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SUMMER READERS

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There were plenty of winners during the summer reading program at the Delhi branch library.

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Volume 84 Number 37 © 2011 The Community Press ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

7, 2011

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Remembering Sept. 11, 2001 Looking at day that ‘opened my eyes to the world’

By Kurt Backscheider

kbackscheider@communitypress.com

Fair time

If it the week of Labor Day, that means it is Harvest Home Fair weekend. The parade, as always, starts at 6 p.m. and marches over Harrison Avenue to North Bend Road and ends at Harvest Home Park. There it’s three days of fair fun. Here’s the basic information: Operating hours: Thursday – Parade, 6 p.m. 1 mile run starts at 5:50 p.m. Friday – 5-11 p.m. Horse show starts at 7 p.m. Saturday – Noon-11 p.m. Horse Shows start at 11 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Sunday – Noon-10 p.m. 5K walk/run starts at 9 a.m. and horse show starts at noon This Year's Theme: Community Affair Admission – $5 adults, children under 12 free Saturday and Sunday until 3:30 p.m. One-price rides – Thursday 6 p.m.-close, $10. Saturday and Sunday noon-6 p.m., $15 Parade night only – $1 pop and pizza, $2 beer. – SEE MORE, B8, AND IN TODAY’S SPECIAL SECTION

Goodwill trip

Two Delhi High School graduates took a 3,072-mile trip this summer dispensing goodwill throughout the South. They saw the “joy of simply helping others and receiving nothing in return.” – SEE STORY, A4

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Patrick Bailey and J.D. Schinkal know exactly where they were the day terrorists flew planes into the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. The Elder High School seniors were only second-graders at the time, but the memories remain fresh in their minds. “We weren’t actually told America was under attack, but we knew something was wrong because of the way the teachers were acting,” said Bailey, a Green Township resident who was a student at Our Lady of Visitation on Sept. 11, 2001. “We started praying in the recess line.” Schinkal, a Green Township resident who was a student at Springmyer Elementary School back then, said he vividly remembers the conversation he had with his mother on the car ride home from school. “She told me we were attacked by terrorists,” he said. “I had no idea what that was or what it meant.” Both he and Bailey said they spent the rest of that evening in front of the television watching the news coverage of the tragedy. Schinkal said he recalls feeling very worried about his father, who was out of town on business and scheduled to fly back home on Sept. 13. “It was kind of a scary personal connection,” he said. As the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks approaches, Americans will look back on that day, remember those who died and reflect on where we’ve come as a nation. Bailey said, for him, 9/11 marks a loss of innocence. “When you are that young you don’t realize there are people out there willing to hurt others,” he said. In the years since the attacks, he said he’s watched news trib-

KURT BACKSCHEIDER/STAFF

Elder High School seniors J.D. Schinkal, left, and Patrick Bailey discuss their memories of Sept. 11, 2001. Both students were second-graders when terrorists attacked New York City and Washington, D.C.

“It’s one of those things that not only changes the perception of an individual person, but also an entire country.”

J.D. Schinkal Elder High School senior

utes and programs about 9/11 on the History Channel, and he’s learned we must always keep a watchful eye. “I just think about seeing those images of the planes crashing into the towers,” Bailey said. Schinkal said the video of a man falling from one of the towers has always stuck with him. He said after 9/11 he started paying more attention to the news and frequently asked his parents if the United States was winning the war. “It opened my eyes to the

world,” he said. “It’s one of those things that not only changes the perception of an individual person, but also an entire country.” Mike Gergen, who is chairman of Elder’s social studies department and has Bailey and Schinkal in his AP government class, said he plans to cover 9/11 topics with his students prior to the anniversary. He said he will show them a brief video and then open a discussion in which they can share their thoughts or ask questions. Gergen said rather than delving too much into what took place

that day, he is going focus on the stories of people who were there or who lost love ones. “I want them to see a personal connection to what happened 10 years ago,” he said. “We can learn something from the people tied to the event.” He said he wants his students to see how we, as individuals and as Americans, have moved on and coped with the tragedy. “We’ll connect the material they’re reading in the book to what’s really going on in the world right now,” he said. Schinkal and Bailey said they will take some time on Sunday, Sept. 11, to remember and honor those who died. “I try to remember as much as I can,” Schinkal said. For more about your community, visit www.cincinnati.com/local.

BLOC renovates rundown building By Kurt Backscheider kbackscheider@communitypress.com

BLOC Ministries transformed a deteriorating apartment building on McPherson into quality, affordable housing for Hispanic families. The faith-based nonprofit organization recently completed its McPherson Mi Casa project at 901 and 903 McPherson Ave. The organization renovated eight units in the apartment building, giving disadvantaged families an opportunity to improve their living conditions and better their lives. Stephanie Russo, spokeswoman for BLOC Ministries, said Mi Casa was a natural byproduct of the group’s commitment to serving the under-served. The apartment building sits down the street from a 125-year-old church that houses a BLOC Center, which offers a variety of programs and educational activities for students and their families. Russo said nine groups use the center and two of the groups are Hispanic groups which offer programs to meet the community needs of the large Guatemalan population in East Price Hill. “We saw a need and an opportunity,” said Dwight Young, BLOC’s executive director. “We wanted to offer disadvantaged Hispan-

KURT BACKSCHEIDER/STAFF

BLOC Ministries renovated the eight-unit apartment building at 901 McPherson Ave. in Price Hill. BLOC’s McPherson Mi Casa project serves disadvantaged Hispanic families. ic families a quality place to live on the same street where they gather for English lessons, computer classes or church services, and to help build a community response to housing discrimination.” He said BLOC also believes restoring the apartment complex – the largest on a street he said is a poster child for the housing crisis – builds hope that revitalization can happen in Cincinnati and his happening despite the tough economy. “The neighborhood climate is changing

with more lights on and more neighbors getting to know neighbors,” Young said. Andy Schneider, a BLOC staff member who helped renovate the apartment building, said construction crews started working on the project in January. He said they rehabilitated all eight units in the building, patching walls, running all new electric, restoring the floors and adding fresh coats of paint. “The bathrooms were in very bad condition,” he said. “All the toilets and sinks were broken.” Schneider said the work was worth it and everything cleaned up real well. He said he enjoyed playing a part in giving someone else a nice place to live. “BLOC is all about family,” he said. “I really like their attitude of being involved in people’s lives and bringing people together.” Russo said BLOC received generous support from the Greater Cincinnati Foundation, the Hubert Foundation and PNC Bank, as well as many other area businesses and individuals who sponsored the McPherson Mi Casa project. She said two more vacant homes on McPherson are undergoing renovation by BLOC this fall.


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Price Hill Press

News

September 7, 2011

BLOC offers jazz with your coffee every Tuesday By Jason Hoffman jhoffman312@communitypress.com

Deep in Price Hill, a coffee shop is providing young musicians a forum to put their skills on display weekly. Tuesday nights, the Corner BLOC Coffee Shop offers a quaint refuge where patrons can enjoy the soothing sounds of jazz performed by artists studying at the University of Cincinnati’s College Conservatory of Music.

The performers range in numbers from two to five and play guitar, piano, bass and drums. Joe Wittman, a 20-yearold jazz student at UC who plays guitar, said he enjoys performing at the Corner BLOC shop, at 3101 Price Ave. “The coffee is great and a lot of supportive people come out,” Wittman said. “The shop is really a nice, comfortable venue and the coffee is top notch.” Rhett Harkins, the oper-

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Jazz performers play in front of a familiar crowd at the BLOC Coffee Shop in Price Hill every Tuesday night. ator of the coffee shop and a Price Hill resident, said the jazz night has enabled the shop to further enrich its connection with residents. “We have had a lot of positive feedback,” Harkins said. “People enjoy the atmosphere jazz brings.” Harkins said the shop also offers something that chain coffee shops can’t – a third wave coffee shop experience. “(Third wave) is a movement of baristas and operators the bring coffee to the gourmet level; getting to the heart of the bean,” Harkins said. “We offer the most

By Heidi Fallon hfallon@communitypress.com

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has some of the most knowledgeable baristas in the area. The shop, however, provides a greater purpose to Price Hill. “(The coffee shop) serves as a third space for the youth in the community,” Silver said. “We offer a place to hang out when the students are not at home or in school.” The jazz nights also give a chance for some to reconnect with their former community. Lois Mueller, a Westwood resident, said the weekly event gives her a great reason to enjoy an evening back in the neighborhood she grew up in. “I really love jazz and great coffee, so it’s the best of both worlds,” Mueller said. “Plus, these young

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Doug Campbell was home with his infant son, the TV on in the background. “I saw the second plane hit and I thought, ‘God, this is going to change everything.’” The assistant fire chief for Delhi Township said he didn’t watch the continuing TV coverage of the 9/11 attacks as a fireman. “I wasn’t looking at it from that perspective at first, but later, I remember thinking about how the New York firefighters were going to get the people out and their equipment in,” Campbell said.

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Calendar ......................................B2 Classifieds.....................................C Deaths .........................................B6 Food.............................................B3 Police...........................................B7 Schools........................................A4 Sports ..........................................A5 Viewpoints ..................................A7

“What happened that day gave us a new mission.” Fire Chief Bill Zoz was with Colerain Township 10 years ago. “My wife called me and I went to the station and watched like the rest of America,” he said. Like Campbell, Zoz said he became preoccupied with the logistics the New York City firefighters and Port Authority of New York were encountering. “The saying that as firefighters we are rushing in as people are rushing out was never more true,” he said. “I think the training kicks in and you just go do what you’ve been trained to do and think of little else at that moment.” Since 9/11, Campbell and Zoz said new procedures, training and guidelines have filtered down to the local level, mainly via Homeland Security. Delhi Township has

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musicians are really talented and it’s great to come out and support them.” The Corner BLOC Coffee Shop began in 2007 as an after-school center for students in the area. It is owned by BLOC Ministries (Believing and Living One Christ), a non-profit group that works to help the underprivileged in Cleves and Price Hill through several community centers and two coffee shops. The Price Hill shop also serves as a meeting space for community programs such as the Price Hill Will and others. In addition to the jazz night, the shop offers open cuppings, an event similar to a wine tasting that serves coffee sampling.

Firefighters will never forget 9/11

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extensive brewing methods in the city and maybe even the state.” Harkins said his shop offers the highest level of coffee purity, while still serving beverages that consumers are used to ordering at other shops. The staff at the shop share Harkins’ enthusiasm for the jazz night and his passion for gourmet coffee. Jenn Silver, a Mount Healthy resident, has been working as a barista at the coffee shop since June 2010. “We enjoy getting to partner with musicians who are getting their start and want to perform jazz for the rest of their lives,” Silver said. She also said the shop

Students from the University of Cincinnati’s College Conservatory of Music, Joe Wittman, center, and Nick Amering, right, are given a chance to perform in front of audiences every Tuesday night at the BLOC Coffee Shop in Price Hill.

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Find news and information from your community on the Web Covedale – cincinnati.com/covedale Price Hill – cincinnati.com/pricehill Hamilton County – cincinnati.com/hamiltoncounty News Marc Emral | Senior Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . 853-6264 | memral@communitypress.com Kurt Backscheider | Reporter . . . . . . . . . 853-6260 | kbackscheider@communitypress.com Jennie Key | Community Editor . . . . . . . . 853-6272 | jkey@communitypress.com Melanie Laughman | Sports Editor . . . . . . . 248-7573 | mlaughman@communitypress.com Tony Meale | Sports Reporter . . . . . . . . . . 853-6271 | tmeale@communitypress.com Ben Walpole | Sports Reporter . . . . . . . . . 591-6179 | bwalpole@communitypress.com Advertising Debbie Maggard | Territory Sales Manager 859-578-5501 | dmaggard@nky.com Patti Lancaster | Account Executive . . . . . . 687-6732 | plancaster@communitypress.com Delivery For customer service. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 853-6263 | 853-6277 Sharon Schachleiter | Circulation Manager. 853-6279 | schachleiter@communitypress.com Classified To place a Classified ad . . . . . . . . . . . . . 242-4000 | www.communityclassified.com To place an ad in Community Classified, call 242-4000.

HEIDI FALLON/STAFF

After a recent office painting project at the Neeb Road fire station, a picture honoring firefighters who died on Sept. 11 is put back on the wall by Delhi Township Assistant Fire Chief Doug Campbell, left, and Fire Chief Bill Zoz. joined with six other departments including Green Township and Cheviot, for scheduled training and drills. The aim, they said, is for everyone to be on the same page in the event of a major disaster, manmade or otherwise. In the immediate aftermath of 9/11, the fire department received an “outpouring of support,” Campbell said. Cookies and cards and strangers stopping to say thanks were a daily occurrence. Not so much anymore. Also missing are the decals that were placed on most of the fire department equipment to symbolize the 9/11 tragedies. Zoz said as equipment has been replaced during the last decade, the decals weren’t put back on. “You don’t have to have a sign on your truck to have it in your heart,” Campbell said. “We’ll never forget.” For more about your community, visit www.cincinnati.com/ delhitownship.


News 9/11 EVENTS F R I D A Y, S E P T . 9 9/11: Is Ten Years Enough?, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m., Receptions Banquet and Conference Center Eastgate, 4450 Eastgate Blvd., Where have we come since the attack, where are we headed and are we going in the right direction. Ed Bridgeman, UC Clermont professor and terrorism expert, and Beth Nevel, Clermont County EMA director, will discuss the need for a local response during luncheon. $40, $25 members. Reservations required. Presented by Clermont Chamber of Commerce. 576-5000; www.clermontchamber.com. Union Township. S A T U R D A Y, S E P T . 1 0 Patriot Day Commemoration, Noon-10 p.m., American Legion Post 450, 450 Victor Stier Drive, Celebration of enduring American spirit. Golf chipping, derby races, music, poker showdown, raffles and silent auction. Food and drink available. For . Free. 2897374; post450.com. Milford. Patriotic Concert, 7 p.m., Gethsemane United Methodist Church, 2776 Burlington Pike, Music by the Florence Community Chorus with the Choral Club of Northern Kentucky. Honoring first responders and armed service personnel. Desserts and beverages follows. Free. 859-586-8250; www.gethsemaneumcburlington.com. Burlington. Remembering Sept. 11, 5 p.m., Epiphany United Methodist Church, 6635 Loveland Miamiville Road, Remembering and reflecting on the 10th anniversary. 677-9866. Loveland. Finding God in the Rubble, 5-6 p.m., Whitewater Crossing Christian Church, 5771 Ohio 128, Reflect, remember and look forward to commemorate the events of 9/11. Special music and video presentation following firsthand accounts of individuals whose lives were changed forever and a message of hope by Pastor David Vaughan. Public servants honored with reception and display of first-responders equipment. Free. 661-5811; www.whitewatercrossing.org. Cleves. S U N D A Y, S E P T . 1 1 9/11 Ceremony, 4-6 p.m., Nisbet Park, 210 Railroad Ave., Opening ceremony with color guards and short program. A patriotic concert by the Clermont County Symphony. Bring seating for grassy area. View the Loveland Firefighters Memorial. Rain or shine event. Free. Presented by Loveland Symmes Fire Department. 583-3001; www.lsfd.org/911ceremony.php. Loveland. Lest We Forget … A 9/11 Remembrance, 8:25 a.m. UC Blue Ash College Muntz Theater, 9555 Plainfield Road, Commemorating the 10th anniversary of the attacks in New

York, Washington, D.C., and Pennsylvania. Scheduled to appear: Dr. Cady Short-Thompson, UC Blue Ash College dean; Connie Pillich, Ohio representative of the 28th district; Jean Schmidt, Republican and congresswoman of Ohio; students from Blue Ash Elementary School and others., Continental breakfast available 7:30 p.m. Presented by Raymond Walters College. 936-7162; www.rwc.uc.edu. Blue Ash. Remembering Sept. 11, 9 a.m. and 10:30 a.m., Epiphany United Methodist Church, 677-9866. Loveland. 9/11 Moment of Remembrance, 1 p.m., Downtown Batavia, Main Street, Pause and reflect, for one minute, on the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. Governments, businesses, churches, law enforcement agencies and citizens are encouraged to show a symbol of solidarity by ringing bells and sounding sirens. Presented by Board of County Commissioners of Clermont County. 732-7597; www.lautenberg.senate.gov/ stopandremember/. Batavia. 9/11 Observance Program, 8:25 a.m., UC Blue Ash College Muntz Theater, 9555 Plainfield Road, Room 119. Continental breakfast at 7:30 a.m. Program with music and remarks from local emergency and medical providers. Free. Presented by Raymond Walters College. 745-5685; www.rwc.uc.edu. Blue Ash. Finding God in the Rubble, 9-10 a.m. and 10:45-11:45 a.m., Whitewater Crossing Christian Church, Free. 661-5811; www.whitewatercrossing.org. Cleves. Lunken Airport Days 9/11 Commemoration, Noon, Lunken Airport, 262 Wilmer Ave., Behind terminal. Kroger is providing free hot dogs and drinks. The Cincinnati Warbirds will fly the “Missing Man” formation over the memorial at noon. Free lunch follows ceremony., Dr. Albert Weisbrod of Symmes Township will sing the national anthem. Color guard and local firefighters’ ladder trucks with an American flag honors those that perished. Piece of a beam from the World Trade Center and a binder with all the names of those who perished 10 years ago will be on display. Free. 489-2022. Linwood. 9/11 Memorial Service, 10:30 a.m., Faith Fellowship of Melbourne, 5783 Mary Ingles Highway, Recognizing and honoring local first responders, firefighters, law enforcement officers and all current and former members of the country’s armed forces. With Mike Chaney, pastor. Free. 859-441-0471; faithfellowshipbaptistmelbourne.com. Campbell County. The Cross and the Towers, 6 p.m., Forestville Baptist Church, 1311 Nagel Road, Documentary follows first-hand accounts of seven individuals whose lives were changed forever - not only by the devastation, but by the stunning symbol of hope they found at Ground Zero. Free. 474-3884; www. forestvillebaptist.com. Anderson Township.

September 7, 2011

Delhi-Price Hill Press

Delhi events mark 9/11 tributes Congregation remembers

The St. John’s Westminster Union Church, 1085 Neeb Road, will have two events marking the 9/11 anniversary. At 7 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 10, the congregation will have a community ecumenical prayer service for peace. On Sept. 11, the congregation is joining with the Mount Auburn Presbyterian Church for an interfaith din-

ner at the Mount Auburn church. Call 347-4613 for details.

Cranes for peace

The College of Mount St. Joseph will mark the anniversary of Sept. 11 with a weeklong making of paper cranes for peace. Campus Ministry, Mission and Ministry, Counseling services and Active Minds are joining to sponsor the crane making. Origami paper and

instructions will be provided at the stations will be available from noon to 4 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 6, in the Classroom Lobby; 10 a.m.3 p.m. in the Seton Lobby; 1 p.m.-3 p.m. in the Seton Lobby; and 10 a.m.-1 p.m. in the Classroom Lobby. Then there will be a community Mass at 9 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 11, to bless the paper cranes in the Sixth Floor Chapel. The cranes will be display Sept. 12-16 in the Seton Lobby.

Show your StripeS. you could win big prizeS.

Saturday children’s series starts this week The Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, 4990 Glenway Ave., has announced the next season of the Saturday Morning Children’s Series. Al programs start at 11 a.m. at the center. The schedule: • ArtReach Touring Productions – The Frog Prince, Sept. 10. • Madcap Puppet Theatre – Tales of Flight with the Brothers Wright, Oct. 22. • The Frisch Marionettes - Holiday Punch Variety Show, Dec. 3. • Tom Sparough – The Space Painter. Juggling for all ages. Feb. 4., • Shizzle Dizzle – Magic

Show. Mystical Matthew, Great Nancini and friends. March 17. • The Frisch Marionettes – Hansel and Gretel. April 28. Purchase or renew a subscription by one of the following methods: • Call the box office at 513-241-6550; • Log on to www.cincinnatilandmarkproductions.co m and purchase online; • In person at the box office ticket counter, 4990 Glenway Ave. Subscription packages feature the subscriber-only price of $24 for all six shows. Single tickets are $5 each.

TV, computer recycling open The Hamilton County Recycling and Solid Waste District began collecting obsolete computer equipment and televisions from Hamilton County residents May 2. To date, 174,454 pounds of computer equipment and televisions have been collected. This free program will be open until Oct. 31 at 2trg, 11085 Kenwood Road, Blue Ash. County residents interested in participating in this program can drop-off their unwanted computer equipment/TVs from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday through Friday. Residents must bring proof of residency, such as a driver’s license or utility bill, in order to participate. This program prohibits the acceptance of computer equipment/TVs from businesses,

churches, schools and nonprofit organizations. The Computer & TV Recycling Drop-Off program will also be open on Saturday, Oct. 15 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. The program will be closed on Sept. 5. Acceptable Items Include: CPUs, hard drives, personal copiers, docking stations, monitors, scanners, printers, cellular telephones, televisions, hard drives, tape and disk drives, VCR and DVD players, circuit boards, cables, main frames, servers, terminals, fax machines, PDAs, back up batteries, chips, keyboards, mice, modems, computer speakers, CD Rom drives, and laptops. For more information, call 946-7766 or visit www.hamiltoncountyrecycles.org.

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Delhi-Price Hill Press

September 7, 2011

News

OH graduates spread goodwill through the South By Kurt Backscheider kbackscheider@communitypress.com

With very little planning, Emily Buckley and Keith Maginn loaded up a car and set out on a 3,072-mile journey of giving hope and finding joy. The two friends had some plans in mind as they disembarked from Cincinnati in mid-July, but they left much of their trip up to fate. “It felt like everything connected for some other power,� said Buckley, an Oak Hills High School alumna who is the communications and development coordinator for the Oak Hills Local School District. She and Maginn, who is also an Oak Hills graduate, traveled throughout the South for 15 days this summer and made stops in about 17 cities, where they scouted out deserving individuals and handed them money. They called it the Goodwill Tour, and they spread as much goodwill and helped as many people as possible. “It was kind of a dream trip for me,� said Maginn, who recently moved back home to Delhi Township after living in Knoxville, Tenn., where he worked for Habitat for Humanity for nearly 10 years. “I’ve wanted to go on a trip like this and write a book about it for as long as I can remember.� Buckley, who lives in Colerain Township, said she’s done volunteer work and given to charities for years, but she decided to organize a goodwill trip after attending a philanthropy conference and doing a “pay it forward� Christmas gift for her family. “I recognized the joy you can experience by simply helping others and receiving nothing in return,� she said. “I realized while I don’t have tons of money, I can and should be doing more.� She shared her idea with Maginn and he was game for joining her. “We said, ‘Let’s pack up the car and hit the road,’� Buckley said. The friends left Cincinnati on July 19. They had certain cities in mind, and had plans to stay with some friends, but they didn’t know for sure who would be the recipients of the $1,000 of Buckley’s money they brought with them to “pay forward.� The pair made scheduled visits to Memphis, New Orleans, Savannah, Charleston, S.C., and Asheville, N.C., and some unexpected stops in Wynne, Ark., Destin, Fla., Tybee Island, Ga., Greenville, S.C., and Hot Springs, N.C. “We packed so much in, and we met a bunch of great people,� Maginn said. Buckley said they were very pleased with the people to whom they donated money.

PROVIDED

Nice looking yard

THANKS TO EMILY BUCKLEY

Oak Hills High School alumni Keith Maginn, far left, and Emily Buckley, far right, get a photo with Pannavati and Michael Akers of My Place Inc. in Hendersonville, N.C., during their Goodwill Tour. Maginn and Buckley traveled throughout the South this summer, giving money to worthy individuals so they could “pay it forward� and help others.

Debbie Blevins of Elm Street is the most recent winner of the Yard of the Week honors from the Delhi Civic Association. Call 922-3111 for nomination information.

Delhi police nab two in home burglaries By Heidi Fallon hfallon@communitypress.com

THANKS TO EMILY BUCKLEY

Oak Hills High School alumni Emily Buckley, far left, and Keith Maginn, far right, are all smiles as they “pay it forward� to Shirley Sessions in Savannah, Ga. Sessions is the director of Hands On Savannah. Maginn and Buckley traveled throughout the South this summer giving money away to worthy individuals who help others.

Delhi Township nabbed two accused burglars within minutes of residents calling police. Samuel Harris, 22, tried to convince police he lived at the condo model he was spotted in Wednesday, Aug. 31. Lt. Joe Macaluso said Harris had allegedly broken into the Timber Top model the night before. He was seen in the condo by a neighbor who alerted police. Macaluso said officers arrived and apprehended Harris as he was attempting to flee out a back door. “He tried to tell us he lived there and never changed his story,� Macaluso said. Macaluso said the last known address for Harris is

in the Walnut Hills area. He said investigators believe Harris broke a window to gain entry to the condo. “He taped up the window and swept up the glass,� he said. “Then he apparently had a glass of wine.� Two days earlier, on Aug. 29, police arrived at a home on Wilke Drive while the homeowner was still talking with police dispatchers. The owner of 459 Wilke Drive arrived home just before 1 p.m. to find a man in the bedroom. The man was able to run out a back door, hop a fence and elude a K-9 unit. Macaluso said they were able to track the suspect down and recover some of the stolen property. Charged with that burglary is Tony Nicholas, 18,

473 Wilke Drive. Nicholas had been arrested days earlier and appeared in court Aug. 30 on receiving stolen property charges. Macaluso said Nicholas was a suspect in the series of day-time break-ins in the Wilke Drive area after he pawned jewelry stolen in one of the burglaries. Wilke Drive and adjacent Basil Lane have been the target of the burglaries for the last few weeks, Macaluso said. “We believe that with the price of copper and gold, burglars are becoming more brazen about breaking into homes for the copper and jewelry,� he said. “Again, it’s been with the help of our alert residents that have helped us.� For more about your community, visit www. cincinnati.com/delhitownship.

BRIEFLY Correction THANKS TO EMILY BUCKLEY

Oak Hills High School alumni Keith Maginn, left, and Emily Buckley stopped at Pat O’Brien’s in New Orleans during their Goodwill Tour throughout the South this summer. The friends traveled around to “pay it forward,� giving money to worthy individuals and organizations. A few of the folks they helped included a nun who runs a church outreach and soup kitchen, a grocery clerk who raises her grandchild despite fighting several health issues and a man and woman who opened a home where high school drop-outs can live while working on life skills and job training. “It was exciting to surprise people and give them money,� Buckley said. “And it was pretty emotional to hear their stories. “It felt good to do something bigger than us.� Maginn, who has already published a book he wrote about his own life, said he is now writing a

book about the Goodwill Tour. “It was such an awesome and surreal experience,� he said. “It’s just amazing how everything came together. Everything fell into place.� Buckley said she didn’t spend the entire $1,000 of hers she planned to give away – thanks to the fact her friends and family gave her money to dish out upon hearing about the trip, bringing the purse to $1,500 – so she plans to give the rest away to causes here at home. “There are still things I want to do,� she said. “I want to share some of the love in my hometown.�

Anthony “Tony� Forte was the Dentist category in the Community Choice Awards. An incorrect name appeared in our listings.

Roll up your sleeves

The 4th annual Brian Schira Memorial Blood Drive, sponsored by the Delhi Township Civic Association, will be Saturday, Sept. 24. It will be from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the fire station at 697 Neeb Road. Donors are given a free mini-physical exam which includes a non-fasting serum cholesterol level screening. Donors must be 17 and older, in good health and weight at least 110 pounds. Schira was a Delhi and Colerain Township firefighter who died fighting a fire in Colerain Township three years ago.

Bring the kids

The Covedale Center for the Performing Arts kicks off its Saturday Morning Children’s Series with a perform-

ance by ArtReach, a division of The Children’s Theatre of Cincinnati. ArtReach will present its rendition of “The Frog Prince,� at 11 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 10, at the Covedale, 4990 Glenway Ave. A pretentious princess, a curious curse and an awkward amphibian meet in this tale of persistence and dedication. When a young prince is transformed into a frog by a cruel fairy, he is forced to bide his time in the slime of the swamp until a charming princess comes along to save him. Tickets are $5 each and can be purchased by calling the box office at 241-6550 or visiting www.cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com.

Children’s sale

Mother of Mercy High School will host Everything Kids, a children’s resale event, from 9 a.m. to noon Saturday, Sept. 10. Gently used clothing (birth to size 14), name-brand toys, play equipment, nursery items, sports equipment,

books, games, puzzles, baby and child furniture and equipment, maternity clothes and other child-related items will be for sale. It is Everything Kids for fall and winter items. Admission is $1 and 10 percent of sale proceeds will benefit Mercy’s music department and Alumnae Scholarship Fund. For more details, including how to be a vendor, contact Kim Zang at zang_k@motherofmercy.org.

Stowe, Civil War

Harriet Beecher Stowe’s novel, “Uncle Tom’s Cabin,� published in 1852, helped this unassuming woman influence the course of events in this country in an era when women typically did not use their voice. Helen Spoon will discuss the many experiences that shaped Stowe’s life, including her time living in Cincinnati, at the next meeting of the Westwood Historical Society. The meeting begins at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 14, at Westwood First Presbyterian Church, 3011 Harrison Ave.

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SPORTS

September 7, 2011

HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | Editor Melanie Laughman | mlaughman@communitypress.com | 248-7573

RECREATIONAL

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Oak Hills o-line outsmarts opposition By Ben Walpole bwalpole@communitypress.com

GREEN TWP. - Brains and brawn. Opponents will have to contend with both when they battle the Oak Hills High School football team’s offensive line this season. The Highlanders feature four offensive linemen who figure to play college football next season, and the schools that are pursuing their talents are big-time academic institutions. Left tackle Caleb Stacey has verbally committed to play football for the University of Michigan. Twins Derrek, the right guard, and Dustin, the right tackle, Ross have drawn interest from Yale, Harvard, Brown and Columbia. Center Chris Hilton is deciding between Wofford, Robert Morris and Duquesne. “They are very gifted cerebrally,” Oak Hills head football coach Kurry Commins said. “They don’t just have high IQs off the field; they’ve got good football IQ as well.” Besides being a cute story for the newspaper, the line's overall intelligence gives the Highlanders a very real advantage. “It allows them to understand the game a lot quicker. They understand angles. They understand footwork,” Commins said. “They don’t make the same mistake twice. They figure out, sometimes even quicker than the coaches, why they got beat. “It allows us so much more flexibility. We’re very fortunate.” Oak Hills can employ far more complex blocking schemes than the average high school team. Having smarts on the offensive

BEN WALPOLE/STAFF

The Oak Hills High School football team’s offensive line features planety of brains and brawn. Caleb Stacey, pictured, is a prime example. The senior has committed to play college football at the University of Michigan. line is a crucial part of running the Highlanders’ no-huddle offense as well. Stacey said he and his linemates are required to read each play at the line of scrimmage and pick up blitzes at a moment’s notice. “You have to be pretty intelligent to make that call,” Stacey said. A lot of that falls on Hilton, a three-year starter at center who boasts a 3.4 grade point average. Commins called him the kind of

player on which to model the football program. “He talks the talk and walks the walk,” Commins said. “He pushes kids to reach their full potential. We’re fortunate to be able to do a lot of things because of his mental and physical toughness.” Commins described the Ross twins as technicians, students of the game. The secret to their success is film work. “We always had to work hard

Steeped in tradition, Elder Panther runners reload By Ben Walpole bwalpole@communitypress.com

PRICE HILL – The tradition speaks for itself. S t e v e Spencer took over the Elder High School cross country program in 1976. In 35 Spencer seasons as head coach, his Panthers have reached the regional meet 35 times. With a track record like that, it’s hard not to be optimistic about the new season, even after graduating last year’s top three runners. Last year’s big three of Josh Makin, Josh Rieskamp and Corey Zielinksi has moved on to college cross country. But Elder has a core of seniors with statemeet experience – Nathan Lauck, Jake Clark, Luke Schafer and Joey Kelley. They ran in the top seven at last year’s Division I state meet, when Elder finished seventh. Their roles are much different this year, however. They can’t just complement what Makin, Rieskamp and Zielinksi do anymore. “Now you kind of have to get it done,” Spencer said. “It’s a little different.” Their season-opening performance at the Finishtiming Invitational, Aug. 27, at Wilmington College indicated that the group is up to the challenge. “You could see it,” Spencer said. “I thought

BEN WALPOLE/STAFF

Several runners have stepped up early in the season for the Elder High School cross country team, including, front row from left, Joey Kelley, Jake Clark and Justin Quatman, middle row, Nathan Lauck, Jonathan Reiter and Jake Fields; back row, Adam Lipps, Kevin Laiveling and Jeremy Rieskamp. they all stepped up.” Lauck finished third overall, while Clark took ninth. The Panthers, who won the event in 2010, finished second as a team to Anderson. “I wanted to beat Anderson,” Spencer said. “But realistically, we ran them pretty tough.” It would certainly help if Schafer was healthy. The senior was often the team’s fifth man last season, but he’s been battling a back injury since the track season. Spencer isn’t sure when he’ll be able to return to the lineup. Several new runners have been showing potential early in the season. Senior Justin Quatman doesn’t have a ton of varsity experience but has flourished in his role as co-captain, along with Lauck, providing excellent leadership. Quatman was 14th at Finishtiming. The junior class is talented, led by Jake Fields, Kevin

Laiveling, Adam Lipps and Jeremy Rieskamp. Last season was Lipps’ first time out for cross country and he missed some time with a sprained ankle. “I think he has a lot of potential to get better,” Spencer said. “He’s really just learning the ropes.” Rieskamp and Laiveling also scored in Elder’s top seven at Finishtiming. Sophomore Jonathan Reiter, a football player as a freshman, ran a sub-18 in his first career cross country meet. “I think we’ve got an experienced varsity team,” Quatman said. “So as the season goes on, we’re going to get better and better.” The Panthers may not win seven meets like they did a year ago. But the big goals remain the same – league title, qualifying for the state meet as a team for a third straight year. “It’s always there,” said Spencer of the state goal. “I don’t want to look too far

Delhi-Price Hill Press

for stuff,” Dustin said. “We’re always scouting our opponents, finding their tendencies.” Former Oak Hills assistant coach Kyle Ralph introduced them to the importance of scout work. Their typical weeknight will include football practice, homework and then an hour of watching film online on their next opponent, tracking which way defensive lines slant out of different formations and other seemingly minute details. “Our coaches do a great job breaking down the other team,” Derrek said. “By Friday we have it all figured out.” Both stand about 6-foot-4, 250 pounds, and both own 4.0 GPAs. The Ivy League would seem a perfect fit, but Dustin said they were surprised when they started getting recruited to play college football last year. “I always thought the Ivy League schools were for geniuses,” Derrek said. “We’re just students that work hard. But I think we’re going to fit in there because of our work ethic.” Stacey, a three-year starter at left tackle, would probably be considered the star of the group. As the scholarship to Michigan suggests, he is regarded as one of the best senior linemen in the country. “Caleb is just an overall, complete football player,” Commins said. “He’s got a mean streak in him that’s second to no one. He’s a mean football player.” Before Michigan though, Stacey has some unfinished business with the Highlanders. This senior group is very close, having played together since junior high. “These guys have been my brothers,” Stacey said. “We feel

A5

PRESS

Week two football scores Elder 35, Lakota West 10

Senior quarterback Ben Gramke completed 20-of-28 passes for a career-high 293 yards and three touchdowns for Elder (2-0). The win was head coach Doug Ramsey’s 125th of his career. Cody Fox added two rushing touchdowns. Next game: home vs. Louisville Trinity (Ky.), 7:30 p.m., Friday, Sept. 9.

Oak Hills 21, Harrison 17

Demarco Ruffin rushed five yards for a touchdown with 19 seconds left to lift Oak Hills (1-1). The sophomore carried the ball 18 times for 130 yards and two scores. Oak Hills quarterback Liam Sallquist was 15 for 23 for 169 yards passing. Harrison (0-2) took a 17-14 lead with 2:32 left in the game, before the Highlanders’ game-winning drive. Next game: home vs. Loveland, 7:30 p.m., Friday, Sept. 9.

Scott (Ky.) 39, Taylor 7

Matt Nash took in a 10-yard pass from A.J. Urmston for the score. Michael Wood kicked the extra point. Next game: at New Richmond, 7:30 p.m., Friday, Sept. 9.

Walnut Hills 36, Western Hills 12

No game information was available by deadline. Next game: home vs. Roger Bacon, 7:30 p.m., Friday, Sept. 9.

No game information was available for Gamble. La Salle played Covington Catholic, Sept. 3, after press deadlines. St. Xavier played Pickerington Central, Sept. 4, after press deadlines. we have one of the best offensive lines in the city, if not the state.” For more coverage, visit Cincinnati.com/blogs/presspreps

Press Preps highlights By Ben Walpole bwalpole@communitypress.com

Golf

• Mercy edged McAuley 171-174, Aug. 29. Taylor Reilly shot a 38. • Elder defeated Oak Hills and Colerain in a tri-meet, Aug. 30, at Western Hills. Cory Dulle led the Panthers with a 35. Chris Beck paced Oak Hills with a 38. • Oak Hills downed Mason’s White team 176-187, Aug. 31. Beck and Sam Meek each shot 40s. • The first GCL South quad meet of the season was Sept. 1 at Clovernook Country Club. St. Xavier finished first with a 144. Elder was second. The Bombers’ Lee House was medalist with a 4-under 31. • The Oak Hills girls golf team beat Milford and Wyoming in a tri-meet, Sept. 1, at O’Bannon Creek. Janie Sanzere shot a 4-over on the front nine to lead the Scots. • St. X won the La Salle Invitiational, Aug. 29 at Clovernook Country Club, edging Moeller by one and the host Lancers by two. Mitchell McMurray shot a 2over 73 to lead the Bombers.

Cross Country

• St. Xavier’s blue team won the Fairfield Invitational, Aug. 27. Jake Grabowski led the Bombers, placing third as an individual. Oak Hills finished third. Blake Meyer and Ross Frondorf went one, two – two seconds apart. The Oak Hills girls finished fourth, led by freshman B’s Frondorf sixth-place run in 20:24.

Volleyball

• Mercy downed Newport Central Catholic, Aug. 29, and Lakota East, Sept. 1. • Seton improved to 2-1 wiht a four-game win against Sycamore, Sept. 1.

Girls tennis

• Seton beat McAuley 4-1, Aug. 30. The Saints followed with a 3-2 win against Milford, Aug. 31.

Soccer

• Mercy improved to 3-0 with an 8-0 win against Harrison, Aug. 31. Sophomore Emily Budde scored three goals and senior Katie Hoffbauer scored two to lead the rout.

Heads up

Elder High School junior Tyler Schumann goes up the back of Fairfield senior forward Kevin Nkrumah in their Thursday, Sept. 1, match at Fairfield. The Indians won 5-1.

MELANIE LAUGHMAN/STAFF

This week’s MVP

• Chris Beck, junior, Oak Hills boys golf Beck paced Oak Hills with a 38 during a tri-meet against Elder and Colerain, Aug. 30. He followed that with another strong showing, shooting a 40 to help the Highlanders down Mason’s White team the next day.

On deck

Cincinnati gets a look at the No. 1-ranked team in the country when Louisville Trinity comes to town to play Elder, 7:30 p.m., Friday, Sept. 9, at The Pit.

Highlight reel

• Watch the Press Preps Roundtable as high school beat writers James Weber, Adam Turer, Scott Springer and Ben Walpole discuss local athletes playing football at the collegiate level. http://tinyurl.com/3lvvrs6

Blog:

www.cincinnati.com/blogs /presspreps


A6

Delhi-Price Hill Press

September 7, 2011

MSJ football sees changes for 2011-12 By Adam Turer presspreps@gmail.com

Which College of Mount St. Joseph football team is going to show up in 2011? The Lions have alternately toyed with mediocrity and success since breaking through with the program’s first playoff appearance in 2004. From 2004-2006, the Lions won three straight Heartland Collegiate Athletic Conference titles, and earned an at-large berth into the Division III playoffs in 2007. A disappointing 5-5 season followed in 2008. The Lions bounced back to win the HCAC in 2009, but followed that with another .500 season in 2010. “We were very disappointed in last year,” head coach Rod Huber said. “We had to make some changes in the offseason.” Those changes included turnover in the coaching staff and on the roster. Huber enters his twelfth season as MSJ’s head

(Simon Kenton) and Jay Dolak will try to improve on last season. “Last year, we were the worst tackling team I’ve had in 21 years,” Huber said. “We were undisciplined. This year, we are focusing on being very disciplined and buying into the team concept.” The secondary is led by senior strong safety Derek Termuhlen (Milford), who will also be critical in the run defense. “He’s the quarterback of our defense,” Huber said. Termuhlen is eager to lead his unit and the rest of the Lions to a return to glory. He and his classmates are not satisfied with two .500 seasons in their first three years. They want to leave a championship legacy behind and win their second conference title. “I think we got complacent last year after having a 9-1 [regular] season,” Termuhlen said. “We didn’t work as hard in the offseason as we should have.” The hunger returned following

coach, and will be taking over defensive coordinator duties for the third different time. He brought back former Lions head coach Ron Corradini to serve as his co-defensive coordinator. “Some of our defensive coaches had the opportunity to move on, and it was the perfect opportunity for me to do what I love to do,” Huber said. It helps that Huber has faith in assistant head coach and offensive coordinator Vince Suriano to take care of the other side of the ball. “I can trust Vince to take half the team, and I can take the other half,” Huber said. “I’ve spent 28 years coaching defense. I’m ecstatic.” The Lions will put eight men in the box and bring pressure to stop the run, while playing a heavy zone in the back. The defensive line is led by Brett Hambrick (Elder), Adam Bigelow (Anderson), and Rob Fox (Colerain). Linebackers Tyler Hopperton

the disappointing 2010 campaign. Huber hired a full-time strength coach to push the players in offseason workouts. Roster changes were also made in the hopes of making addition by subtraction. “We let some kids go who didn’t want to put the team first,” said Huber. The offense has more question marks than the defense. Six quarterbacks enter camp competing for the starting role. It is too early to say who will be the starter. The Lions are looking for leadership and intelligence at the position. “Whoever can run our system the best will win the job,” said Huber. “The window of opportunity to throw is about half a second. We need someone who makes reads quickly.” Running back James Clay will carry the load early and often as the Lions break in their new starting signal-caller. “We’ve got to run the ball to win,” said Huber.

The play of the offensive line will be critical to pave the way for Clay and protect the inexperienced quarterback. Center Rob Bowman (New Richmond) and tackles Kory Bailey (Beechwood) and Joe Noble (Colerain) provide senior leadership up front. The Lions will be young at several key positions, but had a productive offseason and enter 2011 determined to regain their championship form. The Lions have made five playoff appearances in the last seven years, but are still looking for their first playoff win. The optimism and energy levels are high entering this season. “We’re excited,” Huber said. “We have young team. They don’t know what they don’t know yet.” The Lions opened the season Sept. 3, at Wilmington. They will play Thomas More College (JV) at 4:30 p.m., Monday, Sept. 12, at TMC.

Mount St. Joseph tourney honors beloved custodian Wrublewski Charlie Wrublewski never misses a College of Mount St. Joseph men’s or women’s volleyball match. He pulls out the bleachers, sets up chairs and makes sure the gym is in tip top shape for practices. In fact, there isn’t a Mount athletic team Wrublewski doesn’t support. He is the bell ringer at football games when the Lions score a touchdown. He attends basketball games, tennis matches and soccer games. He considers himself the “No. 1 Lions Fan.”

Bridgetown

More. Matches start at 5 p.m. on Friday and at 10 a.m. on Saturday. The men’s team will have its Charlie Wrublewski Tournament on Jan. 21-22. A complete schedule is available on the Mount’s website at www.msjsports.com. “Charlie has always been a big help to the volleyball team,” said Jon Bennett, the Mount’s women’s and men’s head volleyball coach. “Charlie makes everyone feel welcome and has an attitude of service first. Naming the tourna-

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The College of Mount St. Joseph women’s volleyball team is conducting the Second Annual Charlie Wrublewski Tournament Sept. 9-10 in honor of Wrublewski, front center. The women's volleyball team is, in front, from left, are Jaclyn Stenger (Oak Hills), Michelle Woods (NewCath), Wrublewski, Jen Szekely and Torrie Whitmore. In middle are Janelle Davis, Amiee Sickmeier and Bethani Ritter (McAuley). In back are Melanie Monahan, Hannah Vanarsdall (McAuley), Brittany Loechel (Mt. Healthy), Dana Hirschbuehler, Sarah Scheid (Mercy), Michelle Webb (Deer Park), Nicole Sherpensky (Northwest) and Kat Roedig (McAuley). ment after him is our way of saying, ‘Thank you.’” Said Steve Radcliffe, the Mount’s athletic director,“Charlie’s not just a fan of the Mount’s sports teams, but our athletes are fans of his as well. He sets an excellent example of being a good leader and

talks about the importance of sportsmanship at some of our sports banquets. Charlie shows our players how to be good, caring people.” Wrublewski said there was one time he missed a match for a good reason: He was in the hospital. After the match, the women’s

volleyball team went to visit him and share the match. “There was one volleyball game where a parent asked me if I had a daughter on the team,” said Wrublewski, a Harrison resident. “I said yes. I pointed to the court and said, ‘That’s her, and that’s her, and her, and her.’ They’re all my kids. I care about every one of them.” Wrublewski is well known around campus as well. He buys lunch for students if he notices them not eating. He’s collected pop tabs to buy storage carts so the college doesn’t have to spend the money. Wrublewski said he’s proud of the Mount’s sports teams and students. “When I started at the Mount in 1980, there were only two sports: women’s volleyball and basketball. Men’s sports weren’t around then, of course,” Wrublewski said. “It’s changed a lot since then.”

TMC Saints football looks for 4-peat By Adam Turer presspreps@gmail.com

CRESTVIEW HILLS – The Thomas More Saints return 16 starters in their quest to repeat as Presidents’ Athletic Conference champions for the fourth straight season. The Saints have not lost a regular season contest since Nov. 8, 2008. This season, Thomas More will have even more motivation to continue its streak, as the Saints honor a fallen member of their family. Tony Merk sadly lost his battle with medulloblastoma July 4. The 6-year-old was adopted by the Saints as an honorary team captain prior to the 2010 season. He was often on the sideline, wearing his No. 7 Saints jersey. “We adopted Tony about a year and a half ago,” TMC head coach Jim Hilvert said. “He and his family have been motivating to our team.” The Saints will enter 2011 with heavy hearts, but plan to honor Tony the way they always have: By winning. Thomas More players will wear “TONY” decals on their helmets and have dedicated the 2011 season to the Merk family. Several players and coaches attended Tony’s funeral

service. “It was an eye-opener for us,” Hilvert said. “Tony’s family members are heroes to us. Our guys understand how important Tony was and is to us.” Thomas More enters the season ranked No. 11 in the D3Football.com top 25. PAC coaches picked the Saints to four-peat as conference champs. An explosive offense and athletic defense should help the Saints reach, and possibly exceed, these lofty preseason expectations. Junior Rob Kues (NewCath) enters his second season as starting quarterback. The coaching staff has expanded the playbook for Kues and the talented playmakers surrounding him. The Saints feature three talented running backs in senior captain Kendall Owens (LaSalle) and sophomores Domonique Hayden and Adam Rauch. Owens and Rauch are also receiving threats out of the backfield or the slot. “We are very, very excited about our offense this year,” Hilvert said. The skill players benefit from four returning starters on the offensive line, led by junior captain Jeremy Hoop (Glen Este). The pressure will be on Kues to take

advantage of the protection in front of him and the athletic weapons around him. “He feels more comfortable in the offense,” Hilvert said. “We expect big things from him this year.” The defense will be based on athleticism and is eager to prove that the 62point loss their last time out was a fluke. Defensive end John French leads the front line. Jake Smith (NewCath) is expected to have a breakout year at defensive tackle. The linebackers are led by junior captain Nick Gramke (Elder) in the middle. The secondary is led by junior safety Zach Autenrieb (Elder) and senior cornerback Antonio Booker. Their intelligence fuels the Saints’ defense and allows them to be aggressive. “They are both very smart,” said Hilvert of the two captains. “Having Antonio is like having a coach on the field.” All-conference punter Aaron Walter (LaSalle) gives the Saints a special teams advantage. “He is a big-time difference maker for us,” Hilvert said. “He definitely changes games with field position.” The Saints have not lost a PAC game since Hilvert’s first season, in 2007.


VIEWPOINTS CH@TROOM

Last week’s question

While individual Ohio school districts may continue to teach cursive writing, the new state common core curriculum no longer requires it. The focus will now be on keyboarding skills. What do you think of this? Are you glad, sad or indifferent that cursive writing will be fading into the horizon? “I’m sure our founding fathers never dreamt of computers or cell phones. These times they are achanging. We must be willing to change with them. One question though – how will the new generations ‘sign’ their signature? I guess they’ll have to print it.” A.P. “Wow! This is one of the toughest Chatroom questions ever. I hate to see cursive writing fade into obscurity, but I want to be sure that my feelings aren’t based purely on nostalgia (and more on practicality). I’m one of the old codgers who still pays bills with handwritten checks, but the kids today probably won’t do that. “I’ve already learned how to write in cursive so it won’t hurt me. The same is true of my kids, though my grandkids (4 and 7) might be affected. Short of an apocalyptic destruction of modern civilization as we know it, I don’t see us going back to the ‘old days’ in so many areas, so I can’t really say this is a bad thing. It just makes me feel kinda sad. If worse

EDITORIALS

|

LETTERS

|

COLUMNS

Editor Marc Emral | memral@communitypress.com | 853-6264

Next question

Should a replacement for the Brent Spence Bridge between Ohio and Kentucky be partially paid for by charging a toll? Why or why not? Every week The Community Press asks readers a question they can reply to via e-mail. Send your answer to westnews@communitypress.com with Chatroom in the subject line. comes to worse, we can still print. Sigh ...” B.B. “It just goes to show – we are becoming a rude, crude and unrefined nation. What’s next?” M.D.D. “It’s a sign of the times. Keyboarding skills weren’t needed when most of us went to elementary school. Cursive was what our parents and grandparents had learned and valued. “My 20-something child doesn’t use cursive today, he prints. I’ve notice that in many 20-something’s writing. They were taught cursive, but learned as their education continued that they would handle the bulk of their correspondence on a keyboard during their lives, so cursive was no longer valued. “I recognize that our society/ culture is different and that young people need different skills. I have no emotional attachment to cursive in spite of the fact that I still use it and love to write personal letters and notes. I’m a dinosaur.” E.E.C.

Crediting my daughters for life lessons learned Like many educators, I am humbled by the tremendous responsibility of preparing young people to lead and succeed amidst the challenges of the world around us, and in my case at Mount Notre Dame, doing so within the character and spirit of the Catholic faith. The narrower focus of which I am a part – educating high schoolaged young women – is even more dear and personal to me. As the father of all girls, aged 10 to 32, my wife Barbara and I know firsthand the astronomical value of this juncture in a young woman’s life. What my daughters have taught me is that high school plays a critical part in shaping the women they will become. They enter MND more as children than women, and during the next four years discover not only a sense of who they are, but what in life may make them most happy. It will be my mission to deliver against this responsibility each and every day. I feel fortunate and blessed to be able to do so. As the new head of school at Mount Notre Dame, I plan to leverage my professional experiences – as a former vice president and worldwide manager at Procter & Gamble, private school board member, field hockey coach, teacher at two local Catholic schools and adjunct professor at Xavier University – to develop students academically, spiritually, socially and emotionally in order to best prepare them to meet future challenges. While the lessons learned in those settings were great, I can tell you my most valuable and transformative lessons have come from my daughters. I’ve celebrated with them as they were accepted to college and, choking back tears, helped them

Price Hill Press

September 7, 2011

move from our home to their schools and eventually to their own homes. I’ve shared their frustration as they have been Larry Mock passed over for they Community jobs deserved, and Press guest cheered for them columnist as they successfully competed for the jobs they have now. Through it all, they impressed upon me the importance of grace under pressure and belief in oneself, demonstrating the integrity, strength and value young women bring to our world. I carry these lessons with me into my greatest challenge and newest position as head of school at Mount Notre Dame. I promise to remember what my own girls have taught me, and am eager to learn more from the nearly 700 other young women with whom I’ll be sharing my days during the 2011-2012 academic year. While the job is difficult, educators have no choice but to succeed because the stakes are huge. It’s worth reminding ourselves that success requires no less than the best each of us has to give: from educators, students and their families; to alumnae, donors, volunteers, and school administrators. I invite all members of the community to call or write me at any time to talk about our important work. I can be reached at lmock@mndhs.org or 513-8213044 ext.101 or follow at twitter.com/LMockMND. Larry Mock is the new head of school at Mount Notre Dame.

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CH@TROOM

communitypress.com

Where are the jobs Chabot promised? Last week, Congressman (Steve) Chabot complained, in a column he authored, that unemployment has increased since President Obama took office. This past April, I wrote Rep. Chabot on the anniversary of his first hundred days in office and asked what he had done to create jobs as his many re-election yard signs promised voters all last year. Those signs that had Jobs Jobs Jobs printed in large letters across the top of his yard signs just above his name. I asked if his re-election promise/claim really didn’t mean that he needed a job and now that he had landed himself a job, if he wasn’t going to help create jobs for his constituents as his signs implied he was going to do when elected. The august career politician did not extend me the courtesy of answering. It’s now been over 200 days since taking office and our representative still hasn’t offered a job creation bill before Congress. Then, none of his Republican colleagues have stopped shouting

hell no to the administration’s efforts long enough to submit one job creation bill themselves. Town hall meetings conPaul tinue across the this Ashworth country month and more Community voters are being Press guest given the opporcolumnist tunity to speak out against the GOP’s insistence on ignoring job creation, slashing spending and eliminating jobs while increasing the bloated defense budget 10 percent. Congressmen Chabot faced a town hall meeting of his own last week. As he did with ignoring my letter, he silenced his constituents with camera bans and only accepted pre-screened questions chosen by his congressional staff. Wikipedia defines the term town hall meeting as “commonly used by politicians in the United States to describe forums at which

Your Community Press newspaper Serving Price Hill and Covedale

PRESS

PRESS

About guest columns We welcome guest columns on all sides of an issue; however, potential columnists should reserve space in advance with Editor Marc Emral by calling 853-6264. Include with your column your name, address, daytime telephone number, and a two-to-three line biography outlining your expertise related to this topic. Either include a color headshot of yourself, or make arrangements when you call to have your photo taken here. We reserve the right to edit for length, accuracy and clarity. Columns may be no more than 500 words. Deadline: Noon Friday for next wednesday’s issue. E-mail: memral@communitypress.com Letters, columns and articles submitted to the Delhi Press and the Press Hill Press may be published or distributed in print, electronic or other forms. voters can ask questions.” How then can the congressman call his meetings town hall meetings? How can he complain about the increase in unemployment while having a public town hall meeting with his constituents and only accept pre-screened questions and thus continuing to avoid what he is doing to provide job creation? What is wrong with this picture? Paul Ashworth lives in Delhi Township.

Bullying: old problem, new solution Bullying is an old problem, but recently there has been new interest in finding a solution. Many children suffer in silence, afraid to go to school every day because they are targeted by bullies. Parents, teachers and children all need to be involved in creating a culture that does not tolerate bullying behavior. Bullies are children who need to feel superior, and pick on children who seem different. They apply relentless pressure with verbal and physical insults, often in the presence of peers who indirectly support and reinforce the abuse. Sometimes bullying is more subtle, involving gossiping about the victim, or posting insults on websites. Bullies are careful not to let the bullying happen when adults are around. And of course, they threaten their victims with escalating violence if they “tell.” Many bullies are children who have been abused themselves or have emotional problems, and bullying often leads to more violent adult behavior. One study estimates that a quarter of all bullies will have a criminal record by age 30. If your child is a bully, he or she needs help. Hold your child accountable for his behavior and enforce the school’s disciplinary actions. Seek counseling so that he can deal with the anger and poor self-esteem that leads to bullying behavior. Victims of bullies also suffer significant emotional distress and

Teresa Esterle Community Press guest columnist

are likely to have low selfesteem, which creates a vicious cycle that often leads to further bullying. Bullying can affect a child’s schoolwork and cause stress-related health problems. Some victims feel so desperate that they

consider suicide. Parents can help prevent bullying by teaching their child how to respond to bullies. Encourage children to walk tall, look the bully in the eye, and ignore and walk away from any taunts. Help by practicing these behaviors if necessary. Teach them never to respond with violence. Reinforce your child’s confidence and selfesteem, and help him get involved with activities at school, thus creating a network of strong friendships. Victims of bullies can also benefit from counseling to help with self-esteem and build coping skills. If the bullying happens at school, document the incidents and talk to teachers and administrators about the school’s antibullying policies. Ask what steps the school will take to prevent future incidents. Do not try to contact the bully or the bully’s parents yourself. All parents should encourage

their children to talk about what is happening at school. Even if your child is not a target, every child is affected by bullying, because everyone has witnessed it at some point. Often peer groups silently support and laugh along with the bullies, and this behavior is just as destructive as the bullying itself. Parents are their child’s most important role models, and it is important to set a good example of kindness and tolerance of others, regardless of race, size, disability or background. Children should learn that everyone deserves respect. No matter how difficult it seems to get involved, peers need to stand up for the one who is being bullied and not accept the status quo. Schools can help by encouraging an environment where bullying is not tolerated. Schools need firm guidelines for appropriate behavior and clear consequences if the rules are violated. Safe channels for victims to communicate with a principal, teacher or guidance counselor in a safe and private manner should be clearly spelled out. Teachers, school administrators, students and parents all need to be part of the solution, creating a culture of zero tolerance for bullying! Teresa Esterle, M.D., is a board certified pediatrician at West Side Pediatrics. Esterle is also a member of the medical staff at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center.

OFFICIALS Ohio House of Representatives

• 30th District – The 30th District includes Green, Miami and Delhi townships. The seat is vacant. • 31st District – Denise Driehaus (D) In Columbus, write to: 77 S. High St., 13th Floor, Columbus, OH., 43215-6111 or call 614-466-5786; fax 614-719-3585 E-mail: district31@ohr.state.oh.us.

The 31st District includes Westwood, Price Hill, Sayler Park, Cheviot, Addyston, Cleves and North Bend.

Ohio Senate

• 8th District – Bill Seitz (R). In Cincinnati, call 357-9332, In Columbus, write to: Senate Building, Room No. 143, First Floor, Columbus, Ohio. 43215; or call 614-466-8068. E-mail: SD08@senate.state.oh.us.

U.S. House of Representatives

1st District

Steve Chabot (R), U. S. House or Representatives. In Washington, 2351 Rayburn HOB, Washington, D.C., 20515; 202-225-2216. Fax: 202-225-3012. In Cincinnati, write 441 Vine Street, Suite 3003, Cincinnati, Ohio, 45202, or call 513-684-2723. Fax: 513-421-8722. For e-mail, go to http://chabot.house.gov.

A publication of

Email: pricehillpress@communitypress.com Website: communitypress.co m

A7

Price Hill Press Editor . . . . . . . .Marc Emral memral@communitypress.com . . . . . . .853-6264 Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday-Friday | See page A2 for additional contact information.

923-3111 | Fax 853-6220 | 5556 Cheviot Road, Cincinnati, Ohio 45247 | e-mail pricehillpress@communitypress.com | Web site: www.communitypress.com


A8

Delhi-Price Hill Press

September 7, 2011

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PRESS

We d n e s d a y, S e p t e m b e r

7, 2011

PEOPLE

Xander Gonzalez was the lucky preschool winner of Reds tickets from the summer reading program.

Beth Goettke and her daughters Lizzy and Gretchen, was the adult winner of the Delhi branch library’s summer reading contest.

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IDEAS

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RECIPES

Camy Dodd and her sister Brittany were the child winners of the Delhi branch library’s summer reading contest.

Readers win this summer at Delhi library Congratulations to the 37,790 Summer Readers who joined Team Read, the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County's 38th annual Summer Reading Program. Preschoolers, kids, and adults read more than 2 million books. Teens logged more than 3.1 million hours of reading. In the spirit of Team Read, the library held hundreds of free and fun programs and activities throughout the summer. This line-up included Baseball

Jeopardy with the Cincinnati Reds Hall of Fame and fishing with the Cincinnati Recreation Commission as well as visits from the Honey Hill Farm Petting Zoo, the library's own Storybook Puppeteers, arts and crafts, and more. Congratulations to the Delhi Township Branch Library's winners, who won four tickets to either a Cincinnati Reds game or to Coney Island and to the All Star Readers who read the most books won a Nook Color e-reader.

Winning the Nook reader in the Teen category was Kalyn McAfee.

Michelle Hofmann won Reds tickets as the adult winner in the summer reading program at the Delhi branch library.

Anna Kelley was the teen winner of the Delhi Township branch library summer reading contest.

Riley Ashe won the child winner of Reds tickets from the summer reading program.

Jacob Farnsley was the teen winner of the Reds tickets from the Delhi Township branch library.

Catherine Perry was the adult winner of the Nook reader.

Ashley Mueller was the child winner of the Nook reader from the summer reading program.

PHOTOS: THANKS TO EMILY BAUTE.

Award-winning films celebrating the lives, stories and art of people with disabilities. Tuesday, September 20, 2011, 7 p.m. “Warrior Champions” Thursday, September 22, 2011, 7 p.m. “Shooting Beauty”

COLLEGE

OF

MOUNT ST. JOSEPH

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www.msj.edu/reelabilities

COLLEGE THEATRE

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(513) 244-4200

The College of Mount St. Joseph is committed to providing an educational and employment environment free from discrimination or harassment on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, age, disability, or other minority or protected status. Visit www.msj.edu/non-discrimination for the full policy and contact information. CE-0000474817


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Delhi-Price Hill Press

September 7, 2011

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD T H U R S D A Y, S E P T . 8

ART EXHIBITS

Exhibition of Mount Student Art & Design, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Studio San Giuseppe Art Gallery at the College of Mount St. Joseph, 5701 Delhi Road, Exhibit showcases student work from the 2010-2011 school year. Free. Presented by College of Mount St. Joseph. 244-4314; www.msj.edu. Delhi Township.

LITERARY - CRAFTS

Let Us Lego, 4-5 p.m., Delhi Township Branch Library, 5095 Foley Road, Create Lego creations with your friends. Ages 6-12. Legos provided. Free. Presented by Public Library of Cincinnati & Hamilton County. 369-6019; www.cincinnatilibrary.org. Delhi Township.

MUSIC - CABARET

Mickey Esposito, 7-9 p.m., Jim & Jack’s on the River, 3456 River Road, 251-7977; www.jimandjacks.net. Riverside.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Noises Off, 8-10:30 p.m., Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, 4990 Glenway Ave., Farce by Michael Frayn follows actors rehearsing flop called “Nothing’s On.”. $23, $20 students and seniors. 241-6550; www.cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com. West Price Hill. F R I D A Y, S E P T . 9

ART EXHIBITS

Exhibition of Mount Student Art & Design, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Studio San Giuseppe Art Gallery at the College of Mount St. Joseph, Closing reception 4-7 p.m. Free. 244-4314; www.msj.edu. Delhi Township.

FARMERS MARKET

Lettuce Eat Well Farmers Market, 3-7 p.m., Cheviot United Methodist Church, 3820 Westwood Northern Blvd., Locally produced food items. Free. Presented by Lettuce Eat Well. 661-1792; www.lewfm.org. Cheviot.

FESTIVALS

Harvest Home Fair, 5-11 p.m., Harvest Home Park, 3961 North Bend Road, Horse show at 7 p.m. Music, rides, 4-H exhibits, flower and horse shows, food and drinks. $5, free ages 12 and under and before 3:30 p.m. 6620524. Cheviot.

MUSIC - CLASSIC ROCK

DeJaVu, 9 p.m.-1:30 a.m., Jim & Jack’s on the River, 3456 River Road, 251-7977; www.jimandjacks.net. Riverside.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Noises Off, 8-10:30 p.m., Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, $23, $20 students and seniors. 241-6550; www.cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com. West Price Hill.

RECREATION

Walk Club, 8:30 a.m., Fernbank Park, 60 Thornton Ave., Walks led by Park District volunteers. Walkers may choose what days to walk. Ages 50 and up. Free, vehicle permit required. Presented by Hamilton County Park District. Through Nov. 30. 521-7275; www.greatparks.org. Sayler Park. S A T U R D A Y, S E P T . 1 0

CIVIC

Yardwaste Recycling Drop-off Program, 11:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Kuliga Park, 6717 Bridgetown Road, Includes leaves, grass clippings, brush, garden waste, tree trunks and tree and shrub prunings. Hamilton County residents only. Commercial businesses and landscapers not eligible to participate in this program. 946-7755; www.hamiltoncountyrecycles.org. Green Township.

FESTIVALS

Harvest Home Fair, Noon-11 p.m., Harvest Home Park, Horse shows at 11 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. $5, free ages 12 and under and before 3:30 p.m. 662-0524. Cheviot.

HOLIDAY - PATRIOT DAY (9/11)

Finding God in the Rubble, 5-6 p.m., Whitewater Crossing Christian Church, 5771 Ohio 128, Reflect, remember and look forward to commemorate the events of 9/11. Special music and video presentation following firsthand accounts of individuals whose lives were changed forever and a message of hope by Pastor David Vaughan. Public servants honored with reception and display of first-responders equipment. Free. Through Sept. 11. 661-5811; www.whitewatercrossing.org. Cleves.

MUSIC - BLUES

Sonny Moorman Group, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Legends, 3801 Harrison Ave., 662-1222; www.legendscincinnati.com. Cheviot.

MUSIC - OLDIES

The Avenues, 9 p.m.-1:30 a.m., Jim & Jack’s on the River, 3456 River Road, 251-7977; www.jimandjacks.net. Riverside.

For more about Greater Cincinnati’s dining, music, events, movies and more, go to Metromix.com.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Noises Off, 2-4:30 p.m., Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, $23, $20 students and seniors. 241-6550; www.cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com. West Price Hill.

RELIGIOUS COMMUNITY

Wayne Weible, 4 p.m., St. Ignatius of Loyola Church, 5222 North Bend Road, Weible will speak about his trips to Medjugorje, BosniaHerzegovina, and his investigations of apparitions of the Virgin Mary. Goodwill offering accepted. Presented by Our Lady of Light Ministries. 812-637-3998; www.ourladyoflight.org. Monfort Heights. M O N D A Y, S E P T . 1 2

ON STAGE - CHILDREN’S HOME & GARDEN Year-Round Gardening, 6:30-7:30 p.m., THEATER Monfort Heights Branch Library, 3825 West Saturday Morning Children’s Series, 11 a.m., Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, 4990 Glenway Ave., “The Frog Prince,” ArtReach Touring Productions. $5 per show or $24 for all six. 241-6550; www.cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com. West Price Hill.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Noises Off, 8-10:30 p.m., Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, $23, $20 students and seniors. 241-6550; www.cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com. West Price Hill.

Fork Road, Decorate Your Doorstep for Fall: dress up “Porch-Pots” using fall flowers and natural elements and decorations. Learn new ideas for planning and maintaining garden throughout the year. Adults only. With White Oak Garden Center staff. Free. Presented by White Oak Garden Center. 385-3313; www.whiteoakgardencenter.com. Monfort Heights.

S U N D A Y, S E P T . 1 1

BENEFITS

Harvest Home Fair 5K Dog Walk, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., Harvest Home Park, 3961 North Bend Road, Registration starts 8 a.m. Meet and walk with other local dog lovers. Includes Tshirt and goody. Giveaway baskets, free fair entrance, photo opportunity and many dogrelated items for sale. Benefits Fourgotten Paws Animal Rescue. $12 per dog. Registration required. 967-0396; www.fourgottenpaws.com. Cheviot.

CIVIC

Yardwaste Recycling Drop-off Program, 11:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Kuliga Park, Free. 9467755; www.hamiltoncountyrecycles.org. Green Township.

FESTIVALS

Harvest Home Fair, Noon-10 p.m., Harvest Home Park, 5k walk/run at 9 a.m. Horse show at noon. $5, free ages 12 and under and before 3:30 p.m. 662-0524. Cheviot.

HISTORIC SITES

German Heritage Museum, 1-5 p.m., German Heritage Museum, 4790 West Fork Road, Two-story 1830 log house furnished with German immigrant memorabilia. Available by appointment. Free, donations accepted. Presented by German-American Citizens League of Greater Cincinnati. 598-5732; www.gacl.org/museum.html. Green Township.

HOLIDAY - PATRIOT DAY (9/11) Finding God in the Rubble, 9-10 a.m. and 10:45-11:45 a.m., Whitewater Crossing Christian Church, Free. 661-5811; www.whitewatercrossing.org. Cleves.

MUSIC - OLDIES

Lee’s Junction, 7 p.m.-10 p.m., Jim & Jack’s on the River, 3456 River Road, 251-7977; www.jimandjacks.net. Riverside. Cincinnati Oldies and Doo-Wop Association, 1-5 p.m., Jim & Jack’s on the River, 3456 River Road, Presented by Cincinnati Oldies and Doo-Wop Association. 251-7977; www.doowopoldies.org. Riverside.

PROVIDED

The Harvest Home Fair 5K Dog Walk to benefit Fourgotten Paws Animal Rescue kicks off at 9 a.m. Sunday, Sept. 11, at Harvest Home Park, 3961 North Bend Road. Entry is $12 per dog, which includes a T-shirt and a free fair entrance. There also will be basket giveaways and many dog-related items for sale. For more information, call 967-0396 or visit www.fourgottenpaws.com. Pictured at last year’s walk are Joyce Mirrizzi and her dog, Mimi.

FARMERS MARKET

Sayler Park Farmers Market, 4-7 p.m., Sayler Park, Parkland Avenue and Monitor Street, Local produce, spices, dips, salad dressings, barbecue sauce, baked goods, ice cream, plants and flowers. Presented by Sayler Park Village Council. 675-0496. Sayler Park.

SUPPORT GROUPS

RECREATION

Walk Club, 8:30 a.m., Fernbank Park, Free, vehicle permit required. 521-7275; www.greatparks.org. Sayler Park.

SUPPORT GROUPS

Overeaters Anonymous, 7 p.m., Pilgrim United Church of Christ, 4418 Bridgetown Road, Presented by Greater Cincinnati Overeaters Anonymous Intergroup. 921-1922. Bridgetown. T U E S D A Y, S E P T . 1 3

CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS

Oak Hills Kiwanis Meeting, 6:30-8 p.m., Nathanael Greene Lodge, 6394 Wesselman Road, Bi-monthly meeting. Serving Green Township and Oak Hills communities. Ages 21 and up. 325-8038. Green Township.

DANCE CLASSES

Line Dance Class, 10-11 a.m., Dunham Recreation Complex, 4356 Dunham Lane, Line dancing with Jerry and Kathy Helt, instructors. Wear smooth-soled shoes. No partner dances and no prior dance experience required. $4. 321-6776. West Price Hill.

EDUCATION

After-School Drama Program, 4:30-5:45 p.m., Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, 4990 Glenway Ave., Registration required by Sept. 7. Final performance at 2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 15. Classes Tuesdays and Thursdays for six weeks. Ages 10-13. $100. 241-6550; www.cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com. West Price Hill.

Overeaters Anonymous, 7 p.m., Mercy Hospital Western Hills, 3131 Queen City Ave., Sixth-floor, room 1. Presented by Greater Cincinnati Overeaters Anonymous Intergroup. 921-1922; www.cincinnatioa.org. Westwood. Community Mental Health Assistance, 1-3 p.m., Cheviot United Methodist Church, 3820 Westwood Northern Blvd., Mental health support with Recovery International. Free, donations accepted. Presented by Recovery International. 379-6233. Cheviot. W E D N E S D A Y, S E P T . 1 4

CIVIC

Monfort Heights/White Oak Community Association Monthly Meeting, 7:30 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Presented by Monfort Heights/White Oak Community Association. 385-3780. Green Township.

COMMUNITY DANCE

Line Dancing, 7-11 p.m., Jim & Jack’s on the River, 3456 River Road, 251-7977. Riverside.

DANCE CLASSES

Square Dance, 10-11:30 a.m., Dunham Recreation Complex, 4356 Dunham Lane, With Jerry and Kathy Helt, instructors. Wear smooth-soled shoes. No partner dances and no prior dance experience required. $4. Presented by Southwestern Ohio/Northern Kentucky Square Dancers Federation. 3216776. West Price Hill.

About calendar

To submit calendar items, go to “www.cincinnati.com” and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to “life@communitypress.com” along with event information. Items are printed on a space-available basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to “www.cincinnati.com” and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page.

RECREATION

Walk Club, 8:30 a.m., Fernbank Park, Free, vehicle permit required. 521-7275; www.greatparks.org. Sayler Park.

RELIGIOUS - COMMUNITY Life in the Spirit, 7-9 p.m., St. Ignatius of Loyola Church, 5222 North Bend Road, Hilvert Hall. Weekly through Oct. 26. $5 for materials. Registration required. 471-5483; www.lighthouserenewalcenter.org. Monfort Heights.

SHOPPING

Sell Your Stuff: Flea Market, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., Joy Community Church, 5000 North Bend Road, Charge for space is 10-percent donation of what is sold. Set-up time begins 8 a.m. Benefits Joy Community Church. 6624569; www.joycommunitychurch.org. Monfort Heights. T H U R S D A Y, S E P T . 1 5

FILMS Shakespeare’s Globe London Cinema Series, 6:30 p.m., Rave Motion Pictures Western Hills 14, 5870 Harrison Ave., “Henry VIII.” Captured in 2010 from renowned Globe Theatre in London. Each performance includes 20-minute historical perspective on the Globe and behind-the-scenes looks. $15. Presented by Fathom Events. 5743793; www.fathomevents.com. Dent.

F R I D A Y, S E P T . 1 6

FARMERS MARKET Lettuce Eat Well Farmers Market, 3-7 p.m., Harvest Home Park, Free. 661-1792; www.lewfm.org. Cheviot. MUSIC - OLDIES

Cincy Rockers, 9 p.m.-1:30 a.m., Jim & Jack’s on the River, 3456 River Road, 2517977; www.jimandjacks.net. Riverside.

RECREATION

Walk Club, 8:30 a.m., Fernbank Park, Free, vehicle permit required. 521-7275; www.greatparks.org. Sayler Park. S A T U R D A Y, S E P T . 1 7

CIVIC

Yardwaste Recycling Drop-off Program, 11:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Kuliga Park, Free. 9467755; www.hamiltoncountyrecycles.org. Green Township.

SENIOR CITIZENS

Village Open House, 1-3 p.m., Bayley Community Wellness Center, 401 Farrell Court, Information on two- or three-bedroom cottages. Free. 347-5520. Delhi Township.

EXERCISE CLASSES

Spinning, 5:30-6:30 p.m., Western Hills Sports Mall, 2323 Ferguson Road, Ages 14 and up. $8.50-$10. Presented by SpinFit LLC. 4514509; www.spinfitcincinnati.com. Westwood.

FARMERS MARKET

Delhi Farmers Market, 4-7 p.m., Shiloh United Methodist Church, 5261 Foley Road, Diverse market offering natural/organic/chemical-free produce, meat and cottage products, all produced locally within 70 miles. Free. Presented by Delhi Farmers’ Market. 748-9905. Delhi Township.

HEALTH / WELLNESS

PHOTO BY PETER MUELLER

The Cincinnati Ballet’s season-opening production, the Kaplan New Works Series, brings three world premieres and a regional premiere of new artistic movement to the stage. Performances are Sept. 8 to Sept. 18, at the Cincinnati Ballet’s studio stage, in the Mickey Jarson Kaplan Performance Studio. For tickets, visit www.cballet.org.

Lunch and Learn Lecture, Noon-1 p.m., Gamble-Nippert YMCA, 3159 Montana Ave., Free. “Arthritis: Alternative Approaches to Preventing and Relieving Joint Disease.” Presentation educates audience about what arthritis is, who is susceptible, what causes it, how to relieve it, and steps to help prevent joint disease. Reservations required. Presented by Doctors’ Speakers Bureau. 941-0378. Westwood. Hearing Loss, Hearing Aids and More, 1-2 p.m., Bayley Community Wellness Center, 401 Farrell Court, Presentation by Laurie DeWine, doctor of audiology. Free. Reservations required. 347-5510. Delhi Township. Knee Arthritis Seminar, 11 a.m., Bayley Community Wellness Center, 401 Farrell Court, Dr. Moran speaks on causes, symptoms and treatment options available for those living with knee arthritis. Includes light lunch, refreshments and giveaways. Free. Registration required. 888-269-7006. Delhi Township.

PROVIDED

The Ohio Renaissance Festival is open and heralding in yesteryear weekends through Oct. 16. See jousting, Renaissance musicians, jugglers, sword-fighters, storytellers and costumed performers for all ages. There are also artisans displaying their wares, a gaming area, and unique food, such as giant turkey legs. Tickets are $19.99; $9.99, ages 5-12; under 5, free. Visit www.renfestival.com or call 513-897-7000 ext. 242. Location is Renaissance Park, State Route 73, Harveysburg, Ohio.


Life

Delhi-Price Hill Press

September 7, 2011

B3

Garden peppers pop into a tasty Amish relish peppers, my plants are bearing so abundantly that I’m chopping them up for the freezer and making this delish relish.

Rita’s Amish pepper relish

If you go to an Amish grocery, you’ll find the shelves lined with this kind of relish. It’s pricey and sells amazingly fast. Makes a nice gift from the garden and is better than any commercial relish. I store my relish with my other home canned goods in my pie antique pie safe.

Relish

Grind or process in food processor, blender, or chop fine by hand, enough peppers to make 6 cups and enough onions to make a generous cup, or more to taste. Put ground peppers and onions in a bowl and pour boiling water over just to cover. Let sit 5 minutes. Drain. Meanwhile, make brine.

Brine

2 cups vinegar, either cider or clear 11â „4 cups sugar, or to taste 11â „2 teaspoons each: mustard seeds, celery seeds and dry mustard

RITA HEIKENFELD/CONTRIBUTOR

Peppers clean up in Rita’s sink while waiting to be turned into relish. Let boil for several minutes, then add drained pepper mixture into brine and cook for 8 to 10 minutes, until onions are cooked through. Meanwhile, have 6 to 7 canning jars, 8 oz. each (or 4 pint jars) washed and kept in very hot water. Ditto with lids and seals. Drain water from jars and fill to first rim, wipe jars with clean, wet cloth on top to remove any residual pepper mixture (any food on top of the rim will cause a faulty seal). Process in boiling water bath 10 minutes. Even easier: instead of canning, let mixture cool and store in refrigerator for 2 months, or freeze up to 912 months.

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Laine Barresi’s kid pleasin’ salmon

Laine is one of my sous chefs at Jungle Jim’s. During a recent class that featured salmon, she mentioned a recipe that her kids love. “It’s got a great texture and crunch,� she told me. 4 salmon fillets Salt and pepper 1 bunch of green onions, chopped 1 box large pearl couscous or regular couscous, cooked 1 ⠄2 cup apple jelly 21⠄2 tablespoons rice wine vinegar 2 tablespoons reduced sodium soy sauce Take 4 salmon filets, sea-

soned with salt, pepper and brushed with a scant bit of olive oil and place on a foil lined pan. Place under a broiler for 5 to 7 minutes (7 to 9 minutes if a thicker cut on high, keeping an eye on it so as to not burn them) While fillets are in oven, heat the apple jelly, rice wine vinegar and soy sauce in a sauce pan on medium, stirring until all melted together. About 6 minutes into broiling the salmon fillets, spoon on the glaze. Place back under broiler until the glaze is bubbly. Remove from broiler and serve hot on top of hot couscous with remaining glaze over top as well as the green onions.

JalapeĂąo lime butter for salmon or corn For

the

reader

who

wanted something spicy and citrusy to dollop on grilled salmon. Pretty tasty on grilled corn, too. 1 stick unsalted butter, softened 1 tablespoon each: cilantro and jalapeĂąo, minced or more to taste Lime juice: start with juice of 1â „2 lime Mix all together. At first, it won’t blend real easy, but will come together eventually. Roll into a log and wrap. Chill or freeze until firm. Thaw a bit before serving. Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educator and author. E-mail columns@community press.com with “Rita’s kitchenâ€? in the subject line. Call 513-2487130, ext. 356.

Western Hills

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• 5,000 sq. ft. • 2 min. to new Christ and Children’s Hospital • 5 min to I-74

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I was talking to Dan Romito, producer for Fox 1 9 ’ s morning shows, about the recipe I published a while back for Western Southern’s Rita cafeteria’s Heikenfeld stuffed bell pep- Rita’s kitchen pers. Dan’s dad works at Western Southern, so Dan, a Kentucky reader, decided to try the recipe out. “I didn’t have the tomato sauce that the recipe called for, so I used a can of tomato bisque soup,� Dan told me. He usually doesn’t like bell peppers, but he really liked those. His wife, Stephanie enjoyed the peppers and daughters Jalen and Emma “ate them right up.� The same thing happened to Pat Harmon, a loyal reader, who took my shingled cheese recipe and used mozzarella and cream cheese. “It was a hit,� she said. That’s what I love about this column, when readers take a recipe and are adventurous enough to change it up! And speaking of bell


B4

Delhi-Price Hill Press

DONATE YOUR CAR Wheels For Wishes Benefiting

• Free Vehicle Pickup ANYWHERE • We Accept All Vehicles Running or Not • We Also Accept Boats, Motorcycles and RVs • Fully Tax Deductible

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1.855.254.9474(WISH)

Attention Realtors To advertise your Open House or Feature Home, call your advertising representative.

513.768.8335 or 513.768.8319

Life

September 7, 2011

September is the month to work on your turf September is here and that means turf month! What you do to your lawn this month (and fall) is the backbone to how well it can perform next year. So, let’s take a look at three very important things you could be doing – core aerating, seeding and feeding – and some other lawn tips.

Core aerate

A core aerator removes plugs from the soil, and deposits them on top. The

cores (holes) help open the soil for better water ⁄ fertilizer absorption, better airflow to the roots, and loosen heavy compacted soils. Do this annually if you have excessive foot traffic or heavy soils, and can be done spring or fall, as long as the lawn is actively growing. The plugs of soil dry, break down, and return to the soil surface. Core aerating is not a necessity, but very helpful to most lawns. This is also an opportune time for lightly topdressing with a fine

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enquirer Lend-a-Hand, inc. presents

Enter your Pet to win! Deadline is September 12, 2011 Visit www.Cincinnati.com/petidol to submit your entry online or complete the form below and include a clear, color or black/white photo of your pet along with a suggested $10 entry donation to Newspapers In Education.

YOU COULD WIN: First Place Winner - PetSmart® $500 Gift certificate Runner Up Winner - PetSmart® $250 Gift certificate Randomly Selected Winner - PetSmart® $250 Gift certificate YOUR PETS PHOTO WILL BE PUBLISHED IN THE ENQUIRER How to win: Sunday, October 2, 2011 all entrants will appear in The Enquirer and the first of three voting rounds will begin. We will ask our readers to vote for their favorite pet. Each round will eliminate entrants based on voting. We ask that all votes be accompanied by a donation to the Newspapers In Education program. Our Pet Idol contest is just one of the many fun and innovative programs we use to raise money to promote literacy in our local schools. How do I submit my pet’s photo? JPEG (.jpg) or pdf format only with a file size of 500kb or less. Mail: Photos must be a minimum of 3”x 5” but cannot exceed 6”x 4”. We reserve the right to refuse a photograph submission that the staff defines as unacceptable or inappropriate. PHOTOS WILL NOT BE RETURNED.

compost, earthworm castings, etc., and raking that into the open holes, adding organic matter to your soil! Core aerators available at many tool rentals.

Over seeding

Over seeding thinned lawns to help thicken the lawn is one of the best defenses against pesky weeds. Use a compatible seed, or the same seed as the existing grass. A seed slicer (slit seeder) will cut slices through the existing grass to help deposit the grass seed into the soil (very important for seed germination). For over seeding existing lawns use 1⁄2 normal seeding rates (full rates for new seeding). If slice seeding on bare soil, slice seed in at least 2 directions - N to S and E to W, using 1⁄2 the seeding rate amount for each direction. Slit seeders are available at many tool rentals.

Feed the lawn

For new seeding ⁄ over seeding, apply a starter fertilizer. It’s very important for the new grass and feeds the existing grass as well. For established lawns (no seeding) apply a high nitrogen fertilizer, like Fertilome’s Lawn Food plus Iron. September lawn feeding, along with a late fall feeding, are the two most important feedings of the entire year.

Good moisture is important!

The soil must have good moisture to do these things. If it hasn’t rained, water the lawn deeply 2-3 days in advance. Also mow it two or three

Benefitting newspapers in education

Pet Idol 2011 Entry Form My Name___________________________________________________________ Address____________________________________________________________ City/State/Zip _______________________________________________________ Phone ( _______ ) __________________________________________________ Pets Name: _________________________________________________________ Email: _____________________________________________________________ (We will email updated voting results for Pet Idol 2011 only.)

Yes! Enter my pet in the contest and accept my donation of $10 to benefit Newspapers In Education. (Check box below.) I am enclosing a check.

I am enclosing a money order.

(Make checks payable to Newspapers In Education.)

I am paying with a credit card: Visa MasterCard Discover

AmEx

# _______________________________ Exp. Date __________ Signature ___________________________________________

Mail to: The Enquirer 2011 Pet Idol, 312 Elm Street, Cincinnati, OH 45202. NO PURCHASE OR DONATION REQUIRED TO ENTER. ALL FEDERAL, STATE, LOCAL AND MUNICIPAL LAWS AND REGULATIONS APPLY. VOID WHERE PROHIBITED. The Enquirer Lend-A-Hand Pet Idol 2011 Contest is open to Ohio, Indiana and Kentucky residents who are 18 years or older. Employees of Enquirer Lend-A-Hand, The Cincinnati Enquirer, Gannett Co., Inc., and each of their respective affiliated companies, and advertising and promotional agencies, and the immediate family members of, and any persons domiciled with, any such employees, are not eligible to enter or to win. Contest begins at 12:01 a.m. (EST) 8/1/11 and ends at 11:59 p.m. (EST) 11/7/11. Beginning at 12:01 a.m. (EST) 8/1/11 and ending at 11:59 p.m. (EST) 11/7/11, Enter by submitting a photo of your Pet and a completed entry form. Entries must be submitted by a parent or legal guardian, 18 years or older. Entries with incomplete or incorrect information will not be accepted. Only one (1) entry per pet. Enter online at www.Cincinnati.Com/petidol. Enter by mail or in-person: complete an Official Entry Form available in The Cincinnati Enquirer, The Kentucky Enquirer, The Community Presses in Ohio & KY and at The Enquirer Customer Service Center, 312 Elm Street, Cincinnati, OH 45202. All entries must be received by 5:00 p.m. (EST) 9/12/11. Odds of winning depend on the number of eligible entries and votes received. (1) First Place Winner will receive a $500 PetSmart gift card. (1) Randomly Selected Winner will receive a $250 PetSmart gift card. (1) Runner Up Winner will receive a $250 PetSmart gift card. Winners will be notified by telephone or email on or about 11/11/11. Participants agree to be bound by the complete Official Rules and Sponsor’s decisions. For a copy of the prize winners list (available after 11/17/11) and/or the complete Official Rules send a SASE to Pet Idol 2010 c/o The Enquirer, 312 Elm Street, Cincinnati, OH 45202 or contact Pam Clarkson at 513-768-8577 or at pclarkson@enquirer.com.

Ron Wilson

days in In the advance – garden the lower h e i g h t makes it easier to perform aerating and seeding. Soil moisture is the key here in getting any of this to work. Be sure to maintain good moisture in the soil for the new seed to germinate, get growing, and keep growing. If you choose to wait to see if natural rainfall moves in before you aerate and seed, the later you wait, the more the window for opportune times for seeding lawns will close. I’m not saying that you cannot successfully seed in late September through mid October – you can. Many new lawns are established in the fall. But the earlier you can seed, the better the chances for the seed to germinate, grow and ready for the winter.

Weeds popping up

If you have a few weeds in the existing lawn, or some pop up after seeding, we’ll attack them late October (after the new grass is growing and mowed at least three times). The goal right now is getting the new grass growing, or the existing grass growing and filling in. Again, what you do to the lawn now really does help determine how well it can perform next year.

Which grass seed

Use the same seed as the existing grass or one that is compatible. Most lawns in our area are usually a mix of bluegrass, perennial ryes and creeping red fescue, or turf type tall fescues. Not sure? Visit www.scotts.com to help identify your existing grass. Once you know, look for the seed to match. And if you’re wondering which is the “best” grass to grow, I’m not sure there is a “best” grass to grow, as it depends on the soil, light and foot traffic conditions, as well as the look you’d like your lawn to have. But for overall performance, sun and partial shade, I personally like the turf type tall fescue blends. One note on seed selection - if you have a bluegrass ⁄ rye mix lawn, do not over seed with the tall fescues and vice versa, unless the lawn is so thinned out you can barely tell grass is even growing. If you want to switch the type of lawn you have from one to another, kill the existing lawn with Roundup, Killzall or Espoma’s 4N1 Weed and Grass Killer first, and then reseed with your new turf selection. Ron Wilson is marketing manager for Natorp’s Garden Stores and is the garden expert for 55KRC-AM and Local 12. Reach him at columns@ communitypress.com.


Community

Investigate cause of foundation movement Concrete foundation walls can move up, down, in or out. There are many types of causes for foundation movement. Consult an independent professional engineer to investigate the cause of the movement and to determine the cost effective method of repair, if repair is even necessary. There are several common signs of foundation walls leaning inward. Exterior indications of this inward foundation movement can be seen if the exterior wall supported on top of the foundation wall overhangs the center of the foundation wall more noticeably than at the ends of the foundation wall. Homes that have brick veneer or brick exterior may chip off the exterior face of the top of the concrete foundation wall. Some of the typical interior signs of the foundation wall leaning inward may be buckled ceilings, interior basement doors rubbing the door frames, basement doors not closing and often the space between the foundation wall and the vertical plumbing piping getting smaller towards the top of the wall. Concrete foundation walls that lean inward are normally due to excessive unbalanced soil pressure and the foundation not being anchored to the floor framing. Concrete foundation walls are not self-supporting retaining walls and the

There are several common signs of foundation walls leaning inward. top of the foundation wall relies on the floor framing to stabilize the top of the wall. Indications of this type of inward movement are interior diagonal cracks towards the ends of the walls and interior vertical cracks nearer the center of the wall. Foundation walls may not be full-height with split level homes or the top of the left or right side foundation wall being stepped down to follow a sloping lot. If the concrete foundation wall extends sufficiently below the lower level concrete slab, the concrete slab may provide satisfactory bracing of the foundation wall to prevent the foundation wall from leaning inward. One cause of concrete foundation walls leaning outward may be due to exterior porches or porch slabs anchored to the basement foundation wall. Concrete porches and porch slabs normally do not have any foundation or are supported on a shallow foundation. Concrete porches attached to concrete foundation walls may cause a smiley face type of crack on the interior side of the wall that the porch is attached to

or may Michael cause vertiMontgomery cal cracks in adjoining Community walls. Press guest L e s s columnist common causes of foundation walls leaning inward or outward may be foundation settlement, landslides or land slippage. Considerations the engineer will use to design the appropriate method of repair will include the cause of movement and the layout of the lot. For instance, repairing one wall when the opposite wall is mostly above ground may cause the whole house to lean. An independent professional engineer should inspect the house to determine the actual cause and present the most cost effective method of repair. Engineering design plans or details allows the homeowner to get multiple contractors to bid the same scope of work and provide professional documentation when selling the home. Relying on a salesman from a contractor may be very expensive and not necessarily the appropriate repair. Engineers are designers and contractors are installers. By Michael Montgomery, of Buyers Protection Group, is a licensed Engineer in Ohio, Kentucky, and Indiana. Contact him at 1-800-285-3001 or go to www.engineering andfoundations.com.

September 7, 2011

Delhi-Price Hill Press

Happy birthday

Ethel Schuch recently celebrated her 100th birthday. She provided the entertainment for her birthday party for about 70 people playing the piano for 45 minutes from her extensive playlist and from memory. Among her accomplishments, she has been a piano teacher; a member of a five-piece band for 40 years, both playing piano and singing; a high-soprano soloist at her church; a piano and organ accompanist for other soloists. She has been a seamstress, sewing and assembling toy clowns for the Shriners to give to children in the hospital, and crocheting dozens of stuffed animals for her church's bazaar every year, year after year. A true music lover, Ethel still plays piano for the other residents at Mercy Franciscan at West Park; still gets around on her own; enjoys going out to dinner; likes to get her hair done and get all dolled up. Ethel was married to Roy and they had three children, Joan, Lois and Frank. Her father, Joseph Bertram, was a shoemaker in Cincinnati. He was married to Matilda Bieneke. Ethel had two brothers, Stewart and Wilbur. With here are her daughters Joan and Lois. THANKS TO LORI KOVATICH.

Library going wild with teen photo contest This fall, the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County invites teens to snap pictures of the flora and fauna that live in their communities for its 10th annual Teen Photography Contest, Oct. 1-31. To coincide with the Contest’s “Go Wild.” theme, naturalists from the Hamilton County Park District Library will lead workshops from Sept. 14-28 at five library locations to teach teens how to find and photograph plants and animals in their natural habitats without causing anyone (or anything) any harm. They will also bring animals to the Libraries-photograph one, and enter the picture into the Contest. Here are the dates of a nearby workshop: • 4 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 14, Miami Township Branch Library, 8 North Miami Ave., 513-369-6050. Winners will receive a gift card to Chipotle, and each entrant’s name will be entered into a random

drawing at their local Library for a “One Free Item” card to Chipotle. All winning and honorable mention photos will be exhibited in a virtual gallery

6th al Annu Alpaca

on Teenspace, the Library’s website for teens. New this year: email submissions. Learn more at http://Teenspace.CincinnatiLibrary.org.

Gala Festival

Saturday, September 10th, Noon to 5:00 1297 Wilson Dunham Rd. A Free d New Richmond, Ohio 45157 mission Learn About Alpacas. Children’s Activities. Live Bluegrass Music. Alpaca Crafts. Alpaca Products. Food & Refreshments. Fiber Processing. Raffle & Door Prizes.

Fun for the entire family!

for directions & additional information visit

www.alpacagala.com CE-0000476027

What’s your community’s personality? Neighborhood’s niche? Your block’s best feature? Tell us, and you could win a $250 Visa® gift card!

We want to hear from you!

As part of an exciting new initiative here at Enquirer Media, we want to know – how do YOU describe your neighborhood?

Go to Cincinnati.com/survey and take the brief survey to let us know what you think. Everyone who completes the survey between August 3rd and September 25th will be entered into a drawing for a chance to win a $250 gift card.

No purchase necessary. Must be a resident of Ohio, Kentucky or Indiana who is 18 years or older to enter. Deadline to enter is 11:59 p.m. on September 25, 2011. For a complete list of rules visit Cincinnati.com/giveaways. CE-0000475726

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THE RECORD B6

ON

Delhi-Price Hill Press

Margie Brogan

Margaret “Margie” Langen Brogan, 76, died Aug. 26. Survived by husband Lawrence “Butch” Brogan; children Shannon Lipps, Dennis, Brian (Jenn) Brogan,

September 7, 2011

BIRTHS

DEATHS

|

POLICE

|

REAL

ESTATE

Colleen (Tucker) Corcoran, Kerry (George) Armour; grandchildren Lauren, Brad, Jeremy, Sean, Sarah, Alex, Nick, Josh, Kellyn, Aidan, Spencer Daisy; great-grandchildren Jordan, Evelyn; siblings Janet Wade, Joan Feldkamp, Mary Ellen

communitypress.com

DEATHS Ihle, Robert, Tom Langen; nieces and nephews; friends Richard Lipps, Bob, Kathy Ryan, Terry Ruwan, Jackie Rosey. Preceded in death by children Kevin Brogan, Kelly Brogan Ryan. Services were Sept. 3 at Our

Dater High School Walnut Hills High School Entrance Examination Dates The entrance examination for admission to grades 7-12 for the 2012-13 school year in the Special College Preparatory Program (SCPP) offered at Dater High School and Walnut Hills High School will be available to district residents currently in grades 6-11 on the following dates: All current Grade 6 CPS students will be tested at their schools in October 2011. Parents of Grade 6 CPS students do not need to register for this test. » » » »

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Editor Marc Emral | memral@communitypress.com | 853-6264

Saturday, October 1, 2011 Saturday, November 19, 2011 Saturday, December 10, 2011 Saturday, January 7, 2012

About obituaries Lady of Victory. Arrangements by Meyer & Geiser Funeral Home. Memorials to: Allgyer/Brogan Scholarship Fund, Elder High School, 3900 Vincent Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45205, Hospice of Cincinnati, 4310 Cooper Road, Cincinnati, OH 45242 or a charity of the donor’s choice.

Jeanne Brunst-Hollmeyer

Jeanne M. Brunst-Hollmeyer, 85, died Aug. 29. Survived by husband Ray Hollmeyer; children Mike (Patti), Tom (Diane) Brunst, Marsha (Dave) Nicholas, Mary Beth (Roy) Kleckner, Debbie (Tom) Lindeman, Kathy (Jack) Klausing; stepchildren Alan (Maureen), Ron (Bev) Hollmeyer, Gail (Greg) Hoff, Judy (Hal) Weldge; brother Walter “Bo” (Dory) Strassell; many grandchildren and greatgrandchildren. Services were Sept. 2 at St. Antoninus. Arrangements by Meyer Funeral Home. Memorials to: Alzheimer’s Association, Greater Cincinnati Chapter, 644 Linn St., Suite 1026, Cincinnati, OH 45203 or Destiny Hospice, 4350 GlendaleMilford Road, Suite 110, Cincinnati, OH 45242.

Louis Gutzwiller Jr.

Louis Gutzwiller Jr., 68, died Aug. 30. He was a veteran of Vietnam. Survived by wife Anne Kennealy

To attend either school for 2012-13, a student must pass the entrance examination and enroll no later than the last registration date established by each school.

Gutzwiller; children Joeanne, Matt, John, Louis III Gutzwiller; inlaws Amy, Beena; grandchildren George, Benjamin, Asha; siblings Jerry, Gutzwiller Sister Mary Ann, S.C., Sister Judith Gutzwiller, S.C. Services were Sept. 3 at St. William. Arrangements by Meyer & Geiser Funeral Home. Memorials to: Sisters of Charity Retirement Fund, 5900 Delhi Road, Mount St. Joseph, OH 45051 or Evercare Hospice, 9050 Centre Point Drive, Suite 400, Cincinnati, OH 45236.

Gary Humphrey

Gary Lee Humphrey, 67, died Aug. 25. Survived by children Robbin, Eric Humphrey, Rachel Byrd, Shelly Hix; siblings Millie, Randy, Mary Ann, Dick; nine grandchildren. Preceded in Humphrey death by children Gary Jr., Aaron, siblings Helen, Charlie Humphrey. Arrangements by Vitt, Stermer & Anderson Funeral Home.

DELHI TOWNSHIP Arrests/citations

Todd Mount, 20, 4823 Fehr Road, misuse of credit card, receiving stolen property at 900 block of

Neeb Road, Aug. 22. Aaron Underwood, 19, 5249 Ostenhill Court, driving under suspension at 200 block of Greenwell Avenue, Aug. 25. Tyler Mayer, 20, 4810 Basil Lane, theft, receiving stolen property at 4800 block of Fehr Road, Aug. 25.

Assault

Incidents/reports

5415 Whitmore Drive man reported being hit during argument at 5400 block of Whitmore Drive, Aug. 23.

http://www.cps-k12.org/general/Testing/testing.htm

Burglary

CP C CPS P PS S

Woman reported guns stolen at 5576 Hillside Ave., Aug. 23.

Theft

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United Dairy Farmers reported $13 in merchandise stolen at 4905 Delhi Road, Aug. 24. Billy’s Pony Keg reported phone card stolen at 4203 Delhi Road, Aug. 24. LEGAL NOTICE NUISANCE VIOLATION 4636 FEHR ROAD Notice is hereby given to Ron Ense that property you own in Delhi Township contains excessive vegetation. The Delhi Township Board of Trustees has determined, at Resolution #2011-123,that the condition of the property constitutes a nuisance and is detrimental to the health, safety and general welfare of all persons who live, work or own property within Delhi Township.

CINCINNATI DISTRICT 3 LEGAL NOTICE NUISANCE VIOLATION 4765 BASIL LANE Notice is hereby given to Craig and Diana Spriggs that property you own in Delhi Township contains excessive vegetation.

LEGAL NOTICE NUISANCE VIOLATION 3944 DELHI PIKE Notice is hereby given to Aaron Bouras that property you own in Delhi Township contains excessive vegetation.

The Delhi Township Board of Trustees has determined, at Resolution #2011-117,that the condition of the property constitutes a nuisance and is detrimental to the health, safety and general welfare of all persons who live, work or own property within Delhi Township.

The Delhi Township Board of Trustees has determined, at Resolution #2011-117,that the condition of the property constitutes a nuisance and is detrimental to the health, safety and general welfare of all persons who live, work or own property within Delhi Township.

If such excessive vegetation is not cut and removed and if such accumulated debris is not removed, or provision for such cutting and removal is not made within seven (7) days of publishing/posting of this notice, or a hearing before the Board of Trustees is not requested as specified below, the Board will provide for the cutting and removal, and any expenses incurred by the Board in performing such tasks will be entered upon the tax duplicate and will be a lien upon the properties from the date of entry.

This notice shall serve as a formal order for you to address the nuisance violations at your property located at 4765 Basil Lane (also known as Parcel 540-0040-0178 of the Hamilton County Auditor’s Tax Plats), Delhi Township, Hamilton County,State of Ohio as described below: "Cut all excessive vegetation, remove clippings there from, and maintain such at a height not to exceed 12" (All yards and planting beds).

This notice shall serve as a formal order for you to address the nuisance violations at your property located at 3944 Basil Lane (also known as Parcel 540-00100082 of the Hamilton County Auditor’s Tax Plats), Delhi Township, Hamilton County,State of Ohio as described below: "Cut all excessive vegetation, remove clippings there from, and maintain such at a height not to exceed 12" (All yards and planting beds).

If such excessive vegetation is not cut and removed or provision for such cutting and removal is not made within seven (7) days of publishing/posting of this notice, or a hearing before the Board of Trustees is not requested as specified below, the Board will provide for the cutting and removal, and any expenses incurred by the Board in performing such tasks will be entered upon the tax duplicate and will be a lien upon the properties from the date of entry.

If such excessive vegetation is not cut and removed or provision for such cutting and removal is not made within seven (7) days of publishing/posting of this notice, or a hearing before the Board of Trustees is not requested as specified below, the Board will provide for the cutting and removal, and any expenses incurred by the Board in performing such tasks will be entered upon the tax duplicate and will be a lien upon the properties from the date of entry.

You have the right to request a hearing before the Board of Trustees within seven (7) days of publishing/posting of this notice. If requested, the hearing will be held at the next regularly scheduled meeting of the Board. The Boards’ meetings are held on the second and last Wednesdays of each month commencing at 6:00 p.m. at 934 Neeb Road, Cincinnati, Ohio 45233. At the hearing, you may appear in person or by counsel, may present evidence and examine witnesses. If a hearing is timely requested, action to abate the nuisance conditions will be stayed pending the hearing and further decision of the Board. Your request for a hearing before the Board may be submitted in writing to: Thomas R. Stahlheber, Zoning Inspector, Delhi Township Department of Development Services, 697 Neeb Road, Cincinnati, Ohio 45233.

You have the right to request a hearing before the Board of Trustees within seven (7) days of publishing/posting of this notice. If requested, the hearing will be held at the next regularly scheduled meeting of the Board. The Boards’ meetings are held on the second and last Wednesdays of each month commencing at 6:00 p.m. at 934 Neeb Road, Cincinnati, Ohio 45233. At the hearing, you may appear in person or by counsel, may present evidence and examine witnesses. If a hearing is timely requested, action to abate the nuisance conditions will be stayed pending the hearing and further decision of the Board. Your request for a hearing before the Board may be submitted in writing to: Thomas R. Stahlheber, Zoning Inspector, Delhi Township Department of Development Services, 697 Neeb Road, Cincinnati, Ohio 45233.

You have the right to request a hearing before the Board of Trustees within seven (7) days of publishing/posting of this notice. If requested, the hearing will be held at the next regularly scheduled meeting of the Board. The Boards’ meetings are held on the second and last Wednesdays of each month commencing at 6:00 p.m. at 934 Neeb Road, Cincinnati, Ohio 45233. At the hearing, you may appear in person or by counsel, may present evidence and examine witnesses. If a hearing is timely requested, action to abate the nuisance conditions will be stayed pending the hearing and further decision of the Board. Your request for a hearing before the Board may be submitted in writing to: Thomas R. Stahlheber, Zoning Inspector, Delhi Township Department of Development Services, 697 Neeb Road, Cincinnati, Ohio 45233.

Any questions concerning this order should be directed to Mr. Stahlheber at the above described address or at 513-9222705. 1001662353

Any questions concerning this order should be directed to Mr. Stahlheber at the above described address or at 513-922-2705. 1001662346

Any questions concerning this order should be directed to Mr. Stahlheber at the above described address or at 513-9222705. 1001662350

This notice shall serve as a formal order for you to address the nuisance violations at your property located at 4636 Fehr Road (also known as Parcel 540-00400131 of the Hamilton County Auditor’s Tax Plats), Delhi Township, Hamilton County, State of Ohio as described below: •Cut all excessive vegetation, remove clippings there from, and maintain such at a height not to exceed 12" (All yards and planting beds); •Remove all debris, or store indoors (All yards).

Basic obituary information and a color photograph of your loved one is published without charge by The Community Press. Please call us at 8536262 for a submission form. To publish a larger memorial tribute, call 2424000 for pricing details.

James Roberto

James P. Roberto, 72, died Aug. 27. Survived by wife Sharon Roberto; sons Dino (Nancy), Steve (Janis), Jamie (Amy), Greg (Susan) Roberto; mother Mildred RoberRoberto to; grandchildren Stephanie, Nick, Jessica, Dominic, Aaron Fugate, Chaz, Max, Mia, Jacob, Erica; siblings Bob, Joe, Pat Roberto, Diane Runge, Karen Griesl; seven great-grandchildren. Preceded in death by father Joseph Roberto. Services were Sept. 3 at St. Antoninus. Arrangements by Meyer Funeral Home. Memorials to: American Kidney Foundation, 615 Elsinore Place, Suite 400, Cincinnati, OH 45202 or American Diabetes Association, 644 Linn St., Suite 304, Cincinnati, OH 45203.

POLICE REPORTS

TESTS ARE GIVEN BY APPOINTMENT ONLY To schedule an appointment or to make inquiries, call Test Administration at the Cincinnati Public Schools’ Education Center, 363-0186. For additional testing information, go to

PRESS

Arrests/citations

Shanika Grisby, born 1990, criminal damaging or endangering, theft under $300, 3201 Warsaw Ave., Aug. 17. Tashawna Nolen, born 1972, vicious dog, 809 Mount Hope Ave., Aug. 17. John E. Boyer, born 1968, aggravated menacing, 803 Hermosa Ave., Aug. 17. Sherrie Sherman, born 1979, aggravated menacing, 926 Voss St., Aug. 21. Donovan Akeem Peck, born 1991, aggravated armed robbery, 810 Matson Place, Aug. 22. Heather Books, born 1987, trafficking, 817 Elberon Ave., Aug. 22. Marlon Westly Hodge, born 1987, obstructing official business, 3201 Warsaw Ave., Aug. 22. Tyrone Crawford, born 1990, theft under $300, 3609 Warsaw Ave., Aug. 22. Jason Parrish, born 1981, disorderly conduct, 4855 Glenway Ave., Aug. 22. Brian Matthew Baker, born 1991, receiving a stolen motor vehicle, theft under $300, 3749 Glenway Ave., Aug. 23. Gerry A. McDonald, born 1962, menacing, 3201 Warsaw Ave., Aug. 23. Sarah Klink, born 1979, drug abuse, possession of drug abuse instruments, possession of drug paraphernalia, 750 Grand Ave., Aug. 23. Margarita Flynn, born 1969, domestic violence, 606 Trenton Ave., Aug. 23. Brian Matthew Baker, born 1991, assault, criminal damaging or endangering, 3410 Glenway Ave., Aug. 24. Danielle Zinveli, born 1976, domestic violence, 1091 Grand Ave., Aug. 24. Daryl W. Strunk, born 1969, possession of an open flask, 779 Wells St., Aug. 24. Jalen Thomas, born 1993, carrying a concealed weapon, obstructing official business, receiving a stolen firearm, tampering with evidence, 1013 Delmonte Place, Aug. 24. Tina M. King, born 1965, possession of an open flask, 779 Wells St., Aug. 24. Carla Sumner, born 1978, complicity to commit burglary, tampering with evidence, 4419 Ridgeview Ave., Aug. 24. Christian Jackson, born 1992, theft $300 to $5000, 5216 Glenway Ave., Aug. 24. James Allen, born 1980, misuse of a credit card, receiving a stolen credit card, theft under $300, 4828 Glenway Ave., Aug. 24.

Stephanie J. Coy, born 1957, assault, 4445 Ridgeview Ave., Aug. 24. Timothy John Miller, born 1971, menacing, telecommunication harassment, 1236 Beech Ave., Aug. 24. Brittany Gross, born 1982, domestic violence, 497 Enright Ave., Aug. 25. Margaret Campbell, born 1981, menacing, 707 Elberon Ave., Aug. 25. Rachel E. Schueler, born 1976, domestic violence, 497 Enright Ave., Aug. 25. Stanley C. Gatewood, born 1956, possession of drug paraphernalia, 3761 Westmont Drive, Aug. 25. David Lee, born 1984, domestic violence, 1870 Sunset Ave., Aug. 26. Dennis Wadlinger, born 1982, drug abuse, misdemeanor drug possession, 1031 Beech Ave., Aug. 26. Travis Tustin, born 1987, criminal damaging or endangering, domestic violence, 1050 Schiff Ave., Aug. 26. Gerald Richardson, born 1977, disorderly conduct, 977 Hawthorne Ave., Aug. 27. Tamicka Riley, born 1985, assault, 1232 Quebec Road, Aug. 27. Carla J. Shad, born 1961, passing bad checks, 4209 W. Eighth St., Aug. 27. Erin Perkins, born 1993, aggravated menacing, 921 Woodlawn Ave., Aug. 28. Matthew S. Edwards, born 1967, theft under $300, 3609 Warsaw Ave., Aug. 28. James L. Depue, born 1959, assault, 6390 Gracely Drive, Aug. 28. Robert Frye, born 1987, assault, 6390 Gracely Drive, Aug. 28.

Incidents/reports Aggravated burglary

975 Grand Ave., Aug. 25.

Aggravated menacing

4117 W. Liberty St., Aug. 11. 3431 Warsaw Ave., Aug. 13. 1221 Fairbanks Ave., Aug. 20. 1269 Quebec Road, Aug. 21. 4913 Relleum Ave., Aug. 23. 1916 Westmont Lane, Aug. 24.

Aggravated robbery

3609 Warsaw Ave., Aug. 13. 2358 Harrison Ave., Aug. 14. 3700 Warsaw Ave., Aug. 15. 3609 Warsaw Ave., Aug. 13. 2358 Harrison Ave., Aug. 14. 3700 Warsaw Ave., Aug. 15. 4922 Rapid Run Road, Aug. 20.

Assault

4117 W. Liberty St., Aug. 11. 1016 Grand Ave., Aug. 13. 933 Kirbert Ave., Aug. 13. 1052 McPherson Ave., Aug. 14. 904 Woodlawn Ave., Aug. 15. 1928 Westmont Lane, Aug. 15. 1001 Woodlawn Ave., Aug. 16. 4270 Delridge Drive, Aug. 16. 4975 Glenway Ave., Aug. 16. 4438 Ridgeview Ave., Aug. 17. 4822 Glenway Ave., Aug. 17. 4117 W. Liberty St., Aug. 11. 1016 Grand Ave., Aug. 13. 933 Kirbert Ave., Aug. 13. 1052 McPherson Ave., Aug. 14. 904 Woodlawn Ave., Aug. 15. 1928 Westmont Lane, Aug. 15. 1001 Woodlawn Ave., Aug. 16. 4270 Delridge Drive, Aug. 16. 4975 Glenway Ave., Aug. 16. 4438 Ridgeview Ave., Aug. 17. 4822 Glenway Ave., Aug. 17. 1702 Grand Ave., Aug. 19. 1909 Westmont Lane, Aug. 20. 1269 Quebec Road, Aug. 21. 1216 Manss Ave., Aug. 23. 2823 Price Ave., Aug. 24. 3410 Glenway Ave., Aug. 24. Breaking and entering 5111 Highview Drive, Aug. 12.

Police | Continued B7


On the record

September 7, 2011

POLICE REPORTS 6615 Gracely Drive, Aug. 13. 4134 Heyward St., Aug. 13. 55 Kibby Lane, Aug. 14. 1135 Wendover Court, Aug. 14. 4861 Guerley Road, Aug. 15. 1030 Grand Ave., Aug. 16. 3623 Glenway Ave., Aug. 16. 1226 Rutledge Ave., Aug. 16. 4373 W. Eighth St., Aug. 16. 1026 Del Monte, Aug. 17. 2842 Lehman Road, Aug. 17. 3409 W. Eighth St., Aug. 17. 3614 Maria Ave., Aug. 17. 5042 Relleum Ave., Aug. 17. 846 Delehanty Court, Aug. 17. 3999 W. Eighth St., Aug. 18. 5111 Highview Drive, Aug. 12. 6615 Gracely Drive, Aug. 13. 4134 Heyward St., Aug. 13. 55 Kibby Lane, Aug. 14. 1135 Wendover Court, Aug. 14. 4861 Guerley Road, Aug. 15. 1030 Grand Ave., Aug. 16. 3623 Glenway Ave., Aug. 16. 1226 Rutledge Ave., Aug. 16. 4373 W. Eighth St., Aug. 16. 1026 Del Monte, Aug. 17. 2842 Lehman Road, Aug. 17. 3409 W. Eighth St., Aug. 17. 3614 Maria Ave., Aug. 17. 5042 Relleum Ave., Aug. 17. 846 Delehanty Court, Aug. 17. 3999 W. Eighth St., Aug. 18. 1003 Fisk Ave., Aug. 19. 4727 Glenway Ave., Aug. 19. 3711 Glenway Ave., Aug. 20. 3717 St. Lawrence Ave., Aug. 21. 3033 Glenway Ave., Aug. 22. 55 Kibby Lane, Aug. 22. 1029 Ross Ave., Aug. 23. 1033 Parkson Place, Aug. 23. 687 Hawthorne Ave., Aug. 23. 4058 Akochia Ave., Aug. 25.

Burglary

3635 Mayfield Ave., Aug. 12. 6935 Gracely Drive, Aug. 13. 830 Nebraska Ave., Aug. 13. 2915 Price Ave., Aug. 14. 1658 First Ave., Aug. 14. 3536 Glenway Ave., Aug. 15. 312 Rosemont Ave., Aug. 17. 584 Grand Ave., Aug. 18. 1241 Gilsey Ave., Aug. 18. 1373 Covedale Ave., Aug. 18. 4958 Cleves Warsaw Pike, Aug. 18. 3635 Mayfield Ave., Aug. 12. 6935 Gracely Drive, Aug. 13. 830 Nebraska Ave., Aug. 13. 2915 Price Ave., Aug. 14. 1658 First Ave., Aug. 14. 3536 Glenway Ave., Aug. 15. 312 Rosemont Ave., Aug. 17. 584 Grand Ave., Aug. 18. 1241 Gilsey Ave., Aug. 18. 1373 Covedale Ave., Aug. 18. 4958 Cleves Warsaw Pike, Aug. 18. 504 Fairbanks Ave., Aug. 20. 1840 Sunset Ave., Aug. 20. 1752 Gellenbeck St., Aug. 22. 1030 Woodlawn Ave., Aug. 24. 1131 Rulison Ave., Aug. 24. 1911 Wyoming Ave., Aug. 24. 6329 Prescott St., Aug. 25. 1265 Rosemont Ave., Aug. 25.

Criminal damaging/endangering

470 Purcell Ave., Aug. 11. 4117 W. Liberty St., Aug. 11. 3753 Westmont Drive, Aug. 12. 1225 Sliker Ave., Aug. 13. 1675 Gellenbeck St., Aug. 13. 4025 W. Eighth St., Aug. 13. 4729 Loretta Ave., Aug. 13. 830 Nebraska Ave., Aug. 13. 130 Monitor Ave., Aug. 15. 907 Rutledge Ave., Aug. 15. 3050 Mickey Ave., Aug. 16. 537 Elberon Ave., Aug. 16. 1035 Glenna Drive, Aug. 17. 562 Considine Ave., Aug. 18. 1147 Woody Lane, Aug. 18. 4434 Ridgeview Ave., Aug. 18. 4955 Glenway Ave., Aug. 18. 470 Purcell Ave., Aug. 11. 4117 W. Liberty St., Aug. 11. 3753 Westmont Drive, Aug. 12. 1225 Sliker Ave., Aug. 13. 1675 Gellenbeck St., Aug. 13. 4025 W. Eighth St., Aug. 13. 4729 Loretta Ave., Aug. 13. 830 Nebraska Ave., Aug. 13. 130 Monitor Ave., Aug. 15. 907 Rutledge Ave., Aug. 15. 3050 Mickey Ave., Aug. 16. 537 Elberon Ave., Aug. 16. 1035 Glenna Drive, Aug. 17. 562 Considine Ave., Aug. 18. 1147 Woody Lane, Aug. 18. 4434 Ridgeview Ave., Aug. 18. 4955 Glenway Ave., Aug. 18. 1134 Woody Lane, Aug. 19. 1221 Fairbanks Ave., Aug. 20. 1216 Gilsey Ave., Aug. 20. 4134 Heyward, Aug. 20. 917 Enright Ave., Aug. 21. 3765 St. Lawrence Ave., Aug. 22. 3751 Westmont Drive, Aug. 22. 3779 Westmont Drive, Aug. 22. 840 Delehanty Court, Aug. 22. 3410 Glenway Ave., Aug. 24. 1031 Kreis Lane, Aug. 24. 1253 McKeone Ave., Aug. 24. 1636 Minion Ave., Aug. 24. 1908 Westmont Lane, Aug. 24. 4966 Glenway Ave., Aug. 24.

Reported on Price Avenue, Aug. 15. Reported on West Eighth Street, Aug. 15. Reported on Westmont Lane, Aug. 16. Reported on Rapid Run, Aug. 17. Reported on Fairbanks Avenue, Aug. 19. Reported on West Eighth Street, Aug. 19. Reported on Suire Avenue, Aug. 19. Reported on Home City Avenue, Aug. 21. Reported on Clanora Drive, Aug. 22. Reported on Hawthorne Avenue, Aug. 23. Reported on Trenton Avenue, Aug. 23. Reported on Grand Avenue, Aug. 24. Reported on Iliff Avenue, Aug. 24.

Endangering children

1620 Minion Ave., Aug. 11. 1620 Minion Ave., Aug. 11.

Felonious assault

750 Grand Ave., Aug. 12. 1709 Atson Lane, Aug. 5. 1034 Parkson Place, Aug. 15. 1034 Parkson Place, Aug. 15.

Gross sexual imposition

Reported on Sidney Road, Aug. 14. Reported on Warsaw Avenue, Aug. 18. Reported on Sidney Road, Aug. 14. Reported on Warsaw Avenue, Aug. 18.

Menacing

1131 Seton Ave., Aug. 8. 921 McPherson Ave., Aug. 9. 3025 Mickey Ave., Aug. 13. 4724 Green Glen Lane, Aug. 16. 3025 Mickey Ave., Aug. 13. 4724 Green Glen Lane, Aug. 16. 707 Elberon Ave., Aug. 19. 3400 Mount Echo Drive, Aug. 20. 4103 Glenway Ave., Aug. 23.

Rape

Reported on Warsaw Avenue, Aug. 7.

Robbery

3609 Warsaw Ave., Aug. 10. 395 Purcell Ave., Aug. 10.

About police reports The Community Press publishes the names of all adults charged with offenses. The information is a matter of public record and does not imply guilt or innocence. To contact your local police department: • Delhi Township: Chief Jim Howarth, 922-0060. • Cincinnati District 3: Capt. Russell A. Neville, 2638300. 3431 Warsaw Ave., Aug. 7. 4420 Glenway Ave., Aug. 9. 4354 W. Eighth St., Aug. 13. 3000 Glenway Ave., Aug. 15. 4725 Rapid Run Road, Aug. 17. 735 Grand Ave., Aug. 18. 4354 W. Eighth St., Aug. 13. 3000 Glenway Ave., Aug. 15. 4725 Rapid Run Road, Aug. 17. 735 Grand Ave., Aug. 18. 635 Hawthorne Ave., Aug. 23.

Tampering with coin machines 1033 Parkson Place, Aug. 23.

Theft

1232 Purcell Ave., Aug. 10. 1790 Grand Ave., Aug. 10. 1037 Winfield Ave., Aug. 10. 1100 Winfield Ave., Aug. 10. 3609 Warsaw Ave., Aug. 5. 3723 Wieman Ave., Aug. 5. 6615 Gracely Drive, Aug. 5. 1160 Overlook Ave., Aug. 5. 4925 Ralph Ave., Aug. 5. 3411 Warsaw Ave., Aug. 6. 4063 Palos St., Aug. 6. 4980 Glenway Ave., Aug. 6. 4980 Glenway Ave., Aug. 6.

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Reported on Mickey Avenue, Aug. 11. Reported on Grand Avenue, Aug. 5. Reported on Green Glen Lane, Aug. 5. Reported on Glenway Avenue, Aug. 7. Reported on Wyoming Avenue, Aug. 8. Reported on Grand Avenue, Aug. 11. Reported on Oakland Avenue, Aug. 12. Reported on Winfield Avenue, Aug. 12. Reported on Loretta Avenue, Aug. 13. Reported on Warsaw Avenue, Aug. 14. Reported on Price Avenue, Aug. 15. Reported on West Eighth Street, Aug. 15. Reported on Westmont Lane, Aug. 16. Reported on Rapid Run, Aug. 17. Reported on Grand Avenue, Aug. 11. Reported on Oakland Avenue, Aug. 12. Reported on Winfield Avenue, Aug. 12. Reported on Loretta Avenue, Aug. 13. Reported on Warsaw Avenue, Aug. 14.

B7

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B8

Delhi-Price Hill Press

Community

September 7, 2011

Variety of art in Harvest Harvest Home Fair celebrates 152 years Home annual art show West Side art will be on display at the Harvest Home Fair. The annual art show will be up starting Friday, Sept. 9, in the barn at Harvest Home Park. There are three categories – oli and acrylic, watercolor and other media. Co-chairing the show are Jack Williams, a retired pediatrician who is a painter, and Sharon Christopherson, of Christopherson & Clark Hearing Center. “I love art, but have no talent,” Christopherson said, laughing. “I have an appreciation of art.” She’s been working on the Harvest Home art shows for about five years, and hopes to have even

more than the 100 entries that the show had last year, which was up from the year before. “Last year and this year we utilized email and have gotten in touch with all of the art groups in the city,” she said. Many artists enter every year, but seldom enter the same art work. Christopherson said some artists work all year just for this show. Judging this year will be Robert Hebenstreit, a teacher at the Art Academy of Cincinnati. “We try to have different judge each year,” she said. “Each judge looks for different aspects. It gives us a variety of art winners.” There are prizes for the top three in each category. Art work is dropped off Thursday night, judging is Friday morning, with the show running from Friday night through Sunday.

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By Kurt Backscheider • kbackscheider@communitypress.com Ben Clinkenbeard said he attended his first Harvest Home Fair before he could even walk. “I’ve been going to the fair since I was in a stroller,” he said. “It’s a tradition. It’s one of the last big events of the summer.” The Green Township resident and Cheviot-Westwood Kiwanis Club member is serving his first year as chairman of the annual Harvest Home Fair. Clinkenbeard has the honor of overseeing the event through 2013. This year’s theme is Community Affair. “It’s going great,” he said. “We’re going to have another great fair this year.” The “biggest little fair in Ohio” kicks off at 6 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 8, with the annual Harvest Home Parade. The 152nd edition of the Harvest Home Fair will then run through Sunday, Sept. 11. Clinkenbeard said the fair will include all the traditional family-friendly attractions West Siders have come to love, such as the 4-H livestock exhibits, art show, horse show, general

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exhibits, rides and stage shows. Those who want to take a chance at winning some money can place bets in a variety of games like 21card stud and Texas Hold ’em Poker. Back again this year is the Dolly and Me fashion show for young girls and their dolls. “That was a big hit last year, so we brought it back,” Clinkenbeard said. Live music is also back again this year, and fair organizers hope to draw large crowds with a Friday night concert, when local favorite The Rusty Griswolds take the stage at 7 p.m. The Menus, another popular band on the West Side, will perform at 7 p.m. on Sunday. Clinkenbeard said the fairgrounds at Harvest Home Park will be open again this year after the parade on Thursday night until 11 p.m. Tommy and Hub will perform acoustic tunes, and hot dogs and pizza will be available for $1 and beer for $2. Fair hours are 5 p.m.-11 p.m. Friday, Sept. 9; noon to 11 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 10; and noon to 10 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 11. Admission is $5 for adults. Children 12 and younger get in free. Admission for everyone is free on Saturday and Sunday until 3:30 p.m. All the money the Kiwanis Club raises at the Harvest Home Fair goes directly back to the community in the form of scholarships,

building projects and charitable giving. Throughout the years, proceeds from the fair have helped women’s shelters, area schools, Boy Scout and Girl Scout troops, local parks and recreation fields. “All the hard work pays off and it’s a really great way to give back to our community,” Clinkenbeard said. “It makes it all worthwhile.” He said the fair would not be what it is without the support of the families and neighbors who attend the event. “This has been going on for more than 150 years. That says a lot about the people and traditions on the West Side,” he said. “They continue to come back and support us every year.”

Leading the parade

The 152nd annual Harvest Home Fair presented by the Kiwanis Club of Cheviot-Westwood kicks off with the Harvest Home Parade at 6 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 8. The parade begins at the intersection of Harrison Avenue and Bridgetown Road and ends at Harvest Home Park on North Bend Road. Bonnie Perrino-Badinghaus, a Cheviot business owner and longtime Kiwanis member, is the grand marshal of this year’s parade. She said it’s an honor to be named the grand marshal. “There are so many Kiwanians who have done

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so many great things, it’s humbling to have been chosen,” she said. “I’m looking forward to it.” Perrino-Badinghaus said she loves all aspects of the parade, but her favorites are watching all the schools participate and listening to the marching bands. She said she’s also looking forward to the fair on the weekend, especially the art show and the general exhibits. “It’s just amazing what some of these kids can do these days,” she said. She invites everyone to come out and be a part of the tradition. “This event has such a rich history,” she said.

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FILE PHOTO

Sarah Kathman, a member of the county 4-H program, walked in the annual Harvest Home Parade last year with her mini-horse, Gracie. The 4-H exhibit is a traditional attraction at the Harvest Home Fair.

Closing Day September 10 - Meet the Artist

For more information visit, www.green-acres.org or phone, 793-2787(ARTS) CE-0000473459

Joey McDonald Groomer & Proprietor

8400 Blome Road

Cincinnati, OH 45243

Glenway | 6475 Glenway avenue 513-257-0502

Tier Haus Pet Salon Welcomes Tammy Thomas & Katy Haders

Tammy Thomas Professional Groomer

Greenacres Arts Center

Katy Haders Professional Groomer

32 YEARS OF COMBINED EXPERIENCE

Free Nail Trimming No purchase necessary

$5 off any service* *new customers

CE-0000475959

CE-0000475075

513.574.9333

Tier Haus Pet Grooming Salon 5970 Harrison Ave Cincinnati OH 45248 www.tierhauspetsalon.com

$3 Off

a Sandwich Platter

Sandwich Platter includes one 1/2 lb. sandwich and two sides. Must present original coupon. Glenway Ave. Location Only One per customer or group. Expires: October 9, 2011

price-hill-press-090711  

““IItt’’ss oonnee ooff thosethingsthatnotonlychangestheperceptionofan individualperson,butalsoanentirecountry.” Therewereplentyofwinners dur...

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