL — On television, The Amazing Race takes people around the world through a series of increasingly difficult challenges to win luxurious prizes, a wad of cash and a variety of unforgettable experiences. On a Wednesday night in January, Woodland Middle School’s version of the race took168 participants through15 logic puzzles, offering the chance for extra credit, a significantly smaller wad of cash, free pizza and the opportunity to exercise creative problemsolving skills that could last a lifetime. Woodland Middle math teacher Jennifer Butler had participated in challenges similar to the CBS reality television program through a math teacher education grant project at Northern Kentucky University. When she had to commit to a leadership project, she knew it was the perfect time to bring the creative thinking challenges to her school. Butler, who is in her fifth year of teaching math at Woodland and her seventh year in Kenton County Schools, said most of the challenges focused on math skills, but said they also incorporated language arts, social studies and science knowledge. "We’re training the brain to become more of a critical thinker,” said Butler. “These are the kind of skills students need to compete in the real world. Yes, it’s going to help in my classroom, but also, in the bigger scheme of things, if kids can’t think on their own, they’re not going to get jobs. What I see in the classroom is you can teach something and give prob-

lems in class, but if they get a problem that is not designed the same, but requires the same skill, they don’t apply the knowledge. They look at the problem and give up. I feel like there’s a big need for this all around.” Butler’s race included 42 teams traveling through 15 rooms to complete15 challenges. Participants were judged on the number of challenges completed without help or hints. Each team could have up to four participants, which had to include at least one Woodland student and one adult. The top three teams completed every challenge without help. Butler and other math teachers offered15 points of extra credit. Beechmont Toyota donated $500, which funded cash prizes and purchased pizza for everyone. She said she was pleased with the event’s turnout, and she got several emails from parents who agreed. One of those messages came from Lisa Beckelhimer, who coincidentally was on the winning team. She participated in the race with her12-year-old son Jake, who is in the sixth grade at Woodland. Beckelhimer told Butler she “appreciated the way all of the challenges encouraged critical thinking,” and also commended the event’s organization, implementation and the hard work of the volunteers involved. Beckelhimer also said, “As a parent and a teacher, I was thrilled to see the emphasis on education as much as on the ‘fun’ of the event.” Butler said she hopes to host similar events in the future, but will have to redesign the concept to accommodate more participants.

The following students from Kenton County graduated from Indiana Wesleyan University on Dec. 17: Carla Gaines of Covington, bachelor of science in nursing; Stella Huff of Fort

Wright, bachelor of science in nursing; Sarah Kuhn of Independence, bachelor of science in nursing; Rodney Ollier of Independence, bachelor of science in accounting; and Donna Worley of Independence, associate of science in business.

Burkhardt wins solo competition Members of Dianna Burke's class celebrate six weeks of perfect attendance at Howell Elementary School in Elsmere. LIBBY CUNNINGHAM/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

were not available) for the six weeks between fall and winter break students were staunch to participate in the school’s amazing attendance race. The school of 305 students averages 11-13 absences a day, she said, more if a stomach bug is going around. “For the most part the absences we deal with are sickness,” she said. But, with the Amazing Race incentive, based on the popular reality show, classrooms move to different locations based on the amount of students who come to school and pupils are policing their peers on what really constitutes taking a day off school. “The more rewards they got the more they were making sure that if you just have the sniffles we can still come to school,” said Burke, whose class won. “We have tissues.” On Jan. 12, the winners were preparing for their victory party, making buttons and creating a

poster. “We do a lot of science experiments, so that’s why they want to come,” Burke said. “I always tell them if they miss out they won’t be able to do the work they’ve missed.” The students themselves see the importance in being dependable to their own education. “So (Mrs.) Burke can teach us the stuff we need to know,” said Logan Jouett. “And give us the knowledge so we get a job that uses math and we can do it, piece of cake. That’s why it’s important to be in Mrs. Burke’s class.” And if Karleigh Evans keeps this up, she won’t miss much, especially if she is dependable at least 185 days each year. She always shows up. “It just makes me feel good,” she said. “Well, because I learn everything, and I don’t miss anything.” For more one what’s happening in your community visit http:// www.NKY.com/Erlanger.

Seth Burkhardt, a Beechwood High School graduate, will compete as a division finalist in the Music Teachers National Association’s Young Artist Brass Division in January in Clinton, Miss. Burkhardt, the son of Bob and Zan Burkhardt of Fort Mitchell, won the state level of competition playing Ewazen Sonata for Trumpet and Piano, Mvt. I and II, Haydn Trumpet Concerto, Mvt. II and Charlier Solo de Concours. A sophomore music education major at the University of Louisville, Burkhardt has been studying trumpet for eight years and is currently a student of Dr. Michael Tunnell. Burkhardt plans to become a high school band director upon completion of his music education degree from Louisville and to get his masters in trumpet performance. He recently served as brass instructor with both Dixie Heights and Beechwood marching bands. The Young Artist Brass Solo Competition will take place on Jan. 13-16 during the MTNA Division Conference. The winner of this competition will compete in

Seth Burkhardt, a Beechwood High School graduate, will compete as a division finalist in the Music Teachers National Association's Young Artist Brass Division in January in Mississippi. THANKS TO ZAN BURKHARDT

the National Finals during the MTNA National Conference in New York City in March. The three-tiered MTNA competitions begin at the state level. Winners of each state competition advance to the division competition. Division winners then proceed to the national competition finals.


SPORTS

JANUARY 19, 2012 • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • A7

Editor: Melanie Laughman, mlaughman@communitypress.com, 513-248-7573

HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | RECREATIONAL

SOUTH KENTON

RECORDER

CommunityPress.com

PRESS PREPS HIGHLIGHTS By James Weber jweber@nky.com

Boys basketball

» Holmes beat Covington Catholic 57-55 Jan. 10 and Holy Cross 64-53 Jan. 12 to gain the top seed in the 35th District Tournament. Against Cov Cath, Jared Martin scored the winning points from the foul line with a second to go in the game. Daquan Palmer led Holmes with 14 points. Against Holy Cross, Dontel Rice had 19 points. » The All “A” boys regionals will be this week. The Eighth Region is at Trimble County, the Ninth Region at Beechwood, and the 10th Region at Bracken County. The finals are 7 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 21, for all tourneys.

Girls basketball

The Simon Kenton wrestling team celebrates after winning its home invitational tournament Jan. 7. THANKS TO NATHAN GILBERT

PIONEER WRESTLERS

E N J O Y

MILESTONES By James Weber jweber@nky.com

INDEPENDENCE — The Simon

Kenton High School wrestling program had a tough week in the Northern Kentucky Athletic Conference championships, but the tournament showed how strong the Pioneers can be. SK had narrow two-point losses to both Campbell County and Ryle in the dual-meet format. In each match, the teams split the 14 individual bouts but SK earned two less points from its wins. Simon was missing four starters in the tourney. “We wrestled very well,” said SK head coach Nathan Gilbert. “Everything motivates them. After they lost, they came in the next morning at 6 a.m. ready to work.” Against Ryle, SK rolled in the middle weights. Kevin Cooper (145), Ryan Stevens (152), Jacob Clark (160), Jacob Hollingsworth (170), Derek Hicks (182), David Bergman (195) and Colin Patrick (285) won. SK finished third to gain a berth in the state duals tournament Jan. 28 in Lexington. The conference sends its top two finishers to the meet, but runner-up Ryle declined to participate. The Pioneers rebounded with a fifth-place finish in a tourney in Johnson City, Tenn., Jan. 14. Kevin Cooper, Joey Parrott and Hiero Chamblee won their weight classes and Derek Hicks finished second. Cooper, a junior, is a defending state champion and is 48-0 this season with five tournament championships, including three in Ohio. He ranks fourth in school history in wins. “He’s just a lot more intense this year,” Gilbert said. “He wrestled two of the top four guys in Tennessee and they didn’t challenge him. Some of the Cincinnati

Simon Kenton High School Ryan Stevens, top, controls arms and body of Newport High School Chaz Ware during the NKAC meet Jan. 10. JOSEPH FUQUA II/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

INDIANS REACH SEMIS

guys have challenged him pretty close. He just brings it to practice every day.” Parrott, Stevens and Patrick have all earned their 100th career victory since 2012 began. Parrott, a state placer at 112 last year, is second on the team in 2012 with 34 wins. He beat a Tennessee state champion during the Jan. 14 tournament. Stevens has 33 wins. Patrick was a state qualifier last year, as were Harris and Clark. Chamblee is 33-9 this year with two tournament wins. His lone Kentucky loss is to a topranked wrestler from Larue County. They hope to lead SK to a strong showing in the state duals and beyond. “This is one of the smaller teams we’ve had but we have a good wrestler in every weight class,” Gilbert said. “We beat Ryle earlier this year but both teams were missing starters.” Gilbert has the Pioneers practicing “two-a-days” starting in January. The team practices at both 6 o’clocks that occur during the day, before and after school. “It’s something we started last year,” Gilbert said. “It gets the boys’ weights really under control. Very few of them have to cut during the week. Then in February we scale it back a little bit but they’re in the best shape they can be. It’s all about peaking during February.” The Pioneers were set to host Dixie and Scott for the Kenton County championships Jan. 18. After that, SK goes to one of the most important meets in Kentucky at South Oldham Jan. 21. See more sports coverage at www.cincinnati.com/blogs/preps, www. facebook.com/presspreps or visit James on Twitter at @RecorderWeber.

» Holmes beat Harrison County 59-46 Jan. 11 to improve to 8-5. Deja Turner led four Bulldogs in double figures with 18 points. » Holy Cross fell to NewCath 48-29 in the Ninth Region All “A” semifinals Jan. 13. HC fell to 7-8. » Notre Dame beat Sacred Heart 64-52 Jan. 10. Hanna Thelen scored 24 points and three other Pandas had 10. NDA lost to Boone County 68-63 to drop to 12-2, spoiling a 31-point night from Olivia Voskuhl. » Villa Madonna beat Scott Jan. 14, 38-36. Lauren Dumaine had 12 points and Allie Hennard 11. » Local all-tournament picks in the All “A” Ninth Region tourney were Jill Bauer and Savannah Neace (St. Henry), Shelby Rudd (Lloyd), Allie Hennard (VMA), Taylor Brown (Beechwood), Tori Wofford (Ludlow) and Jayden Julian (Holy Cross).

Holy Cross lost to Newport Central Catholic 48-29 in the semifinals of the All “A” Classic Ninth Region tournament Jan. 13 at Newport High School. Senior Jayden Julian made the all-tourney team. HC beat Bellevue 65-22 and Villa Madonna 52-25 in the tourney. HC is 7-8 and hosts St. Henry Jan. 23.

Holy Cross guard DeAsia Beal drives to the basket between Newport Central Catholic defenders Jan. 13 in the All A tournament. GREG LORING/FOR THE Boone County High School Ben Combs, left, takes down Dixie Heights High School's Aaron Munoz during their 145 lbs. match Jan. 10 in Campbell County. JOSEPH FUQUA/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

COMMUNITY RECORDER


SPORTS & RECREATION

A8 • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • JANUARY 19, 2012

Bowling rolling By James Weber jweber@nky.com

Week 5 was snowed out Jan. 12 in the Northern Kentucky Athletic Conference for bowling. Action resumes Jan. 19. Several teams will participate in Cooper's tournament Jan. 21 at Super Bowl Erlanger. Here are the standings through Jan. 12. The first number is total record, the second number is division record for seeding.

Boys

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County 25.5-2.5 (1-0), Cooper 24-4 (1-0), Dixie Heights 20-8 (0-0), Cov Cath 17-11 (0-1), Simon Kenton 15-13 (0-1), Scott 13-15 (0-1). Division 2: St. Henry 15.5-12.5 (1-1), Holy Cross 14-14 (2-0), Highlands 13-15 (1-1), Brossart 13-15 (1-0), Newport 11-17 (1-0), NCC 9-19 (1-1), Lloyd 5-23 (0-2), Beechwood 3-25 (0-1), Dayton 0-28 (0-1). Week 4: Campbell over SK 6-1 (2,913-2,391), Brossart over Beechwood 6-1 (2,075-1,666), Newport over Highlands 4-3 (2,557-2,433), NCC over St. Henry 4-3 (2,386-2,232), Holy Cross over Lloyd 4-3 (2,331-2,038), Dixie over Dayton 7-0 (2,362-1,552), Boone over Cov Cath 5-2 (2,590-2,456), Cooper over Scott 6-1 (2,3662,017). Top averages: Brad Hightchew (Boone) 217.5, Jake Harris (Campbell) 204.88, Trey Brun (Campbell) 204.63, Zach Lawson (Scott) 200.13, Chris Hamilton (Dixie) 200, Tyler Widmeyer (Campbell) 199.6. High games: Brad Hightchew (Boone) 270, Logan Krey (St. Henry) 267, Darren Quinn (NCC) 256, David Zalla (CCH) 249.

Girls

Division I: Boone County 27-1 (1-0), Campbell County 25-3 (1-0), Dixie 22.5-5.5 (0-0), Notre Dame 15-13 (0-1), Cooper 14-14 (1-0), Scott 12-16 (0-1), SK 7-21 (0-1). Division 2: Holy

BLU-SOX 1958-60 REUNION

Cross 23-5 (2-0), Brossart 19-9 (1-0), Newport 19-9 (1-0), NCC 13-15 (1-1), St. Henry 11-17 (2-0), Lloyd 6-22 (0-2), Beechwood 5.5-22.5 (0-1), Dayton 4-24 (0-1), Highlands 1-27 (0-2). Week 4: Campbell over SK 7-0 (2,222-1,541), Brossart over Beechwood 6-1 (1,833-1,478), Newport over Highlands 6-1 (1,807-1,405), St. Henry over NCC 4-3 (1,7201,656), Holy Cross over Lloyd 4-3 (1,830-1,668), Dixie over Dayton 6-1 (1,984-1,439), Boone over NDA 6-1 (1,943-1,750), Cooper over Scott 5-2 (1,807-1,673). Top averages: Katlyn Hoeh (Newport) 187.63, Erica Biddle (Campbell) 184.13, Erica Hickman (Campbell) 183.75), Alli Haggard (Dixie) 179.5, Brianne Vogelpohl (Campbell) 170.5, Delaney Elam (Brossart) 165.13. High games: Erica Hickman (Campbell) 263, Alli Haggard (Dixie) 243, Katlyn Hoeh (Newport) 234, Brianne Vogelpohl (Campbell) 223, Melissa Rodriguez (Holy Cross) 223. Jan. 19 schedule: La Ru - Highlands vs. NCC, Cov Cath/NDA vs. St. Henry; Super Bowl Erlanger - Scott vs. Campbell, Dixie vs. Cooper, SK vs. Boone; Walt's Newport vs. Lloyd; Southern Lanes - Brossart vs. Holy Cross; Super Bowl Bellewood Dayton vs. Beechwood.

The Blessed Sacrament Blu-Sox 1958-60 Class C Knothole baseball team held a reunion at the school in early fall. Pictured, from left: first row, Ralph Huller, Al Jones, Dick Gosney, Tom Egan and Chuck Nussbaum; second, John Saalfeld, Tom Huller, Mike Fedders, Tom Rinschler, Jack Gormley and Dale Holocher; third, Bob Schroder, Chaz Brannen, Tom Dusing, and Joan Schufranz, scorekeeper; fourth, Mick Cahill, coach Ariana Hauer, coach Carol Brown and Dick Berger. THANKS TO DALE HOLOCHER

BRIEFLY

CLANCY LED NKY IN SAVES

All star

College of Mount St. Joseph senior offensive lineman Joe Noble, a Colerain High School graduate, has been selected to the Ohio College Football.com NCAA Division III first team. Junior running back James Clay, senior offfensive lineman Rob Bowman, a New Richmond High School graduate, senior defensive lineman Brett Hambrick, an Elder High School graduate, senior linebacker Tyler Hopperton, a Simon Kenton High School grad and sophomore punter Greg Tabar, a Colerain grad, were chosen to the second team.

Covington Latin junior Patrick Clancy, 15, led all Northern Kentucky goalkeepers in 2011 with more than 150 saves, according to www.nkysoccer.com and statistics from the final district game of the season. In 17 games this season, Clancy, pictured, was shot on more than 300 times and had a save percentage of 83 percent, placing him third among all goalkeepers with at least 100 saves in Northern Kentucky. THANKS TO CINDA RUDOLPH

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VIEWPOINTS

K1

JANUARY 19, 2012 • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • A9

SOUTH KENTON

RECORDER

Editor: Nancy Daly, ndaly@nky.com, 578-1059

EDITORIALS | LETTERS | COLUMNS | CH@TROOM

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR ‘Occupy’ coverage was overblown

Just so I have this straight: Eight people (and of the four who were identified, three live in another state) had a chat, a cookout on the Beechwood parking lot and walked to Senator McConnell’s office with four signs and banging one plastic bucket to enlighten us average citizens to the fact that we have lost our democratic voice. Then (drum roll, please) Mr. Geffre, an Ohio resident, proudly announced “This is new, Northern Kentucky is now represented!” By my count, that would mean five (at the most) Northern Kentuckians constitute official “occupy” membership status which means we are now eligible for complimentary “Food Not Bombs” warm vegetarian meals. To recognize this historic event properly, The Community Recorder saw fit to devote one-third of the front page, complete with bold headlines and three color photos! God only knows what will happen when this little group swarms in to “occupy” Rabbit Hash ... they may be bitten by the mayor – she is not a vegetarian!

Mark Koenig Park Hills

Creation Museum employee responds

We are responding to the guest column that attacked us and our future Ark Encounter, a

full-size Noah’s Ark and other attractions in Northern Kentucky. We flatly reject the charge that we “lack respect for science.” Scientific discoveries have provided great benefits. Furthermore, we employ several staff with doctorate degrees; my PhD is in molecular genetics from Ohio State University. The columnist has probably led many readers to a wrong conclusion about the Ark’s funding. When she claims “state aid” for the Ark will be received, here is what was conveniently omitted: the only taxpayer who will help fund the park is the person who actually visits and pays sales tax. A portion of that tax might be refunded to the Ark LLC if attendance milestones are reached. No money will come from the state budget. In reality, the Ark Encounter will add millions of dollars to the state treasury annually. Also, there is no church-state conflict. There is no “establishment” of religion because the state is not compelling anyone to visit the Ark. It’s a pity that in a tough economy, Ark opponents don’t seem to mind hurting the state’s coffers – as well as thousands of job seekers. For more, see AnswersInGenesis.org.

Dr. Georgia Purdom, research scientist and speaker Creation Museum/Answers in Genesis Petersburg

WHAT OUTSTANDING WORK

Clark Horine and Julie Reinhart received What Outstanding Work (WOW) Awards at the Nov. 14 Kenton County Board of Education meeting. The awards recognize employees that demonstrate excellence in support of children. Horine, an R.C. Hinsdale teacher, receives his WOW Award from board member Becky Melching and vice-chairperson Carl Wicklund. THANKS TO TERESA WILKINS

CommunityPress.com

Stephenson remembers Holbrook Lanny R. Holbrook, 65, of Fort Mitchell, died Jan. 6, 2012, at Hospice Care of St. Elizabeth Edgewood. He was an attorney, real estate investor and philanthropist. I am sure that Lanny’s soul will rest in peace now as his time on this earth has passed. I also know that he had a very giving heart and helped many folks in trouble who were in his properties. I remember him when he began his political adventures with Bruce Lunsford in their first campaign for John Y. Brown who became governor. He was a very smart attorney graduating from the University of Cincinnati with many honors. He contributed in many ways to his undergraduate college of Thomas More and to his high school, St. Henry’s. I always considered him a friend. We did pray for him often and I know he shared his wealth while he had it with many people and good causes. The one thing I liked about him most was that he was the same

person with the garage worker as he was with the garage owner. He was quiet and unassuming but smart John as they come in Stephenson the field of law because he was COMMUNITY RECORDER GUEST a good listener. COLUMNIST Many leaves fall from a tree in a life time. Some blow away with the wind. Leaves which fell from his tree of life touch many more persons in a positive manner than the economic times which he faced in the last days of his life during which these troubling times have indicated. He help develop a property base approaching almost $60 million and that meant a lot of homes and jobs for many of our citizens. He was a doer and in our greatest tradition as a free country and in a free enterprise system he took risk with his own fortune so that others might progress. Unfortunately

that risk has also has its down side which he tried to manage as best he could. I know the feeling as I have seen many citizens facing these same problems on a smaller scale. Sometimes people forget what they were given the day before and only look at what is happening today. Look at the many good and godly deeds he did in the Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky areas. God is the judge of all and he is merciful for which I am thankful. I loved my friend Lanny and I am glad his fellow St. Henry graduate Dick Wilson lifted him up in prayer at our Fort Mitchell men’s prayer breakfast. I hope all his properties can be restored and that those who have been helped by him lend a hand to help all of us restore our country through this treacherous economic time in our history. His family is in all our prayers. May he live in peace in the arms of God. John Stephenson is a resident of Independence.

Nominate Guard, Reserve employers for 2012 Freedom Award As our nation faces continued high unemployment and ongoing military conflicts, members of the National Guard and Reserve often face challenges finding employment opportunities that accommodate their commitment to our country. Thankfully, there are thousands of employers across the country that go out of their way to help Guardsmen and Reservists and their families. These employers deserve recognition for their contribution to our military heroes and to our national security. They make it possible for Guardsmen and Reservists to serve our country in uniform, without sacrificing a good paying job when they return from deployment. To highlight these job creators, the Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve (ESGR), an agency within the Department of Defense, established the Secretary of Defense Freedom Award in 1996. The Freedom Award is the Department of Defense’s highest award for civilian employers who support Guard and Reserve members. The award recognizes employers

that go above and beyond in their support of Guardsmen and Reservists and their families, and promotes U.S. Rep. their support Geoff Davis as a model for others to folCOMMUNITY RECORDER GUEST low. COLUMNIST All employers, large, small, public and private, are eligible to be nominated. Last year’s recipients included diverse employers, including a large car company, a financial services firm, two sheriff’s departments, a small town, and a church. More than 1,700 service members have already submitted nominations for the 2012 Freedom Award including 24 from Kentucky. Kentucky has a great history of military service and supporting our troops. If you are a Guardsman or Reservist, there is still time to nominate your employer and bring them the recognition they deserve. Service members, or a family member acting on their behalf, may submit nominations

at www.Free domAward.mil through Jan. 16. The 2012 award recipients will be announced in early summer and honored in Washington, D.C., during a special ceremony next fall. I hope to see an employer from Kentucky receive this award not only because it would showcase our communities’ support for our troops, but it would also bring attention to the needs of our servicemen and women. By recognizing those who support our troops, we encourage others to do the same. To overcome the challenges of this weak economy, members of the National Guard and Reserve and their families depend on their civilian jobs. Please help give back by encouraging Guardsmen and Reservists to nominate exceptional employers for this national award. To learn more about supporting our troops, please visit http://GeoffDavis. house.gov/Troops/.

op a following that made him the champion of Kentucky’s socalled freedom fighters from potheads to militia groups. He also became the hope for that slice of the electorate that sought an alternative to frustrating partisanship. He became synonymous with legalization, but expanded his platform to include additional issues like a freeze on college tuition prices and mountaintop removal. Gatewood would surely reject a label, but he followed libertarian principles. He rambled on at rallies he wanted to “Take the government and the police out of your bedroom and your bloodstreams and your brains and your bladders your billfolds and

your back pockets and put ‘em back into a little box where they belong.” He claimed he was Tea Party before Tea Party was cool. His propensity to grab the spotlight landed him a brief comedy gig, a Lexington radio show, and a trip to jail when he blocked a 4th of July parade. The mayor had put the UN float ahead of the USA float. In this last quest for the governor’s office, he embraced the slogan, “A Perennial Candidate for Perennial Problems.” I had the occasion to meet and talk with him last October. One could tell he had weathered more than a few rough campaigns. His autobiography, “The Last Free Man in America,” entertainingly recounts his travails across the

country, his attempts to pass the state bar exam, and a variety of other risks. The airlines would have charged a fee for the bags under his eyes. But I, like anyone who paid attention to Gatewood, soon found a considerate, intelligent, articulate, and determined man who cared about the commonwealth. He was more than a distraction in Kentucky politics. He challenged the status quo. He provided comic relief to campaigns. He will be missed, more than every four years. Gatewood was more than the Kentucky Fried Candidate.

U.S. Rep. Geoff Davis, R-Hebron, is a member of the U.S. House of Representatives.

Gatewood: More than the Ky. Fried Candidate A Kentucky folk hero has passed. For 20 years, Lexington attorney and activist Gatewood Galbraith served as an also-ran in statewide races. Earning a cult following of independent voters while annoying the establishment, Gatewood always made election season interesting. Since his first quest for the Democratic gubernatorial nomination in 1991, Galbraith served as the poster boy for opposing government intrusion on civil liberties and for his chief goal: legalizing marijuana. One of his early fundraisers, an outdoor music festival, was billed as “Gatewoodstock.” His chief endorsement came from Willie Nelson.

A native of the Bluegrass and a fixture around the University of Kentucky campus for years, onlookers could spot Gatewood from afar by his David tall, lanky Wolfford frame, signaCOMMUNITY ture hat, and RECORDER GUEST COLUMNIST friendly demeanor. I first encountered him outside the Kentucky Theater on Lexington’s Main Street when he asked me to sign his petition to get on the ballot. I declined. Over the following election cycles I watched this man devel-

SOUTH KENTON

RECORDER

A publication of

228 Grandview Drive, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017 654 Highland Ave., Fort Thomas, KY 41075 phone: 283-0404 email: kynews@communitypress.com web site: www.nky.com

David Wolfford, an Ashland native and UK graduate, teaches government and politics in Cincinnati.

South Kenton Recorder Editor Nancy Daly ndaly@nky.com, 578-1059 Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday See page A2 for additional contact information.


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THURSDAY, JANUARY 19, 2012

LIFE

SOUTH KENTON RECORDER

PEOPLE | IDEAS | RECIPES

Labor love of

CONTINUES By Libby Cunningham Lcunningham@nky.com

VILLA HILLS — It’s Monday, Monday morning to be exact. That’s the day of Carolyn McGoy’s appointment. That’s the day she and her husband, Tom McGoy, find out she has cancer. Monday happens often during their journey; sometimes they spend it at chemotherapy. Sometimes they spend Tuesday awaiting an MRI. One Wednesday morning though, three years after Carolyn passed, a copy of their journey, with a glistening gold cover appeared on a desk. “Thanks for your interest in the book!” a scrawled and distinct cursive handwriting read. “Let me know your thoughts about the chronicle of our great journey.”

A labor of love

The handwriting belonged to Tom, who wasn’t going to write a book about his wife’s passing at first. “Our Great Journey,” originally published by the Villa Hills man in 2009, is the story of his wife’s cancer. He wrote it because “that’s the way I keep her with me.” He wants to keep her sense of hope alive as well, so he now gives copies of the book to near strangers and people he said he knows will benefit from the story. “I do it because I think it’s a good story, I am proud of the book and I am proud of my wife,” he explained. “I mean that sounds like B.S. but it’s really the truth.” Originally he was penning a pamphlet for those who may be confused by the weight of a cancer diagnosis. “No one ever told us steroids have a negative effect,” Tom said, matter of factly, describing some of the details he hoped he could share with others going through a similar journey. Copies came to the cancer treatment center where Carolyn received her radiation and chemotherapy. Patients and their supporters can pick them up for a pick-me-up. “The one thing I gain from Carolyn’s relationship and the problems she had is an empathy for anything they have,” he said. “The reason I do it is because I have heard positive response from people who have read it. Cancer patients. Talking to the head oncology nurse.”

“I” becomes “We”

People he’s never met have approached him about the story, 28 months squeezed into 99 pages of hope that they too can find a home in. “There was one that just recently I almost fell out of my chair,” he said. “ She says ‘Hi Tom.’I don’t remember her from before, and she said ‘I’ve read your book.’” The woman gave the book to her husband to read. “Because that’s the way it’s supposed to be,” he

On a trip to Memphis Tom and Carolyn had a rare photograph taken. THANKS TO TOM MCGOY

er binder he has another said, laughing. copy of the novel in; he Although the cancer keeps five with him in the found host in Carolyn’s car, usually. body, first her breasts, her They’re on a cruise, and life with Tom intertwined Carolyn looks happy in her them. pink shirt. “You have probably no“My memories are ticed the shared pronoun there,” he said. ‘we’,” he writes on page 2. In the copies he gifts, he “Which rapidly became signs off on them, a memory commonplace in my discusfor the reader as well. Resions of the treatments, cently he gave a copy to a cotests, etc.” worker, whose sister is sufIt’s surprising to many, Before handing off a copy McGoy fering cancer. he said, that he was able to thanks readers for joining along the “He said ‘Would you mind remember the exact dates journey. LIBBY CUNNINGHAM/THE giving me another copy of of procedures and what day COMMUNITY RECORDER the book and would you of the week they fell on. mind signing it for her?,” He kept the appointTom explained. ments in a calendar to help, He signs with the same, rhythmic, staccato curbut how could he forget, he lived this after all. sive as he did in the note, careful to get the message Ongoing love right. Tom and Carolyn didn’t make it a point to take “Join Carolyn and I on ‘Our Great Journey’,” he pictures together when they went on their road wrote. trips, but he came across a photograph of them in On his left hand, keeping the book still as he Memphis, during her fight with cancer. scrawls, he still wears his wedding ring. It shines in He pulls it out of the worn envelope, from a leath- the atypical sunlight of a January afternoon.

BEST FRIENDS FOREVER

Beechwood band directors double as best friends By Libby Cunningham Lcunningham@nky.com

Adam Proctor, left and Joe Craig, right, head the Beechwood Marching Tigers as associate director of bands and director of bands, respectively. They have also been good friends since their marching band days at Scott High School. LIBBY CUNNINGHAM/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

FORT MITCHELL — From Covington, to Northern Kentucky University, to Fort Mitchell and Covington again. For Adam Proctor and Joe Craig, who have lived and worked together for most of the years since they’ve known each other, it’s always been band and basketball. “Well, for me, basketball and

band,” joked Proctor, who serves as Beechwood Independent School’s assistant director of bands. “We live really close,” director of bands Craig said. “It got to the point we’d leave our doors open, he would come over and get me up to play basketball.” They met when Proctor was 13 and Craig was 14. Band has been a part of their friendship since day one, and the young directors of the award-win-

ning Marching Tigers said they hope their close friendship is an example for the students. “I’ve said band is everything for these kids, and music,” Proctor said. “In the end it’s something more. They can see every single day a friendship that is working and started because of band.” Craig agrees. “They can see how these high school relationships can carry on beyond what they do here,” he said.


B2 • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • JANUARY 19, 2012

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD FRIDAY, JAN. 20 Art Centers & Art Museums The Art of Hair, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, 1028 Scott Blvd., Exhibition celebrates the highprofile world of hair. Artwork both made from, and inspired by, locks by Wella Professionals. Barbie Style Heads on display. Free. 859-957-1940; www.thecarnegie.com/galleries/gallery.php?page=the_art_of_hair. Covington.

Art Exhibits Universal Vision from a Local Perspective, 7-11 p.m., Boleros Dance Club, 8406 U.S. 42, Works by local artists. Featured artist: Emily L. Figueroa-Wolfe, presenting her first solo show. Using her own unique style paired with classic techniques, Emily takes us on a journey around the world and to our own back yards. Free. Through Jan. 31. 859-379-5143; www.bolerosdanceclub.com. Florence. Color Passions, 7:45 a.m.-4 p.m., Eva G. Farris Gallery at Thomas More College, 333 Thomas More Parkway, Original colorfield oil paintings by Bonita Williams Goldberg. Free. Through Feb. 12. 859-341-5800. Crestview Hills.

Attractions Winter Family Days, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Newport Aquarium, Newport on the Levee, Two children ages 2-12 admitted for $2 with each adult paying full admission price of $22. Children under 2 always free. Strollers welcome. Through Feb. 29. 859-261-7444; www.newportaquarium.com. Newport.

Education Target your Resume/Highlight with Word, 10 a.m., Mary Ann Mongan Library, 502 Scott Blvd., Develop effective resume to catch interest of prospective employers with specific jobs. Free. Registration required. Presented by Kenton County Public Library. 859-962-4071; www.kentonlibrary.org. Covington.

Karaoke and Open Mic Karaoke, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Erlanger VFW, 4435 Dixie Highway, Cash bar only. With Jay. No cover. 859-727-9303. Erlanger.

Museums Borders of Change: The Paintings of Gary Akers, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Behringer-Crawford Museum, 1600 Montague Road, Works by Kentucky-born artist portray rustic landscape of his home state. Included with admission: $7, $6 seniors, $4 children; free for members. 859-491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

Music - Blues Ricky Nye Inc., 8:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m., Chez Nora, 530 Main St., 859-491-8027. Covington.

Music - Classic Rock Bam Bam and the Wayouts, 10 p.m., Peecox II, 12200 Madison Pike, 859-356-1440; www.peecox.com. Independence.

Music - Concerts Samson and Delilah, 8 p.m., Florence Baptist Church at Mount Zion, 642 Mount Zion, UK Opera Theatre and international singers join KSO for Saint-Saen’s opera of the Biblical tale of love and betrayal. $28 A seats, $20 B seats, $18 ages 60 and up, $10 ages 18 and under. Presented by Kentucky Symphony Orchestra. 859-371-7141; www.kyso.org. Florence. Fusion Fest, 8 p.m. With Red Soul Rising, Sinful Crow, Dirtbag, Community Service, Camp David, PerryLouisRich, Six Pack Superheroes and Detrimental. Doors open 7 p.m., Madison Theater, 730 Madison Ave., Standing only on the main floor. $10, $8 advance; plus fees. 859-491-2444; www.madisontheateronline.com. Covington.

Music - Jazz New Sleepcat Band, 7:30 p.m., Dee Felice Cafe, 529 Main St., Directed by Bill Gemmer and features John Von Ohlen. 859261-2365; www.deefelice.com. Covington.

Music - Rock Saving Stimpy, 10 p.m., Peecox, 635 Donaldson Highway, $5. 859-342-7000; www.peecox.com. Erlanger.

Stacey Rishoi of Bellevue will perform the role of Delilah in Kentucky Symphony Orchestra's "Samson & Delilah" at 8 p.m. Friday, Jan. 20, at Florence Baptist Church at Mt. Zion. For more information, visit www.kyso.org. THANKS TO J.R. CASSIDY

Rock Hero, 9:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m., Shimmers Tavern, 1939 Dixie Highway, Karaoke with the band. $5. 859-426-0490. Fort Wright. Two Headed Dog, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. With Pop Empire and Feedback Revival from Nashville., The Avenue Lounge, 411 Madison Ave., 859-261-6120. Covington.

Erin Morgenstern, pictured, will discuss and sign for her debut novel "The Night Circus" at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 24, at Joseph-Beth Booksellers in Crestview Hills. Photo by Kelly Davidson. THANKS TO RANDOM HOUSE

Music - World

ABOUT CALENDAR

Unlucky Charms, 9:30 p.m.-2:30 a.m., Molly Malone’s Irish Pub and Restaurant, 112 E. Fourth St., Celtic, rock and punk music. 859-491-6659. Covington.

Saturday, Jan. 21 Art Centers & Art Museums The Art of Hair, noon-3 p.m., Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, Free. 859-957-1940; www.thecarnegie.com/galleries/ gallery.php?page=the_art_of_hair. Covington.

Behringer-Crawford Museum in Covington will offer "Ice, Ice Mammoth," a day full of ice-age, family friendly fun. The program features guest presenters, hands-on demonstrations, displays and more. Admission to the museum that day is free. For more information, visit www.bcmuseum.org. THANKS TO SUSANNA KNADLER 859-261-9675; www.swingtimebigband.com. Newport.

Art Exhibits

Music - Blues

Universal Vision from a Local Perspective, 6-11 p.m., Boleros Dance Club, Free. 859-379-5143; www.bolerosdanceclub.com. Florence. Color Passions, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Eva G. Farris Gallery at Thomas More College, Free. 859-3415800. Crestview Hills.

Ricky Nye Inc., 8:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. With Bekah Williams., Chez Nora, 859-491-8027. Covington. The Flock, 9:30 p.m.-2:30 a.m., Molly Malone’s Irish Pub and Restaurant, 112 E. Fourth St., Blues, Irish, roots and Americana music. Ages 21 and up. Free. 859-491-6659. Covington.

Auditions

Music - Concerts

American Girl Fashion Show Model Auditions, 9-11:30 a.m., Kerry Toyota, 6050 Hopeful Church Road, Girls ages 4-13 of all ethnic backgrounds who would like to model historical and contemporary American Girl Doll fashions at the American Girl Fashion Show the weekend of April 27-29 at Music Hall. Free. Presented by Aubrey Rose Hollenkamp Children’s Trust Foundation. americangirl@aubreyrose.org; www.aubreyrose.org. Florence.

Foxy Shazam, 7:30 p.m. Doors open 6:30 p.m., Madison Theater, 730 Madison Ave., Standing only on the main floor. $15; plus fees. 859-491-2444; www.madisontheateronline.com. Covington.

Cooking Classes

Music - Country Keith Swinney, 10 p.m., Peecox II, 12200 Madison Pike, 859-3561440. Independence.

Music - Jazz New Sleepcat Band, 7 p.m., Dee Felice Cafe, 859-261-2365; www.deefelice.com. Covington.

Meatballs and Sauce Class, 2-3:30 p.m., Argentine Bean Bistro and Wine Bar, 2875 Town Center Blvd., $35. Registration required. 859-426-1042; www.argentinebean.net. Crestview Hills.

Jorge Wojtas, 7-10 p.m., Argentine Bean Bistro and Wine Bar, 2875 Town Center Blvd., Free. 859-426-1042; www.argentinebean.net. Crestview Hills.

Cruises

Music - R&B

Belle of Cincinnati ’37 Flood Cruise, 8 a.m. Board at 7:30 a.m., BB Riverboats Newport Landing, 101 Riverboat Row, Riverboat with historians on board visits Ohio River sites hit by the worst flood ever to inundate the Queen City. River crested at record 79.9 feet on Jan. 26, 1937, and caused $20 million in damage. One-fifth of Cincinnati and one-third of Newport and Covington were under water. Breakfast and dinner served on board. Lunch served at the Belle’s stop in Rabbit Hash, Ky. Cruise returns at 8 p.m. $120, $110 seniors; $65 ages 4-12; free ages 3 and under. Reservations required. Presented by BB Riverboats. 859-2618500; www.bbriverboats.com. Newport.

Basic Truth, 9:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m., KJ’s Pub, 2379 Buttermilk Crossing, 859-344-1413; basictruth.webs.com. Crescent Springs.

Museums Borders of Change: The Paintings of Gary Akers, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Behringer-Crawford Museum, Included with admission: $7, $6 seniors, $4 children; free for members. 859-491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

Music - Big Band Swingtime Big Band, 7:30 p.m. $10., York St. Cafe, 738 York St.,

Music - Latin

Music - Rock Saving Stimpy, 10 p.m., Peecox, $5. 859-342-7000; www.peecox.com. Erlanger. Fast Forward, 9:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m., Shimmers Tavern, 1939 Dixie Highway, $5. 859-4260490. Fort Wright. The Composure and Squid the Whale, 7 p.m. With John Bobinger., Bangarang’s of Covington, 620 Scott Blvd., $12, $10 advance. 513-460-3815; www.cincyticket.com. Covington. The Soul Pushers, 9-11:45 p.m., The Avenue Lounge, 411 Madison Ave., 859-261-6120. Covington.

Sunday, Jan. 22 Art Exhibits Color Passions, 2-8 p.m., Eva G. Farris Gallery at Thomas More College, Free. 859-341-5800. Crestview Hills.

Exercise Classes Wrestling Open Mats, 5-6:30 p.m., All Star Performance Training, 8419 U.S. 42, Designed

for the committed wrestler, grades K-12, who want to reach full potential. Intense drilling and live wrestling to prepare you for your upcoming season. $6. Registration required. 859912-0764; www.allstarperformancetraining.com. Elsmere.

Literary - Libraries Shark Party, 2-3 p.m., William E. Durr Branch Library, 1992 Walton-Nicholson Road, Ages 3-12. Free. Registration required. Presented by Kenton County Public Library. 859-962-4032; www.kentonlibrary.org. Independence.

Museums Borders of Change: The Paintings of Gary Akers, 1-5 p.m., Behringer-Crawford Museum, Included with admission: $7, $6 seniors, $4 children; free for members. 859-491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

Music - Jazz Phil DeGreg Trio, 4:30 p.m. Sunday Jazz in the Afternoon., Dee Felice Cafe, 529 Main St., 859-261-2365; www.deefelicecafe.com. Covington.

On Stage - Comedy Live Bait Comedy, 8 p.m. Comedians Adam Minnick, Mike foley, Jonathan Craig, Tim Berenato and Ally Bujdoso., 701, 701 Bakewell St., Drink specials include $5 pitchers of Long Islands or domestic drafts and $3 Wells. No cover. 859-431-7011. Covington.

MONDAY, JAN. 23 Art Centers & Art Museums The Art of Hair, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, Free. 859-957-1940; www.thecarnegie.com/galleries/ gallery.php?page=the_art_of_hair. Covington.

Art Exhibits Color Passions, 7:45 a.m.-10 p.m., Eva G. Farris Gallery at Thomas More College, Free. 859-341-5800. Crestview Hills.

Education Toastmasters, 6:30-9 p.m., William E. Durr Branch Library, 1992 Walton-Nicholson Road, Build your self-confidence and develop better speaking and leadership skills. Ages 18 and up. Free. Presented by Kenton County Public Library. 859-9624031. Independence.

Karaoke and Open Mic Karaoke with DJ Will Corson, 9:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m., The Avenue

To submit calendar items, go to www.NKY.com and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to life@communitypress.com along with event information. Items are printed on a space-available basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to www.NKY.com and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page. Lounge, 411 Madison Ave., $5 wine and $10 domestic buckets. 859-261-6120. Covington. Open Mic Night, 7:30 p.m., The Pub Crestview Hills, 2853 Dixie Highway, With Mike Liggett. 859-426-7827; www.experiencethepub.com/crestview-hills. Crestview Hills.

Literary - Libraries Homespun: Ancient Egypt, 1:30-2:30 p.m., Mary Ann Mongan Library, 502 Scott Blvd., Learn about life in ancient Egypt. Grades K-6. Free. Registration required. Presented by Kenton County Public Library. 859-962-4077; www.kentonlibrary.org. Covington.

Recreation Duplicate Bridge, 11:30 a.m.-3 p.m., Elsmere Senior Center, 179 Dell St., Lower Level. Open to all players. Family friendly. $5. Presented by Boone County Bridge Center. 859-391-8639; www.boonecountybridgecenter.com. Elsmere.

TUESDAY, JAN. 24 Art Centers & Art Museums The Art of Hair, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, Free. 859-957-1940; www.thecarnegie.com/galleries/ gallery.php?page=the_art_of_hair. Covington.

Art Exhibits Color Passions, 7:45 a.m.-10 p.m., Eva G. Farris Gallery at Thomas More College, Free. 859-341-5800. Crestview Hills.

Exercise Classes Introduction to Mat Pilates, 7 p.m., Erlanger Branch Library, 401 Kenton Lands Road, Learn mat pilates with instructor from Silverlake: the Family Place. Wear comfortable clothes and bring mat or towel. Free. Registration required. Presented by Kenton County Public Library. 859-962-4002. Erlanger.

Music - Jazz Mike Darrah, 7 p.m., Dee Felice Cafe, 529 Main St., Pianist. 859-261-2365; www.deefelice.com. Covington.

Wednesday, Jan. 25 Art Centers & Art Museums The Art of Hair, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, Free. 859-957-1940; www.thecarnegie.com/galleries/ gallery.php?page=the_art_of_hair. Covington.

Art Exhibits Universal Vision from a Local Perspective, 7-9 p.m., Boleros Dance Club, Free. 859-379-5143; www.bolerosdanceclub.com. Florence. Color Passions, 7:45 a.m.-10 p.m., Eva G. Farris Gallery at Thomas More College, Free. 859-341-5800. Crestview Hills.

Clubs & Organizations Teen Council, 4-6 p.m., Baker Hunt Art and Cultural Center, 620 Greenup St., Studio Building. Have your voice heard about things you would like to see happening at the Covington Library. Free. Presented by Kenton County Public Library. 859-962-4068; www.kentonlibrary.org. Covington.

Music - Jazz Mike Darrah, 7 p.m., Dee Felice Cafe, 859-261-2365; www.deefelice.com. Covington.

Music - Rock Birdbrain Crash, 10 p.m.-1 a.m., Sidebar, 322 Greenup St., Country/rock music. Ages 21 and up. Free. 859-431-3456. Covington.

Senior Citizens

Music - Bluegrass

Senior Movie Day, 1 p.m. Frank Capra classic "You Can’t Take it With You" starring Jean Arthur and James Stewart., Erlanger Branch Library, 401 Kenton Lands Road, Includes theaterstyle snacks and discussion. Family friendly. Free. 859-9624002; www.kentonlibrary.org. Erlanger. Tai Chi for Seniors, 10-10:45 a.m., Elsmere Senior Center, 179 Dell St., Lower Level. Slowpaced, graceful, low-impact form of exercise. For seniors. $1. 859-727-2306. Elsmere.

Northern Kentucky Bluegrass Band, 9 p.m.-midnight, Zola, 626 Main St., Free. 859-261-7510. Covington.

Art Centers & Art Museums

Literary - Signings Erin Morgenstern, 7 p.m., Joseph-Beth Booksellers, 2785 Dixie Highway, Author discusses and signs "The Night Circus.". Free. 859-912-7860; www.josephbeth.com. Crestview Hills.

Music - Hip-Hop Talib Kweli, 8 p.m. Doors open 7 p.m., Madison Theater, 730 Madison Ave., $15. 859-4912444; www.madisontheateronline.com. Covington.

THURSDAY, JAN. 26 Color Passions, 7:45 a.m.-10 p.m., Eva G. Farris Gallery at Thomas More College, Free. 859-341-5800. Crestview Hills.


LIFE

JANUARY 19, 2012 • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • B3

Pork that looks as good as it tastes

Peppered bacon-wrapped pork tenderloin Friend and Kentucky reader Carolyn Grieme served us this delicious stuffed tenderloin. Here’s my adaptation: 4 tablespoons butter or olive oil ¾ pound fresh mushrooms, sliced (I used Kroger blend with wild mushrooms but

115 oz. can creamed corn 115 oz. can whole kernel corn, drained 2 large eggs, lightly beaten 1cup sour cream 1cup shredded cheddar or Colby cheese 6 tablespoons butter or margarine, melted 1small box corn muffin mix

button and/or cremini work great, too) 1cup chopped onion 1 ⁄3 cup chopped pecans, toasted (toast before chopping) Two tenderloins, about1 pound each, trimmed Salt and pepper to taste (start with a teaspoon of each) 8 slices thick peppered bacon 1 ⁄3 to ½ cup firmly packed brown sugar, dark or light

Preheat oven to 450. Melt butter and add mushrooms, onions and sauté until tender. Stir in nuts and set aside. Butterfly pork by cutting a slit into the middle about 2⁄3 of the way down. It will open like a book. Then pound it out to even thickness and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Spread mushroom mixture evenly, leaving a bit of a border so the filling doesn’t ooze out too much. Roll up and wrap 4-5 bacon slices around tenderloin. If you like, you can get the pork ready to this stage the morning of your party but let sit out about 30 minutes prior to baking. (Now if you forget, that’s OK – just remember that it

Rita's stuffed pork tenderloin features mushrooms, onion, pecans and peppered bacon. THANKS TO RITA HEIKENFELD. will take longer to bake). Place, seam side down, in roasting pan. Rub evenly with brown sugar and bake uncovered at 450 degrees for15 minutes. Reduce temperature to 400 and bake about15 more minutes, or until meat thermometer registers150. Don’t over bake so that meat stays moist. To toast pecans: Toast in single layer in 350 degree oven just until they smell fragrant, about 6 minutes or so.

Corn pudding No. 1 similar, to City BBQ For Gary, a Bethel reader, who loves the corn pudding at this restaurant and wants to make it at home. I called the restaurant and they told me their pudding contained basically creamed corn and regular corn, milk, eggs, sour cream and corn meal, among other things. Here’s one from my files that readers say is similar except for the cheese, which the restaurant’s does not contain. If you like, leave the cheese out.

Preheat oven to 350 and butter a13- by 9-inch pan. Mix everything together well and pour into pan. Bake 45-60 minutes. Let sit10 minutes before serving.

Five-star classic corn pudding

Check out my blog Cooking with Rita at Cincinnati.com for this heirloom recipe. The texture is a lot lighter than the one above, and it’s a classic.

Sautéed carrots with sage

I first tasted this when daughter-in-law Jessie brought this side dish to dinner. She found it online and everybody loved them. I made a double recipe of this last night when we were having our neighbors over for dinner. It’s easy, full of good nutrition (did you

know sage is good for your mind?) and pretty on the plate. Here’s how I made it: 1tablespoon each butter and olive oil 3 cups diagonally sliced carrot ¼ cup water Salt and pepper to taste Palmful chopped fresh sage

Melt butter in large skillet over medium heat, add oil and blend. Add carrots and water. Partially cover pan and cook until carrots are crisp tender, about10 minutes. Add seasonings and increase het to medium high. Cook until carrots are tender and lightly browned, stirring frequently, about 5-10 minutes. Sprinkle with sage and serve. Serves 4-5. Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educator and author. Email her at columns@communitypress.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Call 513-248-7130, ext. 356.

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A couple of weeks ago I was on Ron Wilson’s garden show on the radio and we were talking about cooking and gardening trends. I brought Ron and his executive Rita producer, Heikenfeld Joe StreckRITA’S KITCHEN er, this pork tenderloin. I gave the recipe over the air and it garnered a huge response – I’m still getting requests for it. I thought I’d share it with you since it really is a nice way to prepare pork and looks as good as it tastes.

(78 wks)

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LIFE

B4 • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • JANUARY 19, 2012

Cold weather can be hard on pets “Nosey!” I cried, walking into the living room and finding my basset hound chewing a hole in her sweater. “What do you think you are doing?” “What does it look like?” she asked defiantly, pausing for a moment to spit out a clump of red yarn. “I'm acting out, showing my displeasure over being forced to wear clothing.” “Listen Missy,” I said, wrestling the now shredded and slobber soaked garment from her, “You may not like to wear clothes, but I'm the mommy and I know what's best!” Sometimes as a responsible pet owner it can be difficult to know what's best. I know that Nosey has fur and can go outside to do her business without a sweater to keep her warm, but there are times that that fur coat of hers could use a little help if she's going out for a long walk. The flannel pajamas I bought for her at Target were just for fun, not for warmth. Just know that cold weather can be as hard on pets as it is on people. Keep your pets safe and warm this winter with these helpful tips! Shelter First, let me say that I am not an advocate of keeping pets outdoors! It seems to me, personally, if you are going to keep a pet, that you want to keep it indoors with you so it can be a “proper” companion. Domestic cats and dogs are not meant to be outdoors pets. Having said that, I understand that others do not share my opinion. Dogs and cats that sleep outdoors need a snug, dry, draft-free place to sleep. The floor should be raised from the ground to keep cold and moisture away. Ideally the shelter should be heated and have a door to keep the elements out. Bedding should be plentiful; straw is a good insulator. Check it often to make sure it stays dry. If you don't want to invite them indoors during subzero temperatures, consider a heated garage or heating a doghouse especially for them.

Nosey wearing the Christmas sweater he had chewed on. THANKS TO MARSIE HALL NEWBOLD.

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Diet and water Pets need more protein and fat in the winter, especially if they spend time in the cold. Outdoor water bowls need to be checked often as the water can freeze. You can purMarsie Hall chase heatNewbold ed dog MARSIE’S dishes or MENAGERIE even put a tennis or golf ball in the water dish to keep it from freezing. Use plastic dishes in the winter as metal ones can get so cold that their tongues can stick to it, much like poor Flick's did to the flagpole in the movie, “A Christmas Story.” Paws It is important to keep your dog’s paws free of clumps of ice and snow. They can cause injury due to the cold or even cut into your dog’s pads. Salt and chemical de-icers can be irritating as well. If your pet has walked on ground treated with these items, when you get home wash the paws with warm water and dry thoroughly. Check the legs and stomach as well. Always dry your pet’s paws when they come in from out of the snow. You might even want to consider boots for your dog if he/she will tolerate them. Keeping warm If your pet is short haired or very small, you will want to buy him a coat or sweater. Elderly, arthritic dogs will appreciate this as well. Never shave your dog down to the skin in winter, they need the fur for warmth. Our indoor pets are used to central heat and air conditioning; so if you feel cold, chances are they will as well! Smaller caged pets such as birds have needs, too. Make certain that their cages are kept in a part of the house that is free from drafts. The same spot they sit in during warmer months may not be appropriate in the cooler months, so check! Dangers

Antifreeze is toxic to your pet’s kidneys and a tiny bit (as little as 1/4 teaspoon can be deadly to a cat or small dog.) It has a sweet taste so make certain to clean up any spills in the driveway or garage right away. There is nontoxic antifreeze. Check the labels when you shop. Many wild animals and outdoor cats seek shelter underneath the hoods of automobiles because the engines stay warm. Knock on the hood of your car on cold days before starting it. More dogs are lost in the winter time when there is snow and ice on the ground, especially during snowstorms. This happened to my next door neighbor's beloved, elderly dog. The problem is, if they get away from you, finding their way back is difficult because they may be weak to move through the snow/wind and the elements diminish their sense of smell. This is another reason to make sure you dog has tags and/or a microchip. Always make sure this information is up to date and thorough. I have found dogs with collars but no ID tags and ones with vet issued rabies tags, but nothing else. This happened on weekends where it was impossible to get through to the vet's office for the names of the owners. (This is a big pet peeve of mine!) Your home should be pet-proofed! Make certain that your pets can’t knock over space heaters, knock candles off of low tables with their tails, or get too close to the fireplace. They can be burned or worse, start fires. Also, keep your hot drinks up off of low surfaces. If you have any other tips for cold weather pet care, please share them with me! Stay warm...nothing is better than a warm puppy or kitten! ;) For more pet care tips, visit www.marsiesmenagerie.com. If you have ideas for future pet columns, contact Marsie Hall Newbold at marsolete@insightbb.com.

Foster care board volunteers needed in NKY The Northern Kentucky Citizen Foster Care Review Boards are seeking volunteers to make a difference in the

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lives of local children in foster care, especially those in Harrison, Grant, Nicholas and Pendleton counties. Volunteers are needed to review cases of children placed in foster care because of abuse, dependency and neglect . Volunteers are not required to reside in the county where a board meets. All volunteers must complete a six-hour initial training session and consent to a criminal record and central registry check. A recommendation is then made to the chief judge of the District Court or Family Court for appointment. All Northern Kentucky CFCRBs meet in the Northern Kentucky area. The meeting schedules for the boards most in need of volunteers are:

Harrison/Nicholas County CFCRB

The Harrison/Nicholas County CFCRB meets quarterly on the fourth Wednesday of the meeting month. Meetings take place at 9 a.m. local time.

Grant County CFCRB

The Grant County CFCRB meets quarterly on the third Monday of the meeting month. Meetings take place at 4 p.m. local time.

Pendleton County CFCRB

The Pendleton County CFCRB meets quarterly on the fourth Wednesday of the meeting month. Meetings take place at 1 p.m. local time. For more information, contact Jamie Bergman, Family Services Coordinator for the Northern Kentucky CFCRBs Administrative Office of the Courts at 859-334-3245 or jamiebergman@kycourts.net.


LIFE

JANUARY 19, 2012 • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • B5

'Sweetening the soil’ could end up harming gardens Question: I’ve been keeping the fireplace going with all the cold weather we’ve had. Are wood ashes good for the garden? Answer: Wood ashes contain potash and have some use as a liming material. Their rather low neutralizing value ranges from 30 percent to 70 percent, expressed as calcium carbonate. The ash of hardwoods, such as maple, elm, oak and beech, contains about one-third more calcium mainly as the oxide, but, on exposure to moisture, they

are largely in the carbonate form by the time they are applied to soil. So, if a soil test shows that Mike your soil Klahr pH is too HORTICULTURE low for the CONCERNS crops you are growing (i.e., if it’s below pH 6.3 for most vegetables), then lime or wood ashes may be added to raise the soil pH. However, most garden

and landscape soil samples brought in to the Boone County Extension Office are already too alkaline or basic, so adding more lime or wood ashes to “sweeten the soil” would actually make the situation worse, and it becomes difficult for the plants to absorb the nutrients out of the soil. Thus, the answer is the same as that to the question, “should I add lime to my soil?” The answer is: “Never add lime or wood ashes unless a soil test reveals the need.” Soil testing is a free service

through your local Northern Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service Office. Coal ash has little or no liming value. Do not use it on garden soils because it contains a fairly high concentration of heavy metals and other toxic compounds which may be taken up by the plants. With regard to garden planning, it’s best not to plant tomatoes in the same spot each year. As you continue your vegetable garden from year to year, try to avoid planting the same or even closely relat-

MARRIAGE LICENSES Donna Harp, 46, and Micul Hall, 48, both of Batavia, issued Dec. 22. Ashley Baker, 28, and Iain Murray, 29, both of Cincinnati, issued Dec. 27. Carrie Frandoni, 32, and Joseph Souder, 34, both of Middleton, issued Dec. 27. Alyssa Evans, 32, and Adam Osborne, 23, both of Cincinnati, issued Dec. 27. Carol Marker, 51, and Roger Feight, 60, both of New Bremen, issued Dec. 27. Mara Flowers, 26, and Brian

Lonneman, 27, both of Manchester, issued Dec. 27. Fatou Tall, 27, and Charles Ruprecht II, 34, both of Covington, issued Dec. 27. Arpita Chandra, 31, of Missouri and Subrata Behera, 29, of Fort Mitchell, issued Dec. 27. Renee Wells, 51, of Louisville and Gary Rudolph, 62, of Covington, issued Dec. 28. Angela Hill, 33, and Daud Geazan, 48, both of Springfield, issued Dec. 28. Nedra Embry, 39, of Covington

and Craig Walker, 42, of Covington, issued Dec. 29. Teresa McDermitt, 55, and Michael Snyder, 54, both of Washington Court House, issued Dec. 29. Missie Dowel, 27, and Bryan Hyde, 27, both of Cincinnati, issued Jan. 3. Jane Betttis, 32, and Michael Bork, 38, both of Augusta, issued Jan. 4. Pamela Monroe, 46, and Michael Louis, 56, both of Covington, issued Jan. 4.

Tricia Pangallo, 22, and Edward Muench, 24, both of Fort Wright, issued Jan. 6. Dorothy Nash, 36, and Wade Hester, 52, both of Covington, issued Jan. 6. Violet Penick, 37, and James Cooks, 33, both of Covington, issued Jan. 6. Milagros Cairo, 26, and Dustin Zeller, 28, both of Villa Hills, issued Jan. 9. Elizabeth Horne, 31, and Nicholas Snyder, 31, both of Covington, issued Jan. 9.

Bluegrass Ink is now open for business at 659 Stevenson Road in Erlanger. Bluegrass Ink, started by locals Chad Longbons and Larry Bergelt, offers a full line of compatible and OEM ink, toner and ribbon cartridges for printers. For more information, visit www.bluegrassink.com or call 859-448-3321.

TSGA offers new hemorrhoid treatment Tri-State Gastroenterology Associates (TSGA) in Crestview Hills now offers the hemorrhoid banding treatment using the propri-

etary CRH O’Regan System. The CRH O’Regan System is a non-surgical hemorrhoid removal that is fast and painless. TSGA is the first practice in Northern Kentucky to offer this innovative, new technology, which requires no pain medication before or after the procedure. The average procedure time is 30 seconds to one minute. Many patients with office jobs can return to work following the appointment. Others rest at home afterward and can resume normal activities the next day. For more information, contact Jack Rudnick Jr. at 859-760-9009.

Kwik Kopy acquires local sign company Kwik Kopy Business Center (KKBC) in Taylor Mill acquired All Signs Express of Florence in December. The new business, owned by Mark Kiser, will be called All Signs of Northern Kentucky and will be an integrated service company for KKBC. KKBC offers graphic design, color printing, digital black-and-white and color copying, blue print duplication and large color poster production, and now will offer most types of signage, from small banners, auto decals and yard signs to electric signs. KKBC accepts files electronically for all types of printing

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kale, collards, Brussels sprouts, broccoli, kohlrabi, turnips, rutabaga, Chinese cabbage, mustard • peas, broad beans, snap beans, lima beans • carrots, parsley, celery, celeriac, parsnip • potatoes, eggplant, tomatoes, peppers • pumpkins, squash, watermelons, cucumbers, muskmelons • endive, salsify, lettuce In addition, root and bulb crops are susceptible to many of the same soil pests so try to rotate these every year.

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LIFE

B6 • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • JANUARY 19, 2012

Why is this so hard?

It’s a question I often hear from the lips of my 10-year-old daughter. Frustrated by fifth-grade math, (which by the way, I feel stumped by myself) and new and more challenging songs from piano lesJulie House sons, she COLUMNIST often questions the reasoning behind the level of difficulty. “No one said it would be easy,” is often my reply. “Not easy, but definitely worth the work. “Ahem.” How often, I wondered, do I

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take my own advice? On a daily basis I often find myself asking, “Why is life so hard, Lord? Why is it so hard to find affordable groceries, gas, and anything else for that matter? Why is it so hard to raise kids with high morals and values in such a sin-infested world? So hard to find a job, hard to stay motivated to lose weight. Why? Why? Why?” “No one said it would be easy, my child,” is the soft reply I hear if I am quiet enough to listen. “Not easy, but definitely worth the work.” I recently heard a song on the radio, I hadn’t heard for some time. The song title, “Held”, by Natalie Grant, speaks volumes about what we are promised in times of difficulty and trial. “Who told us we’d be rescued?” states the lyrics of the first verse. The chorus goes on to remind me that I may not have been promised freedom from trial and difficulty, but I have been promised a safe place to land when I fall. “This is what it is to be loved, And to know that the promise was When everything fell, we’d be HELD.” Just the other day, I heard a “sniffling” sound coming from my daughter’s

room. As I entered, I found a frustrated little girl sitting at her keyboard, tears strolling down her cheek. (She’s a bit emotional, not sure where she gets it.) I walked up behind her, put my arms around her and just held her. “I love you.” I said. “I know what you’re working on is hard, but it will be beautiful music someday.” The next time you look above and find yourself asking, “why is this so hard?” Be still and listen, you may just hear a loving voice saying, “I love you, and I know what you’re going through is incredibly hard, but it will be beautiful music someday.” Life may not always be easy, but we can always be ensured that even in the darkest and most frustrating times of life; when everything falls, we will be HELD. “The eternal God is your refuge and his everlasting arms are under you...” Deuteronomy 33:27 Julie House is a resident of Independence, and founder of Equipped Ministries, a Christian based health and wellness program with a focus on weight loss. She can be reached at 802-8965. Check out her website for meeting times and locations www.equipped4him.blogspot.com.

PARTY FOR GOOD CAUSE

Party for Good Cause President Karen Bieger presents a check to Vickie Henderson, executive director of Northern Kentucky Children's Advocacy Center, with proceeds from the Black-n-Blue Ball. THANKS TO GAIL MYERS

St. E hosts family wellness event Jan. 21 St. Elizabeth Healthcare will have a Family Health and Wellness event from noon to 4 p.m. Saturday, Jan 21, at Joseph-Beth Booksellers in Crestview Hills Town Centre. There will be several stations throughout the store for participants to visit for more information about health and wellness opportunities. The following health screenings will be available: » Blood pressure checks presented by Women’s Wellness. » Chair massages presented by the Holistic

Health Center. » BMI (Body Mass Index) checks presented by the Weight Management Center. » Cardiovascular screenings in the CardioVascular Mobile Health Unit. The cost is $79 for all three screenings, including carotid artery disease, peripheral arterial disease and abdominal aortic disease. Registration is required; call 859-301-9355. » Mammography screenings with the Mobile Mammography Van. No cost screenings, insurance will be billed, but there will be no out-of-pocket ex-

penses. Registration is required; call 859-655-7400. The following presentations will be offered: » Holistic Health Center: Yoga and Tai Chi for the Family 12-12:45 p.m. » Remke/bigg’s Cooking Demonstrations: Easy, Nutritious Family Recipes for Families on the Go 1-1:45 p.m. » Weight Management Center: Fitness for the Family 2-2:45 p.m. » Women’s Wellness Center: A Lifetime of Women’s Wellness 3-3:45 p.m. For more information, visit www.stelizabeth.com or call 859-301-6300.

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LIFE

JANUARY 19, 2012 • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • B7

Challenge: Try tracking fruits for five days

Doug Doty, Melody Ludwig, Curtis Poland, Jennifer Morgan and Donny Stephens of Northern Kentucky were among Santa's helpers who brought gifts for the children served by the Northern Kentucky Children's Advocacy Center. THANKS TO GAIL MYERS

Advocacy center thankful for community's generosity Community Recorder Northern Kentucky Children’s Advocacy Center (NKCAC) extends thanks to the Advocates, Fidelity Investments and the Northern Kentucky community for providing gifts and holiday support for the children and families served by the NKCAC. The NKCAC provides a coordinated response to concerns of child abuse in a child-focused environment, offering prevention, evaluation and treatment to children and families. The Advocates are the volunteer fundraising organization of the NKCAC. NKCAC provides an opportunity during the Christmas holidays for the community to show support for children that are seen at the Children’s Advocacy Center through a “Giving Tree.” Children and their siblings are iden-

Tabitha DeMoss of Independence coordinated the efforts of 20 Fidelity Investments staffers who supported Northern Kentucky Children's Advocacy Center with their holiday donations. THANKS TO GAIL MYERS

tified throughout the year by staff as families in need. Families are contacted in November to ask if they need assistance with Christmas gifts. Children and their caregivers create a wish list. The lists are compiled, and volunteers select children from the

list and shop for the gifts. NKCAC organizes the gifts, and the gifts and wrapping paper are provided to the families. This year, 21 families were helped by the program. “Many of these children had a year filled with difficulty and trauma,” said Vickie Henderson, executive director of the NKCAC. “The generosity from the community reinforces to the children that they are special and are not forgotten by Santa.” The families who received holiday support from the NKCAC were the most appreciative. The items donated may have been trucks, LEGOs and Barbie dolls, but the meaning was celebration, affirmation and restoration. The help of so many contributed to the healing of 55 children who would have had nothing or very little to open on Christmas.

Aspire concert benefits MS Rock ‘n Aspire is a grassroots fundraiser created by the wife of a young police officer in Cincinnati who was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis right before their wedding. Fans of music, the couple decided to plan a concert to benefit the National Multiple Sclerosis Society. The first annual Rock ‘n Aspire concert took place in 2010, and the event has successfully raised more

than $10,000 to date. “After my husband was diagnosed with MS in 2008, just weeks before our wedding, I developed a passion for creating a world free of MS. There are so many people in Cincinnati affected by MS, and this concert helps fund the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, a national organization doing great research,” said Simcha Kackley, founder and host of Rock

‘n Aspire. This year’s concert will be 7-11 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 25, at the 20th Century Theatre, 3021 Madison Road in Oakley. There will be three bands, appetizers, a cash bar including a Signature MS Drink, a silent auction and more than $5,000 in raffles. For more information, visit www.rocknaspire.org.

WINTER SALES EVENT January 9th — February 25th

Give yourself a simple challenge: track the amount of fruit you eat each day for five days. Fresh, frozen, canned, dried and 100 percent juice all count toward the recommended daily intake of fruit. Fruit consumption is linked to a decreased risk of heart attack and stroke. Some fruits are also thought to protect against some types of cancers. It is recommended that adults eat about two cups of fruit a day. Generally, one cup of fruit or 100 percent fruit juice counts as a cup, while ½ cup dried fruit counts as a cup. The key is to eat a variety of fruits of all colors for the most benefit. While 100 percent fruit juice can be part of a healthful diet, it lacks dietary fiber. It also can provide excess calories. Fruit provides many essential nutrients. Fiber is provided by whole fruits. It can improve cholesterol levels and aid digestion. Some fiber-rich fruits include apples, Asian pears, blackberries, kumquats, pears, persimmons, pomegranates and raspberries. Many fruits are a good source of potassium. Potassium plays an important role in healthy blood

pressure. It may help reduce artery stiffness and protect against the damage from exDiane cess sodiMason um intake. EXTENSION Good fruit NOTES sources of potassium include bananas, cantaloupe, honeydew melons, dried plums, dried apricots and orange juice. Vitamin C is another nutrient provided by fruits. Vitamin C helps our bodies heal cuts and wounds, and keeps our teeth and gums healthy. Some fruits highest in vitamin C include blackberries, cantaloupe, grapefruit, kiwi, lemons, limes, mangoes, pineapple, strawberries, watermelon, oranges and tangerines. Most fruits are nutritional standouts for what they do not contain. They are cholesterol free and most are naturally very low in sodium and fat. And, because most fruits are about 85 percent water they can fill us up and help reduce our urge to indulge in other less-healthy choices. If you are concerned about pesticide contamina-

tion in fruits, choose organic or consider pineapple, mango, domestic cantaloupe, kiwi, watermelon, and grapefruit for their rating of lowest in pesticide residue. Regardless of the source of fruit, it should be rinsed to remove dirt and microorganisms. The U.S. Department of Agriculture advises rinsing fruits under clean, running water while rubbing briskly with your hands. Then dry with a clean cloth. Start your day off with a piece of fruit at breakfast or for a mid-morning pick-me-up. You might be surprised of how little you eat! Diane Mason is county extension agent for family and consumer sciences at the Boone County Cooperative Extension Service.

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LIFE

B8 • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • JANUARY 19, 2012

DEATHS

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Donald William Arnold, 92, of Florence, died Jan. 10, 2012, at St. Elizabeth Florence. He was the retired owner of Arnold Tire Co. of Erlanger and formerly worked for Goodyear Tire Co. and Goodrich Tire Co. He was a U.S. Army Air Corps World War II veteran with the rank of technical sergeant and a member of Hebron Lutheran Church. He was a Kentucky Colonel and enjoyed fishing. His brother, Roger Arnold, died previously. Survivors include his wife, Lydia Anna Frosch Arnold of Florence; daughters, Louise Dorrell of Florence, Joanne Bennett of Edgewood and Ann Bell of Ludlow; son, Jerry Arnold of Plano, Texas; six grandchildren; and 11 great-grandchildren. Burial was Hebron Lutheran Cemetery. Memorials: Hebron Lutheran Church Foundation, 3140 Limaburg Road, Hebron, KY 41048.

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Geneva Ruth Bandy, 89, of Erlanger, died Jan. 8, 2012, at Baptist Village Care Center in Erlanger. She was a retired cashier/clerk for Interstate Brands Corporation Butternut Division and a Kentucky Colonel. She was a member of Central Church of the Nazarene in Fort Wright and the last of the original charter members of the church when it was in Ludlow. Her husband, Estell E. Bandy, and a daughter, Connie Hatter, died previously. Survivors include her son, Wesley Bandy of Burlington; daughter, Phyllis Graves of Burlington; brothers, Jerry Hildebrant of Tollesboro, Ky., and Elmer Hildebrant of New Baden, Ill.; sister, Laverne Hatter of Bromley; eight grandchildren; 14 great-grandchildren; and one great-great-grandchild. Interment was in Highland Cemetery, Fort Mitchell. Memorials: Central Church of the Nazarene, 2006 Pieck Drive,

Harold Ray Breeden Jr., 54, of Covington, died Jan. 10, 2012, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. He was a retired factory warehouse worker, enjoyed sports and watching the Cowboys, Lakers and Cincinnati Cyclones games. His parents, Harold Ray Breeden Sr. and Bertha Roberts Breeden, died previously. Survivors include his wife, Virginia Ober Breeden; daughter, Elizabeth Shipwash; sisters, Anna Smith, Debbie Baird and Rose Lykins; brother, Mark Breeden; and three grandchildren. Interment was at Mother of God Cemetery. Memorials: St. Elizabeth Hospice, 1 Medical Village Drive, Suite 213, Edgewood, KY 41017.

Mary Buhr Mary F. Buhr, 95, of Fort Wright, died Jan. 6, 2012, at Baptist Village Care Center in Erlanger. She was a homemaker and a member of St. Agnes Church, Leisure Time Senior Citizens, Hilltoppers Senior Citizens and St. Agnes Ladies Altar Society. Her husband, Victor Buhr, died in 2002. Survivors include her son, Donald Buhr of New Port Richey, Fla.; daughter, Karen Bosse of Fort Wright; sister, Jo Whelan of Villa Hills; four grandchildren; and four great-grandchildren. Interment was in Mother of God Cemetery, Fort Wright. Memorials: St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, 262 Danny Thomas Place, Memphis, TN 38105.

Beulah Carnes Beulah Myrtle Carnes, 96, of Florence, died Jan. 7, 2012, at Colonial Gardens. She was a member of Elsmere Baptist Church and the Women’s Auxiliary VFW No. 6423, and a Kentucky Colonel. She loved animals and dancing. Her husband, Ralph; a son, Thomas Carnes; a granddaughter, Christina Carnes; three brothers;

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ABOUT OBITUARIES Basic obituary information and a color photograph of your loved one is published without charge by The Community Press. Please call us at 283-0404 for more information. To publish a larger memorial tribute, call 513-2424000 for pricing details. For the most up-to-date Northern Kentucky obituaries, click on the “Obituaries” link at NKY.com. and two sisters died previously. Survivors include her sons, Terry Carnes of Florence and Ronald Carnes of Valdosta, Ga.; and five grandchildren. Interment was at Independence Cemetery. Memorials: Elsmere Baptist Church, 250 Garvey Ave., Elsmere, KY 41018.

James Chipman James Robert Chipman, 20, of Erlanger, died Jan. 7, 2012, at his residence. He was a manager at White Castle for the past year. His father, Mark Chipman, died in 2008. Survivors include his stepfather, Dave Rahe; mother, Dawn Rahe; sister, Tara Chipman; grandfather, Bob Williams; and grandmother, Margaret Williams, all of Erlanger. Burial was at Highland Cemetery, Fort Mitchell. Memorials: Erlanger Police Department c/o D.A.R.E. Program, 505 Commonwealth Ave., Erlanger, KY 41018.

Mildred Cummings Mildred D. Cummings, 89, of Piner, died Jan. 11, 2012, at her home. She was a homemaker and a member of Piner Baptist Church. Her husband, Ernest Cummings, and sister, Emma Lou Armstrong, died previously. Survivors include her son, Jerry W. Cummings of Piner; and brothers, Bob Cornelius of Piner and Tom Cornelius of Independence. Interment was at Independence Cemetery.

Duane Davis Duane Davis, 81, of Frankfort, formerly of Erlanger, died Jan. 5, 2012, at her home. She was a retired executive secretary. A brother, Denny Davis, died previously. Survivors include her sister, May Bolte of Frankfort; brothers, Jerry Davis of Erlanger and Bill Davis of Raleigh, N.C.; and sisterin-law, Marlene Davis of Charlotte, N.C. Burial was in Forest Lawn Cemetery. Memorials: St. Vincent dePaul Society.

Wilma Davis Wilma Davis, 74, of Verona, died Jan. 7, 2012, at her residence. She was a graduate of Gallatin County High School, a retired flight attendant with Eastern Airlines and attended the Sherman Full Gospel Assembly. Survivors include her brothers, Vincent Davis of Dry Ridge, Lloyd Davis of Crittenden, Jimmy Dale Davis of Erlanger, Mike Davis of Warsaw and Greg Davis of Verona; and sisters, Sherry Napier of Union, Vernice Rae of Burlington, Trudy Davis of Elsmere and Fern Atha of Warsaw. Burial was in New Bethel Cemetery, Verona. Memorials: St. Elizabeth Hospice, 483 S. Loop Road, Edgewood, KY 41017 or Sherman Full Gospel Assembly, 3185 Dixie Hwy., Dry Ridge, KY 41035.

Joyce Gausepohl Joyce Mary Hammer Gausepohl, 72, of Severn, Md., formerly of Covington, died Jan. 9, 2012, at Gilchrist Hospice Center in Columbia, Md. As a U.S. Navy family, she and her family traveled the world and retired in Severn, Md., in 1980. She loved sharing stories about their time in Germany, was a real estate agent, an avid Baltimore Orioles fan and loved dogs. Her brother, Eddie Hammer, died previously. Survivors include her husband, Nicholas Gausepohl; daughters, Jenny Duke of Severn, Md., and Judy Harkleroad of Atlantic Beach, Fla.; sons, Greg Gausepohl of Ocean City, Md., and Dana Gausepohl of Washington, D.C.; sisters, Janet Lahner and Darlene Bartlett, both of Florence; nine grandchildren; and two greatgrandchildren. Entombment was at Mother of God Cemetery, Latonia.

Memorials: Gilchrist Hospice, 6336 Cedar Lane, Columbia, MD 21045; gilchristhospice.org.

Annie Harrison Annie Harrison, 66, of Ludlow, died Jan. 1, 2012, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. She was a finance manager for the Hilton Terrace Garden Hotel in Cincinnati and a member of Sts. Boniface & James Church in Ludlow. Survivors include her husband, John Harrison; sons, Tony Harrison of Fort Thomas, Richard Harrison of Elsmere, Robert Harrison of Ludlow and David Harrison of Harrison, Ohio; mother, Cruz M. Gonzalez of Tampa, Fla.; brothers, Juan Gonzalez of Tampa, Fla., and Andy Gonzalez of San Antonio; sister, Edmee Gindlesperger of Orlando, Fla.; and six grandchildren. Memorials: Sts. Boniface & James Church, 304 Oak St., Ludlow, KY 41016.

Wendell Hartman Jr. Wendell L. Hartman Jr., 49, of Sparta, died Jan. 3, 2012, at his residence. He was a laborer for Dudley Construction and enjoyed building things, working on cars, cooking and being outdoors. His brother, David Hartman, died previously. Survivors include his wife, Brenda K. Tolle Hartman; children, Tyler Lee Hartman and Britney Hartman; sister, Rhonda Hartman; brothers, Edward Hartman, Doug Hartman and Brian Hartman; and father, Wendell L. Hartman Sr. Interment was at Wilmington Cemetery. Memorials: Hartman Family c/o Chambers and Grubbs, 11382 Madison Pike, Independence, KY 41051.

William Hoppenjans William M. Hoppenjans, 63, of Fort Mitchell, died, Jan. 9, 2012, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. He was a human resource officer, and served as dean of students and director of financial aide at Thomas More College in the 1970’s. He was an avid sports fan, especially for the Cincinnati Reds and Bengals. He volunteered at the Parish Kitchen and was a lector at Blessed Sacrament Church in Fort Mitchell. His mother and father, Agnes and William Hoppenjans, died previously. Survivors include his aunt, Margaret Puttman. Memorials: Parish Kitchen, P.O. Box 1234, Covington, KY 41012 or charity of donor’s choice.

Mary Isler Mary J. Curran Isler, 102, of Florence, died Jan. 12, 2012, at Colonial Heights in Florence. She was a model for Mabley & Carew, Pogue’s and McAlpin’s. Her husband, John Isler, died in January of 2002. Survivors include her sons, John J. Isler of Union and Bill P. Isler of Edgewood; seven grandchildren; and 12 great-grandchildren. Burial was at St. Mary’s Cemetery, Fort Mitchell. Memorials: Covington Catholic High School or St. Henry High School.

Creed Jarvis Creed R. Jarvis, 85, of Edgewood, died Jan. 7, 2012, at Villaspring of Erlanger. He was a retired insurance agent with the former Commonwealth Insurance Co. and a member of Southside Baptist Church and the Golden Rule Masonic Lodge No. 345 F&AM. He was a U.S. Navy World War II veteran. Survivors include his wife, Norma Jean Scalf Jarvis; daughter, Joy Lynn Haynes of Lexington; brother, Lowell Jarvis of Lexington; four grandchildren; and one great-grandchild. Interment was at Floral Hills Memorial Gardens, Taylor Mill.

Patricia King Patricia Ann King, 70, of Dry Ridge, died Jan. 9, 2012, at St. Elizabeth Florence.

Her husband, Carl King, and a daughter, Carla Lewallen, died previously. Survivors include her daughters, Mary Ann Ralston of Florence, Melissa King of Dry Ridge and Patricia Lueke of Fort Mitchell; sons, Richard King and James King, both of Owensville; 23 grandchildren; and two greatgrandchildren. Burial was at Highland Cemetery, Fort Mitchell. Memorials: American Heart Association, 5211 Madison Road, Cincinnati, OH 45227.

Betty Lancaster Betty Jo Souder Lancaster, 77, of New Richmond, Ohio, formerly of Covington, died Jan. 8, 2012, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. She was a homemaker. Her husband, Billy E. Lancaster; three daughters, Margaret Cordle, Paula Taylor and Fay Eldridge; a grandson; and two granddaughters died previously. Survivors include her sons, Terry Lancaster of Aurora, Ind., and Jerry Lancaster of New Richmond, Ohio; daughters, Billie Jo Smith and Debbie Eldridge, both of Latonia; 20 grandchildren; and 38 great-grandchildren. Burial was at Hill Crest Cemetery, Dry Ridge.

Richard Leadbeater Richard Lee Leadbeater, 61, of Independence, died Jan. 7, 2012, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. He was a machine operator for ZF Steering, LLC., and enjoyed fishing, golfing and bowling. He was a fan of University of Kentucky basketball and the Cincinnati Bengals. His father, Wilbert Leadbeater, and brother, Bill Leadbeater, died previously. Survivors include his wife, Brenda Leadbeater; mother, Anna Leadbeater of Melbourne, Fla.; four daughters; two sons; sisters, Mary Ann Straty of Columbus, Ohio, Debbie Jeffcoat of Shelbyville, Ky., and Patty Maier of Melbourne, Fla.; and 15 grandchildren. Burial was in Locust Grove Cemetery in Keavy, Ky.

Judith Megerle Judith A. “Judy” Megerle, 64, of Bromley, died Jan. 10, 2012, at her residence. She was a homemaker and an artist. She was an animal rescuer and enjoyed fishing and playing pool. She was the first female member of the Ludlow Volunteer Fire Department and a former dog warden. Survivors include her daughter, Kimberly Jean Cox-McIntosh of Junction City, Ky.; sons, Shane Hamant of Walton, Shawn Hamant and Anthony Megerle, both of Bromley; sisters, Joan K. Wilcox and Jean Irene Hartmann, both of Cincinnati; brother, James C. Megerle of Ludlow; and four grandchildren. Memorials: Kenton County Animal Shelter, 1020 Mary Laidley Drive, Covington, KY 41015.

Dana Miller Dana D. Miller, 78, of Edgewood, died Jan. 7, 2012, at home. He was a retired banker, former member of the First United Methodist Church in Van Wert, Ohio, lifelong Mason and a member of 32nd degree Scottish Rite. His wife, Patty Jean, and a grandson, Kyle Miller, died previously. Survivors include his children, Regina Burns, Robin Brannen, Becky Wisman and Doug Miller, all of Northern Kentucky; 11 grandchildren; and nine greatgrandchildren. Memorials: Hospice of the Bluegrass Northern Kentucky, 7388 Turfway Road, Florence, KY 41042.

Barbara Ann Monson Barbara Ann Ward Monson, 74, of Independence, died Jan. 9, 2012, at St. Elizabeth Florence. She retired from Cindus Corp. after 25 years and was a member of St. Cecilia Catholic Church in Independence. Three children, Daniel Ray Monson, Deborah Kay Monson and Michael Wayne Monson; and three siblings, Buddy Ward, Ronnie Ward and Donna Ward, died previously. Survivors include her husband, Ralph W. Monson; daughter, Jennifer Groves of Sparta; sons, Jay Monson of Springdale, Ohio, Robert Monson and James

See DEATHS, Page B9


LIFE

JANUARY 19, 2012 • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • B9

Deaths Continued from Page B8 Anthony Monson, both of Independence; sister, Connie Coffey of Brooksville; brothers, Donnie Ward and Ricky Lynn Ward, both of Brooksville; 16 grandchildren; and 13 great-grandchildren. Burial was at Floral Hills Memorial Gardens, Taylor Mill. Memorials: St. Cecilia Church Building Fund, 5313 Madison Pike, Independence, KY 41051.

Frank Niehoff Frank C. Niehoff, 83, of Erlanger, died Jan. 11, 2012. He worked in construction with Day Precision Wall. His first wife, Mary Jane Depenbrock Niehoff; two grandchildren, Cpl. Robert Weber and Trisha Niehoff; and his brother, Edward Niehoff, died previously. Survivors include his wife, Barbara Saat Niehoff; children, Debbie Niehoff, Cathy WeberClements, Paul Niehoff, Frank Niehoff, Jerry Niehoff, Kevin Niehoff, Tim Niehoff, Amy Niehoff and Nancy Collins; sisters, Bernice Wuellner and Mary Lou Forschbach; and six grandchildren. Interment was at Crown Hill Memorial Park. Memorials: Heartland Hospice.

Robert ‘Bob’ Padgett Robert “Bob” Padgett, 96, of Cold Spring, formerly of Newport, died Jan. 4, 2012, at his home. He retired from H&S Pogue Co. as an assistant manager of the Tri-County store. He was a U.S. Army veteran and served as a cryptographer aboard the USS Ingham in the Pacific Theatre during World War II. He was a founding member and parishioner of St. Therese Church in Southgate for 85 years. His wife, Mary Padgett, died

previously. Survivors include his daughter, Jeanie Smiley of Cold Spring; sons, Bob Padgett of Austin, Texas, and Tom Padgett of Independence; 11 grandchildren; 23 great-grandchildren; and two great-great-grandchildren. Burial was at St. Stephen’s Cemetery, Fort Thomas. Memorials: St. Therese Church, 11 Temple Place, Southgate, KY 41075 or Hospice of the Bluegrass, 7388 Turfway Road, Florence, KY 41042.

12, 2012, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. He was a retired educator for Lloyd and Walton-Verona high schools, served in the U.S. Army, and received the National Defense Service Medal and Army Commendation Medal. He was past commander of American Legion Post No. 4 in Florence, member of Crittenden Baptist Church and a Kentucky Colonel. His parents, William and Lucy Reynolds; and two brothers, Wilbur and Emmett Reynolds, died previously. Survivors include his son, Charles E. Reynolds Jr.; brother, Don Reynolds; sisters, Edith Benson, Roberta Profitt, Barbara Litell, Phyllis Johns and Shirley Reynolds; and three grandchildren. Burial was in Veterans Cemetery North, Williamstown. Memorials: Charles E. Reynolds Scholarship Fund, c/o American Legion Post 4, 8385 Hwy. 42, Florence, KY 41042.

Cheri Pettit Cheri Ann Knuckles Pettit, 65, of Falmouth, died Dec. 17, 2011, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. She was a homemaker, member of Falmouth Baptist Church and former member of the Falmouth Fire Department Ladies Auxiliary. Her parents, William “Red” and Clara Owens Knuckles; husband, Bob Pettit; twin sons, Charles and William Pettit; brother, William Knuckles; and sister, Darlene Knuckles, died previously. Survivors include her children, Robert Joseph Pettit, Kerri Beth Pettit and Clara Ballinger, all of Falmouth, and Gina Marquardt of Taylor Mill; and four grandchildren. Interment was at Riverside Cemetery, Falmouth. Memorials: Hospice of St. Elizabeth, 483 S. Loop Road, Edgewood, KY 41017.

sportsman in archery and bowling. Three brothers, Wendell, Clifford and Mike Ryan, and his sister, Joyce Ryan Readnour, died previously. Survivors include his wife, Emma Lou Kinman Ryan; children, Dennis Michael Ryan of Cincinnati, Timothy M. Ryan and Shauna C. Ryan, both of Villa Hills, Patrick K. Ryan of Farmer City, Ill., Tracy M. Ashworth of Union and Kerry K. Ryan of Independence; brothers, Walt Ryan of Verona and Bob Ryan of Washington, Ill.; 22 grandchildren; and seven great-grandchildren. Burial was at New Bethel Cemetery, Verona. Memorials: American Cancer Society, 297 Buttermilk Pike, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017 or St. Elizabeth Hospice Center, 483 S. Loop Road, Edgewood, KY 41017.

William Skinner William Skinner, 90, of Latonia, died Jan. 9, 2012, at Providence Pavilion in Covington. He retired from CSX and L&N Railroad as a clerk after more than 40 years. He was a member of American Legion Post No. 203 in Latonia and a U.S. Army World War II veteran. Survivors include his wife, Shirley Skinner; son, Keith Skinner of Latonia; grandson, Keith Skinner Jr. of Covington; brother, Clifford Skinner of Erlanger; and great-granddaughter, Peyton Skinner of Union. Interment was in Floral Hills Cemetery, Taylor Mill. Memorials: St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, P.O. Box 1000, Memphis, TN 38148.

Robert Robbins Sr. Robert Charles Robbins Sr., 72, of Independence, died Jan. 6, 2012. His wife, Linda Sue, died previously. Survivors include his sons, Robert Robbins Jr. of Petersburg and David Robbins of Independence; siblings, Dorothy Gumm, Gail Clark, Todd and George Robbins; and seven grandchildren. Burial was at Mother of God Cemetery.

Jean M. Reed Jean M. Reed, 78, of Covington, died Jan. 6, 2012, at St. Elizabeth Hospital. Survivors include her son, Billy Reed; daughter, Elizabeth Wondrely; brother, Harry T. Lay; five grandchildren; and three greatgrandchildren.

Earl ‘Verne’ Ryan Earl LaVerne “Verne” Ryan, 86, of Taylor Mill, died Jan. 7, 2012, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. He was a decorated U.S. Army World War II veteran, serving as a staff sergeant in the European theater. He retired as a machine operator at the Nu-Maid Margarine Co. in St. Bernard, Ohio. After retiring, he was an avid

Charles ‘Teach’ Reynolds Charles E. “Teach” Reynolds, 64, of Independence, died Jan.

Carmel Baptist Church in Pendleton County. Her husband, Raymond “Jack” Smith; a daughter, Anita Smith Mains; two brothers, Paul and David Flynn; and two sisters, Helen Light and Fern Smith, died previously. Survivors include her daughters, Rita Ann Bishop, Rebecca Gallagher and Pauline Glass, all of Falmouth, and Janie Paliobegis of Crestview Hills; brother, Danny Flynn of Falmouth; sisters, Joyce Jones of Falmouth and Jane Askey of Ashland, Ohio; eight grandchildren; and 14 greatgrandchildren. Interment was in Morgan Cemetery in Pendleton County. Memorials: Grant Manor Nursing Home in Williamstown, Ky.

Dolores Toebbe Dolores Rita Regg Toebbe, 46, of Villa Hills, died Jan. 7, 2012, at her residence. Survivors include her husband, Donald L. Toebbe; children, Nancy Moreland of Dry Ridge, Penny Muench of Wilder, Bob Toebbe of Latonia, Donald Toebbe of Fort Mitchell, Susan Toebbe and Bill Toebbe, both of Villa Hills, and Jaime Halpin of Edgewood; brother, Albert Regg of Withamsville, Ohio; and 14 grandchildren.

Lucia Vaniglia

Rainie C. Smith, 83, of Falmouth, died Jan. 7, 2012, at Grant Manor Nursing Home in Williamstown. She was a homemaker, retired seamstress and member of Mt.

Lucia “Lucy” Rose Vaniglia, 91, of Paducah, formerly of Cold Spring and New York, died Jan. 8, 2012, at Western Baptist Hospital in Paducah. She was a retired licensed practical nurse with Lakeside Place Nursing Home and formerly worked on Wall Street in New York. Her husband, Leandro C. Vaniglia; and two brothers, Michael Campagnale and William Campagnale, died previously. Survivors include her sons, Christopher L. Vaniglia of Pisgah,

domestic violence order at 944 Mount Zion Road, Jan. 3. Mimi Spencer, 42, 320 W. 34th Street Apt. 2, DUI, reckless driving, possession of marijua-

na at Bristow Road, Dec. 31. Crystal A. Collins, 30, 846 Ridgepoint Drive, DUI, speeding 22 miles over limit at Ridgepoint, Dec. 30.

Rainie Smith

Ohio, Gregory N. Vaniglia of Florence, Leo M. Vaniglia of Erlanger and Milo M. Vaniglia of Cold Spring; daughters, Regina L. Russell of Paducah and Sandra L. McMinn of Irvine, Calif.; brother, Mario Campagnale of New York; sisters, Rose U. Reed of Norwich, N.Y., Dorothy A. Frederico of Walhalla, S.C., and Rae Peterson of Newark, Del.; 19 grandchildren; and 12 great-grandchildren. Burial was in St. Stephen Cemetery, Fort Thomas.

Susan Webster Susan B. Webster, 61, of California, died Jan. 9, 2012, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. She enjoyed camping and boating, and was an avid Harley Davidson motorcycle enthusiast. She was a longtime supporter of animal rights and the Susan G. Komen for the Cure movement. Survivors include her husband, Cliff Webster; daughters, Marsha Anderson of Walton, Melissa Beach of Erlanger and Melody Dalton of Hebron; stepson, David Webster of Dry Ridge; seven grandchildren; and three greatgrandchildren. Burial was at Forest Lawn Memorial Park, Erlanger. Memorials: Protect 4 Paws - NO Kill Shelter, 105A Three Mile Road, Wilder, KY 41076 or Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation, 522 Cincinnati Mills Drive, Suite C281, Cincinnati, OH 45240.

Margaret Wilson Margaret Helen Wilson, 84, of Villa Hills, died Jan. 12, 2012, at St. Elizabeth Florence. She was a retired private chef, an assistant to former Covington Mayor Denny Bowman and a member of the Evangel Christian Life Center of Louisville. Survivors include her daughter, Sandra Wilson of Villa Hills; niece, Wanda Rumpel; and nephew, Melvin Rumpel. Services will be held at the convenience of the family.

POLICE REPORTS INDEPENDENCE Arrests/citations Justin Ballinger, 18, 2000 Wood-

meadow, burglary, public drunkenness, disorderly conduct, fleeing police at 45 Roselawn Drive, Jan. 3. William E. Boshears, 50, 2 East

32nd Street, executed Campbell County warrant for non-support at Richardson, Dec. 31. Michael W. Sholars, 27, 944 East Mount Zion Road, violation of

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LIFE

B10 • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • JANUARY 19, 2012 ADVERTISEMENT

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NORTHERN KENTUCKY RIGHT TO LIFE

ROBERT C. CETRULO, J.D. ROSE CLASS & CHILDREN MICHELLE CLIFF & FAMILY SR ELEANOR COLGAN, SND DEN PEGGY COLLOPY LIBBY COLVILLE, GLM TOM, KRIS, & MEGAN CONDIT MR & MRS JOSEPH H CONLEY RITA CONNELLY JON CONNELLY APRIL COVINGTON COVINGTON On this thirty-ninth anniversary of the infamous HAYLEY JESSE CRAIL decision of the Supreme Court exercising its raw EMILY CRAIL CRAIL judicial power over the lives of the defenseless JONAH JOSIE CRAIL unborn, we join with a multitude of others in many JUDE CRAIL CRANLEY cities across this nation, to carry the message of JANE JAMES C CROWLEY, J.D. PAT CUELTE Life to President Barrack Obama and to the 112th DANKS Congress. We join the over 100,000 people who HENRY MICHAEL T DANT marched in a circle of life around the capitol in KIMBERLY S DANT JACK & MARION DAUER Washington DC on January 23. TOM DAUGHERTY As much as we would like to be there, for many SAMANTHA DAUGHERTY BUCHER DAUGHERTY, JR it is impossible to travel to Washington. Again, TOM JEANNE DECKER we March on Paper. We openly lend our names FRANK DECKER R. DEE to urge The adoption of a mandatory Human Life INJANET MEMORY OF JIM DEE ROBERT S DEHNER Amendment to the Constitution of the United ROBERT C DEHNER States of America. MICHAEL S DEHNER We pledge to strive to attain that goal in memorial JOSEPH M DEHNER STEPHEN P DEHNER of those little ones who have no identity and bear CHRISTOPHER R DEHNER no names but nonetheless are written on the JOHN A DEHNER DEHNER consciences of all Americans. We are all manner BARBARA FRANNI DENKE of people - We are Democrats, Republicans, PAUL & PERI DENKE DENKE Independents, Conservatives, Liberals and all the ALICIA JOHN DENKE shades in between. ELENA DENKE DENKE The beautiful red rose, symbol of short life CHRISTOPHER JAMES DENKE and martyrdom, will again bloom in Washington LUCIA DENKE GEMMA DENKE January 22. JUSTIN DENKE WE HAVE TAKEN A STAND! MICHAEL DENKE TOM DENNIS WE WILL NOT COMPROMISE! JAMES R DETERS AND WE WILL BE HEARD! DOROTHY L DETERS SHARON M DIETZ MIRIAM DIEZ ANDREW DIEZ NORB BOH NICHOLAS BRUEGGEMANN AILENN ADAMS GRACE DILLON ANGELA BOH NATASHA BRUEGGEMANN DEAN ADAMS IN LOVING MEMORY OF AARON BOH ISABELLA BRUEGGEMANN GRACE ADAMS THOMAS X. DILLON JACK BOH CHRISTINA BRUEGGEMANN JANET ALBERS TIMOTHY DILLON DOUGLAS BOH BENEDICT BRUEGGEMANN ROBERT ALBERS BRENDAN DILLON DENNIS BOH PATRICK BRUEGGEMANN KATHLEEN ALBERS KATERI DILLON GARY & RUTH ANN BOLTE ANNA BRUEGGEMANN MARTIN ALTER P. SEAN DILLON MATTHEW & HANNAH BOLTE MICHAEL BRUEGGEMANN TERESA ALTER MARY ELLEN DILLON MARY L. BOND GRACE BRUEGGEMANN ANTHONY ALTER CHRIS DILLON J.D. BOND, SR ANGELA BRUEGGEMANN ANNA ALTER LISSA DILLON WHITNEY BOONE THERESA BRUEGGEMANN CATE ALTER CLAIRE DILLON LAWRENCE R BORNE, PHD ELIZABETH BRUEGGEMANN EDWARD & MARILYN APPIARIUS TERRY DILLON JOHN D BOURKE JAMES & EMILY BRUEGGEMANN MR & MRS WILLIAM APPLEGARTH ANNE DILLON JULIE A BOWLING RICK BRUEGGEMANN PATRICK APPLEGARTH VIANNEY DILLON ROBERT BOWLING PATTI BRUEGGEMANN BARB APPLEGARTH KATIE MARIE DILLON JEANNINE BOWLING FRANCISCO BRUEGGEMANN STEVE & CATHY ARLINGHAUS JACK BOWLING MR & MRS NICHOLAS BRUEGGEMANN BRIAN DINEEN PAUL & MARLYSARLINGHAUS & FAMILY CAITLIN DINEEN MEGAN BOWLING & FAMILY TAMMY & CHARLES ARMITAGE SHANNON DINEEN COURTNEY BOYLSON RICHARD BRUEGGEMANN, JR RON AUTERI ADRIENNE DINEEN CONSTANCE BRADY RAYMOND BERNARD BRUEGGEN JACKIE AYRES AMY G DINEEN MARY L BRANDT E JAMES BRUN BOB & ROSE BACON MRS JOAN DIORIO JANE & JEFF BRAULEY ANN MARIE BRUN ROSSANNA BAGIALTSALIEF PENNY S (WEED) DIRR RONALD BRAUNWART CHARLIE BRUNE CHRISTOS BAGIALTSALIEF GEORGIANN DISCHAR CHARLES BREWER PAT BRUNE MR & MRS LUIS BALLESTER ALICE DITRICK LISA BREWER BOB & HONEY BRUNSON DOTTIE BANKEMPER NANCY DITRICK BETTY BREWER LOIS BUERGER STAN BARCZAK DIANE DITRICK BILLIE BRIDGES TIM BUERGER CATHY BARCZAK GREG DITRICK WENDEL BRIDGES AMY BUETER MARY BARCZAK TONY & GAIL DOANE ROBERT E. BROCKMAN BETTY BURK ELIZABETH BARCZAK DOMVILLE NICHOLAS JANE BROCKMAN JAMES BURK RACHEL BARCZAK JANE DONADIO PHILIP BROCKMAN BETH BURWINKEL SARAH BARCZAK BILL & KAY DORNING ANTHONY BROCKMAN MICHELE BURWINKEL ROSE BARCZAK BEVERLY DRAUD ANDREW BURWINKEL IN MEMORY OF WALTER BARCZAK BRIAN BROCKMAN JON DRAUD JESSICA BROCKMAN JOYCE BURWINKEL CHERLYN BARCZAK THOMAS & DARLA DRESSMAN EMMA BROCKMAN JOE BURWINKEL IRENEUSZ BARCZAK LAURA DUCKWORTH LUKE BROCKMAN RITA BUSHELMAN IN MEMORY OF MARIA BARCZAK JOHN W DUNN ROBERT F BROCKMAN D.J. BUSHELMAN IN MEMORY OF JOE BARKET TED & BETTY DUPONT FAMILY LISA BROCKMAN CASEY BUSHELMAN WILLIAM BARKIE GERI DURITSCH JOHN BROCKMAN SUSAN BUSHELMAN EVAN BARKIE MARIE DURITSCH HELEN ANN BROCKMAN SHERI BUSHELMAN EMMA BARKIE EASTSIDE CHURCH OFTHE NAZARENE JACK BROCKMAN MARGARET BUTLER DEANNA BARKIE LOIS EDWARDS LUKE BROCKMAN CAROLYN BUTLER ETHAN BARKIE NANCY B EGAN DANNY BROCKMAN BILL BUTLER CRAIG AND KAREN BARTH ARICA EGAN PATRICK BROCKMAN JERILYN BUTLER CAITLIN BARTH DAN EGAN BERNIE BROSSART ANITA BUTLER KYLE BARTH ISABEL EGAN PATRICIA BROSSART MARY DOLORES BUTLER MARILYN BAUMGARTNER JOSIAH EGAN BARBARA BROWN JULIANNA BUTLER ROSE BECKERICH VERONICA ROSE EGAN BARBARA A. BROWN MICHAEL BUTLER FRANK BECKERICH EVANGELINE EGAN ROBERT J. BROWN HELEN BUTLER MALIA BECKERICH SUE EILERS FRED BROWN CHRISTOPHER BUTLER WAYNE BEIL DICK EILERS ROBERT & BARBARA BROWN FAMILY GABRIEL BUTLER TIERSA BEIL BRENT ELLIOT ROSE BRUECKNER ANNE BUTLER NICHOLAS BEIL EUGENE ENGEL PAUL BRUECKNER MARIA BUTLER CRISTIN BEIL RON & DEBBIE ENGELMAN MRS MAE BRUEGGEMAN SUZANNE BUTLER CATHY BEIL JOSEPH & ELVERA ENZWEILER AL BRUEGGEMAN ANTHONY BUTLER PHILOMENA BEIL JOSEPH III & CINDY ENZWEILER ANN BRUEGGEMAN CHUCK BUTLER ISABELLA BEIL MARILYN ESSELMAN BOB BRUEGGEMANN CHRISTI BUTLER GEMMA BEIL LOU ESSELMAN JOHN BRUEGGEMANN REID BUTLER ROSARIE BEIL JAMES & GINA EVANS & FAMILY MARIA BRUEGGEMANN NINA BUTLER WAYNE BEIL, II CATHERINE EXELER JEROME BRUEGGEMANN HEATHER BYERLY WAYNE BEIL, III SEAN & SEAN FARLEY FAMILY MARILYN & BON CAHILL GLENN & THERESE BEIMESCH FAMILY JOACHIM BRUEGGEMANN DOTTIE M FARRELL MARIA BRUEGGEMANN KAY CAPETILLO AUDREY BEITING JOAN FASOLD JOSEPH BRUEGGEMANN THE CAREY FAMILY ABRAHAM BELL DON FASOLD BERNADETTE BRUEGGEMANN DAVID CARNOHAN MONICA BRUEGGEMANN BELL CONNIE FEARS LUKE ANTHONY BRUEGGEMANN DONNA CARNOHAN CHRISTY & NICHOLAS BELL FRANK FEINAUER MARY MAGDALENA BRUEGGEMANN CHRISSY CARNOHAN GENEVIEVE BELL CHRISTANNA BELL GIOVANNI BELL CLAUDIA BELL TH RO IFE OSARY ALEXANDER BELL ANNA BELL ROCESSION ALLY ANTHONY BELL In Reparation for Years of Legalized Abortion ATHANASIUS BELL BLAISE BELL Saturday, January 21, 2012 BOBBY BELL DENISE BELL KRISTEN BELL Seth Morgan, former OH State Rep. LUCY BELL PATRICK BELL and “Think Talk Radio” host PHILOMENA BELL PATRICK BELL Julie Busby, OH Heartbeat Bill strategy team SOPHIA BELL Tom Brinkman, former OH State Rep. MR & MRS NICK BELL & FAMILY ABRAHAM BELL, JR PATRICIA BENDEL MARY BENNETT Time: 11:00 AM FRED BENNETT Where: Cincinnati City Hall – 801 Plum Street MIKE BENNETT JAMES & CHARLOTTE BERLING MARY ELLEN BERTKE JOHN F. BERTKE JERRY & LOIS BIEDENBENDER Time: 11:45 AM Where: Fountain Square BRUCE J BIEDENHARN MARY JO BIEDENHARN J. SEBASTIAN BRUEGGEMANN TRUDY FEINAUER CORRINE CARNOHAN THOMAS L BIEGER AMBROSE A. BRUEGGEMANN TINA FELDMAN THOMAS W. CARR TRUDY A BIEGER DIANA M. BRUEGGEMANN JEFFREY FELDMAN MARY S. CARR R. CYRIL BIEGER THOMAS J. BRUEGGEMANN ROBERT FELDMAN BRIAN CARRILLO META BIEGER-SHERMAN ELEANOR G. BRUEGGEMANN LARRY J FELTHAUS ANGIE CARRILLO VICKI BIERY LISA BRUEGGEMANN NORMA FESSLER WILLIAM CARRILLO BILL BIERY, III MARY BRUEGGEMANN DENNIS FESSLER SAMUEL CARRILLO WALTER BIRCH MATTHEW BRUEGGEMANN STEPHEN E FIEGER ISABELLA CARRILLO RONALD W. BITTER JIM BRUEGGEMANN MARIANNE C FIEGER VINCENT CARRILLO RITA F. BITTER ROBERT BRUEGGEMANN JEANNE A FINCK JOSEPH CARRILLO MARY & ZACHARY BITZER JACINTA BRUEGGEMANN JEFFREY A FINCK MR & MRS JOSIAH CARTER PATRICK & MARY ANN BLACK CATHERINE BRUEGGEMANN AMY W. FINDLEY PAT CARUSO THE BLADES FAMILY GABRIEL BRUEGGEMANN CHRIS FINDLEY GAYLE & WANDA CAYTON REV LESLIE F BLOWERS MM IGNATIUS BRUEGGEMANN JACOB FINDLEY MICHAEL P CETRULO MARY J BLUM REGINA BRUEGGEMANN ALLISON FINDLEY IN LOVING MEMORY OF CHARLEY & TRACY BLUM STANISLAUS BRUEGGEMANN MR. & MRS. JAMES FINKE CAMILLO D. CETRULO WILL BLUM MERCEDES BRUEGGEMANN MARIA C FINKE IN LOVING MEMORY OF MICHAEL BLUM VICTORIA BRUEGGEMANN JEFFREY E FINKE ESTELLE MCGRATH CETRULO ANDREW BLUM DIEGO BRUEGGEMANN THOMAS R FINKE IN LOVING MEMORY OF MARY K BLUM CARMELITA BRUEGGEMANN PETER E FINKE CATHLEEN M. CETRULO CHARLEY BLUM DAVID J FINKE IN LOVING MEMORY OF GREG & ELIZABETH BODDY & FAMILY DOMINIC BRUEGGEMANN MELISSA BRUEGGEMANN JOSEPH R.L. FINKE JOAN ESTELLE CETRULO FRED BOERGER

28

ANNUAL P -L P &R

SPEAKERS:

PROCESSION: RALLY:

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JENNIFER A FINLEY CATHY FLAIG ROBERT FLAIG DANIEL FLAIG DAVID FLAIG ADAM FLAIG JAKE FLAIG PATRICIA FLAIG CALEB FLAIG KATIE FLANAGAN LARRY FOLTZ BETTY FOLTZ MARY ANN FOSTER JANET FOUSHEE BETTY A FRAGGE RONALD G FRAGGE, MD THE FRAMBES FAMILY STEVEN J FRANZEN FRED FREIHOFER FAMILY CAROL FRERMAN JOAN FRILLING IN MEMORY OF MR AND MRS NORBERT J FRILLING IN MEMORY OF MASTER NORBERT W. FRILLING INEZ FROHN ROBERT A. FROHN DONNA GABEL RIK GABEL ROBIN GABEL TONYA GABEL DYLAN GABEL DUSTIN GABEL DONNA A GADDIS AL GARNICK LOIS GARNICK MARGIE GERHARDT PATRICIA GERKE MARY JO GERMANN HANK GERMANN NICK GERMANN MEGAN GERMANN SARA GERMANN CORINNE A. GERRITY PATRICK GERRITY EAMON GERRITY NORA GERRITY KIEREN GERRITY KEVIN GERRITY, ESQ. MOLLY GIESLER VINCE & BETTY GIGLIO THE JOHN GILKEY FAMILY THE GLENMARY LAY MISSIONERS MRS ELLARIE GLENN BRENDA GLUCK KEITH GLUCK ANTHONY GLUCK LUCAS GLUCK VALERIE GLUCK HOLLY GLUCK VERONICA GLUCK LAWRENCE V. GOEBEL DOROTHY GOLD ROY GOLD KEVIN GOLDADE THERESA AND BEN GOLDADE MICHELLE GOLDADE ASHLEY GOLDADE FRANCIS GOLDADE TERRANCE L GOOD IN LOVING MEMORY OF BILL & EILEEN GRADY JOAN GREEN JAMES GREEN MICHAEL GREEN MICHAEL GREENWELL JENNIFER GREENWELL JANE GREENWELL BRAD GREENWELL THE GREER FAMILY MICHAEL GREVER MR & MRS ROBERT GRIPSHOVER & FAMILY ANGELA GROESCHEN ERIC GROESCHEN GERALD G. GRONEMAN TERRY GRONEMAN MRS MARY K. GRONOTTE MARY ANNE GRONOTTE TIM GRONOTTE ELIZABETH GRONOTTE DOROTHY GROTHAUS JACK GROTHAUS PAUL GRUNENWALD, M.D. BARBARA GRUNENWALD, R.N. EVELYN HABERMEHL MRS ELAINE M HAIGIS IN MEMORY OF MEL HAIGIS JOAN M. HALL ROBERT T. HALL NATHANIEL T. HALL BRENDAN J. HALL MAURY & PEGGY HALPIN III ANNA HAMMONS JUANITA Z HANNA JEAN L. HARMEYER MARTHA HAUSER DR & MRS SIEGFRIED HAUSLADEN PAULA HAY STANLEY & BEVERLY HAY JEROME HAY DAVID HAY GARY HAY BRIAN HAY BRENT HAY CARLA HAY SARA HAY DANIEL HECKMAN ANNE BRUEGGEMANN HECKMAN ROSE HECKMAN HENRY HECKMAN VERONICA HECKMAN ELIZABETH HECKMAN CAROL HEHEMANN KRISTI HEIST HAYDON HEIST LOUIS E HELLMANN LOUIS & MARLENE HELLMANN KEMBER HERRING VICTOR HESSLING RUTH HESSLING JAN HIGDON MARK HIGDON RUTH M. HIGDON KIRT HIGDON GERALD HIGDON CHRISTINE HIGDON CLAIRENE HIGDON TIMOTHY HILLEBRAND MICHAEL HILLEBRAND KATRINA HILLEBRAND PATRICK HILLEBRAND CATHY HILLEBRAND VON HILLIARD BERNARD HILLMAN AUDREY HILLMAN MARJEAN HILS JUDE HILS EILEEN HILS JOE HILS KEN HINCHEY FAMILY JIM & MARY K. HOCHHAUSLER BETTE HOFACRE COURTNEY AND JUSTIN HOFFER GRACE E HOGAN MARTHA HOLLAND ANDY HOLLAND JOHN HOLLAND TOM HOLLAND FRED & MARIANN HOLLMANN ELLEN HOLTZ PAUL HOLTZ CHARLENE M. HOLTZ JOHN L. HOLTZ BETTY HOLTZLEITER LAURA HORAN MARY DARLENE HORTON STEPHEN HORTON REV FATHER JOSEPH HORVATH MR & MRS SCOTT HOUP & FAMILY IN MEMORY OF PHILIP & KATHRYN HUBER

BARRY HUESING WILLIAM HUESING ROSEMARY HUESING BILL HUESING BOB HUESING MARIANN HUESING JANET HUESMAN LEO HUESMAN JAMES T HULL LAWRENCE HULL CARRIE HULL CHRISTOPHER J. HULL JOHN & MARLENE HUMMEL CAROL HUMMELL ED HUMMELL SARA & BEN HUMMMEL JOHN HUMMMEL MRS MARGE HUTH IN LOVING MEMORY OF DR TOM HUTH MRS MARGARET HUTH DAVE & TERRI HUWEL FAMILY TAUNYA NOLAN JACK JEFF JACK MARILYN JANSON MIKE JANSON PAUL JANSON, M.D. DIANA JAVINS JAMES JAVINS JOSEPH JAVINS MRS MARJORIE C JOHANNEMAN MARY ELLEN JOHNSON DOUGLAS W. JOHNSON PATRICIA A. JOHNSON LARRY W. JONES JULIA C. JONES KATHERINE M. JONES JOHN WYNNE JONES CARROLL J. JONES SANDRA JONES, CPA GERRY KEAVENEY MIKE KEIPERT PATTI KEIPERT REV THEODORE A KELLER CRAIG KELLEY MR JACK KENKEL, SR KATHLEEN KENNEDY DR MARY C KENNEDY MARY THERESA KENNEDY THOMAS KENNEDY LUCY KENNEDY OWEN M. KENNEDY, ESQ OWEN M. KENNEDY, JR E.B. KERN MARY K. KERN TONY & TAYLOR KESSEN HEATHER KIMBRELL RYLIE KIMBRELL BRYAN KIMBRELL KARLIE KIMBRELL KATHLEEN KING KAITLYN KING ROBERT KIRKOFF DIANE KIRKOFF VIRGINIA KITCHEL JUDY KITCHEN NICOLE KITCHEN KELLY KITCHEN JAMES B KLUEMPER JOSEPH G KLUEMPER JAMES H. KLUEMPER CHRISTOPHER J. KLUEMPER NIKOLAUS C.W. KNIPPER LUKE M KNIPPER SHERRI L KNIPPER BENJAMIN G KNIPPER MARK W. KNIPPER, II MARK W. KNIPPER, SR WILLIAM E KOCH EUNICE KOCH CHRISTINA KOCHANOWSKI JAMES KOCHER MARK KOENIG FAMILY MICHAEL KOLB STEFANY KOO CASSI KOWAL ENRIQUETA A. KRAUS WALTER S. KRAUS BERNICE KREBS JERRY KREMER JEANNE KREMER MONICA KRIVANEK RYAN KRIVANEK MARTHA KUCHLE ROGER KUCHLE ROSE KUEBLER NOAH KUEBLER RAPHAEL KUEBLER COLLEEN P KUNATH STEPHEN A. KUNATH CAITLIN KUNATH G. COLIN KUNATH A. CONOR KUNATH SEAN KUNATH AIDAN M. KUNATH ARTHUR M. KUNATH, M.D. BERNIE & ANGELA KUNKEL ANGELA E KUNKEL ANTHONY KUNKEL ANTHONY & CATHERINE KUNKEL DONALD & THERESA KUNKEL ADAM KUNKEL JAMES KUNKEL MARIANNE KUNKEL LISA PHILOMENA KUNKEL MARK KUNKEL ERIC KUNKEL VIRGINIA KUNKEL NORA KUNKEL MARGARET KUNKEL MICHAEL KUNKEL LAURA KUNKEL ZACHARY KUNKEL ALBERT KUNKEL MATTHEW KUNKEL BILL & KAREN KUNKEL ANDREW KUNKEL JOHN KUNKEL LEO KUNKEL JOAN KUNKEL JEROME KUNKEL CAELI KUNKEL WILLIAM KUNKEL MARIANNA KUNKEL LIAM KUNKEL MARIA KUNKEL RACHEL KUNKEL JULIANNA KUNKEL MELISSA KUNKEL KATHERINE KUNKEL NICHOLAS KUNKEL BRIDGET KUNKEL GEORGE KUNKEL BENJAMIN KUNKEL GERARD KUNKEL JOSEPH & MARY KUNKEL NATALIE KUNKEL PAUL & ANNE KUNKEL AUDREY KUNKEL PATRICK KUNKEL

GABRIELLA KUNKEL SEBASTIAN KUNKEL JOSEPH KUNKEL KATERINA KUNKEL ANASTATIA KUNKEL TONY KUNKEL AUSTIN KUNKEL TOMMY & MELISSA KUNKEL TIMOTHY KUNKEL EMMA KUNKEL ELIZABETH KUNKEL JACOB KUNKEL GABRIEL KUNKEL RAPHAEL KUNKEL MONICA KUNKEL PATRICK KUNKEL ANNA KUNKEL MARTIN KUNKEL AMELIA KUNKEL OLIVIA KUNKEL DAVID & ELIZABETH KUNKEL CLAIRE KUNKEL DAVID KUNKEL VINCENT KUNKEL ISAAC KUNKEL LEONARD KUNKEL PHILIP & MARIA KUNKEL DOMINIC KUNKEL LUKE KUNKEL PHILIP KUNKEL NICHOLAS KUNKEL REBECCA KUNKEL CHRISTOPHER KUNKEL SARA KUNKEL ANTHONY KUNKEL MONICA KUNKEL CHARLIE KUNKEL JOHN & CHRISTIANA KUNKEL JOSEPH KUNKEL, JR DONALD J KUPER M.TRINETT KUPER SETH D KUPER MARY M. KUPER DUSTAN J KUPER DONNA S. LA EACE MARY JO LA EACE IN MEMORY OF GEORGE & RITA LA EACE MR & MRS GEORGE LAHNER MR & MRS PAUL LAJOYE FAMILY THE ROBERT LANG FAMILY MARGARET LAUER RAYMOND LAUER JOE LAWRIE STEPHANIE LAWRIE JOHN LAWRIE JOSIE LAWRIE MAX LAWRIE MAYA LAWRIE ADDIE LAWRIE SARRIE LAWRIE FRED LEMKER EVELYN LENHOFF FAMILY DAVID & MELISSA LEYLAND DAVID LIGHT MR & MRS JOHN LINDSLEY KAIYA LINKUGEL PATRICIA LITTLE MICHAEL LITTLE DANIEL LITTLE ANNA LITTLE PAT LITZLER TOM LITZLER MARY ANN LOHRE DOUGLAS LOHRE T.J. LONGSHORE NICK & MARGARET LUCARELLI MARY LUEBBE RALPH LUEBBE MARY LUEBBE, GLM REV FATHER PATRICK MACKIN AGNES MADER EDWARD MADER, SR ANTHONY & ELVERA MAIER VICKI MALEY DENNIS E MALIK PATRICIA A MALIK MARY ANN MALONEY DAVID MANN MEGAN MANN GIANNA MANN AUDREY MANN ANDREW MANN SR VIRGINIA MARIE THOMAS JO MARTIN MICHAEL C MARTIN MATTHEW MARTIN CARLY MARTIN JOANNA MARTIN MASON MARTIN IN LOVING MEMORY OF MICHAEL L. MARTIN OLIVIA MARTIN SOFIA MARTIN EMILY MASON MICHAEL MASON FRED MASON MICHELLE MCCLOREY JOSEPH MCCLOREY LUCY MCCLOREY ANDREW MCCLOREY HELEN MCCLOREY JANE MCCLOREY CLAIRE MCCLOREY GREGORY MCCLOREY DAVID MCCLOREY MARK MCCLOREY LACI MCDANIEL DAVID L MCGRATH MARY C MCGRATH LAURIE MCKINLEY SCOTT MCKINLEY JACK & JUDY MCMAHON FAMILY JOAN MCNALLY TIM MCNALLY CANDY MCNAY FRED MCNAY IN LOVING MEMORY OF TOMMY MCNAY NICK MCNAY BRIDGETTE MCNAY LIAM MCNAY THE BOB MCNAY FAMILY MR ALOYSIUS MEESE EILEEN MEHURON ROBERT J. MEIHAUS THE MENKE FAMILY BARRY MENKHAUS LYNDA MENKHAUS KEN MERTLE HILDA MESSMER THE METTEY FAMILY GEORGE & DIANE MEYERRATKEN VERA MEYERS & FAMILY MARLENE MICELI LISA W MICHEL ASHLEY MICHEL TIM MICHEL KYNDAL MICHEL

CHRISTOPHER KUNKEL MARY KUNKEL ALEXANDER KUNKEL SEBASTIAN KUNKEL JEROME KUNKEL XAVIER KUNKEL SOPHIA KUNKEL CHARLES KUNKEL LARRY & ALICE KUNKEL SAMANTHA KUNKEL LAWRENCE KUNKEL

KASSIDY MICHEL KARLEY MICHEL KRISTEN MICHEL JIM MIDDENDORF GAY MIDDENDORF DAVID MIDDENDORF LISA MIDDENDORF MICHELLE MIDDENDORF AMY MIDDENDORF CHRIS MIDDENDORF GREG MIDDENDORF

BOBBY SCHABELL FRED H. SUMME, ESQ JEFF SCHABELL CONNIE R. SUMMERS TERRY SCHAEPER CHARITY SUMMERS STEPHEN SCHAEPER DOTTIE SWIKERT MR & MRS DONALD SCHAEPER RON & MARY JO SYBERT PATRICIA SCHAEPER AL TALLARIGO LEO SCHAPPACHER JAN TALLARIGO MARI SCHAPPACHER JOHN TALLARIGO ELIZABETH SCHAPPACHER JEN TALLARIGO SUSANNA SCHAPPACHER JOSEPH TALLARIGO VIRGINIA SCHAPPACHER AL & JAN TALLARIGO FAMILY VICTORIA SCHAPPACHER MR FRED TAYLOR MICHAEL SCHAPPACHER MARYBETH THEMANN LEO SCHAPPACHER, JR. MR. & MRS. JOSEPH E IN MEMORY OF GEORGE & THEMANN FAMILY ANN SCHAROLD REV FATHER DANIEL THEMANN, SSPX DANIEL SCHELLENBERGER JOSEPH TILLMAN “Since the first century, the Church has affirmed the moral evil of MONTE SCHELLENBERGER ALLISON TOBIS every procured abortion. This teaching has not changed and remains ELIZABETH SCHELLENBERGER MARY LOU TOELKE CATHERINE SCHELLENBERGER JUDY TRAME unchangeable. …Since it must be treated from conception as a person, CALEB SCHELLENBERGER DEACON TRAME the embryo must be defended in its integrity, cared for, and healed, EMILY SCHELLENBERGER HAO DO TRAN as far as possible, like any other human being.” Catechism of the JOSHUA SCHELLENBERGER HHUE N TRAN Catholic Church, 2270-2274. JANE-MARIE SCHELLENBERGER MICHAEL TROTTA VIRGINIA SCHEPER LINDA L TROTTA If one would examine each of these so-called “exceptions,” one RUTH SCHEPER GLENN & MARTI TUNGET realizes that not only are the teachings of the Church morally correct, THOMAS SCHEPER ALL UNBORN CHILDREN but when these teachings are ignored, more violence, oppression, and MARY LEE SCHEPER FATIMA URIBE JACK SCHEPMAN CHRIS VENESKY suffering result. MARGIE SCHEPMAN MARY A.VENNEMANN MRS ROBERT E. SCHERRER ROBERT F.VENNEMANN Life of Mother STATE SEN. JOHN SCHICKEL IN LOVING MEMORY OF JACK SCHIERER ELIZABETH VENNEMANN RICH VENNEMANN Promoters of abortion have long argued that abortion can be morally MARTHA L. SCHMEING HELEN (HULL) SCHMUDDE LINDA VENNEMANN justified to save the life of the mother. However, are there any real life DARREN SCHMUDDE RANDY VENNEMANN situations where the mother would die if she would carry her child to KAITLYN SCHMUDDE DANIEL VENNEMANN term, but would live if she destroyed her child by an abortion? BRYAN SCHMUDDE NICHOLAS VENNEMANN KEVIN SCHMUDDE JACKIE VEZINA SCHMUDDE MEGAN FRED VEZINA “Today it is possible for almost any patient to be brought through JORDAN SCHMUDDE THOMAS & CAROL VOET pregnancy alive, unless she suffers from a fatal illness such as cancer MARY E SCHNEIDER JOSEPH & KATHLEEN VON HAGEL or leukemia, and if so, abortion would be unlikely to prolong, much YANDELL P SCHNEIDER MRS BETTY VOORHEES MARCELLA SCHNEIDER MARY ANN WAINSCOTT less save, life. “There is little evidence that pregnancy itself worsens DONNA A. SCHNEIDER BUTCH WAINSCOTT a psychosis, either intensifying it or rendering a prognosis for a full GERALD SCHNEIDER ELLY WAINSCOTT recovery less likely,” wrote in 1967, Alan Guttmacher, M.D., past CECILIA MARIE SCHNEIDER MEGAN WAINSCOTT president of Planned Parenthood. ANDREW SCHNEIDER JULIE WARTMAN BRIDGET SCHNEIDER JENNIFERWARTMAN SCHNEIDER KYLE WARTMAN “In my 36 years of pediatric surgery, I have never known of one instance CHARLIE ELENA SCHNEIDER DEVIN WARTMAN where the child had to be aborted to save the mother’s life,” stated THOMAS E SCHNEIDER TYLER WARTMAN former U.S. Surgeon General C. Everett Koop, M.D., renowned pediatric GERTRUDE N SCHNEIDER KARA WARTMAN ERIC & MARY SCHNEIDER FAMILY MACY WARTMAN surgeon at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. BUTCH & GINA SCHNEIDER FAMILY LARRY WARTMAN, JR A. PATRICK SCHNEIDER, MD, MPH JEREMY WARTMAN, JR What about an ectopic pregnancy or cancer? JOYCE SCHREIBER EVAN WARTMAN, JR FRANK SCHREIBER LARRY WARTMAN, SR MARY G. SCHROER JEREMY WARTMAN, SR A woman carrying a child is always entitled to receive reasonably DICK & BLANCHE SCHUH JOHN WEBB necessary medical treatment for a pathological physical condition KEN & PATRICIA SCHULTE MRS GAYE WEBSTER which imminently threatens her physical life, even if the unintended MARY SCHUMER LOUISE WEED CARL SCHUMER JOHN A WEED, III result is the death of the child. PHILIP J SCHUTTE JOHN A WEED, JR LILLY SCHUTTE JOHN & DONNA WEGENER “An exception is not needed in the law to authorize such operations GREGORY SCHUTTE PAUL & ELIZABETH WEGENER (cancerous womb or an ectopic pregnancy) which can be justified KRISTEN SCHUTTE CINDY WEHRY STEPHEN SCHUTTE DAN WEHRY morally under the principle of the double effect: The justified operation ANDREW SCHUTTE JULIANNE WEHRY to remove the cancerous womb which imminently threatens the LYNNE SCHUTTE CHRISTINA WEHRY mother’s life may have the unintended effect of ending the life of the CARL E SCHUTTE SANDY WEHRY child. In the law they are not even abortions,” teaches Professor DR ROBERT A SCOTT DAVE WELLER MARIANNE SCOTT DAVID WELLER Charles E. Rice, University of Notre Dame’s College of Law. MEGAN SCOTT CHRISTINA WELLER EMERSON SCOTT MICHAEL WELLER Incest ERIN SCOTT GERI WELLER LARRY SENDELBACH MARLENE WENDLING KAY SENDELBACH DOUGLAS WENK “Abortion for incest victims sounds compassionate, caring, and MICHELLE SENDELBACH JOHN WENK heroic; but, in actual practice, it is simply another violent and deceptive ANDREW & EMILY SHAW RYAN WENK tool in the hand of the abuser…abortion does absolutely nothing to CECILIA SHAW ANDREW WENK protect a young girl from continued abuse and, in fact, aids and abets ANDREW SHAW, JR THOMAS WENK GERALD SHAWHAN SUSAN WENK, M.D. the abuser in his crime,” expresses Mary Jean Doe (a pseudonym), a MARIAN SHAWHAN BERNARD & ANGELA WESSELMAN member of Feminists for Life and a victim of incest. MICHAEL SHAWHAN WEST COVINGTON BAPTIST CHURCH KATE SHAWHAN JACK & KELLEY WESTWOOD Rape ANDREW SHAWHAN PAULA WESTWOOD WILLIAM SHAWHAN GREG WESTWOOD “I soon discovered that the aftermath of my abortion continued MONICA SHAWHAN ABIGAIL WESTWOOD a long time after the memory of my rape had faded. I felt empty and GABRIEL SHAWHAN MARY WESTWOOD horrible,” recalls Jackie Bakker, a victim of rape. CHRISTOPHER SHAWHAN IN MEMORY OF GAYLE WHALEY MARY ELIZABETH SHAWHAN IN MEMORY OF JUDITH WHALEY TIM SHERMAN ROBERT & JUDITH WHEELER “Rape and incest victims actually suffer considerably from the MEGAN SHERMAN ED & CAROL WHELAN abortion. The woman feels dirty, guilty, sexually violated, down on CHARLOTTE SHUTER RANDELL WICAL herself, angry, and fearful or hateful toward men; she may experience ROSE R SIEGRIST TRACEY WICAL ALLAN & JEANIE SMILEY VIVIAN WICAL sexual dysfunction, or feel she has lost control of her life. “Now let’s look SMITH JERRY GENEVIEVE WICAL at the symptoms of abortion. The woman feels dirty, guilty, sexually violated, SUZANNE SMITH KENNETH E WILHELM down on herself, angry, and fearful or hateful toward men; she may experience AVERY SMITH THERESA WILHELM sexual dysfunction or a loss of control of her life – all the same symptoms. BRANDON SMITH CORILLA WILHELM RICARDO D. SMITH JASON WILSON “So instead of curing the problem, we are intensifying the same symptoms by SHARON L. SMITH TRISHA WILSON offering abortion. Abortion, then, is a ‘cure’ that only aggravates the problem,” JOSEPH SOLDANO LAURA WILSON teaches David C. Reardon, Director of Eliot Institute for Social Sciences ANDREW SPOOR HOPE WILSON Research. DEAN SPOOR PAUL WILSON IRIS SPOOR JOHN WILSON RICHARD SPOOR THE WILTSES FAMILY It’s A Child ROBERT SPOOR RUTH WINCHESTER RICHARD SPOOR ALICE R WINTERSHEIMER The acceptance of abortion in the case of rape, incest, or the life of the PAM SPOOR JUSTICE DONALD C.WINTERSHEIMER REGINA STAMBUSH BLAISE Q.WINTERSHEIMER mother promotes the culture of death by proclaiming that the right to life is not JOSEPH STAMBUSH CRAIG P.WINTERSHEIMER after all “inalienable,” but rather a right that is very negotiable. RICKY STAMBUSH MARK D.WINTERSHEIMER, J.D. CARA STAMBUSH ED WOESTE No matter how a child is conceived, it is a child. FLORENCE STEFFEN RICK WOESTE CINDY STEFFEN TONY WOESTE DAN STEFFEN NATALIE WOESTE RUTH M. STELTENKAMP CAROLINE WOESTE STEVE STELTENKAMP STACEY WOESTE ROB & LAURA RICHEY HANNAH NIEPORTE JAY MIDDENDORF, DVM TOM STELTENKAMP DONNA WOESTE MARILYN RIEHLE CHRISTINE NIEPORTE WILLIAM MILLER DOLORES STEWART MARK WORMALD ELLIE RITTER HELEN NIEPORTE RUTH ANN MILLER JACK STEWART ANGIE WORMALD WILL RITTER SAMANTHA NIEPORTE ANN MILLER MICHAEL STRUNK MARIA WORMALD THE JIM & TERRY ROESSLER FAMILY VIRGINIA STRUNK JULIA NOLAN WILLIAM M MILLER ROBBY WORMALD BLANCHE ROGERS JOHN NOONAN JULIA MILLER ANNA STYERS MARK S.YAEGEL LLOYD ROGERS SUSAN NUXOLL PEGGY S MILLER STEPHANIE STYERS ANNA V.YAEGEL KENNETH ROGERS GABRIEL NUXOLL ART MINGES ERIK STYERS GARY L YAEGER ANNA ROMITO ROBYN NUXOLL KIM & GLENN MINTON MARTHA SUETHOLZ HANNAH ZALLA JOAN ROSE SARAH BETH NUXOLL KEVIN & MARIA MOLONY JIM SUETHOLZ HILARY ZALLA JEFF ROSENSTIEL JOSEPH NUXOLL, I ANDREW Y MOORE AMY SUETHOLZ CAROLINE ZALLA CAROLYN ROSENSTIEL JOSEPH NUXOLL, II JAMES Y. MOORE PAUL SUETHOLZ LILY ZALLA SAM ROSENSTIEL MARGARET O’BRIEN THOMAS J MOORE OD ERIC SUETHOLZ THOMAS W ZEMBRODT BEN ROSENSTIEL JOHN O’BRIEN CLAIRE MORICONI DAVEY SULLIVAN JOAN ZEMBRODT AVA ROSENSTIEL DANIEL O’BRIEN BOB MORICONI ANDREA SULLIVAN WILLIAM & BARB ZERHUSEN LOUISE E ROTH PEGGY O’BRIEN KIM MORICONI JOE SULLIVAN ANGELA ZERHUSEN RONALD RUST KAREN O’BRIEN ROB MORICONI, JR MAUREEN SULLIVAN EVAN ZERHUSEN KATHLEEN RYAN KATHLEEN O’BRIEN DAN MOSER PATRICK SULLIVAN JADEN & KELLY ZERHUSEN PATRICK RYAN BARBARA O’BRIEN THERESE MOSER MICHAEL SULLIVAN HANNAH ZERHUSEN MIKE RYAN BEBE O’BRIEN LEON MUELLER CAROLYN SULLIVAN ISABELLE ZERHUSEN MATT RYAN MRS MARGARET O’CONNER LAURA & MIKE MUELLER JOEY SULLIVAN LILIAN ZERHUSEN SHAWN RYAN MARGARET O’CONNER & FAMILY LUCIA MUELLER TONY & DARLENE SUMME MONICA ZERHUSEN DOLOURES RYAN ROBERT L OERTHER PHILOMENA MUELLER SAMANTHA SUMME ZACHARY ZERHUSEN MIKE RYAN MARGARET C OERTHER CAROL J. MUENCH MARK SUMME WILLIAM J ZERHUSEN JAMES E SANDER PHILIP C OSBORNE EDWARD J. MUENCH BILLY SUMME MR & MRS JOHN E ZINNER, SR DIANE L. SANDER BRIAN & SULINDA PAINTER MRS RUTH E MURPHY PAM SUMME MARY LEE ZUMBIEL HENRY SARGENT JOHN L. & MARY BETH PEAVLER MISS KATHLEEN M MURPHY THERESA SUMME ROBERT W. ZUMBIEL MRS JEANNE SCHABELL DOROTHY PHIRMAN JAYNE & PAUL MURPHY MATTHEW SUMME WALT & KATHY PIESCHEL JOE MURPHY GAYLE PIRON SHANE MURPHY DAN PIRON PATRICK MURPHY Thanks to the generosity of the above DAVID PIRON CECILIA MURPHY Northern Kentucky pro-lifers, this ad runs in SARAH PIRON XAVIER MURPHY AL PLOEGER MR STEPHEN MURRAY Community Recorders on Jan. 19th & Jan. 26th JO ANN PLOEGER REV ROBERT B. MUSSMAN and the KY Enquirer on Jan. 21st & Jan. 22nd MIKE PLOEGER DANIEL NAEGELE JOHN PLOEGER THOMAS NAEGELE Name AVA PLUNKETT CHRISTOPHER NAEGELE REV ROBERT POANDL MARY RUTH NAEGELE PEGGY PREMEC DONALD NAEGELE KATHY PURCELL DONALD & JANET NAEGELE Address JIM PURCELL MATTHEW NAEGELE REV FATHER ADAM PURDY ROBERT NAEGELE DONALD J. QUINN JAMES NAEGELE City Zip Phone SANDRA L. QUINN STEPHEN & MARY NAEGELE MONICA RAHE JOE NEYER RYAN RAMDASS BRENDA NEYER BRENDAN RAMDASS FRANK NEYER Church BECCA RAMDASS BARB NIEPORTE JILL RAMDASS, RN VERN NIEPORTE Northern Kentucky Right To Life REV JAMES R REBER BRYAN NIEPORTE LOIS M REBER PATTY NIEPORTE 859-431-6380 DR JOHN D REDDEN AND FAMILY JAKE NIEPORTE Your Contribution Brings You DORAN REED KEVIN NIEPORTE GEORGIANA REED KATE NIEPORTE The Newsletter & Special Mailings JACKIE REGNER JUSTIN NIEPORTE MS MARY BARBARA REINERT JOSHUA NIEPORTE Donation Membership (any amount) JOHN & MARY LORETTO RESING FRANCES NIEPORTE PAULINE REUTER FRAN NIEPORTE Regular Membership W.A. REUTER RON NIEPORTE MARY AURELIA RICE AARON NIEPORTE Mailing Address: P.O. Box 1202 • Covington, KY. 41012 JENNIFER A RICE GINA NIEPORTE www.nkyrtl.org JAY & LYNN RICE LINDSAY NIEPORTE GLENN RICE, SR AVERY NIEPORTE

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