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SOUTH KENTON

RECORDER

CELEBRATING

120 YEARS

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Independence and Taylor Mill

THURSDAY, JANUARY 12, 2017

page 3A

$1.00 BECAUSE COMMUNITY MATTERS

Meyer’s executive assistant position unusual Scott Wartman swartman@nky.com

PHOTOS THANKS TO KENTON COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY

Frank Duveneck’s class at Cincinnati Art School.

A PEEK INTO THE PAST:

KENTON LIBRARY BOASTS 100K ONLINE PHOTOS Melissa Reinert mstewart@enquirer.com

I

f a picture is worth 1,000 words, then Kenton County Public Library has 100 million stories to share. The library’s online historic photo album, Faces and Places, recently added the 100,000th photo to its database. The photo, from the former Kentucky Post, is dated March 14, 1975, and features a man named Bill Penick. This photo is just one of thousands preserved digitally for all to see, and share, online via the Faces and Places website, www.kentonlibrary. org/facesandplaces. “People love looking at old photos; they connect us to the past,” said library Executive Director Dave Schroeder. “It’s nostalgia. Whether it’s a memory of the community or family member. Old photos allow you see how things used to be. They also allow you to reconnect with loved ones or an old teacher or doctor, anyone who made a difference in your life.” Schroeder was in charge of Faces and Places when it first began in March 2006. At that time the library had a collection of 20,000 photos. Staff was looking for a way to help patrons get more use out of the photos, so they decided to create an online database. “We slowly scanned in what we had and put them online,” he said. “It was such a success it just snowballed from there.” When the Kentucky Post closed in 2008, it donated its photo archive to the library. Soon people from the community started sharing their photos or collections as well. Now with 100,000 photos online and about 20,000 left to See PHOTOS, Page 2A

TRUMP PRIORITIES Recorder’s Ch@troom replies say take a break from Twitter. 8A

A young Dave Schroeder with his twirling whistle. Schroeder serves as the executive director of the Kenton County Public Library.

RITA’S KITCHEN Purple food – like eggplant, purple cauliflower, elderberries – are a 2017 trend. 6A

Contact us News .........................283-0404 Retail advertising .......513-768-8404 Classified advertising ...513-421-6300 Delivery .......................781-4421 See page A2 for additional information

COVINGTON - The decision of new Covington Mayor Joe Meyer to pay for his own assistant with his own money has some legal experts scratching their heads. “The fact the mayor is paying this person out-of-pocket is fairly unique,” said Chris Johnson, attorney with the Kentucky League of Cities, the major advocacy organization representing all cities in Kentucky. “Based upon what I’ve seen, it’s a different situation than you normally see. Normally there’s a volunteer situation where someone assists at city hall.” In one of his first acts as mayor, Meyer hired with his own money the former director of the MainMeyer Strasse Village Association, Annie Venerable. The city commission this month voted 4-1 to give him that authority. Many mayors have assistants. Some have volunteers. But Johnson and Covington City Solicitor Frank Warnock are not aware of a mayor paying for his own volunteer. This raises questions of the city’s liability as well as giving a private employee access to public property, such as computers, desks or offices. State law doesn’t address it. There’s no precedent, Warnock and Johnson said. “We’ve not researched it to the nth degree,” Warnock said. “There’s some discussion about it, internally.” So why does Meyer want to pay out of his own pocket for an assistant? He doesn’t want to share assistants with City Manager Larry Klein. It’s one of the first blows struck in the feud between Klein and Meyer since Meyer took office Jan. 1. Meyer has made it clear he wants a new city manager. Meyer Klein wants the mayor and city commission to have more control over city government. Meyer said there’s “zero trust” between him and the city manager. “I’m not going to put an administrative assistant into the middle of the situation between the city manager and myself,” Meyer said. “That’s not fair to her.” Meyer ran on a platform promising change. He described Klein’s refusal to resign as an affront to the will of the voters. It’s no different than when a new governor takes over and appoints a new chief of staff, See POSITION, Page 2A

Vol. 6 No. 29 © 2017 The Community Recorder ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


NEWS

2A • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • JANUARY 12, 2017

New NKY hotel tax nearing vote Chris Mayhew cmayhew@communitypress.com

COVINGTON – A proposed new per-night hotel room tax for visitors to Northern Kentucky is nearly ready for county elected officials to see. Elected officials of Boone, Campbell and Kenton fiscal courts could see a hotel tax ordinance as soon as the end of January. Northern Kentucky Convention and Visitors Bureau is seeking a new tax people staying in hotels will see added to their nightly hotel room bill. Hotel room bills will be taxed at 1 percent. Tax money raised will be put into a new capital improvement fund for a hoped-for expansion of

Photos

the region’s convention center in Covington. About $1.2 million annually will be raised by the tax. Ordinances created by NKCVB initially unveiled in Campbell and Kenton counties in December were removed to modify wording, NKCVB President Eric Summe said. “None of the intent is changing,” Summe said. A new hotel tax ordinance should be ready for each Fiscal Court to see as early as the end of January, Summe said. “This whole concept was basically designed to replicate what Lexington did in the last legislative session,” he said. Lexington put in $10 million toward its new convention center expan-

sion plan. Lexington’s expansion will create a 785,000-square-foot convention center nearly triple Northern Kentucky Convention Center’s current capacity, he said. The region’s convention center is losing large conventions to other cities, Summe said. For instance, the Association of Manufacturing Excellence convention outgrew Northern Kentucky’s convention center in 2015. Northern Kentucky lost 4,500 hotel room nights by losing the convention an about $216,000 in tax revenues, Summe said. Convention center plans in Lexington and Louisville’s convention center are outpacing what

Northern Kentucky offers, Summe said. Summe said all three county judge-executives in Northern Kentucky are supporting the tax. All four Campbell County Fiscal Court commissioners said they favor 1 percent hotel room tax. Tea Party favorite Commissioner Charlie Coleman of Alexandria said he supports a room tax as an economic investment. Coleman said. “If we can expand the convention center maybe we can get the American Legion (convention) instead of Cincinnati.” The American Legion’s national convention for 2016 was in Cincinnati. “The convention center is an important asset in

Faces and Places is searchable by keyword, surname, address, city, Continued from Page 1A or subject. Because of the accessibility of the scan, the library has the photographs through the largest online photo datadatabase, many have base in the state and one been used by local auof the largest in the counthors, in local history try, according to Schroebooks, by the media, by der. teachers and students Since its inception a and by museums and lodecade ago, the Faces cal businesses. and Places website has Steven J. Rolfes has received more than 9.2 used Faces and Places for his “Images of America” books. “The Faces and Places database has provided several wonderful photos for each Find news and information from your community on the Web of my books,” he said. Independence • cincinnati.com/independence “A lot of the photos are Taylor Mill • cincinnati.com/taylormill not available any other cincinnati.com/northernkentucky place, or if they are News available, the cost for Nancy Daly Editor ..............................578-1059, ndaly@communitypress.com using the photos is asMelissa Stewart Reporter .....................578-1058, mstewart@communitytronomical. This is a press.com fantastic resource, and Melanie Laughman Sports Editor ............513-768-8512, I am very thankful for mlaughman@communitypress.com James Weber Sports Reporter ................578-1054, jweber@communitypress.com it.”

sbrookbank@communitypress.com

It has been almost a year since the beloved Rabbit Hash General Store was destroyed by fire, but driving through Rabbit Hash today, you’d hardly know it. Construction has been going strong on the General Store since the fall, when plans were approved. Now the walls are up and the Coca-Cola sign is painted. The Rabbit Hash Historical Society wants to keep the General Store on the National Register of Historic Places. The drawings and plans had to be approved by national, state and local historical societies before the plans could move forward. Strict restrictions from the U.S. Department of the Interior state that wood from the same time period must be used in restoration of the General Store. Now construction moves inside where workers must lay 3-inch

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The outside of the Rabbit Hash General Store is complete, less than a year since fire destroyed the beloved landmark. Don Clare, president of the Rabbit Hash Historical Society, said the General Store could possibly be open in early spring 2017.

tongue-and-groove paneling through the inside of the store. “The best news of 2017 is that we don’t think the opening of the store is going to take as long as we first projected. It is not going to take until late summer and Old Timers Day,” said Don Clare,

president of the Rabbit Hash Historical Society in a statement. “We would really like it to be on Feb. 13, 2017. One year to the day it burned (just for the non-believers). But that may be pushing it. Early spring, however, is certainly not out of the question.”

Position

Klein has maintained it was gathering public information available to anyone. The attorney general has not ruled. “To me, it’s obvious he does not have the best interest in mind for the city of Covington as he chooses to force the hand of the commission to deal with him,” Meyer said. “This is sad.” Klein said he didn’t campaign against Meyer and he doesn’t know why Meyer wants him out. Klein has worked for the city since 2008, first as assistant city manager then for the past seven years as city manager. He’s worked under four previous mayors. “I think I do my job,” Klein said. “I think I’m effective. I think you can look around town and see progress. I’m part of the team that made this progress happen. The city is more fiscally solvent today. There’s a lot of good things. Why he wants me to resign, I have no idea.”

Continued from Page 1A

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room taxes that are even higher when they travel to other cities, Campbell County Judge-executive Steve Pendery said. “So the additional cost will be borne by folks who visit our region,” Pendery said.

Sarah Brookbank

SOUTH KENTON

Delivery

our community,” said Commissioner Tom Lampe of Fort Thomas. “It needs to be upgraded and expanded. And this is a way to do it that make sense.” Northern Kentucky residents pay similar

Rabbit Hash General Store on track to open in 2017

million views. There are 100,411 images, 6,508 subject headings and 2,023 comments on the photos. “Comments are important,” said Elaine Kuhn, the library’s local history and genealogy services coordinator. “They give us information that might help someone discover something new when doing research.”

To place an ad .................................513-768-8404, EnquirerMediaAdvertising@enquirer.com

FILE PHOTO

Boone, Kenton and Campbell counties are considering a new per night hotel room tax to go into a fund for an eventual expansion of the Northern Kentucky Convention Center.

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Meyer said. “Mr. Klein said he likes his job and that’s why he wants to stay,” Meyer said. “I’m sure (former Kentucky governor) Steve Beshear’s chief of staff liked his job. (Gov.) Matt Bevin is not expected to keep him. That’s pretty straightforward.” Meyer said he doesn’t have trust in Klein because Klein campaigned against him. Klein said he did not. The Local 38 firefighters union in Covington filed a complaint with the attorney general in October weeks ahead of the election. The union filed the complaint after Klein compiled city information for former Mayor Sherry Carran and incumbent commissioners ahead of a political forum organized by Local 38. The union said this was unlawful use of city resources.


NEWS

JANUARY 12, 2017 • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • 3A

Remke Markets Makes Online Grocery Shopping Convenient Pat Iasillo Over the past decade our world has become more accustomed to shopping online for the products we want. It makes sense not to waste time and effort shopping if we can just as easily click a few buttons to accomplish the same thing. However, there has been some reluctance when it comes to products we like to feel and touch before we buy. We don’t mind purchasing a book online or the latest toy, but some of us like to try on a pair a shoes before we buy them or like to feel the material on an article of clothing. The same thing is even more true when it comes to shopping for food. We want to be

in control when we pick our apples or our lettuce, or a beef roast. Therefore, shopping online for our groceries has met with some resistance. It can also be painful to sort through over 30,000 products to find what we want. That is all changing. Remke Markets has carefully thought through these issues before we offered an online solution to our customers. After all, we have been in business for almost 120 years, partly because we keep the wants and needs of our customers at the top of the list on our approach to the grocery business. That is why we offer something a little different; a personal shopper. Our personal shoppers

are carefully chosen to be as picky as our pickiest customers when it comes to choosing what to put in the basket. They also are people who are anxious to learn just what you like, how you like it, and if they don’t know, they will call you and ask before they choose. We feel confident you will be pleased that your shopper will far exceed your expectations. Couple a personal shopper with the ease of the Remke Mobile Markets website and you have a means of shopping for your groceries that is second to none. With your registration of your Remke Rewards card on our website, you now have access to the top 100 items you normally purchase at your fingertips. You may also like to shop our weekly ad. Now all you need do is click on an item when viewing our ad and presto, it

is on your shopping list. In addition, we have made it simple to shop for anything in our store by using our search bar, or by searching through every department and category. We even have an app available for download on your Apple or Android mobile device, and you can use it to scan the UPC barcodes of the items in your house to add them directly to your list. Once you finish your order, you may choose a pick up time even on the same day! Drive to the store, call or text the phone number on the sign posted in our designated pick up spot, and your order will be brought out and loaded into your car. Scan your credit card and you are on your way. The fee is waived on your first four orders so you have nothing to lose to give Remke Mobile Markets a try!

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4A • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • JANUARY 12, 2017

SCHOOLS

SOUTH KENTON

ACHIEVEMENTS | NEWS | ACTIVITIES | HONORS

1,400 graduate at NKU winter commencement More than 1,400 students were honored Dec. 17 at Northern Kentucky University’s 44th Commencement exercises at BB&T Arena. Two ceremonies were held. Graduates of the College of Education and Human Services, the College of Health Professions, and the College of Informatics were honored at 10 a.m. Graduates of the College of Arts and Sciences and the Haile/US Bank College of Business were honored at 3 p.m. The Commencement address was delivered by Dr. Missy Jones, professor of Special Education and recipient of NKU’s Frank Sinton Milburn Outstanding Professor Award. Jones is a teacher, researcher, and founder of NKU’s Supported Higher Education Project (SHEP), which promotes peer mentoring partnerships to expand access for students with intellectual disabilities. Jones sent the 1,412 graduates out into the world with one final assignment: Celebrate the big moments – but savor the small ones, and use them to change the world one step at a time. “Reflect on ways you have been supported during your life and your time at NKU, and how people helped you along the way. Then make a commitment to pay it forward, spreading kindness to others who may be struggling with their own challenges and barriers,” she said. “One by one, action by action, paying it forward, I truly believe we can

RECORDER

Editor: Nancy Daly, ndaly@communitypress.com, 578-1059

change the world. Go forth and do good things.” Students and their families also heard remarks from NKU President Geoffrey S. Mearns, as well as from two of their peers: Jacob Meece in the morning, and Kylie Stigar-Burke in the afternoon. Meece, who has a hearing disability, delivered his remarks in American Sign Language with the assistance of a voice interpreter. A 2012 graduate of the Kentucky School for the Deaf and valedictorian of his class, Meece graduated cum laude with a Bachelor of Arts in Electronic Media and Broadcasting and a minor in Media Informatics from NKU. He plans to work as a video producer. Stigar-Burke has traveled the world through NKU’s study away and study abroad programs, which inspired her to begin blogging. Her work has appeared in publications such as Thought Catalog, The Huffington Post, and Elite Daily. A graduate of Cincinnati’s Roger Bacon High School, Ms. StigarBurke graduated magna cum laude with a Bachelor of Arts in English from NKU. In all, 1,412 graduates were honored. They include students who completed degrees in August, as well as those who completed degrees in December. A posthumous degree was also awarded to Kirsten Smithson, who was pursuing a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science before she died in November 2015.

Cincinnati.com/northernkentucky

Museum aided so students can go on field trips The Patricia Kisker Foundation has awarded a $15,000 grant to Behringer-Crawford Museum for field trip scholarships for students in underserved areas during 2017. According to BCM Executive Director Laurie Risch, the grant will fund educational visits to the museum by classes of public and parochial school students from underserved area schools (those with 50 percent or more free lunch participation).

Activities will include integrated STEAM-focused educational programs, which combine music, dance, lecture, art, environmental and cultural perspective and historical context to pre-school, elementary, middle and high school students. Programs are aligned to the Kentucky and Ohio educational standards. A portion of the funds will be used for student transportation to and from the museum, Risch said.

“Our goal for this funding is to reach 2500 students, providing them a foundation in their cultural heritage,” Risch said. “We are extremely grateful to the Kisker Foundation for their shared vision for the well-being of our youth and for making this possible.” Schools interested participating in the program should contact BCM Education Director Kim Gehring-Cook at 859-491-4003.

St. Joseph’s penny war benefits Mary Rose Mission The Student Council at St. Joseph School in Crescent Springs has various service projects each year. Student Council has been a loyal supporter of Mary Rose Mission over the past several years, hosting out-of-uniform days and canned food drives. This year, however, they decided to try their hand at a “Penny War” in which the spirit of competition within the school led to a very generous donation to the Mary Rose Mission. In all, $750 was raised over the course of one week to provide “Hams for the Holidays” to the soup kitchen located in Florence. When discussing service projects for this year, St. Joseph teachers and Student Council moderators Amy Coomes and Amy Malone listed organizations in the area which have historically been supported by St. Joseph Church, School, or organiza-

PROVIDED

The St. Joseph Student Council raised $750 to donate to Mary Rose Mission. Student council officers Niko Papakirk (president), Amelia Coomes (vice president) and Zack Serra (treasurer) presented the check to Misha Bell, Mary Rose Mission volunteer, before students left school for Christmas break.

tions within the church and school. Because many of the students have volunteered with the Mary Rose Mission, that organization seemed like a fantastic choice, especially for the eighth grade Confirmation candidates who serve as the leadership team for Student Council. Part of their confir-

mation activities involved exploring agencies in Northern Kentucky which are designed to help the homeless population. “The St. Joseph Student Council is grateful for this opportunity to help our fellow brothers and sisters in Christ,” Amelia Coomes, Student Council vice-president, said.

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JANUARY 12, 2017 • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • 5A

Arboretum supporters eye expansion would also boost the arboretum’s notability in a younger generation. The Boone County Arboretum now boasts 3,600 trees and shrubs. About 75 percent are labeled with extensive information on names and characteristics, but vandals often steal the metal plates. They are expensive to replace. Another one of the arboretum’s biggest challenges is its funding identity. The arboretum’s main operational budget is with Boone County Cooperative Extension. It is physically located within the Boone County Parks system on county-owned land. The county contributes to infrastructure upkeep of the property, as well as a small tools and equipment budget. “Unfortunately, funding for significant enhancements or improvements toward the arboretum must occur via its nonprofit entity, Friends of Boone County Arboretum,” Stone said.

Karen Meiman Community Recorder Contributor

UNION –Years ago, Carol Reis discovered a small dose of relaxation and recreation in the Arboretum at Central Park on Camp Ernst Road. The arboretum – now called the Boone County Arboretum – was in its infancy. It was starting to blossom after being dedicated on May 2, 1999. Reis, a Northern Kentucky native, would drive from her fast-paced Memphis job in fashion design to visit her aging mother, who lived in a nearby retirement facility. Through the years, Reis routinely walked in the park and fell in love with the growing number of trees and shrubs that began to flourish and take shape into a fledgling arboretum. “I just loved how wellkept the trails were. I loved walking among the trees, shrubs and flowers,” she said. In 2014, a few years after retiring and relocating back to Northern Kentucky, Reis joined the Friends of Boone County Arboretum to support what she believes to be one of the region’s “bestkept secrets” and “local treasures.” “I am always amazed at the number of local residents who don’t know about the Boone County Arboretum,” she said. “I think more people know about the arboretum outside the area than people who live nearby.” To tackle one of its biggest challenges – lack of local exposure – the Friends of Boone County Arboretum has launched an annual gift-giving appeal that will run through Valentine’s Day.

Growth depends on nonprofit Friends group Future growth and development depends on The Friends, he added. Membership of Friends of Boone County Arboretum is more than 200. “Many people think we have a lot of money to fund our projects,” Snyder added. “It takes a lot of money to maintain the arboretum. We are always seeking grants.” “From the combined budgets of Extension and county, it costs roughly $500,000 each year to provide the current basic needs of the arboretum,” Stone said. The Friends is eyeing nearby land to purchase for expansion. “This would be used for the development of an Education and Visitors Center, expansion of plant collections and garden areas, and to preserve headwaters of the much-impacted Gunpowder Creek watershed,” Stone said. The challenges the Friends face keep the group busy, but for Snyder it is worth the hard work. “This is an important place for children to run and play and learn and get dirty,” she said. “But it is a well-kept secret.” Anyone wishing to donate to the Annual Gift Giving Appeal, should visit the arboretum’s website at https:// bcarboretum.o rg/support/annualappeal.

Fund drive hopes to launch mobile arboretum lab “This first year, our goal is to raise $25,000 for an innovative mobile lab that will allow us to serve the environmental educational needs of schools on their campuses,” said Jean Snyder, president of Friends of Boone County Arboretum. “Because of funding cuts, educators can’t get their students to us on field trips. This would allow us to take the arboretum and education about the environment, and the importance of trees to Northern Kentucky schools,” said arboretum director Kris Stone. A staffed mobile unit

UP TO

BRIEFLY Learn about Family Promise at Rotary ERLANGER – The executive director of Family Promise of Northern Kentucky, Amanda Speier, will be the guest speaker at the Rotary Club of Kenton County’s luncheon meeting on Thursday, Jan. 19. Family Promise of Northern Kentucky is a group individuals, community leaders, faith communities, corporate partners and civic organizations all working together to change the lives of homeless and low-income families in Northern Kentucky by creating sustainable independence. “The Rotary Club of Kenton County is thrilled to have Amanda Speier as our guest speaker,” stated President Steve Gillespie. “Our club members are looking forward to hearing an update about the services which the Family Promise of Northern Kentucky provides to families in Northern Kentucky.” The luncheon will begin at noon at the Colonial Cottage Inn, 3140 Dixie Highway, Erlanger. There will be limited seating by reservation only. To make a reservation, contact Steve Gillespie at 859-371-2900. The cost to cover the lunch is $12 per person.

2017 shelterhouse rentals to begin INDEPENDENCE – Kenton County Parks

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State Rep. Kimberly Poore Moser, R-Taylor Mill, will serve as chairman of the Medicaid Oversight & Advisory Committee, House Speaker Jeff Hoover announced. The Medicaid Oversight & Advisory Committee is charged with providing oversight on the implementation of Medicaid within the commonwealth. The committee reviews access to services, utilization of services, quality of services, and cost containment. The 2017 Regular Session of the Kentucky General Assembly convened on Jan. 3. For the first time since 1921, the House of Representatives is led by a Republican majority.

Saturday town hall takes up charter schools The Northern Kentucky chapter of The Women’s Network has scheduled a town hall meeting for the purpose of learning more about the proposal to introduce charter schools into Kentucky.

Erlanger offers Christmas tree drop-off ERLANGER – The city’s Public Works Department will conduct its “Christmas Tree Drop-off” program. Bare trees – no ornaments, plastic wrapping, lights – can be dropped off at 3516 Jack Scheben Drive on weekdays between the hours of 7:30 a.m. and 4 p.m. through Jan. 16. Trees will be mulched and made available to Erlanger residents for pickup. Questions? Contact info@erlangerpw.com, 859-727-3893 or 859-7272525.

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and Recreation will begin accepting reservations for the upcoming season beginning at 7:30 p.m. Feb. 6 for walk-in guests only. Reservations can be made at the Kenton County Public Works Administration office, located at 420 Independence Station Road (in Lincoln Ridge Park), Independence. Shelterhouses are available for reservation from April 10 through Oct. 22. These reservations are for the shelterhouses located within the parks maintained by Kenton County Fiscal Court including Lincoln Ridge, Middleton-Mills, Pioneer and Richardson Road. Shelterhouses are great venues for company and family picnics, birthday parties, reunions and wedding receptions. On Feb. 10 at 5 p.m., there will be the option to check availability and make a reservation online at www.KentonCounty.org . Reservations can be made in person any weekday during the regular business hours of 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Reservations are $65 or $80. Because of size, location and amenities, permit fees for Middleton-Mills 2, Pioneer 1 and Lincoln Ridge 3 are each $80. Lincoln Ridge 1 and 2, Pioneer 2, Middleton-Mills 1 and Richardson Road 1 are each $65 to reserve. For more information about each specific shelterhouse,

Luke’s Sewing Centers 4005 Dixie Hwy. Erlanger / Elsmere, KY (859) 342-6600

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NEWS

6A • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • JANUARY 12, 2017

Bone broth, purple food trending for new year Broccoli cheddar soup like Panera It was a request I had to fill. “Do you have a recipe for cheddar broccoli soup like Panera?” I looked up a bunch of recipes and found a few that sounded promising. I tried out a couple and adapted only slightly to suit my taste. I used my chicken bone broth. Find a step-by-step photo primer on my abouteating.com site for both the bone broth and this recipe. 2 tablespoons butter 3/4 to 1 cup finely diced onion (not sweet or red) 4 tablespoons melted butter 4 tablespoons flour Dijon mustard – to taste, start with a little and go from there 2 cups half-and-half 2 cups low sodium, fat free, chicken broth Heaping 3 cups broccoli, chopped – I used frozen, thawed 1 nice carrot, cut into matchsticks, a heaping cup Nutmeg to taste – I grated a whole nutmeg and used a generous 1/4 teaspoon 8 ounces extra sharp or sharp grated cheddar plus extra for garnish Salt and pepper to taste

Cook onion in butter on medium until translucent. Set aside. Make a roux: Whisk melted butter and flour over low heat until bubbly and a bit golden, not brown. Whisk in mustard. Whisk in half-and-half and broth and cook to a simmer about 10 minutes. Add broccoli, carrots and onions. Cook over low heat about 20 minutes. Add nutmeg, salt and pepper to taste. Take off heat and stir in cheese until melted. THANKS TO RITA HEIKENFELD

This copycat Panera broccoli and cheddar soup can be made with nutritious bone broth.

Barbara’s Indian-inspired Rice

Yesterday I walked across the Another trend is purple veggies field to check on my elderly neighand fruit, like eggplant, purple bor, John, and saw lots of grasscauliflower, black rice (yes, it’s like blades poking through the soil. dark purple), elderberries, and Farmer Bruner sowed rye right even purple corn. The reason is after he harvested pumpkins from that the anthocyanin (makes the the same field and that’s what was purple color) in purple plants popping up. Husband Frank told holds huge amounts of nutrients, me it’s called “winter rye” since it Rita fiber and antioxidants. can germinate through the snow. I Heikenfeld I have to chuckle when I read look forward to early spring when RITA’S KITCHEN trends. Heck, I’ve been trending it becomes a field of wavy green. way before the trends hit the news Since we’re beginning a new year, let’s – we’ve been growing elderberries and talk trends for 2017. Guess what one is? Indian/purple corn for years! Bone broth! Now I’ve been making super There are lots of more interesting food nutritious bone broth for years the same and drink trends for 2017. I’ll be talking way my Mom did. Just basically cooking more about them as we segue into the up a lot of bones with aromatics to make New Year. a healthful stock. No waste was her motRita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, to. educator, Jungle Jim’s Eastgate culinary The trend is to embrace the “no waste” professional and author. Find her blog philosophy. From root to seed is how online at Abouteating.com. Email her at chefs are cooking now, using everything rita@communitypress.com with “Rita’s from the plant in some nutritious way. kitchen” in the subject line.

The Indian spices elevate this to a new level. Thanks to Barbara D. for sharing. A good recipe to sub in black rice for white. 1/4 cup water 1 (14.5 ounce) can chicken broth 1 cup long grain rice or black rice 1 teaspoon curry powder 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/8 teaspoon paprika 1-2 pinches ground cloves 1 small onion, coarsely chopped

Bring water and chicken broth to a boil. Combine rice, curry powder, garlic powder, cinnamon, paprika, and cloves in a bowl; stir to mix. Add spiced rice and onion to the boiling broth. Cover and cook until rice is tender, about 25 minutes.

Tip from Rita: Why this recipe is good for you Black rice is whole grain, and used to be called “forbidden rice” since it was eaten only by Emperiors and commoners were not allowed to eat it. Curry powder contains turmeric, a spice with anti-inflammatory qualities. Cinnamon helps lower blood sugar. Garlic is good for your heart. Cloves contain magnesium, calcium and iron, great for bone and overall health.

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8A • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • JANUARY 12, 2017

VIEWPOINTS

SOUTH KENTON

EDITORIALS | LETTERS | COLUMNS | CH@TROOM

Cincinnati.com/northernkentucky

CH@TROOM

Fort Wright mayor sees prosperous 2017 2016 was another great year for the city of Fort Wright thanks to a strong team effort between you, our residents and businesses, our City Council, and our dedicated staff. I’d like to take a moment to update our residents and share the good news about our community. First, I am very happy to report that thanks to the vision, financial acumen and dedication of our team, the city is in a very strong financial position. We have no debt obligations, a five-year capital improvement plan that calls for paying cash for all capital expenditures over the next five years and a very strong cash reserve to help us weather any unforeseen circumstances that may occur. We are committed to maintaining this financial posture moving forward. Furthermore, last year’s financial audit continued a long trend of clean audits and we expect a similar result for this year’s audit which will be presented at the Jan. 4 council meeting. Second, I’m very pleased to say that thanks to our improving financial condition, a substantial increase in property values, an increase in the number of businesses operating in the city, and frugal spending habits by our staff, we were able to reduce our property tax rate this year! Council approved a property tax rate of $2.70 per $1,000 of assessed value versus as rate of $2.76 per $1,000 of assessed value in 2015. As mayor, I can tell you that my goal and the goal of City Council is to keep our tax rates as low as possible while providing the highest quality services. I also want to ensure that residents are aware of our new financial transparency portal which was launched this year. You can access the portal any time at https://fortwrightky.open gov.com/transparency to see how your money is spent, all the way down to each individual check written. I encourage you to check it out, after all, it’s your money.

Another thing I want to mention is infrastructure. Like most communities in Northern Kentucky, our core infrastrucDavid Hatter ture is aging and needs regular COMMUNITY RECORDER GUEST repair and reCOLUMNIST placement. Several years ago, council made a commitment to focus on infrastructure which includes a rolling five-year street plan. In 2016 we allocated more than $500,000 to the reconstruction of Beacon Hill, Wolfzorn Court and Oak Hill Court. As promised, we will continue to address infrastructure in 2017 as we continue to work through our street plan. We were very fortunate to receive an 80/20 grant from the federal government to redesign and rebuild Amsterdam Road between Redwood and General Drive. This project is estimated to cost a little over $3 million, but thanks to the grant funds, the city’s portion will only be about $625,000. The design work on this project will begin in the spring and it’s estimated that construction will be completed in the summer of 2020. Another issue of major importance to our community is public safety. After an extensive cost benefit analysis, a 13th police officer was added to our team in June and is now out serving our community. In May 2016, longtime City Administrative Officer Gary Huff decided it was time for a well-deserved retirement. Gary joined the city in 2008 and his insight, expertise and leadership were key to helping us correct our financial issues. We owe Gary a debt of gratitude and wish him a long, happy, and healthy retirement! Gary left huge shoes to fill, and thankfully after an exhaustive search, we found a fantastic

RECORDER

Editor: Nancy Daly, ndaly@communitypress.com, 578-1059

Last week’s question

THIS WEEK’S QUESTION

What should be the priorities for President-elect Trump during his first 100 days?

candidate to replace him. Ed Butler joined the city as our City Administrative Officer after a 25-year career with Kenton County. Ed served 21 years with the Kenton County Police Department before retiring as chief. He then returned to Kenton County and served four years as the executive director of the Emergency Communications Center. As we move into 2017 and beyond, economic development will continue to be an important part of our success because we derive a substantial portion of our revenues from businessrelated taxes and fees. We were blessed with many successes on this front in 2016 including: Dairy Queen on Highland Pike, Chickfil-A on Madison Pike, the Trek store on Dixie Highway, the Gateway Community College Automotive Center in the old Robke Chevrolet complex at Dudley and Madison, and the relocation of Von Lehman and Co. to the Wright’s Summit Complex at Kyles and Dixie. We anticipate more businesses choosing Fort Wright in 2017 including a Planet Fitness on View Point Drive and an Infiniti dealership which is planned to replace the Days Inn Hotel that was demolished on Dixie Highway. In closing, I would like to thank our City Council for their hard work, dedication, and support. It is an honor to serve with the six members of council, each of whom has a deep commitment to making the city of Fort Wright a great place to live, work and play. I would also like to thank our city staff for their hard work and dedication, we are blessed to have excellent people serving us in the city of Fort Wright. It is my honor and privilege to serve as your mayor here in my hometown. May God bless you and the city of Fort Wright and let me wish you and your family a very happy, safe, and prosperous 2017. David Hatter is mayor of Fort Wright.

“Deleting his Twitter account.” Laura Whiting “1. Reach across the aisle and mend fences that have divided this country over the past eight years, unifying a divided electorate so we might move forward with consensus. This will be tough! “2. Hiring freeze of all federal employees looking to reduce/eliminate redundancy, waste, fraud and abuse at all levels starting with the Department of Education. “3. Simplify the tax code – currently 75,000 pages long! – eliminating loopholes and write-offs, lowering the corporate tax rate which is the highest in the world that would let companies repatriate their billions of offshore profits here in the states. “4. Strengthen the military, especially the Navy, which allow us to exhibit strength and maintaining peace in international waterways throughout the world. “5. Finally, nominate our own community’s Amul Thapar to replace Antonin Scalia on the Supreme Court. I believe he would receive bipartisan approval, and would be a strong constitutionalist.” Scott McKinley Edgewood “I cannot believe I even have to say or suggest these actions or ‘priorities’, but first he needs to get off Twitter, stop talking to and believing other country’s dictators and known enemies to the U.S., and start listening to our country’s intelligence and experts instead. Then, for the LOVE of JESUS, please START taking this job seriously. …OR do humanity a favor and just step down and

What are you most looking forward to in your community in 2017? Every week we ask readers a question they can reply to via email. Send your answers to ndaly@communitypress.com with Ch@troom in the subject line.

return to your shiny gold tower, preferably without groping anyone or sexualizing children along the way, so the world doesn’t end sooner than we had all anticipated. ... (Wishful thinking I know).” S. Daniels “During his first 100 days, President Trump should have the following priorities: “1. Begin filling all open federal judicial positions, starting with the Supreme Court, “2. Defund Planned Parenthood, “3. Order the resumption of enforcement of all immigration laws as they are currently written, initially focusing on any illegal immigrant charged with a felony, “4. Challenge Congress to review U.S. immigration laws and amend as appropriate, “5. Hire a full-time staff person to review and approve all outgoing presidential Tweets and e-mails prior to his hitting the ‘Send’ key.” Mark Koenig “Nothing.” Matthew From The Commonwealth “Making America great again!” Bobby Mackey “Repeal Obamacare. But I know it will take longer than 100 days ... but it’s a start.” Phyllis Sparks

WHAT WAS KENTON COUNTY READING IN 2016? There is nothing better than curling up with a good book and a hot drink. Coming in a close second and third would be curling up to a good movie or listening to great music. But how do you know if it’s going to be good? I guess there is no guarantee but choosing something wildly popular will make it a little more likely. Here is a list of the most checked out items in 2016.

Adult Fiction 1. “The Girl on the Train“ by Paula Hawkins 2. “Rogue Lawyer“ by John Grisham 3. “The Obsession“ by Nora Roberts 4. “The Last Mile“ by David Baldacci 5. “The Guilty“ by David Baldacci 6. “Bullseye“ by James Patterson 7. “After You“ by Jojo Moyes 8. “See Me“ by Nicholas Sparks 9. “Me Before You“ by Jojo Moyes 10.“The Nightingale“ by Kristin Hannah

Adult Nonfiction 1. “When Breath Becomes Air“ by Paul Kalanithi 2. “The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying up the Japanese Art“ by Marie Kondo 3. “Killing Reagan the Violent Assault that Changed a Presidency“ by Bill O’Reilly 4. “The Whole30: the 30-day guide to total health“ and food by Melissa Hartwig 5. “Crisis of Character: A White House Secret Service Officer” by Gary J. Byrne 6. “March Story“ by Hyong-min Kim 7. “Preacher“ by Garth Ennis 8. “Spark Joy: and Illustrated Master Class on the Art of Organizing and Tidying Up“ 9. “The Witches Salem, 1692“ by Stacy Schiff 10.“Bill O’Reilly’s Legends & Lies the Patriots“ by David Fisher

Juvenile Fiction 1. “Greg Heffley’s Journal“ by Jeff Kinney 2. “Diary of the Wimpy Kid: Dog Days“ by Jeff Kinney 3. “Diary of a Wimpy Kid: the

SOUTH KENTON

RECORDER

A publication of

Long Haul“ by Jeff Kinney 4. “Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Rodrick Rules“ by Jeff Kinney 5. “Diary of a Wimpy Kid: The Gina Ugly Truth“ by Stegner Jeff Kinney 6. “Diary of a COMMUNITY RECORDER GUEST Wimpy Kid: COLUMNIST Cabin Fever“ by Jeff Kinney 7. “Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Old School“ by Jeff Kinney 8. “Diary of a Wimpy Kid: The Last Straw“ by Jeff Kinney 9. “Diary of a Wimpy Kid: The Third Wheel“ by Jeff Kinney 10.“Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone“ by J.K. Rowling

YA Fiction 1. “Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children“ by Ransom Riggs 2. “Divergent“ by Veronica Roth 3. “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone“ by J. K. Rowling 4. “The Maze Runner“ by James Dashner 5. “Harry Potter and the Order

of the Phoenix“ by J.K. Rowling 6. “The Fault in Our Stars“ by John Green 7. “Hollow City“ by Ransom Riggs 8. “The Hunger Games“ by Suzanne Collins 9. “Library of Souls“ by Ransom Riggs 10.“Paper Towns“ by John Green

DVD 1. “Star Wars, Episode VII, the Force Awakens“ 2. “The Martian“ 3. “Minions“ 4. “Jurassic World“ 5. “Ant-Man“ 6. “Mission Impossible: Rogue Nation“ 7. “Spectre“ 8. “Inside Out“ 9. “Sicario“ 10.“Marvel Avengers, Age of Ultron“

eBooks 1. “Harry Potter and the Cursed Child“ by J.K. Rowling 2. “Fool Me Once“ by Harlan Coben

228 Grandview Drive, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017 654 Highland Ave., Fort Thomas, KY 41075 phone: 283-0404 email: kynews@communitypress.com web site: cincinnati.com/northernkentucky

3. “The Last Mile“ by David Baldacci 4. “The Obsession“ by Nora Roberts 5. “15th Affair“ by James Patterson

Album Downloads 1. “Hamilton“ 2. “Blurryface“ 3. “Now That’s What I call Music, Volume 58“ 4. “Now That’s What I Call 80s Hits (Deluxe Edition)“ 5. “Suicide Squad: The Album “

Movie Downloads 1. “The Girl on the Train“ 2. “A Walk in the Woods“ 3. “A Goofy Movie“ 4. “August: Osage County“ 5. “Spy Kids: All the Time in the World“ You can put these items on hold at www.kentonlibrary.org . You can choose to pick the items up inside or stay warm in the car by picking up in the drive-thru. Gina Stegner is public relations coordinator for the Kenton County Public Library.

South Kenton Recorder Editor Nancy Daly ndaly@communitypress.com, 578-1059 Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday See page A2 for additional contact information.


JANUARY 12, 2017 • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • 1B

SPORTS

SOUTH KENTON Editor: Melanie Laughman, mlaughman@communitypress.com, 513-248-7573

HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | RECREATIONAL

RECORDER

Cincinnati.com/northernkentucky

Holmes quickly building Teams do well at swim classic an impressive season James Weber jweber@communitypress.com

The Holmes High School girls basketball team has been having a grand time so far this season. Playing their first home game in three weeks Jan. 4, and their first game within two hours of home in that time, the defending Ninth Region Bulldogs had a chance to celebrate individual success. Before Wednesday’s tilt, Holmes’ 35th District opener against Notre Dame, the school gave senior Jaynice Stovall a game ball for her 1,000th career point, which she collected during the holidays. The cheerleaders posted two signs in the Holmes gymnasium, one featuring the digits “1,000” written roughly 500 times in a small space. Stovall, the only senior in Holmes’ main rotation, scored nine points to lead the Bulldogs to a 43-31 over the Pandas. Junior Tyrah McClendon-Englemon had a team-high 13 points and finished the game with 996 for her career, four shy of the millennium mark. The Bulldogs (13-2) won their sixth game in a row in the lowscoring contest. Holmes tied their lowest offensive output of the season but allowed its thirdlowest opposing outing. Holmes came in averaging more than 60 points per game but shot 30 percent from the field (15-of-52) and 12-of-24 from the free-throw line. Holmes head coach Tony Perkins will take the win but he is focused on leading the Bulldogs to a deeper run in the state tournament. Holmes reached the Elite Eight of last year’s Sweet 16. “I didn’t like our effort,” he said. “I didn’t like our intensity. I didn’t like the way we finished. We were 14-of-42 on two-pointers and about 35 of those were layups or close to it. We didn’t make shots. We’ve got to play pressure defense and tonight we didn’t pressure anybody.” After trailing 6-3 early, the Bulldogs scored nine straight points to lead 12-6, but the Pandas stayed within striking range throughout until the Bulldogs scored the last six points of the contest. Holmes’ defense kept the Pandas from getting a lot of open looks and the Bulldogs forced a fair share of turnovers but rarely were able to turn them into points. The Bulldogs hadn’t played at home in nearly three weeks (Dec. 16). Since then, they played in holiday tournaments at Bullitt East and Hazard, going 6-1 in those games. Their two losses have come to preseason 10th Region favorite Mason County and Seventh Region contender Louisville Male.

PHOTOS BY JAMES WEBER/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Holmes senior Jaynice Stovall guards Sophie Hagen of Notre Dame.

Holmes junior Laila Johnson sets up for a play Jan. 4.

Holmes junior Tyrah McClendonEnglemon sets up for a play.

Holmes senior Jaynice Stovall gets a game ball for her 1,000th career point, with head coach Tony Perkins.

Kamari Graham came in leading the Bulldogs with 16 points per game, hitting 48 3pointers for the year, more than three per contest, to rank among the leaders in Kentucky. Laila Johnson (14.5), Stovall

(13.2) and McClendon-Englemon (10.8) were also in double figures. McClendon-Englemon came in averaging 8.5 boards for the year and had 10 rebounds against Notre Dame for a double-double.

The Scott Eagle Classic swimming meet Jan. 7 brought together all of Northern Kentucky for a major meet. A full photo gallery is available at http://cin.ci/2i5jlQs. The Scott diving classic will be Saturday, Jan. 14, at Scott High School in Taylor Mill. Boys Team: CovCath 329, Highlands 219, Dixie 163. Boys events: 200 medley relay – CovCath 1:42.01 (Hanna, Merse, Knollman, Elsbernd), Dixie 1:47.15 (Young, Sims, Sims, Lanham), Highlands 1:50.36 (Pendery, Brown, Conley, Ryan); 200 free – Hanna (CovCath) 1:49.46, M. Sims (Dixie) 1:50.01, Conley (Highlands) 1:53.56; 200 IM – N. Smith (CCH) 1:59.37, Novak (CCH) 2:04.29, Grubb (Scott) 2:04.96; 50 free – Jackson (Model) 23.29, Elsbernd (CCH) 23.33, Winterman (Boone) 23.46, M. Sims (Dixie) 23.69; 100 fly – Young (Dixie) 54.81, Elsbernd (CCH) 54.85, Berry (Boone) 58.59; 100 free – D. Sims (Dixie) 51.41, Berry (Boone) 51.97, Winterman (Boone) 52.16; 500 free – N. Smith (CCH) 4:34.44, Conley (Highlands) 5:01.75, Lanham (Dixie) 5:03.15; 200 free relay – CovCath 1:34.44 (Elsbernd, Knollman, Kunkel, N. Smith), Boone 1:38.09 (Berry, Courtney, Persons, Winterman), Beechwood 1:38.45 (Roman, Richards, Lester, Shoyat); 100 back – Hanna (CCH) 56.91, Shoyat (Beechwood) 57.65, Jackson (Model) 58.75, Pendery (Highlands) 59.13; 100 breaststroke – Grubb (Scott) 59.28, Merse (CCH), 1:01.19, D. Sims (Dixie) 1:05.22; 400 free relay – CCH 3:24.61 (Hanna, Knollman, Novak, Smith), Dixie 3:31.12 (Sims, Lanham, Young, Sims), Highlands 3:34.68 (Russell, Griffith, Pendery, Conley). Girls team: Notre Dame 334, Dixie 220, Highlands 202. Girls events: 200 medley relay – NDA (Glass, Jones, Piccirillo, Stansel) 1:55.88, Dixie (Spritzky, Reil, Beil, Michels) 1:57.76, Highlands (Hopper, Beach, Banks, Foose) 2:05.56; 200 free – Piccirillo (NDA) 2:06.40, Banks (Highlands) 2:07.42, Moore (NDA) 2:09.98; 200 IM – Glass (NDA) 2:12.06, Beil (Dixie) 2:16.02, Jones (NDA) 2:19.07; 50 free – Skinner (NDA) 25.21, Sand (Highlands) 26.97, Michels (Dixie) 27.57; 100 fly – Glass (NDA) 59.86, Piccirillo (NDA) 1:01.40, Weidinger (NDA) 1:02.74; 100 free – Smith (NDA) 54.16, Beil (Dixie) 55.44, Bomkamp (Dixie) 58.34; 500 free – Skinner (NDA) 5:12.63, Sand (Highlands) 5:23.06, Reil (Dixie) 5:31.78; 200 free relay – NDA (Skinner, Jones, Stansel, Smith) 1:45.37, Dixie (Bomkamp, Michels, Tucker, Beil)

Scott senior Stuart Nicholas swims the 100 butterfly.

Simon Kenton junior Lexi Patton swims breaststroke.

Simon Kenton sophomore Braden Chow swims the IM breaststroke.

PHOTOS BY JAMES WEBER/ THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Scott senior Ty Grubb swims the freestyle during the IM.

1:48.07, Highlands (Foose, Moscona, Brady, Sand) 1:49.91; 100 back – Smith (NDA) 1:00.91, Hopper (Highlands) 1:05.53, Muller (NDA) 1:05.88; 100 breast – Mollie Bushelman (Beechwood) 1:10.20, Jones (NDA) 1:13.25, Reil (Dixie) 1:13.50; 400 free relay – NDA (Skinner, Glass, Piccirillo, Smith) 3:53.27, Highlands (Moscona, Banks, Hopper, Sand) 3:57.18, Dixie (Spritzky, Tucker, Reil, Bomkamp) 3:59.75. Combined team scores: Highlands 421, Dixie Heights 383, Model 147, Scott 145.

SHORT HOPS James Weber jweber@communitypress.com

Wrestling » Simon Kenton qualified for state duals tournament during the sectional meet Jan. 4.

Boys basketball » Six of the top boys’ high school basketball teams in Northern Kentucky will play in the St. Elizabeth Healthcare Bluegrass-Buckeye Charity Classic this Friday, Jan. 13 at BB&T Arena on the campus of Northern Kentucky University.

The event raises money for charities in Northern Kentucky and Southwest Ohio. The matchups are Cooper vs. Holmes, 5:30 p.m.; Scott vs. Dixie Heights, 7 p.m.; Covington Catholic vs. Newport Central Catholic, 8:30 p.m. Tickets are $10 and $5 for parking. » Holmes beat Holy Cross 44-43 Jan. 6 in a key 35th District game. Raavia Commodore had 15 points and Jaiden Greene, 14. Holmes beat defending 10th Region champ Mason County 78-66 on Jan. 7. Michael Englemon scored 28. » Scott beat Holmes 73-55

Jan. 3. Jake Ohmer had 31 points and Tim Jolley, 12, for Scott.

Girls basketball » Calvary Christian junior Rebekah Fryman leads the 10th Region in rebounding at 14.7 a contest and is fourth in scoring at 15.3 points. She also leads in blocks with 2.2. Sydney Hennemann leads the 10th in steals with 3.9. » Scott junior Anna Clephane leads the 10th Region in scoring through Jan. 1 at 23.8 points per game. Lexi Stapleton averages 12.8. Clephane is fifth in rebounding at 7.8.

» Simon Kenton beat Scott 58-46 Jan. 4. Ally Niece had 20 points for SK.

NKU Notes » Stu Riddle has been named head coach of the men’s soccer program. Riddle will be the fourth-ever head coach of the Norse. Riddle comes to NKU following a four-year stint as head men’s soccer coach at the University at Buffalo where he most recently led the Bulls to their second-straight MidAmerican Conference Champi-

onship match appearance. In addition to leading Buffalo to a pair of MAC Championship appearances in each of the last two seasons, Riddle guided the Bulls to the program’s winningest season in over a decade in 2016 with a record of 12-4-3, which included a school-record 10 shutouts. The Bulls garnered NSCAA top-25 votes for fiveconsecutive weeks and ended the season with a school record No. 47 ranking in the RPI and No. 4 ranking in the Great Lakes Regional poll. Russell Cicerone, See SHORT HOPS, Page 2B


LIFE

2B • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • JANUARY 12, 2017

Colonels honor 1967 runner-up PHOTOS BY JIM OWENS FOR THE RECORDER

Covington Catholic High School honored the players from the 50th Anniversary of the 1967 state runner-up at halftime. At left is head coach Mote Hills’ son, Mike, who represented his late father. Players are Dick Berger, Joe Fritz, Dale Overman, George Schloemer, Jim Cooper, Tony Kreimborg, statistician Jack Bogaczyk, and assistant coach Hep Cronin.

On. Jan. 6, Covington Catholic honored the 50th-year anniversary of its 1967 Sweet 16 state runner-up basketball team. CovCath beat Conner in the varsity contest. A photo gallery of the night is available at http://cin.ci/2jdO8bD.

The Covington Catholic student section cheers on Cole VonHandorf as he closely guards Conner forward Spencer Hemmerich.

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Covington Catholic center Jake Walter reacts after being called for a foul.

Covington Catholic forward A.J. Mayer saves, then passes the ball before going out of bounds.

Hall of Fame induction Dec. 21 The Northern Kentucky Sports Hall of Fame inducted five new members Dec. 21 at the Villa Hills Civic Club. Inductees are Chris Brunemann, Don Niehaus, Charles Reimer, Scott Ross and Bill Tekulve. Guest speaker is Covington major league baseball umpire Randy Marsh. November inductees were Michael Higgins, Candice Elkin (Neagle), Brandon Granacher, Connie Appelman and Bill Wagner. October inductees were Tim Grogan, Tony Runion, Ryan Smith, Jay Brewer and Brian Dennler.

John Brannen, head men’s basketball coach at NKU, speaks at the October meeting.

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one of Riddle’s players at Buffalo for the last four years, is projected by DraftUtopia.com to be selected in the second round of this year’s MLS draft, which occurs later this week. The Wellington, New Zealand, native has eight years of experience as a head coach at the Division I level. He has amassed a 61-68-21 career record. Prior to coaching at Buffalo for four seasons, Riddle was the head coach

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The October 2016 induction class.

SHORT HOPS at Western Michigan for four years from 2009 through 2013 where he led the Broncos to a pair of MAC Championship appearances. In his second year at WMU, Riddle led the team to its best MAC record in school history and also guided the Broncos to their winningest overall record in seven years at 10-8-1. His squad was also recognized by the NCAA for posting an APR progress rate score in the top 10 percent of Division I men’s soccer teams.


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JANUARY 12, 2017 • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • 3B


LIFE

4B • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • JANUARY 12, 2017

Feeling down? Might be seasonal affective disorder If you find yourself feeling down, depressed, moody or irritable during a particular time of the year, you may suffer from seasonal affective disorder. According Kathy R. to the Byrnes Mayo Clinic, EXTENDING KNOWLEDGE SAD is a type of depression linked to seasonal changes, and it begins and ends around the same time every year. For the majority of people, symptoms start in the fall or winter but quit with the coming of spring or early summer. SAD can cause feelings of depression for most of the day or nearly every day. Other symptoms include low energy, loss of interest in activities you used to enjoy, problems sleeping, loss of appetite, irritability, low energy and difficulty concentrating. A full list of symptoms is available on the Mayo Clinic’s website at http://bit.ly/SADfacts. Symptoms may start out mild but progress as the season wears on for some individuals. It is normal to feel down somedays, but if

you lack motivation and energy and feel blue for multiple days at a time, it is best to make an appointment to see your doctor. While there is no way to prevent SAD, a health care professional can diagnose the disorder and prescribe treatments to help you better manage the symptoms. Such treatments might include brightening up your environment, getting outside more and making physical activity a regular part of your day. If you think you might suffer from SAD, you are not alone. According to the National Institutes of Health, this disorder affects 6 percent of the U.S. population with an additional 14 percent suffering from a lesser form of seasonal mood changes. Females are four times more likely to suffer from the disorder than men. Your risks also increase the farther north you live, as you are farther away from the sun compared to those in the south. People can even develop the disorder after moving to more northern climates. Kathy R. Byrnes is Kenton County family and consumer sciences agent for University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service.

Change once and for all History is marked with periods when oppressed people rose up in the form of “Resistance Movements.” A resistance movement is where oppressed people finally decided to rise up and push back against their oppressors. The Israelites are probably the earliest known group of people to define the term resistance movement. Under the leadership of Moses, and after being in slavery for generations, they stood up to Pharaoh and the Egyptians and said, “Enough is enough.” What is so interesting about resistance movements is that to the outside world looking in, the oppressed person or group of people logically should have stood up long ago. Abusive relationships, food and chemical

addictions are all prime examples. Yet, unfortunately we find Julie House ourselves in FAITH NOTES an oxymoronic state of comfort when we stay where we are, even if leaving or changing is by far the healthier option. There is one common theme among oppressed people and their escape: a choice to no longer stand idly by and live under conditions that are less than what they know they deserve. Many of us today could use a resistance movement in our spiritual walk. It’s time to do more than just pray, “Lord, help me.” We have

to begin pushing back. God does not desire you or your loved one to remain in stronghold of addiction or depression or financial burden. So let’s stop accepting that, “this is just how it is.” Begin to push back, and expect God to move mightily on your behalf. Stop waiting and accepting your circumstances, and prove to God that you are ready to watch Him work. The best way to prove to God that you are ready, is to speak life into your struggling situations. Speak God’s truth where the devil tells you lies. Use the following verses to get you started: “Resist him steadfast in the faith.” (1 Peter 5:19) If the messages you hear in your mind are not good and pure and move you toward health and wellness, they are not of God.

Resist them, and ask God to send you His great and precious promises. “Remember, we ought always ought to pray and not lose heart.” (Luke 18:1) Never stop praying for your loved ones. While they are here on this earth, there is still hope. You will create an environment of resistance through steadfast and persevering prayer. Prayers that say, “God you started this thing in me, now I am ready for you to finish it.” Join me in 2017, declaring that this is the year of resistance, where things change once and for all! Julie House of Independence is founder of Equipped Ministries, a Christian-based health and wellness program.

DEATHS Phillip Blattmann

Sue Bunch

Phillip E. Blattmann, 93, of Villa Hills, died Dec. 27. He was a U.S. Navy veteran of World War II and served on the battleship USS New Jersey in the South Pacific. His career as a wireman at Westinghouse spanned more than 35 years. He was also a member of Blessed Sacrament parish. His wife, Mary Lou Vogt Blattmann; and sister, Martha Jo Tharp, died previously. Survivors include his children, Debi Blattmann, Gary Blattmann, Kim Book, and Cheryl Blattmann; and four grandchildren. Memorials: The Point/ARC of Northern Kentucky, 104 W. Pike St., Covington, KY 41011.

Sue C. Bunch, 80, of Edgewood, died Dec. 28. Her grandson, Taylor Huth, died previously. Survivors include her husband, Harold Bunch; children, Carol Taybi and Jackie Huth; brother, Athol “Buck” Cox Jr.; five grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. Memorials: Epilepsy Foundation of Greater Cincinnati and Columbus, C/O Taylor Huth Memorial Scholarship Fund, 895 Central Ave., Suite 550, Cincinnati, OH 45202-5757.

Stephen Bushelman Stephen Mason Bushelman, 16, of Fort Mitchell, died Dec. 29 at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital

Medical Center. He was a student and football player at Beechwood High School in Fort Mitchell. His brother, Dalton Phillips, died previously. Survivors include his father, Ken Bushelman; mother, retired Judge Lisa Bushelman and companion Jeff Eisenmanger; sisters, Mavis, Mollie, Morgan, and Stella Bushelman; and maternal grandmother, Karen Osborne. Memorials: Epilepsy Foundation Greater Cincinnati, 895 Central Ave., Suite 550, Cincinnati, OH 45202; or Children’s Home of Northern Kentucky Drug Rehab Program, 200 Home Road, Covington, KY 41011.

513-268-1186

Clinton Canfield Clinton M. Canfield, 51, of Independence, died Dec. 30. His wife, Sheryl Canfield; father, Robert Canfield; and brother, Barry Canfield, died previously. Survivors include his son, Brandon C. Canfield; mother, Vicki Canfield; and brothers, Terry Sr., Tim, and Craig.

Mary Ewing Mary G. Ewing, 89, of Erlanger, died Dec. 31.

Henry Goley Henry Goley, 61, of Taylor Mill, died Dec. 17.

See DEATHS, Page 7B


LIFE

JANUARY 12, 2017 • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • 5B

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LIFE

6B • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • JANUARY 12, 2017

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD FRIDAY, JAN. 13 Art Exhibits Tony Dotson: American Outsider, noon to 5 p.m., The Carnegie, 1028 Scott Blvd., Solo show using wry commentary to connect contemporary issues and pop culture sentiments. Continues through Feb. 11. Free. 957-1940; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington. E is for Edie: An Edith McKee Harper Retrospective, noon to 5 p.m., The Carnegie, 1028 Scott Blvd., Major survey of work. Continues through Feb. 11. Free. Through Feb. 11. 9571940; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington.

Exhibits Seahorses: Unbridled Fun, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., Newport Aquarium, 1 Aquarium Way, A new, interactive exhibit where guests can discover 10 species of seahorses, sea dragons, trumpetfish, shrimpfish and pipefish.With a head like a horse, snout like an aardvark and belly pouch like a kangaroo- seahorses are anything but ordinary. The way the exhibit is designed; guests will be completely immersed in the world of seahorses with something new to experience around every corner. $15.99-$23.99; Free for children under 2. Through March 31. 800-406-3474; www.newportaquarium.com. Newport.

Health / Wellness St. Elizabeth Healthcare CardioVascular Mobile Health Unit, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Remke Market Buttermilk Towne Center, 560 Clock Tower Way, 4 heart health screenings, cardiovascular risk assessments and education. $25 per screening. Registration required. Presented by St. Elizabeth Healthcare. 301-9355; bit.ly/2htDyA1. Crescent Springs.

Holiday - Christmas

Storytime: Toddler Tales (2 1/2 to 3 1/2), 11 a.m. to noon, Boone County Public Library Scheben Branch, 8899 U.S. 42, Stimulate child’s development and help build language and literacy skills through interactive stories, songs and music. Free. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 342-2665. Union. Storytime: Tiny Tots (18 months to 2 1/2 years), 11 a.m. to noon, Boone County Main Library, 1786 Burlington Pike, Stimulate child’s development and help build language and literacy skills through interactive stories, songs and music. Free. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 342-2665. Burlington.

Music - Country Concerts at the Library: Hayden Kaye, 7-8 p.m., Boone County Public Library - Scheben Branch, 8899 U.S. 42, Free. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 342-2665; www.bcpl.org. Union. Kevin McCoy Band, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m., Axis Alley, 1 Levee Way, Free. 652-7250; axisalleylevee.com. Newport.

Recreation Mahjong, 1-2 p.m., Boone County Public Library - Scheben Branch, 8899 U.S. 42, All skill levels welcome. Free. Presented by Scheben Branch Library. 342-2665; www.bcpl.org. Union. Bingo, 5:30-10 p.m., Erlanger Lions Club Hall, 5996 Belair Drive, Clubhouse. Jitney starts at 7 p.m., regular games at 7:45 p.m. Ages 18 and up. Prices vary. Presented by Erlanger Lions Club. 727-0888. Erlanger.

Sports 2017 Winter/Spring Meet, 6:15 p.m., Turfway Park, 7500 Turfway Road, Live horse racing. Free, except March 25. 3710200; www.turfway.com. Florence.

Holiday Toy Trains, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Behringer-Crawford Museum, 1600 Montague Road, Layout features Lionel trains and Plasticville. More than 250 feet of track. Patrons welcome to operate more than 30 accessories from buttons on layout. Through Jan. 15.$9, $8 ages 60 and up, $5 ages 3-17; free ages 2 and under and museum members. 491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

SATURDAY, JAN. 14

Literary - Story Times

Drink Tastings

Storytime: Spanish Storytime (birth to 5 years), 10:30-11:30 a.m., Florence Branch Library, 7425 U.S. 42, Stimulate child’s development and help build language and literacy skills through interactive stories, songs and music. Free. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 342-2665. Florence. Storytime: Baby Time (birth to 18 months), 9:30-10 a.m., Boone County Public Library Scheben Branch, 8899 U.S. 42, Stimulate baby’s development and help child build language and literacy skills through interactive stories, songs and music. Free. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 342-2665. Union.

Live Music and Wine, 5:30-7:30 p.m., Brianza Gardens and Winery, 14611 Salem Creek Road, Music by The Touchables. Tastings are $6 or purchase wine by glass or bottle. Beer options too. Free admission. 445-9369. Crittenden.

Art Exhibits Tony Dotson: American Outsider, noon to 5 p.m., The Carnegie, Free. 957-1940; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington. E is for Edie: An Edith McKee Harper Retrospective, noon to 5 p.m., The Carnegie, Free. 957-1940; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington.

Exercise Classes Community CrossFit Class, 10-11 a.m, 11 a.m. to noon, Triumph Strength and Conditioning, 7859 Commerce Place, Certified trainer leads workout in group class setting. Free. Presented by Triumph Strength Conditioning. 414-5904; triumphstrength.net. Florence. Free CrossFit Community Workout, 9-10 a.m., Crossfit

Northern Kentucky, 5785 B Constitution Drive, All levels and abilities welcome. Bring water bottle. All workouts scaleable to each individual. Ages 15-99. Free. 496-0995; www.crossfitnorthernkentucky.com/. Florence. Super Saturday: Tae Kwon Do, 2-4 p.m., Campbell County Public Library - Fort Thomas, 1000 Highland Ave., Learn some basic moves and how to keep yourself safe. Class suitable for whole family. Free. Registration required. 572-5033; www.ccpl.org. Fort Thomas.

Holiday - Christmas Holiday Toy Trains, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Behringer-Crawford Museum, $9, $8 ages 60 and up, $5 ages 3-17; free ages 2 and under and museum members. 491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

Music - Blues Jay Jesse Johnson Band, 9:30 p.m. to 1:30 a.m., Smoke Justis, 302 Court St., Free admission. 814-8858; www.smokejustis.com. Covington.

Sports 2017 Winter/Spring Meet, 6:15 p.m., Turfway Park, Free, except March 25. 371-0200; www.turfway.com. Florence.

Tours Cincy Bourbon Bus: Urban Bourbon Distillery and Tasting Trail, 11:45 a.m. to 5 p.m., New Riff Distillery, 24 Distillery Way, Front of New Riff Distillery. Opportunity to visit and tour New Riff Distillery, Second Sight Spirits, Horse and Barrel Bourbon Bar, The Littlefield Bourbon Bar, Newberry Prohibition Bar and more. Ages 21 and up. $65. Reservations recommended. Presented by Cincy Brew Bus/Cincy Bourbon Bus. 513-258-7909; www.cincybrewbus.com. Newport.

SUNDAY, JAN. 15 Holiday - Christmas Holiday Toy Trains, 1-5 p.m., Behringer-Crawford Museum, $9, $8 ages 60 and up, $5 ages 3-17; free ages 2 and under and museum members. 491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

MONDAY, JAN. 16 TUESDAY, JAN. 17 WEDNESDAY, JAN. 18 Art Exhibits Tony Dotson: American Outsider, noon to 5 p.m., The Carnegie, Free. 957-1940; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington. E is for Edie: An Edith McKee Harper Retrospective, noon to 5 p.m., The Carnegie, Free. 957-1940; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington.

Health / Wellness Take Time for Your Heart, 6:30-7:30 p.m., St. Elizabeth Heart and Vascular Institute, 1 Medical Village Dr., 8-week class. Each class gives valuable tips from clinical experts. $50. Registration required. Present-

FILE PHOTO

Brianza Gardens and Winery will have live music and wine from 5:30-7:30 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 14, at 14611 Salem Creek Road, Crittenden. Music will be performed by The Touchables. Tastings are $6 or purchase wine by glass or bottle. Beer options will be available too. Admission is free. Call 445-9369.

ed by St. Elizabeth Healthcare. 301-9355; www.stelizabeth.com/taketimeforyourheart. Edgewood. St. Elizabeth Healthcare CardioVascular Mobile Health Unit, 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., Five Seasons Family Sports Club Crestview Hills, 345 Thomas More Parkway, 4 heart health screenings, cardiovascular risk assessments and education. $25 per screening. Registration required. Presented by St. Elizabeth Healthcare. 301-9355; bit.ly/2htDyA1. Crestview Hills.

Senior Citizens Explore Your Future, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Boone County Main Library, 1786 Burlington Pike, Series of 4 interactive, facilitated workshops to help envision retirement phase of life. Discussions, reflection and exercises in each session guide participants toward individually developed plan. Free. Registration required. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 342-2665. Burlington.

Sports 2017 Winter/Spring Meet, 6:15 p.m., Turfway Park, Free, except March 25. 371-0200; www.turfway.com. Florence.

THURSDAY, JAN. 19 Art Exhibits Tony Dotson: American Outsider, noon to 5 p.m., The Carnegie, Free. 957-1940; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington. E is for Edie: An Edith McKee Harper Retrospective, noon to 5 p.m., The Carnegie, Free. 957-1940; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington.

Job Fairs New Year, New Career Job Fair, 1-4 p.m., Kentucky Career Center, 1324 Madison Ave., Career opportunities available in several industries. Free parking on site. Free. Presented by Northern Kentucky Area Development District. 767-6206; www.nkcareercenter.org. Covington.

On Stage - Theater The Music Man, 7:30 p.m., The Carnegie, 1028 Scott Blvd., 957-1940; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington.

ABOUT CALENDAR To submit calendar items, go to Cincinnati.com/share, log in and click on “submit an event.” Send digital photos to kynews@communitypress.com along with event information. Items are printed on a space-available basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to Cincinnati.com/calendar.

SATURDAY, JAN. 21 Art Exhibits Tony Dotson: American Outsider, noon to 5 p.m., The Carnegie, Free. 957-1940; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington. E is for Edie: An Edith McKee Harper Retrospective, noon to 5 p.m., The Carnegie, Free. 957-1940; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington.

Music - Classic Rock Signs of Life: The American Pink Floyd, 8-11:30 p.m., Madison Theater, 730 Madison Ave., $25, $20 advance. 491-2444; www.cincyticket.com. Covington.

On Stage - Theater The Music Man, 2 p.m., 7:30 p.m., The Carnegie, 957-1940; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington.

SUNDAY, JAN. 22 On Stage - Theater The Music Man, 3 p.m., The Carnegie, 957-1940; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington.

TUESDAY, JAN. 24 Health / Wellness St. Elizabeth Healthcare CardioVascular Mobile Health Unit, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., Kroger Marketplace Hebron, 3105 N. Bend Road, 4 heart health screenings, cardiovascular risk assessments and education. $25 per screening. Registration required. Presented by St. Elizabeth Healthcare. 3019355; bit.ly/2htDyA1. Hebron.

Literary - Libraries

reserve 30-minute time slot. Registration required. Free. Registration required. Presented by Scheben Branch Library. 342-2665. Union. Hands-on Genealogy: HeritageQuest, 10-11 a.m., Boone County Main Library, 1786 Burlington Pike, Learn to navigate site to search for census records, books, Revolutionary War records, and more. Taught in computer lab. Free. Registration required. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 342-2665; www.bcpl.org. Burlington.

WEDNESDAY, JAN. 25 Art & Craft Classes Piecemakers Quilting Group, 1:30-2:30 p.m., Boone County Public Library - Scheben Branch, Free. 342-2665; www.bcpl.org. Union.

Art Exhibits Tony Dotson: American Outsider, noon to 5 p.m., The Carnegie, Free. 957-1940; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington. E is for Edie: An Edith McKee Harper Retrospective, noon to 5 p.m., The Carnegie, Free. 957-1940; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington.

Health / Wellness Take Time for Your Heart, 6:30-7:30 p.m., St. Elizabeth Heart and Vascular Institute, $50. Registration required. 301-9355; www.stelizabeth.com/taketimeforyourheart. Edgewood.

Literary - Story Times

THURSDAY, JAN. 26

Read with a Teen (grades 1-3), 6-7 p.m., Boone County Public Library - Scheben Branch, 8899 U.S. 42, Build child’s reading skills with help of teen role model. Call Scheben branch to

Art Exhibits Tony Dotson: American Outsider, noon to 5 p.m., The Carnegie, Free. 957-1940; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington.

FRIDAY, JAN. 20 Art Exhibits Tony Dotson: American Outsider, noon to 5 p.m., The Carnegie, Free. 957-1940; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington. E is for Edie: An Edith McKee Harper Retrospective, noon to 5 p.m., The Carnegie, Free. 957-1940; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington.

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LIFE

JANUARY 12, 2017 • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • 7B

REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS COVINGTON 13 E. 24th St.: Michael Daugherty to Morgan Wooton; $111,000. 214 Adams Ave.: Helen Urlage to Barbara Narwold; $130,000. 1207 Grays Peak, Unit 1048: Condo View LLC to Ronald Washington; $437,500. 2216 Oakland Ave.: Virginia and Donald Altevers to Kathryn and Jeffrey Meckstroth; $175,000.

1909 Pine St.: Amy Sutter to Alexandria West and James Rice; $62,000. 9156 Sharp Wood Court: U.S. Bank National to Drazen Katinic; $93,000. 455 Spencely Court: The Drees Co. to Shannon Bentley; $316,000. 3608 Tamber Ridge Drive: The Drees Co. to Nancy and Richard Nadicksbernd; $349,500.

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Continued from Page 4B

Marian Griffin Marian J. Griffin, 90, of Edgewood, died Dec. 29 at her home. She was a homemaker and loved animals. She was the previous owner of Curl & Swirl Hair Salon and was a member of the Eastern Star and St. Marks United Church of Christ. Her husband, Robert E. Griffin, died previously. Survivors include her daughters, Beverly DeMoss and Colleen Steinmetz; and two grandchildren along with six greatgrandchildren. Memorials: Hospice of the Bluegrass, 7388 Turfway Road, Florence, KY 41042; or St. Jude Children’s Hospital, 262 Danny Thomas Place, Memphis, TN 38105.

Lynne Kramer Lynne J. Kramer, of Villa Hills, died Dec. 31 at her home. Her brother, Barry Sidell; and sister, Gail Palazzolo, died previously. She was active in the Cursillo Movement for many years and volunteered with the Kenton County Jail Ministry and several mental health organizations. Music was a large part of her life and she sang in several church choirs throughout the years. Survivors include her husband, Dr. David Kramer; children, Dr. Jennifer Blincoe, Tim Kramer, and Robert Kramer; sisters, Marta Upson and Melodie Tarvin; and three grandchildren. Memorials: St. Elizabeth Hospice, 483 S. Loop Drive, Edgewood, KY 41017.

Mary Lemker Mary Jo Lemker, 87, of Edgewood, died Jan. 2. She was a high school graduate of Notre Dame Academy and a member of the Golden Age Social Club of Edgewood. She loved playing cards and cooking for her family and friends. Her brothers, Edward Thelen, Bernard Thelen, and Raymond Thelen; and great-granddaughter, Katherine Lemker, died previously. Survivors include her husband, Fred Lemker; daughters, Kathy Wenstrup, Janet Arlinghaus, Susan Cropenbaker, and Linda Sherman; sons, Richard Lemker and Daniel Lemker; and 16 grandchildren along with 22 great-grandchildren. Memorials: St. Elizabeth Hospice, 483 S. Loop Road, Edgewood, KY 41017.

Thomas Meihaus Thomas Alan Meihaus, 68, of Fort Wright, died Dec. 27. He was a U.S. Air Force veteran during the Vietnam War. He then went on to work as a technician for AT&T and Kodak. Tom enjoyed spending his time with his family and his cat, Colonel Mosby. He enjoyed gardening and was an avid fly fisherman. Survivors include his wife, Allesanne Gastright Meihaus; children, Lisa Arlinghaus, Kevin Meihaus, and Michelle Fecher; sister, Judi Fillhardt; and five grandchildren. Memorials: Vietnam Veterans of America, 8418 Reading Road, Cincinnati, OH 45215.

B. Wayne Mills B. Wayne Mills, 66, of Fort Mitchell, died Dec. 29 at St. Elizabeth. He was a retired sprinkler pipe fitter with Union Local No. 669 and a U.S. Army veteran. He enjoyed motorcycles and Nascar. Survivors include his daughters, Kristy Blanton of West Chester, Ohio, Kacy Mills of Hebron, and Rachel Mills of Erlanger; son, Ethan Wayne Mills of Taylor Mill; half-sisters, Jackie Murphy of Lexington and Brenda Creamer of Shelbyville, Kentucky; and seven grand-

children along with two greatgrandchildren. Memorials: Veterans Affairs, 3100 Vine St., Cincinnati, OH 45025.

Sammy Schweinefuss Sammy Schweinefuss, 27, of Elsmere, died Dec. 29 at St. Elizabeth Edgewood, following a lifelong illness of Trisomy 18. She touched many who knew and loved her in some small way throughout her short, yet very memorable life. Her gentle smile could melt the hearts of those around her and though she never spoke a word, her voice and thoughts could always be heard. Those who knew her will miss her deeply every day, especially her winning smile, and she will forever remain in their hearts. Survivors include her mother, Vicki Schweinefuss from Elsmere; grandmother, Rita Owen Due from Walton; great-grandmother, Helen Resing Owen; and her nurses, Trina Davenport Barnes, Susan Freihofer Stoddart, and Cindy Sparrow. Memorials: Samantha Schweinefuss Memorial Fund, C/O any Fifth Third Bank.

Frieda Stein Frieda M. Kramer Stein, 85, of Erlanger, died Jan. 1 at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. She was in the Sisters of Divine Providence from 1946 until 1972. She loved children and taught for 47 years at St. Anthony, St. Thomas, Villa Madonna, and Blessed Sacrament Schools. She was also a member of Mary Queen of Heaven Parish in Erlanger. Her brother, Carl Kramer, died previously. Survivors include her husband, Joseph Stein; stepchildren, Frederick Stein, Barbara Kaelin, and Donna Schaffer; siblings, David Kramer, Allen Kramer, Joan Reider, and Betty Brewer; and four grandchildren. Memorials: Mary Queen of Heaven Church, 1150 Donaldson Road, Erlanger, KY 41018; or Sisters of Divine Providence, 5300 St. Anne Drive, Melbourne, KY 41059.

Joe Wagner Joe Wagner, 81, of Independence, died Jan. 2. He was a 32 degree Mason, a member of the Golden Rule Covington Lodge No. 109 F&AM, a member of Blanket Creek Baptist Church in Falmouth, and he worked as a transport driver for Interstate Brands. He was a perfectionist when it came to maintaining his yard and he was an accomplished handyman. Survivors include his wife, Helen Wagner; sons, Larry Wagner, Robert Wassum, and Charles Wagner; daughter, Brenda Klette; and seven grandchildren along with five greatgrandchildren. Memorials: To the charity of the donor’s choice.

Robert Williams Robert “Bob” L. Williams, 94, of Independence, died Dec. 30. He was a graduate of Holmes High School and a U.S. Army veteran, serving in World War II and on D-Day as a paratrooper of the 101st Airborne Division. He was later inducted into the Kentucky Veterans Hall of Fame. His son, David L. Williams, died previously. Survivors include his wife, Barbara Williams; children, Barbara Washington of Park Hills, Jeffrey Williams of Acworth, Georgia, and Diane Cureton of Michigan; stepdaughter, Kim Deaton of North Carolina; stepson, Kevin Deaton of Warsaw; brother, Richard A. Williams of Naples, Florida; and six grandchildren along with 14 great-grandchildren. Memorials: St. Elizabeth Hospice, 483 S. Loop Drive, Edgewood, KY 41017.

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LIFE

8B • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • JANUARY 12, 2017

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD PUZZLE

ANSWERS ON PAGE 6B

No. 0108 THE DOWNSIZING OF NATHANIEL AMES

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Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 4,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year).

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91 Nickname for Louise 93 Feast 94 Sail support 95 In unison 97 Echo effect 99 El operator in the Windy City, briefly 100 Hat for pop singer Corey? 103 Anthem contraction 104 “Uhh …” 105 Show what you know, say 107 “In all probability” 109 Regular 111 Obstinate one, astrologically 112 Two-time Best Actor winner arriving early? 115 Four-star rank: Abbr. 116 Monopoly purchase 117 Singer/songwriter Laura 118 Little foxes 119 Slump 120 ____ cosa (something else: Sp.) 121 Wanders (about) 122 They begin in juin DOWN

1 Original airer of “The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy” 2 Pop competition 3 Something smoked by comic Chris? 4 Hang on to 5 Org. against doping

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RELEASE DATE: 1/15/2017

1 Loops in, in a way 5 Goddess with a throne headdress 9 Tempo 13 Figs. on drivers’ licenses 16 When repeated, a Pacific tourist destination 17 Fish whose name is a celebrity’s name minus an R 18 Old bandleader with an Egyptianinspired name 19 Outrigger projections 20 Things smoked by singer Courtney? 23 Scandalmaker in 2002 news 24 Speed demon 25 Headwear the N.B.A. banned in 2005 26 Game involving sharp projectiles and alcohol 28 Parrot’s cry 29 1950s prez 31 “Charlie Hustle is my name/I am banned from Hall of Fame,” e.g.? 33 Fist bump 34 “Yes, ____!” 36 Put a coat on 37 “Eureka!” moments 40 Press

42 Cloth colorist 43 Feature of Africa 44 ____ oil 46 Televangelist Joel 48 Alternative to “News” and “Maps” in a Google search 50 Road restriction 51 Pugnacious Olympian 53 Relative of a ferret 54 Cold and wet 55 F.B.I.’s div. 56 Hoopster Steph not playing at home? 60 Riffraff 62 Japanese watchmaker 64 Like Granny Smith apples 65 Endless chore 66 Dickens’s Uriah 68 Sega Genesis competitor, in brief 69 Radiant 71 Intersect 73 The sport of boxing in the 1960s and ’70s, essentially? 75 “Nothing to write home about” 76 Groups with co-pays, briefly 78 Jockey strap 80 “Star Trek: T.N.G.” role 81 Installment 83 Personalized gifts for music lovers 85 Valet in P. G. Wodehouse stories 89 Contemporary hybrid music genre 90 Sots’ sounds

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101 Smallish batteries 102 Long spear 105 Makes “it” 106 Zone 108 “Dark Sky Island” singer 110 Drink sometimes served hot 113 “Snowden” org. 114 ____, cuatro, seis, ocho …

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6 Spindly limbed 7 Shakespeare villain 8 Photo of Canada’s former prime minister Stephen? 9 “Stay ____” 10 Aardvarks, by another name 11 Enter surreptitiously 12 Press lightly, as the brakes 13 He was buried in 1915 and died in 1926 14 Dressage gait 15 Invoice figs. 18 ____ lily 19 Fulminating 21 Dwarf planet more massive than Pluto 22 Atypical 23 Summer hrs. in Phila. 27 Literary device used to address plot inconsistencies 30 Nephrologists study them 32 Spies, informally 35 M.L.K.’s title: Abbr. 38 “Today” personality 39 Shark’s home 41 Close by 43 Egg producer 45 Arctic fliers 47 Blow it 49 Like a handyman’s projects, for short 50 “Anything! Anything at all!” 52 Shade of pink 54 Sword fight, e.g. 56 Filament sites, in botany

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Classifieds

JANUARY 12, 2017 µ KC-KENTUCKY - COMMUNITY µ 1C

cincinnati.com

Homes of Distinction

VISIT: cincinnati.com/classifieds TO PLACE YOUR AD

7527 LOCH LOMOND DRIVE WOOHOO!!! This closing was #269 out of 270 closings in 2016 for The Deutsch Team. We found this outstanding newly constructed home for our clients. What a way to start the new year off! If a new home is in your plans for 2017 give one of our agents a call so we can help you with all of your real estate needs.

Homes for Sale-Ohio

Tom Deutsch, Jr.

513-460-5302 Homes for Sale-Ohio

All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968 which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, national origin, handicap or familial status or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newpaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Kentucky Commission on Human Rights 800-292-5566 H.O.M.E. (Housing Opportunities Made Equal) 513-721-4663

Brick Apt Bldg, 2 Apts & Commercial Space., May be converted in to 4 apts. 504 Nowlin Ave, Greendale, IN, $178,500. 812-537-2956, No Realtor Solicitations please

WALTON 2 acre residential lots, (Homes Only), 2 mi. South of Walton. Price Reduced, $48-$52K 859-802-8058

Homes for Sale-Ky

1 Ac. So Grant., 2BD & 1 Ba single wide, fixer upjper, city water, $52,900 $5,000, $440 per mo 4 Ac. Northern Pendleton Co., pasture, woods, view,doubl wides, welcome, city water, $2,000 down, $370 per mo 5 Ac. Grant Co., pasture, small pond, lays great, paved frontage, city water, $42,900, $2,000 down 7 Ac. Pendleton, co., pasture, w/septic system, water & electric hook ups, drive way, $2,500 down, $420 per mo10 Ac. Pendlton Co., rolling wooded, barn, pond, corner lot, city water, close to Hwy 27 $59,900, $2,5000 down 30 Ac, Carroll County, pasture, woods, 2 small ponds, ideal for livestock, hunting, city water, $76,900, $3,000 down, $695 per mo. TRI-STATE LAND CO. Walton, KY (859) 485-1330

Real Estate

Rentals

Central St. Bernard @ Walnut Hills @ Wyoming @ Avondale East Amelia / Batavia @ Bethel @ Brown County @ Goshen @ Hyde Park @ Madeira/Indian Hill/Milford/Loveland @ Montgomery / Silverton @ Oakley West Colerain Twp. @ Groesbeck @ Harrison Monfort Heights @ Northside Western Hills / Westwood @ Wyoming North Fairfield @ Liberty Township @ Maineville @ Morrow Mason @ Sharonville @ West Chester Kentucky Cold Spring @ Crescent Springs Edgewood Erlanger Florence / Burlington Independence / Taylor Mill Park Hills / Ft. Mitchell Union @ Walton / Verona @ Warsaw Indiana St. Leon @ Lawrenceburg @ West Harrison Must be 18 with a valid drivers license and proof of insurance. If interested please call: 1-855-704-2104 deliveryopportunities.gannett.com/

P.O. BOX 198 BURLINGTON, KY. 41005-0198

COLD SPRING- 2BR, 1.5BA, 3rd Fl, balcony, W/D, New Carpet, Carport. $695/mo + Util. No Pets. 859-441-5129

Siesta Key - Gulf Front condo on Cresent Beach, Weekly now thru April. Cincy Owner. Don- 513-232-4854.

Jobs new beginnings... Administrative Tri County firm looking for a FT Administrative Assistant . Requirements: good phone skills, MS Office & Great Benefits. College Degree preferable. E-mail resume to RHamilton@crs401k.com

Phone: 859-334-2175 FAX: 859-334-2234

Boone County Sheriff’s Department Deputy Sheriff Position

The Boone County Sheriff’s Department is now accepting applications for the position of deputy sheriff. Applicants must be at least 21 years of age and be capable of passing a physical agility, written, and oral interview testing. Applicants must have a high school diploma (or equivalent), be a citizen of the United States, possess a valid driver’s license, have no felony convictions, have not been prohibited from carrying a firearm and have the physical strength/agility to perform the duties of a peace officer. Candidates must pass post-offer medical and psychological examinations, polygraph testing, drug testing, and an in-depth background investigation. As a condition of employment, recruits must successfully complete an extensive twenty-three (23) week training course in Richmond, Kentucky where they will obtain their Peace Officer Professional Standards (P.O.P.S.) certification. Applications are available for pickup at the Boone County Sheriff’s Department located at 3,000 Conrad Lane in Burlington, Kentucky 41005 Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. & Saturday 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. Completed applications must be returned to the Sheriff’s Department by Friday, February 17, 2017 by 5:00 p.m. The Boone County Sheriff’s Department is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

Ft. Wright: 2BR, Garage, Nice Area, No Pets. $700/mo + utilities. 859-653-1770 Union- 3BR-2BA, deck, lg front porch & yard, $750+ $700/dep, all util’s incld. 859-384-7726 Walton, KY - Walton Village Apts, 1BR Avail. now. ELDERLY, OR DISABLED Prices based on income. 35 School Rd Call for info M-F 8-5. 800-728-5802 TDD 7-1-1. Ashcraft Real Estate Services Inc. Equal Housing Oppty. Walton, KY - Walton Village Apts, 1BR Avail. now. ELDERLY, OR DISABLED Prices based on income. 35 School Rd Call for info M-F 8-5. 800-7285802 TDD 7-1-1. Ashcraft Real Estate Services Inc. Equal Housing Oppty.

Indiana.Honda.com/Job-Opportunities • Be committed to working in a fast-paced environment • Be flexible and open-minded • Have the ambition to succeed and build products that exceed customers’ expectations • Be motivated to actively seek new challenges • Have the ability to take initiative • Be committed to safety and quality • Be committed to open communication and teamwork REQUIREMENTS: • Be willing to work 2nd shift • Be eighteen (18) years of age • Provide proof of a High School Diploma or GED • Reside in one of the 31 counties listed on our website We are committed to recruiting candidates from diverse backgrounds. Honda is an equal opportunity employer. CE-0000664364

DEUFOL Industrial Crating, Warehousing, Logistics Sales, and Business Leader The main purpose of this position is to introduce Deufol in the US market, interact with major industrial, manufacturing and engineered products clients to establish business opportunities and then to work with Deufol to meet the demand within existing sites or by expansion through greenfield or acquisition growth. 10+ years of Industrial Packaging, Warehousing and/or Supply Chain experience. Experience in designing, developing, and delivering technical demonstrations of software solutions, with understanding of existing prospect / client infrastructure, current and future needs, motivation, and timelines. Possess top sales skills as well as modern operational and management skills in industrial export packaging, warehousing and logistics. Demonstrate exemplary verbal and written communication, and presentation skills; ability to tailor communications for technical and non-technical audiences. Strong command presence for both internal and external stakeholders. Qualified candidate send resume to: amber.haas@deufol.com or Mail to 924 S Meridian St. Sunman, In 47041

CE-0000667030

AmeriCorps Math Tutors needed for Forest Hills school district! 25 hours/week $711/month + $1,500 Education Award To apply, visit: bit.ly/ORC_Application

Call 614-542-4165 or email Meaghan.torres@escco.org

Costco is opening in and looking for an

Independent Lease-Holding Optometrist State-of-the-art equipment.

Westwood psychiatrist seeking part-time administrative assistant with flexible availability. Rate of pay is highly competitive and negotiable. Email resume to keggerman@fuse.net

Great turn-key opportunity.

FULL TIME KITCHEN HELP For a retirement community with benefits. Apply at SEM Terrace 5371 South Milford Rd or call (513) 248-1140 . EOE GROOMING ASSISTANT. FT or PT. $10.00-11.50/Hr. WILL TRAIN. Rich Benefits. Email resume to jobs@nkypets.com or apply online

LPN/RN Full Time & Part Time Days ALF, Excellent Pay Visit terracecommunity.com Contact Tina at 513-471-3491

Florence, KY,

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT

ERLANGER, KY-Ashwood Apts & Townhomes 1 & 2 BR, avail. Start $500. Sec 8 ok, 3510-3534 Kimberly Dr, 621-623 Debbie Lane, 859-727-2256 M-F 8-5. TDD 7-1-1 Ashcraft Real Estate Services, Inc. Equal Housing Opportunity

APPLY NOW AT:

Nucor Steel Gallatin (Ghent, KY), a division of the nation’s largest steel and steel products manufacturer and largest recycler is seeking to assemble a hiring pool of qualified applicants for jobs in: Emergency Medical Technician Please visit our website for a complete description of the position, requirements and benefits package. Interested individuals may register at www.nucor.com > Career Center > Looking for a job? Get Started Now > From the Search Opportunities by location page: Select KY > Select Job > Click “Apply” button. Be prepared to upload a resume. The registration period will end on or before February 4, 2017. Nucor Steel Gallatin does not accept unsolicited resumes. No phone calls please. Nucor is an EEO/AA Employer – M/F/Disabled/Vetand a Drug Free Workplace

Attn: Amber Haas No Phone Calls Please

great places to live... ALEXANDRIA, KY Alexandria Manor Apts 1 BR Avail. now. ELDERLY, OR DISABLED Prices based on income. Call for info M-F 8-5. 800-728-5802TDD 7-1-1. Ashcraft Real Estate Services, Inc. Equal Housing Opportunity

Honda Manufacturing of Indiana

The Cincinnati Enquirer has carrier routes available in the following areas:

MICHAEL A. HELMIG

Destin, FL, Gulf front, 2BR, Condo Rentals, in Beautiful Destin, Local owner. 513-528-9800 Office., 513-752-1735 H

PRODUCTION ASSOCIATES NEEDED

PROSPECTIVE APPLICANTS SHOULD:

BOONE COUNTY SHERIFF

Careers 31 Ac. Pendleton Co., Hwy 22 mostly wooded, secluded home site, city water, $109,900. $4,000 down

OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY - EFNEP PROGRAM SPECIALIST EFNEP Program Specialist – Ohio State University – Job Number 423566 Program Specialist will implement and manage the components of the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) in Hamilton County, Located in Cincinnati, Ohio. Provide functional and administrative supervision over paraprofessional and support EFNEP staff; work with the EFNEP Program Director and County Extension Director to supervise core responsibilities of EFNEP Program Assistants. MS/MA degree in Nutrition, Family and Consumer Sciences, Public Health, or Education is required, or an equivalent combination of education and experience; experience in program planning and administration. OSU is an EEO employer. Applications/Resumes are due by January 15, 2017. Quick Link: http://www.jobsatosu.com/postings/74819

Please contact: Denise Mogil at dmogil@costco.com CE-0000667907

LIBRARIAN Indian Hill Historical Society Hours are flexible 10 hours per week

Please call 891-1873 or Email: ihhist@cinci.rr.com

Tri County firm looking for a FT Administrative Assistant. Requirements: good phone skills, MS Office & Great Benefits. College Degree preferable. E-mail resume to RHamilton@crs401k.com

www.petwow.com/pages/jobapp

Halperns Steak and Seafood Experienced Meat Cutters Needed - Apply at Halperns Steak & Seafood 13151 Apex Dr. Walton, KY

PET GROOMER FT. Great Pay. Rich Benefits. Great Schedule. Email resume to jobs@nkypets.com or apply online www.petwowgroomerjobs.com

VETERINARY HOSPITAL AIDE. FT or PT. $11.50-13.00/Hr. Rich Benefits. Email resume to jobs@nkypets.com or apply online www.petwow.com/pages/jobapp

www.carespring.com/employment

West Shell

To place your ad visit: cincinnati.com/classifieds or search: classifieds

OPT000005B 0117

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ALEXANDRIA

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HOMES

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Housekeeping Positions $350 Sign On Bonus After 60 Days of Employment. Apply online to join our team!

HAND OUT THE CIGARS! Celebratewitha announcement. VISITCLASSIFIEDS onlineatcincinnati.com

AUTOMOTIVE MECHANIC Open Exam sign up ends 2/4/17 Makeup to $53,753.31 annually and substantial benefits package. The city of Cincinnati , Fleet Services is seeking Automotive Mechanics to troubleshoot / repair automobiles, Trucks, construction equipment, Fire Pumpers, and nonautomotive equipment. Must have 3 years paid experience in automotive repair work. Valid Ohio class A CDL , OR obtain one during probation period. ASE Automotive certifications preferred. May be required / willing to work shifts other than normal business hours including nights , weekends , holidays. Application and test date details available at the link below. http://agency.governmentj obs.com/cincinnati/default. cfm

Tractor-Trailer Mechanic 2nd shift, Full-Time needed, light repairs and PM services Sharonville, Oh area Call 513-910-7146

Driver: CDL-A Truck Driver Great Local Route! Get Home Daily, 100% No-Touch Freight Call for Details 844-303-9802


2C µ KC-KENTUCKY - COMMUNITY µ JANUARY 12, 2017

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Sand Casting Foundry and CNC Machine Shop By Order of Court Appointed Receiver Pride Cast Metals, Inc. 2735 Colerain Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio Thursday, January 12, 9:00 am Inspection: Wednesday, January 11, 10-5 Featuring: Sinto FBO-III Flaskless Molding System, New 1998 Inductotherm Powertrak 400-10 Melting Furnace Sand Molding Machines * Beardsley & Piper Speed Muller Harrison Shell Core Machines * Redford Core Blowers Complete Pattern Shop * Foundry Lab Equipment (10) Okuma CNC Turning Centers * VMCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Doosan & Okuma-Howa Twin Spindle Turning Centers Mills * Lathes * Grinders * Saws * Drills Fork Lifts * Air Compressors * Shop Support Items Thompson Auctioneers, Inc. Steve Thompson, Auctioneer 937-426-8446 * www.thompsonauctioneers.com Ohio License 63199566109

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Looking to buy porcelain and painted advertising signs, I buy advertising signs. I am looking for large or small signs that are original. Please only signs older than 1970 , $Any . (513)265-4334 filcallc @gmail.com

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APPLIANCES: Reconditioned Refrigerators, Ranges, Washers, Dryers, Dishwashers. Will deliver. 90 Day Warr. Will Remove Old Appliances. 513-661-3708, 859--431-1400 A+ Rating with the BBB Kenmore 14 CU FT side by side refrig-$150. Soft sided spa tub-$1,000. 859-866-7959

Pay is $16.15 per hour for first shift, $16.96 per hour for second shift.

Firewood For Sale $85 per rick. Delivery Possible. Jim 859-743-0397 SEASONED Firewood, Split, Stacked & Delivered. 1/2 cord $125. 859-760-2929

Apply now!

Visit kellyservices.us/TMMK to learn more and apply.

Seasoned Firewood, split, stacked & delivered-$85 per face cord or full cord 4x4x8 cord-$195. 859-393-5874 or 859-356-0799

kellyservices.us/TMMK An Equal Opportunity Employer Š 2016 Kelly Services, Inc. 16-0977A CE-0000667871

Bring a Bid Driver Wanted Highly safe and dependable driver needed in the Eastgate area to transport military applicants to Columbus for processing. Applicants must have a valid operating license with clean driving record, able to pass D.O.T. physical and drug screen, and criminal background check. Being a vet is preferable, but not necessary. Must work well with Military recruiters and applicants. Schedule is Wednesday-Friday, starting pay is $10/hr. Resumes can be faxed to 937-898-5951, or emailed to: msmith@chartervans.com

Drivers: $5,000.00 Orientation Completion Bonus! Dedicated! Get Home Weekends! Platinum Orientation flight, with upscale lodging and meals.1 year Class-A Call Today: 855-450-2267 Drivers:, CDL-A: LOCAL Lawrenceburg, IN!! Regional & OTR Home Weekends! Sign-On Bonus!! Excellent Pay, Benefits! Drue Chrisman Inc.: 877-346-6589 x103

Community

Drivers: OPEN HOUSE HIRING EVENT! Dedicated Routes! Home Weekends!! $5,000.00 Orientation Completion Bonus! Platinum Orientation flight, with upscale lodging and meals. 1 year Class-A Come & Apply with Koch Trucking: Fri 1/13 or Sat 1/14 8a-6p Homewood Suites by Hilton 9226 Schulze Dr, West Chester Township, OH 45069 Or Call 855-450-2267

CHECK OUT CLASSIFIED online at cincinnati.com

Announce announcements, novena... Special Notices-Clas ! ADOPTION: ! Loving Home with Successful Professionals; Laughter, Music, Celebrations await Miracle Baby. Expenses Paid ! 1-800-563-7964 ! ATTENTION GE EVENDALE (1961-70) & Fernald (FMPC) (1951-83) FAMILIES. Did you, your spouse or your parent become ill after working @ GE or Fernald? You maybe entitles to up to $400,000 from the United States. For more information call Attorney Hugh Stephens at 1-800548-4494, even if your claim has been accepted or denied. We assist with claims, dose reconstructions, appeals, impairment ratings, wage loss, health care and home care. No Recovery-No Fee. 2495 Main St, Buffalo, NY.

Auction a deal for you... General Auctions STORAGE BIN DISPERSAL AUCTION WEDN. JAN. 25, 2017 9.00am JOHNSON MOVING & STORAGE LOCATED AT 31 WEST 8TH ST COVINGTON KY 41011 TAKE I-75 NORTH TO 12TH. EXIT 191 GO STRAIGHT ONTO JILLIANS WAY THEN TURN RIGHT ON PIKE STREET THEN RIGHT ONTO WEST 8TH STREET TO AUCTION THE MANAGEMENT HAS CONTRACTED US TO AUCTION CONTENTS OF STORAGE BIN UNITS FOR PAST DUE RENTS PURSUANT TO KY . LAW K.R.S 35.9-504 BUYERS MUST TAKE TOTAL CONTENTS OF UNITS OR WILL NOT BE ALLOWED TO BID AGAIN TERMS :CASH NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR ACCIDENTS KANNADY-MOORE AUCTION SERVICE RANDY MOORE AUCTIONEER WILLIAMSTOWN KY 859-393-5332

Service Directory CALL: 513-421-6300 TO PLACE YOUR AD

NKyHomeRepair.com Kitchen, Bath & Basement Remodeling, Decks, Tile, Custom Showers, Walk-in Tubs CE-0000666128

25 years exp. Insured.

859-331-0527

CONCRETE LLC

Specializing in new and old replacement of driveways, patios, sidewalks, steps, retaining walls, decorative concrete work, basement and foundation leaks & driveway additions.We also offer Bobcat, Backhoe, Loader, and Dumptruck work, regrading yards & lot cleaning. â&#x20AC;˘ Free Estimates â&#x20AC;˘ Fully Insured â&#x20AC;˘ Over 20 Years Experience Currently Offering A+ Rating with Better 10% DISCOUNT Business Bureau OFFICE CHRIS

859-485-6535 859-393-1138 cohornconcrete@aol.com www.cohornconcrete.com

R & R ROOFING Residential Roofing

5-Year guarantee on all workmanship

â&#x20AC;˘ Free Estimates â&#x20AC;˘ Fully Insured â&#x20AC;˘ 5â&#x20AC;? & 6â&#x20AC;? Seamless Gutters Rodney Goins 859-743-9806

SPLIT FIREWOOD $50 HALF A CORD 859-635-7149

    VISIT CLASSIFIEDS online at cincinnati.com

CASKETS $300 & URNS $99 ALL CASKETS 16 & 18 gauge metal only $300 & Solid Wood only $500 All funeral homes must accept our caskets. IT"S THE LAW! Buy ahead save thousands, churches, police, firemen, businesses. 8455 Winton Rd in Brentwood shopping Center Call Today 513-383-2785 thecasketcompany.com GRAND OPENING Lowest Prices In Cincinnati Great floor model discounts Living Room, Dining Rooms, Mattresses, Bunkbeds, Futons, Electric Adjustable Beds w/ memory foam mattresses. REALLY HOT MATTRESS PRICES 100â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s of premium king sets Lots of floor model specials. SHOP US TODAY! First Come---First Served Lowest Prices--Highest Quality 8455 Winton Rd* Brentwood Plaza Call me, BILL, w/ your questions513-383-2785! Mattress & Furniture Express mattressandfurnitureexpress.com Apply online everyone approved. Guaranteed financing, No Credit Check

HANDYMAN Experienced, Reasonable, No Job Too big or Too Small. Call Steve 513-491-6672

SPECIAL MEETINGS LEGAL NOTICE The Sanitation District No. 1 (SD1), Board of Directors will convene in special session for the purpose of discussing the Fiscal Year 2018 budget on the following dates. The meetings will begin at 8:30 a.m. art SD1â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s main office, 1045 Eaton Drive, Ft. Wright, Kentucky. Tuesday, January 10 Tuesday, February 7 Friday, March 24 Tuesday, April 4 KNT,Jan12,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;17#1839731

CASH PAID for unopened unexpired Diabetic Strips. Up to $35 per 100. 513-377-7522 www.cincytestrips.com

$$$ PAID for LPs,CDs, CASSETTES-ROCK, BLUES, INDIE, METAL, JAZZ, ETC + VINTAGE STEREO EQUIP, DVDs & MEMORABILIA. 50 YRS COMBINED BUYING EXPERIENCE! WE CAN COME TO YOU! 513-591-0123 Want to Buy Antique Leather Sofa, I am looking for a specific type of sofa that is leather. Has brass buttons and lots of buttons throughout. Please let me know if you have one. It needs to be antique not a newer one. , $Any. (513)265-4334 filcallc@ gmail.com

WAR RELICS US, German, Japanese Uniforms, Helmets, Guns, Swords, Medals Etc, Paying Top Dollar Call 513-309-1347 Adopt Me

Pets find a new friend... Airedale Terrier Pups - AKC, 1st shots, standard size, taking deposits, Exc. temperment. 812-620-1519 COCKER SPANIEL PUPS, CKC reg, 1st shots & wormed, Pics available., $600. 859-803-8814

Buying ALL Sports Cards Pre 1970. Please Contact Shane Shoemaker @ 513-477-0553

DOG, Mini Schnauzers, 2 males, 4 females, $1000, 7 weeks , salt pepper, black, white, calm Full AKC (513)526-3138 mpartinlpn@g mail.com

BUYING-RECORD ALBUMS & CDs, METAL, JAZZ, BLUES, ROCK, RAP, INDIE, R&B & REGGAE. 513-683-6985

GOLDEN RETRIEVER AKC, Great Temperment, Shots & Wormed, POP, $500. 502-558-2752

Garage & Yard Sale VISIT: cincinnati.com/classifieds TO PLACE YOUR AD

Great Buys

Garage Sales neighborly deals...

Blue Ash OH Estate Sale 5492 Kenridge Dr, Blue Ash, OH 1/13, 1/14 & 1/15 Fri - 9-4, #â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s @ 8:45; Sat & Sun 9-4 Contents of Home, Garage & Out building. Large 3 Day Sale! Lots of Misc. Collectibles, Antiques, Old Toys, Old Radios, Old Phonographs, Electronics, Cameras, Stereo viewers, Old Books, Records, Clocks, Lamps, Painted China Hutch, Old Chairs, Drop Leaf Table, Desks, Carpenter Bench Coffee Table, Cast Iron, Violins, Accordion, Key board, Guitar, Lift Chair, Oliver Typewriter & Case, Old P & G items, Popcorn maker, Lots of office supplies, lots of Holiday, Linens, Crafts, Antique tables, Stain Glass, Leaded Glass, Ladders, Garden Tools, Hand Tools, Patio Furniture, Lots of Kitchen Items and Smalls. Still unpacking boxes! Too Much to list, All priced to sell! Info & pics hsestatesales.com or 859-468-9468 Directions - Kenwood Rd Kenridge Dr or Meyers Ln (Parking on Meyers Ln,house is at the end of Meyers Ln)

Lawrenceburg IN Estate Sale 19753 Ventura Dr Lawrenceburg, IN 1/14 & 1/15 Sat. 9-4, #â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s @ 8:45; Sun. 9-4 Contents of home & garage. Walnut Dining Table & Hutch, Curio cabinet, glass door bookshelf, rattan glass top table & chairs, bookshelf, large oak & glass door entertainment center, electronics, barstools, patio bench, electric grill, gas grill, carpet cleaner, leaf blower, Power, hand & yard tools, exercise bike, coll. of adv. signs, mirrors, lamps, nautical theme items, scuba equipment, air compressor, tablesaw, snowblower, misc. kitchen items, too much to list all priced to sell! Info and pics â&#x20AC;&#x201C; hsestatesales.com or 859â&#x20AC;&#x201C;992-0212. Directions â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Route 50 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Stateline Road â&#x20AC;&#x201C; L on Alpine Dr â&#x20AC;&#x201C; L on Ventura Dr (Hidden Valley Lake)

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4C µ KC-KENTUCKY - COMMUNITY µ JANUARY 12, 2017 Automotive Italiano Cane Corso, Blue, AKC, 10 wks., 4 Females, shots & wormed. $500 513-338-9916 / 513-658-1413 Old English Sheep Dog Pups $600. 42 years with Old English Sheep dogs. Call 270-524-5621 PUG PUPPY AKC, Adorable & Energetic, (2) M. Fawn $700; (2) F. Fawn $800; (2) M. Black $800. 513-305-5528 Schnauzer Puppies, Mini - AKC, 9 weeks, shots, wormed, black & silver, Males only. $375. Call 937-205-2305

Siberian Husky pups AKC $650 & up can txt pictures (937)423-0545

Teacup Yorkie Puppy, Male, 1.2 lbs, Shots UTD, Very cute! No Young children. $1,500; 859-479-6920

Rides best deal for you...

CASH for junk cars, trucks & vans. Free pick up. Call Jim or Roy anytime 859-866-2909 or 859-991-5176

Audi 2015 A4, Coupe, 58000 mi., 4 dr., Automatic, Black ext., Black int., VIN#WAIJAFAFL2FN042611, 04 Cylinders, FWD, A/C: Front, A/C: Rear, Airbag: Driver, Airbag: Passenger, Airbag: Side, Alarm, Alloy Wheels, Anti-Lock Brakes, CD Player, Cruise Control, Fog Lights, Leather Interior, Moonroof, Power Locks, Power Seats, Power Steering, Power Windows, Premium Sound, Rear Window Defroster, Sunroof, Tinted Glass, Driven 800 expressway miles per week for management position. One owner--all records at Audi dealership. Oil changed every 5000 miles. New radial tires w/ less than 100 miles.-Showroom condition. Email contact for photos, $22,900. Jim Eveslage (513)926-1351

CADILLAC 1998 SEDAN DEVILLE Power, Garage kept, new tires, exc. cond 50K mi., Same as new! Call 859-525-6363 SATURN 2002 SL, Silver, Single Overhead Cam 4 cyl., New tires, Exc. Cond., 99K mi., Call 859-525-6363

Pontiac 1986 Fiero GT- black w/silver int., like new cond., Must see to appreciate, low mi, 859-341-0511 or 859-250-0436

Find your new home today Stress-free home searches

2014 BMW C 650 GT, Like New, 875 miles, Silver, includes matching full face helmet, cover, and Battery Tender, $7,250. Edward Strauss (740)645-3172

JEEP 2004 Grand Cherokee Laredo, 4x4, Low miles, 6 cyl, gar. kept, exc. cond Call 859-525-6363

powering real estate search for over 365 newspapers 2014 Ford F-150 STX extend cab, 2WD, 17,500 miles, warranty remaining, $24,500 859-359-0374 or 937-564-1856 32’ AIR STREAM CARGO TRAILER $2,100 CALL 859-240-5252

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These redesigns stress safety, styling Both the Hyundai Elantra and Kia Forte have raised their games for 2017 in regards to active safety systems, offering features such as collision warning with autonomous braking, lanekeeping assist and rear crosstraffic alert.

2017 Hyundai Elantra

HYUNDAI

KIA

2017 Kia Forte

Starting MSRP: $16,490 to $21,200

Starting MSRP: $17,150 to $22,350 l The 2017 Elantra is significantly reworked inside and out. It’s powered by a 147-horsepower, 2-liter four-cylinder with a sixspeed manual or automatic transmission, while the Elantra Eco version has a 128-hp, turbocharged 1.4-liter four-cylinder with a seven-speed dual-clutch automatic transmission. All models feature new selectable driving modes that adjust engine, transmission and steering effort in Eco, Normal or Sports modes. l CITY: 26 to 32 mpg HIGHWAY: 36 to 40 mpg l The Elantra’s new design is high ighted by a large hexagonal grille flanked by optional high-intensity discharge headlights with available adaptive headlights that turn with the steering wheel. Aerodynamics are a key part of the redesign, including functional front air curtains to manage airflow and minimize resistance. The Elantra also features LED turn signal indicators, taillights and puddle lights. Five new colors are available for 2017. l The interior gets a wide instrument panel design and softtouch materials in key areas. There are two optional touchscreen multimedia systems over the base system: a 7-inch with a backup camera and an 8-inch with navigation. New available features for 2017 include a memory function for the power driver’s seat and side mirrors and a premium Infinity sound system. l Hyundai says reinforcements to the front chassis will improve performance in a collision. An available collision warning system autonomously brakes when needed. The Elantra also has available adaptive cruise control, pedestrian detection, lane-keeping assist, blind-spot monitoring and rear cross-traffic alert.

New or notable

Fuel economy

l The 2017 Forte sedan and Forte5 hatchback get styling updates and added technology. The Forte adds a new trim level, the sport-oriented S, between the LX and EX. The Forte5 is offered in three trim levels as well: LX, SX and EX. The new base engine is a 2-liter four-cylinder. Two other engine options carry over: a 173-horsepower, 2-liter fourcylinder for EX models and a 201-hp, turbocharged 1.6-liter four-cylinder in the Forte5 SX. l CITY: 25 to 29 mpg HIGHWAY: 33 to 38 mpg

Exterior

l Styling changes give the Forte and Forte5 the same nose; this change represents only a slight tweak for the sedan, but for the hatchback, it’s more drastic. The headlights feature updated LED detailing and available Dynamic Bending Light technology, which angles the headlights to illuminate corners at night. The taillights have also been redesigned on both models, with LED elements optional.

Interior

l The 2017 Forte and Forte5 get upgraded materials, new stitching and softer-touch surfaces (in this case, a leatherwrapped steering wheel and shifter on S models). The most exciting changes are on the technology front, with the addition of Apple CarPlay and Android Auto to Kia’s UVO3 multimedia system, which uses a 7-inch touch screen.

Safety

l Kia has expanded the Forte’s safety technology systems for 2017. A new set of driver aids is now available, including forward-collision warning with autonomous emergency braking, lane-change warning/assist, lane-keeping assist, blind-spot detection and rear cross-traffic alert.


MIKE CASTRUCCI

S1

Go Further

7400 ALEXANDRIA PIKE | ALEXANDRIA, KY OPEN M-THU 9-8 | FRI-SAT 9-6 | SUN 11-5

OVER 175 F SERIES IN STOCK

25% OFF ALL 2016 F-150 XL AND XLT MODELS! HURRY!

Limited number of these trucks available at this offer! 2016 FORD F-350 CREWCAB DIESEL 4X4 STOCK #GEA79905

MSRP .................................$51,525 FACTORY REBATE ...............-$3,500 CASTRUCCI DISCOUNT ........-$7,280 BUY FOR.............................$40,745 FORD CASH............................-$750

BUY FOR

39,995

$

2016 F350 CREW CAB DUALLY DIESEL STOCK #GED37579

MSRP .................................$69,010 FACTORY REBATE ...............-$4,000 CASTRUCCI DISCOUNT ........-$6,765 BUY FOR.............................$58,245 FORD CASH.........................-$1,250

BUY FOR

56,995

$

2017 F250 SUPERCAB 4X4 STOCK #HEB99405

MSRP .................................$41,895 FACTORY REBATE ...............-$1,000 CASTRUCCI DISCOUNT ........-$4,900

BUY FOR

35,995

$

CALL TOLL FREE

877.934.4699 www.mikecastruccifordalexandria.com

Not all buyers will qualify. Ford Credit limited-term APR financing. Take new retail delivery from dealer stock by 1/31/2017. Not all Fusion models may qualify. See dealer for residency restrictions qualifications and complete details.

MSRP


Go Further

S2

MIKE CASTRUCCI 2017 FORD

2017 FORD

ESCAPE

EXPLORER MSRP .................................$32,605 FACTORY REBATE ................-$2,000 CASTRUCCI DISCOUNT.........-$4,610

MSRP .................................$24,495 FACTORY REBATE ................-$3,500 CASTRUCCI DISCOUNT.........-$3,000

BUY FOR

17,995

$

#HUA59424

OR LEASE FOR

129/MO.

$

*

*24 months, $2500 down payment, 0 security, 10,500 miles per year, $2629 due at signing plus tax and fees.

2017 FORD

#HGA41902

OR LEASE FOR

*

25,995

$

*24 month lease plus tax & fees. No security deposit. $2999 Cash or Trade Equity due at signing. 10,500 miles per year.

0% FOR 60 MONTHS AVAILABLE ON ALL 2017 ESCAPE

EDGE

259/MO.

$

BUY FOR

AWD

2016 FORD

EXPLORER

#GGD00379

#HBB35496

MSRP .................................$31,535 FACTORY REBATE ................-$1,500 CASTRUCCI DISCOUNT.........-$4,040 BUY FOR.............................$25,995

BUY FOR

MSRP ........................................$51,900 FACTORY REBATE ...................... -$6,000 CASTRUCCI DISCOUNT............... -$4,860 BUY FOR....................................$41,995

25,995

$

2016 FORD

FIESTA

25% OFF ALL REMAINING 16 FIESTA

#GM204810

2016 FORD

FOCUS

25% OFF ALL REMAINING 16 FOCUS

#GL390885

LEASE FOR

59

$

$2500 Cash or Trade Equity due at signing, 24mo. lease, no security deposit, 10,500 miles per year, plus tax & fees

LEASE FOR

79

$

#HR104261

2016 FORD

TAURUS SEL TA

25% OFF ALL REMAINING 16 TAURUS

#GG137795

2017 FORD

MUSTANG #H5238951

PER MONTH

$2500 Cash or Trade Equity due at signing, 24mo. lease, no security deposit, 10,500 miles per year, plus tax & fees

0%

2017 FORD

FUSION S

PER MONTH

FOR 72 MONTHS AVAILABLE ON ALL 2017 FUSION

189

$

PER MONTH

$2500 Cash or Trade Equity due at signing, 24mo. lease, no security deposit, 10,500 miles per year, plus tax & fees

NEARLY $11,000 OFF MSRP!

41,995

$

MSRP ........................................................................ $16,360 CASTRUCCI DISCOUNT ........... -$2,990FACTORY REBATE ....................................................................................-$4,000

BUY FOR

13,495

$

MSRP ........................................................................ $20,485 CASTRUCCI DISCOUNT ...........................................-$3,450 FACTORY REBATE ....................................................-$2,750

BUY FOR

12,995

$

MSRP ........................................................................ $22,995 CASTRUCCI DISCOUNT ...........................................-$3,250 FACTORY REBATE .......................................................-$750

18,995

$

BUY FOR

MSRP ...........................................................$30,415 FACTORY REBATE ...................................... -$4,250 CASTRUCCI DISCOUNT ............................. -$4,170 BUY FOR......................................................$21,995 FORD CREDIT CASH .................................. -$1,000

LEASE FOR

BUY FOR

SPORT

BUY FOR

20,995

$

MSRP ........................................................................ $25,815 CASTRUCCI DISCOUNT ...........................................-$3,320 FACTORY REBATE .......................................................-$500

BUY FOR

21,995

$

All prices reflect all applicable Ford Factory rebates deducted.Some offers require Ford Credit financing. Customers that choose not to finance may lose these rebates. Lease payment is a closed end 24 mo. lease through Ford Credit with approved credit. All leases based on 10,500 miles per year with 20¢ per mile overage. Tax, title, license and acquisition fees not included. Owner Loyalty requires 1995 or newer Ford, Lincoln or Mercury registered to household. Not all buyers will qualify for all offers. Ford Credit Special APR financing is available in lieu of rebates. Some offers may have residency restrictions qualifications. Residency restrictions apply. 25 percent discount offers include all applicable rebates and require ford financing and excludes all ST and RS modelss. See dealer for complete details of any advertised offer. Take new retail delivery from dealer stock by 1/31/2017.

7400 ALEXANDRIA PIKE | ALEXANDRIA, KY • OPEN M-THU 9-8 | FRI-SAT 9-6 | SUN 11-5 OPEN EVERY SUNDAY 11AM - 5PM

877.934.4699

www.mikecastruccialexandria.com


Mike Castrucci Lincoln

T1

OPEN EVERY SUNDAY 11AM - 5PM!

2017 LINCOLN MKC

#5LHUL12758

259

$

per month

36 month lease

MSRP $33,645

$2995 down payment 10,500 miles per year no security deposit $3254 due at signing

BUY FOR

31,595

$

after $500 Customer Cash & 0% APR for 60 months

2016 LINCOLN MKX

2017 LINCOLN MKZ

#2LGBL88375

$

299 per month

36 month lease

BUY FOR

$

MSRP $39,185

$3295 down payment 10,500 miles per year no security deposit $3594 due at signing

35,895

#3LHR610793

299

$

per month

36 month lease

BUY FOR

after $1,500 Customer Cash & 0% APR for 60 months

$

after $1500 Customer Cash

2016 LINCOLN NAVIGATOR

#5LGEL11691

AWD #1LH5616881

$

BUY FOR

50,995 Only 1 remaining at this price

$2995 down payment 10,500 miles per year no security deposit $3294 due at signing

33,195

2017 LINCOLN CONTINENTAL

MSRP $53,445

MSRP $36,430

MSRP $68,960 0% APR FOR 72 MONTHS

BUY FOR

61,595

$

After $4,000 customer cash

All leases & 0% offers through Lincoln Automotive Financial Services with approved credit. All leases based on 10500 miles per year with over milage charge of 20 cents per mile.Tax, title and license fees not included. 1st payment due at delivery. See dealer for complete details of any offer. $16.66 per every $1000 financed at 0% for 60 months. $13.88 per every $1000 financed at 0% for 72 months. Offer ends 1/31/17.

Mike Castrucci Lincoln 7 4 0 0 A l e x a n d r i a P i ke | A l e x a n d r i a , KY | 8 7 7 - 9 3 4 - 4 7 0 2 Open M-Thur 9-8 | Fri-Sat 9-6 | Sun 11-5

www.mikecastruccilincoln.com


Mike Castrucci Ford Lincoln of Alexandria

T2

OVER 50 PRE-OWNED TRUCKS IN STOCK!

2004 JEEP LIBERTY 4X4 ....................................................................$3,495 STOCK#57881

2012 TOYOTA TUNDRA CREW CAB..............................................$22,785 STOCK#57527

2001 BMW X5 .......................................................................................$4,896 STOCK#57782

2011 FORD F-150 SUPERCREW XLT 4X4 ....................................$23,567 STOCK#57530

2004 CHEVROLET SUBURBAN LS 4X4.......................................... $7,999 STOCK#57921

2011 FORD F-150 SUPERCREW XLT 4X4 ....................................$23,785 STOCK#5684

2003 JEEP WRANGLER 4X4...............................................................$8,951 STOCK#56806

2013 FORD F-150 EXT CAB XLT 4X4............................................$26,856 STOCK#57540

2008 FORD ESCAPE HYBRID ........................................................... $8,976 STOCK# 57679

2013 FORD F-150 CREW CAB XLT 4X4 ......................................$28,393 STOCK#57497

207 HONDA RIDGELINE.......................................................................$9,345 STOCK#57642

2014 GMC SIERRA CREW CAB 4X4 SLT .....................................$32,157 STOCK#5583

2009 GMC YUKON XL 4X4 .............................................................. $11,895 STOCK#57875

2014 FORD F150 SUPER CREW LARIAT 4X4............................$32,366 STOCK#57585

2004 TOYOTA TUNDRA QUAD CAB LIMITED 4X4 ................... $15,876 STOCK# 57819

2014 FORD F-150 SUPERCREW FX4...........................................$33,349 STOCK# 5659

200 FORD SPORT TRAC LIMITED ................................................. $17,665 STOCK#5812

2014 FORD F-150 SUPERCREW FX4...........................................$34,668 STOCK#5659

2013 CHEVROLET SILVERADO 1500 REG CAB 4X4................$18,324 STOCK#57134

2014 RAM 2500 CREW CAB DIESEL LARAMIE 4X4.................$44,476 STOCK#57218

2008 FORD F-150 SUPERCREW XLT 4X4....................................$19,017 STOCK#56114

2016 CHEVY SUBURBAN LT 4X4...................................................$45,213 STOCK#5705

2010 TOYOTA TACOMA QUAD CAB 4X4 ....................................$20,590 STOCK# 5810

2015 FORD F-150 CREW CAB 4X4 LARIAT.................................$45,751 STOCK#5628

2012 FORD F-150 SUPERCREW XLT 4X4.................................... $22,541 STOCK#5669

2015 FORD F-350 CREW CAB PLATINUM 4X4 DIESEL .........$48,381 STOCK#57440

7400 ALEXANDRIA PIKE | ALEXANDRIA, KY • OPEN M-THUR 9-8 | FRI-SAT 9-6 | SUN 11-5

859.448.2404

www.mikecastruccialexandria.com

Stop In For Savings! We Can Service Most Makes & Models Regardless of Where You Purchased Your Vehicle!

THE WORKS

FUEL SAVER PACKAGE

Oil & Filter Change, Tire Rotation, Adjust Tire Pressure, Top-Off All Fluid Levels, Includes MultiPoint Inspection, Battery Test, Filter Check & Belts & Hoses Checked

39

$

95

Most vehicles. Up to 5 qts. synthetic blend. Excludes diesels. Expires 1.31.17

Why Pay More?

Alignment Check

Dare To Compare!

Motorcraft Oil & Filter Change

In 2 Minutes or Less!

Front End Alignment Special

Only valid at Mike Castrucci Ford-Lincoln Alexandria. With Coupon only. Expires 1.31.17

Certain makes & models excluded. Only valid at Mike Castrucci For-Lincoln Alexandria. Must present coupon at time of write-up. Expires 1.31.17

24

$

95

Up to 5 qts. Some makes & models excluded. See advisor for details. Includes the multi-point inspection, brake inspection, inspected belts & hoses & top off all fluid levels. Only valid at Mike Castrucci Ford-Lincoln Alexandria. Expires 1.31.17

FREE 59 $

95

Includes camber, caster & toe adjustment

Call to Schedule Today!

(859) 838-4794 | www.mikecastruccialexandria.com 7400 Alexandria Pike, Alexandria KY 41001

MON-THURS. 7:30AM-7PM • FRI 7:30AM-6PM • SAT 7:30AM-3PM • CLOSED SUNDAY

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