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PRICE HILL PRESS

Your Community Press newspaper serving Price Hill and Covedale

It was Price Hill Day at Coney Island last week.

75¢

WEDNESDAY, JULY 25, 2012

CONEY DAY B1

BECAUSE COMMUNITY MATTERS

Finalists selected for Rising Star By Monica Boylson mboylson@communitypress.com

The final two Rising Start finalist are ready to compete. Abby Bolling and Samantha Parrigan advanced from a field of five in the second semi-finals July 19 at Maloney’s Pub in Delhi Township. Also competing were Greg Moore, Katelyn Tesla and Lauren McClanahan. Bolling and Parrigan stole the stage and votes and will compete against last week’s winners Angela Williams and Diane Campbell. The four will sing in the final round at 7 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 2, at the Delhi Skirt Game tailgate party in the Remke/Biggs parking lot. Anyone can attend and purchase tickets to cast votes. Tickets are five for $1. Proceeds from the semi-final rounds totaled $2,160.

Laura Jekel, right, program director of MYCincinnati, works with student Khryssa Wiggins on cello during the after school music program. Jekel and her volunteers are hosting a free summer music camp for Price Hill children in August. FILE PHOTO

MUSIC CAMP Youth music program hosting free summer camp in Price Hill

By Kurt Backscheider kbackscheider@communitypress.com

MYCincinnati is giving children in Price Hill an opportunity to hone their music skills this summer. The youth music program is hosting a free summer camp for new and returning students, from Monday, Aug. 13 through Friday, Aug. 17. Founded last August, MYCincinnati is a classical music program that gives children a chance to study an instrument and play in an orchestra. Students who take part meet every weekday after school for two hours to learn music, and at the same time develop

self-confidence, discipline, responsibility and social skills. Rachel Hockenberry, a volunteer teacher with MYCincinnati who is serving as acting director while program director Laura Jekel is on vacation, said the summer camp will run from 9 a.m. to noon each day at MYCincinnati’s new home, 3117 Warsaw Ave., next to the District 3 police station. “One of the exciting things about the camp is that it’s going to take place in our new building,” Hockenberry said, noting MYCincinnati volunteers have been busy this summer getting the space ready for the camp and the

upcoming school year. MYCincinnati received a Summertime Kids grant from the Greater Cincinnati Foundation to host the one-week camp, making it free for all participants. Hockenberry said the camp is open to children ages 7 to 13, and they hope to have 30 to 40 students enrolled. Those who take part will receive instruction on the violin, viola or cello, and participate in orchestra rehearsals and small group sectionals, she said. Members of the Cincinnati Chamber Orchestra are scheduled to stop by the

SIGNED

RITA’S KITCHEN

Sunset Players signed a 25-year lease to use Dunham Arts Center See story, A3

Tips for drying your herbs. See story, B3

See MUSIC, Page A2

Contact The Press

COMMUNITY PRESS

Samantha Parrigan sang “Lean on Me” in the first round of the semi-finals. She has qualified for the finals at the Delhi Skirt Game tailgate party. MONICA BOYLSON/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

WKRC-TV Local 12’s Bob Herzog will be at this year’s Delhi Skirt Game. Last year, he greets Joan Moritz of Westwood and her friend, Dottie Garrett of Delhi Township. FILE PHOTO

Men planning wardrobe for Skirt Game By Monica Boylson mboylson@communitypress.com

The Delhi Skirt Game will celebrate 35 years of giving back to the community on Friday, Aug. 3, at Delhi Park. “It’s dudes in dresses,” Delhi Skirt Game co-chairman Clyde Kober said. “It’s all for a good cause.” Each year, some proceeds from the skirt game are donated to help a family in need. The festivities actually start Thursday, Aug. 2, with the Skirt Game tailgate party from 6 to 10 p.m. at the Delhi Skirt Game tailgate party in the Remke/ Biggs parking lot on Delhi Road. The Delhi Rising Star finals will begin at 7 p.m. Four contestants remain and one will be chosen to sing at the skirt game. Kober said everyone is invited to attend and people can vote for their favorite singer by

News .........................923-3111 Retail advertising ............768-8196 Classified advertising ........242-4000 Delivery ......................853-6263 See page A2 for additional information

Abby Bolling sang “Brave” from the Disney/Pixar movie of the same name earning her a spot in the finals. MONICA BOYLSON/THE

“It’s dudes in dresses. It’s all for a good cause.” CLYDE KOBLER

Delhi Skirt Game co-chairman

purchasing tickets, five for $1. The singer with the most tickets wins. There will also be a raffle for a scooter. All proceeds from the event will go to the Delhi Skirt Game fund to help others in need. The Skirth Game festivities the next night, Aug. 3, begin at 5 p.m. There will be food, beer and games provided by the Delhi Skirt Game Committee, LaRosa’s and donations from Remke/Biggs. At 6 p.m. the “ladies” will arSee SKIRT, Page A2 Vol. 85 No. 29 © 2012 The Community Press ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


NEWS

A2 • PRICE HILL PRESS • JULY 25, 2012

BRIEFLY Church has block party

Velocity Church, a new West Side church, will have a block party 5-9 p.m. Friday, July 27, at J.F. Dulles Elementary School, 6481 Bridgetown Road. There will be inflatable games, snow cones, cotton candy and popcorn, and more. It’s all free.

For more information, go to www.velocitychurch.me.

Elder hockey hitting the links

The Elder hockey team will host a fundraising golf outing Sunday, Aug. 19, at Aston Oaks Golf Club. The cost is $80 per player, and includes dinner.

PRICE HILL

Roger Bacon book signing

PRESS

Find news and information from your community on the Web Covedale • cincinnati.com/covedale Price Hill • cincinnati.com/pricehill Hamilton County • cincinnati.com/hamiltoncounty

News

Marc Emral Senior Editor ...............853-6264, memral@communitypress.com Monica Boylson Reporter ..............853-6265, mboylson@communitypress.com Kurt Backscheider Reporter ............853-6260, kbackscheider@communitypress.com Melanie Laughman Sports Editor ......248-7573, mlaughman@communitypress.com Tom Skeen Sports Reporter .............576-8250, tskeen@communitypress.com

Advertising

Melissa Martin Territory Sales Manager ...............768-8357, mmartin@enquirer.com

Delivery

For customer service...................853-6263, 853-6277 Sharon Schachleiter Circulation Manager ..................853-6279, sschachleiter@communitypress.com Stephanie Siebert District Manager.......................853-6281

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The outing is an 18-hole scramble format with a shotgun start at 2 p.m. Raffles and auction items will also be available. For more information, email Ken Sponaugle at ken.sponaugle@burgesniple.com. Reservation forms and information about sponsorship can be found in the news and events section on Elder High School’s website, www.elderhs.org.

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West Siders have a new option when they’re looking to satisfy a sweet tooth. Orange Leaf frozen yogurt is opening at 6173 Glenway Ave., Suite 9B, next to the Qdoba Mexican Grill in the Western Village shopping center across from Western Hills Plaza. B.J. Patel, who owns the West Side shop along with two other Orange Leaf locations in West Chester and Florence, Ky., said he planned to have the store open last week. He’s planning a grand opening celebration for Thursday, Aug. 2. Anyone who stops by from 6-9 p.m. that day will be treated to free frozen yogurt. Patel said when he had the grand opening for his Florence location the line for free frozen yogurt stretched more than a half mile out the door. He expects the people on the West Side to turn out

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game in its entirety, and several Roger Bacon players who were on that team will participate in the signing. Roger Bacon was the only Ohio team to ever beat James’ high school team; James finished his prep career 81-1 against in-state competition. The book has been endorsed by writers at ESPN, MaxPreps and SLAM Magazine, among others. For more information on the book, go to www.thechosenonesthebook.com.

Arts, crafts show

The Covedale Center

for the Performing Arts, 4990 Glenway Ave., will host its 11th annual Arts & Crafts Fair from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 18. Sixty artists will be on hand to display and sell their original works at the outdoor fair. Mixed media will include pottery, jewelry, enamel painted iron tiles, woodworks, oils, water colors, graphic art, fiber art, acrylics, photography, ceramics and more. The fair is free and open to the public. For more information, call 241-6550 or visit www.cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com.

Orange Leaf frozen yogurt opens on West Side

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dent and sports journalist Tony Meale will sign copies of his book “The Chosen Ones: The Team That Beat LeBron” from 6-9 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 2, at Buffalo Wings & Rings, 8377 Winton Road, Finneytown. Meale, a St. Xavier High School grad and former Community Press Newspaper sports reporter, is the author of the book which tells the story of the 2001-02 Roger Bacon basketball team that beat LeBron James and Akron St. Vincent-St. Mary in the state final. Buffalo Wings & Rings will replay the

in droves as well. Headquartered in Oklahoma City, Orange Leaf has more than 175 selfserve frozen yogurt stores throughout the country. Patel said customers fill up their bowl with a yogurt

flavor of their liking and then pour on whatever toppings they desire. The cost of the treat is based on the weight of the contents in the bowl. “Orange Leaf frozen yogurt is a great product,” he

said. “It’s a better product and has a better texture than other yogurts.” The Western Hills shop will offer customers the choice of dozens of flavors and 32 different toppings, he said. The 1,500-square-feet store will have seating both inside and outside, and he said he plans to hire 10 to 15 employees. Patel, who also owns a Subway restaurant in Delhi Township, said he decided to open an Orange Leaf on the West Side because he knows it has a large population and there aren’t many frozen yogurt places in the area. The store’s location across the street from the shopping plaza and near several restaurants also makes it ideal, he said. “We’ve had a lot of people call to find out when we’re opening,” he said. For more information, visit www.orangeleafyogurt.com.

Skirt

Walt Disney. During the game the teams will perform Olympic-themed skits and entertain the audience with other charades. “It’s truly a community event,” Kober said. At 9:30 p.m. the winner of Delhi Rising Star, a singing competition, will perform before fireworks,

which begin at 10 p.m. Kober said, “You can’t miss it.” Parking at the park is limited. A shuttle service will run from Delhi Plaza to Shiloh United Methodist Church to the park. For more information about the game, visit www.delhiskirtgame.org or call Kober at 451-1197.

program get excited about beginning the new year and enjoy playing together again, she said. “The last time the students played together was in May,” she said. “We want to get them pumped up for the year ahead and the progress they are going to continue making.”

Aside from learning an instrument, Hockenberry said the camp will also allow all the students an opportunity to form new friendships and share a bond through working together to achieve a common goal. The camp will culminate with a concert at noon Friday, Aug. 17. She said the concert will be open to the public. Hockenberry, who plays the French horn and piano, said it’s been fun watching the students grow musically, socially and emotionally over the past year, and she looks forward to the coming year and including new students into the fold. “It’s been an absolutely phenomenal year,” she said. “The program and the students are really remarkable.” For more information about the summer camp, call 251-3800, ext. 106, or send an email to laura@pricehillwill.org.

Contractors are busy finishing construction inside the new Orange Leaf frozen yogurt store in the Western Village shopping center in Western Hills. Owner B.J. Patel hopes to have the shop open by Saturday, July 21. He’s planning to give away free frozen yogurt during a grand opening Thursday, Aug. 2. KURT BACKSCHEIDER/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Continued from Page A1

rive to mingle with guests before the 7 p.m. game cohosted by WKRC-TV Local 12’s Bob Herzog and John Gumm. The theme of the game is Warner Brothers versus

Music Continued from Page A1

camp and work with students as well, she said. The goal of the camp is to introduce new students to the musical experience and help students returning to the

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NEWS

JULY 25, 2012 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • A3

Players sign lease on arts center First play slated for October

In what is seen by both parties as a win-win, Sunset Players, the resident drama group at Dunham Arts Center for more than 30 years, signed a 25-year lease with the city of Cincinnati for the arts center building at the Dunham Recreation Complex. The arts center will be repurposed as the Arts Center at Dunham, a fine arts center for the West Side of Cincinnati. The upper level of the building will contain a 350-seat performance auditorium, and the lower level will have art studio and art programming space. The auditorium will be used not only for performances (Sunset Players plays, concerts, etc.), but also art shows. “This important building is going to be saved rather than being mothballed and or shut down,” says John Wesseling, long time Sunset Players member and president of the Dunham Advisory Board. “The city will no longer be responsible for its utilities and repairs. This will enable CRC to focus on repurposing the newly closed golf course.” The arts center is one of three remaining buildings of a hospital complex dating back to 1879. The building, an example of the art deco architecture, features an auditorium, terrazzo floors, a bronze entryway, and art deco fixtures. The Hannaford and Sons-de-

signed building was built as the arts and recreation center for the former Dunham Hospital for tuberculosis patients. The Hannaford firm also designed many historical buildings in Cincinnati, including Music Hall and City Hall. Combining the Arts Center at Dunham with the Dunham recreation center programming, the Cincinnati Reds Miracle Ball field, and the aquatic center, the Dunham Recreation complex is unique in Cincinnati. Price Hill has been working to redefine itself as an arts community for several years. Creating this vibrant Arts Center on the West Side dovetails with these plans. “This project is a wonderful collaboration with so many partners at the table,” said Beth Andriacco, of Price Hill Will. “Here we have an arts organization, a community development corporation, a community council, CRC, and City Council coming together to create something that will truly benefit not just our neighborhood but the city of Cincinnati as a whole. Collaboration like this is difficult and time consuming, but all the partners at the table are willing to put in the work and make the Arts Center a true success.” Working with the Sunset Players to bring an arts center to Price Hill are members of the Price Hill Will Arts CAT, the Price Hill Civic Club, and the Price Hill Historical Soci-

Sunset Players and Price Hill Will members with lease, and ready to work on the building, are in back from left, Jerry Yearout, Mike Burke, Don Frimming, Dave Myers and John Wesseling; front from left: Chris Yearout, Beth Andriacco, Jan Yearout and Dennis Betz. PROVIDED.

ety as well as the Cincinnati Recreation Commission. “Sunset is currently spearheading this project but we can’t make this happen alone,” Mike Burke, a founding Sunset Players member adds. “It also can’t happen with just Sunset Players, Price Hill Civic, Price Hill Historical Society, and Price Hill Will. We need to get community involvement, interest, and knowledge of this project. For far too many people, the entire Dunham Complex is unknown, let alone a just-starting Arts Center and we need to find a way to let people know that we are here.” Although the groups have been working hard securing funding and cleaning up the Arts Center

Group helping job seekers Western Hills Job Search Satellite Group welcomes all job seekers each Wednesday from 9-11 a.m. at the Westwood First Presbyterian Church, 3011 Harrison Avenue. The no-cost benefits include: » Dynamic speakers provide expertise in job search subjects. » Free resume review by Judy Rahm, Career Management fellow.

» Free interpretation of Myers Briggs Type Instrument. » Contacts and support provided among the group. » Free coffee available at 8:45. Doughnuts and pastries in celebration of new employment. » Networking following the meeting. » Opportunity to post your resume for review by all church members. Scheduled speakers:

while waiting for the lease to be finalized, members are ready to face the many

hurdles ahead. Upcoming challenges include raising funds for improvements,

long-term building maintenance, and ongoing expenses. “That is why we are not only pursuing grants and donations, but also artists who would like to rent studio space in the building,” says Wesseling. The group is 100 percent volunteer and is trying to do as much work as possible through volunteer hours in order to keep costs low. The group is planning on opening its 2012/2013 season this October in the arts center with “King o’ the Moon,” Tom Dudzick’s sequel to the hilarious crowd favorite, “Over the Tavern.” The play will be directed by Mike Burke. For ticket information or information on donating your time or money to the Arts Center at Dunham, call 513-588-4988 or visit www.sunsetplayers.org.

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NEWS

A4 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • JULY 25, 2012

Siblings find niche in preserving memories By Kurt Backscheider

kbackscheider@communitypress7⁄8.com

Katy Samuels said people constantly tell her and her brother, Scott Berding, they made a great move by starting their business. The West Side brother and sister team founded Memories of Loved Ones, a small business specializing

in creating commemorative collages and displays for funerals, weddings, anniversaries, graduations and other milestone celebrations. “We feel we offer a very unique service,” said Samuels, who grew up in Delhi Township and now lives in Green Township. The idea for their busi-

ness was inspired by a friend of theirs who they miss very much, she said. Samuels and Berding worked together in the information technology field for many years, and in July 2004 their friend and colleague, Keith Noble, died suddenly while on vacation with his family. Samuels said she and her brother de-

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cided the best way to honor their friend was to organize a memorial golf outing and raise money for charity. She said they borrowed the poster boards used at Noble’s funeral that featured photographs chronicling his life and displayed them near the registration table at the inaugural outing. The display was very popular at the outing, and she said everyone enjoyed looking at all the photos of him. They brought the poster boards back for the second and third annual outings, and they were the most popular feature at the outings each year, she said. Prior to the fourth annual outing, Samuels said they contacted Noble’s wife to get the poster boards, but they were misplaced when she moved to a new home. So, Samuels contacted Noble’s sister and borrowed as many photos of him as she could to create digital scrapbook

pages to display at the outing. For the next few months, she said people were telling them left and right how beautiful the display was. “The feedback we received was so great,” Samuels said. “We began wondering if there was anyone who was offering this type of service to grieving families.” She said when they couldn’t find any, Memories of Loved Ones was born. They started the family business in 2010, and have continually worked to improve their process and expand their services. Samuels said they meet face-to-face with every family who requires their services, design personal and memorable collages and displays and have them professionally framed so they can be cherished for years to come. Utilizing an RV

equipped with computers and scanning equipment, she said they can drive to a customer’s home and convert their favorite photographs to digital images in a matter of hours, ensuring the photos are not lost or damaged. In addition to funerals, she said they’ve designed displays for graduations, weddings, anniversaries, family reunions and corporate events. They can also create photo books and DVD slide shows. As a way to give back to the community, the business offers a Heroes Package in which they’ll design, free of charge, displays for any police officer, firefighter and military member killed in the line of duty. They also work closely with the Yellow Ribbon Support Foundation and the Let Us Never Forget Scholarship Fund. For more information, visit www.themolo.com or call 661-6656.

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SCHOOLS

JULY 25, 2012 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • A5

St. Dominic presents scholastic awards Lexi Zimmer – sixth grade; Peyton McCarthy – seventh grade for demonstrating the gospel message of Jesus Christ in school, on the playground and the parish at large. Seventh-graders Matthew Kirkendall and Erica Wessel received the Patrick Cottingham II Schoarships based on their love of science and demonstrated Christian character. The Student Council Scholarships were awarded to Monica White – fifth grade; Analise Kandra – sixth grade; Hannah Doll – seventh grade based on their positive attitude, effort, cooperation and Christian values. The PTO Father Stockelman/ Sister Mary Ruth Scholarships

were awarded to Brody Ferencak and Wesley McErlane in kindergarten, Madeline Baker in second grade, Erica Schloemer and Jack Sunderman in sixth grade based on teacher nominations. The following students received the Student Council American Citizenship Award and pin: kindergarten – Thomas Roth and Ella Vatter; first grade – Alicia Burke and Megan Childs; second grade – Jason Childs and Rebecca Ochs; third grade – Heather Cook and Adam Kent; fourth grade – Collin Kandra and Mia Roth; fifth grade – Carmen Leisgang and Danny Moster; sixth grade-Hannah Bacon and Grace Paustian; seventh grade – Jill Kloepfer and Mikki Thai.

OFF IN STYLE

Delshire Elementary School cafeteria manager Lovey Schoch and cafeteria employee Dottie Reiter were celebrated by Delshire Elementary students at the end of school. Both retired from the district with over 25 years of service. As a final goodbye, students held up signs and cheered as Lovey and Dottie were driven by Superintendent Todd Yohey and human resources Director Sonny Tudor in a mustang convertible. PROVIDED.

YWCA’s Earl Sells scholarship In conjunction with the annual Career Women of Achievement awards, the YWCA also awards the finalists of the Mamie Earl Sells Scholarship. The Mamie Earl Sells Scholarship is awarded to an outstanding African-American female high school senior entering a post-secondary institution. Now in its 20th year, the scholarship was established in 1993, and honors the memory of the late Sells for her commitment and service to the YWCA and the community. The 2012 Mamie Earl Sells Scholarship winner, Whitney Hollingsworth of Northside, is a senior at Western Hills Engineering High School. Hollingsworth ranks first in her class and carries a GPA of 3.98. She has maintained her position as valedictorian since freshman year. She is a senior class officer runs track and field, and gives of her free time to volunteer. She has won numerous scholastic awards, including being a two time national runner-up, Ohio affiliate winner and Cincinnati Tri-State winner for the National Center for Women & Information Technology “Aspirations in Computing Award.” Hollingsworth has ambitions of being a computer scientist, author and inventor and will start on that journey this fall as a freshman studying computer science at the University of Cincinnati. Over 50 applications from more than 20 Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky schools were submitted. Factors evaluat-

PRESS

Editor: Marc Emral, memral@communitypress.com, 578-1053

ACHIEVEMENTS | NEWS | ACTIVITIES | HONORS

At the St. Dominic School closing Awards Assembly held on June 1, students were awarded scholarships towards tution for next school year and various awards totaling $7,350.00. The Jacob & Sydney Wittich Memorial Scholarships were awarded to fourth-grader Abigail Baker and third-grader Tommy Schoener selected for their family's committment to Catholic Education. Eight PTO Father Collins Christian Scholarships were awarded to Ethan Lipps – kindergarten; Emma Walter – first grade; Bridget Barron – second grade; Gabriel McDonald – third grade; Ella Hartung – fourth grade; Ally Albertz – fifth grade;

COMMUNITY

The 2012 Mamie Earl Sells Scholarship winner Whitney Hollingsworth, second from left, the with YWCA President and CEO Charlene Ventura, left, and Barbra Smitherman, scholarship committee co-chair, and Sue Allen, scholarship committee co-chairwoman. PROVIDED. ed by the scholarship committee include academic record, challenges and hardships, ACT and/or SAT scores, letters of recommendation, class rank, involvement in extracurricular activities, employment and community service. In addition to the scholarship winner, the YWCA names two runners-up and seven honorable mentions. The two runners-up: » Rashawnda Joiner of North College Hill, who attended Mount Healthy High School, and » Dominique Wreh of Westwood, who attended Summit Country Day School. The seven honorable mentions are: » Brittany Allen, Withrow University High School;

» Valeta Brown, Princeton High School; » Micaiah Copeland, Walnut Hills High School; » Indyasia Johnson, James N. Gamble Montessori; » Rannie McCants, School for the Creative & Performing Arts; » Kayla Mitchell, Holmes High School; and » Jai’La Nored, Purcell Marian High School. The young women were presented their scholarship awards at a spring recognition tea at the historic YWCA building on Walnut Street. Family, school administrators and YWCA board members gathered together in celebration of the many accomplishments of these bright young women.

CommunityPress.com

COLLEGE CORNER Dean’s list

The following students were named to the second semester dean’s list at Miami University: Aaron Baker, Rachel Blake, Elizabeth Cook, Trevor Cook, Taylor Deters, Tarra Dirkes, Madeline Earley, Jacqueline Ehrman, Kevin Haas, Joseph Healey, Laurie Jacob, Lindsey Knorr, Josh Kremer, Alexander Lewis, Ryan Martini, Katherine Moster, Benjamin Proud, Katherine Rohr, Melissa Rohr, Michael Schwarz, Jessica Seger, Cathy Smith, Alison Stevens, Abigail Sturgill, Eric Thorman, Stephanie Weber and Amber Wynn. ■ The following students were named to the spring dean's list at the University of Cincinnati: Kelsey Abel, Terrence Aufermann, Paula Bader, Lisa Bambach, Alexandra Bauer, Daniel Beck, Kathryn Berling, Allison Biggs, Amy Billow, Maxwell Bischoff, Matthew Book, John Boylson, Matthew Bretnitz, Jonathan Budde, Kati Carney, Sarah Carr, Spencer Chamberlain, Brittany Christian, Zachary Clark, Colin Craig, Allison Eberle, Lindsay Ebner, Amy Echler, Kaitlin Elliott, Hope Esposito, Michael Fern, Kayla Finn, Jason Fishburn, Brittany Fitzgerald, Ryan Fleming, Joseph Fricke, Joseph Frost, Grania Frueh, Lyndsey Geiser, Samuel Geroulis, Dameisha Gibson, Charles Graham, Angelia Gregg, Katie Griffith, Molly Hackett, Christopher Hais, Regina Hartfiel, Jacob Hartmann, Emily Hautman, Michael Hegman, Christina Heil, Rachel Heinlein, Michael Hetzer, Zachary Hoffman, Clark Horning, Christina Jeremiah, Nicole Johnson, Sarah Johnston, Matthew Kaeser, Matthew Kallmeyer, Colleen Kane, Lera Khubunaia, Daveen Knue, Victoria Koch, Jeffrey Kollmann, Melanie Laiveling, Kristin Lasita, Lauren Lehan, Junyi Li, Jennifer Little, Thomas Mann, Maria Mathews, Keenen Maull, Molly McKee, Erin Merz, Kara Miladinov, Steven Mittermeier, Alex Moore, Lydia Morton, David Murphy, Krista Newland, Jessica Nolte, Sara Piller, Melissa Rapier, Jennifer Ross, Carolyn Rydyznski, Charles Saunders, Lisa Schott, Daniel Schroyer, Gregory Schulz, Patrick Seifert, Christopher Smith, Athena Stefanou, Zachary Studt, Veronica Sunderman, Kristen Suter, Geraldine Suyat, Mark Tepe, Nathan Terry, James Topmiller, Benjamin Van Oflen, Andrew Wagner, Timothy Wagner, Andrew Wahler,

Kaitlin Welch, Paige Westerfield, Brian Wiechert, Nicholas Wiedeman, Robert Williams and Kathryn Wittich.

Graduates

David Doll has graduated from Columbus State Community College. ■ Jillian Fitzpatrick has graduated from Emory University with a master’s degree in public health. ■ Meredith McKinney has graduated from Butler University with a degree in pharmacy. ■ The following students have graduated from Northern Kentucky University: Timothy Barron, an educational leadership doctoral graduate degree major; Amanda Boeshart, a music education undergraduate degree major; Caitlin Brown, a theater arts undergraduate degree major; Michael Cook, a finance undergraduate degree major; James Engle, a business administration graduate degree major; Aaron Geraci, a fine arts undergraduate degree major; Daniel Gerhardt, a computer information technology undergraduate degree major; John Hoffman, an industrial organizational psychology undergraduate degree major; Amanda Huster, a radiologic technology undergraduate degree major; Lindsey Ingram, a psychology undergraduate degree major; Caprise Johnson, a liberal studies undergraduate degree major; Debra Kasel, an educational leadership doctoral graduate degree major; Alex Meyer, a computer information technology undergraduate degree major; Amy Nicely, a computer information technology undergraduate degree major; Kimberly Pastura, a business administration undergraduate degree major; Laura Prost, a nursing undergraduate degree major; Kevin Rohrmeier, a marketing undergraduate degree major; Katarina Schneider, a biological sciences graduate degree major; Sarah Seibert, a criminal justice undergraduate degree major; Sonya Thielmann, a public administration graduate degree major; and Stacey Welch, a middle grades education undergraduate degree major.

Seton students join Leadership Scholars This spring, 21 Seton High School students were honored for their commitment to the Leadership Scholars program. This nonprofit organization pairs high school seniors and juniors with inner-city seventh and eighth grade students to share information about college, communication and leadership while providing emotional support. Student leaders are required to make a two-year commitment to the Leadership Scholars program. This year, the following Seton students were honored for the time they committed to the organization: » Melissa Alexander,

» Julie Buttlewerth, » Sarah Clark, » Anna Combs, » Emma Lindle, » Mollie Ruffing, » Kylee Siefke, » Lindsey Ackerman, » Hannah Beckman, » Danielle Drinkuth, » Katie Finfrock, » Morgan Hughes, » Taylor Kuhl, » Thandy Mamutse, » Marisa Meyer, » Ali Moehring, » Kara Rattermann, » Helena Sabato, » Maggie Sollmann, » Anna Stagge and » Andrea Toth.


NEWS

A6 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • JULY 25, 2012

Three jailed for aggravated robbery

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The Montana Avenue improvement project in Westwood is entering its final stages. Andréa Henderson, a project engineer with Cincinnati’s transportation and engineering department, said steps to finish the project are scheduled to begin the week of July 23. Those steps include grinding the existing pavement, resurfacing and installing new pavement markings and signs. “The project began in the third quarter of 2011 and will be substantially complete by mid-August,” she said. Henderson stopped by the Westwood Civic Association meeting Tuesday, July 17, to give residents an

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SPORTS

JULY 25, 2012 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • A7

COMMUNITY

PRESS

Editor: Melanie Laughman, mlaughman@communitypress.com, 513-248-7573

HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | RECREATIONAL

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Much on the ‘Horizon’ St. X grad honored, may head to European league By Tom Skeen tskeen@communitypress.com

DELHI TWP. — Walt Gibler ended his basketball career for Loyola University in perhaps the sweetest way possible without winning a championship. The St. Xavier graduate and Delhi Township resident was the recipient of the Cecil H. Coleman Medal of Honor June 28 – the highest individual honor in the Horizon League. “It was an incredible honor to get,” Gibler said. “I definitely didn’t expect it with all the good people and variety of sports in the league. It was a great way to end my career and was the cherry on top of an amazing experience.” To add to his legacy as a Rambler, Gibler became the 18th player in school history to finish his career with 1,000 points and 500 rebounds, while finishing his senior year averaging12.4 points and 5.8 rebounds per game, both personal bests. Even though he ended his career on a team that finished 7-23 and lost in the firstround of the Horizon League Tournament to Detroit, it didn’t ruin his four years as a Rambler. “It was an unbelievable experience,” he said. “Obviously I would have liked to win more, but truly only one team in the country won enough games and that is the national champion. We played against some top-level competition and I couldn’t ask for more. Living in Chicago was unbeliev-

St. Xavier and Loyola graduate Walt Gibler squares up for a jumper in a loss against Butler. Gibler was the recipient of the 2012 Cecil H. Coleman Medal of Honor. THANKS TO STEVEN WOLTMANN able as well. On and off the court, I was blessed with an awesome experience.” Gibler signed with an agent just over a month ago and is looking to go overseas to play somewhere in Western Europe. In a process that moves quickly, Gibler should know where he will play within a month and a half and could be on his way across the ocean within “three to four days” after finding out. If things go the way he wants, training camp will start in August and the season runs from October through February. If for some reason basketball doesn’t work out, Gibler has his degree to fall back on. He was named to the Horizon League Honor Roll three times, the National Jesuit Men’s Basketball All-Academic Team twice and the Horizon League All-Academic Team and the I-AAA Scholar-Athlete Team as a senior, all while maintain nearly a 4.0 GPA.

Fun event held in honor of Nocheck Money raised will go to scholarship fund By Tom Skeen tskeen@communitypress.com

GREEN TWP. — On Saturday, Aug. 4, at Woodhaven Swim Club, a memorial swim meet will honor former Oak Hills swim coach Mike Nocheck, who died June 22 of pancreatic cancer. The Oak Hills swimming and diving alumni have created the Mick Nocheck Scholarship Fund with all proceeds from the event going to the fund. The scholarship will be given to an Oak Hills senior swimmer or diver. “The event is a fun swim meet,” Oak Hills athletic director Jan Wilking said. “We will have many races and funky relays. All

ages are welcome to swim or cheer on the swimmers. There will be food, drinks and baked good for sale along with other fundraising items.” Doors will open at 5 p.m. with the races beginning around 5:30 p.m. Donations will be accepted at the door for admittance and the race events are $3 each. Those unable to attend Aug. 4 can drop off donations at Oak Hills High School c/o Nicole Lane, with checks payable to Oak Hills Athletic Boosters or OHAB for the Coach Nocheck Memorial Scholarship fund. Write “Coach Nocheck memorial fund” in the memo section. Donations can be mailed to: OHAB, P.O. Box 58451, Cincinnati, Ohio 45258. Attention: Nicole Lane, OHAB treasurer. For details regarding the event or the scholarship fund, visit facebook.com/CoachNocheckMemorialScholarship.

SIDELINES Buckeyes baseball

The 11U Cincinnati Buckeyes select baseball team will conduct tryouts: 6-8 p.m., Thursday, July 26, at Delhi Park on Field 7. 5-8 p.m., Sunday, July 29, at Delhi Park on Field 7. Attendance at both tryout dates is not mandatory but is encouraged. For questions or information please contact Gary Schloemer at 675-6734. Players may not reach age 12 prior to May 1, 2013.

Weststars tryouts

The Cincinnati Weststars 11U National Baseball team is looking for experi-

enced pitchers for the 2013 season. Serious inquiries only. Please contact Dan Dugan at 2136900 to schedule a private tryout.

8U baseball tryouts

An 8U baseball ball team is being started for next summer with the Cincinnati Future Stars. Tryouts are noon to 2 p.m., Sundays, July 29 and Aug. 5, at Lincoln Lee Baseball Complex. The team is looking for players willing to play at a highly competitive level. For questions, contact scottroberts@zoomtown.com.

Myrtle Beach Pelicans outfielder Josh Richmond takes a cut during a game against the Wilmington Blue Rocks at April 8 in Myrtle Beach, S.C. Richmond is hitting .164 with 19 RBI this season. THANKS TO ROBERT GURGANUS

Richmond works through 1st-time struggles Oak Hills grad enjoys time, matures with Rangers organization By Tom Skeen tskeen@communitypress.com

GREEN TWP. — Every athlete experiences some struggles along the way to the pinnacle of their particular sport. After working his way through the first two stages of A-ball, Oak Hills grad Josh Richmond is amid the biggest struggle thus far in his career with the Myrtle Beach Pelicans in High-A, an affiliate for the Texas Rangers. “So far I haven’t been seeing the success I anticipated at the beginning of the year,” Richmond said. “It’s a tough game; it’s a grind. I’ve grown a lot as a person and a player this year. It’s the first time in my career I’m seeing failure at the plate.” Richmond want to get things turned around after hitting just .164 with 19 RBI in 232 at-bats, but he knows everybody goes through slumps. “Although I haven’t had the best season, I’ve learned a lot and matured as a player,” he

said. “On this journey you need to see a little bit of failure, you definitely are going to. It’s made me take a step back and learn a lot about the game.” About 16 months ago, Richmond was blessed with his No. 1 fan when his son was born. Although he dedicates everything he can to the game of baseball, his priorities have changed. “He definitely comes first in my life,” Richmond said. “My relationship with God and my son is my life. I love baseball. I live to play the game. My entire life revolves around the game, but it is so much more to be a father, and to see him watch me is an amazing feeling. I love it and it makes it easier to go out and work hard and do what I do knowing I am setting an example for him.” The Richmonds are a baseball family going back to Josh’s father who played at Eastern Kentucky, down to his two younger brothers who currently play. “(Baseball) is really big,” he

said. “We’ve always been a baseball family. I grew up watching my father and now my brothers are watching me. My boy is already hitting off the tee. I come home and he is sweating after playing on the tee with his mom.” Richmond, who is getting married in October 2013, isn’t just a father, but a role model for his younger brother, Jake, who is a senior at Oak Hills and already receiving offers to play college ball. Josh is doing whatever he can to help little brother through the process. “That is the one thing that makes me feel so good is to be able to give him advice,” the elder Richmond said. “I had my dad, but I was kind of the first one to do this, the first one to sign professionally. He definitely calls me and takes in everything I tell him. I try to relay everything I can and try to help. I just try to tell him you are going to fail, especially in baseball. It’s the only sport you can do everything right, hit a missile and they catch it.”


VIEWPOINTS A8 • PRICE HILL PRESS • JULY 25, 2012

Beating a dead horse

In response to the article “Good works can’t overcome actions,” please allow the writer to be more specific as to why he’s still beating a dead horse over something that happened 20 years ago, i.e. nuns, airplanes and the Delhi community. In retrospect, maybe this writer would dare to do a little compare and contrast as to what makes for a good politician vs. a good female nun? Oh, and by the way, the humorous part of his plane complaint: there are now more Canadian geese flying over Delhi than airplanes. Oops, there goes the environment. Trustees, let’s find a way to tax those Canadians for invading our Delhi air space before you know who sells us out again. No pun intended sister, (after all you are the largest employer in Delhi, for which we thank you). Most importantly, the sad part of this writer’s point of view, which he doesn’t address, is think about taking his political expertise to the next level of humanity, and help find jobs for the unemployed (pilots, plane workers, young people, teachers, government workers, small business owners, laborers, etc.). No pun intended Mr. Auditor, (after all you are an elected official withe employees of your own, for which we thank you). Bill Keenan Delhi Township

No excuse

I guess it was too much to expect that my recent column on renegade Catholic nuns wouldn’t provoke the usual charges of “grudges” and “vendettas.” And I must have missed the memo that said because a handful of priests betrayed their vows the Church no longer had the right to speak on faith and morals. It doesn’t matter how “prestigious” one might believe the College of Mount St. Joseph to be or how many “respected businessmen” and “people of importance” serve on its board or speak at its functions. I am very happy last week’s guest column writer claims no “terrible results” although she did acknowledge airplanes prevented her from hearing instructors at the college. Did the Sisters of Charity ask “What Would Jesus Do” before they made their private deal with the Northern Kentucky airport? Rather than answering the community’s questions and explaining their actions, just as some nuns now, they responded by only citing their good works and service. The point is that this is no answer and does not excuse what they did. Finally, if one believes women should be priests they probably should find another

ABOUT LETTERS AND COLUMNS We welcome your comments on editorials, columns, stories or other topics important to you in The Community Press. Include your name, address and phone number(s) so we may verify your letter. Letters of 200 or fewer words and columns of 500 or fewer words have the best chance of being published. All submissions may be edited for length, accuracy and clarity. Deadline: Noon Friday E-mail: memral@community press.com Fax: 853-6220 U.S. mail: See box below Letters, columns and articles submitted to The Community Press may be published or distributed in print, electronic or other forms.

faith.

Dusty Rhodes Delhi Township

Good deal

I have heard for years how people think their gas and electric bills are to high. I, like most, do not like paying bills. So to put things into perspective, I took my last gas and electric bill of $273 and divided it by 30 days. According to my calculator that is $9.10. That is my per day average cost through one of the hottest spells we have ever had in this part of the country. During that time I would have paid the $9.10 just for air conditioning. I keep our thermostat at 75 degrees 24 hours a day, and we have a two-story 2,500-square-foot house. For that $9.10 I also received lighting, refrigerated/frozen food, TV, stereo, hot water, gas to cook with and all of the other stuff I have forgotten. I think that is a pretty good deal. In fact I went to lunch with some buddies the other day and spent more than $9.10 on lunch! Thanks Duke for keeping costs down and passing those savings onto us. Dave Schafer Delhi Township

Time to unite

I am sure what Jesus would do is say, “Forgive and Forget.” We have heard from both Dusty and Tina now it is time to say, “Knock it off and get on with your lives” we as Catholics face enough challenges in the next several months it is a time to unite and not divide, as the old adage says, “divide and conquer,” so let us all as Christians put our petty grievances aside and unite for the good of the country. Larry Schmolt Price Hill

PRESS

Editor: Marc Emral, memral@communitypress.com, 853-6264

EDITORIALS | LETTERS | COLUMNS | CH@TROOM

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

COMMUNITY CommunityPress.com

Your newspaper covering your local news As you probably know, the cost of your Community Press Newspaper is increasing. Starting this month, the cost of a monthly voluntary payment will be $3.50, up from $2.50. There are a few factors that went into this decision. Community Press Newspapers have not increased its cost since 2001 - 11 years. There have not been many items in our lives that have not increased in price in 11 years. As you can imagine, many of the costs in producing our weekly newspapers have gone up - ink, newsprint, gas for our delivery people and salaries of all of our workers. If you receive your newspaper from one of our junior carriers, they keep as their pay half of all they collect. That means 50 cents of the $1 increase will go into their pockets; the carriers appreciate when you pay for your service. If your newspaper is delivered by a motor carrier, a voluntary pay envelope for $10.50 will be inserted into your paper every three

months. This increase will enable us to remain the place to go for your local news. What is Marc Emral happening in your school EDITOR’S NOTEBOOK district, your township, city, village - all over our coverage area - will be covered in our pages. We’ll have news from your schools, community events, new businesses opening, road work planned and new developments in all of our areas. In our classified section, you will find great buys on homes, cars, find employment, and find out where your neighborhood garage and yards sales will be held. What to look forward to this fall is the start of school and the start of fall sports seasons. We’ll continue to give you news from your school rooms - from the newest teachers to the National Merit Scholars. We’ll also be there during the coming sports seasons

covering the athletes as they aspire to win state titles. From football, to golf to tennis and volleyball, all of the sports, we’ll be here to bring you the race for the championships. Last year, we followed Ursuline’s Mehvish Safdar who won the girls Division I state tennis title and Mount Notre Dame as it won in girls volleyball We’ll also be there on the West Side as Mercy Health West Hospital is taking shape in preparation of an October 2013 opening in Green Township. And on the East Side as the area moves forward with the Eastern Corridor Study. And in Clermont County as it works through new development and all of what that means. We are the only place you will find most of the stories that affect your daily life. I hope you continue to read your Community Press Newspaper. Thanks for reading. Marc Emral is a senior editor at Community Press Newspapers. He can be reached at memral@communitypress.com.

Walking the walk in Covedale

Avid walkers agree – walking frees the mind, replenishes the body and stirs the soul. So, why is it that people don’t walk more? According to urban planner Andres Duany, “People will walk if walking is convenient and pleasant.” Unfortunately, new spread-out auto-dependent development offers little in the way of pedestrian-friendly environments. But neighborhoods designed in the traditional manner, like Covedale, have sidewalks and catwalks that connect residents to meaningful destinations. So places to pray, shop, study, play, dine and relax are easily accessible by foot. Street patterns also affect the walking experience. Instead of cul-de-sacs feeding into a busy “collector road” the grid network of traditional neighborhoods provides multiple routes between destinations. Narrow streets with on-street parking calms traffic, and parked cars and curb trees act as barriers

between the sidewalk and moving cars – also helping to make walking pleasant, interesting and safe. Jim Grawe In short, COMMUNITY PRESS traditional GUEST COLUMNIST neighborhoods are designed for people, not automobiles. And the quality of life they engender is not going un-noticed. Social observers explain that people are not only more physically fit but are much friendlier – or at least less sociopathic – when they walk. Why? Because when driving we compete for space, which by nature is an adversarial relationship; our only means of communicating is the sound of the horn and the gesture of the hand. But when time is spent enjoying pleasant, pedestrian-friendly public space, and the sociability it engenders, we are

more likely to learn the civic arts of conversation and just simply getting along. Certainly there is more than one way to live. So, when choosing a place of residence it’s good to know how a neighborhood’s configuration can affect one’s lifestyle. In Covedale we seem to enjoy more of life’s simple pleasures, like walking and meeting neighbors on the street and getting to know them – and their dogs – or simply sitting on the porch and waving at passers by, “exotic rituals” that gives Covedale its “Hi neighbor!” charm. To be fair, in the “one size fits all” sense, there is no perfect neighborhood. But if you think that blending thoughtful sesign with a spirit of neighborliness is a good idea, then welcome to Covedale, where neighbors become friends! Jim Grawe is the co-founder of the Covedale Neighborhood Association.

Bottoms beehive of activity in city’s early history The Bottoms is an old neighborhood that started at Public Landing and went up to Sixth Street. It also took in Walnut Street east to the foot of Mount Adams. It is where Cincinnati began. Cincinnati’s progress was slow until 1811 when the steamboat started landing there. A collection of warehouses, manufacturing plants, and retail stores, hotels, railroad stations, churches and saloons resulted. By 1900 mechanized transportation caused rich people to move from the crowded, smelly

city to the suburbs. That left poor people and immigrants from Lebanon, Ireland, Japan, China, GermaBetty ny and Italy. Kamuf There were COMMUNITY PRESS many historic GUEST COLUMNIST buildings, like Pennsylvania Railroad Station, Spencer House Hotel, Pearl Street Market and the many tenements buildings. The residents were very

PRICE HILL

PRESS

A publication of

religious and there were many churches, mostly Catholic. The largest was the St. Xavier complex on Sycamore between Sixth and Seventh. It contained a church, a grade school, a commercial school for girls, Notre Dame Academy, Xavier High School, and Xavier University. There were three Irish churches: the Church of the Atonement stood on both Third and Fourth streets; St. Thomas stood on Sycamore Street at Cuts Alley; Sacred Heart, the Italian church, now in Camp Washington, was at Sixth and

Broadway. St. Anthony of Padua, the Lebanese church, now on Victory Parkway, was on Third Street. Other churches were torn down. St. Philomena, a German church, was located on Pearl Street until the steeple fell on the candy store. Then it moved to Third Street. Besides the Catholic churches there was the Pentecostal Church on Third Street, the Methodist Church on Pearl Street, the A.M.E. Allen Temple on Sycamore, and Wesley Chapel on Fifth Street. The Christ

5556 Cheviot Road Cincinnati, Ohio 45247 phone: 923-3111 fax: 853-6220 email: pricehillpress@communitypress.com web site: www.communitypress.com

Church on east Fourth Street is the only one left. Children were safe in the bottoms. The gatekeeper at the Taft’s house watched out for them. They could go to the Emery Theater at Central Parkway and Walnut to rehearse and act in operettas. The north side of Pearl Street, around the market, was often closed after 6 p.m., so the neighborhood kids could play. Betty Kamuf lives in Sayler Park. You can email her at westnews@communitypress.com

Price Hill Press Editor Marc Emral memral@communitypress.com, 853-6264 Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday See page A2 for additional contact information.


WEDNESDAY, JULY 25, 2012

LIFE

COMMUNITY PRESS

PEOPLE | IDEAS | RECIPES

Price Hill residents Kenia Valdez, 11, left, and Lilana Holbrook, 8, fling their arms up in joy as they ride the Scrambler at Coney Island during the annual Price Hill Day. KURT BACKSCHEIDER/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Price Hill resident Kayden Owens, left, and his cousin, Korey Boyles of Sayler Park, do some scheming as they prepare to spend the afternoon in Sunlite Pool during the annual Price Hill Day at Coney Island. KURT BACKSCHEIDER/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

PRICE HILL ENJOYS ITS DAY AT

CONEY ISLAND

By Kurt Backscheider

kbackscheider@communitypress.com

Spending a day at Coney Island is very nostalgic for Gail and Glenn Miller. The Price Hill couple have fond childhood memories of making the trek east to swim in Sunlite Pool and experience the thrills on the amusement park’s rides. “When we started dating, I used to bring her on dates to Moonlight Gardens,” Mr. Miller said. He and his wife relived some of those memories Wednesday, July 18, as they made the trip out to Coney Island for the annual Price Hill Day. Mrs. Miller said they’ve been regularly taking part in Price Hill Day for the past six or seven years. They were there this year with a group of 15 friends and family. “It’s nice to get together with everyone,” she said. “I enjoy coming out here because it’s just an easy, relaxing and fun day.” The Millers joined hundreds of other West Siders who gathered at Coney for the neighborhood tradition dating back 96 years. The Price Hill Civic and Businessman’s Club, now known as the Civic Club, started Price Hill Day in 1916. The Price Hill Historical Society took over sponsoring it in the late 1990s. Price Hill Day was held at Stricker’s Grove for several years, but the society moved it back to Coney Island in 2000.

Florence Sparks, an historical society member who helps organize Price Hill Day each year with her husband, Dave, and society treasurer Betty Wagner, said the ticket sales for this year’s celebration went well and, despite scattered rainstorms, she expected a good turnout. “It’s a really good deal for our neighborhood,” she said. “For a $13 ticket, you get access to the pool, all the rides, parking and the use of the picnic shelter.” She said she and her husband have been involved in organizing Price Hill Day for about seven years, and she and Mr. Sparks, who volunteered for Cincinnati Public Schools for 35 years, continue coming back each year because they enjoy doing it for the children. Mr. Sparks said, “I like to see the kids have fun.” Dave Callahan, a longtime Price Hill resident who now lives in Delhi Township, said he also enjoys watching the children soak up the fun. He said his family has been coming out to Coney for Price Hill Day for the past 10 years, and he likes the time he gets to spend with his children and grandchildren. Callahan wakes up early the day of the outing to prepare a feast of fried chicken and homemade pizza for his family to snack on while taking a break from swimming and riding the rides. “This is a great get together for the community,” he said. “They should have it more than once a year.”

Jeff Sparks, a Cleves resident, walks his granddaughter, Chloe Swane, to the rides at Coney Island during the annual Price Hill Day. Sparks’ parents, Price Hill residents Dave and Florence Sparks, help organize the day at Coney each summer. KURT BACKSCHEIDER/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Bridgetown sisters Lydia, left, and Mackenzi, far right, enjoy a post-lunch lollipop with their mother, Tara Callahan, while taking a break from swimming at Coney Island during the annual Price Hill Day at the amusement park. KURT BACKSCHEIDER/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Price Hill residents Gail and Glenn Miller unpack their cooler and get the picnic ready under the Shooting Star pavilion during the annual Price Hill Day at Coney Island. KURT BACKSCHEIDER/THE COMMUNITY PRESS


B2 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • JULY 25, 2012

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD THURSDAY, JULY 26 Exhibition of Mount Student Art & Design, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Studio San Giuseppe Art Gallery at the College of Mount St. Joseph, 5701 Delhi Road, Exhibit showcases student work from the 2011-2012 school year. Free. Presented by College of Mount St. Joseph. 244-4314; www.msj.edu. Delhi Township.

The Wedding Singer, 8 p.m., Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, 4990 Glenway Ave., It’s 1985 and rock-star wannabe Robbie Hart is New Jersey’s favorite wedding singer. He’s the life of the party, until his own fiancée leaves him at the altar. $10-$20. Presented by Cincinnati Young People’s Theatre. 241-6550; www.cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com. West Price Hill.

Exercise Classes

Senior Citizens

Gentle Beginners Ashtanga Vinyasa Flow Yoga, 7-8 p.m., EarthConnection, 370 Neeb Road, Gentle progression of postures to ease into a fulfilling Ashtanga practice. Each class engaging in a flow of asanas, creating a moving meditation of energy and heat. Family friendly. $7 drop-in, $30 for five-class pass, $49 for 10-class pass, $85 for 20-class pass. Presented by Yoga by Marietta. 675-2725; www.yogabymarietta.com. Delhi Township. Boot Camp, 7-8 p.m., Western Sports Mall, 2323 Ferguson Road, Combination of strength training and conditioning that will help you improve strength, lower body fat, improve body composition and improve aerobic and anaerobic capacity. $10. 451-4905. Westwood.

Pinochle, Noon-4 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, 385-3780. Green Township. Arthritis Exercise, Noon-12:45 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Workout to videos geared to help lessen arthritis symptoms. For seniors. Free. 385-3780. Green Township. Taking Off Pounds Sensibly, 10-11 a.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Weight loss support and accountability. For seniors. $28 annual fee. 385-3780. Green Township.

Art Exhibits

Health / Wellness Balancing Hormones Naturally, 6-7 p.m., Aroma’s Java and Gelato, 6407 Bridgetown Road, Main dining room. Information on natural alternatives to address PMS and menopause symptoms. Ages 21 and up. Free. Presented by Foundation for Wellness Professionals. 574-3000. Green Township.

Recreation Thursday Night Lightz, 7 p.m.-12:30 a.m., Edgewater Sports Park, 4819 E. Miami River Road, Heads-up car and motorcycle drag racing, burnout competition, music, food and $1 beers. Gates open 6 p.m. $5 off at participating sponsors. $10; $15 to race, requirements available online. Presented by Thursday Night Lightz. 874-2508; www.facebook.com/ThursdayNightLightz. Cleves.

Senior Citizens Exercise to Music, 10-11 a.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, $1. 385-3780. Green Township. Open Bridge, 12:15-3:15 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Free. 385-3780. Green Township.

FRIDAY, JULY 27 Art Exhibits Exhibition of Mount Student Art & Design, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Studio San Giuseppe Art Gallery at the College of Mount St. Joseph, Free. 244-4314; www.msj.edu. Delhi Township.

Community Dance Butler Squares, 7:30-10 p.m., Miami Whitewater Township Firehouse, 6736 Ohio 128, Plus-level square dance club open to all experienced dancers. $5. Presented by Southwestern Ohio/Northern Kentucky Square Dancers Federation. 929-2427. Miamitown.

Exercise Classes Tone and Strength, 9-10 a.m., Western Sports Mall, 2323 Ferguson Road, Combination of upper body, lower body and core strengthening exercises mixed in with light conditioning and stretching. $10. 451-4905. Westwood.

Farmers Market Lettuce Eat Well Farmers Market, 3-7 p.m., Harvest Home Park, 3961 North Bend Road, Locally produced food items. Free. Presented by Lettuce Eat Well. 661-1792; www.lewfm.org. Cheviot.

SATURDAY, JULY 28 Art & Craft Classes Books Alive! for Kids, 11 a.m., Covedale Branch Library, 4980 Glenway Ave., Interactive program combines sight, sound and touch by presenting a book, engaging children in a performance and providing a handson, make-it-and-take-it craft. Free. Presented by Public Library of Cincinnati & Hamilton County. 369-4460; www.cincinnatilibrary.org. West Price Hill.

Civic Yard Trimmings Drop-off, 11:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Kuliga Park, 6717 Bridgetown Road, Hamilton County residents may drop off yard trimmings. Free to all Hamilton County Residents. Bring proof of residency. Landscapers and commercial establishments not eligible to participate. Free. Presented by Hamilton County Recycling and Solid Waste District. 946-7766; www.hamiltoncountyrecycles.org. Green Township.

Exercise Classes Zumba Class, 9-9:30 a.m., Curves - Miami Heights/Cleves, 3797 Shady Lane, $2. 467-1189; www.miamiheightscurves.com. Miami Heights. Vinyasa Flow Yoga for Fitness, 9-10 a.m., Western Sports Mall, 2323 Ferguson Road, Practice ancient styles and modern mix of vinyasa flows, with integrated music. $10, free for members. 451-4900. Westwood. Boot Camp, 9-10 a.m., Western Sports Mall, $10. 451-4905. Westwood.

Festivals Our Lady of Lourdes Family Festival, 5-11 p.m., Our Lady of Lourdes, Free. 922-0715; www.lourdes.org. Westwood.

Literary - Story Times Books Alive for Kids Summer Library Tour, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Covedale Branch Library, 4980 Glenway Ave., Combines sight, sound and touch by presenting a book, engaging children in performance and providing hands-on make-it-and-take-it craft. Free. Presented by Learning Through Art Inc. 242-6028; www.learningthroughart.com. West Price Hill.

Music - Blues Chuck Brisbin & the Tuna Project, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Poppy’s Tavern, 5510 Rybolt Road, Free. 574-6333. Green Township.

On Stage - Theater The Wedding Singer, 8 p.m., Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, $10-$20. 241-6550; www.cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com. West Price Hill.

Festivals

Recreation

Our Lady of Lourdes Family Festival, 5-11 p.m., Our Lady of Lourdes, 2832 Rosebud Drive, Beer garden, food, games for all ages, raffle, rides and more. Free. 922-0715; www.lourdes.org. Westwood.

Kids Olympics Celebration, 11 a.m.-1 p.m., Refuge Coffee Bar, 5010 Glenway Ave., Specialty drinks and games for all ages. Olympics shows on three flatscreen TVs. 429-4215. Price Hill.

Music - Blues Chuck Brisbin & the Tuna Project, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Drew’s on the River, 4333 River Road, $3. 451-1157. Riverside.

On Stage - Theater

Summer Camp Religious/VBS Fun in the Son, 10 a.m.-1 p.m., New Hope Community Church, 3707 Edgewood Drive, Ages 5-12. Water games, crafts, snacks and a Bible lesson. Free. 6612428; www.visitnewhope.org. Green Township.

Billiards, 1:30-3:30 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Free. 385-3780. Green Township.

WEDNESDAY, AUG. 1 Art Exhibits Exhibition of Mount Student Art & Design, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Studio San Giuseppe Art Gallery at the College of Mount St. Joseph, Free. 244-4314; www.msj.edu. Delhi Township.

Exercise Classes

The Cincinnati Young People’s Theatre’s 31st annual summer musical, “The Wedding Singer,” kicks off Friday, July 27, at the Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, 4990 Glenway Ave. It’s 1985 and Robbie Hart was New Jersey’s favorite wedding singer until his own fiancee leaves him at the altar. Shot through the heart, he makes every wedding as disastrous as his own. Tickets are $20 for the gold section, $14, $12 for college students and senior citizens, and $10 for high school students and younger. For more information, call 241-6550. Pictured from front left are Reggie Hemphill as Sammy and Kelcey Steele as Robbie; second row, Dorsey Ziller as Rosie, Kalie Kaimann as Linda and Lindsey Mullen as Julia; third row, Brian Spencer as George and Jo Ellen Pellman as Holly. THANKS TO JENNIFER PERRINO.

Sunday, July 29 Civic Yard Trimmings Drop-off, 11:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Kuliga Park, Free. 946-7766; www.hamiltoncountyrecycles.org. Green Township.

Education Historic 1795 Cabin and Schoolhouse, 2-5 p.m., Shawnee Lookout Park, 2008 Lawrenceburg Road, Free, vehicle permit required. Presented by Hamilton County Park District. 521-7275; www.greatparks.org. North Bend.

Exercise Classes Yoga, 4-5 p.m., Guenthner Physical Therapy, 5557 Cheviot Road, Strengthen, stretch and tone with gentle postures that release tension rand support the integrity of the spine. Family friendly. $7 walk-in; $120 for 10 classes. 923-1700; www.guenthnerpt.com. Monfort Heights. Zumba, 10-11 a.m., Western Sports Mall, 2323 Ferguson Road, Latin dance-inspired fitness program combines dance and aerobic elements to create fun and challenging workout. $10. 451-4905. Westwood.

Festivals Our Lady of Lourdes Family Festival, 5-11 p.m., Our Lady of Lourdes, Free. 922-0715; www.lourdes.org. Westwood.

Music - Benefits Bobapalooza, 1-9 p.m., Legends, 3801 Harrison Ave., Scheduled to appear: The Sonny Moorman Group, Robin Lacy and Dezydeco, Chuck Brisbin and the Tuna Project, Dallas Moore, Cheryle Renee, Kenny Cowden, Kelly Thomas, and friends and Rock Candy. Doors open at noon. Food, split-the-pot, raffles and entertainment. Benefits Bob Cushing’s medical recover fund. $10. 662-1222; www.legendscincinnati.com. Cheviot.

On Stage - Theater The Wedding Singer, 8 p.m., Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, $10-$20. 241-6550; www.cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com. West Price Hill.

MONDAY, JULY 30 Art Exhibits Exhibition of Mount Student Art & Design, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Studio San Giuseppe Art Gallery at the College of Mount St. Joseph, Free. 244-4314; www.msj.edu. Delhi Township.

Exercise Classes Gentle Beginners Ashtanga Vinyasa Flow Yoga, 7-8 p.m., EarthConnection, $7 drop-in, $30 for five-class pass, $49 for 10-class pass, $85 for 20-class pass. 675-2725; www.yogabymarietta.com. Delhi Township. Yoga for Rookies: An Introduction, 5:45-6:45 p.m., EarthConnection, 370 Neeb Road, For participants who have never tried yoga. Class introduces each practitioner to a progression of pranayama

ABOUT CALENDAR To submit calendar items, go to www.cincinnati.com and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to life@communitypress.com along with event information. Items are printed on a spaceavailable basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to www.cincinnati.com and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page. (breathing techniques), focus of gaze and asanas (postures) leading to a unique practice for each participant. Family friendly. $7 drop-in, $30 for five-class pass, $49 for 10-class pass, $85 for 20-class pass. Presented by Yoga by Marietta. 675-2725; www.yogabymarietta.com. Delhi Township. Zumba, 5:30-6:30 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Wear comfortable workout attire and gym shoes. Bring water. $5. Presented by Deb’s Fitness Party. 205-5064; www.debsfitnessparty.com. Green Township. Total Joint Class, 1:30-2:30 p.m., Guenthner Physical Therapy, 5557 Cheviot Road, Designed for people who have finished physical therapy after joint replacement surgery but are looking to improve upon the progress they’ve made leading to a better quality of life. Family friendly. $7 walk-in; $90 for 15 classes. 923-1700; www.guenthnerpt.com. Monfort Heights. Tone and Strength, 9-10 a.m. and 6-7 p.m., Western Sports Mall, $10. 451-4905. Westwood.

Senior Citizens Chair Volleyball, 10 a.m.-noon, Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, 385-3780. Green Township. Indoor Cornhole, 10 a.m.-noon, Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, 385-3780. Green Township. Pinochle, Noon-4 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3853780. Green Township.

Summer Camp Religious/VBS Vacation Bible School, 6-8:30 p.m., Grace Lutheran Church, 3628 Boudinot Ave., Bible time, crafts, games, snack, Bible challenge and music. For Ages 4 to fifth grade. Free. 661-5166; www.gracemin.org. Westwood.

Summer Camp - YMCA Traditional Day Camps, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., Gamble-Nippert YMCA, 3159 Montana Ave., Ages 6-12. Monday-Friday. $130 per week for YMCA member, $160 per week for non-member. 661-1105. Westwood.

TUESDAY, JULY 31 Art Exhibits Exhibition of Mount Student Art & Design, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Studio San Giuseppe Art Gallery at the College of Mount St. Joseph, Free. 244-4314; www.msj.edu. Delhi Township.

Exercise Classes Pilates Mat Class, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Guenthner Physical Thera-

py, 5557 Cheviot Road, Taught by Judy Feazell. Family friendly. $15 drop-in; $120 for 10 classes. 923-1700; www.guenthnerpt.com. Monfort Heights. Body Sculpt, 6-7 p.m., Western Sports Mall, 2323 Ferguson Road, Divided into 15 minutes of cardio, 15 minutes of upper body toning, 15 minutes of core/ab toning and 15 minutes of leg toning. $10. 451-4905; westernsportmall.com. Westwood. Boot Camp, 6-7 a.m., Western Sports Mall, $10. 451-4905. Westwood. TRX Training, 7-8 p.m., Western Sports Mall, 2323 Ferguson Road, Consists of body-weight exercises to develop strength, balance, flexibility and core stability. $10. 451-4905. Westwood.

Farmers Market Sayler Park Farmers Market, 4-7 p.m., Sayler Park, Parkland Avenue and Monitor Street, Farmers Market with homegrown items like fruits, vegetables, desserts, salsas, relishes, jam and olive oil. Presented by Sayler Park Village Council. 675-0496. Sayler Park.

Literary - Story Times Summer Reading Kids Night, 6-7 p.m., Gold Star Chili Cleves, 4175 Ohio 128, Includes story time and hands-on activity. First 20 children receive story book to take home. Family friendly. Free. Presented by Public Library of Cincinnati & Hamilton County. 353-0709. Cleves.

Senior Citizens Quilting, 9:30-11:30 a.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Make blankets to donate to Project Linus and Children’s Hospital. For seniors. 385-3780. Green Township. Exercise to Music, 10-11 a.m., Green Township Senior Center, $1. 385-3780. Green Township. Ceramics, 11:30 a.m.-3 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, 385-3780. Green Township. Stability Ball, 9:30-10 a.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Bring your own stability ball and work on strengthening your core. For seniors. 385-3780. Green Township. Euchre, 12:30-3:30 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Open game. For seniors. 385-3780. Green Township. Pattern Dancing, 1-2:30 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Learn line dancing and have fun while exercising. For seniors. Free. 385-3780. Green Township.

Ashtanga Vinyasa Flow Yoga Classes, 5:30-6:45 p.m., EarthConnection, 370 Neeb Road, Sequence of postures to increase strength, flexibility and allow release of stress. Family friendly. $7 drop-in, $30 for five-class pass, $49 for 10-class pass, $85 for 20-class pass. Presented by Yoga by Marietta. 675-2725; www.yogabymarietta.com. Delhi Township. Yoga for the Back, 7-8 p.m., EarthConnection, 370 Neeb Road, Students use breath and movement to lengthen and strengthen the back muscles. Family friendly. $7 drop-in, $30 for five-class pass, $49 for 10class pass, $85 for 20-class pass. Presented by Yoga by Marietta. 675-2725; www.yogabymarietta.com. Delhi Township.

On Stage - Theater The Wedding Singer, 8 p.m., Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, $10-$20. 241-6550; www.cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com. West Price Hill.

Senior Citizens Pinochle, Noon-4 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3853780. Green Township. Vintage Artist, 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Place for artists to paint together. Beginners welcome. Bring own supplies. For seniors. Free. 385-3780. Green Township. Knitting and Crocheting, 10-11:30 a.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Knit or crochet blankets for Project Linus. Yarn provided. For seniors. Free. 385-3780. Green Township. Wood Carving, 1-3 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Carve with Greenwood Chippers. Many different techniques used: relief carvings, scroll saw, figurines. Bring own tools. For seniors. Free. 3853780. Green Township. Wii Bowling, 2-3:30 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Free. 385-3780. Green Township. Zumba Gold, 1-2 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Modified Zumba for seniors with standing and chair participation. For seniors. $3, $25 for 10 classes. 205-5064; www.debsfitnessparty.com. Green Township.

THURSDAY, AUG. 2 Art Exhibits Exhibition of Mount Student Art & Design, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Studio San Giuseppe Art Gallery at the College of Mount St. Joseph, Free. 244-4314; www.msj.edu. Delhi Township.

Exercise Classes Gentle Beginners Ashtanga Vinyasa Flow Yoga, 7-8 p.m., EarthConnection, $7 drop-in, $30 for five-class pass, $49 for 10-class pass, $85 for 20-class pass. 675-2725; www.yogabymarietta.com. Delhi Township. Boot Camp, 7-8 p.m., Western Sports Mall, $10. 451-4905. Westwood.

On Stage - Theater The Wedding Singer, 8 p.m., Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, $10-$20. 241-6550; www.cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com. West Price Hill.

Recreation Thursday Night Lightz, 7 p.m.-12:30 a.m., Edgewater Sports Park, $10; $15 to race, requirements available online. 874-2508; www.facebook.com/ ThursdayNightLightz. Cleves.

Senior Citizens Exercise to Music, 10-11 a.m., Green Township Senior Center, $1. 385-3780. Green Township. Open Bridge, 12:15-3:15 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, Free. 385-3780. Green Township.


LIFE

Refuge Bar celebrating economist’s birthday Refuge Coffee Bar, 5010 Glenway Ave., is part of an international effort celebrating the life and legacy of the late Milton Friedman, the late Nobel Prize winner who is considered one of the 20th century’s leading economists. The bar will welcome 100 attendees to a dinner presentation and celebration to honor Friedman on what would have been his 100th birthday from 4-9 p.m. Tuesday, July 31. Friedman’s theories on free markets and limited government dominated the economic and political discourse in the latter half of the 20th century. His opinions countered those of British economist John Maynard Keynes, who advocated for greater government spending as a way to prevent economic downtimes. Friedman also gained notoriety for his book “Capitalism and Freedom” and the PBS special “Free to Choose.” Organizers of Cincinnati’s 2012 Friedman celebration are asking that those interested in attending register by July 27 or until 100 seats are filled. Last year, Friedman Legacy for Freedom Day gatherings welcomed more than 8,400 people in 45 states and six countries. “There is a lot Ohio residents and leaders can still learn from Milton Friedman,” said Robert Enlow, president and CEO of the Friedman Foundation for Educational Choice, which Friedman and his wife, Rose, founded in 1996. “For those Ohio residents interested in boosting their economy, improving government, and providing access to a quality education for all, they should attend Refuge Coffee Bar’s Friedman Legacy for Freedom Day gathering.” Today, Friedman’s name appears frequently in matters related to school choice, as the late Nobel laureate was father of the school voucher idea.

JULY 25, 2012 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • B3

Recipes feature fresh herbs, plus help for drying your own herbs

We have a new neighbor and a boisterous one at that. In fact, when we ride our bikes past his house, he starts squawking. His name is Herman and, if I do say so myself, he’s a good looking male. I just wish his personality matched his looks. Herman is nosy to the point of obsession. He likes to position himself on the fence Rita so that he’s Heikenfeld high RITA’S KITCHEN enough up to see any and all activity on our old country road. Just so you know, Herman is a rooster, and no one knows his origins. He just showed up one day, running through everyone’s yards, finally taking up residence at the Collins’ home. Mike keeps telling me Herman should be with our little flock. I told him our rooster, Yardboy, is territorial and I’m sure he’d chase Herman back down the road.

“Just one more” stuffed mushrooms

These were a “secret” staple during my catering days. Nobody could ever eat just one. Depending upon the size of mushrooms, you may have stuffing left over. It freezes well. 1 lb. sausage, regular or hot 2-3 cups shredded mozzarella Palmful fresh basil, chopped, or 1 generous teaspoon dried basil 2 lbs. mushrooms, stems removed (save for other uses) Parsley for garnish

Preheat oven to 350. Combine everything but mushrooms. Stuff mushrooms and place on baking sheet. Bake 20-30 minutes until sausage is done. Sprinkle with parsley.

away, also. If refrigerated overnight, allow extra baking time. Filling:

1 stick unsalted butter, softened 1 cup sugar 2 large eggs, room temperature 8 oz. sour cream 2 teaspoons vanilla 2 cups flour 1 teaspoon each: baking powder and soda Dash salt

Streusel: Mix together:

Rita calls these “just one more” stuffed mushrooms, made from a old catering recipe.

Fresh tomato mozzarella tart Homegrown tomatoes are available and just the best for this recipe. Some folks like to squeeze out part of the juice and seeds of the tomatoes. 1 pie crust 1 tablespoon flour 8 oz. mozzarella, Monterey Jack or a combination of both Salt and pepper to taste ½ to ¾ cup mayonnaise, regular or light (start out with ½ cup; if too thick to spread, add a bit more as needed) Tomatoes, thickly sliced, enough to make a layer 1 bunch green onions, sliced thin, both white and green parts Generous handful of fresh basil, chopped, about 1⁄3 cup or so, or 2 teaspoons dry Sprinkling of shredded Parmesan or Romano for top

Preheat oven to 400. Prick crust and pre-bake 10 minutes. Dust bottom with flour. Mix cheese, salt and pepper and mayonnaise. Spread thin layer over crust. Lay tomato slices on top. Spread rest of cheese mixture over tomatoes. Sprinkle with green onions and basil. Smooth top, pushing onions and basil into cheese mixture. Sprinkle with Parmesan. Bake about 20 minutes or until puffed and golden. Serves 6.

Drying herbs

For John, who said his basil and oregano are flowering. “I want to dry it and I’m not sure how to do it,” he said. To dry herbs, strip an inch or so from the bottom of the stem and hang upside down in a large paper bag. Or strip all the leaves from the stem and place in single layers in a basket, on a cloth or screen. The key here is to

dry them in a dry place away from light. You’ll know the herbs are dry enough when a few leaves crinkle between your fingers. This could take anywhere from a few days to a few weeks, depending upon the moisture in the herb. Don’t crush leaves: After the herbs are dry, I leave the leaves whole, and put them in bottles or tin containers. The volatile oils stay intact until I crush them between my palms for cooking. Store herbs away from heat and light which reduces their flavors.

Crunchy overnight cinnamon streusel cake This can be made right

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Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educator and author. Email her at columns@communitypress.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Call 513-2487130, ext. 356.

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LIFE

B4 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • JULY 25, 2012

Bethany House begins fundraising campaign Since its founding in 1985, Bethany House Services (BHS) has provided case management, comprehensive emergency shelter services, life skills training, family stabilization, education and employment referrals, transitional and permanent housing to more than 50,000 homeless women and children. Funding for these essential and supportive services has historically been a mixture of government, corporate and individual contributions. Changes in the form of a more challenging profile of homeless women and children have given BHS new barriers to address. Bethany House Services has a community building in Westwood and other houses in Fairmount. For this reason, Bethany House Services has embarked on a Comprehensive Campaign to raise $1.4 million for longterm needs of the organization. “As we envision our future, we recognize that we have a great many needs. The board and leadership of BHS have identified program expansion to meet the serious mental, physical and developmental health issues in those we serve, an upgrade of facilities and a more substantial Endowment Fund as essential to the future of our mission,” says Robert

Bethany House Shelter offers a therapeutic environment to homeless women and children. PROVIDED Heidt, Jr., M.D., board member and campaign chair. “For this reason, we have begun the Comprehensive Campaign. This initiative will address current needs and provide essential resources to prevent, respond to and decrease family homelessness.” To date, BHS has received gifts and pledges totaling nearly $900,000. All board members and all employees of Bethany House Services have made pledges to the cam-

paign, as have some major donors. BHS is now reaching out to all individuals concerned about family homelessness in the community to ask them to support the work. One priority area identified for the campaign is maintenance and facility improvements. “Our 100-year-old facilities offer a homelike, therapeutic atmosphere for housing, client services, outdoor activities and work space for 30-40 women and children dai-

ly,” said Sister Mary Stanton, executive director of BHS. The age and use of these buildings require considerable attention to safety, lighting, parking and ongoing internal and external upkeep.” Examples of renovations needed at Bethany House Emergency Shelter include expansion of dining space, sleeping and storage space, as well as children’s indoor recreational/homework areas. Remodeling needs also exist at the BHS Social Services Center and Administrative Center. BHS has plans to focus on creating and partnering with programs for affordable housing, education and employment. Physical and mental health care access for homeless families, permanent supportive housing and homelessness prevention are all areas to be addressed by the campaign. “We need to grow our Endowment Fund. This will provide annual earnings that will be used to enable BHS to step up to meet new challenges with new resources for homeless and disadvantaged women and children in our community,” said Tom Leugers, BHS board member and vice chair of the campaign. For more information or to make a campaign donation, call Bethany House Services at 513921-1131, ext. 102.

Salvation Army has parent camp The Salvation Army in Cincinnati has more than 25 openings remaining for its Single-Parent Camp program this summer. Single-Parent Camp is a three-day residential camp offered to singleadult households in Hamilton County with children ages 5 to 15. Single Parent camp is only $30 per family, regardless of the number of age-appropriate children that attend. The camp is an opportunity for low-income families in Hamilton County to enjoy a great camping experience together. Single Parent camp

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from kindergarten through high school unite to bring to life some of the most-loved Broadway shows. “KidzShow” performed “Annie” last summer and “Cinderella” in 2010. Both shows were a huge success for the program. The cast of “Beauty and the Beast” includes youth from St. Ignatius, St. Catharine, St. James, St. Jude, St. John’s Dry Ridge, and McAuley , Mercy, LaSall, and St. Xavier high schools. Tickets are only $6 at the door. For more information, call directors Jenny and Emily Bates at 5747163.

will be Aug. 3-5 at The Salvation Army’s Camp SWONEKY, a 250-plus acre campgrounds operated by The Salvation Army in Oregonia, Ohio, about 10 miles north of Kings Island. Those in Hamilton County interested in registering for Single-Parent Camp can visit their nearest Salvation Army Community Center, daily from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., until all openings are filled. Those who have any questions about the registration process, or any other aspect of the Single Parent Camp opportunity, are asked to contact Chris Wald, at 513-762-5636.

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LIFE

JULY 25, 2012 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • B5

DEATHS Jennie Clarkson Bushman, 92, died July 12. Survived by daughters Linda Malecha, Margery (S. Andrew Jacobs) Bushman; grandchildren Peter, Elizabeth (Patrick Greene) Malecha; brother Alfred (Rada) Clarkson; many nieces and nephews. Preceded in death by husband Clifford Bushman, brother George (the late Virginia) Clarkson. Arrangements by B.J. Meyer Sons Funeral Home.

Robert Dimitroff Robert Dimitroff, 89, died July 17. He was owner of Lands Shoe Repair and former owner of Hilltop Restaurant in Price Hill. Survived by children Rosemarie (John) Nitsis, John (Renee) Dimitroff; grandDimitroff children Angela (Donato) DiPaolo, Chris Nitsis; great-grandchildren Rocco, Sophia DiPaolo. Preceded in death by wife Chryssoula Dimitroff. Services were July 20 at Holy Trinity-St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church. Arrangements by Neidhard-Minges Funeral Home. Memorials to Holy Trinity-St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church.

Debbie Feirl Debbie D. Feirl, 51, Sayler Park, died July 18. She had worked as a manager for Cincinnati Microwave. She was a member of the Change of Heart Organization and a volunteer for Compassion magazine at Good Samaritan Hospital. Survived by partner James Bright; parents Thomas, Marlene Feirl; siblings James, Toni Feirl, Penny Lamkin; nieces, nephews, aunts, uncles and cousins. Services are 7 p.m. Wednesday, July 25, at Dennis George Funeral Home. Memorials to: Unverferth House, 190 King Ave., Columbus, OH 43201.

Marybeth Friedhoff Mary Elizabeth “Marybeth” Hunzeker Friedhoff, 66, Delhi Township, died July 18. She was a teacher's aide for Cincinnati Public Schools. Survived by husband Doug Friedhoff; children Brad (Barbie), Troy (Sara), Sarah (Reid Manning); stepsons Jeff (Karen), Scott (Shelly); brothers Edwin, John, Robert; four grandchildren; three step-grandchildren; one step-great-grandchild; many nieces and nephews. Preceded in death by parents Edwin, Meriam Hunzeker, sister Jeanne. Services were July 23 at St.

Joseph Church. Arrangements by Radel Funeral Home. Memorials to: St. Joseph Church, 745 Ezzard Charles Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45203 or the National Ovarian Cancer Coalition.

Alma Gellenbeck Alma Drury Gellenbeck, 100, Delhi Township, died July 17. She was a homemaker. Survived by daughters Rosemary Gellenbeck, Carolyn “Judy” (Tom) Crotty; grandchildren Tom Jr., Patrick (Lily) , Sean Gellenbeck (Jane), Erin Crotty; great-grandchildren Rickelle (Alex) Coon, Samantha (Chris) Ginandt, Kaitlin, Megan, Sean, Nicky, Tony, Brianna, Elizabeth, Jessica, Olivia, Renee, Corinne; great-great-grandchildren A.J., Spencer, Emmalyn, Addalyn, Garrett. Preceded in death by husband Charles Gellenbeck. Services were July 23 at St. Teresa of Avila. Arrangements by Neidhard-Minges Funeral Home. Memorials to: Right to Life of Greater Cincinnati, 1802 W. Galbraith Road, Cincinnati, OH 45239.

Kenneth Hellman Kenneth Francis Hellman, 84, died June 30. He was director of customer service for the Drackett Company. He was an Army veteran of World War Hellman II. Survived by wife Verna Hellman; sons Ken (Diane), Steve (Susan), Bob Hellman; six grandchildren; one great-grandchild. Preceded in death by brother John “Dick” Hellman. Services were July 5 at Bayley. Arrangements by Radel Funeral Home. Memorials to Bayley Pastoral Care.

Helen Hermann Helen Speckert Hermann, 90, Delhi Township, died July 10. Survived by daughter Candy

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(John) Daulton; grandchildren Sarah, Andrew, Holly Daulton, Dawn (Barry) Anderson; greatgrandchildren Andrew Jr., Charlie, Devin, Hannah, Emma, Zoey; siblings Betty Jones, Vera Oelerich, Robert Speckert. Preceded in death by husband William Hermann. Services were July 13 at Dalbert, Woodruff & Isenogle Funeral Home. Memorials to the Hospice of Cincinnati.

Joseph Ludwig Joseph F. Ludwig, 78, died July 18. Survived by wife Sandra Montgomery Morgeson Ludwig; children Nancy (Michael) Finke, Mary Janet, Joseph “Sep” (Elaine), Stephen (Beth), Thomas (Stacey) Ludwig, Diane (Allan) Bass, JoAnn Ludwig (Thomas) Derenthal, Amy (Christopher) Wuerdeman, Terri (Brandon) Dunphy, Jeff Morgeson; siblings Helen, James (Edie) Ludwig; 23 grandchildren; many nieces and nephews. Preceded in death by wife Janet Kahny Ludwig, siblings Henrietta (Rich) Witterstaetter, Edna (Tom) Jennings, John (Betty) Ludwig. Services were July 23 at St. Teresa of Avila. Arrangements by Meyer & Geiser Funeral Home. Memorials to: Elder High School, 3900 Vincent Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45205, Seton

High School, 3901 Glenway Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45205 or Hospice of the Bluegrass, 7388 Turfway Road, Florence, KY 41042.

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Mary Bell Merriman Meece, 88, died July 14. Services were July 17 at Meyer & Geiser

Alice Schmitt Alice Doyle Schmitt, 84, Delhi Township, died July 15. She worked for Federated Department Store. Survived by children Janice, Edward (Kathy), Arlene, David (Julie), Gregory Schmitt, Vickie (Terry) O’Dell; siblings Eileen Murphy, John Doyle; 10 grandchildren; 11 great-grandchildren; many nieces and nephews. Preceded in death by husband Robert Schmitt, daughters Jennifer Flanigan, Kathleen Neville, parents Robert, Grace Doyle, 10 siblings. Services were July 18 at Radel Funeral Home. Memorials to: Hospice of Cincinnati, P.O. Box 633597, Cincinnati, OH 452633597. Patrick D. Scott, 58, died July 15. He worked for the Knowledge Learning Center. Survived by wife Pam Scott; children Jodi (Bryan) Steward, Patrick Scott; granddaughters

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Ashley, Brittney; father Joe Scott; parents-in-law Dot, Bob Cassidy; siblings Sug (Dan), Sally, Mike (Laureen), Jim (Mary), Tom (Teri); many nieces and nephews. Preceded in death by mother Margaret Scott. Services were July 21 at Radel Funeral Home.

Hap Steimle Paul W. “Hap” Steimle, 65, died July 16. Survived by wife Janet Steimle; children Greta (Chris) Bayless, Joe (Kelly) Steimle; grandchildren Tyler, Austin, Hunter, Hannah, Jack, Paul, Ben; brother Anthony Steimle; nephew Tony Steimle, many other nieces and nephews. Services were July 20 at St. Lawrence Steimle Church. Arrangements by Vitt, Stermer & Anderson Funeral Home. Memorials to the American Heart

Association, Kidney Foundation or Disabled American Veterans.

Rich Tedesco Anthony “Rich” Tedesco, 77, died July 13. Survived by wife Betty Venable Tedesco; daughter Toni (Steve Weyler) Tedesco; grandchildren Olivia, Alex, Mark, Bryce Weyler; siblings Jerry (Carol) Tedesco, Marilyn (Paul) Costa; many nieces and nephews. Preceded in death by son Mark Tedesco, parents AnthoTedesco ny, Marie Tedesco, parents-in-law Stan, Betty Venable. Services were July 18 at Our Lady of Victory. Arrangements by Meyer & Geiser Funeral Home. Memorials to: Mark Tedesco Scholarship Fund, Elder High School, 3900 Vincent Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45205.

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“Come Hear The Story of Jesus” 5421 Foley Rd. • 513-922-8363 Rev. Bob Overberg Sunday School..................................10:00a.m. Sunday Morning Worship ..................11:00a.m. Sunday Evening ..................................6:00p.m. Wednesday Evening Bible Study .........6:00p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF DENT 6384 Harrison Ave. - 574-6411 Bible Study ........................... 9:30am Sunday Worship ................. 10:30am Wed. Youth Service .............. 7:00pm Wed.Pray Sevice .................. 7:00pm

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Liberty Missionary Baptist Church "Where Everybody is Somebody" 1009 Overlook Ave. 513-921-2502 Rev. Kendell Hopper Sunday School 10:00 am Sunday Morning Worship-11:00 am Sunday Evening 6:00 pm Wednesday Bible Study - 7:00 pm

123 Symmes Ave. North Bend, OH 45202 One block off Route 50, Phone 941-3061 Small, friendly, casual, blended music, Bible based messages that connect with real life. Sunday School 9:30am Worship 10:30am

SHILOH UNITED METHODIST

Anderson Ferry & Foley Roads 513-451-3600 www.shilohumc.com 9:30 a.m. Traditional Worship and Sunday School 11:00 a.m. Praise Celebration and Junior Church nursery provided for both services

PRESBYTERIAN OAK HILLS PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 6233 Werk Rd. (Enter off Werkridge) 922-5448 Rev. Jerry Hill 10:00 a.m Worship & Sunday School Nursery Care Avail.

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CHEVIOT UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 3820 Westwood-Northern Blvd. Kerry Wood, Senior Pastor Lois Schalk-Hartley, Associate Pastor

9:20 a.m. Traditional Worship 10:20 a.m. Sunday School for All Ages 11:20 a.m Contemporary Worship Service 662-2048 www.cheviotumc.org

UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST St. Peter & St. Paul United Church of Christ

3001 Queen City Ave. 513-661-3745 Rev. Martin Westermeyer, Pastor Summer Chapel Service: 8 am Bible Study: 9 am Worship & Church School: 10 am Dial-A-Devotion 426-8957 www.stpeterandstpaulucc.org


LIFE

B6 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • JULY 25, 2012

POLICE REPORTS Arrests/citations Kaiwan Phillips, born 1979, assault, 3201 Warsaw Ave., July 5. Kari Kist, born 1985, child endangering/neglect, possession of drug abuse instruments, 464 Grand Ave., July 4. Kenneth M. Turner, born 1955, assault, assaulting a law officer, 3311 Warsaw Ave., July 8. Michael Tittle, born 1975, assault, domestic violence, 3309 W. Eighth St., July 7. Naeseanita Toler, born 1994, aggravated menacing, 3836 W. Eighth St., July 4. Richard A. Miller, born 1971, unauthorized use of a motor vehicle, 3201 Warsaw Ave., July 5. Roger Cordray, born 1959, assault, 3201 Warsaw Ave., July 8. Ronald A. Terry, born 1964, violation of a temporary protection order, 536 Woodlawn Ave., July 4. Samual Smith, born 1982, obstructing official business, 967 Woodlawn Ave., July 4. Shon Turnbow, born 1994, criminal trespassing, 3753 Warsaw Ave., July 4. Tabitha Thompson, born 1981, drug abuse, 2500 Maryland

Ave., July 6. Anna Finkbeiner, born 1990, telecommunication harassment, violation of a temporary protection order, 162 Richardson Place, July 5. Amber M. Carmen, born 1989, domestic violence, 3903 W. Liberty St., July 5. Brandon A. Moore, born 1991, domestic violence, 4443 Ridgeview Ave., July 8. Dawn Wrightsman, born 1972, domestic violence, 3903 W. Liberty St., July 5. Dominique Neal, born 1990, assault, 3756 Westmont Drive, July 4. Dominique Neal, born 1990, misdemeanor drug possession, 3759 Westmont Drive, July 4. Erikka Slater, born 1991, domestic violence, 3725 Westmont Drive, July 7. Jason Prater, born 1980, domestic violence, 846 Delehanty Court, July 8. Jennifer Hatfield, born 1990, domestic violence, 1840 Sunset Ave., July 6. Jose Neptali Rodriguez, born 1981, assault, 3796 Westmont Drive, July 8. Myranda Ewing, born 1989, check theft, 4300 Glenway Ave., July 8. Nickolas Woodard, born 1980, carrying concealed weapons,

ABOUT POLICE REPORTS The Community Press publishes the names of all adults charged with offenses. The information is a matter of public record and does not imply guilt or innocence. To contact your local police department: » Springfield Township: Chief David Heimpold, 729-1300 » Mount Healthy: Chief Al Schaefer, 728-3183 » Cincinnati District 5, Captain David Bailey, 569-8500 » North College Hill: Chief Gary Foust, 521-7171 » Greenhills: Chief Thomas Doyle, 825-2101 » Forest Park: Chief Phil Cannon, 595-5220. having weapons under disability, 1911 Westmont Lane, July 4. Rachel E. Johnson, born 1965, criminal damaging or endangering, 3796 Westmont Drive, July 4. Shane M. Achor, born 1983, theft under $300, 1060 Sunset Ave., July 7. Theodore McClanahan, born 1980, vandalism, 1852 Sunset Ave., July 6. Willis Tremble, born 1991, criminal trespassing, 1910 Westmont Lane, July 3. Andre Curry, born 1991, possession of drug paraphernalia, 1047 Grand Ave., July 13. Anthony Stewart, born 1985, possession of drugs, 2525 Ring Place, July 3. Belinda Shelton, born 1968, criminal trespassing, 944 Chateau Ave., July 9. Douglas Rice, born 1983, firearm in motor vehicle, obstructing

CLEVES

LEGAL NOTICE NUISANCE VIOLATION 306 ANDERSON FERRY ROAD

SELF STORAGE

Notice is hereby given to Phillip W. Platt that property you own in Delhi Township contains accumulated debris. The Delhi Township Board of Trustees has determined, at Resolution #2012-133, that the condition of the property constitutes a nuisance and is detrimental to the health, safety and general welfare of all persons who live, work or own property within Delhi Township. This notice shall serve as a formal order for you to address the nuisance violations at your property located at 306 Anderson Ferry Road (also known as Parcel 540-0042-0025 of the Hamilton County Auditor’s Tax Plats), Delhi Township, Hamilton County, State of Ohio as described below: •Remove all debris (Discarded furniture on front yard drive). If such accumulated debris is not removed or provision for such removal is not made within seven (7) days of publishing/posting of this notice, or a hearing before the Board of Trustees is not requested as specified below, the Board will provide for the removal, and any expenses incurred by the Board in perform ing such tasks will be entered upon the tax duplicate and will be a lien upon the proper ties from the date of entry. You have the right to request a hearing before the Board of Trustees within seven (7) days of publishing/posting of this notice. If requested, the hearing will be held at the next regularly scheduled meeting of the Board. The Boards’ meetings are held on the second and last Wednesdays of each month commencing at 6:00 p.m. at 934 Neeb Road, Cincinnati, Ohio 45233. At the hearing, you may appear in person or by counsel, may present evidence and examine witnesses. If a hearing is timely requested, action to abate the nuisance conditions will be stayed pending the hearing and further decision of the Board. Your request for a hearing before the Board may be submitted in writing to: Thomas R. Stahlheber, Zoning Inspector, Delhi Township Department of Development Services, 697 Neeb Road, Cincinnati, Ohio 45233. Any questions concerning this order should be directed to Mr. Stahlheber at the above described address or at 513-922-2705. 7432

257-0833 CORNER OF 128 and CILLEY ROAD

official business, tampering with evidence, using or carrying a weapon while intoxicated, 2926 Glenway Ave., July 13. Fredrick R. Meiggs, born 1950, disorderly conduct, 3101 Murdock Ave., July 10. James Wofford, born 1986, assault, 3300 Warsaw Ave., July 9. Jason Clarence Shelton, born 1963, disorderly conduct, 944 Chateau Ave., July 9. John J. Nare, born 1958, disorderly conduct, 3110 Murdock Ave., July 10. Kaiwan Phillips, born 1979, criminal mischief, 3201 Warsaw Ave., July 5. Keith B. Tims, born 1965, criminal damaging or endangering, 3201 Warsaw Ave., July 8. Larziah Alexander Hall, born 1993, aggravated menacing, disorderly conduct, 3411 Glenway Ave., July 12. Lori Heilmayer, born 1974, disorderly conduct, 3201 Warsaw Ave., July 13. Marcella Edens, born 1981, menacing, 811 Hawthorne Ave., July 13. Michael Pickens, born 1994, burglary, 566 Grand Ave., July 10. Michael Williams, born 1984, aggravated menacing, 3201 Warsaw Ave., July 5.

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FLORIDA

Michelle Simms, born 1984, assault, felonious assault, 1030 Considine Ave., July 9. Mohamed Magassa, born 1969, possession of an open flask, 1041 Delmonte Place, July 8. Natalie A. Dunson, born 1975, criminal damaging or endangering, 720 Purcell Ave., July 7. Natalie A. Dunson, born 1975, disorderly conduct, 583 Purcell Ave., July 7. Naytoria Simms, born 1992, assault, 1105 Purcell Ave., July 10. Princess A. Williams, born 1957, possession of an open flask, 1041 Delmonte Place, July 8. Ronnie Anders, born 1983, assault, 3201 Warsaw Ave., July 5. Tony V. Johnson, born 1971, city or local ordinance violation, possession of drug abuse instruments, 3120 Warsaw Ave., July 6. Brandon Burger, born 1989, criminal damaging or endangering, 6360 Revere Ave., July 13. Andrew Harvey, born 1984, possession of drugs, 3726 Westmont Drive, July 6. Antonio Woffard, born 1990, falsification, obstructing official business, possession of drug paraphernalia, 1264 Henkel Drive, July 15. Ashley Jones, born 1991, falsification, 3759 Westmont Drive, July 4. Chris Simonson, born 1985, assault, 1142 Rosemont Ave., July 9. Daron R. Ard, born 1967, criminal damaging or endangering, 870 Nebraska Ave., July 14. Deborah A. Clark, born 1960, drug abuse, possession of drug abuse instruments, 1601 Manss Ave., July 11. Dewey Witt, born 1973, domestic violence, 1240 Sliker Ave., July 14. Dustin Goostree, born 1992, possession of an open flask, 1505 Manss Ave., July 10. Emanuel Thomas, born 1990, obstructing official business, 3900 Glenway Ave., July 12. Jack W. Hayes, born 1957, disorderly conduct, misdemeanor drug possession, 4161 W. Eighth St., July 10. Jeffrey Mussman, born 1988, domestic violence, 4547 Midland Ave., July 11. Jennifer Fortmann, born 1972, passing bad checks, 4518 W. Eighth St., July 15.

Jodeci Smity, born 1992, criminal trespassing, 1910 Westmont Lane, July 3. Johnny Bonfield, born 1977, theft under $300, 4161 W. Eighth St., July 10. Karen Preston, born 1986, assault, criminal damaging or endangering, 1142 Rosemont Ave., July 9. Kent Chisenhall, born 1974, possession of an open flask, 4435 W. Eighth St., July 4. Michael Jr. Clark, born 1984, possession of drug abuse instruments, possession of drug paraphernalia, 1601 Manss Ave., July 11. Starlina Sanders, born 1980, theft $300 to $5000, 544 Roebling Road, July 9. William Tully, born 1960, obstructing official business, 523 Roebling Road, July 15.

Incidents/reports Aggravated menacing 4375 Ridgeview Ave., July 3. 1250 Ross Ave., July 8. 1639 Gilsey Ave., July 7. 3796 Westmont Drive, July 12. Aggravated robbery 5000 Glenway Ave., July 5. 3411 Warsaw Ave., July 8. 3429 Warsaw Ave., July 11. Assault 1030 Ross Ave., July 4. 1104 Carson Ave., July 3. 1945 Dunham Way, July 5. 4106 Glenway Ave., July 3. 482 Elberon Ave., July 3. 6360 Revere Ave., July 3. 719 Grand Ave., July 5. 1005 Parkson Place, July 7. 1018 Wells St., July 10. 1018 Wells St., July 10. 1051 Considine Ave., July 9. 1100 Purcell Ave., July 7. 1142 Rosemont Ave., July 8. 3311 Warsaw Ave., July 8. 3609 Warsaw Ave., July 9. 3796 Westmont Drive, July 8. 4292 Foley Road, July 7. 430 Elberon Ave., July 11. 4413 W. Eighth St., July 10. 800 Grand Ave., July 7. 958 McPherson Ave., July 10. Breaking and entering 1051 Benz Ave., July 5. 1717 Gilsey Ave., July 5. 2144 Ferguson Road, July 5. 3715 St. Lawrence Ave., July 6. 3715 St. Lawrence Ave., July 6. 406 Crestline Ave., July 10. 4117 W. Liberty St., July 11. 4460 Guerley Road, July 11. Burglary 3212 Bassett Road, July 5.

See POLICE, Page B7

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LIFE

JULY 25, 2012 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • B7

Continued from Page B6 361 City Scape Drive, July 5. 3638 Glenway Ave., July 3. 4127 Francis Ave., July 5. 448 Grand Ave., July 3. 5105 Sidney Road, July 3. 750 Grand Ave., July 5. 1240 Henkel Drive, July 9. 1790 Grand Ave., July 9. 2810 Maryland Ave., July 8. 3003 W. Eighth St., July 11. 3003 W. Eighth St., July 7. 3414 W. Eighth St., July 9. 4470 Guerley Road, July 11. 4619 Glenway Ave., July 11. 566 Grand Ave., July 10. 6427 Gracely Drive, July 10. 906 Elberon Ave., July 8. Criminal damaging/endangering 1126 Beechmeadow Lane, July 6. 1418 Manss Ave., July 4. 1910 Westmont Lane, July 5. 3796 Westmont Drive, July 4. 4105 Glenway Ave., July 5. 456 Grand Ave., July 5. 482 Elberon Ave., July 4. 723 Grand Ave., July 5. 1088 Omena Place, July 8. 1110 Woodlawn Ave., July 8. 1142 Rosemont Ave., July 8. 1343 Manss Ave., July 12. 1413 Manss Ave., July 11. 1771 Ashbrook Drive, July 9. 1816 First Ave., July 11. 3418 Bassett Road, July 10. 357 Rosemont Ave., July 12. 3648 Warsaw Ave., July 11. 3763 St. Lawrence Ave., July 6. 3796 Westmont Drive, July 12. 4231 Delridge Drive, July 9. 526 Grand Ave., July 10. 548 Purcell Ave., July 10. 704 Wilbud Drive, July 11.

720 Purcell Ave., July 7. 725 Purcell Ave., July 8. 800 Grand Ave., July 7. 803 Rosemont Ave., July 10. 937 Seton Ave., July 7. 944 Summit Ave., July 7. 952 Seton Ave., July 9. 963 Purcell Ave., July 10. Criminal mischief 498 Enright Ave., July 4. Domestic violence Reported on Price Avenue, July 5. Reported on Quebec Road, July 3. Reported on West Liberty Street, July 5. Reported on Gilsey Avenue, July 11. Reported on Lehman Road, July 7. Reported on Midland Avenue, July 11. Reported on Rapid Run Road, July 9. Reported on McPherson Avenue, July 9. Felonious assault 1051 Considine Ave., July 9. 1230 Manss Ave., July 9. Improperly discharging firearm at/into habitation/school 3735 Westmont Drive, July 5. Reported on Bassett Road, July 8. Menacing by stalking Reported on West Eighth Street, July 9. Menacing 2812 Price Ave., July 5. 3104 Lehman Road, July 4. 3648 Warsaw Ave., July 4. 1101 Rosemont Ave., July 7. 3609 Warsaw Ave., July 6. 3796 Westmont Drive, July 12. Robbery 903 McPherson Ave., July 3. 1316 Sunset Ave., July 10. 1790 Grand Ave., July 8.

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4746 Highridge Ave., July 8. 4846 Rapid Run Road, July 12. 4899 Cleves Warsaw Pike, July 7. 4986 Glenway Ave., July 6. 500 Mount Hope Ave., July 10. 505 Hawthorne Ave., July 10. 544 Roebling Road, July 7. 808 Elberon Ave., July 8. 835 Greenwich Ave., July 10. 943 Rosemont Ave., July 8. 983 Enright Ave., July 7. Unauthorized use of a motor vehicle 1256 Gilsey Ave., July 4. Vandalism 1852 Sunset Ave., July 6. Violation of a protection

order/consent agreement 162 Richardson Place, July 3. 683 Overlook Ave., July 3.

DELHI TOWNSHIP Arrests/citations Bobby Stephens, 35, 6378 Rover Ave., driving under suspension at 4000 block Delhi Road, July 9. Ronald Hinds, 23, 3050 Mickey Ave., Apt. 45, driving under suspension at 400 block Pedretti Avenue, July 10.

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1613 Kellywood Ave., July 6. 1919 Colony Drive, July 9. 2660 Lehman Road, July 9. 2934 Glenway Ave., July 7. 3410 Warsaw Ave., July 11. 3411 Glenway Ave., July 8. 3609 Warsaw Ave., July 10. 3951 W. Eighth St., July 8. 4011 W. Liberty St., July 6. 4017 Jamestown St., July 7. 4030 Akochia Ave., July 6. 4108 Flower Ave., July 9. 4116 Flower Ave., July 9. 4210 Glenway Ave., July 6. 4314 Delridge Drive, July 8. 4539 W. Eighth St., July 9. 4674 Rapid Run Road, July 11.

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Sexual imposition Reported on Glenway Avenue, July 6. Theft 1033 Belvoir Lane, July 6. 1659 Kellywood Ave., July 6. 1919 Colony Drive, July 3. 3410 Warsaw Ave., July 3. 3775 Westmont Drive, July 3. 4030 St. Lawrence Ave., July 3. 4308 Schulte Drive, July 3. 4862 Guerley Road, July 6. 4901 Cleves Warsaw Pike, July 3. 714 Rosemont Ave., July 5. 725 Mount Hope Ave., July 3. 815 Terry St., July 3. 934 Seibel Lane, July 4. 1057 Gilsey Ave., July 9. 1060 Sunset Ave., July 7. 1091 Grand Ave., July 6. 1175 Overlook Ave., July 9. 1253 Parkside Court, July 9.

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LIFE

B8 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • JULY 25, 2012

Lawson receives Mount st. Joe’s Clifford Award

Tim Lawson, Ph.D., has received the 2012 Sister Adele Clifford Award, the most prestigious teaching honor presented to a full-time member of the faculty at the College of Mount St. Joseph. Lawson is the chairman of the psychology department in the division of behavioral and natural sciences. The Clifford Award recognizes faculty members who have significantly influenced students’ lives and demonstrated excellence in teaching. The award is named in honor of the late Sister Adele Clifford, a Sister of Charity and longtime biology professor who was also a

former president of the College. Clifford Award recipients are nominated by Lawson students and chosen by a committee of past faculty recipients and current students. The nomination requirements include a narrative essay in support of the nominee, and a minimum of five signatures of students who have either worked or taken at least one class with the nominee. Lawson was described by students in his nominations as organized and informative,

which make his classes “interesting and conducive to learning.” A student also stated, “One of this professor’s best qualities is his ability to make his students better critical thinkers. Through fun readings, seminars, discussions, and writing assignments, his students always leave class with a better understanding of how to approach problems with a critical eye.” Lawson earned a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Adrian College and a master’s degree and doctorate in social psychology from Miami University. He and his wife, Anna, reside in Monfort Heights with their two children.

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Westwood group prepares for annual art show The Westwood Civic Association presents its fourth annual Westwood Art Show 11 a.m. – 5 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 15, at Westwood Town Hall, Montana and Harrison avenues. This annual outdoor exhibition features local artist vendors; local food vendors (City Barbeque, Queen City Pizza, Zen & Now Coffee House); live acoustic music from Fast Sky, The Mitchells, and The Usual Suspects, Love Harvest; face painting and henna tattoos; Henke Winery wine tasting; and a Madcap Puppets performance. Free and open to the public, all ages, rain or shine. Featured artists/artwork include: Abby Langdon of abbydid – all manner of plush goodness

Amanda Hogan Carlisle – handmade cards, collage and acrylic paintings Amanda Nielsen of Swan Maiden Soap Barb and John Henwood of TFC Design – glass jewelry and photography Barbara Kock – acrylic and watercolor paintings, paper mosaics and cards Bernadette Zimmerman – handcrafted fair trade wallets, scarves and more Betty Brzezinski – wind chimes, bracelets and spoon rings from vintage silver Brittney Meguire of BAM Studios – pottery, knit and crochet accessories Carolyn Althoff – fused glass house wares and accessories Clint Wood III – original landscape oil paintings on

wood panels Colleen McAndrews Wood – original decorative oil paintings on panels Creations By Kathleen Unkrich – handcrafted jewelry Designs by Connie Nuxoll – wearable accessories and cards Ed Cooper – wooden animals, cradles and more Elizabeth Kindle – coiled bowls made from recycled fabrics and plastics Jaime’s Art Pottery Jan, Tim and Jessie Boone – oil paintings and sculpture Joanne Honschopp – paintings, prints and cards Katie Swartz – pottery and crocheted animals from recycled sweaters Karen M. Jenkins – original photography cards

Area students part of XU World Choir Games silver medal Xavier University’s Edgecliff Vocal Ensemble was awarded a silver medal for its performance in the Mixed Chamber Choirs competition during the World Choir Games. The 24 singers were conducted by Tom Merrill, chair and associate professor of music and theater. The ensemble competed with large choirs from Northern Kentucky, China, Venezuela, Australia, Columbia, Nigeria, Russia and Thailand. Choir members are: Chelsea Elsmeier of Lakeside Park sang first alto. Dan Parsely of Cleves sang first tenor. Kristin Lonsway of Mason sang second soprano. 2012 alumnus Mike

Xavier University's Edgecliff Vocal Ensemble was awarded a silver medal for its performance in the Mixed Chamber Choirs competition during the World Choir Games. THANKS TO LAUREL BAUER

Franzosa of Loveland sang first tenor. Kathleen Bosse of Cincinnati sang first soprano. Maddy Fessler of Cincinnati sang second alto. 2012 alumnus Mike Pekel of Cincinnati sang second bass.

LEGAL NOTICE NUISANCE VIOLATION 4301 SKYLARK DRIVE Notice is hereby given to Donny C. Abner that property you own in Delhi Township contains excessive vegetation. The Delhi Township Board of Trustees has determined, at Resolution #2012-131, that the condition of the property constitutes a nuisance and is detrimental to the health, safety and general welfare of all persons who live, work or own property within Delhi Township. This notice shall serve as a formal order for you to address the nuisance violations at your property located at 4301 Skylark Drive (also known as Parcel 540-00100286 of the Hamilton County Auditor’s Tax Plats), Delhi Township, Hamilton County,State of Ohio as described below: •Cut all excessive vegetation, remove clippings there from, and maintain such at a height not to exceed 12" (All Yards). If such excessive vegetation is not cut and removed or provision for such cutting and removal is not made within seven (7) days of publishing/posting of this notice, or a hearing before the Board of Trustees is not requested as specified below, the Board will provide for the cutting and removal, and any expenses incurred by the Board in performing such tasks will be entered upon the tax duplicate and will be a lien upon the properties from the date of entry. You have the right to request a hearing before the Board of Trustees within seven (7) days of publishing/posting of this notice. If requested, the hearing will be held at the next regularly scheduled meeting of the Board. The Boards’ meetings are held on the second and last Wednesdays of each month commencing at 6:00 p.m. at 934 Neeb Road, Cincinnati, Ohio 45233. At the hearing, you may appear in person or by counsel, may present evidence and examine witnesses. If a hearing is timely requested, action to abate the nuisance conditions will be stayed pending the hearing and further decision of the Board. Your request for a hearing before the Board may be submitted in writing to: Thomas R. Stahlheber, Zoning Inspector, Delhi Township Department of Development Services, 697 Neeb Road, Cincinnati, Ohio 45233. Any questions concerning this order should be directed to Mr. Stahlheber at the above described address or at 513-9222705. 1717430

Rachael Blum of Cincinnati sang second alto. 2012 alumnus Ryan Leep of Cincinnati sang second bass. Evan Herbert and alumnus Andrew Herbert of Cincinnati sang second tenor and first bass.

LEGAL NOTICE NUISANCE VIOLATION 6035 RAPID RUN ROAD Notice is hereby given to Federal National Mortgage that property you own in Delhi Township contains excessive vegetation. The Delhi Township Board of Trustees has determined, at Resolution #2012-132, that the condition of the property constitutes a nuisance and is detrimental to the health, safety and general welfare of all persons who live, work or own property within Delhi Township. This notice shall serve as a formal order for you to address the nuisance violations at your property located at 6035 Rapid Run Road (also known as Parcel 540-0112-0002 of the Hamilton County Auditor’s Tax Plats), Delhi Township, Hamilton County,State of Ohio as described below: •Cut all excessive vegetation, remove clippings there from, and maintain such at a height not to exceed 12" (All Yards). If such excessive vegetation is not cut and removed or provision for such cutting and removal is not made within seven (7) days of publishing/posting of this notice, or a hearing before the Board of Trustees is not requested as specified below, the Board will provide for the cutting and removal, and any expenses incurred by the Board in performing such tasks will be entered upon the tax duplicate and will be a lien upon the properties from the date of entry. You have the right to request a hearing before the Board of Trustees within seven (7) days of publishing/posting of this notice. If requested, the hearing will be held at the next regularly scheduled meeting of the Board. The Boards’ meetings are held on the second and last Wednesdays of each month commencing at 6:00 p.m. at 934 Neeb Road, Cincinnati, Ohio 45233. At the hearing, you may appear in person or by counsel, may present evidence and examine witnesses. If a hearing is timely requested, action to abate the nuisance conditions will be stayed pending the hearing and further decision of the Board. Your request for a hearing before the Board may be submitted in writing to: Thomas R. Stahlheber, Zoning Inspector, Delhi Township Department of Development Services, 697 Neeb Road, Cincinnati, Ohio 45233. Any questions concerning this order should be directed to Mr. Stahlheber at the above described address or at 513-922-2705. 7428


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