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PRICE HILL PRESS

Your Community Press newspaper serving Price Hill and Covedale

OUTSTANDING The Cheviot Westwood Community Association honored Outstanding Young Citizens at a banquet. See page B1

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WEDNESDAY, MAY 30, 2012

BECAUSE COMMUNITY MATTERS

Lourdes students make annual Trek for Tech By Kurt Backscheider

kbackscheider@communitypress.com

Students at St. Dominic School in Delhi Township have decorated a fiberglass pig for this year's Big Pig Gig. The pig will be located in downtown Cincinnati this summer in connection with the World Choir Games. Pictured, front row, from left, are first-graders Gabby Ingle and Bailey Broxtermann; back row, eighth-grader Keith Orloff, St. Dominic art teacher Regina Angel, eighth-grader Josie Angel and PTO volunteer Mary Orloff. KURT BACKSCHEIDER/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

St. Dominic decorates pig for Big Pig Gig

School hopes to buy pig at ending auction By Kurt Backscheider kbackscheider@communitypress.com

Students at St. Dominic School can’t wait to see their pig on the streets of downtown Cincinnati. The school is taking part in this summer’s Big Pig Gig, an art project sponsored by ArtWorks and C-Change to honor the city’s Porkopolis history, and St. Dominic students recently helped decorate a pig to represent the school. This is the second time ArtWorks is organizing the Big Pig Gig. More than 400 giant fiberglass pigs were created for the first Big Pig Gig in 2000, and the event was brought back this year to coincide with the Flying Pig Marathon and the World Choir Games. “The students love it,” said St. Dominic art teacher Regina Angel, who helped create the design for the school’s pig. “They think it’s the greatest thing in the world. The little

Every student at St. Dominic School dipped a finger in paint and placed it on the pig the school is decorating for the Big Pig Gig. The students' finger prints serve as the centers of flowers. Each student has their first name written next to their flower as well. KURT BACKSCHEIDER/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

ones always want to hug it when they come in the classroom.” Mary Orloff, a St. Dominic parent and member of the PTO, said when she heard ArtWorks was doing another Big Pig Gig she contacted Angel to see if she would be interested in taking part in the project. Orloff said she and her friend, Julie Combs, took their children around the city in 2000 to see as many pigs as possible

TOP STUDENT

during the first Big Pig Gig and they had a blast. “I thought it would be great if St. Dominic could get involved this year,” Orloff said. “I approached the PTO board and they graciously donated some of the funding for the pig. We were able to secure additional sponsors to cover associated costs for the project.” She said the Carol Ann and Ralph V. Haile Jr./U.S. Bank Foundation provided a grant, and Sherwin Williams and Stithmeier Painting donated the paint. Keith Clayton of Keith Clayton Painting Inc. painted the base layer of the pig for free. St. Dominic’s pig is painted green and yellow, and is covered with leaves and flowers to represent the school’s motto, “A Place to Grow.” The pig will also be adorned with a blue ribbon to symbolize St. Dominic’s designation as a National Blue Ribbon School. “I think it looks really cool,” Orloff said. Angel said it was challeng-

COOKING

Mercy and West Hi names top graduation students. See stories, A5

Rita’s Kitchen fires up the grill for fish tacos. See story, B3

See GIG, Page A2

Students at Our Lady of Lourdes School had a picture perfect day for continuing a spring tradition. The school hosted its annual Trek for Tech fundraiser Friday, May 18, where students enjoyed sunny, 70-degree morning weather as they walked around the Lourdes campus for two hours to raise money to support the school’s technology needs. Lourdes Principal Aimee Ellmaker said this is the 10th year the PTO has organized the walk. Students gather pledges for their trek, and she said all the money raised goes toward purchasing servers, computers, software, Smart boards and projectors for the school. “It’s really a community effort,” she said. “This has become a tradition here.” Many parent volunteers turn out to ensure the event runs smoothly and man the variety of booths children stop at along the walk route, she said. This year’s theme was “Tropical Paradise.” Students donned sunglasses and other beach accessories, and as they made their

Parent volunteer Melissa Flohre, left, of Westwood, places a temporary flamingo tattoo on the cheek of Our Lady of Lourdes first-grader Rose Danenhauer during the school’s Trek for Tech event Friday, May 18. This year's fundraiser had a tropical theme. KURT BACKSCHEIDER/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

way around the campus they took part in activities like the limbo booth, the photo booth, a cornhole booth and a misting booth. A DJ provided musical entertainment throughout the walk and students snacked on treats like snow cones and popcorn. “It’s a festival atmosphere,” See TREK, Page A2

Collection time In the next few days your Community Press carrier will be stopping by to collect $2.50 for delivery of this month’s Price Hill Press. Your carrier retains half of this Duncan amount as payment Kelley for his or her work. If you wish to add a tip to reward the carrier’s good service, both the carrier and The Community Press appreciate your generosity. This month Paxton we’re featuring Kelley brothers Duncan, Paxton and Griffin Kelley. Duncan played basketball for St. William and plays baseball for the Cincinnati Heat. He will be a

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freshman at Elder in the fall. Paxton, who will be an eighth-grader this fall, also plays baseball for the Cincinnati Heat. He also Griffin Kelley swims for the Powel Crosley YMCA and competed in the zone championships in Canton, Ohio. Griffin, who will be a fifth-grader in the fall, also swims for the Powel Crosley YMCA. He plays baseball for the Delhi Athletic Association. If you have questions about delivery, or if your child is interested in becoming part of our junior carrier program, please call 853-6263 or 853-6277, or e-mail circulation manager Sharon Schachleiter at sschachleiter@communitypress.com.

Vol. 85 No. 21 © 2012 The Community Press ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

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NEWS

A2 • PRICE HILL PRESS • MAY 30, 2012

Trek Continued from Page A1

Ellmaker said. “The kids get so excited.” Heather Leesman, a PTO member who helps organize the walk with fellow members Jenn Bruce, Shawna Smith and Lisa Waltz, said this is the sixth year she’s been involved with the event and she looks forward to it every year. “It’s so nice to see everyone come out to support our school,” Leesman said. “It’s a great day and it’s so much fun.” Ellmaker said she loves listening to the students laugh and seeing their snow cone-stained smiles as they walk with their classmates. “It’s their last hurrah before the end of the school year and they move on to the next step in their journey,” she said. “We usually go home dancing.” She said this year’s trek was projected to raise about $11,000 for the school.

Index

Calendar .................B2 Classfieds .................C Food ......................B4 Life ........................B1 Police .................... B6 Schools ..................A5 Sports ....................A6 Viewpoints .............A8

Grote Barber celebrating four decades By Kurt Backscheider kbackscheider@communitypress.com

A lot has changed since Terry Grote opened a twochair barber shop at the corner of West Eighth Street and Sunset Avenue. For decades, the longtime Price Hill resident has watched families move away, he’s witnessed hairstyle trends, he’s seen the neighborhood transform and he’s noticed technology evolve. He’s also overseen changes at his own shop. “We’re doing things now I never thought we’d be doing,” he said. Grote owns Grote Barber & Styling Salon with his wife, Jo Anne, and this year they are celebrating the shop’s 40th anniversary. A barber for 47 years, Terry Grote opened his Price Hill shop April 1, 1972 – April Fool’s Day. “I should have taken that as an omen,” he joked. After he graduated from Elder High School,

Gig Continued from Page A1

ing to get all 503 students in the school to contrib-

Price Hill residents Terry and Jo Anne Grote are celebrating 40 years of keeping West Siders looking their best. Grote's barber shop has been open in the same location at West Eighth Street and Sunset Avenue since April 1972. KURT BACKSCHEIDER/THE COMMUNITY PRESS he said he really had no idea what he wanted to do. He considered going to business college, but his older brother who was signed up to attend barber college pulled out to pursue a different job opportunity and asked him if he would like to take his spot in barber school. Grote took his brother up on the offer and has been helping West Siders look their best ever since.

“We’ve been very fortunate here,” he said. His shop has been located in the same building at West Eighth and Sunset for 40 years. In fact, the business is housed in the same building where Terry and Jo Anne first met, the Sunset Pub. “Our whole life story is in this building,” he said. He expanded the shop from a one-room barber

ute in decorating the pig, but they pulled it off. She said each student dipped their finger in paint and then placed it on the pig. The finger prints formed the cen-

ters of the flowers. “Every student has their own flower with their name and finger print,” she said. Angel is now putting the finishing touches on

shop with two chairs to a two-room barber shop and hair salon in 1983 when Jo Anne earned her barber’s license and joined him in the business. A Seton High School graduate, she trained to be a barber when their three children started school. She became a barber instead of a beautician because, at the time, barbers and beauticians weren’t permitted to work together in the same shop. Her clients were all men when she started, but now 95 percent of her clientele is women because barbers can now do highlights and perms. Mrs. Grote said working with her husband has brought them closer as a couple. They’ve been married for 43 years. “We’ve always gotten along well together, and I think working together has made our marriage stronger,” she said. “Communication is the most important thing in a marriage and it holds true

for business, too.” Mr. Grote said in the event they disagree with each other at home, they are forced to resolve it before heading to work the next morning. “We would have to settle it down before we came in here and started working with people,” he said. “The customers can tell if there is something bothering you.” Aside from being willing to show up and turn the lights on every day, he said the secret to sustaining a business for 40 years is being able to adapt to changes and find ways to better serve customers. For instance, he said the shop now has a website – www.grotebarber.com – and they have a Facebook page where he and Jo Anne post photos and messages. Mrs. Grote said they also recently became the first salon in Cincinnati to offer customers organic hair color from Organic Color Systems.

the pig and she said she plans to deliver it to ArtWorks the first week of June. ArtWorks will apply a clear-coat finish to the pig before putting it on display. “It’s a really neat project,” she said. “The students are excited to go downtown to see the pig.” St. Dominic’s pig will

go up for auction when the Big Pig Gig is over, and Orloff and Angel said they hope the school is able to raise enough money to buy the pig so it can be displayed permanently at the school. “The whole school community has come together to support this project,” Orloff said.

PRICE HILL PRESS

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NEWS

MAY 30, 2012 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • A3

Westwood pharmacist drug of choice – laughs kbackscheider@communitypress.com

Nicholas Hoesl believes laughter is the best medicine, so he’s helping people get their doses. The Westwood resident recently published his third humor book, “Laughter: The Drug of Choice.” Hoesl, 79, a lifelong West Sider who makes his living as a pharmacist, has also authored “The First Humorously Medical Dictionary” and “Jest Desserts of Cincinnati’s 50 Plus.” His newest work is a collection of funny quotes, quips, poems and musings he’s acquired throughout his career in the medical field. “I’ve been saving material ever since I graduated from college,” said Hoesl, who graduated from University of Cincinnati’s pharmacy college. “Whenever I would hear funny stories or one-liners from patients or other pharmacists or doctors, I would scribble them down. “I thought, ‘Gee, I have enough for a book.’” A jack of all trades, Hoesl has led a diverse life and brings his sense of humor to every task at hand. An Army veteran who served in the Korean War, Hoesl has also been a Peace Corps volunteer in Afghanistan, a singer in the Southern Gateway Chorus, a longtime member of the West Hills Toastmasters Club and a certified chimney sweep.

Westwood resident Nicholas Hoesl recently published a humor book titled, “Laughter: The Drug of Choice.” A pharmacist by trade, Hoesl’s book is a collection of funny quips and quotes he's acquired throughout his career in the medical field. KURT BACKSCHEIDER/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

“I was probably the only pharmacist/chimney sweep in the country,” he joked. He’s also earned a broadcasting degree and served on WCET’s speaker’s bureau, presented seminars on global volunteering at UC’s Institute of Learning in Retirement and ran several marathons and races dressed in outlandish costumes – most notably as a pig in Cincinnati’s Heart Mini-Marathon. “I have fun with all of this,” he said. When he learned about an organization called the Association for Applied and Therapeutic Humor, a nonprofit group comprised of an international community of humor and laughter

A group of Cincinnati teachers and principals will become some of the first in the nation to receive training on how to adjust their lessons in order to align with new education standards. The educators will learn about the Common Core State Standards, which Ohio adopted, from the co-authors of the standards in math and English language arts/literacy. The goal of the Standards Immersion Institute, held recently in New York City, is to empower teachers and prin-

professionals and enthusiasts, he joined as soon as he could. Hoesl said some of what he’s learned from the professionals he has met at the association’s events and conferences have found their way into his latest book. He said humor and health are interconnected, and although humor is not a cure for disease, laughter has been proven to reduce stress, perk up the immune system, relax muscles, clear the respiratory tract, increase circulation and ease perceived pain. As he writes in his book, “Laughter is like a human body wagging its tail.” Because of the positive effects humor and laughter have on the body, Hoesl said he’s proud his book is available in several hospital gift shops. “Laughter: The Drug of Choice” can be found on shelves at The Christ Hospital, Bethesda North Hospital, the Cleveland Clinic and the Mayo Clinic, he said. His book is also sold at Joseph-Beth Booksellers and online at Amazon.com. “People should laugh more, and I feel I’m an instrument to help them.”

at Standards Immersion Institute included these West Siders: » Margie DiMuzio, Carson, teacher, English language arts; » Brittany Fair, Carson, teacher, English language arts; » Ruthenia Jackson, Carson School, principal; » Linda Johnson, Sayler Park Elementary, teacher thrid- through fifth-grade; » Emily Robertson, Carson, teacher, math; » Jennifer Rylatt, Carson School, teacher, math.

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NEWS

A4 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • MAY 30, 2012

Cheviot Eagles host ride benefiting Honor Flight

Friends of library has book sale have a good memory of any particular sale, or want to share your thoughts on what the book sales mean to you? Do you have a photo from a past sale? If so, we’d like to hear from you. Please post your memories on the Friends’ Facebook page: http://tinyurl.com/cysbjxv. Or, send your thoughts via email to: BookSaleMemory@aol.com. The 40th annual June Book Sale, will be June 3-8 at the Main Library, 800 Vine St. Hours are: Sunday: 1-5 p.m.; Monday-Wednesday: 9 a.m.-9 p.m.; Thursday: 9 a.m.-6 p.m.; and Bag Day, Friday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. where you can buy a Friends’ shopping bag for $10 and fill it up.

The Friends of the Public Library of Cincinnati & Hamilton County would like to hear from you. In 1973, they decided to try their hand at a used book sale to raise funds for the library. The group, led by Friends’ secretary Sarah Kahn, hosted the firstever book sale on Fountain Square. Originally planned to last all week, it ended after only three days, selling out all 4,000 books and raising just over $3,000. To celebrate its 40th annual used book sale June 3-8 at the Main Library, the Friends want you to share your thoughts and recollections. Did you attend that first used book sale in1973? Or, did you attend subsequent year’s sales? Do you

By Kurt Backscheider kbackscheider@communitypress.com

Irene Viltrakis is praying Mother Nature doesn’t decide rain on this year’s Honor Flight Run. The Cheviot resident said the inaugural motorcycle benefit ride was greeted with a downpour last year, preventing many motorcyclists from taking part in the event. “We only had 12 riders go out last year,” Viltrakis said. “Twelve brave souls.” Although only a dozen riders saddled up for the roughly 100-mile ride, she said more than 125 people turned out for the after party and helped the Eagle Riders from the Cheviot Fraternal Order of Eagles raise $4,000 for Honor Flight TriState. The Eagle Riders will host their second Honor Flight Run at 10 a.m. June 16. Viltrakis, who serves as secretary and co-chair of the Eagle Riders with her husband, Rome, said the ride benefits Honor Flight Tri-State, an organization whose mission is to fly as many World War II veterans as possible to Washington, D.C., so they can see their memorial. Honor Flight covers all the costs for the veterans who take the trip. Described as a scram-

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A motorcyclist who took part in last year's Honor Flight Run decorated their bike with patriotic flags. The Eagle Riders from the Cheviot Fraternal Order of Eagles will host their second annual motorcycle ride benefiting Honor Flight Tri-State on Saturday, June 16. THANKS TO IRENE VILTRAKIS ble, she said the motorcycle ride will start in the Cheviot municipal parking lot at Harrison and Glenmore avenues. Motorcyclists will depart in groups in 15-minute intervals and cover about 100 miles during the ride. She said the ride features scheduled stops at the Lebanon, Hamilton West and Mount Healthy Fraternal Order of Eagles clubs, and then Kel-

ler’s Cafe in Cheviot before ending at the Cheviot Fraternal Order of Eagles club where dinner will be served. The evening features live music from the Power Pigs, as well as Chuck Brisbin & the Tuna Project. Raffle chances will also be sold and door prizes will be awarded. Viltrakis said she hopes to have 100 to 200 motorcyclists take part

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SCHOOLS

MAY 30, 2012 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • A5

Editor: Marc Emral, memral@communitypress.com, 578-1053

ACHIEVEMENTS | NEWS | ACTIVITIES | HONORS

COMMUNITY

PRESS

CommunityPress.com

Seton’s top grads offer advice

Both students at top of class all 4 years By Kurt Backscheider kbackscheider@communitypress.com

Brooke Moorhead had a pretty good idea she’d be the valedictorian of her class. The Seton High School senior said she knew she fluctuated between being ranked No. 1 or No. 2 in her class throughout all four years of high school. “I wasn’t very surprised when I found out I was this year’s valedictorian,” Moorhead said. “But I was definitely happy it was confirmed.” The Green Township resident said she put a lot of work into graduating at the top of her class, but she also made time for activities outside of the classroom. “It’s mostly about time man-

agement and being efficient with your school work and extracurricular activities,” she said. Her advice to incoming high school freshmen is to develop strong time management skills and to participate as much as possible in class discussions. “Don’t be afraid to ask a lot of questions,” she said. Price Hill resident Anne Goettke, who is the salutatorian of Seton’s class of 2012, encouraged students to take classes that are interesting to them. She said she did work hard to finish as one of the top students in her class, but she also made sure she enrolled in classes in which she wanted to learn. “Enjoy it,” she said. “Find a way to make it fun. It’s easier to learn when you’re having fun.” Goettke said she was surprised to learn she was this year’s salutatorian because her class

Price Hill resident Anne Goettke, left, is Seton High School’s salutatorian this year, and Green Township resident Brooke Moorhead, right, is the valedictorian of the class of 2012. KURT BACKSCHEIDER/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

rank ranged between No. 3 and No. 6 most of the time. She said she’s proud of her ac-

complishment, and she appreciates all the great friendships she’s developed at Seton.

Moorhead said she’s grateful for the school spirit and welcoming, friendly environment Seton students and staff provided. She and Goettke were both involved in several clubs and organizations throughout their high school years. Moorhead was captain of the tennis team, president of National Honor Society, a student ambassador, and member of the Junior Engineering Technical Society, the Spanish Club and tutoring club. Goettke ran cross country and track, served as secretary of National Honor Society and was a member of the Junior Engineering Technical Society. Both students will attend the University of Cincinnati this fall. Moorhead said she will study pharmacy and Goettke said she will major in mechanical engineering.

Western Hills’ top grads ready for next steps By Kurt Backscheider kbackscheider@communitypress.com

Brandi Nastold said she called her mom as soon as she found out the good news. “I was excited,” she said. “I couldn’t wait to call my mom.” She had good reason to immediately call her mother. Nastold, a Northside resident, is the valedictorian of Western Hills University High School’s class of 2012. “I was proud of myself,” she said. “I worked hard all year, every year.” Her advice to students entering high school next year is to give it their best when it comes to academics, right from the beginning. She said every year of high school counts, so make the most of it. Looking back on her four years at Western Hills, she said she learned she can accomplish anything she wants when she tries hard. “I didn’t think I could keep go-

ing sometimes,” Nastold said. “But I stuck it out and worked hard, and I did keep going.” She will attend Berea College in Kentucky this fall, and said she plans to study childhood education. Kasondra Belew, a Western Hills resident and this year’s salutatorian at Western Hills University, agreed with her classmate about hard work. “Don’t give up, even when things look hard or challenging,” she said. “Keep pushing.” Belew said she’s proud to be graduating as one of the top students in her class. “I wanted to finish in the top 10 percent,” she said. “I feel like I accomplished something.” She will attend the Ohio State University this fall, where she will study animal sciences en route to becoming a veterinarian. Kenneth Phelps of Price Hill was as equally proud as Nastold and Belew for being named the salutatorian of Western Hills En-

Brandi Nastold, from left, Kasondra Belew and Kenneth Phelps are the top students in their classes this year. Nastold is valedictorian of Western Hills University High School, Belew is salutatorian of Western Hills University and Phelps is salutatorian of Western Hills Engineering High School. Not pictured is Whitney Hollingsworth, who is valedictorian of Western Hills Engineering. KURT BACKSCHEIDER/THE COMMUNITY PRESS gineering High School’s class of 2012. “It was pretty exciting,” Phelps said. “It was the first time I felt like I accomplished something.” He said one of the biggest lessons he learned in high school is to never give up. “I have to keep trying,” he said.

Phelps recommended incoming freshmen stay focused on their studies and always keep scholarships in mind. “It’s never too early to start looking for scholarships,” he said. He will attend Cincinnati State Technical and Community College next year. He said hasn’t decided whether he wants to enter

the veterinary assistant program or study criminal justice and become a police officer. Price Hill resident Whitney Hollingsworth is the valedictorian of this year’s class at Western Hills Engineering. She was not available for the interview.

screenings. He has received several academic and professional honors, including an American Association of Gynecologic Laparoscopists’ Excellence in Laparoscopy award from Wright State University and a Cincinnati Business Courier 40 Under 40 Leadership Award. Flick supports several local and global charities actively and received recognition for his works of service, including a Kentucky Colonel award for medical assistance provided during hurricanes Katrina and Rita and a nomination for a Health Care Hero award. Flick is currently accepting new patients at his Western Hills location and at Dent Crossing Family Medicine. For more information, call 513-389-4095.

on Sunday, June 10. The celebration, now in its 15th year, begins with a prayer service at St. Teresa at 2 p.m., followed by a procession with the Blessed Sacrament through the streets of West Price Hill, ending at St. William. The service concludes with Benediction, followed by a reception outside St. William. It is suggested that those attending the service park in the St. William School parking lot. A bus will transport people to St. Teresa beginning at 1 p.m. The same bus will be in the procession back to St. William, so those who have difficulty walking can participate in the procession. For more information, contact Rev. Andrew Umberg, pastor of St. William, at 921-0247 or visit www.saintwilliam.com.

Corpus Christi marked

Madcap camp

Your child will work with professional puppeteers and puppet-builders throughout the week to create a unique puppet or mask that they will learn to manipulate. In addition to building this creation, your child will also learn some basic acting skills, how to create voices for their character and storytelling techniques that they can use to put on a puppet show of their very own. The camp will be 9:30a.m.-2 p.m. Monday-Thursday, June 2528 and 2-6 p.m. Friday, June 29, with the final even beginning at 6 p.m. at Westwood Town Hall, 3017 Harrison Ave. Cost of the camp is $150 and includes daily snack, Madcamp T-shirt and pizza party on Friday. Registration and additional information at www.madcappuppets.com/madcamp. For more information, contact Mel Hatch Douglas at m.hatch@madcappuppets.com or 513-921-5965, ext. 21.

BRIEFLY Hiking adventure

Come and join the Western Wildlife Corridor for the Big Bug Hunt at 2 p.m. Saturday, June 2, along Bender Mountain Preserve. This hike will be held as a part of The American Hiking Society’s National Trails Day. Meet at the guardrail at the west end of Delhi Pike in Delhi Township. Hiking will be along the ridge of the preserve looking for smallerscale wildlife: bugs. Parking will be available at the west end of Mount Saint Joseph College’s parking lot. For further details contact Bob Nienaber at 513-251-5352.

West Side car show

The fourth annual West Side Car, Truck and Bike Show is Saturday, June 2, at the West Side Masonic Center, 4353 West Fork Road. Registration is 9 a.m. to noon with trophies awarded at 4 p.m. The top 25 entries receive a tro-

phy and a Best in Show will be awarded. There also will be refreshments and a vendor area. The cost to enter a car is $15, day of show. Proceeds benefit the Spotlight Cincinnati 2014 Fund. For more information, call Gene at 481-1673.

Health talk

Robert Flick, M.D., will host Women’s Wellness Wednesday sponsored by Mercy Health. This free question and answer session takes place from 7-8 p.m. Wednseday, May 30, at the Corner BLOC Coffee Shop, 3101 Price Ave., Price Hill Flick, an obstetrician and gynecologist, speaks on women’s wellness regularly and recently discussed the most important precautions women can take to safeguard their health with Cincinnati Parent magazine. These precautions include eating well, quitting smoking, exercising regularly and staying current with vaccinations, tests and

St. William and St. Teresa of Avila parishes will celebrate the Feast of Corpus Christi with a prayer service and procession

Are you looking for a new and totally unique summer camp for your child? Sign them up for Madcamp 2012.


SPORTS

A6 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • MAY 30, 2012

COMMUNITY

PRESS

Editor: Melanie Laughman, mlaughman@communitypress.com, 513-248-7573

HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | RECREATIONAL

CommunityPress.com

Lady Highlanders make school history Win sends team farther than any OH softball team

By Tom Skeen tskeen@communitypress.com

GREEN TWP. — The Oak Hills Lady Highlanders made school history as they advanced to the Division I regional final after a dramatic 13-inning, 2-1 victory over Fairborn in the regional semifinal May 23 at Northmont High School. This is the farthest any softball team from the school has ever advanced, and they did it in the unlikeliest of ways. Lauren Slatten’s blooper over second base scored Brooke Shad from second base for the gamewinning run. “I think the most gratifying part was that we’ve been underdogs all year, even before the season started,” coach Jackie Cornelius-Bedel said. “To see the results of all the hard work is the most rewarding thing.” Slatten’s hit wasn’t the only thing she did to snap Fairborn’s15 game-winning streak. She struck out 20 Skyhawk hitters and, in the process, broke the Greater Miami Conference strikeout record of 364 previously set by Colerain’s Emily Schwaeble in 2009. “She was phenomenal,” Cornelius-Bedel said. “She does a great job of not letting the team see (her get flustered). She is another person that hasn’t gotten a lot of credit early in the year. No one has really noticed her, and she has the fight in her to let people know that Oak Hills is here.” The game didn’t go by without some controversy. With Sam Sagers at the plate in extra innings and a runner on third, she hit a ball down the third base line that most everyone thought was the game-winner but was foul by an eyelash. Then, in the top of the 13th, the Skyhawks got the scoring under way after Kati Knecht singled and moved to second one batter later. She was knocked in on a Brook Broussard hit to right field, but Broussard collided with an umpire on her way to second base. The umpire stopped play to call interference and a meeting of the minds ensued.

TEAM BOWS OUT IN REGIONAL FINALS The Lady Highlanders’ season came to an end May 26 after a 5-0 loss to Lebanon in the regional final at Northmont. With the score knotted at zero and the bases loaded, Lebanon’s Kaitlyn Bergman hit a 3-2 pitch over the fence and the Warriors never looked back. Brooke Shad’s first-inning single was the only hit for the Lady Highlanders off Lebanon ace Tara Trainer, who struck out 17 and moved to 15-1 on the season. Lauren Slatten allowed five runs on six hits, three walks and struck out seven. “They accomplished more than anyone thought they would,” Cornelius-Bedel said. “They weren’t expected to win, but they did.”

After a good five-to-10 minute break, the umpires ruled that the run counted and Broussard had to return to first base as they ruled it a dead ball. The Lady Highlanders weren’t happy, but it was nothing new for the team. “We have had crazy things happen all year and none of them fell on our side,” Cornelius-Bedel said. “I think that is the best part of the team is that it’s almost like no one expects us to get those calls so the team knew they weren’t done yet. I didn’t have to keep them up. They stayed up. Also, they are so young that they don’t know how or when to be nervous. This was their first time they have been to a regional game.” Devan Colebank got the 13th inning started for the Lady Highlanders with a bunt single. After stealing first and second base, something the team did little of in the previous 12 innings, she scored on a Brooke Shad bunt after Skyhawk pitcher Sophia Bolser made a bad throw to home, which advanced Shad to second base putting her in scoring position for Slatten’s game-winner. “I was nervous at first, but I knew deep down inside that we were going to come back and win this game,” Slatten told Gannett News Services.

The Oak Hills softball team celebrates at home plate after Brooke Shad scored the game-winning run in the bottom of the 13th inning of their regional semifinal game against Fairborn. TOM SKEEN/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Elder junior Jimmy White rips a single to left field that drove in the eventual game-winning run for the Panthers in their regional semifinal game against Vandalia Butler. This is White’s first season with the Panthers after transferring from Oak Hills and sitting out a year. TOM SKEEN/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Panthers fly by Aviators, fall to Crusaders By Tom Skeen tskeen@communitypress.com

PRICE HILL — The postseason dramatics continued for the Elder Panther baseball team as the guys notched their third consecutive one-run victory in the postseason, 4-3 over Vandalia Butler May 24 in a Division I regional semifinal at Marge Schott Stadium on the campus of the University of Cincinnati. It was a two-out single by Oak Hills transfer Jimmy White in the bottom of the sixth inning that gave the Panthers the lead for good. “We knew it was going to be just a battle,” coach Mark Thompson said. “Just one of those bulldog-type of games; they battled. They take on the persona of their coach, and I like to think our guys take on the persona of their coach and it’s a dog fight.” It was the Panthers’ second victory over Butler this season after beating the Aviators 6-3 to open the season. Perhaps the biggest play of

the game was a successful double steal by the Panthers to put runners at second and third with one out. It allowed Anthony Asalon to score the tying run on a fielder’s choice and put Kevin Helmers at third base, allowing him to score easily on White’s line drive to left field. “That was huge,” Thompson said. “One thing that we always stress is that we are going to do what they allow us to do. Anytime (Butler pitcher, Taylore) Cherry had a big leg kick and didn’t slide step, we were going to steal. I told Anthony (Asalon) when he was on second base that if he goes to the high leg kick you are on third base. It’s neat when they have the confidence and the one thing we’ve talked about all year is trust, and trust in what we are teaching. Trust in your ability and trust has been a real key word for us all year.” It was just another one-run game for Elder. They beat Loveland 8-7 in the sectional final, won a district title with a 9-8 win over Northmont and were involved in seven one-run games

CATCHING UP WITH COLLEGE ATHLETES Conference accolades

Six Thomas More College baseball student-athletes have been named to the 2012 AllPresidents' Athletic Conference baseball teams by the conference's head coaches. Named to the first team were senior first baseman Andrew Thole, a McNicholas High School graduate; junior shortstop David Kennett; and junior designated hitter Ryan Darner, a Covington Catholic High School; while sophomore second baseman Tyler Graber; sophomore third baseman Travis Miller, a St. Henry High School graduate and sophomore outfielder Cody Makin, an Elder High School graduate, were named honorable mention. Thole batted .374 as he was 55-of-147 with five home runs, 13 doubles, one triple and 43 runs batted-in for a slugging percent-

age of .578. He also had 351 putouts with 16 assists and helped turn 31 double plays. Miller was first on the team in batting with a .407 average as he was 50-of-123 with a home run, nine doubles, 27 runs scored and 21RBI for a slugging percentage of .504. He had 16 putouts and 74 assists to go with one double play. Makin batted .368 as he was 49-of-133 with a home run, a triple, eight doubles, 27 runs scored and 21RBI for a .466 slugging percentage. In the field he had 65 putouts and six assists. The Saints ended the season at 25-16 overall and a 13-11 mark in the PAC to finish third during the regular season. If you would like to submit news of your college athlete, send it to mlaughman@communitypress.com.

during the regular season. Unfortunately for the Panthers, they couldn’t squeak out another close one in the regional final against Moeller May 25. The Crusaders beat Elder 6-4, giving them a birth in the Division I state tournament semifinal. Moeller had a 2-1 season series advantage over the Panthers, after a 12-2 Panther victory March 28 and a 7-6 Moeller win May 1. Elder took an early 2-0 lead in the first inning, but fell behind 4-2 before a Joe Ramstetter double knotted it at four in the top of the fourth. The Crusaders added a run in the bottom of the inning and another in the sixth to seal the deal and snap the Panthers’ six-game winning streak. This was Elder’s first trip back to the regional final since 2010 when the two teams met in the state semifinal. “Their hitters are so good,” Thompson told Gannett News Services. “We made a couple really good pitches in the spot we wanted and they just rode it.”

TOURNAMENT HIGHLIGHTS By Tom Skeen tskeen@communitypress.com

Girls lacrosse

» Seton’s season came to a close following a 12-10 loss to Indian Hill in the regional semifinals of the Division II state tournament. The Saints finish the season at 7-6.

Track

The following have advanced to the state tournament meet June 1-2 at The Ohio State University: Division I Boys » Oak Hills: Kevin Konkoly, 400-meter, fourth-place. » Western Hills: Denzel Peters, 110-meter hurdles, fourth-place. » La Salle: Jaleel Hytchye, 100, second; 200, first.


SPORTS & RECREATION

MAY 30, 2012 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • A7

15th Showdown to include 42 schools In-Game Sports, the owner and operator of the Skyline Chili Crosstown Showdown, announced the 15th anniversary schedule of prep football games on May 15 at the University of Cincinnati. The list includes 42 schools playing 21 games over a 10-day period and will utilize several venues. The 2012 event starts Aug. 17 at Dixie Heights High School with defending district champion Campbell County playing Covington Catholic at 6 p.m. The nightcap will feature Dixie Heights and defending district champ Newport Central Catholic at 8:30. The first Ohio game is Aug. 22 with Reading and Roger Bacon meeting at 5:30 at Colerain High School. Following that, at 8 p.m. will be Mount Healthy and North College Hill. Aug. 23 will shift the games to Sycamore where Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy and Madeira will have a rematch of their first-round playoff game. The Eagles spoiled the Mustangs’ perfect season last fall with a 16-10 victory. After that 5:30 game, Wyoming will square off under new head coach Aaron Hancock against Bishop Fenwick. A new wrinkle takes place Aug. 24 at UC’s Sheakley Athletics Complex, where the Bearcats

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Western Sports Mall is partnering with Bill Spraul and his trainers from Cincinnati West in doing an indoor soccer camp from 5:30-6:30, July 16-19. The camp will focus on both technical and tactical skill training. The camp is for ages 7 to 14 and is $60, which includes a camp T-shirt. Call 451-4900, or visit westernsportsmall.com, or e-mail cmitchell@fuse.net. Registration deadline is July 9.

playing in a college stadium. “That was huge motivation for our guys coming back in the offseason,” Kontsis said. “Last year, we played a great game at Colerain, but this year we’re on a big stage at Nippert Stadium. To play in that venue is really exciting.” At 5:30 on Aug. 25, Colerain takes on Ohio DI runner-up Pickerington Central. The final game is an 8 p.m. kick-off between La Salle and Lakota West. However, there are more Aug. 25 games as Dayton’s Welcome Stadium will host four contests. Hamilton and Springfield start the day at noon, followed by Northmont and Princeton at 2:45. The third game is Wayne and Winton Woods at 5:30, with Dayton Dunbar and Valley View wrapping things up at 8:15. The Skyline Chili Crosstown Showdown concludes at Kings High School Aug. 26 with defending DII state champ Trotwood-Madison playing University School from Fort Lauderdale, Fla., as part of the ESPNHS Kickoff Classic. The second game (times to be determined) involves the Gilman School from Baltimore against seventime Ohio state champion Moeller. Showdown tickets will be available July 1 at the participating schools. Advance tickets to multigame sessions will be $10.

use “the bubble” during the winter months. Finneytown and Northwest will have a 7 p.m. kick-off at that 1,500 seat field. The same night, Anderson and Sycamore play at 6 p.m. at Nippert. Following Anderson/ Sycamore, it’ll be Middletown and St. Xavier at 8:30 on Aug. 23. The Bombers advanced to the state semis last season, while the Middies feature Ohio State commit Jalin Marshall. On Friday, Aug. 24, Elder gets into the mix by hosting Centerville at “The Pit” at 7:30. Across the river, it’ll be a Northern Kentucky double-header with Simon Kenton hosting the Beechwood Tigers at 6. The late game is district champion Cooper against the defending Division 2A champion Holy Cross. The games return to Nippert Stadium Aug. 25, opening with Walnut Hills clashing with Oak Hills at 3 p.m. The Eagles made their Showdown debut a year ago with a win over Wyoming. Walnut Hills eventually made their first playoff appearance. “I think it (the Wyoming game) was the catalyst that took us over the top,” head coach George Kontsis said. “It really changed the culture of our program. It was a championship program with championship coaches and we came from behind twice to win.” Like Sycamore, Walnut Hills savors the idea of

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VIEWPOINTS A8 • PRICE HILL PRESS • MAY 30, 2012

COMMUNITY

PRESS

Editor: Marc Emral, memral@communitypress.com, 853-6264

EDITORIALS | LETTERS | COLUMNS | CH@TROOM

CommunityPress.com

MEETINGS » Cincinnati City Council meets at 2 p.m. every Wednesday in room 300 at Cincinnati City Hall, 801 Plum St. When there is a Monday holiday, all meetings including committee meetings are pushed back a day. City Manager: Milton Dohoney Jr. Mayor: Mark Mallory. » Cincinnati Public Schools Board of Education usually meets at 7 p.m. the second and fourth Mondays of the month at 2651 Burnet Ave. Board of Education phone: 475-7000. Superintendent: Mary Ronan. Board President: Eve Bolton. » Delhi Township Trustees meet at 6 p.m. the second and last Wednesday of the month at township of-

fices, 934 Neeb Road. Phone: 9223111. Administrator: Thomas R. Stahlheber. Board president: Mike Davis. » Price Hill Civic Club meets the second Tuesday of each month at 7:30 p.m. at Seton K of C Hall on West Eighth St. (across from St. William Church), Phone: 251-0880. Club President: Mark Armstrong. » East Price Hill Improvement Association meets the third Monday of each month at 7:30 p.m. at Holy Family Church, 3006 W. Eighth St., Phone: 549-3744. Association President: John Schlagetter. To be considered for this list send your information to memral@communitypress.com.

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES Cincinnati is spending $2.27 million on street repairs in Sayler Park. BETTY KAMUF/FOR THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Residents did street repairs in Home City

Cincinnati’s transportation department is spending $2.27 million on street repairs in Sayler Park. The rehab project includes street paving and curb replacement. The Betty streets inKamuf volved are: COMMUNITY PRESS Gracely Drive, GUEST COLUMNIST Huey Avenue, Wren Street, Monitor Avenue, Prescott Street, Elcho Avenue, and Thornton Avenue. Most of these streets have been already been peeled and repaved. Now old curbs and some driveway aprons are being replaced. No new curbs are being built only old broken curbs are being replaced. The Cincinnati Waterworks is also working on their lines. Water lines along Hillside Twain Revere and Monitor are being replaced. MSD is replacing the sewer and water lines at Gracely Drive and River Road, after they collapsed. The price tag is $184,000. In old Home City they handled street repairs a different way. An ordinance passed stating that each able bodied person between 21-55 who lived in

Home City had to perform two days of labor upon the streets, alley and highways each year. If someone could not perform the labor themselves they could either send a substitute or pay a fine of $3. Several groups were exempted. Among them were disabled men, those serving in the military, and the Ohio National Guard. Members of Fire Company 64 and Ladder Company 30 were to busy to serve. All of this work was to be done starting at 7 a.m. All parties were to show up with the necessary hand tools for work. The person owning the alley, road or highway was responsible for supplying a team of horses, mules, oxen and wagon or cart, plow or scraper. Home City’s Board of Improvement provided a supervisor. Board of Improvement members Nelson Sayler and William Burger were to come up with a schedule and give a five-day notice of when the individual was to work. If those persons refused to work or did not send a substitute, they were fined $1 for each occurrence in mayor’s court. If they did not show up they were fined $3. Shortly after that a 1 mill tax was levied on homeowners to pay for street repairs and macadamizing. (Paving with tar

ABOUT LETTERS AND COLUMNS We welcome your comments on editorials, columns, stories or other topics important to you in The Community Press. Include your name, address and phone number(s) so we may verify your letter. Letters of 200 or fewer words and columns of 500 or fewer words have the best chance of being published. All submissions may be edited for length, accuracy and clarity. Deadline: Noon Friday E-mail: memral@community press.com Fax: 853-6220 U.S. mail: See box below Letters, columns and articles submitted to The Community Press may be published or distributed in print, electronic or other forms.

mixed with small rocks.) Numerous streets were improved and sidewalks were added, hills were graded down and drains added. I’m sure the price tag was less then today’s price tag. Betty Kamuf is a winner of Griffin Yeatman Award for Historical Preservation. She lives in Sayler Park. You can email her at westnews@communitypress.com.

Anyone can be an Everyday Hero Local news sources can’t help it. They are often in the position lately of reporting disturbing news. There are caregivers in our community who sometimes cause harm to the children they are responsible for keeping safe. Linda Children are Smets-Ullrich injured. They COMMUNITY PRESS are “tortured.” GUEST COLUMNIST Sometimes they die. These aren’t far away wars. These are families in our own community. It’s hard not to look away. We are all tempted to turn the page, to turn our faces to something more pleasant. It’s too painful to think about.

But what if you had the power to make a difference? What if you could be the difference for just one child? If you are of strong spirit, we have a challenge for you. One you can share with your neighbors, your family and your church. You can open your home and your heart and help one child. You can make a safe place for one child whose family is hurting and in pain. You can help that child grow in a healthy family until their own family can welcome them back. Foster parents are “Everyday Heroes.” They are the brave souls that put the kids of our community first. They invest love, time and tears in making a difference for just one child. Could you spend some time helping with homework? Or drying a child’s tears if they

PRICE HILL

PRESS

A publication of

wake with a nightmare? Can you laugh together with a child over their silly jokes? Can you help them learn that discipline can be loving and gentle? Maybe you can be a hero. Maybe you have the strength to be a foster parent. We’d love to help you along your journey. We’ll work to support you every step of the way. We are the Everyday Hero Collaborative. We are foster care agencies in your community. We’ve been waiting for you! Call 211 when you’re ready to learn more about becoming a foster parent. There is a child who needs you. The time is right for you to be a hero. Linda Smets-Ullrich, LISW-S, is the director of Hamilton County Services at St. Aloysius Orphange. Reach her at 513-242-7613, ext. 331.

Animals/ Nature

GRRAND – Golden Retriever Rescue and Adoption of Needy Dogs takes in needy displaced, abandoned or unclaimed stray golden retrievers and places them in volunteer foster homes until adoptive families are found. Call 1-866-981-2251 and leave your name and phone. Visit www.ggrand.org. email www.cincygrrand@yahoo.com. League For Animal Welfare – A no-kill shelter needs volunteers 16-and-older to help socialize cats and 18-and-older to socialize and walk dogs. Other opportunities available. Call 735-2299, ext. 3. Save the Animals Foundation – Needs people 18 and older to staff its shelter for homeless cats and dogs. Call 378-0300 for cats and 588-6609 for dogs. Spring Grove Cemetery and Arboretum – has a new horticulture volunteer program. Volunteer opportunities include working side by side Spring Grove’s nationallyrenowned horticulture team at this National Historic Landmark. Groups of volunteers will be developed to help in the following areas: keeping the front entrance area looking spectacular, controlling invasive species, taking care of the tree and shrub collection. They are also looking for a volunteer, or volunteers, to help with the hybrid tea roses. New volunteers join the volunteer docents who are ambassadors for the cemetery and arboretum. Information sessions, conducted the last Saturday and first Wednesday of each month, will explain the volunteer opportunities. Sessions are at 10 a.m. in the Historic Office, just inside the main entrance to the cemetery. For more information, contact volunteer coordinator Whitney Huang, Spring Grove horticulturist, at 853-6866. Tri State County Animal Response Team (CART) – Is at 11216 Gideon Lane in Sycamore Township. Meetings are open to the public. Visit www.tristatecart.com for monthly subjects or more information. Call 702-8373. Winton Woods Riding Center – is in need of volunteers to assist with the Special Riders Program, which provides training and competition opportunities for children and adults with disabilities, and to help with barn duties, horse shows and a variety of other tasks. No experience is necessary and training is provided. Interested individuals ages 14 and older are invited to contact the Winton Woods Riding Center at 931-3057, or at wwrc@greatparks.org.

PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

Executive Service Corps of Cincinnati – Professionals can use their administrative skills to help a busy, growing nonprofit manage its projects and members. Executive Service Corps of Cincinnati is looking for someone with experience in Word, Excel, Power Point and Outlook to assist in the Blue Ash office. Volunteers set their own days and hours and enjoy nice working conditions and friendly, bright volunteers and staff. Help the ESCC help other nonprofits succeed. Contact Darlyne Koretos for more information at 791-6230,

5556 Cheviot Road Cincinnati, Ohio 45247 phone: 923-3111 fax: 853-6220 email: pricehillpress@communitypress.com web site: www.communitypress.com

ext. 10. ESCC is located at 10945 Reed Hartman Highway, Suite 108.

HEALTH/WELLNESS

Crossroads Hospice - Volunteers are wanted to join the team of Ultimate Givers who strive to provide extra love and comfort to terminally-ill patients and their families in Brown, Butler, Clermont, Clinton, Hamilton, Highland and Warren counties. Volunteers are also needed to support signature programs inspired by Jim Stovall’s novel, “The Ultimate Gift” The Gift of a Day program asks patients what their perfect day is and staff and volunteers work to make it a reality. Ultimate Givers visit with patients in their homes, assisted living facilities and nursing facilities and help with clerical duties at the Crossroads office. They provide emotional support and companionship to patients and family members, assist with errands or provide respite for those caring for terminally-ill loved ones. For more information or to sign up as an Ultimate Giver, call 793-5070 or compete an application online at www.crossroadshospice.com/ volunteering. Before becoming a Crossroads Hospice Ultimate Giver, participants must complete an application, TB skin test and training session lead by members of the Crossroads team. Volunteers must wait a minimum of one year after the death of an immediate family member or loved one before applying.

EDUCATION

Change a life – Volunteer to tutor an adult with low-level literacy skills or GED preparation needs. Call 621-READ. Cincinnati Reads – a volunteer tutoring program working with K-4 students in Cincinnati Public Schools. Volunteers receive free training to work one-on-one with children who are struggling to read. Call 621-7323 or email Jayne Martin Dressing, jdressing@lngc.org. Inktank – Group looking for volunteers to help children and adults improve their skills in writing-based initiatives across the city. Call 542-0195. The Salvation Army – The Salvation Army issued an appeal today for volunteers to assist with its youth development programs. The Salvation Army offers After-School and Summer Enrichment programs, providing children from at-risk neighborhoods with development opportunities throughout the year. The Salvation Army offers these programs at Community Centers across Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky, providing localized opportunities for volunteers to engage with these critical programs. For more information or to volunteer with The Salvation Army’s youth programs, please contact Melanie Fazekas at 7625671, or Melanie.fazekas@use. salvationarmy.org.

If you have a volunteer opportunity you would like listed, email the information to memral@communitypress.com.

Price Hill Press Editor Marc Emral memral@communitypress.com, 853-6264 Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday See page A2 for additional contact information.


WEDNESDAY, MAY 30, 2012

LIFE

COMMUNITY PRESS

PEOPLE | IDEAS | RECIPES

From Bridgetown Elementary School were, from left, Mia Griffin, Carly Miller, Noah Gray and Brady Hesse; and from Westwood Elementary School Luis Mejia-Escobar and Kaeli Smith THANKS TO JENNY KRONER JACKSON.

At the banquet from St. Martin, from left, Nick Weber and Brittany Daughtery; from St. Catharine: Cailyn Brock and Nolan Keller; and from St. Als: Margo Waters and Luke Doerger Group2 (Left to Right) THANKS TO JENNY KRONER JACKSON.

GROUP HONORS OUTSTANDING YOUNG CITIZENS T

he Cheviot Westwood Community Association had its 48th annual Outstanding Young Citizens Banquet April 24 at the Cheviot United Methodist Church. Twenty-six eighth-graders were honored as Outstanding Young Citizens. Selected by their principals and teachers, the students were recognized for their qualities of leadership and moral strength. Dennis Johnson, principal of Hillcrest Training School, was the guest speaker for the evening. Students honored were: » Luke Doerger and Margo Waters from St. Aloysius Gonzaga; » Nolan Keller and Cailyn Brock from St. Catharine of Siena; » Mia Griffin, Noah Gray, Brady Hesse and Carly Miller from Bridgetown Middle School; » Kaeli Smith and Luis Mejia-Escobar from Cheviot Elementary School; » Rolando Mendez and Therese Geralds from Westwood Elementary; » Conner Bergen, Ashley Hawk, Andy James and Lauren Tepe from Our Lady of Lourdes; » Brittany Daughtery and Nick Weber from St. Martin of Tours; and » Spencer Carroll, David Guck, Luke Haffner, Rosie Nienaber, Grace Schuer-

mann, Lauren Tebbe, Jared Thiemann and Claire Zernich from St. Ignatius Loyola. The Outstanding Young Citizen’s Banquet was started in 1964 at the suggestion of Lou Kroner Jr. as an opportunity to showcase the students who will be exceptional citizens of the future. This event, along with many other programs and endeavors, has been initiated by the CWCA in hopes of making a worthwhile contribution to the community. In 2005 the CWCA partnered with the Thomas J. Rebold Foundation for Youth Performing Arts. Together the organizations awarded $14,000 to area schools in support of performing arts last year. Additionally, every school’s library receives a $100 donation in the name of each student recognized. This year, the CWCA board surprised their president Ray Kroner, by announcing that the donations given to each schools’ library has been named The Lou Kroner Library Memorial Fund, in honor of Ray’s father who died in March. Over 40 local businesses and individuals sponsored the students this year. For more details about the Cheviot Westwood Community Association or to become a member visit www.cwca.info or contact Ray Kroner at 513-661-1400.

At the banquet from St. Ignatius, from left, Spencer Carroll, Luke Haffner, Grace Schuerman, Rosie Nienaber, Claire Zernich, Lauren Tebber and Jared Thiemann. THANKS TO JENNY KRONER JACKSON.

Dennis Johnson, principal at Hillcrest Training School, was the guest speaker at the Outstanding Young Citizens Banquet. THANKS TO JENNY KRONER JACKSON.

Mindy Sweeny, co-owner of Sweeney's Cone Zone and CWCA vice president, and Kathy Taylor of the Cheviot Library and CWCA secretary, award Kaeli Smith of Cheviot Elementary School at the 48th Annual Outstanding Young Citizens Banquet. THANKS TO JENNY KRONER JACKSON.

Attendees and honorees of the Outstanding Young Citizens Banquet listen to guest speaker Dennis Johnson, principal at Hillcrest Training School. THANKS TO JENNY KRONER

Ray Kroner, Cheviot-Westwood Community Association president, addresses the crowd at the 48th annual Outstanding Young Citizens Banquet. THANKS TO JENNY KRONER JACKSON.

JACKSON.


B2 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • MAY 30, 2012

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD THURSDAY, MAY 31 Exercise Classes Spintensity, 5:45-6:45 p.m., Western Sports Mall, 2323 Ferguson Road, Cycling combined with boot camp and strength training moves. Ages 14 and up. Family friendly. $8.50$10 per class. Presented by SpinFit LLC. 451-4905; www.spinfitcincinnati.com. Westwood. Gentle Beginners Ashtanga Vinyasa Flow Yoga, 7-8 p.m., EarthConnection, 370 Neeb Road, Gentle progression of postures to ease into a fulfilling Ashtanga practice. Each class engaging in a flow of asanas, creating a moving meditation of energy and heat. Family friendly. $7 drop-in, $30 for five-class pass, $49 for 10-class pass, $85 for 20-class pass. Presented by Yoga by Marietta. 675-2725; www.yogabymarietta.com. Delhi Township. Boot Camp, 7-8 p.m., Western Sports Mall, 2323 Ferguson Road, Combination of strength training and conditioning that will help you improve strength, lower body fat, improve body composition and improve aerobic and anaerobic capacity. $10. 451-4905. Westwood.

Recreation Thursday Night Lightz, 7 p.m.-12:30 a.m., Edgewater Sports Park, 4819 E. Miami River Road, Heads-up car and motorcycle drag racing, burnout competition, music, food and $1 beers. Gates open 6 p.m. $5 off at participating sponsors. $10; $15 to race, requirements available online. Presented by Thursday Night Lightz. 874-2508; www.facebook.com/ThursdayNightLightz. Cleves.

Senior Citizens Movement Class for Seniors, 11 a.m.-noon, Guenthner Physical Therapy, 5557 Cheviot Road, $6, first class free. 923-1700; www.guenthnerpt.com. Monfort Heights. Exercise to Music, 10-11 a.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, $1. 385-3780. Green Township. Open Bridge, 12:15-3:15 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Free. 385-3780. Green Township.

FRIDAY, JUNE 1 Benefits Lost Limbs Foundation Charity Event, 6 p.m.-1:30 a.m., The Sedamsville Rectory, 639 Steiner Ave., With special guest Ben Hansen from SyFy channel’s “Fact or Faked: Paranormal Files.” Benefits Lost Limbs Foundation. $20-$100. Presented by Lost Limbs Foundation. 384-9793; www.lostlimbsfoundation.org. Sedamsville.

Exercise Classes Tone and Strength, 9-10 a.m., Western Sports Mall, 2323 Ferguson Road, Combination of upper body, lower body and core strengthening exercises mixed in with light conditioning and stretching. $10. 451-4905. Westwood.

Farmers Market Lettuce Eat Well Farmers Market, 3-7 p.m., Harvest Home Park, 3961 North Bend Road, Locally produced food items. Free. Presented by Lettuce Eat Well. 661-1792; www.lewfm.org. Cheviot.

Festivals St. Jude Bridgetown Festival, 7 p.m.-midnight, St. Jude Church, 5924 Bridgetown Road, Rides, games, bid-n-buy and more. Friday: music by DJ Jeff Smith. Free. 574-1230. Bridgetown.

Music - Pop Saffire Express, 9 p.m.-1:30 a.m., Jim & Jack’s on the River, 3456 River Road, $5. 251-7977; www.jimandjacks.net. Riverside.

Senior Citizens Pinochle, Noon-4 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, 385-3780. Green Township. Arthritis Exercise, Noon-12:45 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Workout to videos geared to help lessen arthritis symptoms. For seniors. Free. 385-3780. Green Township. Taking Off Pounds Sensibly, 10-11 a.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road,

Chuck Brisbin & the Tuna Project will perform beginning at 9 p.m. Saturday, June 2, at Poppy’s Tavern, 5510 Rybolt Road. For more information, call 574-6333. FILE PHOTO

Weight loss support and accountability. For seniors. $28 annual fee. 385-3780. Green Township.

SATURDAY, JUNE 2 Benefits Lost Limbs Foundation Charity Event, 6 p.m.-1:30 a.m., The Sedamsville Rectory, $20-$100. 384-9793; www.lostlimbsfoundation.org. Sedamsville.

Civic Yard Trimmings Drop-off, 11:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Kuliga Park, 6717 Bridgetown Road, Hamilton County residents may drop off yard trimmings. Free to all Hamilton County Residents. Bring proof of residency. Landscapers and commercial establishments not eligible to participate. Free. Presented by Hamilton County Recycling and Solid Waste District. 946-7766; www.hamiltoncountyrecycles.org. Green Township.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 6 To submit calendar items, go to www.cincinnati.com and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to life@communitypress.com along with event information. Items are printed on a spaceavailable basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to www.cincinnati.com and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page.

friendly. $7 walk-in; $120 for 10 classes. 923-1700; www.guenthnerpt.com. Monfort Heights. Zumba, 10-11 a.m., Western Sports Mall, 2323 Ferguson Road, Latin dance-inspired fitness program combines dance and aerobic elements to create fun and challenging workout. $10. 451-4905. Westwood.

Festivals St. Jude Bridgetown Festival, 4-10 p.m., St. Jude Church, Sunday: Family Day. Free. 5741230. Bridgetown.

Recreation

Gentle Beginners Ashtanga Vinyasa Flow Yoga, 10-11 a.m., EarthConnection, $7 drop-in, $30 for five-class pass, $49 for 10-class pass, $85 for 20-class pass. 675-2725; www.yogabymarietta.com. Delhi Township. Vinyasa Flow Yoga for Fitness, 9-10 a.m., Western Sports Mall, 2323 Ferguson Road, Practice ancient styles and modern mix of vinyasa flows, with integrated music. $10, free for members. 451-4900. Westwood. Boot Camp, 9-10 a.m., Western Sports Mall, $10. 451-4905. Westwood.

Open House, 2-7 p.m., Delhi Swim Club, 202 Felicia Drive, New memberships available. Free. 471-1800; www.delhiswim.com. Delhi Township.

St. Jude Bridgetown Festival, 6 p.m.-midnight, St. Jude Church, Saturday: music by My Sister Sarah. Free. 574-1230. Bridgetown.

Music - Blues Chuck Brisbin & the Tuna Project, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Poppy’s Tavern, 5510 Rybolt Road, Free. Through July 28. 574-6333. Green Township.

SUNDAY, JUNE 3 Auditions Snoopy: The Musical, 2-5 p.m., Glenmore Playhouse, 3716 Glenmore Ave., Characters: Snoopy, Charlie Brown, Linus, Lucy, Sally, Peppermint Patty and Woodstock (silent). Bring head shot and resume. Prepare 16-32 bars of song in style of show. Performance dates: Oct. 5-21. Family friendly. Free. Presented by The Drama Workshop. 470-5516; www.thedramaworkshop.org. Cheviot.

Civic Yard Trimmings Drop-off, 11:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Kuliga Park, Free. 946-7766; www.hamiltoncountyrecycles.org. Green Township.

Education Historic 1795 Cabin and Schoolhouse, 2-5 p.m., Shawnee Lookout Park, 2008 Lawrenceburg Road, Free, vehicle permit required. Presented by Hamilton County Park District. 521-7275; www.greatparks.org. North Bend.

Exercise Classes Yoga, 4-5 p.m., Guenthner Physical Therapy, 5557 Cheviot Road, Strengthen, stretch and tone with gentle postures that release tension rand support the integrity of the spine. Family

Exercise Classes

ABOUT CALENDAR

Exercise Classes

Festivals

Green Township Senior Center, $1. 385-3780. Green Township. Ceramics, 11:30 a.m.-3 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, 385-3780. Green Township. Stability Ball, 9:30-10 a.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Bring your own stability ball and work on strengthening your core. For seniors. 385-3780. Green Township. Euchre, 12:30-3:30 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Open game. For seniors. 385-3780. Green Township. Pattern Dancing, 1-2:30 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Learn line dancing and have fun while exercising. For seniors. Free. 385-3780. Green Township. Billiards, 1:30-3:30 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Free. 385-3780. Green Township.

Senior Citizens Over 55 Dance, 2-5 p.m., Delhi Senior and Community Center, 647 Neeb Road, Non-members welcome. Music by Nelson. $5. Presented by Delhi Seniors. 451-3560. Delhi Township.

MONDAY, JUNE 4 Auditions Snoopy: The Musical, 7-9:30 p.m., Glenmore Playhouse, Free. 470-5516; www.thedramaworkshop.org. Cheviot.

Exercise Classes Yoga for Rookies: An Introduction, 5:45-6:45 p.m., EarthConnection, 370 Neeb Road, For participants who have never tried yoga. Class introduces each practitioner to a progression of Pranayama (breathing techniques), focus of Gaze and Asanas (postures) leading to a unique practice for each participant. Family friendly. $7 drop-in, $30 for five-class pass, $49 for 10-class pass, $85 for 20-class pass. Presented by Yoga by Marietta. 675-2725; www.yogabymarietta.com. Delhi Township. Zumba, 5:30-6:30 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Wear comfortable workout attire and gym shoes. Bring water. $5. Presented by Deb’s Fitness Party. 205-5064; www.debsfitnessparty.com. Green Township. Total Joint Class, 1:30-2:30 p.m., Guenthner Physical Therapy, 5557 Cheviot Road, Designed for people who have finished physical therapy after joint replacement surgery but are looking to improve upon the progress they’ve made leading to a better quality of life. Family friendly. $7 walk-in; $90 for 15 classes. 923-1700; www.guenthnerpt.com. Monfort Heights. Tone and Strength, 9-10 a.m. and 6-7 p.m., Western Sports Mall, $10. 451-4905. Westwood.

oakgardencenter.com. Monfort Heights.

Senior Citizens Pinochle, Noon-4 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3853780. Green Township.

Summer Camp - YMCA Traditional Day Camps, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., Gamble-Nippert YMCA, 3159 Montana Ave., Ages 6-12. Monday-Friday. $130 per week for YMCA member, $160 per week for non-member. 661-1105. Westwood.

TUESDAY, JUNE 5 Exercise Classes Spinning, 5:45-6:45 p.m., Western Sports Mall, 2323 Ferguson Road, Cycling class. First class free. Ages 14 and up. Family friendly. $8.50-$10 per class. Presented by SpinFit LLC. 4514905; www.spinfitcincinnati.com. Westwood. Pilates Mat Class, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Guenthner Physical Therapy, 5557 Cheviot Road, Taught by Judy Fazel. Family friendly. $15 drop-in; $120 for 10 classes. 923-1700; www.guenthnerpt.com. Monfort Heights. Body Sculpt, 6-7 p.m., Western Sports Mall, 2323 Ferguson Road, Divided into 15 minutes of cardio, 15 minutes of upper body toning, 15 minutes of core/ab toning and 15 minutes of leg toning. $10. 451-4905; westernsportmall.com. Westwood. Boot Camp, 6-7 a.m., Western Sports Mall, $10. 451-4905. Westwood. TRX training, 7-8 p.m., Western Sports Mall, 2323 Ferguson Road, Consists of body-weight exercises to develop strength, balance, flexibility and core stability. $10. 451-4905. Westwood.

Farmers Market Sayler Park Farmers Market, 4-7 p.m., Sayler Park, Parkland Avenue and Monitor Street, Farmers Market with homegrown items like fruits, vegetables, desserts, salsas, relishes, jam and olive oil. Presented by Sayler Park Village Council. 675-0496. Sayler Park.

Health / Wellness Lunch and Learn, Noon-1 p.m., Guenthner Physical Therapy, 5557 Cheviot Road, Learn about topics on improving your health and wellness. Free. 923-1700; www.guenthnerpt.com. Monfort Heights.

On Stage - Comedy Comedy Show, 8-9:30 p.m., Zen and Now Coffee House, 4453 Bridgetown Road, Open mic comedy night. Free. 598-8999. Cheviot.

Home & Garden

Senior Citizens

Gardening Seminar: In Living Color, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Monfort Heights Branch Library, 3825 West Fork Road, Using the bright and beautiful to create your best garden ever. Free. Presented by White Oak Garden Center. 385-3313; www.white-

Quilting, 9:30-11:30 a.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Make blankets to donate to Project Linus and Children’s Hospital. For seniors. Through Dec. 18. 385-3780. Green Township. Exercise to Music, 10-11 a.m.,

Women and Weights, 6-7 p.m., Western Sports Mall, 2323 Ferguson Road, Program specifically designed for women. Maintain bone density, increase metabolism and discover health benefits of weight training. Family friendly. $7.50-$10. Presented by SpinFit LLC. 4514905; www.spinfitcincinnati.com. Westwood. Power and Pump, 5:15-6 p.m., Western Sports Mall, 2323 Ferguson Road, Simple, yet challenging cardiovascular and strength training exercises combined for total body workout. Family friendly. $7.50-$10. Presented by SpinFit LLC. 4514905; www.spinfitcincinnati.com. Westwood. Ashtanga Vinyasa Flow Yoga Classes, 5:30-6:45 p.m., EarthConnection, 370 Neeb Road, Sequence of postures to increase strength, flexibility and allow release of stress. Family friendly. $7 drop-in, $30 for five-class pass, $49 for 10-class pass, $85 for 20-class pass. Presented by Yoga by Marietta. 675-2725; www.yogabymarietta.com. Delhi Township. Yoga for the Back, 7-8 p.m., EarthConnection, 370 Neeb Road, Students use breath and movement to lengthen and strengthen the back muscles. Family friendly. $7 drop-in, $30 for five-class pass, $49 for 10class pass, $85 for 20-class pass. Presented by Yoga by Marietta. 675-2725; www.yogabymarietta.com. Delhi Township. Abs Express, 7-7:20 p.m., Western Sports Mall, 2323 Ferguson Road, Racquetball Center. Work core like never before in quick class that will hit entire abdominal area. Free. Presented by SpinFit LLC. 451-4905; www.spinfitcincinnati.com. Westwood.

EarthConnection, $7 drop-in, $30 for five-class pass, $49 for 10-class pass, $85 for 20-class pass. 675-2725; www.yogabymarietta.com. Delhi Township. Boot Camp, 7-8 p.m., Western Sports Mall, $10. 451-4905. Westwood.

Recreation Thursday Night Lightz, 7 p.m.-12:30 a.m., Edgewater Sports Park, $10; $15 to race, requirements available online. 874-2508; www.facebook.com/ ThursdayNightLightz. Cleves.

Senior Citizens Exercise to Music, 10-11 a.m., Green Township Senior Center, $1. 385-3780. Green Township. Open Bridge, 12:15-3:15 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, Free. 385-3780. Green Township.

FRIDAY, JUNE 8 Exercise Classes Tone and Strength, 9-10 a.m., Western Sports Mall, $10. 4514905. Westwood.

Farmers Market Lettuce Eat Well Farmers Market, 3-7 p.m., Harvest Home Park, Free. 661-1792; www.lewfm.org. Cheviot.

Festivals St. Bernard Summer Festival, 6 p.m.-1 a.m., St. Bernard of Clairvaux Church, Taylor Creek, 7130 Harrison Ave., Music by The Menus. Rides, games and chance to win up to $25,000. Alcohol with ID. Free parking and shuttle. 353-4207; www.bernardfest.com. Colerain Township.

Senior Citizens Pinochle, Noon-4 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3853780. Green Township. Arthritis Exercise, Noon-12:45 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, Free. 385-3780. Green Township. Taking Off Pounds Sensibly, 10-11 a.m., Green Township Senior Center, $28 annual fee. 385-3780. Green Township.

SATURDAY, JUNE 9 Civic Yard Trimmings Drop-off, 11:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Kuliga Park, Free. 946-7766; www.hamiltoncountyrecycles.org. Green Township.

Exercise Classes Gentle Beginners Ashtanga Vinyasa Flow Yoga, 10-11 a.m., EarthConnection, $7 drop-in, $30 for five-class pass, $49 for 10-class pass, $85 for 20-class pass. 675-2725; www.yogabymarietta.com. Delhi Township. Vinyasa Flow Yoga for Fitness, 9-10 a.m., Western Sports Mall, $10, free for members. 451-4900. Westwood. Boot Camp, 9-10 a.m., Western Sports Mall, $10. 451-4905. Westwood.

Senior Citizens

Festivals

Pinochle, Noon-4 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3853780. Green Township. Vintage Artist, 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Place for artists to paint together. Beginners welcome. Bring own supplies. For seniors. Free. 385-3780. Green Township. Knitting and Crocheting, 10-11:30 a.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Knit or crochet blankets for Project Linus. Yarn provided. For seniors. Free. 385-3780. Green Township. Wood Carving, 1-3 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Carve with Greenwood Chippers. Many different techniques used: relief carvings, scroll saw, figurines. Bring own tools. For seniors. Free. 3853780. Green Township. Wii Bowling, 2-3:30 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Free. 385-3780. Green Township. Zumba Gold, 1-2 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Modified Zumba for seniors with standing and chair participation. For seniors. $3, $25 for 10 classes. 205-5064; www.debsfitnessparty.com. Green Township.

St. Bernard Summer Festival, 5 p.m.-midnight, St. Bernard of Clairvaux Church, Taylor Creek, Music by the Renegades. 3534207; www.bernardfest.com. Colerain Township.

THURSDAY, JUNE 7 Exercise Classes Spintensity, 5:45-6:45 p.m., Western Sports Mall, $8.50-$10 per class. 451-4905; www.spinfitcincinnati.com. Westwood. Gentle Beginners Ashtanga Vinyasa Flow Yoga, 7-8 p.m.,

Runs/Walks Price Hill Pacer 5K, 7:30 a.m.noon, Elder High School Schaeper Center, 4005 Glenway Ave., Includes warm-up and cooldown exercises from Mercy Health HealthPlex, refreshments, goodie bag, before and after-race party with Steve Mann from Rewind 94.9, the new Hart Pharmacy one-mile course and Kid’s Fund Run in the Pit. Benefits Santa Maria Community Services and Price Hill Will. Family friendly. $20, $15 students, groups (5-10 people) $15 per person; $15, $10 students, groups (5-10 people) $10 per person advance. Registration required. 557-2730, ext. 408; www.pricehillpacer.org. West Price Hill.

SUNDAY, JUNE 10 Civic Yard Trimmings Drop-off, 11:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Kuliga Park, Free. 946-7766; www.hamiltoncountyrecycles.org. Green Township.

Education Historic 1795 Cabin and Schoolhouse, 2-5 p.m., Shawnee Lookout Park, Free, vehicle permit required. 521-7275; www.greatparks.org. North Bend.


LIFE

MAY 30, 2012 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • B3

Flavorful fish tacos: That’s the rub

I can’t tell you how many recipes I’ve had over the years for fish tacos. Some were comRita plicated, Heikenfeld some were RITA’S KITCHEN easy and most were pretty good since I have always used a homemade spice rub. Today I was in a time crunch so I used a Southwestern blend from Colonel De Gourmet Herbs & Spices at Findlay Market instead of making my own rub. It was so good that I decided to leave the fish whole and serve it as an entree instead of as a taco. The time saved from making my own rub was happily spent in the garden, pulling weeds from the rows of Swiss chard and red onions.

Master recipe for Tex-Mex fish and tacos Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Fish 2 pounds firm white fish (I used halibut) Olive oil

Brush fish on both sides with olive oil. Sprinkle on both sides with seasoning. Roast 8-10 minutes depending upon thickness of fish, until it flakes with a fork. Don’t overcook. While fish is roasting, make sauce. To serve fish as an entree: Leave whole and serve sauce alongside or drizzled on top. I served mine with a side of potatoes. To make tacos: 8 tortillas (corn or flour), warmed 1 small head Napa cabbage, shredded or favorite greens, shredded

Break cooked fish into pieces and divide among tortillas. Top with cabbage and taco sauce. Serve with avocado wedges. Cathy’s cilantro scallion creamy sauce Cathy, an Eastern Hills Journal reader, gave me this recipe after I finished teaching a class on easy seafood entrees. “This is delicious on top of fish tacos,” she said. I used cilantro from the herb garden. You can also top the tacos with salsa, guacamole or pico de gallo sauce, if you want.

Rita's recipe for Southwestern-seasoned fish can be used by itself or as a component in fish tacos. THANKS TO RITA HEIKENFELD. Stir together: ¼ cup thinly sliced scallions/green onions Chopped cilantro to taste: start with 1⁄3 cup 3 tablespoons each sour cream and mayonnaise Grated rind from 1 lime Lime juice to taste: start with a scant 2 teaspoons and go from there 1 nice-sized clove garlic, minced Salt and pepper to taste Diced tomatoes (optional) Avocado slices to serve alongside (optional)

Boston brown bread

/$3 8;$:;#;"%

FOOD • Popcorn • Nachos • LaRosa’s • Roasted Corn

PROVIDED.

June 1, 6, 7 and 8: Rock on in and enjoy board games or video games, food and music (courtesy of the Friends of the Public Library and the Anderson Township Library Association) at: » Friday, June 1, 6 p.m. at Miami Township Branch

Summ

10,000 MAJOR AWARD

Major Award Drawing: Sunday, June 10 • 9 pm

• Hamburgers • Fries & More! Chicken Dinner 5 - 7 pm

Ga me s

Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educator and author. Email her at columns@communitypress.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Call 513-248-7130, ext. 356.

v i a t l s e F er (";7

Saturday: 5:30 - Midnight

$

Sunday Library » Friday, June 1, 6:30 p.m. at Green Township Branch Library » Friday, June 8, 6:30 p.m. at Main Library, TeenSpot Find information at www.CincinnatiLibrary.org/SummerRead/.

Butter 1½ cups brown-bread flour (see note) 1 teaspoon baking soda ½ teaspoon salt 1 ⁄3 cup dark molasses 1 cup whole milk ½ cup raisins, currants, dried cherries, cranberries, apricots or your favorite dried fruit

)-+2012

Friday: 6:00 - 11:00 pm

Preschoolers Ridley and Lennox Ludeman of Delhi Township are ready to rock and read at the public library.

with fresh diced strawberries and sweeten with confectioners sugar, or blend softened cream cheese with drained, crushed pineapple. You can also simply stir strawberry jam into softened cream cheese.

I hope this is close to what Northern Kentucky reader John Meier is looking for. It’s adapted from a recipe by Jasper White, the famous New England cook. John loved Busken Bakery’s brown bread served in their downtown location. John enjoyed it with cream cheese and strawberries. Cooks Illustrated also has a wonderful recipe for Boston brown bread, which is a bit too long to include here. Check out their site for the recipe. To make strawberry (or pineapple) cream cheese, mix softened cream cheese

Library kicks offs ‘rockin’ summer reading program Summer reading kicks off at the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County with Kickoff Parties That Rock: June 2 at many branches. Kickoffs for Kids & Families: June 2: Children and their families are invited to have a rockin’ good time at five Summer Reading kickoff parties on Saturday, June 2 at 2 p.m. Rock ’n read with popular musical performers while decorating a book bag (courtesy of Friends of the Public Library and Anderson Township Library Association). Also, enjoy refreshments (courtesy of United Dairy Farmers and Costco Wholesale) at the following locations: » Delhi Township Branch – with David Kisor Kickoffs Just for Teens:

Preheat oven to 325 degrees. Generously butter a 1-pound coffee can. Combine flour, baking soda and salt. Stir in molasses and milk. Fold in fruit. Fill coffee can with batter. It should come up only about two-thirds of the way. Cover top with foil and tie with string to make airtight. Place in a deep baking pan, put pan in oven and fill pan with boiling water halfway up the side of coffee can. Steam for two hours, checking water level after one hour. Add more boiling water if needed. Check by sticking a skewer into the bread; it will come out clean when done. Remove string and foil and allow to cool one hour before unmolding. Note: Brown bread flour is a specialty New England flour and can be hard to find. Make your own by combining equal amounts of whole wheat flour, rye flour and cornmeal. Store in freezer.

Southwestern seasoning

++& * +' 8, +) 9, 10

Sunday: 4:00 - 10:00 pm

BID ‘N BUY BANDS Exciting Bid ‘n Buy items to run Friday, Saturday and all weekend!

• Friday: Brooks & Roe • Saturday: The Sullivan & Janszen Band • Sunday: D.J. Brian Hellmann

Fabulous raffle items to run all weekend!

back by popular demand

RIDES

Sunday Ride Special All you can ride 4 - 7 pm $15

St. Antoninus

is proud to present

The Farm’s Famous

Fried Chicken Dinnerr on Sunday June 10th

CE-0000510098

A door has been opened.

For a limited time, 2 Bedroom Cottages in The Village at Bayley are available for priority occupancy with no waiting list. In The Village, all your maintenance is taken care of — from landscaping and gardening to repairs and trash removal. Convenience and family values are a way of life — with daily Mass as well as regularly scheduled non-denominational services. You can trust that Bayley is committed to meeting the needs of adults — today and tomorrow. Visit our Open House • June 2, 1-3 pm

513.347.5520 | bayleylife.org CE-0000511687


LIFE

B4 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • MAY 30, 2012

Izaak Walton hosts Kids Fishing Day Seventh annual event is free and open to children 16 and younger

By Jennie Key

The Mount Healthy Chapter of the Izaak Walton League in Colerain Township plans its sev-

jkey@communitypress.com

Hook 'me young.

SOUTHERN BAPTIST

UNITED METHODIST

DELHI HILLS BAPTIST CHURCH

NORTH BEND UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

“Come Hear The Story of Jesus” 5421 Foley Rd. • 513-922-8363 Rev. Bob Overberg Sunday School..................................10:00a.m. Sunday Morning Worship ..................11:00a.m. Sunday Evening ..................................6:00p.m. Wednesday Evening Bible Study .........6:00p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF DENT 6384 Harrison Ave. - 574-6411 Bible Study ........................... 9:30am Sunday Worship ................. 10:30am Wed. Youth Service .............. 7:00pm Wed.Pray Sevice .................. 7:00pm

“Reflecting Christ...the Light of the World”

123 Symmes Ave. North Bend, OH 45202 One block off Route 50, Phone 941-3061 Small, friendly, casual, blended music, Bible based messages that connect with real life. Sunday School 9:30am Worship 10:30am

SHILOH UNITED METHODIST

Anderson Ferry & Foley Roads 513-451-3600 www.shilohumc.com 9:30 a.m. Traditional Worship and Sunday School 11:00 a.m. Praise Celebration and Junior Church nursery provided for both services

&(#"))"%)!'"$#)"

Liberty Missionary Baptist Church "Where Everybody is Somebody" 1009 Overlook Ave. 513-921-2502 Rev. Kendell Hopper Sunday School 10:00 am Sunday Morning Worship-11:00 am Sunday Evening 6:00 pm Wednesday Bible Study - 7:00 pm

PRESBYTERIAN OAK HILLS PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 6233 Werk Rd. (Enter off Werkridge) 922-5448 Rev. Jerry Hill 10:00 a.m Worship & Sunday School Nursery Care Avail.

Come and worship in a small casual church that emphasizes the fellowship and mission in the community and globally. www.oakhillspc.com

UNITED METHODIST

CHEVIOT UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 3820 Westwood-Northern Blvd. Craig D. Jones, Senior Pastor Lois Schalk-Hartley, Associate Pastor

9:20 a.m. Traditional Worship 10:20 a.m. Sunday School for All Ages 11:20 a.m Contemporary Worship Service 662-2048 www.cheviotumc.org

UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST St. Peter & St. Paul United Church of Christ

3001 Queen City Ave. 513-661-3745 Rev. Martin Westermeyer, Pastor Bible Study: 9am Worship & Church School: 10am Dial-A-Devotion 426-8957 www.stpeterandstpaulucc.org

Catching fish usually brings pride to the face of the fisherman. The Mount Healthy chapter Izaak Walton League’s seventh annual Kids Fishing Day is June 2. FILE PHOTO. enth annual Kids Fishing Day, designed to introduce youngsters to the joys of fishing on Saturday, June 2, at 3504 Bevis Lane. David Rivers, the chapter’s recording secretary and coordinator for the Kids Fishing Day program, says the event will be from 8:30 a.m. to around 1 p.m. Youngsters will fish from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m., followed by lunch, and an awards ceremony where prizes will be given. Rivers says the league will have some basic fishing gear on hand for youngsters who don’t have their own. A representative

We Service All Makes and Models!

from the Ohio Division of Wildlife will talk to the youngsters about catch and release fishing, which the Izaak Walton League promotes. The youngest fisherman registered so far is 1 years old. Rivers said youngsters must be supervised by an adult. Fishing will be in the pond at the Mount Healthy Chapter of the Izaak Walton League on Bevis Lane. Rivers said the lake contains predominantly blue gills. Rivers said the event will teach basics of fishing and talk about common sense behavior in natural settings. “We are hopefully going to lay out some guidelines here,” he said. “We will put a pole in their hands and get them started right.” Rivers says he has been

fishing since age 10 or 12. He says it’s fun, relaxing and a great way to spend time with friends or by yourself. He says fishing with youngsters is especially good. “There is nothing like the expression on a kid’s face when he catches his first fish,” River said. The event is free, and bait and lunch will be provided. Space is limited, so call to register at 513-2578595. If it rains and you not sure if the event will be canceled, you can call the registration number for that information. “We have a number of categories, and our prizes include some fishing tackle and other fishing items,” River said. “We are just hoping the kids will come and find out how much fun they can have fishing.”

Located at Walt Sweeney Ford • (513) 347-4958

OIL & FILTER CHANGE

+

MULTI-POINT INSPECTION

24

$

95 See Advisor for Details

Oil Change + Multi-Point Inspection No Appointment Needed

Purchase 5 Oil Changes, Get The 6th One Free (see store for details) Retail purchases only. Up to five quarts of Motorcraft® semi-synthetic premium blend oil & Motorcraft® oil filter. Taxes, diesel vehicles & disposal fees extra. Offer valid with coupon. See Quick Lane® Manager for vehicle exclusions & details. Expires 6/30/12

12

MONTHS SEE OUR FOR TO UP NO INTEREST FULL SERVICE TO PAY YOUR BODYSHOP DEDUCTIBLE COLLISION CENTER OR SERVICE REPAIRS

N E E D B R A K ES ? ? Receive up to

50

$

IN GIFT CARDS

with any complete brake replacement Not valid with any other offer. $25 gift card per axle for brake pad replacement with machining or replacement of rotors/drums. Gift card is one time use on future repairs/services. Taxes, shop supplies extra. See advisor for details. Expires 6/30/12.

Quick Lane

Tire & Auto Center

(513) 347-4958

Located at Walt Sweeney Ford 5400 Glenway Ave., Cinti., OH 45238

Mon-Thu 7:30 am - 7:30 pm Friday 7:30 am - 6:00 pm Saturday 7:30 am - 3:00 pm

The Quick Lane Located At Walt Sweeney Ford Will Save You Money!!!

LEGAL NOTICE NUISANCE VIOLATION 498 LOBOB COURT Notice is hereby given to U.S. Bank National Association that property you own in Delhi Township contains excessive vegetation. The Delhi Township Board of Trustees has determined, at Resolution #2012-055, that the condition of the property constitutes a nuisance and is detrimental to the health, safety and general welfare of all persons who live, work or own property within Delhi Township. This notice shall serve as a formal order for you to address the nuisance violations at your property located at 498 Lobob Court (also known as Parcel 540-00100199 of the Hamilton County Auditor’s Tax Plats), Delhi Township, Hamilton County, State of Ohio as described below: •Cut all excessive vegetation, remove clippings there from, and maintain such at a height not to exceed 12" (All yards). If such excessive vegetation is not cut and removed or provision for such cutting and removal is not made within seven (7) days of publishing/posting of this notice, or a hearing before the Board of Trustees is not requested as specified below, the Board will provide for the cutting and removal, and any expenses incurred by the Board in performing such tasks will be entered upon the tax duplicate and will be a lien upon the properties from the date of entry. You have the right to request a hearing before the Board of Trustees within seven (7) days of publishing/posting of this notice. If requested, the hearing will be held at the next regularly scheduled meeting of the Board. The Boards’ meetings are held on the second and last Wednesdays of each month commencing at 6:00 p.m. at 934 Neeb Road, Cincinnati, Ohio 45233. At the hearing, you may appear in person or by counsel, may present evidence and examine witnesses. If a hearing is timely requested, action to abate the nuisance conditions will be stayed pending the hearing and further decision of the Board. Your request for a hearing before the Board may be submitted in writing to: Thomas R. Stahlheber, Zoning Inspector, Delhi Township Department of Development Services, 697 Neeb Road, Cincinnati, Ohio 45233. order this concerning questions Any should be directed to Mr. Stahlheber at the above described address or at 513-9222705. 1707381

REAL ESTATE Delhi Township

6531 Candlestick Drive: Roell Builders LLC to Gates, Mark and Christine; $280,000. 5035 Dellers Glen Drive: Fischer, Richard J. Tr. to Twilling, Thomas L. and Teresa M.; $154,000. 317 Don Lane: Railey, Bart C. and Kimberly A. Kathman to Tojo, Michael J. and Merea J.; $124,500. Fox Trails Way: Roell Builders LLC to Walpole, Todd E. and Brittany L.; $30,000. 766 Gilcrest Lane: CPA1Holdings LLC to ATP LLC; $50,000. 559 Greenwell Ave.: Webber, Rich to Vance, Tara; $68,500. 201 Jupiter Drive: Holtmeier, David G. to Harris, Kayla S.; $113,500. 5153 Kincardine Drive: Red Brick Properties LLC to Rogalsky, John B. and Vivian V.; $123,000. 646 Libbejo Drive: Koo, Kristan M. to Miller, John III; $67,000. 517 Morrvue Drive: Niehaus, Francis J. Tr. to Riverman, Gina; $86,000. 5309 Orangelawn Drive: Mendell, David J. to Becker, Matthew T.; $74,900. 6304 Rapid Run Road: Seitz, Howard W. to Kirby, Douglas M. and Joanna M.; $182,000. 5048 Riverwatch Drive: Behler, Maria L. and Clinton T. Kersting to Newman, Timothy; $120,000. 4281 Skylark Drive: Martin, Joyce A. to Citifinancial Inc.; $38,000. 5379 Style Lane: Endress, Katherine B. and John M. to Sroczynski, Ashley E.; $109,000. 939 Villa View Court: Guaranty Bank to Stephenson, Heather; $25,000. 456 Woodlands Ridge Drive: Brendle, Susan C. to Walsh, James J.; $199,000. 6184 Cedarbluff Court: Santen, Catherine A. Tr. to Stadtmiller, Michael and Jennifer M.; $245,000. 1297 Ebenezer Road: Haley, James L. and Mary Lou to Willig, Susan M.; $115,000. 1157 Fashion Ave.: Howard, Bryan E. and Errin L. to Kappa, Kevin M. Jr.; $107,500. 760 Ivyhill Drive: Walter, Diane S. to Remmel, Heidi; $84,900. 411 Morrvue Drive: CPIT LLC to Langley, Jennifer I.; $111,500. 885 Suncreek Court: Smith, Cledith F. to VHB Properties LLC; $26,913.

EAST PRICE HILL

2724 Bodley Ave.: Puckett, Shelby to Schutter, Russell and Marilyn; $38,000. 761 Mount Hope Ave.: JA Rentals No. 2 LLC to Timedstockpicks.Com LLC; $17,069. 411 Elberon Ave.: Infinity Ventures LLC to Marko, Robert Michael; $182,500. 3638 Glenway Ave.: Infinity Ventures LLC to Marko, Robert Michael; $182,500. 735 Grand Ave.: Cunningham, Justin and Keri to Senske, Dave; $5,000. 2680 Lehman Road: Fannie Mae to Massey, Sabreena; $38,000. 3772 Liberty St.: Infinity Ventures LLC to Marko, Robert Michael; $182,500. 916 Mount Hope Ave.: Zornes, Robbie J. to Fannie Mae; $48,000.

Gavin Strickley

Happy 2nd Birthday


LIFE

MAY 30, 2012 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • B5

Mercy to offer orthopaedic seminars Mercy Health, which provides quality care with compassion in your neighborhood, hosts free orthopaedic presentations throughout Cincinnati over the coming months. The seminar series features experts in orthopaedic care sharing information and answering questions on a variety of topics related to pain and treatment options for the head, neck, spine, shoulder, elbow, wrist, hand, knee, hip, foot and ankle. The orthopaedic series runs through the fall. The schedule of dates and topics follows below: » June 5: Dr. Brion Mo-

ran: Shoulder & Elbow Pain, 6-7 p.m., The Centennial Barn-Gubbio Room, 110 Compton Road, call 95-MERCY (513-9563729) to register » June 6: Dr. Michael Chen: Shoulder & Elbow Pain, 6-7 p.m., Mercy Health-Fairfield HealthPlex, 3050 Mack Road, call 95-MERCY (513-956-3729) to register » June 7: Dr. John Gallagher: Knee Replacement, 6-7 p.m., Mercy Health-Western Hills HealthPlex, 3131 Queen City Avenue, call 95MERCY (513-956-3729) to register » June 12: Dr. John Jac-

quemin & Dr. Larry Zeff: Spine/Back Pain, 6-7 p.m., The Centennial BarnGubbio Room, 110 Compton Road, call 95-MERCY (513-956-3729) to register » June 13: Dr. Robert Hill: Knee Injuries & Recovery, 6-7 p.m., Mercy Health-Fairfield HealthPlex, 3050 Mack Road, call 95-MERCY (513-956-3729) to register » June 14, Dr. Michael Chen: Knee Injuries & Recovery, 6-7 p.m., Mercy Health-Western Hills HealthPlex, 3131 Queen City Avenue, call 95MERCY (513-956-3729) to register » June 19: Dr. Francis

Florez: Hip Replacement, 6-7 p.m., Mercy HealthMt. Airy Hospital, 2446 Kipling Ave., call 95MERCY (513-956-3729) to register » June 20: Dr. Arthur Arand & Dr. Humam Akbik: Spine/Back Pain, 6-7 p.m., Mercy Health-Fairfield HealthPlex, 3050 Mack Road, call 95-MERCY (513-956-3729) to register » June 21: Dr. Sameh Arebi: Foot & Ankle Issues, 6-7 p.m., Mercy Health-Western Hills HealthPlex, 3131 Queen City Ave., call 95-MERCY (513-956-3729) to register » June 26: Dr. Craig

Willis: Hand & Wrist Issues, 6-7 p.m., Mercy Health - Mt. Airy Hospital, 2446 Kipling Ave., call 95-MERCY (513-956-3729) to register » June 27: Dr. Craig Willis: Hand & Wrist Issues, 6-7 p.m., Mercy Health-Fairfield HealthPlex, 3050 Mack Road, call 95-MERCY (513-956-3729) to register » June 28: Dr. Carl Rafey and Dr. Vijay Rajan: Head/Neck Pain & Chronic Migraines, 6-7 p.m., Mercy Health-Fairfield HealthPlex, 3050 Mack Road, call 95-MERCY (513-956-3729) to register » Aug. 29: Dr. Charles

Miller: Knee Arthritis and Treatment, 5:30-6:30 p.m., Mercy Health-Clermont Hospital, 3000 Hospital Road, Batavia, call 95MERCY (513-956-3729) to register » Sept. 19, Dr. Robert Rhoad: Hand/Wrist/Elbow Injuries and Treatment, 5:30-6:30 p.m., Anderson Center, 7850 Five Mile Road, Anderson Township,call 95-MERCY (513956-3729) to register The events are free but seating is limited. To reserve your seat, please call the registration number listed for the event that interests you.

Art for All is at Winton Woods

Art for All, a public art program that features 80 reproductions placed throughout Cincinnati, including six in the Hamilton County Parks is presented in celebration of the Taft Museum of Art’s 80th Anniversary. This is Charles-François Daubigny’s, Evening on the Oise, painted in 1863, which will be featured at Sharon Woods. participating locations. An interactive map will be available on the Taft’s website at www.taftmuseum.org/. Art for All is free and open to the public. A valid Hamilton County Park District Motor Vehicle Permit ($10.00 annual; $3.00 daily)

is required to enter the parks. Armleder and Fernbank Parks are cooperative ventures with the Cincinnati Park Board and a Motor Vehicle Permit is not required. For additional information, visit GreatParks.org or call 513-521-7275.

CE-0000512405

The Hamilton County Park District is part of a unique celebration from June 1 through Sept. 30. The Taft Museum of Art is celebrating 80 years of excellence with a special event called Art for All, a public art program that features 80 reproductions of works from the Taft collection placed throughout Greater Cincinnati, including six in the Hamilton County Parks, one of which will be Winton Woods. These life-size reproductions can be admired in locations such as the Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Garden, Devou Park, the Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky International Airport, and more. Maps for the art locations are available at the Taft Museum of Art, community arts centers, and at

TOLL FREE

1-855-295-3642 5815 DIXIE HWY (RT 4), FAIRFIELD

Come Experience the Jeff Wyler Cadillac Difference! A Better Way to Buy a Vehicle

JeffWylerFairfieldCadillac.com

INTRODUCING THE NEW STANDARD OF LUXURY OWNERSHIP.

Premium Care Maintenance Standard on all 2011 and newer Cadillac vehicles, Premium Care Maintenance is a fully transferable maintenance program that covers select required maintenance services during the first 4 years or 50,000 miles.[1]

Connections by OnStar Hands Free Calling capability from OnStar[3] allows you to safely make and receive calls from your Cadillac. With MyCadillac and OnStar MyLink[4] mobile apps, you can access and control your Cadillac from anywhere you have cell phone service. All Cadillac models come with 1 year of OnStar service.

Warranty Protection Cadillac Powertrain Warranty[2] is 30K miles more than Lexus and 50K more than BMW and Mercedes-Benz. The 4-year/50,000-mile[1] Bumper-To-Bumper Limited Warranty covers repairs on your entire vehicle, including parts and labor, to correct problems in materials or workmanship.

Emergency by OnStar In a crash, built-in sensors can automatically alert an OnStar[3] Advisor who is immediately connected into your Cadillac to see if you need help sent to your exact location. Other OnStar emergency services include Injury Severity Predictor and First Assist. All Cadillac models come with 1 year of OnStar service.

Diagnostics by OnStar With best-in-class diagnostics from OnStar[3], maintaining your Cadillac can be as simple as checking your email or your OnStar MyLink mobile app. Every month you can receive an email with the status of key operating systems. All Cadillac models come with 1 year of OnStar service.

Security by OnStar If you’ve reported your Cadillac stolen, OnStar[3] can use GPS technology to help authorities quickly locate and recover it. On most Cadillac models, an Advisor can send a Stolen Vehicle Slowdown® or Remote Ignition Block signal to help authorities safely recover it. All Cadillac models come with 1 year of OnStar service.

2012 Cadillac

CTS

LEASE

309

$

SPORT SEDAN

PER MONTH

CTS

COUPE

MSRP DISCOUNT

$39,725 -$2,730

36,995

$

Courtesy Transportation During the warranty coverage period, this Cadillac program provides alternate transportation and/or reimbursement of certain transportation expenses if your Cadillac requires warranty repairs.

LUXURY COLLECTION

LEASE

429 PER MONTH

$

6

39 MONTHS $995 DUE AT SIGNING NO SECURITY DEPOSIT

STOCK # 6NG626

2011 Cadillac

Roadside Assistance Among leading automotive luxury brands, Cadillac is the only brand to offer standard 5-year Roadside Assistance that provides lock-out service, a tow, fuel, Dealer Technician Roadside Service and more.

SRX

5

39 MONTHS $995 DUE AT SIGNING NO SECURITY DEPOSIT

STOCK # 6DM69

2012 Cadillac

2012 Cadillac

Navigation by OnStar Just push the OnStar[3] button and ask the Advisor to download directions to your Cadillac, and a voice will call out every turn. You can also plan routes from Google Maps™ or MapQuest.com® to your Cadillac. All Cadillac models come with 1 year of OnStar service.

CTS-V

MSRP DISCOUNT REBATE

$71,285 -$5,334 -$4,000

61,951

$

(1) Whichever comes first. See dealer for details.(2) See dealer for limited warranty details.(3) Visit onstar.com. for coverage map, details and system limitations. Services vary by model and conditions. (4) OnStar MyLink is available on 2011 and newer vehicles, excluding STS. (5) CTS closed end lease 39 months/10k per year lease $309 mo. $995 due at signing, no security deposit required with highly qualified approved credit. Total of payments $12051. (6) SRX closed end lease 39 months/10k per year lease $429 mo. $995 due at signing, no security deposit required with highly qualified approved credit. Total of payments $16731. $.30 cents per mile penalty overage. Purchase option at termination. All offers are plus tax license and fees. Not available with some other offers. See dealer for details. Vehicle / equipment may vary from photo. In stock units only, while supplies last. Expires 5/31/2012


LIFE

B6 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • MAY 30, 2012

DEATHS Whitey Armbruster

Porter. Preceded in death by son Mark “Andy” (Mary Ann) Barr, grandchild Madison Barr. Services were May 22 at the Bible Chapel of Delhi Hills. Arrangements by Dennis George Funeral Home. Memorials to: Alois Alzheimer Center, 70 Damon Road, Greenhills, OH 45218 or Bible Chapel of Delhi Hills, 705 Pontius Road, Cincinnati, OH 45233.

Howard “Whitey” Armbruster, 97, Delhi Township, died May 5. He was a custodian at Princeton High School. Survived by grandsons Dennis (Nancy), Richard Bryant; great-grandson Chandler Bryant; daughter-in-law Carol Bryant; siblings Donald, Lowell Armbruster, Alma Heemann; many nieces and nephews. Preceded in death by wife Artice Armbruster, son Chester Bryant, grandson Robert Bryant, brothers Norbert, Robert, Milton, Leroy Armbruster. Services were May 9 at Miller-Busse & Borgmann Funeral Home. Memorials to the American Cancer Society.

Laurie Beasley Aretta “Laurie” Beasley, 42, died May 18. She was a homemaker Survived by children Amber Marrs, Samantha, Zachary Reinzan; grandchildren Haidyn, Terry, Liam; father Beasley Carl; siblings Jeff (Evelyn), Doug (Toni), Leanne (Geraldo), Larry; sisterin-law Paula; companion Dennis; many nieces and nephews. Preceded in death by daughter Stephanie Reinzan, mother Rose, brother David. Arrangements by Vitt,

Lyle Barr Arlyle “Lyle” Yana Barr, 85, died May 18. She was a homemaker. She was a member of the Bible Chapel of Delhi Hills. Survived by husband William A. Barr; children Lawrence (Suzie Hurvitz) Barr, Katherine (Charles) Pape; grandchildren Caleb, Seth Porter, William W., Mason Barr; great-grandchild Gabriel

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ABOUT OBITUARIES Basic obituary information and a color photograph of your loved one is published without charge by The Community Press. Please call us at 853-6262 for a submission form. To publish a larger memorial tribute, call 242-4000 or pricing details. Stermer & Anderson Funeral Home. Memorials to: SIDS Foundation, c/o Children’s Hospital Development Center, 2800 Winslow Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45206.

Marie Bill Marie Bridewell Bill, 99, East Price Hill, died May 30. She worked for the Red River Hat Company. Survived by many nieces and nephews. Preceded in death by husband George Bill. Services were May 24 at Radel Funeral Home. Memorials to: Evercare Hospice, 9050 Centre Pointe Drive, Suite 400, Cincinnati, OH 45236.

Emma Bolino Emma Ralston Bolino, 100, died May 16. Survived by children Angela (Bill) Robb, Ralph (Maggie) Bolino; grandchildren Cara (Mark) LaRosa, Chrysa (Steven) Sallquist, Bill (Jill) Robb, Lynn (Mark) Scherer, Karen (Jon) Elliott; 10 great-grandchildren. Preceded in death by husband John Bolino. Arrangements by Radel Funeral Home. Memorials to: St. Luke’s Church, 1191 Devils Backbone Road, Cincinnati, OH 45233.

Kelley Garvey Kelley Garvey, 52, Delhi Township, died May 23. He was a boilermaker with Trinity Brighton Enterfab. Survived by children Melany, Ryan (Kelly), Jon, Sara Garvey; stepson Rob Jones; grandchildren

Roman, Nivaiya, Brycen, Rylee; siblings Mike, Tim (Marie), Pat, Kevin (Paige) Garvey, Theresa (Ray) Moon; many nieces and nephews, great-nieces and nephews. Services were May 25 at St. William. Arrangements by Vitt, Stermer & Anderson Funeral Home. Memorials to the Hemophilia Foundation or National Kidney Foundation.

Loraine Gibson Loraine Turner Gibson, 92, died May 21. Survived by children Phyllis (Terry) Duennes, Glenn (Phyllis), Wayne (Lorraine) Davis; 11 grandchildren; many greatgrandchildren. Preceded in death by sister Sudie Cunningham. Services were May 26 at Radel Funeral Home. Memorials to a charity of the donor’s choice.

Jeanie Lawrence Virginia “Jeanie” Lawrence, 96, Delhi Township, died May 20. She worked for Wurster Builders Survived by children Earlene (late Ken) Antrobus, Mary Lou (late Marlin) Hehl; grandchildren Kenny (Sue), Artie (Kelly), Marty Antrobus, Lisa (Terri) Cannon, Lisa (Mike) Ujvary, Steve (Krista), Lawrence Sean, Todd Lawrence, Joseph (Toni) Hehl; great- and great-great-grandchildren. Preceded in death by husband Earl Lawrence, son Dwayne (Sue) Lawrence, granddaughter Peggy (War-

Garvey

Arrests/citations

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Jackie Namie Peggy “Jackie” Barr Namie, Delhi Township, died May 20. She was a teacher. Survived by husband Ralph Namie; son Marc (Margaret) Namie; grandchildren Paul, Peter, Luke Namie. Arrangements by NeidhardMinges Funeral Home.

Rod O’Connor John Roderick “Rod” O’Connor, 98, died May 22. Survived by children Mary Frances (Tom) Krumm, Rita Sullivan, John Jr. (Kathy Zeller), Patrick (Marcia Glandorf), Kevin O’Connor, Anne (Daniel) Scheidler, Michele (Tim) McCarthy; grandchildren Robert, Joseph, Kenneth Krumm, Karen Stringer, Kelly Holland, Nancy Krumm Richardson, J. Patrick Sullivan, Patrick, Colin, Monica, Colleen, Alan, John III, Erin, Michael O’Connor, O'Connor Christopher, Nicholas, Timothy, Katherine Scheidler, M. Shannon Myers, Meghan Zeiser, Caitlin, Sean, Kevin McCarthy; great-grandchildren Benjamin, Jonathan, Andrew Stringer, Caroline, Connor, Henry, Sophia, Eliza Krumm, Alex and Isabella Richardson, Ryan, Avery Sullivan, Jacob Holland, Addison, Cooper Myers, Will, Katie, Maggie, Brady, Colin, Eryn, Mick, Oliver, Brennan O’Con-

Braydon Williams, born 1980, criminal damaging or endangering, 3201 Warsaw Ave., May 8. John C. Klosterman, born 1949, board of health violation, 3201 Warsaw Ave., May 8. Lateicha Clark, born 1980, assault, 721 Grand Ave., May 14. Derrick Riggs, born 1992, felonious assault, 1911 Wyoming Ave., May 14. Gerard Davidson, born 1952, criminal trespassing, 4208 Glenway Ave., May 14. Travis Mentor, born 1982, misdemeanor drug possession, 3411 Glenway Ave., May 15. Craig Bryan, born 1987, domestic violence, 1023 Winfield Ave.,

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James Edward Martini, 76, Delhi Township, died May 14. He was a tile setter. Survived by wife Jackie Martini. Services were May 22 at Our Lady of Victory. Arrangements by Radel Funeral Home.

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nor, Penelope Scheidler, Julia, Evan Zeiser; many nieces and nephews. Preceded in death by wife Mary Julia O’Connor, siblings Lawrence, Gerald, Martin O’Connor, Kathleen Kartholl. Services were May 26 at St. Antoninus. Arrangements by B.J. Meyer Sons Funeral Home. Memorials to: Wounded Warrior Project, P.O. Box 758517, Topeka, KS 66675.

Thomas Orgo Sr. Thomas Orgo Sr., 86, Delhi Township, died May 22. Survived by wife Cecelia Orgo; children Thomas (Eileen) Jr., Victor (Margaret) Orgo, CeAnn (John) Raterman; grandchildren Kelly, Jay, Missy, Kimberly, Paul, Lisa, Tommy, Jeanna, Kati; great-grandchildren Ethan, Braylin; sister Florence Orgo. PrecedOrgo ed in death by brother Victor Orgo. Services were May 26 at St. Antoninus. Arrangements by Meyer & Geiser Funeral Home. Memorials to: St. Antoninus Endowment Fund, 1500 Linneman Road, Cincinnati, OH 45238 or Hospice of Cincinnati, 4310 Cooper Road, Cincinnati, OH 45242.

Joel Robinson Joel L. Robinson, 78, West Price Hill, died May 12. He was a sheet metal fabricator for General Electric. He was an Army veteran. Survived by daughters Nancy (Jeff) Luehrmann, Annette, Susan Robinson; grandchildren Katie, Chris Luehrmann; great-grandson Owen Fisk; sister Lois Pierson. Services were May 17 at St. William. Arrangements by Radel Funeral Home. Memorials to: American Cancer Society, P.O. Box 22718, Oklahoma City, OK 73123-1718.

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May 15. Brian Briede, born 1986, possession of drug abuse instruments, tampering with evidence, 1700 Sunset Ave., May 16. Pedro Mercer, born 1993, disorderly conduct, 4441 W. Eighth St, May 16. Jermaine Barnett, born 1991, assault, 942 Grand Ave., May 17. Kenny Harvey, born 1984, aggravated burglary, 1037 Beech Ave., May 17. Kyanna Williams, born 1990, aggravated menacing, assault, 1870 Sunset Ave., May 17. Ryan Cooley, born 1983, grand theft auto, 3217 Price Ave., May 18. Michael Mann, born 1983, domestic violence, 1027 Winfield Ave., May 18. Shawn Lovelace, born 1977, disorderly conduct, 527 Elberon Ave., May 19. Janet M. Jones, born 1980, possession of drug abuse instruments, possession of drug paraphernalia, 2716 Lehman Road, May 20. Freddie J. Greer, born 1958, assault, 3201 Warsaw Ave., May 21.

Incidents/reports Aggravated menacing 3201 Warsaw Ave., May 12. 1037 Beech Ave., May 14. 1020 Purcell Ave., May 16. Aggravated robbery 5701 Lantana Ave., May 13. Assault 1350 W. North Bend Road, May 14. 7909 Bobolink Drive, May 14. 800 Grand Ave., May 14. 2700 Glenway Ave., May 16. 4441 W. Eighth St., May 16. 4728 Green Glen Lane, May 16. 3000 W. Eighth St., May 17. 942 Grand Ave., May 17. 3761 Westmont Drive, May 17. Breaking and entering 955 Purcell Ave., May 11. 156 Dahlia Ave., May 11. 3441 Warsaw Ave., May 16. 3703 Warsaw Ave., May 16. Burglary 2339 W. North Bend Road, May 11. 1687 Grand Ave., May 12. 2345 W. North Bend Road, May

See POLICE, Page B7


LIFE

MAY 30, 2012 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • B7

POLICE REPORTS

Reported on Rapid Run Road, May 15. Reported on Hawthorne Avenue, May 16. Reported on Elberon Avenue, May 18. Felonious assault 412 Considine Ave., May 12. 1911 Wyoming Ave., May 14. Menacing 3330 Warsaw Ave., May 15. Robbery 901 McPherson Ave., May 16. Theft 1234 Ridlen Ave., May 11. 156 Dahlia Ave., May 11. 4738 Glenway Ave., May 11. 5008 Rapid Run Road, May 12. 864 Academy Ave., May 12. 810 Matson Place, May 13. 4220 Glenway Ave., May 13. 4441 W. Eighth St., May 13. 1030 Academy Ave., May 14. 4018 W. Eighth St., May 14. 4725 Rapid Run Road, May 14. 3609 Warsaw Ave., May 15. 652 Hawthorne Ave., May 15. 716 Wells St., May 15. 1018 Academy Ave., May 15. 3120 Lehman Road, May 16. 3310 Lehman Road, May 16. 1037 Belvoir Lane, May 16. 1104 Maureen Lane, May 16. 3951 W. Eighth St., May 16. 4056 W. Eighth St., May 16.

Continued from Page B6 13. 1159 Coronado Ave., May 13. 1161 Liveoak Court, May 14. 979 Oakland Ave., May 15. 6264 Collegevue Place, May 16. 4725 Rapid Run Road, May 16. Criminal damaging/endangering 3114 Murdock Ave., May 11. 906 Elberon Ave., May 11. 5140 Willnet Drive, May 11. 1209 W. Galbraith Road, May 12. 1178 Atwood Ave., May 14. 1185 Groesbeck Road, May 14. 1037 Beech Ave., May 14. 6020 Budmar Ave., May 15. 3108 Price Ave., May 15. 728 Elberon Ave., May 15. 800 Woodlawn Ave., May 16. 3907 S. Clerose Circle, May 16. 4441 W. Eighth St., May 16. 4441 W. Eighth St., May 16. 712 Trenton Ave., May 17. Domestic violence Reported on St. Lawrence Avenue, May 12. Reported on Sunset Avenue, May 12.

4521 W. Eighth St., May 16. 5006 Relleum Ave., May 16. 1190 Nancy Lee Lane, May 17. 1206 Nancy Lee Lane, May 17. Vandalism 3006 W. Eighth St., May 17. Violation of a protection order/consent agreement 1159 Coronado Ave., May 13.

DELHI TOWNSHIP Arrests/citations Joyce G. Valdez, 30, 1231 Gilsey Ave., driving under suspension at 502 Pedretti Ave., May 14. Christopher Webb, 37, 47 Branchhill Drive, driving under suspension at 400 Pedretti Ave., May 14. Scott Shean, 33, 3754 Grovedale Place, driving under suspension at 5600 Cleves Warsaw, May 17. Christopher Whitt, 28, 545 Claymore Terrace, driving under suspension at 400 Greenwell Ave., May 18. Jamie D. Vollrath, 38, 587 Cutter Lane, driving under suspension at 400 Pedretti Ave., May 20. Christopher Ense, 24, 875 Beechmeadow Lane, driving under suspension at 502 Pedretti Ave., May 20. Jawanda N. Hurt, 31, 404 Elbe-

ron Ave., driving under suspension at 502 Pedretti Ave., May 20. David W. McDonald, 53, 2161 Woodmere, driving under suspension at 500 Rosemont Ave., May 20. Eric Gilbert, 27, 125 Zinn, driving under suspension at 5080 Delhi Road, May 20. Juvenile, 12, assault and theft at 4402 Glenhaven Road, May 16. David J. Mueller, 47, 207 Jupiter Drive, disorderly conduct at 207 Jupiter Drive, May 16. Juvenile, 16, obstructing official business and underage possession of alcohol at 5615 Victoryview Lane, May 18.

water townships combined). » Reduced greenhouse gas pollution equal to every household in Hamilton County not driving their car for more than three weeks. » Saved 351,249 trees from being harvested (more than one tree for every household in Hamilton County). Recycling reduces pollution so the air is cleaner, conserves natural resources, and decreases the energy needed to make new products. Recycling

also boosts the local economy by creating169,000 jobs (4.3 percent of all jobs) just in the state of Ohio. On average, each household in Hamilton County recycled 261 pounds in 2011. That’s 14.41 percent of all the waste generated. If you do not have a bin, call 946-7766 to find out how to recycle in your community. Here are materials that can be recycled: » Recyclable Materials » Plastic bottles and jugs » Aluminum and steel

15. Bowling bag, six bowling balls, bowling shoes and miscellaneous bowling tools stolen from vehicle at 5090 Riverwatch Drive, May 15. MP3 player, MP3 cable and candy stolen from vehicle at 898 Sundance Drive, May 16. Medicine stolen from vehicle at 377 Glen Oaks Drive, May 17. Victim left their backpack on the ground while riding a ride at Our Lady of Victory festival, and an MP3 player was stolen from the backpack at 808 Neeb Road, May 20.

Incidents/reports Criminal damaging Tire slashed on vehicle at 467 Pedretti Ave., May 14. Tires slashed on two vehicles at 939 Beechmeadow Lane, May 14. Criminal mischief Mustard poured on vehicle’s hood at 5292 Serenade Drive, May 19. Misuse of credit card Victim had their debit card used to make unauthorized purchases at 4954 Poinsettia Drive,

Residents recycle more than 45,000 tons in Hamilton Co. Hamilton County residents, in 2011, recycled 45,498 tons of metal, glass, plastic, and paper. Hamilton County recycled 5,613 more tons in 2011 than in 2010. Residents saved resources, conserved energy, and reduced pollution by recycling. According to the Hamilton County Department of Environmental Services, the recycling efforts in Hamilton County: Conserved enough energy to power 6,142 homes for a year (more than all the homes in Miami and White-

May 18. Victim had their credit card used to make two unauthorized purchases at 488 Greenwell Ave., May 19. Theft Wallet and contents stolen from vehicle at 513 Montview Court, May 14. Computer hardware and a cordless drill stolen from vehicle at 482 Leath Ave., May 15. Personal check stolen from mailbox at 482 Pedretti Ave. No. 2, May 15. Money stolen from victim at 1234 Anderson Ferry Road, May

cans » Empty aerosol cans (remove and dispose of lids and tips) » Glass bottles and jars (remove and recycle lids) » Paperboard (cereal boxes, etc.) » Junk mail and envelopes » Magazines, catalogs and phone books » Newspapers » Cardboard » Office Paper » Brown grocery bags » Clean pizza boxes Visit www.HamiltonCountyRecycles.org.

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LIFE

B8 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • MAY 30, 2012

Want to win a hybrid car? Get out there and start hiking LEGAL NOTICE NUISANCE VIOLATION 186 FRANCISRIDGE DRIVE Notice is hereby given to David and Kristy Fisher that property you own in Delhi Township contains excessive vegetation. The Delhi Township Board of Trustees has determined, at Resolution #2012-076, that the condition of the property constitutes a nuisance and is detrimental to the health, safety and general welfare of all persons who live, work or own property within Delhi Township. This notice shall serve as a formal order for you to address the nuisance violations at your property located at 186 Francisridge Drive (also known as Parcel 540-0033-0076 of the Hamilton County Auditor’s Tax Plats), Delhi Township, Hamilton County, State of Ohio as described below: •Cut all excessive vegetation, remove clippings there from, and maintain such at a height not to exceed 12" (All yards). If such excessive vegetation is not cut and removed or provision for such cutting and removal is not made within seven (7) days of publishing/posting of this notice, or a hearing before the Board of Trustees is not requested as specified below, the Board will provide for the cutting and removal, and any expenses incurred by the Board in performing such tasks will be entered upon the tax duplicate and will be a lien upon the properties from the date of entry. You have the right to request a hearing before the Board of Trustees within seven (7) days of publishing/posting of this notice. If requested, the hearing will be held at the next regularly scheduled meeting of the Board. The Boards’ meetings are held on the second and last Wednesdays of each month commencing at 6:00 p.m. at 934 Neeb Road, Cincinnati, Ohio 45233. At the hearing, you may appear in person or by counsel, may present evidence and examine witnesses. If a hearing is timely requested, action to abate the nuisance conditions will be stayed pending the hearing and further decision of the Board. Your request for a hearing before the Board may be submitted in writing to: Thomas R. Stahlheber, Zoning Inspector, Delhi Township Department of Development Services, 697 Neeb Road, Cincinnati, Ohio 45233. Any questions concerning this order should be directed to Mr. Stahlheber at the above described address or at 513-9222705. 1707379

Contest promotes 30 Ohio parks

Thane Maynard, Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden, and Willie Carden Jr., Cincinnati Parks, listen as Josh Knights of the Nature Conservancy in Ohio introduces the sweepstakes in Ault Park.

Gannett News Service Take a hike, win a car. That’s the slogan for the Nature Conservancy in Ohio’s “Natural Treasures of Ohio” sweepstakes, a statewide contest encouraging Ohioans to get outside and explore their state’s natural areas this summer. Ohio residents can enter to win the grand prize, a 2012 Honda Insight Hybrid, or one of five $500 gift certificates to REI outdoor stores by visiting one or more of 30 qualifying Ohio parks and uploading a photo of themselves in front of the selected landmark for that park. (Upload to www.nature.org/natural treasuresohio or www .facebook.com/ohiona tureconservancy through Aug. 8.) Parks were chosen for geographic diversity, representation of Ohio’s natural world and accessibility, according to Josh Knights, executive director of the Nature Conservancy in Ohio. Two of the 30 sites – Ault Park and Mount Airy Forest – are Cincinnati parks. “From the Cincinnati Parks perspective, we’re really excited that they selected two of our parks

THE ENQUIRER/ SHAUNA STEIGERWALD

as part of the contest,” said Deborah Allison, manager of business services for Cincinnati Parks. Thane Maynard, director of the Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden and host of PBS’ “The 90-Second Naturalist,” was on hand at Ault Park Wednesday to help launch the contest. “One of the myths is that in order to get outdoors, you need to get out in the wilderness,” he said. Added Knights: “We want to give an extra incentive for Ohioans to reconnect with nature. I think people aren’t aware of all of the options they have in the state. Our message is that there’s a little bit of something for everyone here in Ohio.”

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COOKING 6380GlenwayAve. Vol.85No.21 ©2012TheCommunityPress A LL R IGHTS R ESERVED News .........................923-3111 Retailadvertising ....

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