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PRICE HILL PRESS

Your Community Press newspaper serving Price Hill and Covedale

The Cincinnati Young People’s Theatre is presenting “The Wedding Singer.”

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WEDNESDAY, JULY 18, 2012

WEDDED BLISS B1

BECAUSE COMMUNITY MATTERS

West Side brothers opening new Incline District restaurant

Pizza, sandwiches, craft beer on menu By Kurt Backscheider kbackscheider@communitypress.com

Mary Croft told Tony and Dominic Cafeo they are going to be amazed at how busy their new restaurant is going to be. “We are ready,” the East Price Hill woman said to the restauranteurs at a press conference Thursday, July 12. The Cafeo brothers are the proprietors of East Price Hill’s newest eatery – the Incline Public House. “We are very excited about this project,” said Tony Cafeo. “We look forward to seeing you and bringing great food and service to this area.” Overlooking downtown Cincinnati, the 2,500-square-feet restaurant is part of the Incline Village development led by Cincinnati Lights Development LLC. The development project, located near the corner of Matson Place and West Eighth Street in East Price Hill’s Incline District, includes 15 recently completed apartments and condominiums, and Cincinnati Landmark Productions, owners and operators of the Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, plans to build a new community theater at the site as well. John Cranley, an attorney and former Cincinnati councilman who is a partner in Cincinnati Lights Development, said he and his partners are proud to introduce a new restaurant to the

Outside of their new restaurant in East Price Hill, Tony, left, and Dominic Cafeo show what the view looks like from their Incline Public House. The restaurant, part of the Incline Village development, will feature both indoor and outdoor seating with views of downtown Cincinnati. KURT BACKSCHEIDER/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

neighborhood. “This is an exciting day for Price Hill,” he said. “There are a lot of great things happening here.” Tony Cafeo, who grew up on the West Side and still lives in Westwood, said he and his brother, who lives in Price Hill, chose to open a new restaurant because they want to be involved in the growth and progress of the neighborhood and they know West Siders are fiercely loyal customers. Plus, they couldn’t pass up the terrific view the location affords. “That view is spectacular,” Tony Cafeo said. Scheduled to open in October, he said the Incline Public House will serve brick oven pizzas, gourmet sandwiches, appetizers, salads, craft beer and wine. The restaurant can seat up to 65 See INCLINE, Page A2

Construction of the new Incline Public House restaurant in East Price Hill is entering its final stages. The restaurant, which offers a great view of downtown Cincinnati, is scheduled to open in October. KURT

Annie Spinnenweber, a Mount Healthy teen entering her senior year at Roger Bacon High School, paints details on a mural on the side of the Covedale Pet Hospital in West Price Hill. Oak Hills High School art teacher Jamie Schorsch, seen painting in the background, is leading a group of teens in painting the mural as part of the 2012 ArtWorks Apprentice Program. KURT BACKSCHEIDER/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Artists create mural for West Price Hill ArtWorks project going up on pet hospital

By Kurt Backscheider

Blake Winans, a Price Hill resident and Western Hills University High School graduate, helps paint a mural on the side of the Covedale Pet Hospital as part of the 2012 ArtWorks Apprentice Program. KURT BACKSCHEIDER/THE

kbackscheider@communitypress.com

A group of young artists is hard at work this summer creating a mural for folks to enjoy in West Price Hill. For the past few weeks a team of eight young people, many of whom are from the West Side, have been painting a mural on the side of the Covedale Pet Hospital as part of the 2012 ArtWorks Apprentice Program. Each summer the nonprofit organization hires young people to work with professional artists to make innovative public art to enrich communities throughout Cincinnati. The mural at the Covedale Pet Hospital is the program’s first in West Price Hill. “It’s been a fun project,”

COMMUNITY

said Jamie Schorsch, an Oak Hills High School art teacher who is serving as the lead artist for the West Price Hill mural. “Everyone has worked really well together.” She said the mural, which stretches 121 feet long, was designed to reflect the history of the neighborhood and also show how the community has transitioned over the years. Schorsch met with community leaders to find

out what they wanted in the mural, and she and the teen artists developed a design incorporating themes the community wanted. Familiar neighborhood landmarks like the Covedale theater’s beacon tower, the stone arches at Rapid Run Park and elements of art deco architecture can be seen in the mural, she said. A dog and a cat are included in See ARTISTS, Page A2

BACKSCHEIDER/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Junior newspaper carriers needed Hey kids! Become a Community Press carrier and earn your own spending money and still have time for other fun activities since delivery is just once a week on Wednesday. It’s your own business where your neighbors rely on you to deliver information about their community.

You’ll learn valuable business skills and gain experience in customer service and money management. You’ll also be able to earn bonuses, win prizes and participate in special carrier events. Call 853-6277. Find out more about the junior carrier program at Cincinnati.com/carrier.

ArtWorks selected West Price Hill as one of the neighborhoods to receive a mural as part of its 2012 apprentice program. A group of teens, most of whom are from the West Side, have been transforming a blank wall at the Covedale Pet Hospitall. KURT BACKSCHEIDER/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

STAR TURN

RITA’S KITCHEN

Half of the final four Rising Star singers are picked. See story, A3

Heirloom recipes are some of the ones we enjoy the most. See story, B3

Contact The Press

News .........................923-3111 Retail advertising ............768-8196 Classified advertising ........242-4000 Delivery ......................853-6263 See page A2 for additional information

Vol. 85 No. 28 © 2012 The Community Press ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

NEWS

A2 • PRICE HILL PRESS • JULY 18, 2012

Kiwanis car show raises money for charity mboylson@communitypress.com

Hundreds of hot rods, coupes, classic cars and souped-up rides will roll into Fernbank Park Sunday, July 22, to participate in the Riverview Delhi Kiwanis’ 23rd annual Rollin’ on the River Charity Car Show. The show is from noon to 3:30 p.m. and is free to the public. In addition to the car show, there will be food, a disc jockey, splitthe-pot and a raffle for a choice of 55-inch LCD TV or $1,000 cash. More than 160 vehicles have already registered for the car show. Proceeds from car registrations and

Cars in aline for the Rollin’ on the River Car Show in 2009. This year’s show is Sunday, July 23, at Fernbank Park. FILE PHOTO

the event will be donated to various community organizations. “We target a gross-net revenue from the show of

Incline Continued from Page A1

guests inside, plus an additional 60 to 65 diners outside on a 1,500-square-feet deck. Dominic Cafeo said the

restaurant offers a casual dining atmosphere with affordable prices. “It will be a nice complement to what the Primavista (located next door in the Queen’s Tower) already does,” he said. Ken Smith, executive director of Price Hill Will,

$20,000. All the proceeds are distributed to the Riverview and Delhi communities,” event chairman Al Duebber said.

said it’s great to have yet another restaurant opening in the neighborhood. “With Bayou Fish House opening a few blocks away earlier this year, and Happy Days Cafe opening last week, dining options continue to expand across Price Hill,” he said.

Continued from Page A1

Vehicles can pre-register through Friday for $10 or from 9 a.m. to noon Sunday at the park for $15. Eighty-four trophies will be awarded to show participants, including nine specialty awards, from people’s choice to best GTO. “Our club members volunteer their time and talent to make this thing happen and the neatest thing about it is that it’s free,” Duebber said. For more information about the event or to register visit, www.rollinontherivercarshow.com. “It’s just one of the good West Side things,” Duebber said.

Index Calendar .................B2 Classfieds .................C Food ......................B3 Life ........................B1 Police .................... B9 Schools ..................A5 Sports ....................A9 Viewpoints ............A10

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the mural since it adorns the pet hospital, and there are several eyes placed throughout the piece to represent the many neighborhood block watch programs in the area. Price Hill resident Dennis Wysinger, a student at Hughes STEM High School, said he joined the ArtWorks program because he loves art and he wanted to help brighten up his community. “We were able to put our own designs in some of the pieces,” he said. “You get to say, ‘I did that. I helped make that.’” Cameron White, a Westwood teen entering his sophomore year at Gilbert A. Dater High School, said he’s enjoyed working with the other young artists and getting to know everyone. “We’ve also been able

to get to know what the community is like,” he said. Price Hill resident Blake Winans, a Western Hills University High School graduate who now attends Cincinnati State Technical and Community College, said he couldn’t pass up the chance to work on the mural. “I wanted to be a part of the community,” he said. “And we’re also getting great experience in drawing and painting a large project.” The other artists helping bring the mural alive are Stephen Cavanaugh, Shakier Hill, Elena Jordan-Keller, Annie Spinnenweber and Ryan Strochinsky. John Ford is the project’s teaching artist. She said the mural will be completed by Friday, July 27, and ArtWorks will host a dedication of the piece sometime this fall. Price Hill Will and Santa Maria Community Services sponsored the mural project.

PRICE HILL

PRESS

Find news and information from your community on the Web Covedale • cincinnati.com/covedale Price Hill • cincinnati.com/pricehill Hamilton County • cincinnati.com/hamiltoncounty

News

Marc Emral Senior Editor ...............853-6264, memral@communitypress.com Monica Boylson Reporter ..............853-6265, mboylson@communitypress.com Kurt Backscheider Reporter ............853-6260, kbackscheider@communitypress.com Melanie Laughman Sports Editor ......248-7573, mlaughman@communitypress.com Tom Skeen Sports Reporter .............576-8250, tskeen@communitypress.com

Advertising

Melissa Martin Territory Sales Manager ...............768-8117, mmartin@enquirer.com

Delivery

For customer service...................853-6263, 853-6277 Sharon Schachleiter Circulation Manager ..................853-6279, sschachleiter@communitypress.com Stephanie Siebert District Manager.......................853-6281

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NEWS

JULY 18, 2012 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • A3

Women’s Connection celebrates 15th anniversary

By Kurt Backscheider

Sister Mary Jo Gasdorf, left, founder of The Women’s Connection, posed with Aimee Shinkle, the center’s new executive director, during a recent party celebrating the center’s 15th anniversary.

kbackscheider@communitypress.com

Aimee Shinkle said she and the staff at The Women’s Connection always ask themselves if they are meeting the needs of women and girls in the community. “We are a neighborhood center for women and girls, and our mission is to empower women and girls to make choices that will lead to positive changes in their lives,” she said. “Education, referral and support have always been the three pillars of what we do, and we’ve always stayed true to our mission.” The Price Hill organization is celebrating 15 years of fulfilling that mission. Founded in 1997 by Sister Mary Jo Gasdorf, a Sister of Charity, The Women’s Connection has provided several programs and services to women and girls over the past decade and a half. The center celebrated its 15th anniversary in May, just prior to Gasdorf’s retirement in June. Shinkle, who has been with the center for five years and now serves as its executive director, said Gasdorf and Sister Kathleen Hebbeler, a Dominican Sister of Hope, opened the center as a walkin referral service after talking with women in the neighborhood and listening to what their needs were. The walk-in and referral service remains an important aspect of the organization, but Shinkle said The Women’s Connection has also grown to offer dozens of programs, services and workshops women and girls use to better their lives. Linda Keller, the organization’s director of programs, said the center served more than 2,100 women and girls last year.

THANKS TO AIMEE SHINKLE

Angela Williams belted out "You and I," by Lady Gaga during the first round of Delhi Rising Star Competition semi-finals. MONICA BOYLSON/THE COMMUNITY PRE She said she’s proud of the relationships the center has built with women in the community over the past 15 years and the level of trust women have for the center. “There are always new challenges facing women in this community,” she said. “We’re here to listen and respond.” Shinkle said the center would not be what it is without the support it receives from dedicated volunteers. Whether they help plan events, serve on the board of trustees or answer phones at the front desk, she said more than 140 volunteers donated their time last year, giving 4,300 hours of service. “Our volunteers are so critical to what happens here on a daily basis,” she said. Both she and Keller said Gasdorf showed tremendous vision in founding The Women’s Connection. “Sister Mary Jo was well aware of the needs of women in the community,” Keller said. “She knew having a place of support for women will always be important.”

Delhi names 2 rising stars

COMMUNITY CELEBRATION As a way to celebrate its 15th anniversary, The Women’s Connection is hosting a Neighborhood Block Party from noon to 3 p.m. Saturday, July 21, at its Learning Center, 4022 Glenway Ave. Families and friends are invited to join the staff for a fun day marking the center’s 15 years of providing programs and services to women and girls in Price Hill. The event will feature games such as a bean bag toss, water balloon toss and Hula-hooping. Music, food and prizes will also be a part of the celebration. The block party is free and open to the public. For more information, call April Kandil at 471-4673, ext. 18, or email her at akandil@thewomensconnection.org.

The Delhi Rising Star Competition, a singing competition sponsored by the Delhi Civic Association, had it’s first round of semi-finals Thursday, July 12, at Maloney’s Pub in Delhi Township. Seven competitors serenaded the packed pub. Angela Williams and Diane Campbell will move on to the finals at the Delhi Skirt Game tailgate party at 7 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 2, at Remke/Biggs on Delhi Road. Also competing were: Becky Bedel, Mary Beth Heyl, Crystal Dennis, Erin Durkin and Hannah Petry. The second round of semi-finals will be at 7 p.m.

For more information about the center, visit www.thewomensconnection.org or call 471-4673.

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Patsy Cline was Diane Campbell’s muse during the Delhi Rising Star Competition. Campbell’s choice of “I Fall to Pieces,” helped launch her into the finals. MONICA BOYLSON/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

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NEWS

A4 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • JULY 18, 2012

Local governments glad to get refunds By Kurt Backschedier kbackschedier@communitypress.com

and Jennie Key

jkey@communitypress.com

Hamilton County Auditor Dusty Rhodes is returning $1.65 million in fees he didn’t spend on last year’s property reappraisals to the school districts, town-

ships and taxpayer-supported social-service agencies in the county. The refund is about $16.5 million. The reappraisal happens every six years. County auditors in each of Ohio’s 88 counties gets a percent each year of property taxes collected in their county to pay for the property ap-

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praisal process. In Hamilton County, that percentage added up to $54.5 million over the last six years. Rhodes spent only two-thirds of it, so the rest gets sent back, he said. He would prefer to return the money to the tax payers, but state law won’t allow that. But it does allow Rhodes to return it to local governments, and that’s what he does. “The state threw local governments a curve ball when the local government funds were cut,” he said. “We are fortunate that we

are able to give some money back. I believe it’s just the right thing to do.” He’s been consistent in that belief. In 2006, Rhodes gave back $14 million; in 2000, he returned $4.2 million to local governments, districts and agencies. This year, 90 entities get money back and each gets a different amount depending on the amount of property taxes they collect. Delhi Township is getting $143,849.43. “The money will go back into the general fund. It’s like Christmas in July,” turstee President Mike Davis said. “It

By Monica Boylson mboylson@communitypress.com

Rows of cages hold cats and dogs who have been groomed and are yet to be groomed. On an elevated table, golden doodle Sophie stands patiently while Jenny Newman, 62, shaves the dog’s back. Owner of Jenny’s Grooming Inc. on Rapid Run Road, the Delhi Township resident has been preening pets for decades and this month is celebrating her 25th year in business. “Without my helpers, I couldn’t have done it,” Newman said. A table away, Teresa Bradford, 29, of Covedale clips the hair of Belle, a long-haired chihuahua. “I love working with Jenny. We really work well together,” Bradford said,

Jenny Newman, 62, of Delhi Township has been grooming pets for 25 years. Here Newman grooms Sophie. MONICA BOYLSON/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Jenny's Grooming Inc. is celebrating 25 years this month. Jenny Newman, 62, left, and Teresa Bradford, 29, groom dogs in the salon. MONICA BOYLSON/THE COMMUNITY PRESS who has worked with Newman for 11 years. About 25 to 30 dogs cycle through the salon each day. The process from dirty paws to clean animal usually takes four to five hours, Bradford said. “We do cream-of-the-

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NEWS

JULY 18, 2012 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • A5

HONOR ROLLS MOTHER OF MERCY HIGH SCHOOL

The following students earned honors for the fourth quarter of the 2011-2012 school year.

Freshmen First honors: Jordyn Alexander, Brooke Benjamin, Emily Biery, Emma Bley, Mary Bowman, Megan Buse, Kelly Cline, Danielle Diersing, Sarah Doren, Sara Dressman, Sara Forbeck, Brittany Frandsen, Kristen Gandenberger, Delaney Greiner, Katelyn Harrell, Margaret Hartmann, Colleen Kotlas, Bailey Kurtz, Lynsey Kurzhals, Kellie Leonard, Rachel Leonhardt, Marissa Long, Emily Massengale, Abigail McBee, Hannah Muddiman, Rachael Petranek, Rebecca Rhein, Jessica Richter, Abigail Schatzman, Erika Schmitt, Molly Sexton, Kathryne Smith, Madeline Spetz, Nadya Streicher, Maria Vetter, Macara Vonderahe, Bridget Walsh, Audrey Wanstrath, Heather Williams, Ashley Wittrock and Alexandra Zeller. Second honors: Allison Bosse, Erica Brewer, Abigail Connor, Abigail Cullen, Sarah Davis, Shannon Ferrier, Paige Fischer, Lauren Gallagher, Allison Gay, Olivia Hart, Maria Hornsby, Emily House, Brianna Hughey, Rachel Huhn, Madison Johns, Lyndsi Kohls, Brooke Leonard, Natalie Luken, Margaret Morrissey, Elizabeth Neville, Nancy Nzobigeza, Gabrielle Phelps, Emily Ramsey, Kelly Salerno, Hannah Schibi, Brooke Schierenbeck, Shelby Schmidt, Caroline Schmitz, Andrea Smith, Michaela Smith, Diamond Snow, Jillian Stern, Brooklynn Sturwold, Amara Sydnor, Margaret Tegenkamp, Kelly Tieman, Alexis Von Holle, Lynn Vormbrock, Megan Vormbrock, Maria Waters and Megan Zeinner.

Sophomores First honors: Victoria Agustin, Stephanie Alderson,

Macey Anderson, Emily Beckmann, Madeliene Bell, Lauren Briede, Emily Budde, Erika Burwinkel, Sarah Chiappone, Megan Corso, Lauren Cummings, Grace Cunningham, Haley Dannemiller, Alena Flick, Olivia Folzenlogen, Claire Garbsch, Natalie Geraci, Lauren Grosheim, Emma Hatch, Rachel Hautman, Erin Helmers, Sara Heyd, Julia Heyl, Rachel Horn, Hannah Jackson, Hannah Kern, Carolyn Kesterman, Kaitlyn Klusman, Catherine Kneip, Lauren Leesman, Jessica Lienesch, Kimberly Lohbeck, Kaitlyn Luckey, Taylor Maas, Olivia Maltry, Samantha Mattlin, Katherine Minnelli, Brenna Mueller, Kelly Quatman, Courtney Reder, Megan Ridder, Abigail Rieger, Erin Rudemiller, Mary Rust, Teresa Rust, Erin Schapker, Kelly Schmitz, Jamie Seger, Hannah Siefert, Andrea Sizemore, Hannah Smith, Kathryn Spurlock, Erica Stowe, Mikayla Tepe, Tara Vogelpohl, Emily Wagner, Savanah Wagner, Victoria Weckenbrock, Holly Willard and Abigail Wocher. Second honors: Allison Adams, Rebecca Bradley, Dianna Bredestege, Isabella Brunsman, Patricia Cavanaugh, Kimberly Collins, Lauren Dinkelacker, Allyson Frame, Emily Havens, Amanda Huening, Bo Kim, Carly Linnemann, Claire Luken, Nicole Newsom, Elaine Niehauser, Miranda Perry, Erin Pope, Alexandra Ramsey, Maria Rechtin, Olivia Schad, Theresa Schill, Rebecca Schmitz, Madalyn Sheridan, Corey Specht, Danielle Stahl, Natalie Storm, Meggie Strawser, Abigail Thompson, Maggie Trentman, Stephanie Tumlin, Megan VanSant, Emily Wagner, Katherine Wernke and Mckala Will.

Juniors First honors: Sarah Bailey, Haley Baker, Rachel Barkalow, Kristen Bauer, Ellen Bley, Kristen Brauer, Katherine Brossart, Laura Burkart, Ste-

Heidemann, Katelyn Hoffbauer, Grace Jung, Lauren Kayse, Erin Kissinger, Jennifer Langen, Allison Loechtenfeldt, Brianna McCrea, Colleen McHenry, Erin McNamara, Elizabeth Miller, Amanda Myers, Kelsey Niehauser, Elizabeth Odenbeck, Monica Phipps, Meghan Pope, Abigail Rebholz, Abby Rechel, Morgan Redrow, Taylor Reilly, Carly Ruwan, Livia Sabato, Marissa Sander, Morgan

phanie Cline, Elizabeth David, Emily Davis, Kerri Davis, Hannah DeZarn, Amy Dirksing, Gabriela Discepoli, Hannah Donnellon, Maria Finnell, Sara Freking, Emily Friedmann, Erin Glankler, Emily Hartmann, Kelsey Herbers, Therese Herzog, Ashley Humphrey, Molly James, Rebecca Kaiser, Rebecca Klapper, Kelsey Kleiman, Katherine Ledermeier, Anna Lynd, Caroline Meyer, Jessica Michael, Nazret Michael, Megan Mitchell, Laura Raphael, Kimberly Reynolds, Katherine Ruwe, Christina Schmidt, Alexandra Souders, Nicole Stephan, Kelsey Stevens, Callie Talbot, Elizabeth Trentman, Maggie Walsh, Kelsey Watts, Kristen Weber, Samantha Weidner, Kelley Wiegman and Jenna Zappasodi. Second honors: Melina Artmayer, Ashlee Barker, Erin Biehl, Angela Blake, Sarah Bode, Katilynn Brown, Catherine Cosker, Abigail Dinkelacker, Jane Eby, Emilee Fischer, Taylor Hayes, Kelly Henderson, Rachael Hester, Maria Hils, Chelsea Jansen, Abbie Kemble, Elizabeth Kenkel, Courtney Kurzhals, Emily Kurzhals, Kotchakorn Limsakul, Marissa McPhillips, Rosa Molleran, Amy Pellegrino, Jennifer Peterman, Brianna Sallee-Thomas, Alina Scholz, Marisa Schwartz, Zoe Scott, Hanna Smith, Sara Staggs, Kristina Staley, Katelyn Stapleton, Rebecca Tumlin, Brittney Welborne and Emily Wernke.

Eighth grade

The following local students earned honors for the fourth quarter of the 2011-2012 school year.

Seventh grade B Average: Griffin Sherwood and Ariana Whitehead.

A Average: Anthony Clark. B Average: Anastasia Dwyer.

Freshmen A Average: Josie Hart. B Average: Jessica Hart and Kendra Myles.

Juniors

Jessica Kerley, Stephanie Kerley, Leslie Kurzhals, Olivia Luken, Elizabeth Maffey, Amanda Maurmeier, Nicole Metzner, Victoria Muccillo, Erin Newell, Emma Powell, Marissa Prinzbach, Holly Reckers, Kelsey Redmond, Lauren Rhein, Meagan Riesenbeck, Emily Schroer, Lindsey Schuermann, Marissa Sharbell, Abby Shay, Emily Storm, Jacquelyn Voet, Caroline Walsh and McKenzie Wills.

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NEWS

A6 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • JULY 18, 2012

HONOR ROLL DELHI MIDDLE SCHOOL The following students earned honors for the fourth quarter of the 2011-2012 school year.

Sixth grade Highest honors: Rebecca Binkley, Courtney Boehmer, Mitchell Brodbeck, Samantha Burke, Sicily Calouro, Samuel Carlson, Dominique Cole, Kaitlin Ann Cordell, Olivia Earhart, Amanda Eisenmann, Elizabeth Eisenmann, Aidan Flanigan, Kamryn Fleming, Alexis Gerke, Cassandra Ginter, Carley Knierim, Abagayle Kromme, Hannah Lewis, Meghan Lloyd, Sydney Longbottom, Katie Ludwig, Erica Mahoney, Lauren McCarthy, Hailee Murphy, Dominic Niederkorn, Johnathon Piersall, Michael Radcliffe, Samantha Reese, Brianna Rhoton, Lauren Rippy, Dylan Roach, Autumn Shelton, Chandler Trennepohl, Austin Wilfert, Nathan Young and Maria Zalot. High honors: Abraham Alnajar, Hannah Anderson, Alexandria Antrobus, Mitchell Baines, Felix Bangert, Cameron Barge, Jacob Bender, Lydia Brunner, Sydney Cardullias, Tyler Clark, Paul Collins, Kimberlea

Czulewicz, Tommie Davenport, Derrik Deidesheimer, Matthew Dorsey, Katrina Essen, Timothy Flanigan, Anna Gates, Elijah Harris, Emily Hess, Torri King, Hannah Knight, Abigael Lahmer, Lindsey Lawrence, Barbara Lubbers, Blake Michaelis, Jayson Mitchell, Madison Mitchell, Steven Pohlmann, Katelyn Powers, Joshua Presnell, Katlynn Pristas, Natalie Rowe, Brittney Sajna, Allison Sanker, Chance Schneider, Elyse Schulte, Justin Schumacher, Andrew Stevens, Jacob Stevens, Abigail Turner, Abigail Voss, Jessica Ward, Brennan Wells, Christian White and Olivia Young. Honors: Jacob Abbott, Madison Adkins, Katelin Allen, Ronald Allen, Mykayla Blanchard, Aerial Brazzell, Ashley Britt, Joshua Burke, Josiah Burmeister, William Butts, Janelle Chambers, Betelhem Daniel, Sarah Davis, Makenna Doyle, Tyler Doyle, Hallie Ernette, Cameryn Fee, Brandon Fuller, Torrey Gough, Keanen Hackle, Lane Hafner, Matthew Hale, Anthony Hilvert, Antonio Hollingsworth, Devin Keyes, Sean Law, Robert Loudermilk, Skyler Mansu, Carl (CJ) Martini, Katlynn McKee, Neil

Meyer, Jordan Murray, Timmy Nguyen, Cecilie Patterson, Hope Snapp, Andrea Steinmetz, Justin Taylor, Cory Thacker, Caitlin Venturini, Kenneth Warby, Isiah Waynick and Megan Woytsek.

Seventh grade Highest honors: Holly Ahrman, Paige Bailey, Shelby Barnell, Morgan Beare, Jeffrey Bill, Michael Bill, Robyn Combs, Shiann Cox, Ethan Cundiff, Chelsea Davis, Holly Feucht, Marisa Fink, Keyrstin Fisher, Julia Gomien, Hannah Hale, Lindsey Hale, Elizabeth Hoffman, Hope Hollandsworth, Kylee Howard, Keith Kaiser, Megan Kappen, Cailyn Kleisinger, Paige Knorr, Mya Lipps, Brianna Lunsford, Danielle Martini, Kaylee Morris, Donna Nguyen, Tyler Parrish, Blair Patterson, Jackson Petrich, Madison Raabe, Madison Schaefer, Jacob Schaub, Sheldon Slayback, Shelby Spitzfaden, Selina Sunderman, Cierra Tarter, Devin Ulrich, Sarah Urban, Kaylei Wilcox and Jonah Yates. High honors: Nicholas Ashwell, Maxwell Bartholomew, Ryan Batte, Jossie Belcher, McKenna Belmont, Taylor BiggsSpecht, Aliyah Boeh, Hannah

Burmeister, Miranda Chisenhall, Karen Connelly, Haley Cox, Lydia Cox, Abby Daugherty, Hannah Davenport, Makenzie Deidesheimer, Victoria Essen, Jessica Essert, Shayla Gee, Chase Gilkeson, Kenyon Hairston, Taylor Hibbard, Jessica Hornback, Alexis Hutchinson, Joshua Jones, Ryan Leming, Susan Macdonald, Nathan Madden, James Maltry, Sidney McElroy, Trevor Might, Hope Mitchell, Kyle Montag, Saed Musaitif, Timothy Neale, Amberlee Rosen, Taylar Sabath, Alexander Schoenlaub, Sarah Spraul, Zen Spring, Colleen Suhr, Zane Thompson, Hunter Tripp, Melissa Vollhardt, Austin Watson and Howie Zade. Honors: Destiny Ashbrook, Jenna Baker, Joseph Bardonaro, Mariah Bayalan, Brooke Bellomo, Dominic Breen, Ashley Brinkerhoff, Juliann Bunner, Sean Clark, McKenna Curry, Anthony Day, Bethany Dodge, Nicholas Felty, Kayla Feucht, Megan Gibson, Jordon Green, Dylan Guthrie, Marissa Kempf, Jodi King, Jayden Kirchner, Mariah Koenig, Kayla Maxson-Brooks, Brianna Messer, Bryson Michaelis, Justin Pickerell, Brandon Prom, Emma Sinnard, Caleb Thacker, Gabrielle Thomas,

Gavin Wiggs, Keajea Williams and Alisseia Wissemeier.

Eighth grade Highest honors: Diana Ahrman, Allison Berding, Matthew Brodbeck, Emily Dull, Alexandra Eby, Emily Ewry, Emily Fischvogt, Kristina Flanigan, Samantha Goldizen, Quinten Griffis, Chandler Harlow, Devon Hash, Nikki Ingle, Taylor King, Natalie Lloyd, Bradly Mansu, Alexandra McCarthy, Sarah Miller, Kristen Nunlist, Alex Schulz, Joseph Shine and Ashley Wright. High honors: Alex Albrecht, Haden Barkley, Danielle Brunner, Michaela Bruser, Jamie Colston, Alexis Cornelius, Austin Costa, Travis Costa, Kaley Eberle, Madison Froehle, Rebecca Funk, Tyler Gates, Cheyenne Henson, Anna Hilvert, Morgan Inskeep, Kali Jones, Charles Jump, Zachary Kappen, Abigail Lang, Molly Luebbering, Amanda Meyer, Danielle Muench, Nolan Norman, Hailee Powell, Jeremy Rossi, Ciera Ruschman, Zachary Schultian, Daniel Scott, Carly Segbers, Thomas Seibert, Emma Sexton, Samantha Siegel, Carley Smith, Matthew Stevens, Kayla Stevenson, Aaron Thatcher, Tara Vassal-

lo, Jared Willwerth, Thomas Willwerth, Alexis Witt, Bryon Wood, Conor Young and Kareem Zade. Honors: Jazmin Abu-Rizeq, Haley Allen, Alyssa Baldwin, Jasmine Barnes, Drew Beck, Laura (Taylor) Bell, Alexis Bock, Elizabeth Bowling, Joshua Brummett, Jeffrey Buschard, Taylor CarmonyHackle, K. Jessica Clark, Krisdena Cole, Alexis Conley, Morgan Cox, Joshua Cunningham, Matea Davis, Andrew Dezarn, Sara Duffy, Brooklyn Earhart, Emily Ellenberg, Michael Fairbanks, Garrett Feist, Larissa Fuller, Chelsey Gillium, Quentin Graham, Anthony Heinlein, Tyler Heller, Alyson Kelley, Sedrick Kirschman, Ryan Korn, Austin Long, Ally McCarthy, Heather McCowan, Isaac McMichael, Alexander Minnick, Nicholas Morrow, Johnny Nguyen, Abygayle Partin, Brooke Pristas, Sydnee Pruitt, Tyler Reese, Meghan Roark, Gabrielle Rosen, Dylan Roth, Kelsey Sammons, Dalyia Shalash, Alicia Simpson, Luny Singharat, Michaela Skalski, Briana Staples, Sofia Tedesco, Corey Todd, Tabitha Traylor, Sarun Va, Kearsten Weber, Amber Williams, Maria Willman, Abigail Winch and Shyane Wright.

HONOR ROLLS ST. DOMINIC SCHOOL

The following students earned honors for the fourth quarter of the 2011-2012 school year.

Fourth through eighth grades First honors: Lucas Abbott, Lydia Abbott, Baylee Adams, Allyson Albertz, Marie Altenau, Rachel Auer, Stefanie Autenrieb, Hannah Bacon, Abigail Baker, Katelyn Barnes, Timothy Berndsen, Caroline Berning, Emily Berning, Justin Besl, Blake Bethel, Brooke Bethel, Kyle Branson, Chelsey Brown, Jordan Burke, Logan Burke, Samantha Clark, Austin Combs, Heidi Cook, Tanner Daria, Makayla Deilkes, Hannah Doll, Taylor Doyle, Rachel Dreiling, Renee Dreiling, Kathleen Erpenbeck, Morgan

Essen, Austin Gilkey, Nicholas Gillespie, Sydney Goins, Stosh Groszek, Annie Gruber, Jacob Gutzwiller, Kyle Gutzwiller, Barkley Haneberg-Diggs, Bridget Hellmann, Olivia Hensley, Kayla Hess, Jacob Hibbard, Nora Hibbard, Nathan Hill, Ryan Hill, Joshua Hoffman, Gwendalyne Homan, Lars Illokken, Analise Kandra, Collin Kandra, Luke Kandra, Jacob Kellard, Audrey Kirkendall, Jill Kloepfer, Shelby Lanpheare, Andrew Le, Carmen Leisgang, Charles Lipps, Eddie Lipps, Emily Lipps, Kurt Luken, Jacob Melvin, Elizabeth Moore, Morgan Morano, Daniel Moster, Alexander Mullins, Tyler Mullins, Braedy Murphy, Brandon Myers, Abigail Neumann, Abigail Nutter, Madelynne Nutter, Brooke Oakley, Caroline

Oakley, Emma Ochs, Olivia Ohradzansky, Taylor O’Leary, Keith Orloff, Grace Paustian, Lexi Philpot, Taylor Pitchford, Elana Radigan, Alexandra Reckers, Zachary Rizzo, Caroline Rosen, Michael Rosen, Mia Roth, Rylee Sanker, Morgan Scherer, Erica Schloemer, Matthew Schloemer, Hannah Schwaeble, Nicholas Sebastian, Rachel Sebastian, Kyle Sokolis, Abigail Staubitz, Allison Sullivan, Ryan Sullivan, Jack Sunderman, Abigail Tettenhorst, Caitlyn Thai, Mikaleigh Thai, Angelina Tran, Lindsey Vale, Dane Vatter, Mackenzie Vatter, Kurtis Wagner, Patrick Wagner, Kelli Wanger, Jacob Wells, Erica Wessel, Ryan West, Andrew White, Alyssa Wittrock, Alex Young, Timothy Zang and Alexander Zimmer.

Second honors: John Altenau, Josie Angel, Scott Araujo, Lindsey Audretch, Annie Awad, Siler Barkley, Kevin Bill, Tyler Billman, Kelsey Bottoms, Nathan Bottoms, Matthew Bredestege, Abigail Brinker, Chad Brinker, Dallas Buresh, Jack Burgasser, Nicholas Burgasser, Alexander Carcutt, Benjamin Carroll, Anna Castano, Amanda Chafins, Mercede Chaney, Joshua Clark, Laura Clark, Chloe Cole, Alexis Conard, Braden Connor, Heather Cook, Michael Corcoran, Nicholas Corcoran, Samuel Coy, Nicholas Cron, Zachary Czoer, Dalton DeBruler, Ryan Doll, Joseph Dowd, Hayley Dressler, Matthew Dugan, Zachary Dugan, Hannah Eggers, Randall Ellis, Joseph Enlund, Tyler Eshman, Anthony Essen, Logan

Essen, Alexis Fink, Justin Finkelstein, Rashel Flores, Riley Folzenlogen, Maggie Geiger, Mitchell Gibbs, Drew Goins, Kyle Goins, Mitchel Grady, Benjamin Gruber, Sarah Haile, Gage Hammann, Daniel Happy, Madelyn Hart, Ella Hartung, Nathan Hartung, Mitchell Huesman, Zachary Huesman, Kari Illokken, Sophia Illokken, Hope Inman, Michael Jackson, Alexa Jacob, Olivia Jacob, Danielle Jacobs, Spencer Kandra, Kyle King, Olivia Klumpp, Jack Knolle, Monica Lape, Evan Lewin, Brady Lindsey, Brianna Lindsey, AnnaMarie Lipps, Eric Lipps, Matthew Listermann, Kelsey Lively, Connor Lohmiller, Corey Manhema, Adam Martini, Ian Martini, Bailey Mason, Peyton McCarthy, Brenna McDermott, Adam

Melvin, Morgan Miller, Amanda Murray, Olivia Murray, Ryan Niehaus, Robert Oswald, Austin Park, Juliet Perrino, Regina Richards, Renee Rodgers, Jack Rolfes, Livia Satzger, Joseph Shoemaker, John Specker, Marie Specker, Christian Staubitz, Breanna Steelman, Nicholas Stenger, Matthew Stephens, Savannaha Stidham, Abigail Strack, Patrick Sturgill, Rowan Tolbert, Daniel Vale, Ryan Vincent, Olivia Volz, Megan Wade, Hannah Wagner, Nicholas Watson, Alexandra Weartz, Cassandra Weartz, Mara Weaver, Monica White, Zoe Willis, Jeffrey Wolf, Tristan Worsham, Samuel Wuebbling and Christopher Zimmer.

HONOR ROLLS WESTERN HILLS HIGH SCHOOL

The following students earned honors for the fourth quarter of the 2011-2012 school year.

Freshmen A honors: Kayla Eaton, Samantha Finke, Chau Nguyen and Candice Ousley. A average honors: Denzel Brown, Jasmine Butler, Brandon Lauderback, Luis Lorenzo, Nyla Slaughter, Tyler Sperveslage, Cameron Stewart and Najwa Tibtani. B average honors: Steven Banks, Kelvion Bush, Destiney Cromer, Langston Culbreath, Akeem Duncan, Jameil Haynes, Tamiaa Hudson, Alexis Jansen, Emoni Jeffries, Damonte’s Johnson, Diamond King, Alphonso Pouncy, Marcelous Riggs, Sophia Romelli, Curtiss Scott, Solana Sutton, Michael Thomas and Nastahja Williams.

Sophomores A average honors: Adrienna Avery-Earnest, Joshua Batchelor, Shayla Edwards, Takeisha Hergins, Josephine Miller, Darius Myrick, Josalynn Smith, Shannon Thomas, Mauricio Vivar, Qi Weng and J’onae Wright. B average honors: Stefanie Aguilera, Stephon Banks, Tajaei Blanton, Latasha Butte, Jewel Chancellor, Johnny Cummings, Jade Evans, Jonathan France, Jaleah Glover, Cierra Gordon, Ahmad Harvey, Lawren Jones, Rhon-Nyiah Jones, Latia Kemp, Danielle Saleem, Jaleea Smith, Ieisha Thomas, Jasmine Thomas, Cydney Watkins and Joshua Watkins.

Juniors A honors: Sarah Melford and Dametra Vance. A average honors: Ray Qel Bradley, Jamaika Floyd, Danielle Huffaker, Belinda Kemetse, Siara

Myrick and Zaire Sims. B average honors: Jaelyn Barfield, Earl Danzy, Robert Jones, Asiana Knox-Allen, Tamar Lebron, Ashley Morrow, Rkasia Ramsey, Santana Saleem, Adrienne Smith, Leon White and Charmeka Williams.

Seniors A honors: DaVaughn Blue, Mandie Franklin, Santanna Huff and Brandi Nastold. A average honors: Charnee Betts, Kimira Crumby, Nia GoodeMayo, Demond Kimber, George Lundy, Markius Williams and Blake Winans. B average honors: Kaitlyn Autenrieb, Kasondra Belew, Tywuan Black, Ciera Calhoun, Kazia Goode, Lionel Hill, Ivory Johnson, Marisa Jones, Mokpokpor Kemetse, Elecia Newton, Aurelia Persley, Breahna Satterfield, Brooklyn Smith, Aidan Tudor and Leanne White.

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NEWS

JULY 18, 2012 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • A7

Salutatorian may follow family into teaching By Connie Ruhe

westnews@communitypress.com

Riki Drout relished every minute at Walnut Hills High School, balancing springboard diving and playing viola with challenging academics to become its 2012 salutatorian. The 17-year-old graduate from Price Hill finished second in a class of just more than 310, at a high school that appears annually on lists of top high schools in the country. U.S. News & World Report ranks Walnut Hills 65th (first in Ohio) and Newsweek places it at No. 66. Yet it wasn’t just her weighted grade point average of 5.4805 that earned her a place on the commencement stage with the valedictorian and class officers. It was the culmination of 12 years of hard work and fun through sixth-grade at FairviewClifton German Language School and through 12thgrade at Walnut Hills.

“It’s good and I made it,” she said the day after graduation – and the day she passed her driver’s test. She is the daughter of Kristi and Rick Drout. Her brother, Noah, is a student at Walnut Hills. Riki is headed to Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, where she’ll major in chemistry. Although she sees herself doing research, she figures she just might end up a teacher like her mother and grandfather. “I tutor and I love it. And I was picked as ‘Most Likely to Return as a Walnut Hills Teacher.’” Regardless, she added, “I don’t think I’ll stray far from math and science.” Not surprisingly, she counts chemistry teacher Jeff Lazar among her favorites at Walnut Hills. “I came home from10thgrade and said ‘I want to be a chemistry teacher,’” she recalled. “He made me love chemistry.” She enjoyed performing

with the chamber orchestra at Carnegie Hall in New York City in the spring of 2011. She competed in springboard diving for four years at Walnut Hills and was recognized as an Ohio High School Athletic Association Scholar-Athlete. Riki is coaching diving at Anderson Hills Swim and Tennis Club this summer, and

in Walnut Hills’ orchestras under the direction of John Caliguri. Participation during the day’s last period prevented her from taking an additional Advanced Placement (AP) class her senior year that may have impacted her GPA, but Riki said she wasn’t concerned. “I wasn’t the best but I loved the people I was with, the teacher and the music. It was a good way to end the day,” she said. It also gave her a memorable opportunity to play

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SCHOOLS A8 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • JULY 18, 2012

Editor: Marc Emral, memral@communitypress.com, 578-1053

ACHIEVEMENTS | NEWS | ACTIVITIES | HONORS

Sgt. Steve Watt, left, and Alex Watt of the Hamilton County Sheriff's Pipe & Drum Corps played bagpipes before the graduating Highlanders filled floor at the Cintas Center. PROVIDED

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Oak Hills graduates look to the stands to find their families during graduation. PROVIDED

Zachary LeCompte, president of the senior class, was one of the students who made a speech at graduation. PROVIDED

Kyle Freeman accepts his diploma from assistant principal Lisa Schlomer. Oak Hills graduation was Saturday, June 2, at the Cintas Center. PROVIDED

HIGHLANDERS GRADUATES Members of the Oak Hills Drumline perform at the graduation ceremony in Cintas Center at Xaiver University. PROVIDED

Oak Hills High School had its graduation June 2 at Xavier University’s Cintas Center. Zachary LeCompte, senior class president; and Stevie Smith, highest honors student, presented speeches to the 660 students who graduated.

Confetti fell upon the graduates at the end of the commencement ceremony. PROVIDED

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JULY 18, 2012 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • A9

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Editor: Melanie Laughman, mlaughman@communitypress.com, 513-248-7573

HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | RECREATIONAL

CommunityPress.com

Steam roll into All-Star break Team successes – including those from Elder grad Chidemo - bring 2nd-place standings

By Tom Skeen tskeen@communitypress.com

PRICE HILL — The Cincinnati Steam enter the All-Star break winning five of their last seven games and sitting just a half game back of the first-place Lima Locos. “We are excited about the way we’re playing,” coach Billy O’Conner said. “The games we stubbed our toes in have been doubleheaders. Those games have a different feel to them than single games. You are on the field all day and other factors come into play. Other than that, when we take the field be know who the best team is.” One of the top guys for the Steam has been Roger Bacon graduate Josh Ungerbuehler, who is second on the team with a .373 average. After helping Marietta College to its second consecutive Division III National Championship, Ungerbuehler leads the Steam with seven doubles and ranks second in RBI, walks and stolen bases. “(Josh) has been great,” O’Conner said. “He ended his spring season on fire and picked right up for us. He has been a difference maker at the top of the lineup. He has quality at-bats every time, always hits, walks, Former Roger Bacon and current Marietta College standout Josh Ungerbuehler looks on as the Grand Lake moves runners and handles the Mariners are introduced before their June 21 contest. Ungerbuehler is hitting .373 - second on the team - and bat well.” leads the Steam with seven doubles on the season. TOM SKEEN/THE COMMUNITY PRESS Another guy who continues to hit is former Elder Panther Selby the field, but he is really pro- more than (Williams),” O’Conner der Ryan Martin is on fire. In 14.1 said. “He loves every part of it. innings pitched, he has struck out Chidemo. Since June 21, Chidemo gressing.” Infielder Matt Williams is in Nobody runs harder down the 22 batters and walked just one has raised his batting average his second season with the Steam line than him. He has all the tools while posting a 2.51 ERA and a 2-1 from .292 to .328. “He is definitely making and has made big strides since and has really grown. He had a record. “The key to his success is how strides,” O’Conner said, a former last season, according to O’Con- pretty good summer last year, Panther himself. “He is better ner. The former CHCA standout but this year things are really competitive he is,” said O’Conner. now than he was three weeks ago. and current Cincinnati Bearcat is coming together and I think he’s “Never in a million years would He gives us good at-bats, doesn’t hitting .321 and leading the Steam starting to realize his full poten- you think he is a high strikeout guy because he doesn’t throw tial.” strike out and puts the ball in- with 22 RBI. On the mound, Turpin gradu- hard or have high velocity. He is “I don’t know if there is a kid play. His arm is coming around; he has good days and bad days in on the team that loves baseball ate and Michigan State left-han- so competitive and so crafty and

St. Ursula has 14 sign to play in college

Delhi Township girls among group

St. Ursula Academy seniors participated in a signing ceremony on May 15 to commit to play college sports. Of the 14, local signees include:

Abby Bettner

Abby Bettner of Delhi Township signed her letter of intent to play golf at The College of Mt. St. Joseph. She was a member of the SUA junior varsity team as a sophomore and junior and joined varsity as a senior. SUA awards and accomplishments: At the end of this season she won the Saint Ursula Academy Bulldog Award. She also made either first and second honors since freshman year. Abby recently was named as a recipient of the Greater Cincinnati Women’s Golf Association award. The scholarship award can be used for her freshman year at The College of Mount Saint Joseph for expenses. In May 2010, Abby won a golf tournament at Majestic Springs. Abby’s St. Ursula Golf Coach Mark Hannahan, said: “Abby Bettner loves golf and has dedicated herself these past four years to improve. She has worked very hard and the results have been impressive. As a senior varsity player, she mod-

eled many fine qualities for her teammates. Mount St. Joseph is fortunate to have Abby join their golf program.”

Danielle Dusing

Danielle Dusing of Delhi Township has signed her letter of intent to play golf at Marysville University in St. Louis. Danielle played golf for St. Ursula during all four years, first on the JV team then on the varsity team. She also played freshman and JV basketball for two years at SUA. But she chose to ultimately pursue her golf game. She has done a good job balancing her athletics and her studies and earned second honors all four years. On the course, she has decreased her scoring average every year. This year, she was named to the second team AllGGCL. She has also received recognition with an Honorable All-City award and Honorable Mention-All Southwest District. Danielle’s St. Ursula Golf Coach, Mark Hannahan, had this to say about her, “Danielle Duesing has been a very solid two year varsity performer and helped our team succeed. She has worked as hard as anyone to improve and it showed as all aspects of her game got better. The coach at Maryville University is lucky to have Danielle join their program; she will be a

key contributor there.”

Katie Hulsman

Katie Hulsman of Delhi Township has signed her letter of intent to play Division III softball for Transylvania University. An all-around athlete, Katie played freshman and JV basketball in addition to her four years playing varsity softball for SUA. She was named first-team All GGCL for softball in her sophomore and junior year. She also was named a Cincinnati Enquirer Honorable Mention Division I All-Star for softball in 2010-2011. Plus, she made the fast-pitch Coaches Association first team for the Cincinnati AllMetro Southwest District in 2011. Through her club team, she was given the Queen of the Diamonds North Showcase Cage Animal Award in 2011. She was the Bustos Ultimates travel team captain in 2011. Katie’s St. Ursula softball coach, Chrissy Martini said , “I’ve had the pleasure of coaching Katie for 4 years and she is a most fiery competitor. She is dedicated to improving her game and competing at the highest possible level. She is aggressive, smart, determined and she is pretty funny too!! I am so proud of her success both on and off the field, and I wish her all the best as a future Pioneer.

Former Elder Panther Selby Chidemo, right, talks with first-base coach Kyle Ottaway after reaching base through a bunt June 21 in the Steam’s win over Grand Lake. Chidemo has raised his batting average nearly .30 points since the June 21 contest. TOM SKEEN/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

smart on the mound, he just knows how to get things done. He is not scared at all out there.” With 13 games to go, including three against first-place Lima, who the Steam have already defeated once this season, they are in a great position to make a run for the Great Lakes Summer Collegiate League title. “I think we have plenty of talent to win,” the Steam coach said. “We have to sustain our hard work and energy and come to play every single day. We have competitive guys on this team and that means a lot to a coach. They step on the field and want to win and put forth the effort. We are doing that this year and if we keep it up it will lead to success the second half.”

Scouts visit Western Hills On July 3, Western Hills baseball hosted the nationally recognized college and professional baseball recruiting service PBR (Prep Baseball Report). The showcase presented more than 60 players from middle, Southwestern Ohio and Northern Kentucky. Fourteen players from Cincinnati Metro Athletic Conference attended, including four from Western Hills. The other 10 players were from Aiken and Withrow. West High outfielder Cameron Washington (2013), turned in the best 60-yard time of 6.86 (best in the camp) and Western Hills catcher Jordan Saunders (2013) opened some eyes with his strong throwing arm and quick release

for the college and pro scouts in attendance. Some of the colleges in attendance were: Bluffton, Bowling Green, Akron, Louisville, Miami (OH) and Shawnee State. Major League scouts included the Cincinnati Reds, Milwaukee Brewers and Texas Rangers. PBR and Western Hills has formed an alliance wherein PBR holds a showcase camp at Arch McCartney stadium once in July and in return, CMAC players can attend the camp free of charge (cost is $250 per player). Players from freshmen to seniors can attend the camp. Each player is then entered into the Prep Baseball Report national registry for all college and professional scouts.

SIDELINES Rebels tryouts

The SWOL Westside Rebels will conduct tryouts at Delhi Park. » 12U, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Friday, July 20, on Field No. 6. » 11U, 10 a.m. to noon, Saturday, July 21, on Field No. 6. » 15U, 4-6 p.m., Saturday, July 21, on Field No. 1. » 12U, 2-4 p.m., Sunday, July 22, on Field No. 6. Contact Lou Martini at 646-3185. Age cut-off is April 30 for each age level.

Buckeyes baseball

The 11U Cincinnati Buckeyes select baseball team will conduct tryouts: 6-8 p.m., Thursday, July 26, at Delhi Park on Field 7. 5-8 p.m., Sunday, July 29, at Delhi

Park on Field 7. Attendance at both tryout dates is not mandatory but is encouraged. For questions or information please contact Gary Schloemer at 675-6734. Players may not reach age 12 prior to May 1, 2013.

Weststars tryouts

» The Cincinnati Weststars 11U National Baseball team is looking for experienced pitchers for the 2013 season. Serious inquiries only. Please contact Dan Dugan at 2136900 to schedule a private tryout. » Tryouts for the 2013 9U Cincinnati Weststars will be at Delhi Park Field 4 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Saturday, July 21; and noon to 3 p.m., Sunday, July 22. Call Beau Parton at 315-7293 or e-mail Beau.parton@gmail.com.

VIEWPOINTS A10 • PRICE HILL PRESS • JULY 18, 2012

Golf outing helps Kreuter Memorial Fund

I would like everyone on the West Side to know about a golf outing that is coming up on July 21. This golf outing is the third annual David Kreuter Memorial Golf Outing. The golf outing will be held at Aston Oaks in North Bend and will begin with a shotgun start at 2 p.m. The $65 entry fee included the18 hole scramble, cart, picnic dinner and awards. This is a great golf outing at a reasonable price. The golf outing is great, but the important thing is what happens with the funds that are collected from this golf outing. David Kreuter was a sergeant in the Marine Corps who was part of Lima Company and was killed in action on Aug. 3, 2005. David and his parents were and are a part of the West Side community and attend Shiloh Church in Delhi. They formed the David Kreuter Memorial fund in their son’s honor. They use the money to provide scholarships for kids on the west side of town. They are doing this to honor their son and to keep his memory alive. If you golf, would you consider getting a foursome together and playing in this outing? If you do not golf, would you consider a

ABOUT LETTERS AND COLUMNS We welcome your comments on editorials, columns, stories or other topics important to you in The Community Press. Include your name, address and phone number(s) so we may verify your letter. Letters of 200 or fewer words and columns of 500 or fewer words have the best chance of being published. All submissions may be edited for length, accuracy and clarity. Deadline: Noon Friday E-mail: memral@community press.com Fax: 853-6220 U.S. mail: See box below Letters, columns and articles submitted to The Community Press may be published or distributed in print, electronic or other forms.

donation to the David Kreuter Memorial Fund. You can send all donations to 2765 Mahoning Court, Cincinnati, Ohio, 45233. To register your foursome or for other questions, contact Pat Murray at 513-941-3646 or famkreuter@fuse.net. Clyde Kober Delhi Township

PRESS

Editor: Marc Emral, memral@communitypress.com, 853-6264

EDITORIALS | LETTERS | COLUMNS | CH@TROOM

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

COMMUNITY CommunityPress.com

Ask ‘What would Jesus do?’ I just can’t help it – I have to reply to Dusty Rhodes’ article about “renegade Roman Catholic nuns” who use praise for their good works to excuse them from Vatican suggestions that some have “strayed from church teaching.” It seems that whatever errors by such nuns he is referring to is another strike in his vendetta against the Sisters of Charity. For most of the 20 years since the cited “selling out of the community” by the Sisters of Charity, we have been exposed to his criticism of this “private deal.” Most residents of Delhi probably do not even know about or remember what he refers to in his repeated verbal attacks on the sisters. Dusty, why can’t you get over it? It was 20 years ago! I have lived in Delhi all of my life and have not experienced any terrible results from the “outof-state threat to our quality of life” to which you refer, and which the sisters supposedly supported by their business arrangement with the Greater Cincinnati Airport. I do remember sitting in class at the Mount as an adult

student in the eighties and not being able to hear a word from the instructors as plane after plane Tina Modafari passed diCOMMUNITY PRESS rectly overhead! That GUEST COLUMNIST was definitely a threat to my right to get the education I was paying for, along with all the other students attending not only the Mount, but all of the other public and parochial schools in the area. If you think that Delhi has provided “service and support to their tax-free college and facilities for over 100 years,” that is true, but I recognize that the College of Mount St. Joseph is an extremely prestigious institution which has by its very existence done much to put Delhi “on the map.” I’m sure you have noticed over the years how many respected businessmen and women and other people of importance have served on its board, attended and spoke at its functions, and otherwise added to

Delhi’s prominence. While the Delhi Pike business district flounders (which saddens me), the college, Bailey Place, and the Motherhouse flourish and expand. Does this anger you? Can’t you understand that we are so fortunate to have the Sisters of Charity and their facilities in our township? As far as the Vatican speaking out against nuns who act against church teaching, what about the number of priests who are guilty of unspeakable acts against young people? Isn’t that worthy of Vatican condemnation instead of being covered up and ignored? And, in a time when we are so short of priests, why is it such a sin for some nuns to seek to serve God in a priestly role? Is that a worse crime than that committed by the unfortunate priests mentioned above? I think that Dusty and the Vatican need to ask themselves, “What would Jesus do?” I don’t think He would hold grudges, or favor men over women to do His work. Tina Modafari lives in Delhi Township.

A funeral business of long-standing Generally events occur for a reason. As a board member of the Price Hill Historical Society and an editor of its monthly newsRichard Jones COMMUNITY PRESS letter, I’m usually aware of GUEST COLUMNIST what is happening around our museum headquarters. Last April we did an oral history on the first female licensed embalmer in Greater Cincinnati who was employed by John J. Radel Co. Then last month I was doing some research for my West Side baseball book and came upon a news clip in a 1932 Western Hills Press; “Bellar Olds team plays Radel’s Ghouls at Mt. Echo Park.” Just last week we received an email from an out-oftown member with a photo of a 1941 Knothole team sponsored by Radel. These repeated references to a long-standing West Side funeral business must be sending me a message. So what do we know about this family who have been in the funeral business for over 133 years. John J. Radel had helped a neighbor with the burial of an

Henry Radel bough the Schulte mansion at 4122 Glenway Ave., a majestic edifice that had been built around 1891. It still houses Radel Funeral Home. PROVIDED infant in 1878 and decided to enter the funeral service field. The Lower Price Hill area west of downtown had no such business, so he opened his office in a small frame building at 652 State Ave. One of the many services Radel offered the public beginning in 1898 was membership in a burial association, a forerunner of modern insurance plans. A weekly payment provided complete burial expenses for the poor of the area. In 1903, Radel, along with Charles Terry, Harry Lameier, John Seery and Charles Yeager formed a corporation to take care of the rapidly expanding

business. First on their agenda was to build the structure that is still in use on the site. The basement was where horses and carriages were housed. Parlors, a chapel, a preparation room and offices were on the first floor. An apartment and storage were above. Caskets were delivered to the basement where employees would hoist them to the main level using block and tackle. By 1912 automobiles were introduced to the business making the task much easier as ropes were tied to their bumpers and the caskets were raised when they entered the garage area.

Radel was one of the first to offer auto-serviced funerals in the country. Shortly thereafter, Radel invested money to begin Cincinnati’s first bus service, running west from Fountain Square to St. Joseph Cemetery at Nebraska and West Eighth Street, a trip of about five miles with a one-way fare of five cents. In 1917, at the age of 57, John Radel died during the flu epidemic. His son, Henry J., took over the company. Henry had the job, since he was 16, of looking after the horses and buggies which a number of doctors kept at the Radel stables. Henry had

recalled that the most unusual burial he had handled was that of a gypsy queen, when a 120piece band played the funeral music. Henry bought the Schulte mansion at 4122 Glenway Ave., a majestic edifice that had been built around 1891. The brick structure which contains approximately 8,000 square feet was converted into a second funeral home. For a time this home also served as a residence for Henry, his wife Josephine, and their two sons, Henry Jr. and Fares. When he died at age 80 in August 1973, Henry Radel Sr. was possibly the oldest active Ohio funeral director. At that time the company was taken over by his two sons. Henry Jr., known as Skip, said his most unusual funeral received considerable coverage in the media. Held for a prominent member of the Cincinnati Hell’s Angels motorcycle group, it proceeded to the cemetery with a regular police escort and 300 other motorcyclists. Richard Jones is a member of the Price Hill

Steam: A journey into the past led by the stars of tomorrow As you drive down Glenway Avenue, you might just notice a small sign at the corner of Ferguson Place advertising the K.L. date and time Willdermood COMMUNITY PRESS of the next Steam game. It GUEST COLUMNIST is a simple sign, not very flashy; and if you don’t happen to be looking that way, you might just miss it. And to

miss a Cincinnati Steam game, well that might just be a shame. The Cincinnati Steam is not just another summer collegiate baseball team; it is symbol of a great legacy known as Cincinnati baseball. It is a team that runs onto the field of Western Hills High, a school where not one or two, but four Major League baseball managers walked the halls as students. It is a team that proves baseball is still America’s pastime. It is a team that brings pride to the people of the west side.

PRICE HILL

PRESS

A publication of

A Steam game is a unique blend of nostalgia mixed with the current trends of whacky in-game promotions and entertainment. While one can sit in the bleachers, eat a hot dog, and bask in the purity of a game played by those who still play with heart, another can buy a few split-the-pot tickets, participate in one of MC Smitty’s (A.K.A. Jeff Smith) wild promotions, and catch a ball game on the side. Whatever the reason, there is an air of delight that runs through the crowd at each

and every Steam game played at Western Hills High. A delight that continues to feed the community, bringing them back season after season. The Cincinnati Steam is one of 11 teams playing in the Great Lakes Summer Collegiate League and is sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association. The team consists of 30 players representing various colleges and universities. The Steam prides itself with what they call “home grown” talent, having a majority of their

5556 Cheviot Road Cincinnati, Ohio 45247 phone: 923-3111 fax: 853-6220 email: pricehillpress@communitypress.com web site: www.communitypress.com

players coming from the Tristate area. The regular season runs through the end of July. If you happen to miss the sign on Glenway, you can find more information at cincinnatisteam.com. K.L. Willdermood graduated in May From Xavier University with a master’s degree in sports management. She works part-time for the Steam as the assistant media relations director; and works part-time for the Reds Hall of Fame and Museum.

Price Hill Press Editor Marc Emral memral@communitypress.com, 853-6264 Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday See page A2 for additional contact information.

WEDNESDAY, JULY 18, 2012

LIFE

COMMUNITY PRESS

PEOPLE | IDEAS | RECIPES

The Cincinnati Young People's Theatre will present "The Wedding Singer" as its summer musical at the Covedale Center for the Performing Arts. Having fun in the model DeLorean used in the show are cast members, top row form left, Kalie Kaimann of Delhi Township; Lindsey Mullen of Cleves and Jo Ellen Pellman of Mount Airy; front row, Kelcey Steele of St. Bernard; Reginald Hemphill of Mount Airy and Tyler Kuhlman of Green Township. KURT BACKSCHEIDER/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Teens take to Covedale stage

Young People’s Theatre perform

SHOW TIMES The Cincinnati Young People’s Theatre will present “The Wedding Singer” beginning Friday, July 27, through Sunday, Aug. 5. All shows are at the Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, 4990 Glenway Ave. Shows start at 8 p.m. July 27, 28 and 29, and Aug. 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5. There is also a 2 p.m. matinee performance Sunday, Aug. 5. Tickets range from $10 to $20. For more information, or to order tickets, call 241-6550 or visit www.cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com.

By Kurt Backscheider kbackscheider@communitypress.com

The teenagers in this summer’s Cincinnati Young People’s Theatre production are taking audiences back to a time when hair was big, greed was good and collars were popped. The 1980s will be in full effect when the teens take the stage at the Covedale Center for the Performing Arts to present “The Wedding Singer.” More than 80 teens representing nearly 40 schools from around the region have come together for this year’s musical, which is based on the hit comedy film starring Adam Sandler and Drew Barrymore. “It’s a really fun show,” said Tim Perrino, artistic director at the Covedale and founder of the Cincinnati Young People’s Theatre (CYPT). “There are several lead roles and some giant chorus numbers. It all melts together to be one whacked out, 80s trip.” Although most of the teens in this summer’s show aren’t very familiar with 1980s music – none of them were born until the 1990s – Kalie Kaimann, a Delhi Township resident who is entering her sophomore year at Seton High School, said it’s been a lot of fun learning some of the hit pop songs from the decade when mullets were king. “We’re excited for the show,” she said. “We all love

Seton High School senior Lindsey Mullen, left, and Kelcey Steele, a sophomore at Miami University, star in the Cincinnati Young People's Theatre's production of "The Wedding Singer" at the Covedale Center for the Performing Arts. THANKS TO HOLLY YURCHISON

“There are so many great performers here, so no matter what you now it’s going to be a good show.” LINDSEY MULLEN

Seton High School senior

entertaining people.” Green Township resident Tyler Kuhlman, a La Salle High School graduate who is now a sophomore at Xavier University, said he’s looking forward to taking a leading role in this year’s production. He said this is his third and final year with the theater program. “I knew there were a lot of older kids leaving after last year’s show, and I wanted to come back this year to step up and be a leader the way they were,” he said.

“The quality of the shows here are so far ahead of our high school shows. We work hard, but we also have fun every day.” Lindsey Mullen, a Seton High School senior from Cleves, echoed Kuhlman’s thoughts regarding the production quality. “There are so many great performers here, so no matter what you now it’s going to be a good show,” she said. Jo Ellen Pellman, a Mount Airy resident and junior at Walnut Hills High School,

and Reginald Hemphill, a Mount Airy teen who is a senior at the School for Creative & Performing Arts, both of whom are in their second year with the CYPT, said they are glad they joined the program. “I had seen CYPT shows for years and I knew it was something I wanted to be a part of,” Pellman said. “I auditioned last year and I’ve been loving it ever since.” Hemphill said one of his teachers suggested CYPT when he expressed interest

in a summer theater program. “I love it,” he said. Kelcey Steele, a Miami University sophomore from St. Bernard, said not only does the program allow young people an opportunity to make great friendships, but it also gives them experience performing live for large crowds. “It’s a thrill being in front of an audience,” he said. “It’s not something people our age usually get to do.” Perrino said his favorite part of directing the CYPT, which is now in its 31st season, is watching the teens come in as shy 13-year-olds and leave as confident, 19year-old stage veterans. He also gets a kick out of the way teens from all over the city form lasting bonds with each other through their involvement in the program. “They make lifelong friendships,” he said. “That’s the neat part.”

B2 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • JULY 18, 2012

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD THURSDAY, JULY 19

Westwood. TRX Training, 7-8 p.m., Western Sports Mall, 2323 Ferguson Road, Consists of body-weight exercises to develop strength, balance, flexibility and core stability. $10. 451-4905. Westwood.

Art Exhibits Exhibition of Mount Student Art & Design, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Studio San Giuseppe Art Gallery at the College of Mount St. Joseph, 5701 Delhi Road, Exhibit showcases student work from the 2011-2012 school year. Free. Presented by College of Mount St. Joseph. 244-4314; www.msj.edu. Delhi Township.

Farmers Market Sayler Park Farmers Market, 4-7 p.m., Sayler Park, Parkland Avenue and Monitor Street, Farmers Market with homegrown items like fruits, vegetables, desserts, salsas, relishes, jam and olive oil. Presented by Sayler Park Village Council. 675-0496. Sayler Park.

Exercise Classes Boot Camp, 7-8 p.m., Western Sports Mall, 2323 Ferguson Road, Combination of strength training and conditioning that will help you improve strength, lower body fat, improve body composition and improve aerobic and anaerobic capacity. $10. 451-4905. Westwood.

Music - Classical 20th Century Celebration, 7:30 p.m., Seton High School, 3901 Glenway Ave., Cincinnati Metropolitan Orchestra. Orchestral and choral selections including Tin Pan Alley, WWII/jazz, TV themes, sounds of ’60s and patriotic finale. Free, donations welcome. Presented by Cincinnati Metropolitan Orchestra. 941-8956; www.gocmo.org. West Price Hill.

Recreation Thursday Night Lightz, 7 p.m.-12:30 a.m., Edgewater Sports Park, 4819 E. Miami River Road, Heads-up car and motorcycle drag racing, burnout competition, music, food and $1 beers. Gates open 6 p.m. $5 off at participating sponsors. $10; $15 to race, requirements available online. Presented by Thursday Night Lightz. 874-2508; www.facebook.com/ThursdayNightLightz. Cleves.

WBO super featherweight titlist Adrien Broner is scheduled to fight Vicente Escobedo at U.S. Bank Arena Saturday, July 21. His fight is part of the HBO Boxing After Dark show. For tickets, go to www.ticketmaster.com. JOSEPH FUQUA II/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

ABOUT CALENDAR

Senior Citizens

To submit calendar items, go to www.cincinnati.com and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to life@communitypress.com along with event information. Items are printed on a spaceavailable basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to www.cincinnati.com and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page.

Exercise to Music, 10-11 a.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, $1. 385-3780. Green Township. Open Bridge, 12:15-3:15 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Free. 385-3780. Green Township.

FRIDAY, JULY 20

parks.org. Cleves.

Art Exhibits

Recreation

Exhibition of Mount Student Art & Design, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Studio San Giuseppe Art Gallery at the College of Mount St. Joseph, Free. 244-4314; www.msj.edu. Delhi Township.

Rollin’ on the River Car Show, 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Fernbank Park, 60 Thornton Ave., Classic and antique cars, music, raffles and refreshments. Car registration, 9 a.m.-noon, $15. Benefits Riverview-Delhi Kiwanis. Free for spectators; vehicle permit required. Presented by Kiwanis Club of Riverview-Delhi Hills. 941-7700; www.rollinontherivercarshow.com. Sayler Park. Family Fun Day, 2 p.m., Delhi Park Floral Paradise Gardens, 461 Greenwell Road, Greenwell Gardens Shelter. Games and other activities for whole family. Includes activities plus one meal ticket per family member good for hot dog, drink and chips or dessert. Basket raffles and split-the-pot available. Benefits auxiliary’s needy family fund. $15 per family. Presented by Mother Seton Ladies’ Auxiliary. 482-0963. Delhi Township.

Community Dance River Squares, 7:30-10 p.m., Miami Whitewater Township Firehouse, 6736 Ohio 128, Plus-level square dance and round dance club. $5. Presented by Southwestern Ohio/Northern Kentucky Square Dancers Federation. 929-2427. Miamitown.

Exercise Classes Tone and Strength, 9-10 a.m., Western Sports Mall, 2323 Ferguson Road, Combination of upper body, lower body and core strengthening exercises mixed in with light conditioning and stretching. $10. 451-4905. Westwood. Sampler Free Friday, 9 a.m.noon, Guenthner Physical Therapy, 5557 Cheviot Road, Zumba/yoga fusion 9-10 a.m. Hot yoga 11 a.m.-noon. Ages 18 and up. Free. 923-1700. Monfort Heights.

Farmers Market Lettuce Eat Well Farmers Market, 3-7 p.m., Harvest Home Park, 3961 North Bend Road, Locally produced food items. Free. Presented by Lettuce Eat Well. 661-1792; www.lewfm.org. Cheviot.

Festivals St. Joseph Church Festival, 6-11:30 p.m., St. Joseph Church, 25 E. Harrison Ave., Games for children and adults, rides, raffle, music and food. Alcohol with ID. 941-3661; www.stjosephnorthbend.com. North Bend.

Music - R&B Basic Truth, 9:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m., Drew’s on the River, 4333 River Road, $3. 451-1157; basictruth.webs.com. Riverside.

Senior Citizens Pinochle, Noon-4 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, 385-3780. Green Township. Arthritis Exercise, Noon-12:45 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Workout to videos geared to help lessen arthritis symptoms. For seniors. Free. 385-3780. Green Township. Taking Off Pounds Sensibly, 10-11 a.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Weight loss support and accountability. For seniors. $28 annual fee. 385-3780. Green Township.

Look for butterflies and other scale-winged creatures on the Blue Jacket Trail at Shawnee Lookout Park, 2008 Lawrenceburg Road, during the Scale Wings Hike at 2 p.m. Saturday, July 21. The hike is free, but a vehicle permit is required to enter the park. For more information, call 521-7275 or visit www.greatparks.org. FILE PHOTO. Yard Trimmings Drop-off, 11:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Kuliga Park, 6717 Bridgetown Road, Hamilton County residents may drop off yard trimmings. Free to all Hamilton County Residents. Bring proof of residency. Landscapers and commercial establishments not eligible to participate. Free. Presented by Hamilton County Recycling and Solid Waste District. 946-7766; www.hamiltoncountyrecycles.org. Green Township.

Yard Trimmings Drop-off, 11:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Kuliga Park, Free. 946-7766; www.hamiltoncountyrecycles.org. Green Township.

Exercise Classes

Exercise Classes

Zumba Class, 9-9:30 a.m., Curves, 3797 Shady Lane, $2. 467-1189; www.miamiheightscurves.com. Miami Heights. Vinyasa Flow Yoga for Fitness, 9-10 a.m., Western Sports Mall, 2323 Ferguson Road, Practice ancient styles and modern mix of vinyasa flows, with integrated music. $10, free for members. 451-4900. Westwood. Boot Camp, 9-10 a.m., Western Sports Mall, $10. 451-4905. Westwood.

Yoga, 4-5 p.m., Guenthner Physical Therapy, 5557 Cheviot Road, Strengthen, stretch and tone with gentle postures that release tension rand support the integrity of the spine. Family friendly. $7 walk-in; $120 for 10 classes. 923-1700; www.guenthnerpt.com. Monfort Heights. Zumba, 10-11 a.m., Western Sports Mall, 2323 Ferguson Road, Latin dance-inspired fitness program combines dance and aerobic elements to create fun and challenging workout. $10. 451-4905. Westwood.

Education Historic 1795 Cabin and Schoolhouse, 2-5 p.m., Shawnee Lookout Park, 2008 Lawrenceburg Road, Free, vehicle permit required. Presented by Hamilton County Park District. 521-7275; www.greatparks.org. North Bend.

MONDAY, JULY 23 Art Exhibits Exhibition of Mount Student Art & Design, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Studio San Giuseppe Art Gallery at the College of Mount St. Joseph, Free. 244-4314; www.msj.edu. Delhi Township.

Exercise Classes

Music - Blues

Music - Rock

Tempted Souls, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Poppy’s Tavern, 5510 Rybolt Road, Featuring the Sisters Milligan. Classic soul, R&B, classic rock and blues. Dinner available at Sakura Japanese Steakhouse & Sushi. Family friendly. Free. 233-7613; www.temptedsouls.com. Green Township.

Laurie Morvan Band, 7 p.m., Legends, 3801 Harrison Ave., Blues rock band fronted by female blues guitarist Laurie Morvan. Ticket pricing TBA. 662-1222; www.legendscincinnati.com. Cheviot.

Zumba, 5:30-6:30 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Wear comfortable workout attire and gym shoes. Bring water. $5. Presented by Deb’s Fitness Party. Through Dec. 17. 205-5064; www.debsfitnessparty.com. Green Township. Total Joint Class, 1:30-2:30 p.m., Guenthner Physical Therapy, 5557 Cheviot Road, Designed for people who have finished physical therapy after joint replacement surgery but are looking to improve upon the progress they’ve made leading to a better quality of life. Family friendly. $7 walk-in; $90 for 15 classes. 923-1700; www.guenthnerpt.com. Monfort Heights. Tone and Strength, 9-10 a.m. and 6-7 p.m., Western Sports Mall, $10. 451-4905. Westwood.

Nature

Home & Garden

Whoooo Flies by Night?, 1 p.m., Embshoff Woods, 4050 Paul Road, River Mount Pavilion. Learn about owls, an amazing nocturnal predator. Free, vehicle permit required. Presented by Hamilton County Park District. 521-7275; www.greatparks.org. Delhi Township. Whoooo Flies by Night?, 3:30 p.m., Mitchell Memorial Forest, 5401 Zion Road, Stone Shelter. Learn about owls, amazing nocturnal predators. Free, vehicle permit required. Presented by Hamilton County Park District. 521-7275; www.great-

Gardening Seminar: Ornamental Grasses, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Monfort Heights Branch Library, 3825 West Fork Road, How to integrate nuts and bolts of low-maintenance gardening staple into your landscape. Free. Presented by White Oak Garden Center. 385-3313; www.whiteoakgardencenter.com. Monfort Heights.

Festivals St. Joseph Church Festival, 5:30-11:30 p.m., St. Joseph Church, 941-3661; www.stjosephnorthbend.com. North Bend.

Nature Scale Wings Hike, 2 p.m., Shawnee Lookout Park, 2008 Lawrenceburg Road, Walk the Blue Jacket Trail in search of colorful scale-winged creatures, such as butterflies and moths. Free, vehicle permit required. Presented by Hamilton County Park District. 521-7275; www.greatparks.org. North Bend.

SATURDAY, JULY 21

SUNDAY, JULY 22

Civic

Civic

Festivals St. Joseph Church Festival, 3-10 p.m., St. Joseph Church, 941-3661; www.stjosephnorthbend.com. North Bend.

Senior Citizens Chair Volleyball, 10 a.m.-noon, Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, 385-3780. Green Township.

Indoor Cornhole, 10 a.m.-noon, Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, 385-3780. Green Township. Pinochle, Noon-4 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3853780. Green Township.

Summer Camp - Arts Theatreworks Summer Camp, 9 a.m.-2 p.m., Mother of Mercy High School, 3036 Werk Road, Daily through July 27. Boys and girls. Ages 7-14. $135. Registration required. 661-2740; www.motherofmercy.org/ summercamps. Westwood.

Summer Camp Miscellaneous Laffalot Summer Camps, 9 a.m.-2 p.m., St. Ignatius of Loyola School, 5222 North Bend Road, Daily through July 27. A variety of sports, games and activities for campers. An all boy and all girl format. Bring water bottle and lunch. Ages 6-12. $102-$120 depending on location. Registration required. Presented by Laffalot Summer Camps. 313-2076; www.laffalotcamps.com. Monfort Heights.

Summer Camp Religious/VBS Vacation Bible School, 6:308:30 p.m., Bible Chapel of Delhi Hills, 705 Pontius Road, Daily through July 27. Children learn about God through singing songs, making crafts, playing games and listening to teachings from the Bible. Ages 4-11. Free. 941-4707. Delhi Township.

Summer Camp - YMCA Traditional Day Camps, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., Gamble-Nippert YMCA, 3159 Montana Ave., Ages 6-12. Monday-Friday. $130 per week for YMCA member, $160 per week for non-member. 661-1105. Westwood.

TUESDAY, JULY 24 Art Exhibits Exhibition of Mount Student Art & Design, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Studio San Giuseppe Art Gallery at the College of Mount St. Joseph, Free. 244-4314; www.msj.edu. Delhi Township.

Exercise Classes Pilates Mat Class, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Guenthner Physical Therapy, 5557 Cheviot Road, Taught by Judy Feazell. Family friendly. $15 drop-in; $120 for 10 classes. 923-1700; www.guenthnerpt.com. Monfort Heights. Body Sculpt, 6-7 p.m., Western Sports Mall, 2323 Ferguson Road, Divided into 15 minutes of cardio, 15 minutes of upper body toning, 15 minutes of core/ab toning and 15 minutes of leg toning. $10. 451-4905; westernsportmall.com. Westwood. Boot Camp, 6-7 a.m., Western Sports Mall, $10. 451-4905.

Senior Citizens Quilting, 9:30-11:30 a.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Make blankets to donate to Project Linus and Children’s Hospital. For seniors. 385-3780. Green Township. Exercise to Music, 10-11 a.m., Green Township Senior Center, $1. 385-3780. Green Township. Ceramics, 11:30 a.m.-3 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, 385-3780. Green Township. Stability Ball, 9:30-10 a.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Bring your own stability ball and work on strengthening your core. For seniors. 385-3780. Green Township. Euchre, 12:30-3:30 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Open game. For seniors. 385-3780. Green Township. Pattern Dancing, 1-2:30 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Learn line dancing and have fun while exercising. For seniors. Free. 385-3780. Green Township. Billiards, 1:30-3:30 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Free. 385-3780. Green Township.

WEDNESDAY, JULY 25 Art Exhibits Exhibition of Mount Student Art & Design, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Studio San Giuseppe Art Gallery at the College of Mount St. Joseph, Free. 244-4314; www.msj.edu. Delhi Township.

Senior Citizens Pinochle, Noon-4 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3853780. Green Township. Vintage Artist, 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Place for artists to paint together. Beginners welcome. Bring own supplies. For seniors. Free. 385-3780. Green Township. Knitting and Crocheting, 10-11:30 a.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Knit or crochet blankets for Project Linus. Yarn provided. For seniors. Free. 385-3780. Green Township. Wood Carving, 1-3 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Carve with Greenwood Chippers. Many different techniques used: relief carvings, scroll saw, figurines. Bring own tools. For seniors. Free. 3853780. Green Township. Wii Bowling, 2-3:30 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Free. 385-3780. Green Township. Zumba Gold, 1-2 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Modified Zumba for seniors with standing and chair participation. For seniors. $3, $25 for 10 classes. 205-5064; www.debsfitnessparty.com. Green Township.

THURSDAY, JULY 26 Art Exhibits Exhibition of Mount Student Art & Design, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Studio San Giuseppe Art Gallery at the College of Mount St. Joseph, Free. 244-4314; www.msj.edu. Delhi Township.

Exercise Classes Boot Camp, 7-8 p.m., Western Sports Mall, $10. 451-4905. Westwood.

LIFE

JULY 18, 2012 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • B3

Good dishes come from heirloom recipes

Greyhound Tavern’s Pasta Gabriel

Mary Ann Wainscott, owner with her husband Butch, of this historic Northern Kentucky restaurant, shared this heirloom recipe. She told me “People absolutely love it.” I’ve given my approximate equivalents next to ingredients. Made fresh per serving. 5 oz. angel hair pasta, cooked 1 oz. (2 tablespoons) olive oil 1 tablespoon butter 3 oz. mushrooms, sliced 1 teaspoon minced garlic

Betty Crocker’s impossible pumpkin pie features a crust that doesn’t require rolling. THANKS TO RITA HEIKENFELD.

2 oz. green onions, about ¼ cup, chopped 2 oz. tomatoes (1 small tomato), diced Salt and pepper to taste Chicken or shrimp (optional)

Put olive oil, butter and mushrooms in a sauté pan. Sauté these with a little salt to get them started. Then add garlic, green onions and, last, the tomatoes so they don’t overcook. When the tomatoes are warm, add pasta. Served with blackened chicken or shrimp. Chicken (boneless skinless, 6 oz.) is broiled and blackened and cut in strips. Shrimp (5 oz.) is broiled in a little butter and salt and pepper and small amount of white wine. All is tossed several times so flavors are mixed.

Impossible pumpkin pie

Betty Crocker’s “impossible” pies never lose their appeal, since they’re easy and tasty with no pie crust to roll I’ve had a couple requests for these. One was for the impossible quiche pie. I don’t have that recipe but do have the other, for a

pumpkin pie. 1 cup canned pumpkin (not pumpkin pie mix) ½ cup original Bisquick mix ½ cup sugar 1 cup evaporated milk 1 tablespoon butter, softened 1½ to 2 teaspoons pumpkin pie spice 1 teaspoon vanilla 2 large eggs

Preheat oven to 350 and spray 9-inch pie plate. Blend all ingredients. Bake 35-40 minutes or until knife inserted in center comes out clean. Refrigerate until chilled, a few hours. Serve with whipped cream. Serves 6.

Beef pot roast with garlic and ginger

This is one of those recipes that has stood the test of time. I continue to get requests for it, even in the summer. Yummy over mashed potatoes or noodles. For Carol Ann, who said this is her husband’s favorite pot roast.

1 chuck, brisket or other inexpensive roast, approximately 3 lbs. Oil for browning ¼ cup cup hot water ¾ teaspoon powdered

ginger or 1 tablespoon minced fresh ginger 2-3 teaspoons minced garlic ¼ cup soy sauce or more to taste 2 large onions, sliced 2 teaspoons cornstarch mixed with ¼ cup cold water

Brown beef in a small amount of oil. Cover with water, ginger, garlic, soy sauce and onion. Cover and simmer about 2-3 hours, until tender, adding water as needed, about 1 cup. Or roast, covered, in 225 degree oven. Remove meat. Add cornstarch mixture to sauce and stir until thick. (May need to add a bit more cornstarch dissolved in a small amount of cold water). Serves 6.

Can you help?

not cause additional long We are in a very dry term problems. When the and hot summer. The dry weather starts to get dry, weather causes some watering along the foundafoundations to begin to tion may prevent this settle. Foundation, exterior wall cracks and interior settlement and control movement. Also, homecracks start to become evident. Houses supported owners with sump pumps on expansive clay soils are can unplug the pump and the sump fills with water likely to settle differabove the footing drain entially. Not every neighpipe level. The borhood has this water will reverse type of soil. Large flow through the trees will extract piping along the large amounts of foundation to remoisture from the store the moisture soil, accentuating level in the soil. the problem. The homeowner Settlement cracks has to remember develop because to plug the pump different portions Michael back in when the of the foundation Montgomery settle at different COMMUNITY PRESS rains begin. There are several other rates. GUEST COLUMNIST types of minor Some of the foundation repairs that older homes have unmay be very appropriate derground plumbing and and less costly. Some ecodownspout piping that has nomical methods may a limited life. The older piping may collapse, crack include structural repair of the cracks or steel tie or have tree root intrurods. sion. If these pipes begin The more extensive to leak along the foundatypes of repairs are classition, seasonal foundation fied as underpinning may be more likely due to piers. The various types of excess water content in underpinning piers are the soil, which weakens concrete piers, helical the soil. steel piers and push piers. There are several signs The push piers, if installed that homes experience correctly, should stabilize this seasonal movement. only the portion of foundaFoundation and brick cracks widen after extend- tion that has had the system installed to. The pored periods of dry weather. tion of the foundation not Interior wall and ceiling supported by these piers cracks also widen during may develop cracks, rethe dry times. If the quiring additional foundacracks are repaired when tion repairs. the crack is wider, the patch will buckle as the moisture level in the soil is Michael Montgomery of Buyrestored. ers Protection Group is a There are several licensed engineer . He can be methods of repair. Some reached at 800-285-3001 or homeowners live with the www.engineeringandfoundachanging cracks that may tions.com.

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Impossible quiche pie. If you have a recipe, please share. Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educator and author. Email her at columns@communitypress.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. For her blog, go to http://cincinnati.com/ blogs/cookingwithrita/

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Each year, my neighbor, Sandy Shelton, gifts me with one of her mother’s heirloom monkey face flowers. The leaves are a dark purplish green and the flowers do resemble a monkey face (with a bit of imagination) and they are a gorgeous shade of light purple. (Check out my blog for a photo). This plant is precious to her and her siblings since they repRita resent a Heikenfeld family’s RITA’S KITCHEN history of passing down those things that have meaning. That’s why I treasure my mom’s mint and send each child off with a sprig to plant on their own, much like mom did. And I can’t make jelly or jam without using my motherin-law Clara’s preserving spoon. She inherited it from her mom, and it’s a simple design made of cast metal with a long handle, and an angled bottom, just perfect for stirring jelly from the sides and bottom of the pan. Food is like that, too. Seems like the recipes we enjoy most are those with a history, like the ones I’m sharing today.

Dry periods may cause foundation cracks

LIFE

B4 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • JULY 18, 2012

Don’t rely on verbal vehicle warranties If you buy a used car, is the dealer responsible if something goes wrong with it after just a few days? A surprising number of people believe the dealer is responsible even if the car was sold “As Is,” meaning without a warranty. Now some judges

are ruling against the dealers as well. Cason Hensley, of Walton, bought a 2001 Honda Odyssey from a used car dealer in Cleves. “We test drove the vehicle. It sounded OK and we bought it. The very next day my fiancée goes to take it to work and the van

was just spinning through its gears. She tells me, ‘I can’t drive it,’” Hensley said. Hensley says he realized the van was purchased “As Is,” but says, “When they sell you a car there they say you have a 30-day unwritten warranty. It says ‘As Is’ on the

Willkommen

to GREATER “ZINZINNATI’S” OLDEST FESTIVAL

Schützenfest 2012

WHAT IS THE SCHUTZENFEST? Schutzenfest in the Greater Cincinnati Area is a traditional festival of the Catholic Kolping Society. A hand-carved eagle is used as a target for the marksmen. The individual to shoot the last part of the eagle has the honor of being proclaimed King for the year. All profits from the festival benefit the social, sports, and cultural sports exchanges, and myriad of charitable and philanthropic interests of the Catholic Kolping Society.

SINCE 1866

German American Food and Music! Domestic and Imported Beer! Booths, Games, Rides for Children! Pork and Chicken Dinners in Air Conditioned Hall (Sat. & Sun.)

KOLPING CENTER •10235 Mill Road • Cincinnati, Ohio 45231

JULY 20, 21, 22

FRIDAY, JULY 20 (6pm - midnight)

SUNDAY, JULY 22 (1-9pm)

PAVILION Rock Band “Under the Sun” (8pm-midnight) TENT Country Music “Back Street Band” (8pm-midnight)

OPENING PARADE Start of Shooting for “King” (3pm) GRAND PARADE Crowning of New King & Queen (6pm) PAVILION Vereins Musikanten (2-5pm) Magic Show (4pm) Germania Jagdhorn Blaesergruppe (3- pm) Germania Schuhplattler (3:30pm) Enzian Dancers (7pm) Dave Hughes (5-9pm) Bring the TENT whole family! Vereins Musikanten Plenty of Parking

SATURDAY, JULY 21 (4pm-midnight) PAVILION Donauschwaben Dancers (5pm) 14pc Dayton Airforce Sauerkraut German Band (4-7pm) Enzian Dancers (7pm) Robin Lacy & DeZydeco (8pm-midnight) TENT Fest Meisters (7-11pm)

*Program is subject to change

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paperwork but then they tell you, ‘Hey, if anything is wrong with it we stand behind our autos. We’ll give you 30-days.’” Hensley had paid Mike Weinle at Michael J’s Auto Sales $2,800 for the vehicle and took it back to him. Hensley says Weinle checked over the van. “He says, ‘Oh, it was just low on transmission fluid.’” But Hensley says while driving the van back to Walton he noticed the same problem occurred. This time, Hensley says, although he contacted the dealer again, nothing more was done. So he returned the van to dealership, then filed suit in small claims court seeking his money back. Weinle defended his position to the magistrate by pointing to the receipt showing the van was sold “As Is” without a warranty. But the magistrate

The magistrates are ruling that whenever Weinle tries to fix the vehicle it negates his “As Is” warranty. I’ve heard of several used car dealers offering these verbal warranties, but believe they may tend to give consumers a false sense of security. So despite the court rulings, don’t rely on any warranty that is not in writing. Instead, get your own ASE certified mechanic to check out a vehicle before you buy it. It may cost you about $100 for the inspection, but its well worth it to avoid buying a vehicle that will cost you a lot more than that if there are problems.

ruled in favor of Hensley and ordered the money returned to him. Why did Howard the judge Ain rule for HEY HOWARD! Hensley? “Well, the judge flat out told Weinle, ‘You took the car back to repair it, didn’t you? Did you touch that automobile? Yes? Well, then you took it back to fix it, so there was an issue then,’” Hensley said. Weinle appealed, but a judge upheld the magistrate’s ruling and now he’s appealed again. “I’m just trying to be a nice guy,” Weinle said. However, he says this is not the first time magistrates have ruled against him in similar situations where he was just trying help out.

Howard Ain answers consumer complaints weekdays on WKRC-TV Local 12. Write to him at 12 WKRC-TV, 1906 Highland Ave., Cincinnati 45219.

Literacy Network receives grant The Literacy Network of Greater Cincinnati has received an $18,000 grant from The Greater Cincinnati Foundation to fund the Children’s Basic Reading Program. The grant is funded from the Williamson Company Foundation Fund and Eleanor D. and Erik G. Nelson Fund of GCF. LNGC is a nonprofit organization serving children and adults in the Tristate area by raising awareness, improving access and serving as a catalyst for literacy efforts.

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The GCF grant will be used to support the Children’s Basic Reading Program (CBRP) which offers classes to first- to fourthgrade students with severe reading difficulties, who require more intensive intervention. According to the International Dyslexia Association, these children learn best from utilizing multi-sensory, structured language techniques, and CBRP offers this type of instruction free of cost. The Literacy Network works with surrounding schools and teachers to identify

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these students and organize CBRP classes. In 2011, LNGC held seven CBRP classes and served 75 students in the Greater Cincinnati area. The Literacy Network is accepting donations to sustain and expand adult and children’s literacy programs in the Greater Cincinnati area. For more information on the Literacy Network of Greater Cincinnati or how you can support its community efforts, call the Literacy Hotline at 513-621-READ (7323) or visit www.lngc.org.

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Connections by OnStar Hands Free Calling capability from OnStar[3] allows you to safely make and receive calls from your Cadillac. With MyCadillac and OnStar MyLink[4] mobile apps, you can access and control your Cadillac from anywhere you have cell phone service. All Cadillac models come with 1 year of OnStar service. Emergency by OnStar In a crash, built-in sensors can automatically alert an OnStar[3] Advisor who is immediately connected into your Cadillac to see if you need help sent to your exact location. Other OnStar emergency services include Injury Severity Predictor and First Assist. All Cadillac models come with 1 year of OnStar service. Security by OnStar If you’ve reported your Cadillac stolen, OnStar[3] can use GPS technology to help authorities quickly locate and recover it. On most Cadillac models, an Advisor can send a Stolen Vehicle Slowdown® or Remote Ignition Block signal to help authorities safely recover it. All Cadillac models come with 1 year of OnStar service. Navigation by OnStar Just push the OnStar[3] button and ask the Advisor to download directions to your Cadillac, and a voice will call out every turn. You can also plan routes from Google Maps™ or MapQuest.com® to your Cadillac. All Cadillac models come with 1 year of OnStar service.

STOCK # M42247 6DN69 *0% Apr with qualified and approved credit in lieu of rebate. (1) Whichever comes first. See dealer for details.(2) See dealer for limited warranty details.(3) Visit onstar.com. for coverage map, details and system limitations. Services vary by model and conditions. (4) OnStar MyLink is available on 2011 and newer vehicles, excluding STS. (5) model 6DM69 2012 CTS closed end lease 24 months/10k per year lease $289 mo. $0 due at signing, no security deposit required with highly qualified approved credit. Total of payments $6936. (6) model 6NG26 2012 SRX closed end lease 24 months/10k per year lease $349 mo. $995 due at signing, no security deposit required with highly qualified approved credit. Total of payments $8376. $.25 cents per mile penalty overage. Purchase option at termination. All offers are plus tax license and fees. Not available with some other offers. See dealer for details. Vehicle / equipment may vary from photo. In stock units only, while supplies last. Expires 7/26/2012

Roadside Assistance Among leading automotive luxury brands, Cadillac is the only brand to offer standard 5-year Roadside Assistance that provides lock-out service, a tow, fuel, Dealer Technician Roadside Service and more. Courtesy Transportation During the warranty coverage period, this Cadillac program provides alternate transportation and/or reimbursement of certain transportation expenses if your Cadillac requires warranty repairs.

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LIFE

JULY 18, 2012 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • B5

HONORING THE FALLEN

Members of Chambers Hautman Budde American Legion Post 534, legion, auxiliary, and Sons of the American Legion, put out over 1,300 flags on the graves of veterans buried in St. Joseph cemetery on May 23. This is done every year around Memorial Day to honor our veterans. PROVIDED

After a month of growth in the Delhi Park greenhouse, Pack 300 Den 10 Cub Scouts show off the plants they grew from seeds thanks to the instruction of Joan Gillespie, Delhi Township horticulturist. Pictured form left arr Scouts Nathan, Nick, Jenny, Joey, and Adham. PROVIDED

Sisters of Charity Cub Scouts learn about planting commemorate Civil War The Sisters of Charity of Cincinnati celebrated the Memorial Day weekend by honoring their sisters who served in the American Civil War 150 years ago. Sisters, associates and friends of the community gathered at the Mount St. Joseph cemetery to acknowledge the places served and to honor the individual sisters who were called upon through the duration of the war. More than 40 Sisters of Charity were recognized during the program. Representatives from the College of Mount St. Joseph Nursing Department and the Battle of Richmond Association presented grave site wreaths; a proclamation by President Abraham Lincoln was read. Music was provided by the Hills of Kentucky Dulcimers and a performance of “Taps” by Peter Sturdevant, a native of Cincinnati and assistant state director for Bugles Across America. “The reading from the sister nurses’ journals was inspirational,” said Sister Mary Kathryn McFerrin, one of the Sisters of Charity in attendance. “Realizing the hardships that our

Cub Scouts of Pack 300’s Den 10 participated in an instructional series hosted by Delhi Township Parks horticulturist Joan Gillespie. In the first session, the boys learned about seeds, how plants produce them, different ways they can

be transported to new areas, how to plant seeds, and what a seed needs in order to germinate and produce a new plant. They then planted marigold and sunflower seeds and kept them at the greenhouse in Delhi Park. A month later, they re-

turned to the greenhouse to see the growth of their new plants, and the boys were amazed as to the extent of growth that had occurred in just one month. They then learned how to repot, transplant, and care for their new plants.

Sister Georgia Kitt places a decorated ribbon on the gravesite of S. Anthony O’Connell during the Sisters of Charity of Cincinnati Civil War Memorial Day commemoration. Sister Anthony was known as The Angel of the Battlefield, a true heroine of the Civil War and praised by President Lincoln. PROVIDED early members faced and the courage they had to go onto the battlefields to nurse and attend to the wounded makes me very proud. More than half of the early Community served the soldiers in some

capacity – what a legacy we have.” For information on the sisters’ service in the Civil War, contact Sister Judith Metz at 513-347-4058 or Judith.metz@srcharitycinti.org.

Laura Schiller, DDS GENERAL DENTISTRY "!+&-$(,

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LIFE

B6 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • JULY 18, 2012

Start of

SUMMER READING

Nearly 200 children and their parents were entertained by The Frisch Marionettes performance in the Main Library’s Children’s Learning Center June 2 during the kickoff of this year’s free Summer Reading Program. Participants personalized their own book bags, enjoyed ice cream courtesy of United Dairy Farmers, and learned about all the great incentives they can earn and prizes they can win for reading now through July 31. Parents, too, are encouraged to sign up. Go to www.CincinnatiLibrary.org/ SummerRead/ to learn more and register.

Jonathan McGinnis of Western Hills had fun playing hopscotch while wearing the book bag he decorated at the Summer Reading kickoff on June 2. PROVIDED.

Covedale resident Danyetta Najoli and her children, Diane and Jumba, enjoyed ice cream courtesy of United Dairy Farmers. PROVIDED.

The McGinnis Family of Western Hills came out to enjoy the Summer Reading kickoff party at The Main Library's Children's Learning Center. PROVIDED.

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Power of Attorney: Plan Ahead for Peace of Mind • Parents with young children take a vacation…without the kids. What if their 8-year-old breaks an arm and needs surgery? Who will authorize medical care? • Husband and wife plan for retirement. What if the husband has a debilitating stroke? How will the wife handle investments kept in both of their names? • Retired “snowbirds” head to Florida for a six-month stay. What if they have an opportunity to unload property they’d been trying to sell? Will one or both have to return just to close the deal? There are advantages to being prepared. That’s why many adults plan for a time when they are most vulnerable, such as if they become incapacitated or when they reach an advanced age. A Power of Attorney is a vital component of any plan to protect an adult’s wishes and provide him or her peace of mind. A Power of Attorney, or POA, is a legal document that allows one to give a trusted person the legal authority to act on his behalf and perform tasks for a short time or indefinitely. He can continue to

Kiara McGinnis of Western Hills watched The Frisch Marionettes performance at the Summer Reading kickoff on June 2. PROVIDED.

In the three scenarios above, having a POA would prepare an agent or attorney-in-fact to act if the unexpected happened: • A close relative could make decisions about a child’s treatment until the parents came home. • A wife could pay bills and transfer stocks as long as her husband remained incapacitated. • A son or daughter could sell the snowbirds’ property while they were out of town. Our advice There are different kinds of Power of Attorney for different situations. Your best bet is to start with an attorney, who can advise what’s the best kind of POA for you and draw up the appropriate papers. Don’t have an attorney? Seniors can contact an organization such as Pro Seniors at www.proseniors.org. It’s a nonprofit organization that provides free legal care to Ohio residents age 60 and older.

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The Frisch Marionettes performed at The Main Library's Children's Learning Center as part of the Summer Reading kickoff party on June 2. PROVIDED.

make decisions and act on his own behalf as long as he’s able, and he can revoke the POA if he wants.

SOUTHERN BAPTIST

DELHI HILLS BAPTIST CHURCH

“Come Hear The Story of Jesus” 5421 Foley Rd. • 513-922-8363 Rev. Bob Overberg Sunday School..................................10:00a.m. Sunday Morning Worship ..................11:00a.m. Sunday Evening ..................................6:00p.m. Wednesday Evening Bible Study .........6:00p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF DENT 6384 Harrison Ave. - 574-6411 Bible Study ........................... 9:30am Sunday Worship ................. 10:30am Wed. Youth Service .............. 7:00pm Wed.Pray Sevice .................. 7:00pm

“Reflecting Christ...the Light of the World” &(#"))"%)!'"$#)"

Liberty Missionary Baptist Church "Where Everybody is Somebody" 1009 Overlook Ave. 513-921-2502 Rev. Kendell Hopper Sunday School 10:00 am Sunday Morning Worship-11:00 am Sunday Evening 6:00 pm Wednesday Bible Study - 7:00 pm

UNITED METHODIST NORTH BEND UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

SHILOH UNITED METHODIST

Anderson Ferry & Foley Roads 513-451-3600 www.shilohumc.com 9:30 a.m. Traditional Worship and Sunday School 11:00 a.m. Praise Celebration and Junior Church nursery provided for both services

PRESBYTERIAN OAK HILLS PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 6233 Werk Rd. (Enter off Werkridge) 922-5448 Rev. Jerry Hill 10:00 a.m Worship & Sunday School Nursery Care Avail.

Come and worship in a small casual church that emphasizes the fellowship and mission in the community and globally. www.oakhillspc.com

UNITED METHODIST

CHEVIOT UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 3820 Westwood-Northern Blvd. Kerry Wood, Senior Pastor Lois Schalk-Hartley, Associate Pastor

9:20 a.m. Traditional Worship 10:20 a.m. Sunday School for All Ages 11:20 a.m Contemporary Worship Service 662-2048 www.cheviotumc.org

FLORIDA

123 Symmes Ave. North Bend, OH 45202 One block off Route 50, Phone 941-3061 Small, friendly, casual, blended music, Bible based messages that connect with real life. Sunday School 9:30am Worship 10:30am

UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST

SIESTA KEY û GULF FRONT We’ re directly on the most beautiful beach in USA. All amenities. Prv. Prkg. Clubhse w/pool. Discounted Summer til Dec. 513-232-4854

FLORIDA Beautiful Seagrove Beach Rent & Relax. Nr Destin, between famous Seaside & Rosemary Beach. Cozy Cottages to Gulf Front Condos. Web Specials. 1-800-537-5387 www.garrettbeachrentals.com

St. Peter & St. Paul United Church of Christ

3001 Queen City Ave. 513-661-3745 Rev. Martin Westermeyer, Pastor Summer Chapel Service: 8 am Bible Study: 9 am Worship & Church School: 10 am Dial-A-Devotion 426-8957 www.stpeterandstpaulucc.org

NEW YORK MANHATTAN--NYC HOTEL $129/2 persons. Singles $124. Suites $139-$159. Lincoln Ctr area, Hudson River views, 18 flrs, kitchenette, 5 mins to midtown, safe, quiet, luxury area. RIVERSIDE TOWER, Riverside & 80th St. Call 1-800-724-3136 or visit: www.riversidetowerhotel.com

SOUTH CAROLINA DESTIN. Luxury 2 BR, 2 BA oceanfront condos. Heated pool, spas, kids’ pool & tennis. Sleeps 6. Local owner. www.us-foam.com/destin . D- 513-528-9800, E- 513-752-1735

SEABROOK EXCLUSIVES Villas & Private Homes. Ocean, golf, tennis, equestrian. Pet friendly rentals. Free brochure. Book online! 888-718-7949. www.seabrook-vacations.info

LIFE

JULY 18, 2012 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • B7

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES GRRAND – Golden Retriever Rescue and Adoption of Needy Dogs takes in needy displaced, abandoned or unclaimed stray golden retrievers and places them in volunteer foster homes until adoptive families are found. Call 1-866-981-2251 and leave your name and phone. Visit www.ggrand.org. email www.cincygrrand@yahoo.com. League For Animal Welfare – A no-kill shelter needs volunteers 16-and-older to help socialize cats and 18-and-older to socialize and walk dogs. Other opportunities available. Call 735-2299, ext. 3. Save the Animals Foundation – Needs people 18 and older to staff its shelter for homeless cats and dogs. Call 378-0300 for cats and 588-6609 for dogs. Spring Grove Cemetery and Arboretum – has a new horticulture volunteer program. Volunteer opportunities include working side by side Spring Grove’s nationally-renowned horticulture team at this National Historic Landmark. Groups of volunteers will be developed to help in the following areas: keeping the front entrance area looking spectacular, controlling invasive species, taking care of the tree and shrub collection. They are also looking for a volunteer, or volunteers, to help with the hybrid tea roses. New volunteers join the volunteer docents who are ambassadors for the cemetery and arboretum. Information sessions, conducted the last Saturday and first Wednesday of each month, will explain the volunteer opportunities. Sessions are at 10 a.m. in the Historic Office, just inside the main entrance to the cemetery. For more information, contact volunteer coordinator Whitney Huang, Spring Grove horticulturist, at 8536866. Tri State County Animal Response Team (CART) – Is at 11216 Gideon Lane in Sycamore Township. Meetings are open to the public. Visit www.tristatecart.com for monthly subjects or more information. Call 702-8373. Winton Woods Riding Center – is in need of volunteers to assist with the Special Riders Program, which provides training and competition opportunities for children and adults with disabilities, and to help with barn duties, horse shows and a variety of other tasks. No experience is necessary and training is provided. Interested individuals ages 14 and older are invited to contact the Winton Woods Riding Center at 931-3057, or at wwrc@greatparks.org.

5070 or compete an application online at www.crossroadshospice.com/ volunteering. Before becoming a Crossroads Hospice Ultimate Giver, participants must complete an application, TB skin test and training session lead by members of the Crossroads team. Volunteers must wait a minimum of one year after the death of an immediate family member or loved one before applying.

EDUCATION

Change a life – Volunteer to tutor an adult with low-level literacy skills or GED preparation needs. Call 621-READ. Cincinnati Reads – a volunteer tutoring program working with K-4 students in Cincinnati Public Schools. Volunteers receive free training to work one-on-one with children who are struggling to read. Call 621-7323 or email Jayne Martin Dressing, jdressing@lngc.org. Great Oaks – currently recruiting volunteer tutors for its GED and ESOL classes. There are five hours of training required. The next dates are Wedmesdays, Aug. 22 and 29, at Scarlet Oaks in Sharonville. Numerous sites and times are available for volunteering. Call Kim at 6125830 for more information. Inktank – Group looking for volunteers to help children and adults improve their skills in writing-based initiatives across the city. Call 542-0195. Helping Young Mothers Mentors Inc. – is seeking individuals who are willing to give their time as a mentor to assist teen mothers in improving their quality of life and who are striving to make it in today’s society. If you are interested in helping to “create a self sufficient mom for a better tomorrow” in your community and interested in truly seeing results, become a mentor by calling 513-520-6960. Winton Woods City Schools – Wants to match community members who are interested in volunteering in the schools with the students. Volunteer opportunities at Winton Woods Primary North and South, middle school and high school. Volunteers who would have one-on-one contact with students outside of a classroom are required to have a background check. To volunteer, contact Gina Burnett at burnett.gina@wintonwoods.org or 619-2301. The YMCA of Greater Cincinnati’s College Readiness Program – that inspires and encourages teens of color toward

paths of success is looking for caring professionals who want to make a difference, and for young people who can benefit from positive adult role models. Part of a national YMCA initiative, the local program incorporates mentoring, career exploration and college readiness; and helps students develop a positive sense of self, build character, explore diverse college and career options. Volunteers, many of whom are sponsored by area companies, share their own personal insight and encouragement. Contact Program Director Darlene Murphy at the Melrose YMCA, 961-3510 or visit www.myy.org.

ENTERTAINMENT

Business Volunteers for the Arts – BVA is accepting applications from business professionals with at least three years experience, interested in volunteering their skills within the arts community. Projects average six to eight months in length and can range from marketing or accounting to Web design or planning special events. A one-day training program is provided to all accepted applicants. Call 8712787. Center for Independent Living Options – Seeking volunteers to staff Art Beyond Boundaries, gallery for artists with disabilities. Volunteers needed noon to 4:30 p.m. Tuesday through Friday, and noon to 5 p.m. Saturday. Call 241-2600. Cincinnati Museum Center – Needs volunteers to work in all three museums, the Cincinnati History Museum, the Museum of Natural History and Science and the Cinergy Children’s Museum, and special exhibits. Call 287-7025.

HEALTH CARE

Ameircan Diabetes Association – Seeks volunteers in its area office downtown for

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clerical support, filling requests for educational materials from phone requests, data entry, special events support and coordinating the Health Fair. Call 759-9330. American Heart Association – Volunteers needed to assist with the American Heart Association’s cause campaigns, Power to End Stroke, Go Red For Women, Start!, and the Alliance for a Healthier Generation. Assignments include clerical work, event specific duties and community outreach. Contact the American Heart Association at 281-4048 or email ray.meyer@heart.org. Captain Kidney Educational Program – Needs volunteers one or more mornings or afternoons a month during the school year to educate children in first through sixth grades about kidney function and disease.

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Hamilton County Republican Party – looking for volunteers for the presidential campaign to get in now on the ground floor. Anyone interested can call Lori Newsom at 382-1400 for more information.

If you have a volunteer opportunity you would like listed, email the information to memral@communitypress.com.

We have said before that we are proud to be a locally owned and family run Funeral Home. We would like to share with you some of our beliefs ... We believe that our first duty to the families in our community is to serve our friends with a professional, yet a caring and personal attitude. Dignity, understanding, honesty and value are our traditions.We believe that each service should be offered in accordance with each family’s individual point of view. And this means not imposing ideas, but accepting the family’s wishes and offering advice when it is requested. We believe it is our duty to provide our services within a wide range of prices that every family can afford. We believe what we do is important to every family and how we do it is important to us... Every detail of a funeral service is important to us. To Those We Serve We Pledge: confidential business and professional relationships; co-operation with customs of all religions and creeds; observance of all respect due the deceased; the highest standards of competence and dignity in the conduct of all services; truthful representation of all Marilyn E. Holt, services and merchandising. Jessica E. Totton-Miller,

the

BUSINESS HELPER! BOOK KEEPING & QUICKBOOKS LESSONS QUICKBOOKS PROADVISOR SINCE 1999

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683-9252

Rachel S. Hartmann

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3440 Glenmore Avenue, Cheviot 661-0690 www.gumpholtfuneralhome.com

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HEALTH/WELLNESS

Crossroads Hospice - Volunteers are wanted to join the team of Ultimate Givers who strive to provide extra love and comfort to terminally-ill patients and their families in Brown, Butler, Clermont, Clinton, Hamilton, Highland and Warren counties. Volunteers are also needed to support signature programs inspired by Jim Stovall’s novel, “The Ultimate Gift” The Gift of a Day program asks patients what their perfect day is and staff and volunteers work to make it a reality. Ultimate Givers visit with patients in their homes, assisted living facilities and nursing facilities and help with clerical duties at the Crossroads office. They provide emotional support and companionship to patients and family members, assist with errands or provide respite for those caring for terminally-ill loved ones. For more information or to sign up as an Ultimate Giver, call 793-

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families. Volunteers needed to visit with patients and/or assist in administrative and clerical tasks. Volunteers may provide care wherever a patient resides, whether in a private home or nursing facility. Call 1-888-8668286 or 682-4055.

GUMP-HOLT Funeral Home

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PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

Executive Service Corps of Cincinnati – Professionals can use their administrative skills to help a busy, growing nonprofit manage its projects and members. Executive Service Corps of Cincinnati is looking for someone with experience in Word, Excel, Power Point and Outlook to assist in the Blue Ash office. Volunteers set their own days and hours and enjoy nice working conditions and friendly, bright volunteers and staff. Help the ESCC help other nonprofits succeed. Contact Darlyne Koretos for more information at 791-6230, ext. 10. ESCC is located at 10945 Reed Hartman Highway, Suite 108.

Training provided. Call 961-8105. Crossroads Hospice – Seeking volunteers to assist terminally ill patients and their families. Call 793-5070. Destiny Hospice – is seeking caring and compassionate people to make a difference in the life of a person living with terminal illness. No special skills or experience needed; simply a willingness to help provide comfort and support. Orientation is scheduled to fit the volunteer’s schedule. Opportunities are available throughout the Cincinnati, Middletown and Butler County area. Contact Angie at 554-6300, or amclaughlin@destiny-hospice. com. Evercare Hospice and Palliative Care – is seeking volunteers in all Greater Cincinnati communities. Evercare provides care for those facing end-of-life issues and personal support to their

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Home Health Plus

A Comprehensive Senior Health and Rehab Program Since 1994

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Day Share offers a full network of care designed to help seniors maintain their personal independence in the comfort of their own home. • • • • •

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LIFE

B8 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • JULY 18, 2012

Bob Herzog and the children from Delhi Park Summer programs had a dance party during Adventure Week at Storywoods Park. MONICA BOYLSON/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Bob Herzog teaches the kids the “shopping cart.” MONICA BOYLSON/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Dancing in Delhi

Local 12 news anchor and host of Dance Party Friday Bob Herzog made a special appearance at the Delhi Park summer programs “Adventure Week.”

Campers enjoyed their own dance party with Herzog. They learned “the sprinkler,” “the shopping cart,” and “the lawnmower,” before showing off some moves of their own.

Bob Herzog leads the group in “the sprinkler.” MONICA BOYLSON/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

REAL ESTATE DELHI TOWNSHIP

4327 Champdale Lane: Duffy, Georgianne to Beuerlein, Rhonda R.; $84,500. 583 Covedale Ave.: Waynick, Steve R. and Patricia Pittman to Federal Home Loan Mortgag Corp.; $74,000. 795 Gilcrest Lane: Nichols, Alexandra to Essman, Mary L.; $127,900. 4484 Mayhew Ave.: Carroll, Daniel Jeffrey to Fox, Martha J.; $66,000. 5272 Serenade Drive: RELSSEP LLC to Roberto, Brittany M.; $113,000.

5280 Briarhill Drive: MBS Partners LLC to Pratchard, Flen A. and Wanda L.; $110,000. 5443 Casual Court: Castellini, Nicholas to Porta, Robert P Tr. and Joan K. Tr.; $123,600. 6132 Cleves Warsaw Pike: Rolfes, Gregory M. to McGaha, Kristin N.; $111,000. 5567 Delhi Pike: Imbus, Theresa Tr. to Izzo, Pete; $147,900. 1259 Ebenezer Road: Busam, Jennifer A. and Donna S. Huber to Spinnenweber, Jennifer; $60,000. 502 Hibernia Drive: Hehman, Mark A. II to Deutsche Bank

ANTIQUES FAIR INDIAN • HILL SUNDAY, JULY 22ND INDIAN HILL HIGH SCHOOL

National Trust Co. Tr.; $56,000. 843 Neeb Road: Cleary, Martin P and Patricia M. to Huntington National Bank The; $54,000. 540 Palmerston Drive: Servizzi, Gene J. Jr. to Servizzi, Bryan A. and Nicole M.; $100,000. 572 Pedretti Ave.: Maiden, Kimberly K. to Bank Of New York Mellon T.; $55,165. 5335 Rawhide Court: Welch, Michael R. and Elizabeth A. Kramer to Kramer, Elizabeth A.; $67,450. 4850 Sapphire Lane: Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. to Beigel, Mary Anne and Walter L.; $54,000. 413 Sunland Drive: Jetter, Nancy L. to Bedinghaus, Robert A. and Elizabeth M.; $105,000. 5025 Troubador Court: Federal National Mortgage Association to Ruthven, John S. and Regina E.; $91,000. 5237 Woodlake Drive: Fannie Mae to Freese, Shane; $69,100.

Home Loan Mortgage Corp. to Crawley, Francine; $18,500. 1273 Elberon Ave.: Fern-Renner, Ida Mae Tr. to Strunk, Victor; $22,500. 3618 Lasalle St.: Harrison Building and Loan Association to Ahern, Terence D.; $37,500. 3620 Lasalle St.: Harrison Building and Loan Association to Ahern, Terence D.; $37,500. 924 Chateau Ave.: Peters, Brian K. to Federal National Mortgage Association; $22,000. 341 Crestline Ave.: CRB Management LLC to Howell, Troy S.; $10,000. 687 Hawthorne Ave.: Fouts, Patricia A. to Levy, David; $9,000. 340 Nonpareil St.: CRB Management LLC to Howell, Troy S.; $10,000. 342 Nonpareil St.: CRB Management LLC to Howell, Troy S.; $10,000.

EAST PRICE HILL

617 Church St.: Brenner and Jansen Properties Inc. to Price-

1739 Wyoming Ave.: Federal

LOWER PRICE HILL

SAYLER PARK

936 Bradford Court: Thatcher, David W. to Penley, Charles A. and Raymele; $122,500. 833 Bradford Court: Mullin, Kyle to Patton, Kimberly A.; $112,500. 7482 Gracely Drive: Avey, Tricia L. to Cushing, Robert and June; $65,000. 893 Bradford Court: Gamel, Robert M. to Kroeger, Andrew J. and Lindsey Downey.; $118,500. 152 Meridian St.: Byrd, Mary S. and Richard Valentine Witt to Byrd, Mary S.; $35,000.

WEST PRICE HILL

4316 Delridge Drive: Poppe, Anne J. to Henninger, Robert W. and Kathleen M.; $74,500.

you.

Our most important asset is

6845 DRAKE ROAD 100 OUTSTANDING DEALERS Admission: $8.00 New Hours 9:00-4:00

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view LLC; $9,440. 817 State Ave.: Brenner and Jansen Properties Inc. to Priceview LLC; $9,440. 2128 Storrs St.: Brenner and Jansen Properties Inc. to Priceview LLC; $9,440.

For info call 513.378.5770

J.B. YEAGER BASEBALL 2013 TRYOUTS

ALL TEAMS PLAY IN THE SOUTHWEST OHIO LEAGUE

BIRTHDAY CUTOFF IS MAY 1st • PLAYERS MAY NOT REACH OLDER AGE BEFORE THIS DATE

AGE DATES

8U 9U

JULY 21, 22 JULY 28, 29 AUGUST 1 AUGUST 4 10U JULY 21, 22 11U JULY 22 12U JULY 28, 29 AUGUST 4 13U AUGUST 5, 12 14U AUGUST 4, 5 15U JULY 28, AUG. 4 JULY 29, AUG. 5 16U AUGUST 18, 19 Legion AUGUST 5, 12

TIMES

12:00-2:00 1:00-3:00 6:00-8:00 1:00-3:00 9:00-12:00 6:00-8:00 3:00-5:00 10:00-12:00 5:00-7:00 2:00-4:00 4:00-6:00 12:00-2:00 11:00-1:30 6:00-8:00

FIELD

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(18U - American Legion - Player May Not Reach 19th Birthday Prior to Jan 1, 2013)

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4318 Delridge Drive: Poppe, Anne J. to Henninger, Robert W. and Kathleen M.; $74,500. 901 Kreis Lane: Doerflein, Sherri and Jim Neiheisel to Shunn, Bradford; $81,000. 4546 Midland Ave.: Advantage Bank to RV Holdings Nine LLC; $56,895. 4788 Rapid Run Road: North Side Bank and Trust Co. The to Tomlin, Joel and Michael Davis; $9,300. 1980 Sunset Lane: Advantage Bank to RV Holdings Nine LLC; $56,895. 1054 Winfield Ave.: Davis, Eric Jr. and Dion Flowers to Fourth Power Investments LLC; $5,000. 855 Academy Ave.: Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. to Only The Strong Survive Inc.; $19,901. 1023 Glenna Drive: Stamm, Darrell L. to Romero, Dane P.; $65,000. 3801 Glenway Ave.: FFF Management Inc. to New Horizon Properties Ll; $60,000. 3805 Glenway Ave.: FFF Management Inc. to New Horizon Properties Ll; $60,000. 3821 Glenway Ave.: RDJ Property and Development Ltd. to New Horizon Properties Ll; $225,000. 3827 Glenway Ave.: RDJ Property and Development Ltd. to New Horizon Properties Ll; $225,000. Glenway Ave.: FFF Management Inc. to New Horizon Properties Ll; $60,000. 1167 Nancy Lee Lane: Papadis, Jennifer L. and Thomas C. Clemens to Federal National Mortgage Association; $40,000. 925 Seibel Lane: Porter, Greg and Tonya to Deutsche Bank National Trust Co. Tr.; $172,209. 1143 Seton Ave.: FFF Management Inc. to New Horizon Properties Ll; $60,000. 2402 Bluffcrest Lane: Horick, Mark J. to Adams, John E.; $98,500. 1062 Coronado Ave.: Tepe, Dennis M. and Anne M. Leuenberger to Joseph, Jonathan; $127,500. 562 Delridge Drive: Luebbe, Doug to Kersey, Constance M.; $29,000. 4322 Delridge Drive: Orue, Augusto F. to Williams, Alivee; $81,000. 1666 Dewey Ave.: CPA1 Holdings LLC to CPIT Ltd; $6,560. 1625 First Ave.: Fifth Third Bank Tr. to Re Recycle It LLC; $5,000. 1040 Fisk Ave.: Katenkamp, Donna K. to Re Recycle It LLC; $27,500. 4103 Flower Ave.: Almond, Kathy to Smith, Kissha; $36,340. 1263 Gilsey Ave.: Brenner and Jansen Properties Inc. to Priceview LLC; $9,440.

LIFE

JULY 18, 2012 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • B9

DEATHS Josephine Curry

Mayme Royce Abbott \-Langdon, 89, died July 11. Survived by children Lynda (Ty) Meredith, Larry (Sandy), Barry (Karen) AbbottLangdon, Langdon Donna Durham; 12 grandchildren; eight great-grandchildren. Services were July 14 at Dalbert, Woodruff & Isenogle Funeral Home.

Josephine Alaimo Curry died June 27. She was president of the Cincinnati Bar Association auxiliary, and a member of the Cincinnati Women’s Club and Westwood Women’s Club. Survived by sons Richard Jr. (Susan), John (Nancy), Samuel (Germaine) Curry; 12 grandchildren; 13 greatgrandchildren. Preceded in death by Curry husband Richard Curry Sr. Services are 2 p.m. Tuesday, July 24, at Westwood United Methodist Church. Arrangements by Vitt, Stermer & Anderson Funeral Home. Memorials to: Westwood United Methodist Church, 3460 Epworth Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45211 or Hospice of Cincinnati, P.O. Box 633597, Cincinnati, OH 45263.

Larry Blake Larry W. Blake, 62, formerly of Delhi Township, died July 3. He was a printer. Survived by wife Diana Blake; children Bill (Michelle) Blake, Jami (Jerry) Gilliam; stepchildren Kevin (Susan), Blake Boerner Nelson, Kristy (Chad) Manning; sisters Bonnie (Ray) Ashcraft, Nancy (Jerry) Conner, Debbie (Mike) Hampton; six grandchildren; many nieces and nephews. Preceded in death by siblings Keith Blake, Karen Youngman. Services were July 10 at Vitt, Stermer & Anderson Funeral Home. Memorials to the American Diabetes Association.

Gerald Conner Gerald Conner, 67, Delhi Township, died July 7. He was a chemical worker. Survived by wife Nancy Conner; sons Brian (Samantha), Matthew Conner Conner; grandchildren Laney, Anthony Conner; siblings William Jr., Lawrence Conner, Mary Smith; many nieces and nephews. Services were July 11 at Vitt, Stermer & Anderson Funeral Home. Memorials to the American Heart Association or Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Cincinnati.

Bill Donaldson Charles “Bill” Donaldson, 85, Covedale, died July 6. He was supervisor of communication with CSX. Survived by children William Donaldson, Judy, Glen Chambers; grandchildren Brandon Straughn, Sheridan Chambers; siblings Norma Donaldson Arvin, Wilma Smith, Joyce Kreiger, Marilyn Puckett, Frank Donaldson. Preceded in death by wife Twila Donaldson. Services were July 11 at Clifton United Methodist Church. Arrangements by Vitt, Stermer & Anderson Funeral Home.

Ida Krupp Ida Schaeper Krupp, 83, died July 9. Survived by daughter Edie (Don) Heiland; grandchildren Crystal, Laurie, Nicole, Jason, Justin; great-grandchildren Siler, Christopher, Alexis, Luke; sister Rosemary Reuteman. Preceded in death by husband Robert Krupp Sr., son Robert Krupp Jr., grandchildren Jamie, Jennifer.

Services were July 12 at St. Lawrence Church. Arrangements by Vitt, Stermer & Anderson Funeral Home. Krupp Memorials to the St. Lawrence Education Fund.

Mary Ann McKenzie Mary Ann Jensen McKenzie, 81, Delhi Township, died July 8. She was a homemaker. Survived by children Tim, Thomas, Patricia, Bridget McKenzie; grandchildren Steven Hicks, Camille Reed; siblings Robert, Thomas Jensen, Kathy Van Steenbergen. Preceded in death by husband Harold McKenzie II, children Harold III, Mary Catherine McKenzie. Services were July 11 at St. Lawrence Church. Arrangements by B.J. Meyer Sons Funeral Home.

Maxine Muldoon Maxine Fries Muldoon died July 9. She was a member of Our Lady of Victory Parish for over 50 years, was a member of the Delhi Community Council and worked with Matthew 25 Ministries. Survived by sons Philip (Colleen) III, Sean (Moreen), Muldoon Brian Muldoon; grandchildren Erin, Kelly, Philip IV, Michael, Patrick; siblings Elmer Fries, Catherine Dickey. Preceded in death by husband Philip Muldoon Jr., son Terrence Muldoon, brother Charles Fries. Services were July 13 at Our Lady of Victory. Arrangements by Meyer & Geiser Funeral Home. Memorials to: Matthew 25 Ministries, 11060 Kenwood Road, Cincinnati OH 45242 or Our Lady of Victory Food Pantry, 810 Neeb Road, Cincinnati, OH 45233.

Timothy Peters

Peters; sons Bryan, Nick, Matt Peters; father Robert (Diana) Peters; siblings Jamie (Ray) Mazza, Scott (Julie) Peters Peters. Preceded in death by mother Margaret Peters, parents-in-law Jack and Marlene O'Brien. Services were July 16 at St. Jude Church. Arrangements by B.J. Meyer Sons Funeral Home. Memorials to: Elder High School Scholarship Fund, 3900 Vincent Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45205.

Rosemary Rolfes Rosemary “Buddy” Fettig Rolfes, 74, died July 5. Survived by children Lisa (Tom) Smith, Fred (Becky), Doug (Lori), Mike (Sharon), Steve (Julie) Rolfes, Amy (Carmine) Domenicone; grandchildren Rolfes Jillian, Katie, Kyle, Evan, Maria, David, Jackie, Mitchell, Jenna, Eric, Kayla, Mike, Nick, Sarah, Liz, Carmine, Leah, Derek, Cody; great-grandchildren Grace, Lincoln, Fiona; siblings Mary Ann Mills, Joan Hoffman, Ruth Hoeting, Margie Walter, Joe, Jerry Fettig. Preceded in death by husband Fred Rolfes. Services were July 10 at St. Antoninus. Arrangements by Meyer & Geiser Funeral Home. Memorials to: St. Antoninus Endowment Fund, 1500 Linneman Road, Cincinnati, OH 45238 or Pregnancy Center West, 4900 Glenway Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45238.

Betty Sanders Calme

Sanders Calme

Timothy M. Peters, 50, died July 10. He was director of sales for Kenosha Beef. Survived by wife Pamela

POLICE REPORTS DELHI TOWNSHIP Arrests/citations Michael W. Hemingway, 20, 845 Bracht Piner Road, drug offense at 5200 block of Foley Road, July 3. Doniel Sue Miller, 26, 6400 Gracely Apt. 18, driving under suspension at 500 block of Rosemont Ave., July 2. Tony A. White, 46, 113 W. 69th, driving under suspension at 4200 block of Delhi Road, July 2. Steffanie C. Bode, 26, 4351 Ridgeview, driving under suspension at 500 block of Pedretti Ave., July 2. David I. Burgin, 40, 862 Academy Apt. 1, driving under suspension at 1100 block of Pineknot Drive, July 3. Timothy L. Sickman, 26, 3160 Fiddlers Green, driving under suspension at 4200 block of Delhi Road, July 3. Thomas R. Fisher, 37, 510 Angel Nook Drive, driving under suspension at 4500 block of Foley Road, July 3. Juvenile male, 17, driving under suspension at 4400 block of Fehr Road, July 3. Nicolette Paige Moler, 19, 255 McGregor Apt. 1, driving under suspension at 5100 block of Delhi Road, July 4. Clark Martin, 31, 3035 Penrose, driving under suspension at 500 block of Pedretti Ave., July 4. Steven C. Madden, 35, 2576 Riverside Drive, driving under suspension at 500 block of Pedretti Ave., July 5. Clark Martin, 31, 3035 Penrose, driving under suspension at 4400 block of Delhi Road, July 5. Trisha Dull, 23, 3035 Penrose, driving under suspension at 4400 block of Delhi Road, July 5. Joshua R. Drain, 21, 3248 Stanhope Ave., drug offense at 4500 block of Fehr Road, July 6. Cody Meyers, 20, no address given, aggravated robbery at 4905 Delhi Road, July 7. Charles Burnett, 23, 3156 Harri-

ABOUT POLICE REPORTS The Community Press publishes the names of all adults charged with offenses. The information is a matter of public record and does not imply guilt or innocence. To contact your local police department: » Delhi Township: Chief Jim Howarth, 922-0060 » Cincinnati District 3: Capt. Russell A. Neville, 263-8300 son Ave., aggravated robbery at 4905 Delhi Road, July 7. Marcus Devonte Matthews, 19, 4336 W. Eighth St., aggravated robbery at 4905 Delhi Road, July 7. Michellia Harp, 22, 9951 Fishing Gut Road, driving under suspension at 400 block of Pedretti Ave., July 7.

Incidents/reports Criminal damaging Eggs thrown at victim’s car damaged paint at 6716 Sandover Drive, July 4. Victim’s outside lights and deck were damaged at 771 Trio Court, July 7. Suspect damaged victim’s vehicle by kicking the dashboard, breaking the plastic and breaking the driver’s side mirror at 373 Robben Lane, July 8. Criminal mischief Victim’s mailbox destroyed by lit firework at 5240 Serenade Drive, July 4. Robbery Two males reportedly jumped out of the woods, knocked the victim down and stole $5 at 384 Glen Oaks Drive, July 2. Theft CDs, mp3 player and car chargers were stolen from victims car at 4071 Mardon Place, July 2. A 12-inch subwoofer and an amplifier were stolen from the victim’s vehicle at 4491 St. Dominic Drive, July 5. Victim’s vehicle stolen from home at 5189 Cleves Warsaw Pike, July 7. Car window was broken and CD player was stolen from victim’s

vehicle at 4293 Glenhaven Road, July 7. Bicycle stolen from victim’s driveway at 5180 Locust Ave., July 7. Hunting knife was stolen from victim’s unlocked car at 5156 Rapid Run Road, July 7. Off-road motorcycle and aluminum cans were stolen from victim’s property at 4494 Delhi Road, July 7. Digital camera stolen from victim’s vehicle at 4484 Mayhew Ave., July 8.

CINCINNATI DISTRICT 3 Arrests/citations Adam Matthew Murray, born 1988, child endangering/neglect, possession of drug abuse instruments, 464 Grand Ave., July 4. Darrell King, born 1981, possession of an open flask, 1041 Delmonte Place, July 8. Dawan Slater, born 1993, domestic violence, 3201 Warsaw Ave., July 7. Denna Mincy, born 1982, falsification, 3431 Warsaw Ave., July 5. Emmanuel D. Rodgers, born 1983, felonious assault, 960 Mansion Ave., July 6. James A. Shelton, born 1958, domestic violence, menacing, 2812 Price Ave., July 6. Jessica Smith, born 1981, criminal trespassing, 3609 Warsaw Ave., July 7. Justin Clifton, born 1982, theft under $300, 3201 Warsaw Ave., July 6. CE-0000510773

Betty Sanders Calme, 83, Delhi Township, died July 12. She was a homemaker.

Survived by children Robert (Shannon) Sanders, Vickie (Don) Paulin; grandchildren Brian (Monica), Kimberly (Brian), Melissa (Gregory); great-grandchildren Brooke, JP, Roman, Mina, Alex, Rachel, Graham; step-children Maureen Bill, Paul Calme Jr., Mary Giesting, Joyce Sprague; many step-grandchildren, step-great-grandchildren. Preceded in death by husbands Robert Sanders, Paul Calme, brothers Stanley (Carol), Edward, Robert, Richard Busic. Services were July 15 at North Bend United Methodist Church. Arrangements by Dennis George Funeral Home. Memorials to North Bend United Methodist Church or the Hospice of Cincinnati.

Rose Stadtmiller Rose Lipps Stadtmiller, 93, Delhi Township, died July 6. She was a homemaker. Survived by children Sandra Criscillis, Stadtmiller Mary Jo (Steve) Witterstaetter, Margie (Jim) Jansing, Diane (Michael) Steinberg, Lisa (Jeff) McDonald, Carl (Sandy), Gil (Mary Ann), Roy

Stadtmiller; sister-in-law Loretta Herkert; 16 grandchildren; 14 great-grandchildren. Preceded in death by husband Carl Stadtmiller, siblings Catherine Backscheider, Henry, Agnes, SM, Marie, SM, Paul Lipps, Ethel Loze, Ruth Gates, sister-in-law Francie Menninger. Services were July 10 at St. Dominic. Arrangements by Vitt, Stermer & Anderson Funeral Home. Memorials to the St. Dominic Education Fund.

Ruth Zieverink Ruth Zieverink, 90, Delhi Township, died July 9. She was an Army veteran of World War II, and a lifetime member of Disabled American Veterans and Veterans of Foreign Wars. Survived by children Diane (Mike) Yost, Lorraine (Jim) Harper, Shorty (Ken) Kramer, Beverly (George) Young, Marleen (Dan) Cassedy, George (Cindy) Zieverink; sister Mary (the late Benard) Schreiber; 19 grandchildren; 20 great-grandchildren. Preceded in death by husband George Zieverink, three siblings. Services were July 12 at Our Lady of Victory. Arrangements by Radel Funeral Home. Memorials to a charity of the donor’s choice.

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LIFE

B10 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • JULY 18, 2012

Covedale’s head librarian set to retire By Kurt Backscheider kbackscheider@communitypress.com

It will be bittersweet for Eileen Mallory to say goodbye to the Covedale Branch Library. She said she’ll miss working with her fellow librarians and interacting with the patrons, but she’s

looking forward to her retirement. “I’ll miss it,” she said. “I’ve really enjoyed my years here and all the people and staff I’ve come to know.” Mallory is retiring Friday, July 27, after a 36-year career with the Public Library of Cincinnati and

Hamilton County. She’s served at library branches in Mount Healthy, Westwood, Madeira and Groesbeck over the years, but her longest stint has been in Covedale. “I opened the Covedale branch in January 1998, and I’ve been the branch manager here for 14

Barry Larkin HaLL of fame Commemorative SeCtion We celebrate the career of Cincinnati native and one of the greatest Reds in team history— Barry Larkin. With an intro by former teammate Sean Casey.

Your Guide to the BenGals traininG Camp Bengals training camp is downtown for the first time. We’ll provide tips on where to see the players, schedules, maps, and more.

All the news about your favorite teams on the go! Get the Reds Baseball App and the Bengals Football App today. Pick up Sunday’s Enquirer at a local retailer Or Subscribe here: www.cincinnati.com/subscribe

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years,” she said. A White Oak resident, Mallory said she’s especially enjoyed working with the people on the West Side. She said she’s met a lot of great people through the book club she started and the annual Covedale quilt show she organized, and she’ll count those people and events among her fondest memories of the library. “I will miss the people and the staff, and being involved in the community,” she said. The Covedale branch, 4980 Glenway Ave., is hosting a retirement party for her from 2-5 p.m. Thursday, July 26. The community and library patrons are

Eileen Mallory, who has been the manager of the Covedale Branch Library since 1998, is retiring from the library at the end of July. The community is invited to celebrate her career and wish her well in her retirement at a party at the library Thursday, July 26. KURT BACKSCHEIDER/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

invited to attend to celebrate Mallory’s career. Aside from spending more time with her family and spoiling her grandson, Felix, Mallory said she doesn’t have many plans in place yet for how she’ll enjoy her retirement.

“I’m going to take life at a slower pace,” she said. Ben Lathrop, branch manager at the Walnut Hills library, will replace Mallory as Covedale’s branch manager. Lathrop is scheduled to start in early August.

Ponds feature of weekend tour Pondarama Water Garden Tour, a self-guided tour of 15 custom water features built exclusively for the homeowner by Meyer Aquascapes Inc., will be 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday, July 21, and 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday July 22. Admission is free. This summer marks the 11th anniversary of Pondarama tour. You can tour one or both of the two-day, selfguided tour of water gardens that display eco-system friendly ponds of various sizes and shapes and pondless waterfalls and streams. The western and northern Cincinnati tour include an array of streams, waterfalls and ponds. The water features are shown through the generosity of Meyer Aquascapes clients. Each home is marked with a Pondarama or Parade of Ponds sign in the yard. Ponds on the western and northern Cincinnati tour » Greg and Rose Altenau, 16 Turnberry, North Bend. The Altenaus now have two pondless waterfalls.

Greg and Rose Altenau’s garden in North Bend is featured on the Pondarama tour July 21 and 22. It features two pondless waterfalls. PROVIDED. One is located opposite the front door and the other is a wet rock with a 15-foot stream from edge of driveway. The entry way pondless is a 10-foot stream surrounded by weathered limestone rock creating a dramatic entrance to this Aston Oaks home. Descending the natural Aston rock steps will lead to two secluded water features set in the woods above the 15th hole of the Jack Nicholas designed Golf Course at Aston Oaks. At the bottom of the steps is a large pond designed with natural rock found on the property, plenty of natural plants and stocked with large goldfish. » Aston Oaks Golf Clubhouse, 1 Aston Oaks Drive, North Bend. This large pondless feature is behind the clubhouse for viewing by the patrons in the restaurant, wedding parties, and golfers. This is a 20-feet-wide by 20-feet-high feature built out of natural stone from the area with 16 waterfalls. » Russ and Donna Welty, 8183 Jordan Road, Cleves. This 28-foot-by-65-foot pond gives a magnificent view from all rooms facing the pond, decks and patios. This pond was built with 70 tons of boulders and 30,000 gallons of water. There are two large waterfalls separated by a 15-foot stone bridge. Lots of koi with a fish cave. There will be a grill out from noon-3 p.m,. Sunday, July 22. » Mary Jo and Dan Pfaffinger, 439 St. Cloud Way, Cleves. This is an example of a small pond that Meyer Aquascapes has redesigned. View the well landscaped pond from the patio. Pond has koi and beautiful lilies. » Bill Bross and Susan Auel, 2232 South Road, Green Township. This established 11-footby-16-foot pond has a 20foot stream and two water-

falls built with sandstone boulders. Location is very serene. Yard is landscaped with a natural mix of annual colors, native gardens and bird feeding areas creating a natural habitat for wildlife. » Marathon Station, 6094 Bridgetown Road, corner of Ebenezer and Bridgetown roads, Bridgetown. This is a large pondless waterfall with three powerful waterfalls. Two of the waterfalls face the street and one faces the gas station. The front waterfalls push 15,000 gallons per hour. The feature is constructed with weathered limestone rock. » Dave and Diane Collini, 4170 Clearpoint Drive, Green Township. This pond is new on the tour this year. This is an unusual pond that was converted this year. The source of the waterfall is a fire hydrant which cascades down into a 4-footby-6-foot pond. The pond has beautiful plants and fish. » Western Hills Builder’s Supply, 6801 Harrison Ave., Green Township. This pond is open Saturday, July 21, only. A pondless waterfall with a 10foot stream and three waterfalls. This pondless waterfall has been designed by Meyer Aquascapes and is built from a new manmade stone called Rosetta stone. Join the staff of Western Hills Builder’s Supply for a demo in the morning; join them for a cookout at lunch. » Bonita and Gene Brockert, 2382 Crest Road, Colerain Township. This home has three features and lush gardens. Visit the 20-foot-by-20-foot sandstone pond which is framed with lush landscaping, gazebo and a pergola. For more information and for more on the other ponds on the tour, call call 513-941-8500, or go to www.aquascapes.com.


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