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PRICE HILL PRESS

Your Community Press newspaper serving Price Hill and Covedale

The Delhi Seniors Auction will benefit getting people there.

75¢

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 15, 2012

BECAUSE COMMUNITY MATTERS

Mount St. Joe opening art gallery in Incline District Another option for entertainment

Skirt game raises $55K

Nearly 10,000 attend annual softball game

By Kurt Backscheider kbackscheider@communitypress.com

East Price Hill’s Incline District is set to get another new attraction. The College of Mount St. Joseph is opening an art gallery on the first floor of The Flats apartment building at the corner of Price and Hawthorne avenues. “We’re very excited the Mount is coming to the Incline District,” said Bill Burwinkel, an East Price Hill resident who led the renovation of the historic 100-year-old apartment building with his business partner, Tom Koopman. “Their gallery in The Flats building will be joining the Warsaw Project Gallery as our arts, entertainment and dining offerings continue to grow.” Burwinkel and Koopman opened the five-unit luxury apartment in March 2011 as revitalization of the neighborhood was taking shape. The Incline District has since been designated as an entertainment district by the city. Home to the Primavista restaurant and the Corner Bloc Coffeehouse, the district is slated to get another restaurant this October when the Incline Public House opens. Cincinnati Landmark Productions, owner and operator of the Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, is planning to build a theater in the area as well. “Exciting things are happening in this neighborhood,” Burwinkel said. “There is no reason this area shouldn’t take off.” Tony Aretz, the Mount’s president, said the college is proud to be a part of the renaissance of the Incline District. “This is an exciting opportunity for the Mount’s new gallery to help the momentum that is turning this area into a designated community and entertainment district,” he said. Mount spokeswoman Jill Eichhorn said Mount students and staff will operate the 1,300-square-feet art gallery, which will be named the Flats Gallery – A College of Mount S.t Joseph Urban Arts Partnership. She said the gallery will be used for exhibitions, including Mount faculty and student work, regional artists, community collaborations and special events like

GOING ONCE! A3

By Monica Boylson mboylson@communitypress.com

The College of Mount St. Joseph is opening an art gallery on the first floor of The Flats apartment building, a 100-year-old building at the corner of Price and Hawthorne avenues in East Price Hill's Incline District. KURT BACKSCHEIDER/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

lectures and recitals. The gallery gives the Mount an opportunity to serve the community, and she said there are plans to engage area artists, students and residents in art-related discussions and activities. Sister Marge Kloos, a Sister of Charity and dean of the Mount’s division of arts and humanities, said the gallery allows the college to showcase the very best of its See GALLERY, Page A2

NO MORE FISH The Price Hill Bayou Fish House, which opened in January, closed Aug. 3. “It never developed the way we expected,” said owner Grant Gieseler, of the restaurant, 3108 Price Ave. in East Price Hill. He said the Newport outpost of the made-from-scratch fried fish restaurant, which is at 527 York St., is doing well and will remain open. “I keep telling people, ‘Newport is only 10 minutes away,’” he said of the plethora of calls he’s been getting from disappointed Price Hill customers. 859-491-3474 (FISH); www.bayoufishhouse.com/ By Shauna Steigerwald

Nearly 10,000 people packed into Delhi Park Friday, Aug. 3, to attend the Delhi Skirt Game, a West Side tradition for 35 years. Men dressed as their favorite Disney and Warner Brothers characters played softball to help raise money for charity to help Delhi families in need. The game was hosted by Local 12’s John Gumm and Bob Herzog. The skirt game and other fundraisers including the Delhi Rising Star singing competition, tailgate party, auction and various donations totaled more than $55,000. “This was the best Skirt Game we’ve had,” skirt game co-chair Clyde Kober said. “Paired with the tailgate party, this was our best weekend financially.” Skirt game co-chair Marty Smith said they didn’t have expectations for the amount of money raised. “You never expect it but you always hope for it,” Smith said. “It’s amazing that that many people get together for the cause.” The Skirt Game Committee extended thanks to all the volunteers who helped with the fundraisers, in particular Boy Scout Troop 350.

Thousands of people attended the Delhi Skirt Game Aug. 3 to raise money for charity, at Delhi Park. Little Mermaid WKRC-TV Local 12 meteorologist John Gumm, from left, skirt game co-chair Clyde Kober and Mary Poppins WKRC-TV Local 12 news anchor Bob Herzog get ready for the game. MONICA BOYLSON/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Price Hill ready to celebrate its cultural heritage By Kurt Backscheider kbackscheider@communitypress.com

Price Hill residents are invited to come together at St. Lawrence Corner for a celebration that’s quickly become a neighborhood tradition. The third annual Price Hill Cultural Heritage Fest is set for noon to 6 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 25, on the convergence of St. Lawrence, Enright and Olive avenues.

The festival, presented by Price Hill Will and the East Price Hill Business Alliance, celebrates the arts, culture and community spirit of Price Hill and features the various traditions in the neighborhood, from throughout its history to today. “Price Hill has a wide range of traditions and cultures, and this neighborhood has always known how to have a good time,” said Matt Strauss, director of marketing and neighborhood outreach

for Price Hill Will. “This is a great chance for people from many traditions from all over the area to gather in the heart of Price Hill and share some of that Strauss spirit.” Strauss said street closures at St. Lawrence Corner will allow for a main stage to showcase popular area bands, including K-Dra-

KICKING OFF

RITA’S KITCHEN

Have a look at the West Side’s boys soccer teams. See story, A8

Rita’s recipe includes Rocky Road fudge that kids can make. See story, B3

ma, Bulldancer, Blues in the Schools, Acarya, Andy Man and Brad Loans from the Sundresses. New to the festival this year is the Grill Master Challenge, in which three contestants will each prepare a regional or cultural cuisine of their choice, such as Appalachian, soul food, Cajun, German, Chinese or Mexican. Diana Vakharia, director of operations for Price Hill Will, said the idea for the grill challenge came out of one of the heri-

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tage festival’s planning committees. She said one of the committee members is a chef who has strong ties to the culinary community in Cincinnati, and he is working to line up a few celebrity judges to be a part of the event. “We thought it would be a fun way to exhibit the culinary traditions that are a big part of our heritage,” Vakharia said. See HERITAGE, Page A2 Vol. 85 No. 32 © 2012 The Community Press ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


NEWS

A2 • PRICE HILL PRESS • AUGUST 15, 2012

Heritage Continued from Page A1

The grill challenge begins at noon and the winner will be announced at 2 p.m. The recipes will be available to the public. In addition to the selection of food at the festival, Strauss said adults will be able to sample area wine, while children can enjoy

face painting, a hula hoop contest, temporary tattoos, balloon animals and other games and activities. A dozen area artists will be on hand as well throughout the celebration, sharing their work in a street sale, he said. A silent auction will also take place at Price Hill Will’s office on St. Lawrence avenue during the festival. Strauss said the festival is part of three big days of

PRICE HILL PRESS

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Marc Emral Senior Editor ...............853-6264, memral@communitypress.com Monica Boylson Reporter ..............853-6265, mboylson@communitypress.com Kurt Backscheider Reporter ............853-6260, kbackscheider@communitypress.com Melanie Laughman Sports Editor ......248-7573, mlaughman@communitypress.com Tom Skeen Sports Reporter .............576-8250, tskeen@communitypress.com

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arts and culture in the neighborhood. “The event was created to show where Price Hill has been, where we are now and where we’re going, together,” he said. Other festivities planned for the weekend include a free summer concert by the Latin-American band, Chapines Mayo, from 7-9 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 23, at Seton High School. Friday, Aug. 24 features the Il-

luminating the Arts in Price Hill, a gallery walk from Hawthorne Avenue in the Incline District to the Warsaw Project Gallery, 3116 Warsaw Ave. The gallery walk is from 6:30-8:30 p.m. For more information about the Price Hill Cultural Heritage Fest, visit www.culturalheritagefest.com.

Gallery

District as we develop an urban arts partnership,” Kloos said. Burwinkel said there is a great deal of history in the 100-year-old building. He said it was once home to some of the wealthier people in Price Hill, and he’s heard stories from neighborhood residents who remember an old German butcher shop occupying the first-floor space where the gallery will be located. Eichhorn said the Flats Gallery will open to the public with an exhibition by Mount art and design faculty on Friday, Aug. 24, and Saturday, Aug. 25, in conjunction with the Price Hill Cultural Heritage Festival. Initial gallery hours are 4-8 p.m. Tuesdays; 4-8 p.m. Fridays; and noon to 8 p.m. Saturdays. Updated gallery hours will be posted at www.msj.edu.

Continued from Page A1

talented art community, and, just as importantly, the gallery will focus on urban arts activities such as juried exhibitions for high school students and themed shows celebrating recognized and award-winning artists and designers in the area. “This is an incredible opportunity for the Mount students and the Incline

Index Calendar .................B2 Classfieds .................C Food ......................B3 Life ........................B1 Police .................... B9 Schools ..................A6 Sports ....................A8 Viewpoints ............A10

BUILDING THE FUTURE OF WEST HEALTHCARE.

BRIEFLY Two concert remain

rainwater for use in your garden at two workshops at Hillside Community Garden on the campus of Mount St. Joseph. Rain Catchment, Part1 Introduction will be 10 a.m.-noon Saturday, Aug. 18. There will be bagels and coffee and a short tour of the garden, followed by an educational introduction to harvesting rainwater at EarthConnection. Learn: » Benefits of rainwater harvesting » Local regulations for rainwater harvesting » Rainwater harvesting methods » Basic principles of system design A $5 donation and registration is helpful but not required. Email Amy at Amy.Stross@gmail.com with questions or to register. The second, Rain Catchment, Part 2: Installation will be 9 a.m.- noon Saturday, Aug. 25. You will help install a 250-gallon catchment tank and overflow system at Hillside Community Garden. This is a free event and no registration is necessary. Sturdy boots or shoes are necessary; bring your own water bottle. Also helpful but not required: work gloves, shovel.

Two more concerts remain in the Price Hill Summer Concert Series. From 7-9 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 16, Old Green Eyes will perform Frank Sinatra-style jazz numbers. And then the following week, from 7-9 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 23, the band Chapines Mayo will play Latin American music. Both concerts take place on the lawn at Seton High School, 3901 Glenway Ave. The concerts are free, and those who attend are welcome to bring their own blankets, chairs and coolers.

Covedale hosts casting call

The Covedale Center for the Performing Arts will host auditions for two of its upcoming productions. Auditions for “Cinderella” will take place from 6-8:30 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 9 and Monday, Sept. 10, at the theater, 4990 Glenway Ave. Auditions for “Broadway Bound” are for one night only, from 6-8:30 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 9. Those who audition must have a resume listing theatrical experience. The Covedale will present “Cinderella” from Nov. 29 through Dec. 23. “Broadway Bound” takes the Covedale stage from Jan. 24 to Feb. 17, 2013. All roles are paid positions. For more information, call 241-6550 or visit www.cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com.

Mercy hosts theater academy

Mother of Mercy High School is accepting registrations for its 2012 Young Actors Academy, a musical theater and drama camp for boys and girls entering the sixth-, seventh- or eighth-grade. Led by Mercy’s Drama Director Lisa Bodollo, the camp provides a fun and safe place for students from all over the city to experience acting, music and movement, and discover life in the performing arts world. The academy runs Sept.18, 2012 through Jan. 11, 2013, with classes every Tuesday from 4-5:30 p.m. in Mercy’s theater and rehearsal studios. The semester will finish with a show performed on Mercy’s stage for the actors’ family and friends. To register, download a form at www.motherofmercy.org/YAA. Contact Bodollo at 6612740, extension 421, or bodollo_l@motherofmercy.org with questions.

Elder band washing cars

Dear Community Members, It is my privilege to provide you with the latest update regarding Mercy Health’s strategy to bring a network of the finest medical care and service to you, our west neighbors. I’m pleased to share that Mercy Health – West Hospital has reached several construction milestones within the past few weeks. Late June, the final steel beams were put into place. This is known in the construction industry as the “Topping Out.” For us, this was an opportunity to honor the men and women who are helping us bring comprehensive medical care and compassion to the people of western Cincinnati. We also saw the dismantling of the two large cranes, marking another significant construction milestone. These highly-visible structures, first installed in September 2011 at a height of approximately 160 feet, have come to symbolize the arrival of advanced medical care to residents of the west. On August 15, we broke ground on the Medical Office Building that will be located on the grounds of the new hospital. It will house numerous specialist physicians and services.

Members of Elder High School’s band will wash cars from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 18, at Esterkamp’s Automotive, at the intersection of Sidney and Anderson Ferry roads. Students will be washing cars to raise money for an upcoming trip to perform in New Orleans. The band will perform in the Big Easy in February 2013. Stop by for a speedy and friendly car wash, or make a donation.

Hillside workshops

Learn about capturing

Our plan to increase access to physicians continues as Mercy Health Physicians recently welcomed three new doctors to the west. New to Mercy Health Physicians is Dr. Vikas Kashyap, a primary care physician at our Delhi Internal Medicine location, Dr. Jeffrey Striet, a cardiologist with The Heart Institute at our Mt. Airy Hospital, and Dr. James Muth, a cardiovascular and electrophysiology specialist with The Heart Institute at our Western Hills Hospital. You may have noticed a new Mercy Health team out and about the neighborhoods of Cincinnati: Mercy Health – Medical Transport. Our fleet of 13 medical transport vehicles is based at Mercy Health – Mt. Airy Hospital and provides non-emergency medical transportation for the entire Greater Cincinnati area. In Harrison, we recently hosted a major Open House event at our Mercy Health – Harrison Medical Center. If you didn’t get to attend the event, I invite you to stop in the Center to meet staff and learn about the emergency department staff and other services available in the Harrison community.

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Next month, we will break ground for the new free standing Emergency Department that will be located on the campus of Mercy Health – Western Hills Hospital. By far, the most important ongoing focus of our strategy for the people of the West Side is quality. Once again, Mercy Health – Western Hills Hospital was named in the top five percent of hospitals nationwide for patient safety. Mercy Health – Mt. Airy Hospital was named one of the top five orthopedic programs in the state. These are just two examples that reflect the commitment to quality that is at the forefront of everyone at Mercy Health. We enjoy being of service to you and your family and look forward to being your partner in health as we advance our mission to help you be well. Michael R. Stephens Market Leader and President Mercy Health — West Market

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NEWS

AUGUST 15, 2012 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • A3

Auction to raise money for senior bus access By Monica Boylson

mboylson@communitypress.com

Protestors called for accountability from property owners of 4373 W. Eighth St. West Price Hill residents lined the corner of Anderson Ferry Road and Palisades Court in Delhi Tosnship demanding someone take care of the property. MONICA BOYLSON/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Protestors probe property owners By Monica Boylson mboylson@communitypress.com

A property located in West Price Hill has caused a stir among neighbors near 4373 W. Eighth St. “We’ve got a blighted property in West Price Hill. It’s unlivable …,” neighbor Laura Hamilton said. Hamilton and dozens of protestors lined the corner of Anderson Ferry Road and Palisades Drive Wednesday, Aug. 8, looking for answers to the problem. The protestors chose the Anderson Ferry corner as they believed it was near the West Eight Street property owner’s home. “There are really hokey transfers and we don’t know if it’s OK or not,” Hamilton said. “We just want to know who’s responsible.” The hokey transfer Hamilton refers to is a deed transfer in May from former owner, Delhi Township resident Phil Yeary, to Free Truth Enterprise, a non-profit organization with a mission to help the low-income population obtain housing, jobs and other services. People chanted “West Side united” and carried signs seeking accountability from county auditor Dusty Rhodes.

“We think Dusty can help us but he keeps copping out,” Hamilton said. “We can’t get any good answers and nobody seems to know who’s job it is to look at that.” Rhodes said it is the job of the auditor’s office to transfer property, assess property value and take care of the financial payroll and accounting for the county. “I really find their repeated attempts to blame this office for their frustration offensive and repulsive. We do not have the authority to investigate the background of the owners. But if anything looks suspicious we pass it along to the authorities,” Rhodes said. The transfer, former owner Yeary said, was due to health reasons. “My health was going down. I’d had operations. It was just time to get rid of it,” Yeary said. But still protestors were unhappy with the state of the property. “It’s an awful place and it shouldn’t continue in its condition,” Hamilton said. But Yeary said that since January 2012 and before the transfer, he spent about $380,000 in renovations to the building. “I chose Free Truth Enterprise because I liked what they were trying to

do and they said they wanted to continue to renovate the building,” Yeary said. Free Truth Enterprise employee Byron Germany works at the West Eighth building and helps coordinate any assistance the resident’s need. He said the neighbors were leery of the residents because they are considered lowincome. Germany said he wanted to put their minds at ease. “We make sure anybody that comes here has a job. We do a background check. We’re just trying to rehabilitate people back into society and get them on their feet,” Germany said. Germany also added that the property is still being renovated. “There’s nothing wrong with the building or the land. It’s a nice building, it’s all lit up and we’re taking good care of it,” Germany said. “We’re going to give it a good history and a face lift.”

A small task force is hard at work to get ready for the Seniors 5th annual Auction to be hosted from 2 to 5 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 26, at the Delhi Township Senior Citizens Center. Committee members have been gathering donations for the auction and putting together baskets for a silent auction “It’s a lot of work,” auction committee member Vicki Steinmann said. Proceeds from the event will help fund transportation to the center, at 647 Neeb Road. “We need $5,000 per year to pay for the bus service to pick up the seniors on Wednesdays,” auction chairman Russ Brose said.

The Delhi Seniors 5th annual Auction committee has been preparing baskets for the silent auction and auction that will take place from 2 to 5 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 26. Vicki Steinmann, left, Russ Brose and Bert Brothers with a sampling of what will be at the auction. MONICA BOYLSON/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

There will be a traditional auction and a silent auction with more than 100 baskets with items ranging from high school spirit wear to Reds and Bengals tickets. Items to bid on in the

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traditional auction include a trip for two to the Smokey Mountains and a piano among other things. There will also be a raffle for a 39-inch LCD TV. Tickets are $5 each or three for $10.

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“EVERYONE DESERVES TO BE TREATED AS

AN INDIVIDUAL.” Allegra Tenkman, MD

Mercy Health — Dent Crossing Family Medicine

Dr. Tenkman became a doctor because she loves helping people. She understands that for her patients to get the best possible care, a strong relationship must be formed. Beyond simply knowing what’s wrong with her patients medically, she gets to know each individual personally, and addresses their concerns. That’s how Dr. Tenkman helps her community be well. To find a primary care physician or specialist in your neighborhood, call (513) 981-2222 or visit e-mercy.com. CE-0000514251


NEWS

A4 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • AUGUST 15, 2012

No tuition increase at St. Dominic School By Monica Boylson

same as last year’s rate, something patrons have not seen in a long time. Yearly tuition at St. Dominic for one child is $2,875, a second child is $2,725, a third child is $2,275 and the fourth child is free. “Parents were pleasantly surprised and grateful,” Principal Bill Cavanaugh

mboylson@communitypress.com

Families sending their children to St. Dominic School in Delhi can breathe a sigh of relief when they open their checkbooks to pay this year’s tuition. The 2012-13 school year tuition rate will remain the

said. Jen Vatter is sending three children to St. Dominic this year and she said it was a nice relief to see tuition stay the same, something she said was a testament of the hard work of the school and church staff. “When you have three

kids, every little bit helps,” she said. Cavanaugh said tuition typically increases by $200 to $300 each year. “We knew that with the economy, we wanted to keep things the same,” Cavanaugh said. Cavanaugh said the effort was parish-wide. From church organizations to

Sunday collections, St. Dominic was able to defray the costs. “We have been working to reduce many of our expenses and we have very generous parishioners,” St. Dominic Business and Development Director Skip Roos said. Roos said the church communicated with pa-

rishioners the need for more funds. “They’ve been increasing their offertory givings and we’ve received many donations,” Roos said. The outlook to keep tuition the same is positive. “We’re hoping,” Cavanaugh said. “We’re not sure if it’s realistic, but it’s optimistic.”

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Laura Schiller, DDS, is pleased to announce the association of Laura M. Schiller, DDS to Schiller Dental beginning in mid-August.

The Delhi Township library hosted a petting zoo to celebrate summer reading. Honey Hill Farm representative Sally Brown Powell, 57, brings a goat up close and personal with guests. MONICA BOYLSON/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

5330 Glenway Ave. Cincinnati, OH 45238 513-922-7111 schillerdental@yahoo.com

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Library celebrates reading with petting zoo The Cincinnati Public Library Delhi Township Branch hosted a petting zoo to celebrate the end of summer reading on Satur-

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NEWS

AUGUST 15, 2012 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • A5

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SCHOOLS

A6 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • AUGUST 15, 2012

COMMUNITY

PRESS

Editor: Marc Emral, memral@communitypress.com, 578-1053

ACHIEVEMENTS | NEWS | ACTIVITIES | HONORS

CommunityPress.com

COLLEGE CORNER Awards

Oak Hills High School special needs students have transformed the school's interior courtyard. Pictured from left are Michael Ronan, Drew Breiner, Jake Campbell, Lowery Willis and Temperance Burden. PROVIDED.

Oak Hills students design memorial garden Hard work and dedication has paid off for the Oak Hills High School special needs students through the work study program. Over the last three years, they have been working on the interior courtyard at the high school. Building manager Mark Bruns gave the responsibility to the students to allow them to redesign the space. Over the years, the students have removed everything around the fountain, including bushes, flowers and weeds, and taken out the neglected trees. They then planted more rose bushes and flowers throughout the garden. The theme of the courtyard is a memorial rose garden, and the grounds serve as a remembrance site for Oak Hills students lost while attending the high school. “It makes me feel good that so many people like the garden. It was fun,” said student gardener Temperance Burden. The responsibility of the courtyard is a seasonal task. Depending on the weather, the students are out a few times a week. In the fall, they plant bulbs and perennials. In the spring, some of the work includes trimming and watering the flowers, planting flowers, edging the gardens and pulling weeds. The gardens are 100 percent natural and use no chemicals. Working with the students

The memorial rose garden honors students who died while attending Oak Hills High School. PROVIDED. are job coaches Jane Abbott and Dru Ripley and work study coordinator Deb Stroud. Abbott said the students’ work can be turned into skills they can use in future employment. The high school, Oak Hills PTA, student council, Jim Wilde of Wilde Nursery, and private donor and Oak Hills Educational Foundation board member Earl Conklin fund the courtyard project and gardens. The courtyard is used by students between classes and by some teachers that want to move their classrooms outside on nice days. In addition to the work

study program, students in the Earth and Art Clubs assist in maintaining other courtyards around the high school. “Allowing the students to take ownership in their school and giving back is a tremendous opportunity for our students,” said Bruns. “It provides them a sense of pride and really makes our campus attractive to the student body, staff and community. Visitors to our building provide positive feedback on the appearance and maintenance of our courtyards. That is a true testament of the efforts of our students.”

School has new partners With the start of the 2012-13 academic year, DePaul Cristo Rey High School has commitments of to place all students in Corporate Work Study Program (CWSP) positions again this year. DPCR welcomes 16 new businesses and nonprofit organizations as partners, the only one of its kind in a Cincinnati area Catholic high school. The following are the new partners: Bridges for a Just Community Chatfield College Christ Hospital Cincinnati Children’s Hospital (will employ two teams of students) Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber Dress for Success Cincinnati E.W. Scripps Company

Gorilla Glue Company Hahn Automation Home City Ice KnowledgeWorks National Underground Railroad Freedom Center St. Joseph Home The Standard United Way of Greater Cincinnati University of Cincinnati These organizations join the companies that employed DPCR students during the 2011-12 academic year and are returning as valued partners again this year. The complete list of all corporate partners is available at www.depaulcristorey.org. DePaul Cristo Rey is a Catholic, college-preparatory high school for underserved students in Greater Cincinnati and North-

ern Kentucky. All students participate in CWSP, enabling them to finance a portion of the cost of their education, gain real-world job experience, grow in self-confidence and realize the relevance of their education. Students work five days a month in entry-level positions at one of the CWSP partners with their academic schedules planned so no class time is missed while they are working. DePaul Cristo Rey is sponsored by the Sisters of Charity of Cincinnati and is one of 25 schools in the nationwide Cristo Rey Network which serves 6,900 urban young people who live in communities with limited education options. Most of the students qualify for the Federal Free or Reduced Lunch Program.

Franklin College senior Matt Brems received the Delegates’ Choice Award at the National Model United Nations Conference. The National Model United Nations Conference is the largest international conference of its kind and is the only conference recognized as a non-governmental organization by the United Nations itself. Matt Brems received the award for his representation of Somalia in the General Assembly First Committee. The award was conferred upon him by his nearly 300 peers working in the committee. Students competed among 201 delegations from schools around the world.

Dean’s list

Lisa Jacob was named to the spring semester dean’s list at Ohio Northern University. ■ Brian Sauer was named to the spring semester president’s list at Shawnee State University. The president’s list recognizes students who earned a 4.0 grade-point average. ■ Ivan Blanco-Heywood, Anne Delisio and Rachael Rogers were named to the spring semester dean’s list at Marquette University. ■ Megan Burns, Elizabeth Hartke, Michelle Hodapp, Paige Klawitter, Emily Kunkel, Kayla Lutz, Olivia McCarthy, Megan Moore and Anna Solomon were named to the spring semester dean’s list at the University of Kentucky. ■ Braden Durbin, Christopher Olberding and Ryan Shiverdecker were named to the spring semester dean’s list at Clemson University. ■ Elizabeth Williams was named to the spring dean’s list at Saint Francis University. ■ James Tucker was named to the spring semester dean’s list at Urbana University. ■ Morrison Wilson was named to the spring semester president’s list at the University of Toledo. The president’s list recognizes students who earned a 4.0 grade-point average. ■ The following students were named to the spring semester dean’s list at the University of Toledo: Alyssa Essert, Samuel Fetters, Jill Fink, Stephen Kluesener, Andrew Mathews, Sarah Seig, Jennie Vetter, Sarah Warren and Chun Wong. ■ Tim Menchen was named to the spring semester dean’s list at Eastern Kentucky University. ■ Kathryn Scala was named to the spring dean’s list at Delaware Valley College. ■ Clare Gandenberger, Kristin Hamrick, Ellen Hartsburg, William Reis and Ellen Schmidt were named to the spring semester dean’s list at Bellarmine University. ■ The following students were named to the spring quarter dean’s list at Wright State University: Antoneisha Isham, Jessica Linger and Erica Page, highest honors; Lynnise Burnam and Kristen Hayhow, high honors; Emily Adkins, Nicholas Doll, Hannah Kleimeyer, Brianna

Lundy, Ashley Schramm, Brent Streibig and Regina Villaver. ■ Timothy Koenig was named to the spring dean’s list at Gettysburg College. ■ Ashley Smith was named to the spring semester dean’s list at the University of Akron. ■ Hannah Hedrick was named to the spring semester dean’s list at Niagara University. ■ John Riestenberg was named to the spring semester dean’s list at Northeastern University. ■ Allison Hill, Hannah Kuhn, Muirisha Lavender, Megan Rogg and Nathan Smith were named to the spring dean’s list at Butler University.

Graduates

Kate Wharton has graduated from the Georgia Institute of Technology with a degree in economic and international affairs. ■ Dustin Green has graduated from Ohio Wesleyan University with a bachelor of arts degree. ■ Emily Gardner has graduated from the University of San Diego with a bachelor’s degree in marine science. ■ Matthew Warndorf has graduated from Clark University with a bachelor of arts in biology. ■ Christopher Veddern has graduated from Washington and Lee University with a bachelor of arts in history. ■ Paul Jacob has graduated from Tulane University with a doctor of medicine degree and a a master’s degree in public health and tropical medicine. ■ Nicholas Speckert has graduated from Ohio Northern University with a bachelor of science degree in manufacturing technology. ■ Nicole Francis and John Stevens have earned degrees through the Cincinnati State Technical & Community College collaboration with Wilmington College. Francis earned a bachelor of arts in business administration, while Stevens received bachelor of arts in business administration and accounting. ■ Kevin Day and Sara Warner have graduated from the University of Toledo. Day earned a bachelor of science in pharmaceutical sciences, while Warner received a master of arts in recreation and leisure studies. ■ Justin Koch has earned a doctor of pharmacy degree from the College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences at Butler University. A 2006 graduate of Elder High School, Koch has accepted a pharmacist position with CVS in Indianapolis. He will transfer to a CVS location in Birmingham, Ala., in August. He is the son of Jim and Deena Koch of Bridgetown. ■ David Doll and Scott Keckeis have graduated from Columbus State Community College. ■ Mary Miller has graduated from Hanover College with a bachelor of arts degree.


NEWS

AUGUST 15, 2012 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • A7

Mount students learn of Japanese culture thing to read about Japanese graphic design or Shinto shrines then to be surrounded by advertising, fashion and packaging. It takes learning to a new level.” The Japan Foundation Center for a Global Partnership gave the Mount more than $35,000 to help fund student travel. It also financed two additional lecturers during the trip, including one at the EdoTokyo Museum discussing Japan after World War II and a discussion of Zen Buddhism with a priest in a Kyoto temple. “The grant made it possible for students to take part in this program who wouldn’t have otherwise been able to afford it,” said Jennifer Morris, Ph.D. associate professor of history at the Mount. “The trip offers a great hands-on experience for our students to witness

More than a dozen students and professors from the College of Mount St. Joseph recently returned from two weeks touring Japan, where they were able to see the shrines, temples and design elements they studied during the spring semester. The trip culminated the course the students took titled, “Contemporary Japan and Its Roots,” which examined the art history and religion of the country from the Edo period to the present. This year, the Japan Foundation Center for a Global Partnership awarded a grant to the Mount to help pay for the program. “The trip helps students connect book learning with their personal experiences,” said Helen Rindsberg, adjunct instructor at the Mount, who initiated the curriculum six years ago. “It’s one

Protect your eyes from heat and sun

the culture of Japan that they can’t experience in the classroom. There is so much our students took away from this trip that is beneficial to their college experience.” “You can take a class in college about Japan, but seeing how different their culture is from ours gives us a different global perspective,” said Emily Helman, a senior majoring in fine arts from Wyoming. “The grant generously provided us the opportunity for some real handson learning experiences.” Highlights of the trip included the Sanja Festival in Tokyo, visiting local shrines, home stays with Japanese families, creating a tea bowl with a Japanese artist, visiting a hot springs resort near Mt. Fuji, and learning about Japanese cultural influences in religion.

over $3 million dollars to local charities in the past 20 years. Cary Powell, CISE director, was presented with a $15,000 check at a reception at the Kenwood Country Club. “We feel very fortunate to be one of the recipients of the wine festival proceeds,” Powell said. “These funds will directly impact children in Cincinnati’s poorest neighborhoods by giving them

lated eye problems is higher for people who spend long hours in the sun, have had cataract surgery or have certain retina disorders or people who are on certain medicines, such as tetracycline, sulfa drugs, birth control pills, diuretics and tranquilizers that increase the eye’s sensitivity to light. For additional information regarding visual impairments and available services, visit www.cincyblind.org or www.clovernook.org.

MAKE A SPLASH

CISE gets money from festival Catholic Inner-city Schools Education Fund (CISE) was once again one of the beneficiaries of the annual Cincinnati International Wine Festival. The festival includes four events: the Winery Dinners, the Charity Auction & Luncheon, the Grand Tastings and the Russ Wiles Memorial Golf Tournament. Through these events the wine festival has donated

(PBA) recommends wearing a wide brimmed hat or cap and eyewear that absorbs UV rays anytime you may be exposed sunlight. “It’s important to note that people of all ages, including children, are at risk of damaging their eyesight if they are not taking the proper precautions when exposing themselves to sunlight,” said Robin Usalis CEO of Clovernook Center. According to www.preventblindness.org, the risk of sun re-

Cincinnati Association for the Blind & Visually Impaired (CABVI) and Clovernook Center for the Blind & Visually Impaired are joining forces to remind the community to take care of their eyes. Exposure to the sun’s harmful UV rays increases the risk of macular degeneration, cataracts, pterygium, skin cancer around the eyelids and corneal sunburn. In order to avoid damage to the eyes, Prevent Blindness America

the opportunity to attend a Catholic School. The education these children receive, at the schools supported by CISE, prepares them for a bright and hopeful future. Our work would not be possible without generous supporters such as the wine festival.” Information about CISE can be found at www.cisefund.org or by calling the CISE office at 513-421-3131, ext. 2751.

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SPORTS

A8 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • AUGUST 15, 2012

COMMUNITY

PRESS

Editor: Melanie Laughman, mlaughman@communitypress.com, 513-248-7573

HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | RECREATIONAL

CommunityPress.com

FIRST PASS AT BOYS HIGH SCHOOL SOCCER: PREVIEW 2012

SOCCER MEN CREATE THEIR OWN WEST-SIDE STORIES Area teams optimistic about upcoming seasons

for most of the season and played behind two senior keepers. “I’m looking forward to sticking him in goal for a full season,” Mirizzi said, “and see what we can get out of him.” The season gets underway for the Highlanders Aug. 20 at home against Walnut Hills.

By Tom Skeen tskeen@communitypress.com

The boys soccer season is right around the corner. Here is a look at what area teams are expected to bring to the pitch in 2012.

St. Xavier

Elder

The Panthers finished 2011 in last place in the Greater Catholic League South Division and finished the season at 5-9-4 overall. Coach Dave Ruehl is in his first year and takes over a team that graduated just six. The regular season begins for the Panthers Aug. 21 when they travel to Sycamore.

La Salle

For the La Salle High School soccer team, the future is now. Four returning starters who are entering their third year at the varsity level lead the Lancers. While going through the growing pains of being underclassmen, those players, who are now seniors, could be poised to have the Lancers build off last fall’s third-place league finish. “This season as seniors they are more physically mature and capable of competing at a high level,” said head coach Steve Schulten by email. “This team’s size, speed, quickness and expe-

Oak Hills’ Cody Frondorf, right, advances upfield in their July 14 game at Heritage Oak Park, as part of the 2012 Mason Pre-season High School Classic tournament. MELANIE LAUGHMAN/THE COMMUNITY PRESS rience should have them in the mix for the GCL.” Senior midfielders C.J. Seig, Jake Eisenacher, Andrew Wood are set to return, while junior Jacob Whyle returns at forward. Seig was seventh in the GCL South with 14 points coming off six goals and two assists a season ago, according to GCLsports.com. Defensively, the Lancers will

count on Alex Murray and Matt Henkes to shore up a defense that lost all-league goalie, Mack Robinson, to graduation. The Lancers kick off the 2012 campaign at home against Kings Aug. 21.

Oak Hills

The Highlanders graduated nine seniors from its 5-11-1 team in 2011, but coach John Mirizzi

returns seven with varsity experience and will run out 12 seniors in 2012. Leading the group will be seniors Nick Norman, Aaron Willis, Kevin Sattler, Adam Schueler and twin brothers Jordan and Jeremy Cain. Another senior is goalkeeper Brandon Scott. Scott transferred from Kentucky at the beginning of last season, but was injured

After graduating 14 seniors, the St. Xavier Bombers will look to make up for their lack of experience with their team speed, athleticism and high work rate, according to coach Henry Ahrens. Key returners are seniors John Broderick (midfield), Josh Melrose (defense) and Micah Bledsoe (goalkeeper). In addition, junior midfielder Austin Harrell will add key depth. Senior midfielder Myles Beresford, who played junior varsity last season recovering from injury, will add experience to the varsity squad in 2012. Junior defenders David Elsen and Matthew Locaputo will help on the backside. One disadvantage the Bombers will encounter is their tough schedule, which will make for a learning-on-the-fly experience for the newcomers. They open the season against Loveland, who was 11-7 last season, then head to the Ohio Jesuit Cup where they face Toledo St. John’s and then either Cleveland St. Ignatius or Walsh Jesuit. “I am confident in the abilities of our players,” Ahrens said, “but many players will See BOYS, Page A9

FIRST PASS AT GIRLS HIGH SCHOOL SOCCER: PREVIEW 2012

GIRLS LACE UP THEIR CLEATS Mercy, Oak Hills to lead locals

Oak Hills’ Sam Davis runs down the ball during a scrimmage against McAuley Aug. 7. Davis, a three-year starter for the Lady Highlanders, will provide key leadership for coach Chuck Laumann and the team. TOM

By Tom Skeen tskeen@communitypress.com

The girls soccer season is right around the corner. Here is a look at what the area teams are expected to bring to the pitch in 2012.

Mother of Mercy

Bobcats coach Mike Rust has 12 seniors on his 2012 roster – the most he’s had since taking over at Mercy. Leading that bunch will be seniors Nicole Stephan and Becca Tumlin, along with junior Emily Budde. In addition, senior Tess Herzog will play varsity for the first time in her career. Rust believes she might be the fastest kid he has coached. When it comes to defense, the Bobcats will run out junior Sam Mattlin, who was first-team All-Girls Great Catholic League and first-team All-City last season, along with senior Liz Trentman and junior Macey Anderson. With all that experience and maturity, needless to say, Rust likes his team. “They have a chance to be very, very good this year,” he said. “We have the talent to be

SKEEN/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

good.” The Bobcats beat Lakota West, tied Mason and lost by one to St. Ursula in scrimmage action this year. They get to the regular season Aug. 22 when they travel to Carroll.

Oak Hills

The Lady Highlanders bring some youth to the table in 2012,

as they will start the season with at least nine freshmen and sophomores on the squad. Luckily for coach Chuck Laumann, the team returns four-year starter Olivia Kilgore, who will make the move to defense this season, and three-year starter Sam Davis. Perhaps the two players who could provide the biggest im-

pact are sophomore midfielders Bailey Feist and Katie Murray. Both were second-team AllGreater Miami Conference players in 2011 and Feist finished the season with five goals and three assists. “We are overall young with a good mixture of upperclassmen,” Laumann said, who is in his 21st season as coach. “The youth gives us energy, which is good for competition.” The team will have to find its rhythm early as they open the season Aug. 23 against Turpin, who finished third in the Fort Ancient Valley Conference in 2011, and follow that up two days later with a matchup against Walnut Hills, who finished second in the FAVC. “We are looking forward to the challenge,” Laumann said, “and want to see where we can end up when it is all finished.”

er’s Jessica Woeste and Allie Luebbering. Joining the goalkeeper Luebbering on the defensive side of the ball is senior defender Emily Gramke. Quinn, who is in his third year leading the Saints, knows no matter how good his team is, the girls still have to fight through a tough schedule. “We play in one of the strongest conferences in the state,” he said, “so that means every year we are going to have a competitive schedule. This year is no different, we have a very competitive schedule.” The Saints begin that tough schedule Aug. 21 against Lakota East. Their next two games are against Fairfield and Mason, who finished first and second, respectively, in the GMC last season.

Seton

First year coach Jordan Harris didn’t have the roster filled out for the Lady Mustangs by deadline. Harris, who has played soccer his whole life and is a Cincinnati native and graduate of Seven Hills, is looking forward to the 2012 season and his first year of coaching. The ladies get their season started Aug. 27 when they face Mount Healthy.

After a 4-11-2 record and a last-place finish in the GGCL Scarlet Division in 2011, coach Ron Quinn is optimistic about the 2012 season with his mix of returning talent and young players. Leading the Saints will be senior Erika LaRosa, who was first-team All-GGCL and firstteam All-City last season. Also back, are second-team-

Western Hills


SPORTS & RECREATION

AUGUST 15, 2012 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • A9

Kings soccer team finishes 2nd in nation By James Weber jweber@nky.com

Kings Soccer Academy came up just short on their quest for a national championship title July 28. The girls U15 Kings Gold G96 team lost 1-0 to Legends FC from California in the final game of the US Youth Soccer National Championships in the U15 division in Rock Hill, S.C. Legends’ Ashlee Smith sent a lofted ball into the box that found the head of Peyton Perea. Her effort was deflected, by Kings Keeper Abby Stevens, but it bounced back to Perea who knocked it home for the game and national

championship winner. The title was one of 12 (by age group, gender) decided in South Carolina last week. KSA had two shots on goal to four for the Legends. KSA was 2-0-1 in pool play, with the tie coming 0-0 to Legends FC. KSA beat a team from Pennsylvania 4-2, with Kelly Polacek scoring twice, Bayley Feist once and Katie Murray once. KSA then beat a team from Texas 2-1. Incoming Dixie Heights sophomore Lauren Nemeroff scored the equalizer in the second half, and Feist won it late in the second half. Most of the players are entering their sophomore

seasons in high school this fall. Players are (schools listed if known): Payton Atkins (Turpin), Madison Baumgardner (Colerain), Haley Best, Kaitlyn Bigner (Colerain), Bayley Feist (Oak Hills), Sydney Goins (St. Dominic), Brittany Mahoney (Oak Hills), Meghan Martella (McNicholas), Katie Murray (Oak Hills), Lauren Nemeroff (Dixie Heights), Kelly Polacek (Anderson), Brooklynn Rivers, Abby Stevens (Princeton), Marissa Stone (Amelia), Maryellen Tully (Turpin), Michelle Washburn, Camille Williams and Emily Wiser (Summit Country Day). Head coach is Jon Pickup.

Cincinnati United Premier team makes national tourney By Scott Springer sspringer@communitypress.com

ROCK HILL, SC — The 2012 U.S. Youth Soccer National Championships were July 24-29 representing the top six teams in the country. Locally, the Cincinnati United Premier U15 team became the first area boys team to make it there, according to coach Terry Nicholl. (Crew Juniors U19, which won a national title at its age group, is an Ohio-South team based in Columbus comprised of about 1/3 Cincinnati athletes.) “We qualified on two fronts, Nationals in Vegas and winning the region in Saginaw, Mich. (in June),” Nicholl said. “We were fantastic in that week scoring 19 goals and giving zero away. In Nationals, we won 20 and gave three goals against in seven games.” At the championships in Rock Hill, S.C., they tied Manhattan Paris-St. Germain out of New York, 0-0, lost to the Chicago Magic 3-2 and lost to the Fullerton (CA) Rangers 2-0. “We got a little surprised frankly,” Nicholl said. “On Wednesday (July 25) we played the No. 4 team in the country, on Thursday we played the No. 2 team and on Friday we played the No. 1 team in the country. We had to win at least two of those games to go on.” With Nicholl being from outside of Manchester, England, he described the CUP competition accordingly. “It would be like playing Chelsea Wednesday, Manchester City on Thursday and Manchester United on Friday,” he said. “We came up a little short, but we learned a lot.” Nicholl, who coaches Seven Hills during the school season, headed up players who will soon be dribbling for the likes of Sycamore, Cincinnati Country Day, Lakota East, Lakota West. St. Xavier, Mason, Walnut Hills and Oak Hills among others. “Every member of our

The Cincinnati United Premier U15 boys team won the U.S. Youth Soccer National League in Las Vegas in June, which qualified them for the U.S. Youth Soccer championships in Rock Hill, S.C. in July. From left, they are: Front, Charlie Byers, Alex Besl, Luke Treadway, Brandin Ward, David Jeffries, and Drew Eagan; middle, Christian Lytle, Luke Thomas, Brady Daulton, Dan Schleitweiler, Lucas Andrew, Mohamed Elmardi, and Luke Deimer; back, coach Terry Nicholl, J.J. Iroh, Will Cohen, Peter Cinibulk, Logan Wiedmann, Nate Gibson and coach Bobby Puppione.

WILLIAMS OF THE WEST

The St. Williams 9U baseball team (made up of St. William and Holy Family students) goes 8-3 for a third-place finish during the regular season of the Cincinnati Western Baseball Conference, American Red division. They also went 3-1 andwon the post season consultation tournament at St. Jude. In front, from left, are Noah Finley, Danny Boller III, Kevin Turner, Davilmar Vasquez and Nicholas O'Leary. In middle are Quentin McFarren, Brian Caldwell, Damon Miller, Devin Wuebbling, Isaiah Blust and Corey Wainscott. In back are assistant coach Dan McFarren, assistant coach Dan Boller Jr. and head coach Al Caldwell. Not pictured are assistant coach Jerry Jones and Christian Jones. THANKS TO GINGER BOLLER

Boys Continued from Page A8

need to adjust to the varsity level of play for us to get off to a fast start.”

Taylor

Coming of a 2-13-2 season in 2011, secondyear coach Gerd Hildebrandt expects more from his Yellow Jackets in 2012. The team returns seniors Jake Webb - who was honorable mention All-Cincinnati Hills League last year - Teddy Graham and Jake Schneider. “Last year they did pretty good,” Hildebrandt

The team roster and some high schools represented are: Charlie Byers (Sycamore), Luke Treadway (Scott), Brandin Ward (Cincinnati Country Day), Will Cohen (CCD), Luke Deimer (CCD), Nate Gibson (CCD), Drew Eagan (St. Xavier), Alex Besl (St. Xavier), Christian Lytle (Lakota West), Dave Jeffries (Waynesville), Luke Thomas (Centerville), Dan Schleitweiler (Lakota East), Mohamed Elmardi (Lakota East), J.J. Iroh (Mason), Brady Daulton (Mason), Peter Cinibulk (Bellbrook), Logan Wiedmann (Walnut Hills), Lucas Andrew (Fenwick) and Noah Griffith (Oak Hills).

club will be a factor in high school soccer even though they’re only sophomores,” Nicholl said. “I’m looking for great seasons for all of these lads.” While the crew came away winless, they played courageously according to the former English pro. Their first loss to the Chicago team could’ve been a blowout. “The second game, they controlled the first half and had a 3-nil lead,” Nicholl said. “We fought back and showed great pride in the second half.

We got two goals and missed a penalty kick. That was a team we had beaten in the regional finals.” Nicholl’s boys couldn’t find the net in their finale, but played well defensively. “The final game was against one of the best U15 teams and I’ve seen a lot,” Nicholl said. “They dominated us. To keep it down to two and be that competitive is a compliment to our players.” Nicholl offered up some veteran advice for his players before they began their school seasons. “When I gathered to summarize the tournament, I said they really needed a week off,” Nicholl said. “We were playing in 105-degree temperatures against three of the top four teams in the country. We were asking players to run marathons in 100-degree temperatures.” Early indications are Nicholl will coach the same group again and he hopes the experience pays off. “It’s fantastic when you qualify for anything that’s top six in the country,” Nicholl said. “Getting there’s fantastic (but) we needed to be fantastic when we got there. The teams we played had all been there.”

Western Hills

The Mustangs are under the direction of new coach Jordan Harris.

While the final rosters are yet to be set, one impressive story to watch is that of goalkeeper Tony Tucker. Tucker missed much of last season, on and off the pitch, due to health problems and coach Tucker says he is on top of everything as they prepare for the 2012 season. “He is an impressive kid,” Harris said. “He is really a miracle with all the health issues he had last year.” Another player to watch is center midfielder Damon Jung. The Mustangs start the season Aug. 25 against Belmont.

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said. “This year they are my leaders. I have a young team, mostly freshmen and sophomores, so that kind of helps us a little bit.” Two of those talented freshmen are Daniel Blake and Jackson Budke. Blake will start at midfield to begin the season and Hildebrandt says he will bring Budke, who will play both varsity and junior varsity, off the bench. The Yellow Jackets get things going when they travel to Cincinnati Christian Aug. 20.

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VIEWPOINTS A10 • PRICE HILL PRESS • AUGUST 15, 2012

COMMUNITY

PRESS

Editor: Marc Emral, memral@communitypress.com, 853-6264

EDITORIALS | LETTERS | COLUMNS | CH@TROOM

CommunityPress.com

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Thank you

An open letter to the students and staff of Oak Hills High School: We would again like to take this opportunity to thank you publicly for allowing us to share in the profits of the “walk” you held last spring. When you initiated the walk in 2010 we assumed that it was a one-time event to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Oak Hills School District. When our president was contacted this year to come receive another check we were pleasantly surprised. It is so generous of you to remember our organization. We want you to be aware that we have set up a special projects savings account for these funds. It will only be used for capital purchases, not ongoing expenses. We currently are purchasing items that will be used as we start new activities here at the senior center.

Lynne Case, president and the Board of Directors Green Township Senior Citizens Inc.

Making his point

Let me assure last week’s writer that my soul is neither “grounded” nor “imprisoned with frustration and anger” as she so grandly presumes. By attacking me in the most personal of terms she makes my point. My guest column simply stated that citations of “good works” and “community service” are not an acceptable answer to direct questions and concerns. Neither are dark implications about my “spirit” or feel good pleas to “live in harmony with others.” This is just another attempt in the 25-year effort to avoid the issue, to pretend it didn’t happen and to hope the community forgets.

Dusty Rhodes Delhi Township

Thank you

Our family would like to thank everyone who attended and donated to the Cpl. Tim Roos Garden Walk. It was a wonderful success and brought us wonderful memories! If you get a chance please visit his

Gardens and the new Memorials at the New St. Joseph Cemetery (Foley and Pedretti roads).

The Roos Family and Dawn Ambrose Delhi Township

New trees will be planted

Appointed by the Delhi Board of Trustees as chairman of the 1976 American Bicentennial Commission, I have had numerous phone calls, emails and conversations concerning the removal of the commemorative trees along the entrance to Delhi Park off Foley Road. For those who are not aware, 24 trees were planted and a flag pole-time capsule monument was erected at the park entrance as a permanent memorial to honor our Nations 200th birthday and is registered as such in Washington, D.C. According to a Delhi Park foreman, due to age (36 years) and adverse weather conditions detrimental to trees, several had to be removed over the years and plans were in pro-

gress for the eventual replanting of all of the trees. Most recently however, I was contacted by park personnel informing me that there was wind damage and lightening strikes to several of the remaining trees causing concern for safety. Therefore a decision was made to remove all of the trees. Both township officials and park personnel are aware of the fixed status of the Bicentennial Memorial trees and have assured me that 24 new trees will be planted in the exact same location and positioned exactly as the original trees as shown in the bicentennial records housed in Washington. I was also informed that 24 new trees will be planted in October of this year. The trees, when replanted will continue to be Delhi Township’s symbol in honor of our nation’s eternalness and will again return the dramatic entrance to our ever improving park.

Bicentennial Commission

Great time

The Delhi Skirt Game had a tailgate party on the Thursday (Aug. 2) before the big game. It was a great time. The beer was cold and only $2 (listen up Reds/ Bengals), the food was better quality than the usual brats and burgers found at festivals. As well, the atmosphere was up beat. They held the final competition for Delhi's Rising Star. This was far more entertaining than I had imagined it would be. The contestants were all very good even though it was extremely hot and the sun was in their eyes. Congratulations Abby on winning. I hope this tailgate becomes an annual event. Thank you organizers of this event. If I would make any change (and not much change is needed) I would set up a recycling process for the pop and beer cans.

Dave Schafer Delhi Township

Jack Ryan Chairman, Delhi Township American

Thanks to many who help Skirt Game Again this year, I want to thank those in Delhi and the West Side of Cincinnati for another successful Delhi Skirt Game. With the growth of the second annual tailgate party and the Delhi Rising Star contest, coupled with the huge crowd we had at the Skirt Game, this will go down as the best financial weekend the Skirt Game has ever had, by far. And we owe it to all of Clyde E. Kober the support COMMUNITY PRESS that we received from GUEST COLUMNIST the entire community and from those who work so hard to pull this off. The first Skirt Game was 35 years ago and has now grown into a two-day event at two different venues. We now support people throughout the year who need help, instead of a few people after the Skirt Game. We support and organize Kid, Cops ‘n Firefighters where we help kids at Christmas time have a better Christmas by allowing

them to shop with a cop or firefighter at Target. This event last year gave 155 kids from 55 families this opportunity. But as a committee of about 30 to 40 people, we cannot pull this off ourselves. On the night of the game, about 250 volunteers show up to make this happen. These are just common folks from Delhi as well as not so common folks like Judge Pat Dinkelacker, Bob Herzog and John Gumm. Boy Scout Troop 350 from Shiloh Church provided us with a massive amount of help with teardown the night of the event and anything else that we needed help with. Doug Galbraith and his troop are lifesavers for those on the committee who are approaching 60 and beyond who cannot perform physical work the way we used to. Without them it is hard telling how we would pull this off. This is really a great group of young men. There are also a lot of groups in Delhi who help with this event. Starting with Remke/ Biggs who provides food for our food booths and people to help cook and serve the food. The Civic Association who runs our

ABOUT LETTERS AND COLUMNS We welcome your comments on editorials, columns, stories or other topics important to you in The Community Press. Include your name, address and phone number(s) so we may verify your letter. Letters of 200 or fewer words and columns of 500 or fewer words have the best chance of being published. All submissions may be edited for length, accuracy and clarity. Deadline: Noon Friday E-mail: memral@community press.com Fax: 853-6220 U.S. mail: See box below Letters, columns and articles submitted to The Community Press may be published or distributed in print, electronic or other forms.

split the pot booth. The Delhi Business Association who provides the bouncy house and the people to run it for the kids. The Delhi Township Veterans Association who ran a booth and donated all proceeds to the Skirt

Game. The Delhi Fire Department (all off duty) take care of the pop booth. The Delhi Police Department works security on a voluntary basis and also provides us with an umpire on the field. The Delhi Citizens Police Association runs a booth and is responsible for parking cars at the event. Their president also umpires. Delhi Athletic Association provides a lot of the players for the game and the third umpire. LaRosa’s provides the pizza and has done so for the entire time I have been involved with the Skirt Game. Duebber’s Automotive provides all of our ice for the game. Rick from the Delhi Township Park Depatment works all day at the park, then volunteers and works the Skirt Game. These are just folks who love Delhi and are working to make it a better place to live. And the list is much longer than this if I include financial donations, major award prizes and many, many other things that are donated to the cause by businesses as well as individuals. I want to take this time to

thank all of the above who helped us this year and have helped us many years in the past. But I also want to thank all of you who are reading this who attended the game and purchased a beer and a brat. This money goes directly to help your neighbor in need. For you see, because of all of the help we receive, there is very little overhead and all profits go to those in need. If you want to become involved in the community and want to help with next year’s game, give me a call (513-4511197). We will add you to our email list and you can start attending our meetings and become involved in what has developed into a great organization of people who do good in the community. Ask around. You will probably find someone who has been touched by the Delhi Skirt Game. We are a group of neighbors helping neighbors. What a great neighborhood to be in! Clyde E. Kober is vice president of the Delhi Skirt Game Committee.

Support during Livebold appreciated

On behalf of my family, and all of those who worked so tirelessly on the “Livebold” campaign, I want to offer a huge “thank you” to everyone for your tremendous support. We raised over $42,000 during Christina Bold the 2012 LeuCOMMUNITY PRESS kemia and Lymphoma GUEST COLUMNIST Society’s Man/ Woman of the Year Campaign, which is incredible. This means thousands of dollars for cancer research. We could not be prouder of our efforts and

this result. As many of you know, I was nominated for LLS’s Woman of the Year campaign in memory of my loving husband, Emmett Bold Sr., who lost his battle with MDS due to complications from a stem cell transplant. Through all of your help and efforts, I was named the runner up for the campaign. Katie Youngblood was named Woman of the Year and John Bowman was named Man of the Year. And we had another West Sider as runner up on the men’s side, Paul Garrett. They all did a fantastic job. The entire campaign, with all the candidates, raised over $300,000 for cancer research.

PRICE HILL

PRESS

A publication of

So thank you all so much for everything you did. Thank you for attending all those great fundraisers: Logan’s Bold lemonade Emmett Bold stand; the car wash; drinks at the Dog Haus; and Livebold day at Phillips Swim Club. Thank you for the donations, and for reaching out to friends, co-workers, neighbors and family members to let them know about the campaign. Thank you for your endless show of support, words of encouragement, and so many prayers for our family. I be-

lieve that by sharing our family’s tragedy and keeping Emmett’s memory alive, we have truly made a difference. This campaign was really the culmination of the two years of support that so many of you provided to our family during Emmett’s battle with this disease. It has been such a challenge to live with his absence, which means living without such an amazing husband and father. We feel that absence every day. But while the cancer may have taken Emmett’s body, it will never take away the love he showed us, our memories of him, or his amazing legacy to this community.

5556 Cheviot Road Cincinnati, Ohio 45247 phone: 923-3111 fax: 853-6220 email: pricehillpress@communitypress.com web site: www.communitypress.com

And to make his legacy even stronger, John (Man of the Year) and Michelle Bowman raised our total fundraising amount to $50,000, which allows me to name the cancer research after Emmett. I am so thankful for their kindness and compassion in helping us continue research in Emmett’s memory. Our family’s story continues on www.live-bold.com. I’d love for you to check in on us, as I will continue to work to raise awareness of this disease for LLS. Like Emmett, I will never give up the fight. Christina Bold lives in Delhi Township.

Price Hill Press Editor Marc Emral memral@communitypress.com, 853-6264 Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday See page A2 for additional contact information.


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 15, 2012

LIFE T

COMMUNITY PRESS

PEOPLE | IDEAS | RECIPES

SKATE ON!

he Cleves Skate Park was officially open last month, and skaters wasted no time in trying out the park. Councilwoman Jan Pastrick helped cut the ribbon to open the park, at the corner of Miami Avenue and West Howell Street, that was paid for with “We Thrive” grant from the Hamilton County Public Health department. The Cleves Skate Park was built by volunteers and is open to the public, free of charge. At the opening, donations by Skyline, BlackList Skateboards, Beacon Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine, city of Cleves and volunteers provided for the helmets, painting, food and skateboards.

Jake Brown enjoys skate time at the new park. BECKY BUTTS/CONTRIBUTOR

Jake Bonfield enjoys skate time at the new park. BECKY BUTTS/CONTRIBUTOR

Six new skateboards were raffled off to lucky kids during the opening. BECKY BUTTS/CONTRIBUTOR Cleves Mayor Danny Stacy, Dr. Robert Rolf of Beacon Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine, Scott Becker of Cleves Skyline, and Councilwoman Jan Pastrick at the city’s skate park opening. Donations by Skyline, BlackList Skateboards, and Beacon Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine, city of Cleves and volunteers provided for the helmets, painting, food and skateboards. BECKY BUTTS/CONTRIBUTOR

Tyler Maddux demonstrates his skill with a board at the opening of the Cleves Skate park at the corner of Miami Avenue and West Howell Street. BECKY BUTTS/CONTRIBUTOR

Leigh and Ron Hodgeman enjoyed the opening festivities of the skate park with their sons Jax and Cole. BECKY BUTTS/CONTRIBUTOR


B2 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • AUGUST 15, 2012

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD THURSDAY, AUG. 16 Art Exhibits Exhibition of Mount Student Art & Design, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Studio San Giuseppe Art Gallery at the College of Mount St. Joseph, 5701 Delhi Road, Exhibit showcases student work from the 2011-2012 school year. Free. Presented by College of Mount St. Joseph. 244-4314; www.msj.edu. Delhi Township.

Exercise Classes Gentle Beginners Ashtanga Vinyasa Flow Yoga, 7-8 p.m., EarthConnection, 370 Neeb Road, Gentle progression of postures to ease into a fulfilling Ashtanga practice. Each class engaging in a flow of asanas, creating a moving meditation of energy and heat. Family friendly. $7 drop-in, $30 for five-class pass, $49 for 10-class pass, $85 for 20-class pass. Presented by Yoga by Marietta. 675-2725; www.yogabymarietta.com. Delhi Township. Boot Camp, 7-8 p.m., Western Sports Mall, 2323 Ferguson Road, Combination of strength training and conditioning that will help you improve strength, lower body fat, improve body composition and improve aerobic and anaerobic capacity. $10. 451-4905. Westwood. Zumba/Yoga Fusion, 7-8 p.m., Guenthner Physical Therapy, 5557 Cheviot Road, $7; $90 for 15-class pass. 923-1700. Monfort Heights.

Health / Wellness Free Hearing Screenings, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., The Place for Better Hearing, 3302 Westbourne Drive, Evening appointments available by request. Free. Reservations required. 922-0123; www.hearingbetter.net. Green Township.

Recreation Thursday Night Lightz, 7 p.m.-12:30 a.m., Edgewater Sports Park, 4819 E. Miami River Road, Heads-up car and motorcycle drag racing, burnout competition, music, food and $1 beers. Gates open 6 p.m. $5 off at participating sponsors. $10; $15 to race, requirements available online. Presented by Thursday Night Lightz. 874-2508; www.facebook.com/ThursdayNightLightz. Cleves.

Senior Citizens Exercise to Music, 10-11 a.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, $1. 385-3780. Green Township. Open Bridge, 12:15-3:15 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Free. 385-3780. Green Township.

FRIDAY, AUG. 17 Art Exhibits Exhibition of Mount Student Art & Design, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Studio San Giuseppe Art Gallery at the College of Mount St. Joseph, Free. 244-4314; www.msj.edu. Delhi Township.

Community Dance River Squares, 7:30-10 p.m., Miami Whitewater Township Firehouse, 6736 Ohio 128, Plus-level square dance and round dance club. $5. Presented by Southwestern Ohio/Northern Kentucky Square Dancers Federation. 929-2427. Miamitown.

Exercise Classes Tone and Strength, 9-10 a.m., Western Sports Mall, 2323 Ferguson Road, Combination of upper body, lower body and core strengthening exercises mixed in with light conditioning and stretching. $10. 451-4905. Westwood.

The Hanky Panks, 8 p.m.midnight, Cabana on the River, 7445 Forbes Road, Free. 9417442; www.cabanaontheriver.com. Sayler Park.

Schools

Music - Acoustic

Yellowjacket Kick-Off: Class of 2016, 9 a.m.-noon, Taylor High School, 36 E. Harrison Ave., Orientation camp for incoming freshman. Students receive class schedules, find lockers, learn about extracurriculars, meet peers and hear from upperclassmen, teachers, administrators and counselors. $6. Registration required. 467-3200. North Bend.

Bob Cushing, 7 p.m., Top Shelf Grille, 6507 Harrison Ave., 574-5600; www.topshelfgrille.com. Green Township.

Recreation Thursday Night Lightz, 7 p.m.-12:30 a.m., Edgewater Sports Park, $10; $15 to race, requirements available online. 874-2508; www.facebook.com/ ThursdayNightLightz. Cleves.

Senior Citizens Pinochle, Noon-4 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, 385-3780. Green Township. Arthritis Exercise, Noon-12:45 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Workout to videos geared to help lessen arthritis symptoms. For seniors. Free. 385-3780. Green Township. Taking Off Pounds Sensibly, 10-11 a.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Weight loss support and accountability. For seniors. $28 annual fee. 385-3780. Green Township.

SATURDAY, AUG. 18 Civic Yard Trimmings Drop-off, 11:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Kuliga Park, 6717 Bridgetown Road, Hamilton County residents may drop off yard trimmings. Free to all Hamilton County Residents. Bring proof of residency. Landscapers and commercial establishments not eligible to participate. Free. Presented by Hamilton County Recycling and Solid Waste District. 946-7766; www.hamiltoncountyrecycles.org. Green Township.

Craft Shows Covedale Performing and Fine Arts Fair, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, 4990 Glenway Ave., Show and sale of pottery, jewelry, enamel painted iron tiles, woodworks, oils, water colors, graphic art, fiber art, acrylics, photography, ceramics and more. Free. 241-6550; www.cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com. West Price Hill.

Exercise Classes Gentle Beginners Ashtanga Vinyasa Flow Yoga, 9-10 a.m., EarthConnection, $7 drop-in, $30 for five-class pass, $49 for 10-class pass, $85 for 20-class pass. 675-2725; www.yogabymarietta.com. Delhi Township. Vinyasa Flow Yoga for Fitness, 9-10 a.m., Western Sports Mall, 2323 Ferguson Road, Practice ancient styles and modern mix of vinyasa flows, with integrated music. $10, free for members. 451-4900. Westwood. Boot Camp, 9-10 a.m., Western Sports Mall, $10. 451-4905. Westwood.

Festivals St. William Parish Festival, 6-11 p.m., St. William Church, Music by Excalibur.921-0247; www.saintwilliam.com. West Price Hill.

Music - Blues Ralph and the Rhythm Hounds, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Another Bar, 250 S. Miami Road, 8348275; ralphandtherhythmhounds.com. Cleves.

Music - Classic Rock

Lettuce Eat Well Farmers Market, 3-7 p.m., Harvest Home Park, 3961 North Bend Road, Locally produced food items. Free. Presented by Lettuce Eat Well. 661-1792; www.lewfm.org. Cheviot.

Woodwind Steel, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Jim & Jack’s on the River, 3456 River Road, 251-7977; www.jimandjacks.net. Riverside.

St. William Parish Festival, 6-11 p.m., St. William Church, 4108 W. Eighth St., Adults only on Friday with music by the Rusty Griswolds. Food specials include fish, barbecue and chicken. Bid and Buy all weekend. 921-0247; www.saintwilliam.com. West Price Hill.

Gentle Beginners Ashtanga Vinyasa Flow Yoga, 7-8 p.m., EarthConnection, $7 drop-in, $30 for five-class pass, $49 for 10-class pass, $85 for 20-class pass. 675-2725; www.yogabymarietta.com. Delhi Township. Boot Camp, 7-8 p.m., Western Sports Mall, $10. 451-4905. Westwood.

Music - Rock

Farmers Market

Festivals

Exercise Classes

Hearing, Free. Reservations required. 922-0123; www.hearingbetter.net. Green Township.

Music - R&B Basic Truth, 9:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m., Drew’s on the River, 4333 River Road, $3. 451-1157; basictruth.webs.com. Riverside.

SUNDAY, AUG. 19 Civic Yard Trimmings Drop-off, 11:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Kuliga Park, Free. 946-7766; www.hamiltoncountyrecycles.org. Green Township.

Health / Wellness

Education

Free Hearing Screenings, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., The Place for Better

Historic 1795 Cabin and Schoolhouse, 2-5 p.m., Shawnee Lookout Park, 2008 Law-

Lettuce Eat Well Farmers Market is open from 3-7 p.m. Friday. Earlier this year, Jenny Kettering, 61, Monfort Heights, points out different pie flavors to Ruth Haneberg, 61, Western Hills. MONICA BOYLSON/THE COMMUNITY PRESS renceburg Road, Free, vehicle permit required. Presented by Hamilton County Park District. 521-7275; www.greatparks.org. North Bend.

Exercise Classes Yoga, 4-5 p.m., Guenthner Physical Therapy, 5557 Cheviot Road, Strengthen, stretch and tone with gentle postures that release tension rand support the integrity of the spine. Family friendly. $7 walk-in; $120 for 10 classes. 923-1700; www.guenthnerpt.com. Monfort Heights. Zumba, 10-11 a.m., Western Sports Mall, 2323 Ferguson Road, Latin dance-inspired fitness program combines dance and aerobic elements to create fun and challenging workout. $10. 451-4905. Westwood.

Festivals St. William Parish Festival, 5-10 p.m., St. William Church, Music by Elder Glee Club. 9210247; www.saintwilliam.com. West Price Hill.

MONDAY, AUG. 20 Art Exhibits Exhibition of Mount Student Art & Design, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Studio San Giuseppe Art Gallery at the College of Mount St. Joseph, Free. 244-4314; www.msj.edu. Delhi Township.

Exercise Classes Gentle Beginners Ashtanga Vinyasa Flow Yoga, 7-8 p.m., EarthConnection, $7 drop-in, $30 for five-class pass, $49 for 10-class pass, $85 for 20-class pass. 675-2725; www.yogabymarietta.com. Delhi Township. Yoga for Rookies: An Introduction, 5:45-6:45 p.m., EarthConnection, 370 Neeb Road, For participants who have never tried yoga. Class introduces each practitioner to a progression of pranayama (breathing techniques), focus of gaze and asanas (postures) leading to a unique practice for each participant. Family friendly. $7 drop-in, $30 for five-class pass, $49 for 10-class pass, $85 for 20-class pass. Presented by Yoga by Marietta. 675-2725; www.yogabymarietta.com. Delhi Township. Zumba, 5:30-6:30 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Wear comfortable workout attire and gym shoes. Bring water. $5. Presented by Deb’s Fitness Party. 205-5064; www.debsfitnessparty.com. Green Township. Total Joint Class, 1:30-2:30 p.m., Guenthner Physical Therapy, 5557 Cheviot Road, Designed for people who have finished physical therapy after joint replacement surgery but are looking to improve upon the progress they’ve made leading to a better quality of life. Family friendly. $7 walk-in; $90 for 15 classes. 923-1700; www.guenthnerpt.com. Monfort Heights. Tone and Strength, 9-10 a.m. and 6-7 p.m., Western Sports Mall, $10. 451-4905. Westwood.

Home & Garden Gardening Seminar: Shining Stars of Fall: Trees and Shrubs, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Monfort Heights Branch Library, 3825 West Fork Road, Learn which plants make a stunning statement in the landscape. With White Oak Garden Center. Free. Presented by White Oak Garden Center. 385-3313; www.whiteoakgardencenter.com. Monfort Heights.

ABOUT CALENDAR To submit calendar items, go to www.cincinnati.com and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to life@communitypress.com along with event information. Items are printed on a spaceavailable basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to www.cincinnati.com and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page.

Senior Citizens Chair Volleyball, 10 a.m.-noon, Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, 385-3780. Green Township. Indoor Cornhole, 10 a.m.-noon, Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, 385-3780. Green Township. Pinochle, Noon-4 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3853780. Green Township.

TUESDAY, AUG. 21 Art Exhibits Exhibition of Mount Student Art & Design, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Studio San Giuseppe Art Gallery at the College of Mount St. Joseph, Free. 244-4314; www.msj.edu. Delhi Township.

Exercise Classes Pilates Mat Class, 11 a.m., Guenthner Physical Therapy, 5557 Cheviot Road, Taught by Judy Feazell. $15 drop-in; $120 for 10 classes. Through Nov. 27. 923-1700; www.guenthnerpt.com. Monfort Heights. Body Sculpt, 6-7 p.m., Western Sports Mall, 2323 Ferguson Road, Divided into 15 minutes of cardio, 15 minutes of upper body toning, 15 minutes of core/ab toning and 15 minutes of leg toning. $10. 451-4905; westernsportmall.com. Westwood. Boot Camp, 6-7 a.m., Western Sports Mall, $10. 451-4905. Westwood. TRX Training, 7-8 p.m., Western Sports Mall, 2323 Ferguson Road, Consists of body-weight exercises to develop strength, balance, flexibility and core stability. $10. 451-4905. Westwood.

Farmers Market Sayler Park Farmers Market, 4-7 p.m., Sayler Park, Parkland Avenue and Monitor Street, Farmers Market with homegrown items like fruits, vegetables, desserts, salsas, relishes, jam and olive oil. Presented by Sayler Park Village Council. 675-0496. Sayler Park.

Senior Citizens Quilting, 9:30-11:30 a.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Make blankets to donate to Project Linus and Children’s Hospital. For seniors. 385-3780. Green Township. Exercise to Music, 10-11 a.m., Green Township Senior Center, $1. 385-3780. Green Township. Ceramics, 11:30 a.m.-3 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, 385-3780. Green Township. Stability Ball, 9:30-10 a.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Bring your own stability ball and work on strengthening your core. For seniors. 385-3780. Green Township. Euchre, 12:30-3:30 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Open game. For seniors. 385-3780. Green Township. Pattern Dancing, 1-2:30 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Learn line

dancing and have fun while exercising. For seniors. Free. 385-3780. Green Township. Billiards, 1:30-3:30 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Free. 385-3780. Green Township.

WEDNESDAY, AUG. 22 Art Exhibits Exhibition of Mount Student Art & Design, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Studio San Giuseppe Art Gallery at the College of Mount St. Joseph, Free. 244-4314; www.msj.edu. Delhi Township.

Exercise Classes Ashtanga Vinyasa Flow Yoga Classes, 5:30-6:45 p.m., EarthConnection, 370 Neeb Road, Sequence of postures to increase strength, flexibility and allow release of stress. Family friendly. $7 drop-in, $30 for five-class pass, $49 for 10-class pass, $85 for 20-class pass. Presented by Yoga by Marietta. 675-2725; www.yogabymarietta.com. Delhi Township. Yoga for the Back, 7-8 p.m., EarthConnection, 370 Neeb Road, Students use breath and movement to lengthen and strengthen the back muscles. Family friendly. $7 drop-in, $30 for five-class pass, $49 for 10class pass, $85 for 20-class pass. Presented by Yoga by Marietta. 675-2725; www.yogabymarietta.com. Delhi Township.

Senior Citizens Pinochle, Noon-4 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3853780. Green Township. Vintage Artist, 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Place for artists to paint together. Beginners welcome. Bring own supplies. For seniors. Free. 385-3780. Green Township. Knitting and Crocheting, 10-11:30 a.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Knit or crochet blankets for Project Linus. Yarn provided. For seniors. Free. 385-3780. Green Township. Wood Carving, 1-3 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Carve with Greenwood Chippers. Many different techniques used: relief carvings, scroll saw, figurines. Bring own tools. For seniors. Free. 3853780. Green Township. Wii Bowling, 2-3:30 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Free. 385-3780. Green Township. Zumba Gold, 1-2 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Modified Zumba for seniors with standing and chair participation. For seniors. $3, $25 for 10 classes. 205-5064; www.debsfitnessparty.com. Green Township.

THURSDAY, AUG. 23 Art Exhibits Exhibition of Mount Student Art & Design, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Studio San Giuseppe Art Gallery at the College of Mount St. Joseph, Free. 244-4314; www.msj.edu. Delhi Township.

Senior Citizens Exercise to Music, 10-11 a.m., Green Township Senior Center, $1. 385-3780. Green Township. Open Bridge, 12:15-3:15 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, Free. 385-3780. Green Township.

FRIDAY, AUG. 24 Art Exhibits Exhibition of Mount Student Art & Design, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Studio San Giuseppe Art Gallery at the College of Mount St. Joseph, Free. 244-4314; www.msj.edu. Delhi Township.

Community Dance Butler Squares, 7:30-10 p.m., Miami Whitewater Township Firehouse, 6736 Ohio 128, Plus-level square dance club open to all experienced dancers. $5. Presented by Southwestern Ohio/Northern Kentucky Square Dancers Federation. 929-2427. Miamitown.

Exercise Classes Tone and Strength, 9-10 a.m., Western Sports Mall, $10. 4514905. Westwood.

Farmers Market Lettuce Eat Well Farmers Market, 3-7 p.m., Harvest Home Park, Free. 661-1792; www.lewfm.org. Cheviot.

Festivals St. Ignatius Loyola Church Festival, 6 p.m.-midnight, St. Ignatius of Loyola Church, 5222 North Bend Road, Prizes, games, entertainment, rides, miniature golf and food. Beer with wristband and ID. 661-6565. Monfort Heights.

Health / Wellness Summer Blood Drive Tour, Noon-3 p.m., Hoxworth Blood Center Western Hills, 2041 Anderson Ferry Road, Hoxworth Bloodmobile accepts blood donations. Donors receive free Gold Star cheese coney and Summer Blood Drive T-shirt. Double Red donors receive coupon for free Double Decker Sandwich. Free. Presented by Hoxworth Blood Center. 4510320. Western Hills.

Music - Blues Chuck Brisbin & the Tuna Project, 10 p.m.-2 a.m., The Full Moon Saloon, 4862 Delhi Ave., Free. 244-6111. Delhi Township.

Senior Citizens Pinochle, Noon-4 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3853780. Green Township. Arthritis Exercise, Noon-12:45 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, Free. 385-3780. Green Township. Taking Off Pounds Sensibly, 10-11 a.m., Green Township Senior Center, $28 annual fee. 385-3780. Green Township.

SATURDAY, AUG. 25 Art & Craft Classes Books Alive! for Kids, Noon, Price Hill Branch Library, 3215 Warsaw Ave., Interactive program combines sight, sound and touch by presenting a book, engaging children in a performance and providing a handson, make-it-and-take-it craft. Free. Presented by Public Library of Cincinnati & Hamilton County. 369-4490; www.cincinnatilibrary.org. East Price Hill.

Civic Yard Trimmings Drop-off, 11:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Kuliga Park, Free. 946-7766; www.hamiltoncountyrecycles.org. Green Township.


LIFE

AUGUST 15, 2012 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • B3

Easy-to-make fudge recipe for kids, and chop kebabs

Update on Silverglade’s chicken salad clone As mentioned previously, Annie Hoffman’s recipe for chicken salad (her version of this popular salad) is not the recipe that Silverglade’s makes and sells. Their recipe is proprietary and Mike Silverglade said Annie’s recipe is not even close to his recipe. To get the “real deal,” stop by

done, turning occasionally. Be careful here as pork cooks quickly.

Sautéed spinach or Swiss chard

Rita’s Tuscan pork chop kebabs feature a citrus marinade. THANKS TO RITA HEIKENFELD.

Silverglades at their Findlay Market location or their deli at Eighth and Sycamore streets in downtown Cincinnati.

Rocky Road fudge for kids to make

The last couple of years, my grandsons Luke, Will and Jack have submitted items to the junior division at our Clermont County Fair. This year they made fudge, cinnamon spirals and decorated cupcakes. They were so excited, as usual. I brought their offerings in, but I was a bit late in getting them there, so their items couldn’t be judged. They did get ribbons for participation and I learned a valuable lesson. This fudge recipe is easy and really good, an excellent starter recipe for kids wanting to learn to cook.

1 14 oz. can condensed milk (not evaporated milk) 3 cups chocolate chips 1 cup butterscotch chips 2 teaspoons vanilla Handful of mini marshmallows 1 cup mixed nuts (optional)

Line an 8-inch by 8-inch pan with foil, letting foil

hang over sides, and spray the foil. Bring milk to a boil. Add chips and cook on low until melted. Add everything else. Mix. Pour into pan. Chill until hard and cut into shapes.

Tuscan pork chop kebabs

We like this served with sides of corn on the cob and sautéed spinach.

About 2 lbs. pork tenderloin, trimmed ¼ cup olive oil or bit more Zest and juice of one large lemon (2 tablespoons juice) or more to taste Salt and pepper to taste 1 tablespoon minced garlic 2-3 bell peppers: Use your favorite. I like a combo of red, yellow and orange, cut into 1-inch pieces 1 large red onion, cut up to fit on skewers

Combine olive oil, juice, salt and pepper and garlic. Taste and add more of what you like if necessary. Add pork and marinate at room temperature about 15 minutes, stirring occasionally, or up to a couple hours in the refrigerator. Thread pork, peppers and onions alternately onto skewers. Grill 10 minutes or until pork is

Heat a skillet and film pan with olive oil. Add 8 cups spinach or chard (rinse, drain and leave some water clinging to the leaves), chopped if necessary, 2-3 teaspoons garlic, salt and pepper to taste. Sauté until spinach wilts.

Mini banana bread loaves

Reader Eileen Bittman sent this to me. “Bernice, my friend, said this was a great recipe,” Eileen said. I like that it makes five mini loaves, plenty to share. 1 18.5 oz. box yellow cake mix 1 3.4 oz. box banana cream flavor instant pudding 4 large eggs 1 cup water ¼ cup canola oil 1 cup mashed fully ripe bananas ¾ cup chopped walnuts (optional) 5 foil mini loaf pans, sprayed

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Beat everything except bananas and nuts until well blended. Add bananas and nuts and mix just until blended. Pour into loaf pans and bake 30-40 minutes, until toothpick inserted in center comes out clean. Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educator and author. Email her at columns@communitypress.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Call 513-248-7130, ext. 356.

Wesley Community Services, in partnership with AARP Ohio, is taking delivery of fresh vegetables from local community gardens to be shared with area seniors who receive Meals-On-Wheels. Neighborhood community garden leaders in Walnut Hills, College Hill and Over-the-Rhine agreed to host and maintain AARP Giving Gardens through a grant process inspired by Walnut Hills’ resident LaDonna Pope. Pope sparked the idea last summer when she told AARP about her efforts in Walnut Hills. The garden provides exercise and social engagement, says Pope, but she also donates extra vegetables to help feed neighbors. AARP Ohio sought to build upon the idea and connected with Wesley Community Services. In return for hosting the giving gardens, AARP members provide volunteer labor to install/prep the giving gardens and the necessary materials, including lumber, soil, and tools. “It’s just a win-win for everyone – because we all know if we eat healthy, we’re going to stay healthy,” said Pope, who now is an AARP volunteer who leads the program. “And thanks to Wesley, it’s easy to see that the vegetables reach seniors in need.” “The vegetables from the giving gardens are a blessing to the many sen-

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North Bend Road, Monfort Heights Festival 2012 6 p.m.-midnight Aug. 24 4 p.m.-midnight Aug. 25 4-11 p.m. Aug.t 26 Food available; beer with ID,

iors in our care and we are truly thankful to AARP and community garden volunteers who make it all possible” said Rev. Stephanie Tunison, chief executive officer, Wesley Services Organization, parent entity of Wesley Community Services. “Wesley employees and Meals-On-Wheels clients in Greater Cincinnati greatly appreciate AARP Ohio’s work providing vegetables to our homebound seniors who cannot get out and shop for fresh vegetables” explains Stephen Smookler, executive director, Wesley Community Services. On July 23, the first basket of fresh tomatoes was collected from the new College Hill Community Garden, off North Bend Road. The garden, in partnership with Pleasant Hill Academy, includes three AARP Giving Gardens and only will provide tomatoes for this first year. Other gardens will provide a different array of vegetables. The partnership is a multi-year effort, with hopes to expand in 2013 to include more participating community gardens. If you would like more information about AARP Giving Gardens for your community garden, call Kevin Craiglow at 614/ 222-1512 or email at kcraiglow@aarp.org. For information about Wesley Community Services Meals-On-Wheels call 513/ 661-5460.

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If you have a festival not listed send the info to memral@communitypress.com.

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We are down to the last row of corn, so I’ve been blanching and freezing it. I like to blanch the whole ears and then take the kernels off. I put the whole ear into the center hole of an angel food pan and it keeps it stable so the corn kernels don’t fly everywhere. I am always amazed at how many ears of corn it takes to fill a pint jar, at least three. And if you’re growing flowers like petuRita nias and Heikenfeld they are RITA’S KITCHEN looking leggy, go ahead and pinch them back. It will take a couple of weeks but you’ll get a new flush of blooms. I like to give them a light dose of fertilizer, too. My zinnias and marigolds are starting to go to seed and I’m going to save seeds for next year. Think about doing that yourself. It’s a lot less expensive than store-bought seeds and a good lesson for the kids to be stewards of their environment.

Community gardens share chop with Wesley services

771-8827


LIFE

B4 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • AUGUST 15, 2012

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You may not know it, but tires can wear out – even if there’s plenty of tread left on them. In some instances, even the car tires you buy new may be too old. That’s what a College Hill woman learned. Kathleen Metzger bought four new tires earlier this year and, after a few months, she started noticing problems. “It felt like it was out of alignment really bad. You had to have your hands on the wheel pretty firm in order to keep it corrected,” Metzger said. Metzger’s husband Ken put on a spare tire and, as he did, he saw the problem with the recently purchased tire. “I saw you could see the belt right at the end of the tire. These tires are falling apart. There are all these microcracks and fissures in the tires. I knew that was

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“He really didn’t look at all four tires, he just looked at one and told me that they shouldn’t be on the car because they’re way outdated,” Metzger said. The tires Metzger bought new are actually 17 years old. Clearly, the tires sat on a store shelf for years before they were sold. And technically there is no expiration date on tires, but now the government says after six years tires tend to rot and can be dangerous. Metzger said as a result of what she’s learned, “I’m very concerned. I haven’t been driving my car for the last few days. I just would like a refund or all new tires.” So, I contacted the store that sold the tires and the owner told me he was unaware of the age of the tires when he sold them. Given that the tires are deteriorating after less than a year, he’s now given her a complete refund. Remember, tires can deteriorate inside even if they look alright on the outside. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration says tires are only good for six to 10 years. Anything older than that, it says, are just not safe on the roads.

probably what the problem was,” he said. They went back to the store that had Howard sold the Ain tires, but HEY HOWARD! were told they were only able to get a warranty based on the tread wear of the problem tires. Metztger then went to another tire store where the Department of Transportation identification was checked on the tire’s sidewall. The first two numbers of the identification tell the week in which the tire was made – in the case of one of her tires it was week 13. The next numbers tell you the year in which it was made – in that case it simply said 4, which meant 1994.

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LIFE

AUGUST 15, 2012 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • B5

Students help on Mt. Adams mural Ten local students worked on a large multipart mural project in Mount Adams. In addition to a mural that will serve as the focal point of the project, the wall below the Holy Cross Church will be accented with cement cast designs inspired by the mural, images from the church, and Mount Adams history. The students include some from the West Side: Andy Crusham, 21, University of Cincinnati DAAP; Madeline Delgado, 18, Mount Notre Dame High School; Julian Gregory, 15, Elder High School; Virginia Johnson, 18, Seven Hills; Lauren Jones, 18, Lakota West High School; Alex Logsdon, 16, Sycamore High School; Tam Nguyen, 16, Dixie Heights High School; Sean Redmond, 18, St. Xavier High School; Theodore Simon, 18,

Warehouse sale begins Aug. 16

Two students work on large multi-part mural project in Mount Adams. PROVIDED Sycamore High School; Jazmin Smith, 15, North College Hill High School. The murals will be created in partnership with the Mount Adams Civic Association, and will be led by Westerkamp with assistance from artists Ximena Flores and Lisa MeridaPaytes. The main mural is at 1136 St. Gregory St., while the wall with the castings wraps around

Monastery Street and onto Celestial Street, below the Holy Cross Church. The project was set to be finished the first week of August. This summer, ArtWorks employed 115 students and 32 artists to complete 15 projects in the Greater Cincinnati area. For more information about the projects, visit ArtWorksCincinnati.org.

The entire Friends’ warehouse collection of nearly 80,000 used books, CDs, DVDs, sets, and more will be available to the public when The Friends of the Public Library of Cincinnati & Hamilton County hosts its annual Summer Warehouse Sale from Aug. 1619, 8456 Vine St. (Hartwell). Hours of the sale are 10 a.m.-7:30 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 16; 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Friday and Saturday, Aug. 17 and 18; and noon-5 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 19. There will be a wide selection of reading and audiovisual material, including hardback and paperback fiction in every genre: general fiction, mystery, horror, romance, science fiction and westerns. The nonfiction collection consists of topics that include art, biography, business, cooking, educational material, health and fitness, home improvement, military history, and travel The children’s section contains classic children’s books as well as more contemporary authors. One area that has always been popular is vinyl records (LPs). “Record

The Friends of the Public Library of Cincinnati & Hamilton County Summer Warehouse Used Book Sale is Aug. 16-19 at the library’s warehouse in Hartwell. collectors will love our collection of mostly classical music,” said Anne Keller, Friends’ Director. All records are priced at one dollar a disk. In a special deal: 50 percent off purchase on Sunday, Aug. 19, for Friends’ members. Memberships are available throughout the sale. Another benefit of membership is preferred seating at the Library’s great programs. A Preview Sale for Friends’ members will be held 5-8 p.m.m Wednesday, Aug. 15. Non-mem-

bers can purchase a membership at the door beginning at $20 a year. “Benefits of membership are limitless,” Keller said. “It gives you advance notice of sales and special events, as well as special sales at the Library Friends’ Shop at the Main Library.” For more information contact the warehouse at 513-369-6035, email friendsofplch1@fuse.net, or visit http://friends.cincinnatilibrary.org/.

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“Come Hear The Story of Jesus” 5421 Foley Rd. • 513-922-8363 Rev. Bob Overberg Sunday School..................................10:00a.m. Sunday Morning Worship ..................11:00a.m. Sunday Evening ..................................6:00p.m. Wednesday Evening Bible Study .........6:00p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF DENT 6384 Harrison Ave. - 574-6411 Bible Study ........................... 9:30am Sunday Worship ................. 10:30am Wed. Youth Service .............. 7:00pm Wed.Pray Sevice .................. 7:00pm

“Reflecting Christ...the Light of the World” &(#"))"%)!'"$#)"

Liberty Missionary Baptist Church "Where Everybody is Somebody" 1009 Overlook Ave. 513-921-2502 Rev. Kendell Hopper Sunday School 10:00 am Sunday Morning Worship-11:00 am Sunday Evening 6:00 pm Wednesday Bible Study - 7:00 pm

123 Symmes Ave. North Bend, OH 45202 One block off Route 50, Phone 941-3061 Small, friendly, casual, blended music, Bible based messages that connect with real life. Sunday School 9:30am Worship 10:30am

SHILOH UNITED METHODIST

Anderson Ferry & Foley Roads 513-451-3600 www.shilohumc.com 9:30 a.m. Traditional Worship and Sunday School 11:00 a.m. Praise Celebration and Junior Church nursery provided for both services

PRESBYTERIAN OAK HILLS PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 6233 Werk Rd. (Enter off Werkridge) 922-5448 Rev. Jerry Hill 10:00 a.m Worship & Sunday School Nursery Care Avail.

Come and worship in a small casual church that emphasizes the fellowship and mission in the community and globally. www.oakhillspc.com

UNITED METHODIST

CHEVIOT UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 3820 Westwood-Northern Blvd. Kerry Wood, Senior Pastor Lois Schalk-Hartley, Associate Pastor

9:20 a.m. Traditional Worship 10:20 a.m. Sunday School for All Ages 11:20 a.m Contemporary Worship Service 662-2048 www.cheviotumc.org

UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST St. Peter & St. Paul United Church of Christ

3001 Queen City Ave. 513-661-3745 Rev. Martin Westermeyer, Pastor Summer Chapel Service: 8 am Bible Study: 9 am Worship & Church School: 10 am Dial-A-Devotion 426-8957 www.stpeterandstpaulucc.org

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LIFE

B6 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • AUGUST 15, 2012

Arts society has seven concerts in new season Blues, bluegrass, rock, Celtic music all on schedule The Greater Cincinnati Performing Arts Society (GCPAS) has released the line up for the 2012-2013 concert season. The series is comprised of seven performances featuring Grammy nominated and award-winning artists and runs from September through May. The organization was founded in 2007 by Pete Ellerhorst and Rob Ellig, who were so moved after seeing guitar virtuoso Tommy Emmanuel that they decided to get into the concert promotion business in an effort to bring Emmanuel to Cincinnati. “This has been 10 times the work I ever thought it would be, but it has been incredibly rewarding and very educational,” says Ellerhorst, who is the president of the organization. “I have always been pretty much a classic rock guy but this has opened my eyes and gave me a real appreciation for the incredible musicianship and talent in areas such as folk, bluegrass and Celtic that I would never have known otherwise.”

Celtic Crossroads will perform in the Greater Cincinnati Performing Arts Society season on Saturday, March 2, at St. Xavier High School Performance Center. PROVIDED

The popular Riders in the Sky will perform as part of the Greater Cincinnati Performing Arts Society concert series at Harrison High School on Saturday, April 6. PROVIDED Ellerhorst is a musician himself, performing with the Cincinnati group The Remains who have been performing in the Cincinnati area for over 25 years. Ellig is a luthier and owner of Ellig String Instruments in White Oak, and does work for many of the prominent musicians throughout the Tristate. The series will kick off Sunday Sept. 9 with the Tommy Emmanuel at the McAuley Performing Arts Center at 7:30 p.m. Tickets for the show are $35 in advance and $40 the day of the show. Emmanuel has become one of the favorites of the series and his popularity has grown significantly over the last several years. He is a two-time Grammy nominee and a protege of

the late Chet Atkins. Emmanuel became a master of the finger-picker style made famous by Atkins and eventually met his mentor in 1980. They became instant friends and eventually recorded “The Day the Fingerpickers Ruled the World” which would be nominated for a Grammy. It would also be Chet Atkins last recording. Sara Watkins, formerly of the multi-Grammy award winning group Nickel Creek, will perform at the St. Xavier Performance Center Saturday, Oct. 13, at 7:30 p.m. Watkins has just released her second solo effort, “Sun Midnight Sun,” to critical acclaim and is currently opening for Jackson Browne. Tickets are $30 in advance and $35 the day of

the performance. Blues singer Ruthie Foster will appear at the Martin Marietta Theater at Harrison High School, Saturday, Nov. 17, at 7:30 p.m.. Foster is a two-time Grammy nominee and released her latest effort, “Let It Burn,” in January. This is Ruthie’s sixth CD effort and is rapidly gaining traction in the Blues and Roots genre. Tickets are $30 in advance, $35 the day of the show. In January, two-time Grammy nominated Bluegrass group Blue Highway will hit the stage at the St. Xavier Performance Center. Blue Highway has been a force in the bluegrass scene for 17 years and released its 10th CD in 2011. The show will take place Saturday, Jan. 26, at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $30 in advance or $35 the day of the show. Saturday, March 2, will feature Celtic Crossroads, a touring group form Ireland, which celebrates traditional Celtic music, song

and dance. The show is acclaimed as one of Ireland’s best stage music shows. It is an explosion of youthful energy and dazzling musicianship. The performance will take place at the McAuley Performing Arts Center. Tickets are $35 in advance, $40 the day of the show. The legendary Riders in the Sky will be making a return to Cincinnati on Saturday, April 6, at the Martin Marietta Theater in Harrison at 7:30 p.m. Many will remember Riders from their regular Saturday afternoon broadcasts on WVXU, “Riders in the Sky Radio Theater.” A number of the shows were broadcast live from the Emery Theater on Central Parkway. Riders has been the recipients of two Grammy awards and their music was prominently featured in Disney’s “Toy Story 2.” They have been treating audiences to the throwback cowboy music of Gene Autry and Roy Rogers for over 30 years. Tickets for

the show are $30 in advance, $35 the day of the performance. The series will wrap up on Saturday, May 4, featuring the Hit Men form New Jersey at 7:30 p.m. at the College of Mount St. Joseph Theater. The group features former member of the Four Seasons, Tommy James and the Shondelles and The Critters, performing all of the great music they have performed, written or recorded over the years. The show will feature all of the classic music of the Four Seasons as well as the hit recordings they have all been a part of. Tickets for the show are $35 in advance $40 the day of the concert. Season ticket packages and patron ticket packages are available as well as four packs whereby people can select which four shows they would like to attend. For tickets and information on the series, go to www.gcparts.org or call 513-484-0157.

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LIFE

AUGUST 15, 2012 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • B7

OH student busy at museum college and into her adult life. You may have even seen her in the Cincinnati History Museum guiding guests through the museum, answering questions and presenting demonstrations on World War II or the early CinZito cinnati frontier. Zito also serves as treasurer for the Youth Advisory Council at Museum Center, a group that helps plan museum events, including the annual Youth Programs

awards and recognition banquet. Additionally, Zito spends her time teaching students about embracing diversity and providing equity and justice for all with Bridges for a Just Community. She is an Hugh O’Brian Youth Leadership ambassador where she works to inspire leadership, service and innovation. Last summer, Zito was a camper at the Red Cross Leadership Development Center, a program designed to equip students with useful tools to become a leader within their community. She returned to the Red Cross camp again this year as a counselor, and fa-

The curriculum will include such topics as constitutional law, crime scene investigation, patrol operations, use of force, and many other topics. During each academy students will have the opportunity to go to the Sheriff’s Tactical Training Center and, after safety training, be given the opportunity to fire a service handgun. Anyone who is a resident, owns a business, or is employed within Hamilton County is encouraged to apply. The program is designed to include anyone from age 18 to seniors. The academy for Western Hamilton County will be held at the Miami Township Community Center.

The Winton Woods Riding Center is at 10073 Daly Road. For pricing and to register for private or semi-private lessons, please visit www.greatparks.org/recreation/equestrian, contact the Riding Center at 513-931-3057 or via email at wwrc@greatparks.org. A valid Hamilton County Park District Motor Vehicle Permit ($10 annual; $3 daily) is required to enter the parks. For additional information, please visit GreatParks.org or call 513-521PARK (7275) on Facebook or Twitter.

Registration is now open for the fall horseback riding session, which runs 11 weeks from Sept. 4 through Nov. 18 and offers group, private and semi-private lessons. Lessons are for beginner through advanced riders in both English and Western disciplines. Students ride one day per week, at a set day and time, for the entire session. Release forms can be downloaded at GreatParks.org and must be turned in prior to first riding lesson. Riding boots and long pants are required for all lessons.

Gump-Holt

Sheriff recruiting for citizen’s academy The Hamilton County Sheriff office is accepting applications for upcoming citizen’s patrol academies which are scheduled to begin the week of Sept. 10. Three separately operating academy classes will be conducted for western, northeastern, and southeastern Hamilton County regions. The Sheriff’s Citizen Academy is an 11-week program designed to provide the students with firsthand information about how the sheriff’s office operates. Participants will find out what it is like to be a sheriff’s deputy and learn the role law enforcement plays within their community.

cilitated a project management session with fellow Museum Center youth programs participant Bria Wyatt, a 2012 graduate of McAuley High School. “Rhiannon has quickly become one of the leaders of our youth programs. She is driven, focused and excels with each task she is given,” said Kristen Kloth, director of youth programs at Cincinnati Museum Center. “Her dedication to education, diversity and unity is inspiring to all those around her. She’s wise beyond her years and we’re so excited to see all the things she is going to accomplish in the years to come.”

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The academy for Northeastern Hamilton County will be held at Sheriff’s Patrol District 3 in Symmes Township. The academy for Southeastern Hamilton County will be held at the Anderson Center in Anderson Township. Applications are available at any sheriff’s patrol district, and they can also be found online at http:// www.hcso.org. Inquiries can be made by calling: Sheriff’s Patrol District 1 (Western) at 825-1500, Sheriff’s Patrol District 3 (Northeastern) at 6833444, Sheriff’s Patrol District 5 (Southeastern) at 4745770.

SINCE 1974

Tie the arm to the side and it withers; cease exercising the mind for a prolonged period and thinking can be recovered no more than spoiled fruit can regain freshness. What great energy there is in thought! It can be good or it can be bad! New ideas and powerful thought have affected the destiny of mankind. Thoughts become a part of us and are reflected in our lives. If our thoughts are so filled with fait, cheerfulness, gratitude, encouragement, happiness, love and friendship, there can be no room for such destructive thoughts as greed, despair, fear and vulgarity. Our thoughts of today will be creating a new tomorrow, adding purpose to life. Life without a purpose is like a train without a track-all power but no place to go. Purpose in thought adds depth to life - a depth of faith; it adds dimension - the dimension of hope; it adds a discipline of patience - an ingredient of a happy life... Incidentally, we welcome any thoughts Marilyn E. Holt, Jessica E. Totton-Miller, you may have about this column... Rachel S. Hartmann

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At the age of 15, upcoming Oak Hills High School junior and Delhi Township resident Rhiannon Zito has a very impressive resume. She’s active at school as a Spanish and math tutor and an active member and cofounder of the Chinese club. She also participates in Spanish, math and art clubs all while being on the academic team and maintaining her 4.0 GPA. As a third-year participant in Cincinnati Museum Center’s Youth Programs, Zito is involved in workshops, field trips, college visits, volunteerism and other learning opportunities that help her prepare for success in high school,

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LIFE

B8 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • AUGUST 15, 2012

DEATHS Roe Clark Rowena “Roe” Sprang Clark, 95, Delhi Township, died Aug. 3. She was a homemaker. Survived by children Carolyn Caudill, Lois (William) Beiting, Patricia (James) Peaker, Kathy Jones, Richard Clark; siblings Helen Clark Rohe, Albert Sprang; sister-in-law Doris Anne Flower; many nieces and nephews. Preceded in death by husband Homer Clark, sister Marcella Manne. Services were Aug. 10 at St. Dominic. Arrangements by Vitt, Stermer & Anderson Funeral Home. Memorials to the St. Dominic Education Fund or American Heart Association.

Carole Dressman Carole Bruening Dressman, 73,

died Aug. 5. She was a lifelong member of St. William Parish, serving as a teacher in the Confraternity of Christian Doctrine program, bereavement minister, sacristan and lay distributor of the Eucharist. Survived by husband Ron; sons Douglas (Lorie), Thomas (Lisa), Joseph Dressman (Pete), John (Marianne); grandchildren Nicolas, Lindsey, McCoy, Bowen, Jake, Roan, Kyle, Lauren; siblings Barb, Wini, Paul (Mary Ellen), Bill Bruening; nephews and nieces Christopher, Michael (Jennifer), Jenny, Willie, Sean, Katie, Maggie; great-nephew Maximus. Services were Aug. 13 at St. William. Arrangements by Meyer & Geiser Funeral Home. Memorials to St. William Church.

Pat Haverland Patricia “Pat” Hensler Haverland, 86, died Aug. 5. She was a member of the Our Lady of Victory Parish Council, PTA, Rosary Altar Society, Meals on Wheels and Pregnancy Center West. Survived by husband Herbert “Pat” Haverland; children R. Bruce (Kathleen), James (Nancy), Patrick (Sarah), John (Betsy) Conly, Connie (John) Burns, Ceci (Tom) Wille, Mary (Bob) Haverland Morrissey; step-children Rick (Diane), Randy (the late Nancy), Rex, Rod (Cindy), Russ (Mary) Haverland, Cindy (Curt) McLane; sisters Mary (Mike) Heroux, Marge (Jerry) Bleh, Virginia (Stan) Farquer; sister and brother-in-law Betty Bischak, Herman Haverland; former daughters-in-law Joyce,

Teri Conly; 22 grandchildren; 18 great-grandchildren; 14 stepgrandchildren; 14 step-greatgrandchildren. Preceded in death by first husband Robert Conly, children Brian (Cheryl) Conly, Christine (Richard) Stegmaier, brothers George (Dottie), Paul (Wilma), Dan (Pat) Hensler. Services were Aug. 13 at St. Antoninus. Arrangements by Meyer & Geiser Funeral Home. Memorials to: Pregnancy Center West, 4900 Glenway Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45238 or Hospice of Cincinnati, P.O. Box 633597, Cincinnati, OH 45263-3597.

Marcia Hutzel Marcia Hill Hutzel, 66, died July 23. She was a licensed practical nurse. Survived by sons Kevin (Tammy), Philp Jr. Hutzel; grandchildren Jenna, Megan, Branden, Cade; sisters Vicki, Claudia Hill, Cynthia Tenhundfeld, Tricia (Steve) Gilmour; many cousins, nieces and nephews. Preceded in death by husband Philip Hutzel Sr., parents Joseph, Virginia Hill. Services were Aug. 10 at St. Catharine of Sienna. Arrangements by Vitt, Stermer & Anderson Funeral Home.

Frank Kramer

Baldwin 60th

Frank J. Kramer, 85, Delhi Township, died Aug. 3. He was an electrical engineer. Survived by children Steven (Jane), Michael Kramer (Mary), Stan (Barb) Kramer, Karen (John)

Charles and Mary Baldwin celebrated their 60th Wedding Anniversary on July 19th. They have 4 children and 6 grandkids. They lived all 60 wonderful years on Muddy Creek Rd in Green Twp

Gary I. Kuhn, 59, died Aug. 5. Survived by children Kyle, Ryan, Lacy Kuhn; parents Irwin, Audrey Kuhn; sisters Shirley (David) Klingenberg, Sharon (Richard) Scarborough; many nieces and nephews. Arrangements by B.J. Meyer Sons Funeral Home. Memorials to: Crossroads Hospice, 4380 Glendale-Milford Road, Cincinnati, OH 45242 or ALS Association, Central & Southern Ohio Chapter, 1170 Old Henderson Road, Suite 221, Columbus, OH 43220.

Dorothy Kuhr Dorothy C. Kuhr, 93, Delhi Township, died Aug. 6. Survived by nieces Carol Kinley, Eileen McNalley; great-nephew David Kinley. Preceded in death by parents John, Adele Kuhr, siblings Adele (Vincent) Martini, John Kuhr. Arrangements by B.J. Meyer Sons Funeral Home.

Ronald Liebau

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Tracy Mays Tracy N. Mays, 29, died July 22. Survived by mother Rhonda Mays; brother Steven Mays. Preceded in death by father Steven Mays. Services were July 30 at St. William. Arrangements by Ralph Meyer & Deters Funeral Home.

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Loraine Roebel

Loraine Braun Roebel, Delhi Township, died Aug. 3. Survived by son Barry (Chris) Whitton; grandchildren Heather, Brady, Mikaela, Kyle; greatgrandchildren Amber, Madelyn, Macey; many nieces and nephews. Preceded in death by husbands Don Whitton, Charles Roebel, siblings Virginia Bley, Jerome, Betty Jo Braun. Services were Aug. 9 at St. Antoninus. Roebel Arrangements by B.J. Meyer Sons Funeral Home. Memorials to the Twin Towers LEC Foundation or Down Syndrome Association. Florence “Babe” Fisher Schlomer, 82, Delhi Township, died July 23. She was a homemaker. Survived by by sons Greg (Peggy), Joe (Kathy), Jerome Schlomer; grandchildren Jerome (Amy), Tim, Emily, Brian Schlomer, Jennifer (Brandon) Huffman; great-grandmother Judaia; sister Ruth (Jack) Kemper. Preceded in death by husband Jerome “Skip” Schlomer. Services were July 26 at St. Joseph (New) Cemetery. Arrangements by Vitt, Stermer & Anderson Funeral Home. Memorials to: Alzheimer’s Association, 644 Linn St., Cincinnati, OH 45203.

Dorothy Speckert

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was an online news editor with the Cincinnati Enquirer Survived by wife Linda Liebau; son Ronald Paul Liebau; mother Hilde Liebau; mother-in-law Lucija Bruzgulis; brother Walter (Linda) Liebau; sister-in-law Loretta (John Bugg) Bruzgulis; nephews Matthew, Kurt Liebau; many aunts, uncles and cousins in Germany, Spain and Sweden. Preceded in death by father Karl Liebau, father-in-law Ralfs Bruzgulis Services were Aug. 13 at St. Dominic. Arrangements by Vitt, Stermer & Anderson Funeral Home. Memorials to his son’s education fund.

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Oberschlake; siblings Richard Kramer, Ruth Mees; 12 grandchildren; two great-grandchildren. Preceded in death by wife Patricia Kramer. Services were Aug. 11 at St. Dominic. Arrangements by Vitt, Stermer & Anderson Funeral Home. Memorials to the Hospice of Cincinnati.

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Dorothy Vonderhaar Speckert, 85, Delhi Township, died Aug. 4. She was a cafeteria manager. Survived by son Jeffrey (Mary Kay) Speckert; grandchildren Nicholas, Jessica Speckert. Preceded in death by husband Martin Speckert, sister Betty Cunningham. Services were Speckert Aug. 8 at Vitt, Stermer & Anderson Funeral Home. Memorials to the Hospice of Cincinnati or Alzheimer’s Association.

Fritz Wurzbacher Frederick Paul “Fritz” Wurzbacher, 85, East Price Hill, died Aug. 3. He was a truck driver for Coca Cola. He was a Navy veteran of World War II. Survived by wife Helen Green Wurzbacher; children Frederick Jr., Donald, Richard Wurzbacher, Kathleen (Mike) Halpin; grandchildren Michael (April) Jr., Anthony (Simone), John, Matthew Halpin, Elizabeth (Mark) McDermott; great-grandchildren Lexi, Mattie, Eli, Asher Halpin, James McDermott; siblings Frank, Edward (Mary Rae), Joseph (Debbie) Wurzbacher, Roselyn Van Lue; brothers- and sisters-inlaw William, Alfreda, Donald Green, Gladys Bowers, Mary Joyce, James Foy, Patricia, Richard Handy, Jim McBride; many nieces and nephews. Preceded in death by parents Fred, Frances Wurzbacher, siblings Jack, William Wurzbacher, Mary Lou (the late Bob) Davis, Frances (the late Charlie) Kirkland, Margaret McBride, sister-in-law Margie Wurzbacher, brother-in-law Raymond Green. Services were Aug. 7 at Holy Family. Arrangements by Radel Funeral Home. Memorials to the American Diabetes Association.


LIFE

AUGUST 15, 2012 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • B9

POLICE REPORTS Arrests/citations Amanda J. Steinmetz, born 1980, criminal trespassing, theft under $300, 3609 Warsaw Ave., Aug. 1. Brandon Braley, born 1986, domestic violence, 1041 Fairbanks Ave., Aug. 5. Candice Gooden, born 1980, assault, 3320 Lehman Road, Aug. 1. Cedric Burroughs, born 1987, obstructing official business, 1628 Quebec Road, Aug. 1. Dawn Caldwell, born 1977, falsification, possession of drug abuse instruments, 2717 Price Ave., Aug. 4. Jack W. Hayes, born 1957, misdemeanor drug possession, 3411 Warsaw Ave., Aug. 4. Jason Clarence Shelton, born 1963, theft under $300, 934 Chateau Ave., Aug. 2. Michael Walker, born 1994, city or local ordinance violation, 962 Mansion Ave., Aug. 5. Rashawn Riley, born 1993, carrying concealed weapons, misdemeanor drug possession, 3501 Warsaw Ave., Aug. 2. Tina M. McGhee, born 1963, burglary, criminal damaging or endangering, 920 Voss St., Aug. 5. Tonya Taylor, born 1971, domestic violence, 3405 Lehman Road, Aug. 6. William Timmons, born 1977, aggravated menacing, falsification, 817 Hawthorne Ave., Aug. 4. Charles Masur, born 1991, theft under $300, 1175 Overlook Ave., Aug. 3. Christopher Hill, born 1989, falsification, obstructing official business, 4130 Talbert Ave., Aug. 6. Craig Rice, born 1988, domestic violence, 841 Delehanty Court, Aug. 4. Glenn Nuckles, born 1988, receiving stolen property, 4438 Ridgeview Ave., Aug. 1. Helena J. Warner, born 1969, disorderly conduct, 1911 Wyoming Ave., Aug. 4. Richey Mullins, born 1982, menacing, 4369 W. Eighth St., Aug. 5. Thomas Dillingham, born 1988, possession of an open flask, 1601 Wyoming Ave., Aug. 1. Yolanda T. Ligon, born 1969, disorderly conduct, 1907 Wyoming Ave., Aug. 4.

Incidents/reports Aggravated menacing 535 Wilsonia Drive, Aug. 2. Assault 1115 McPherson Ave., Aug. 1. 1214 Gilsey Ave., Aug. 2. 3320 Lehman Road, Aug. 1. 3738 Warsaw Ave., Aug. 1. 3792 Westmont Drive, Aug. 2. 381 Elberon Ave., July 31. 4017 Jamestown St., July 31. 535 Wilsonia Drive, Aug. 2. Breaking and entering 1700 Atson Lane, Aug. 1. 4036 St. Lawrence Ave., July 31. 503 S. Delridge Drive, Aug. 1. 720 Woodlawn Ave., Aug. 1. 935 Rosemont Ave., July 31. Burglary 4450 Guerley Road, July 31. 4816 Glenway Ave., July 26. 503 S. Delridge Drive, July 27. 740 Rosemont Ave., July 23. 805 Harris Ave., July 30. 941 Grand Ave., July 21. 1646 Rosemont Ave., July 31. 2915 Price Ave., Aug. 1. Criminal damaging/endangering 1200 Grand Ave., July 21. 1275 Dewey Ave., July 25.

1275 Dewey Ave., July 25. 1416 Manss Ave., July 23. 159 Richardson Place, July 23. 1600 Elberon Ave., July 26. 1924 Westmont Lane, July 20. 2315 Grand Ave., July 22. 2812 Bodley Ave., July 21. 3217 Price Ave., July 26. 3414 W. Eighth St., July 26. 3609 Warsaw Ave., July 21. 3789 Glenway Ave., July 27. 4508 Glenway Ave., July 26. 4784 Rapid Run Road, July 22. 938 Fairbanks Ave., July 27. 944 Chateau Ave., July 20. 947 Grand Ave., July 23.1848 Grand Ave., July 31. 3411 Lehman Road, July 31. 3731 Westmont Drive, Aug. 2. 3750 Warsaw Ave., Aug. 2. 972 Olive Ave., July 31. Domestic violence Reported on McPherson Avenue, July 25. Reported on Purcell Avenue, July 30. Reported on Rapid Run Road, July 20. Reported on River Road, July 24. Reported on Rutledge Avenue, July 22. Reported on Warsaw Avenue, July 25. Reported on West Eighth Street, July 25. Reported on Western Hills Avenue, July 22. Reported on Westmont Drive, July 27. Reported on Westmont Lane, July 21. Reported on Wyoming Avenue, July 21. Felonious assault 3540 Warsaw Ave., July 31. Improperly discharging firearm at/into habitation/school 903 Seton Ave., July 27. Menacing 4719 Green Glen Lane, July 22. 750 Grand Ave., July 21. Murder 1345 Beech Ave., July 29. Robbery 1005 Ross Ave., July 23. 1109 Sunset Ave., July 20. 3111 Price Ave., July 20. 3501 Warsaw Ave., July 25. 4400 Glenway Ave., July 23. 4500 Rapid Run Road, July 25. 5397 Glenway Ave., July 24. 812 Kreis Lane, July 20. Theft 1006 Woodlawn Ave., July 25. 1015 Rutledge Ave., July 23. 1041 Fairbanks Ave., July 26. 1062 Lockman Ave., July 28. 1087 Benz Ave., July 27. 1108 Omena Place, July 25. 1148 Considine Ave., July 27. 1234 Carson Ave., July 23. 1236 Manss Ave., July 21. 1238 McKeone Ave., July 28. 1249 Dewey Ave., July 23. 1254 Manss Ave., July 20. 126 Revere Ave., July 20. 1707 Ashbrook Drive, July 25. 2291 Wyoming Ave., July 22. 3201 Warsaw Ave., July 27. 3410 Warsaw Ave., July 25. 3414 W. Eighth St., July 25. 3414 W. Eighth St., July 26. 3414 W. Eighth St., July 27. 3609 Warsaw Ave., July 22. 3609 Warsaw Ave., July 25. 3636 W. Liberty St., July 20. 3638 Glenway Ave., July 24. 3703 Warsaw Ave., July 25. 4020 W. Liberty St., July 22. 4108 Flower Ave., July 29. 4220 Glenway Ave., July 23.

ABOUT POLICE REPORTS The Community Press publishes the names of all adults charged with offenses. The information is a matter of public record and does not imply guilt or innocence. To contact your local police department: » Delhi Township: Chief Jim Howarth, 922-0060 » Cincinnati District 3: Capt. Russell A. Neville, 263-8300 4438 Ridgeview Ave., July 22. 4450 Rapid Run Road, July 23. 4500 Glenway Ave., July 25. 4537 Clearview Ave., July 20. 4942 Cleves Warsaw Pike, July 22. 5008 Rapid Run Road, July 25. 5248 Highview Drive, July 26. 5270 Willnet Drive, July 27. 540 S. Delridge Drive, July 20. 6550 Parkland Ave., July 22. 750 Grand Ave., July 23. 750 Grand Ave., July 26. 830 Nebraska Ave., July 30. 833 Seton Ave., July 26. 907 Sunset Ave., July 20. 912 Elberon Ave., July 24. 956 Wells St., July 20. 1240 Henkel Drive, Aug. 1. 2311 Grand Ave., July 31. 3406 Warsaw Ave., July 31. 4221 Glenway Ave., Aug. 2. 503 Enright Ave., Aug. 2. 5223 Glenway Ave., Aug. 1. 934 Chateau Ave., Aug. 2. Violation of a protection order/consent agreement 6812 Gracely Drive, July 20.

DELHI TOWNSHIP Arrests/citations Kelsie L. Rankin, 21, 213 Monitor Ave., drug offense at 263 Anderson Ferry Road, July 30. Mary K. Chuck, 58, 5662 Rapid Run Road Apt. 1, shoplifting at 5080 Delhi Road, July 31. Michael A. Wides, 19, 5026 Bonaventure Court, theft at 5025 Delhi Road, Aug. 4. Todd Smith, 37, 785 Neeb Road, driving under suspension at 5900 block Delhi Road, July 30. Leroy William Owens Jr., 24, 4390 Valence Drive, driving under suspension at 500 block Pedretti Avenue, July 30. Christopher Brandon Justice, 20, 4302 River Road, driving under suspension at 200 block Anderson Ferry Road, July 31. Michael P. Dustrude, 47, 14 Lakeshore, driving under suspension at 200 block Anderson Ferry Road, July 31. Ronnie Wright, 19, 3335 Stanhope, driving under suspension at 6000 block Bender Road, July 31. Haitham M. Shalash, 20, 519 Palmerston Drive, driving under suspension at 400 block

Greenwell Avenue, July 31. Stacy Roper, 25, 5625 Montana Ave., driving under suspension at 500 block Pedretti Avenue, Aug. 1. Micah Yelton, 28, 2432 Ferguson Road, driving under suspension at 7000 block Cleves Warsaw Pike, Aug. 2. Toriano L. Johnson, 41, 9326 Round Top, driving under suspension at 4700 block Delhi Road, Aug. 4. Louie J. Florante, 43, 83 Anderson Ferry Road, driving under suspension at 4200 block Delhi Road, Aug. 4. Roger D. Tucker Jr., 26, 467 Pedretti Ave., Apt. 12, driving under suspension at 400 block Pedretti Avenue, Aug. 4. Jay B. Jackson, 34, 3429 Hillside Ave., driving under suspension at 500 block Pedretti Avenue, Aug. 4. Willie R. Lockett, 26, 3230 Moosewood, driving under suspension at 500 block Rentz Place, Aug. 4. Frank Weiss, 48, 930 Eatondale Road, driving under suspension at 500 block Rosemont Avenue, Aug. 4. Michael J. Mullen, 53, 6650

Hearne, driving under suspension at 5300 block Foley Road, Aug. 5. Adam M. Baker, 29, 456 Greenwell Ave., driving under suspension at 500 block Pedretti Avenue, Aug. 5. Sir Darvis Lamar Abernathy, 22, 3324 Galbraith, driving under suspension at 5500 block Delhi Road, Aug. 5. Jason R. Roell, 23, 9 University, driving under suspension at 5900 block Bender Road, Aug. 5.

Incidents/reports Assault Altercation resulted in minor injury at 356 Robben Road, Aug. 1. Breaking and entering Various tools stolen at 6358 Upper Road, Aug. 1. Criminal damaging Rock thrown through window at 4848 Delhi Road, July 31. Vehicle shot by BB gun at 1123 Betty Lane, Aug. 4. Vehicle window broken at 731 Neeb Road, Aug. 5. Mirrors broken off vehicle at 1055 Bandanna Drive, Aug. 5. Graffiti on vehicle at 294 Jupiter Drive, Aug. 5. Domestic violence Reported on Pembina Drive, July 30. Forgery Check forged at 990 Bayley Place, Aug. 2. Rape Reported on Delhi Road, Aug.

4. Reported on Rapid Run Road, Aug. 3. Theft Credit cards and license stolen at 5330 Rawhide Court, July 30. Three aluminum ladders stolen at 4750 Fehr Road, July 30. $5,250 of tools stolen from vehicle at 1049 Beechmeadow Lane, July 31. Mp3 player at 544 Morrvue Drive, Aug. 2. Vehicle stolen from home at 5148 Ballantrae Court, Aug. 2. $2,000 stolen from register at 5223 Delhi Road, Aug. 2. Electric wire stolen at 6050 Cleves Warsaw Pike, Aug. 3. Medication stolen at 4356 St. Dominic Drive, Aug. 3. Jewelry stolen at 5274 Whitmore Drive, Aug. 3. Horseshoe game set stolen at 376 Glen Oaks Drive, Aug. 3. Medication stolen at 474 Morrvue Drive, Aug. 4. Ladder stolen at 525 Pedretti Ave., Aug. 4. Property stolen from home at 4611 Shady Lawn Terrace, Aug. 4. Ladders stolen at 5770 Faysel Drive, Aug. 4. Jewelry stolen at 1023 Bandanna Drive, Aug. 5. Bicycle stolen at 1053 Devils Backbone Road, Aug. 5. Cell phone stolen at 5125 Foley Road, Aug. 1.

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B10 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • AUGUST 15, 2012

New company coming to West Side East side or West side? It’s a loaded question in Cincinnati, but Total Quality Logistics (TQL) is proud to announce that its company will now flank both sides of I-75. TQL’s newest office, Cincinnati West, will open its doors at 5130 Glencrossing Way on Sept. 4. TQL anticipates creating at least 80 jobs over the next three years. TQL coordinates the movement of freight across

North America, primarily by arranging full truckload transportation. “We have been successful through our Erlanger office in attracting quality candidates from the state of Kentucky,” said Kerry Byrne, executive vice president. “Similarly, we expect our Cincinnati West office to attract great people from the west side of town and southeastern Indiana.” TQL’s Erlanger office,

LEGAL NOTICE NUISANCE VIOLATION 5344 HILLSIDE AVENUE Notice is hereby given to Harbour Portfolio VII LP that property you own in Delhi Township contains excessive vegetation. The Delhi Township Board of Trustees has determined, at Resolution #2012-156, that the condition of the property constitutes a nuisance and is detrimental to the health, safety and general welfare of all persons who live, work or own property within Delhi Township. This notice shall serve as a formal order for you to address the nuisance violations at your property located at 5344 Hillside Avenue (also known as Parcels 540-0100-0081, 540-0100-0084, 540-0100-0085, 540-01000094, 540-0100-0095, 540-0100-0096, 5400-0100-0097, and 540-0100-0098 of the Hamilton County Auditor’s Tax Plats), Delhi Township, Hamilton County, State of Ohio as described below: •Cut all excessive vegetation, remove clippings there from, and maintain such at a height not to exceed 12" (All yards); •Remove all debris, or store indoors (Discard ed carpet and household items in all yards). If such excessive vegetation is not cut and removed and if such accumulated debris is not removed, or provision for such cutting and removal is not made within seven (7) days of publishing/posting of this notice, or a hearing before the Board of Trustees is not request ed as specified below, the Board will provide for the cutting and removal, and any expens es incurred by the Board in performing such tasks will be entered upon the tax duplicate and will be a lien upon the properties from the date of entry. You have the right to request a hearing before the Board of Trustees within seven (7) days of publishing/posting of this notice. If requested, the hearing will be held at the next regularly scheduled meeting of the Board. The Boards’ meetings are held on the second and last Wednesdays of each month commencing at 6:00 p.m. at 934 Neeb Road, Cincinnati, Ohio 45233. At the hearing, you may appear in person or by counsel, may present evidence and examine witnesses. If a hearing is timely requested, action to abate the nuisance conditions will be stayed pending the hearing and further decision of the Board. Your request for a hearing before the Board may be submitted in writing to: Thomas R. Stahlheber, Zoning Inspector, Delhi Township Department of Development Services, 697 Neeb Road, Cincinnati, Ohio 45233. Any questions concerning this order should be directed to Mr. Stahlheber at the above described address or at 513-922-2705. 1126 LEGAL NOTICE NUISANCE VIOLATION 311 ANDERSON FERRY ROAD Notice is hereby given to Matthew E. Green that property you own in Delhi Township contains accumulated debris. The Delhi Township Board of Trustees has determined, at Resolution #2012-149, that the condition of the property constitutes a nuisance and is detrimental to the health, safety and general welfare of all persons who live, work or own property within Delhi Township. This notice shall serve as a formal order for you to address the nuisance violations at your property located at 311 Anderson Ferry Road (also known as Parcel 540-0071-0096 of the Hamilton County Auditor’s Tax Plats), Delhi Township, Hamilton County, State of Ohio as described below: •Remove all debris (Garbage, debris, and furniture in all yards and drive). If such accumulated debris is not removed or provision for such removal is not made within seven (7) days of publishing/posting of this notice, or a hearing before the Board of Trustees is not requested as specified below, the Board will provide for the removal, and any expenses incurred by the Board in perform ing such tasks will be entered upon the tax duplicate and will be a lien upon the proper ties from the date of entry. You have the right to request a hearing before the Board of Trustees within seven (7) days of publishing/posting of this notice. If requested, the hearing will be held at the next regularly scheduled meeting of the Board. The Boards’ meetings are held on the second and last Wednesdays of each month commencing at 6:00 p.m. at 934 Neeb Road, Cincinnati, Ohio 45233. At the hearing, you may appear in person or by counsel, may present evidence and examine witnesses. If a hearing is timely requested, action to abate the nuisance conditions will be stayed pending the hearing and further decision of the Board. Your request for a hearing before the Board may be submitted in writing to: Thomas R. Stahlheber, Zoning Inspector, Delhi Township Department of Development Services, 697 Neeb Road, Cincinnati, Ohio 45233. Any questions concerning this order should be directed to Mr. Stahlheber at the above described address or at 513-922-2705. 1122

which opened in January with 21 employees, now employs 56. TQL employs more than 1,400 in the Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky area to date, and expects to add about 575 new positions to its offices on Cincinnati’s East side within the next three years. Rob Poulos, TQL’s vice president of sales, Elder High School, and Mount St. Joseph alumnus says the new office will fea-

ture a few classic West Side touches, such as a state-of-the-art corn hole set and tribute wall to high school alma maters. “I also anticipate we will frequent Price Hill chili,” said Poulos. Interested candidates are encouraged to learn more at www.tqljobs.com. Total Quality Logistics is in the truckload transportation industry.

Davis to perform benefit concerts Delhi Township Board of Trustees President and tribute artist Mike Davis will perform two West Side concerts to raise money for Alzheimer’s research. At 7 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 19, Davis will perform an “Evening in Vegas” concert at Jim and Jack’s on the River, 3456 River Road, and at 8 p.m. Friday, Aug. 31, at the Mariner’s Inn, 7391 Forbes Road. The 25-year perform-

er will pay tribute to Elvis, Tom Jones and Neil Diamond to name a few. The performances have reserved seating. Tickets for the show at Jim and Jack’s are $10 with dinner available. Call 251-7977 for reservations. Tickets for the show at the Mariner’s Inn which include dinner are $25. Call 941-8600. For more information, visit www.todayselvis.com.

LEGAL NOTICE NUISANCE VIOLATION 467 ROSEMONT AVENUE Notice is hereby given to Roberta Wasteney that property you own in Delhi Township contains excessive vegetation. The Delhi Township Board of Trustees has determined, at Resolution #2012-148, that the condition of the property constitutes a nuisance and is detrimental to the health, safety and general welfare of all persons who live, work or own property within Delhi Township. This notice shall serve as a formal order for you to address the nuisance violations at your property located at 467 Rosemont Avenue (also known as Parcel 540-0010-0138 of the Hamilton County Auditor’s Tax Plats), Delhi Township, Hamilton County, State of Ohio as described below: •Cut all excessive vegetation, remove clippings there from, and maintain such at a height not to exceed 12" (All yards); If such excessive vegetation is not cut and removed or provision for such cutting and removal is not made within seven (7) days of publishing/posting of this notice, or a hearing before the Board of Trustees is not request ed as specified below, the Board will provide for the cutting and removal, and any expens es incurred by the Board in performing such tasks will be entered upon the tax duplicate and will be a lien upon the properties from the date of entry. You have the right to request a hearing before the Board of Trustees within seven (7) days of publishing/posting of this notice. If requested, the hearing will be held at the next regularly scheduled meeting of the Board. The Boards’ meetings are held on the second and last Wednesdays of each month commencing at 6:00 p.m. at 934 Neeb Road, Cincinnati, Ohio 45233. At the hearing, you may appear in person or by counsel, may present evidence and examine witnesses. If a hearing is timely requested, action to abate the nuisance conditions will be stayed pending the hearing and further decision of the Board. Your request for a hearing before the Board may be submitted in writing to: Thomas R. Stahlheber, Zoning Inspector, Delhi Township Department of Development Services, 697 Neeb Road, Cincinnati, Ohio 45233. Any questions concerning this order should be directed to Mr. Stahlheber at the above described address or at 513-922-2705. 1100

LEGAL NOTICE DANGEROUS STRUCTURE 469 ROSEMONT AVENUE Notice is hereby given to Teddy Ray Scarbrough that property you own in Delhi Township contains a dangerous structure. The Delhi Township Board of Trustees has determined, at Resolution #2012-147, that the condition of the property is unsecure & unsafe and is detrimental to the health, safety and general welfare of all persons who live, work or own property within Delhi Township. This notice shall serve as a formal order for you to address the unsecure & unsafe conditions at your property located at 469 Rosemont Avenue (also known as Parcel 540-0010-0135 of the Hamilton County Auditor’s Tax Plats), Delhi Township, Hamilton County, State of Ohio as described below: •Secure the building from unfettered access by the general public (secure all windows and doors from unfettered access). If such dangerous structure is not secured or provision for such securing is not made within thirty days of publishing/posting of this notice, or a hearing before the Board of Trustees is not requested as specified below, the Board will provide for the securing, and any expenses incurred by the Board in performing such tasks will be entered upon the tax duplicate and will be a lien upon the property from the date of entry. You have the right to request a hearing before the Board of Trustees within seven (7) days of publishing/posting of this notice. If requested, the hearing will be held at the next regularly scheduled meeting of the Board. The Boards’ meetings are held on the second and last Wednesdays of each month commencing at 6:00 p.m. at 934 Neeb Road, Cincinnati, Ohio 45233. At the hearing, you may appear in person or by counsel, may present evidence and examine witnesses. If a hearing is timely requested, action to abate the conditions will be stayed pending the hearing and further decision of the Board. Your request for a hearing before the Board may be submitted in writing to: Thomas R. Stahlheber, Zoning Inspector, Delhi Township Department of Development Services, 697 Neeb Road, Cincinnati, Ohio 45233. Any questions concerning this order should be directed to Mr. Stahlheber at the above described address or at 513-9222705. 1721096

LEGAL NOTICE NUISANCE VIOLATION 469 ROSEMONT AVENUE Notice is hereby given to Teddy Ray Scarbrough that property you own in Delhi Township contains accumulated debris. The Delhi Township Board of Trustees has determined, at Resolution #2012-147, that the condition of the property constitutes a nuisance and is detrimental to the health, safety and general welfare of all persons who live, work or own property within Delhi Township. This notice shall serve as a formal order for you to address the nuisance violations at your property located at 469 Rosemont avenue (also known as Parcel 540-00100135 of the Hamilton County Auditor’s Tax Plats), Delhi Township, Hamilton County, State of Ohio as described below: •Remove all debris, or store indoors (Remove all discarded furniture and debris). If such accumulated debris is not removed or provision for such removal is not made within seven (7) days of publishing/posting of this notice, or a hearing before the Board of Trustees is not requested as specified below, the Board will provide for the removal, and any expenses incurred by the Board in performing such tasks will be entered upon the tax duplicate and will be a lien upon the properties from the date of entry. You have the right to request a hearing before the Board of Trustees within seven (7) days of publishing/posting of this notice. If requested, the hearing will be held at the next regularly scheduled meeting of the Board. The Boards’ meetings are held on the second and last Wednesdays of each month commencing at 6:00 p.m. at 934 Neeb Road, Cincinnati, Ohio 45233. At the hearing, you may appear in person or by counsel, may present evidence and examine witnesses. If a hearing is timely requested, action to abate the nuisance conditions will be stayed pending the hearing and further decision of the Board. Your request for a hearing before the Board may be submitted in writing to: Thomas R. Stahlheber, Zoning Inspector, Delhi Township Department of Development Services, 697 Neeb Road, Cincinnati, Ohio 45233. Any questions concerning this order should be directed to Mr. Stahlheber at the above described address or at 513-9222705. 1721090 LEGAL NOTICE DANGEROUS STRUCTURE 467 ROSEMONT AVENUE Notice is hereby given to Roberta Wasteney that property you own in Delhi Township contains a dangerous structure. The Delhi Township Board of Trustees has determined, at Resolution #2012-148, that the condition of the property is unsecure & unsafe and is detrimental to the health, safety and general welfare of all persons who live, work or own property within Delhi Township. This notice shall serve as a formal order for you to address the unsecure & unsafe conditions at your property located at 467 Rosemont Avenue (also known as Parcel 540-0010-0138 of the Hamilton County Auditor’s Tax Plats), Delhi Township, Hamilton County, State of Ohio as described below: •Secure the building from unfettered access by the general public (Secure all windows and doors from unfettered access). If such dangerous structure is not secured or provision for such securing is not made within **fifteen/thirty (15/30)** days of publishing/posting of this notice, or a hearing before the Board of Trustees is not request ed as specified below, the Board will provide for the securing, and any expenses incurred by the Board in performing such tasks will be entered upon the tax duplicate and will be a lien upon the property from the date of entry. You have the right to request a hearing before the Board of Trustees within seven (7) days of publishing/posting of this notice. If requested, the hearing will be held at the next regularly scheduled meeting of the Board. The Boards’ meetings are held on the second and last Wednesdays of each month commencing at 6:00 p.m. at 934 Neeb Road, Cincinnati, Ohio 45233. At the hearing, you may appear in person or by counsel, may present evidence and examine witnesses. If a hearing is timely requested, action to abate the conditions will be stayed pending the hearing and further decision of the Board. Your request for a hearing before the Board may be submitted in writing to: Thomas R. Stahlheber, Zoning Inspector, Delhi Township Department of Development Services, 697 Neeb Road, Cincinnati, Ohio 45233. Any questions concerning this order should be directed to Mr. Stahlheber at the above described address or at 513-922-2705. 1117

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