Issuu on Google+

PRICE HILL PRESS

Your Community Press newspaper serving Price Hill and Covedale

WEDNESDAY, MAY 29, 2013

PRAYING AT THE PIT B1 West Siders rally for the rosary.

BECAUSE COMMUNITY MATTERS

Seton community donates hair for cancer patients By Kurt Backscheider

kbackscheider@communitypress.com

By Kurt Backscheider kbackscheider@communitypress.com

See HAIR, Page A2

CUTTING STORIES Rachael Rogers, left, cuts the ponytails of her sister, Noelle, during the simultaneous cut at Seton High School for the Pantene Beautiful Lengths campaign. The Westwood sisters are both Seton graduates.

Valedictorian advice: Don’t procrastinate By Kurt Backscheider kbackscheider@communitypress.com

Westwood — Sarah Melford and RayQel Bradley are grateful for their high school experiences and are ready for college. The Western Hills University High School graduates were the top two students in West High’s class of 2013. Melford is this year’s valedictorian and Bradley is salutatorian. As the two prepare for the next step, they took some time to reflect on the past four years and offer advice to incoming seniors. Melford, daughter of Sharon Combs and Mark Melford of Westwood, said her biggest challenge was

Seton grads had busy year. See story A 4

Green Twp. — The Cincinnati Metropolitan Housing Authority is searching for multifamily buildings available for sale in the township. “We’ve engaged a realtor who is researching for-sale properties in the area,” said CMHA spokeswoman Kelly Kramer. The housing authority is under a mandate from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) to add 32 subsidized housing units in Green Township. Green Town- Linnenberg ship filed a lawsuit against HUD in August 2011 alleging the township was unfairly singled out in a voluntary compliance agreement between HUD and CMHA, which would have added about 70 public housing units in the township. The voluntary compliance agreement between CMHA and HUD was the result of a fairhousing complaint that accused the housing authority of blocking public housing in Green Township for several years. The township settled with HUD in January 2012, agreeing to 32 units. In late February, CMHA floated a proposal to build a new multifamily housing facility at

See C<HA, Page A2

KURT BACKSCHEIDER/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

West High grads ready for college

TOP OF THE CLASS

CMHA looking in Green Twp. Housing will be ‘spread out’

Price Hill — There were plenty of tears, but there were also hundreds of smiles. It was an emotional morning at Seton High School Monday, May 20, as nearly 350 students, alumnae, future students and community members gathered in the gymnasium to make the kindest cut of all for Pantene Beautiful Lengths. The simultaneous cut marked the third time Seton has organized a donation to the campaign, which creates real-hair wigs for women battling cancer. “My friend Rachel had cancer and my aunt had cancer,” said Seton senior Brooke Heideman, Delhi Township. “I’ve just been touched by cancer in my life.” She said it was a little scary to cut off 8 inches of her hair, but she’s glad she did it. “It feels good,” Heideman said. “Everyone should do it.” Seton spokeswoman Christy Schutte said the school expected about 320 people to take part in the cut, but dozens more showed up Monday morning volunteering to donate their locks for the great cause, pushing the total number of donors to almost 350. “There are so many amazing personal stories to share,” she said.

Hear about the experience of donating their hair. Go to Cincinnati.Com/pricehill

75¢

keeping up with all of her work, but having supportive friends to make her happy made the most difference in her high school experience. A member of the school’s band, she said she’s glad she was involved in the band program because it was the most rewarding experience of her high school career. If she had to do it all over again, Melford said she wouldn’t change a thing. “I like where I am today,” she said. “Even though some of my decisions weren’t so thought out, I accept them.” She said she will attend Miami University in Oxford this fall, and plans to major in physics. Her advice to students who will begin their senior year is, “Stick with See GRADS, Page A2

RITA’S KITCHEN Corn bread – quick, easy and good tasting. See story B3

Western Hills University High School graduates RayQel Bradley, left, and Sarah Melford are the top two students in the class of 2013. Melford is this year’s valedictorian and Bradley is the salutatorian. KURT BACKSCHEIDER/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Contact The Press

News .........................923-3111 Retail advertising ............768-8357 Classified advertising ........242-4000 Delivery ......................853-6263 See page A2 for additional information

Collection time

In the next few days your Community Press carrier will be stopping by to collect $3.50 for delivery of this month’s Price Hill Press. Your carrier retains half of this amount as payment for his or her work. If you wish to add a tip to reward the carrier’s good service, both Floyd the carrier and The Community Press appreciate your generosity. This month we’re featuring Joe Floyd, a student at the School for Creative and Performing Arts, where he is majoring in dance. Floyd plays football and lacrosse, and enjoys just about any outdoor activity. He uses his route earning to help pay for dance supplies for school. If you have questions about delivery, or if your child is interested in becoming part of our junior carrier program, please call 8536263 or 853-6277, or e-mail circulation manager Sharon Schachleiter at sschachleiter@communitypress.com.

Vol. 86 No. 21 © 2013 The Community Press ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


NEWS

A2 • PRICE HILL PRESS • MAY 29, 2013

CMHA

Grads

ings and eight, two-family buildings. CMHA has not yet made an offer on any properties, but they do intend to scatter the units throughout the township, she said. The housing authority’s board met April 30, and Kramer said the board approved a measure requiring there be no more than six public housing units added in any given township neighborhood. Green Township Trustee David Linnenberg said CMHA representatives will host an informational meeting at 7 p.m. Wednesday, June 5, at the Nathanael Greene Lodge, 6394 Wesselman Road.

Continued from Page A1

the corner of North Bend Road and Westwood Northern Boulevard, but after outcry from nearby residents the proposal was abandoned. The housing authority’s board of commissioners and the Green Township board of trustees both voted in March to support a plan to scatter the 32 units throughout the township. Kramer said the housing authority’s board has since directed CMHA staff to focus on locating two-family and four-family buildings in the township. She said the plan is to purchase and renovate four, four-family build-

Continued from Page A1

your friends, and get your work finished. Don’t procrastinate.” Bradley, daughter of LaShaun Bradley of Westwood, said staying focused, meeting deadlines and always giving her best effort were her biggest challenges, but her teachers helped her make the most difference in her high school career. “They are always there and sometimes they may care more than you do,” she said. Bradley said she’s also glad she took dual enrollment classes her senior year, which allowed her to earn college credit and

Healthy Adults 55 to 74 Years Old Needed for Pneumonia Vaccine Study Adult Pneumonia Vaccine Study

Who

Healthy adults 55 to 74 years old who: ! Received the pneumonia vaccine 3 to 7 years ago or ! Never received the pneumonia vaccine

Pay

May receive up to $250 for time and travel

CCHMC IRB #2012-1211: Version 2.0

Hair

grandma cut my ponytail. That moment was very emotional for both of us. As the countdown started we both broke into tears because we were so proud of each other. Here I am three years later doing it again with my grandma by my side.” Schoster said she donates because it helps peoples through some of their darkest days. “This is my way of giving back to all of the people fighting cancer and to show them that there is a community willing to give them support as they fight this long, hard battle,” she said. Seton senior Rachel Wink, one of four speakers who addressed the crowd, knows firsthand what it’s like to fight cancer. The Delhi Township teen, who donated her hair for the second time, was diagnosed with Hodgkin’s lymphoma when she was 8 years old. “I am donating in honor of all the other pediatric cancer survivors, as well as those who have passed,” Wink said. “This is such a great opportunity and I am so blessed to be able to take part in this. “I just think it’s really cool to be able to give back to the cancer community what they gave to me when I was going through treatment,” she said.

Continued from Page A1

One of those stories involves Seton senior Katie Schoster and her family. Schoster donated 9 inches of her hair to the campaign when she was a freshman in 2010, and she grew her ponytail out again to donate this year. She said she did it in honor of her grandmother. “My grandma has fought breast cancer three different times and she is the strongest person I know,” she said. “When I was a little girl my grandma always said she loved my hair. When going through chemotherapy she said that if she lost her hair she would want to use my hair as her wig. When I was a freshman doing Pantene Beautiful Lengths I had my

PRICE HILL PRESS

Find news and information from your community on the Web Covedale • cincinnati.com/covedale Price Hill • cincinnati.com/pricehill Hamilton County • cincinnati.com/hamiltoncounty

News

Marc Emral Senior Editor ...............853-6264, memral@communitypress.com Monica Boylson Reporter ..............853-6265, mboylson@communitypress.com Kurt Backscheider Reporter ............853-6260, kbackscheider@communitypress.com Melanie Laughman Sports Editor ......248-7573, mlaughman@communitypress.com Tom Skeen Sports Reporter .............576-8250, tskeen@communitypress.com

Advertising

Melissa Martin Territory Sales Manager ...............768-8357, mmartin@enquirer.com Lisa Lawrence Sales Manager.........................768-8338, llawrence@enquirer.com

Details

For more information, contact the Gamble Program for Clinical Studies at Cincinnati Children’s: gambleprogram@cchmc.org Study Line: 513-636-7699.

cincinnatichildrens.org/clinical-studies facebook.com/cincinnatichildrensstudies pinterest.com/cincykidstrials

get a jump start for next year. If she could start over, she said she would be more involved in extracurricular activities at school. She said she will attend the University of Cincinnati this fall, where she plans to study pre-pharmacy. Bradley’s advice to incoming seniors is, “Work hard and do your best because no one owes you anything, you have to go get it yourself,” she said. “Also, use your spare time wisely because when deadlines approach ... and you don’t have what you need, you may not like the outcome,” she added. Western Hills University students graduated during a ceremony Wednesday, May 22, at the Cintas Center at Xavier University.

Index Calendar .................B2 Classifieds ................C Deaths ...................B8 Food ......................B3 Police .................... B8 Schools ..................A7 Sports ....................A8 Viewpoints ............A10

Delivery

For customer service...................853-6263, 853-6277 Sharon Schachleiter Circulation Manager ..................853-6279, sschachleiter@communitypress.com Stephanie Siebert District Manager.......................853-6281

Classified

To place a Classified ad ................242-4000, www.communityclassified.com

To place an ad in Community Classified, call 242-4000.

CE-0000557435

NEW 2013 CHRYSLER

NEW 2012 RAM

RAM 1500 CREW CAB 4X4

TOWN & COUNTRY

J2966 MSRP $37,025 3 AT THIS PRICE

TOURING

5,500 OFF MSRP

INCLUDING $2,000 REBATE

5 AT THIS PRICE!

NEW 2013 CHRYSLER

6,500

NEW 2013 DODGE

DURANGO CREW AWD

OFF

DEMO

J3049 MSRP $45,660 1 AT THIS PRICE

MSRP

INCLUDING $3,500 REBATE

28,983

$

INCLUDING $3,250 REBATE YOU SAVE $8,042

J285 • MSRP $28,225

$

20” CHROME WHEELS • HEMI DUAL EXHAUST W/CHROME TIPS • FOG LAMPS FULL POWER • REMOTE KEYLESS ENTRY

NOW ONLY

200 LIMITED

DART

J3008 MSRP $26,390 5 AT THIS PRICE

J3053 • MSRP $31,885

$

NEW 2013 DODGE

4,000

SAVE $

OFF MSRP

INCLUDING $750 REBATE

NEW 2013 JEEP

GRAND CHEROKEE

LAREDO

J3120 MSRP $47,070 3 AT THIS PRICE

1 AT THIS PRICE!

NEW 2013 JEEP

WRANGLER UNLIMITED

7,000

SAVE $

J3284 • MSRP $30,565

4,000

$

An Official Automotive Sponsor of the Cincinnati Reds

OFF

3,000

SAVE $

OFF MSRP

INCLUDING $2,500 REBATE

MSRP

NEW 2013 DODGE

1 AT THIS PRICE!

Rt. 50 - I-275, Exit 16

TOLL FREE

OFF MSRP

1-855-453-8969

Formerly Kidd Chrysler Jeep Dodge

SALES HOURS: MON–THURS 9am - 9pm FRI 9am - 6pm SAT 9am - 5:30pm CLOSED SUN

Convenient to all of Northern Kentucky, Cincinnati, and S.E. Indiana!

NEW 2012 CHRYSLER

AVENGER SXT SEDAN 300 AWD DEMO DEMO

J2778 MSRP $27,764 1 AT THIS PRICE

POWER MOONROOF • NAVIGATION • RALLYE APPEARANC GROUP • DUAL EXHAUST • CHROME WHEELS • REAR SPOILER • 3.6 LITRE V6 ENGINE

NOW ONLY

20,988

$

INCLUDING $2,500 REBATE YOU SAVE $6,776

J2967 MSRP $36,835 1 AT THIS PRICE

LUXURY LEATHER • NAVIGATION DRIVER CONVENIENCE PKG. • 3.6 V6 W/8 SP AUTO REAR BACK-UP CAMERA

NOW ONLY

29,997

$

INCLUDING $2,500 REBATE YOU SAVE $6,838

All base consumer rebates deducted to achieve sale prices, additional incentives may be available. In stock units only, subject to prior sale, Vehicle/equipment may vary from photo. Chrysler Jeep Dodge and Ram are registered trademarks of Chrysler GROUP, LLC. EPA estimates based on manufacturers testing. Actual mileage may vary, depending on optional equipment and actual driving habits. Expires 6/3/2013.


NEWS

MAY 29, 2013 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • A3

Oak Hills grads want to ‘make a difference’ he attends college in the fall at the University of Cincinnati to study engineering. “In the next 10 years, I see myself graduating from graduate school and getting a job at a very scientifically innovative company.” Laumann said she hopes her experiences in

By Monica Boylson

mboylson@communitypress.com

Oak Hills High School senior class president and graduation speaker Mackenzie Laumann said golf was a help during her high school career. “I was fortunate enough to make the varsity golf team freshman year and I started competing right away,” the 18-year-old Delhi Township resident said. “Our season started before the school year even began and I was playing against seniors and hadn’t lived a day at Oak Hills (High School) yet. I was depended on for low scores and my team was counting on me. I grew up and matured quickly and had to have the courage to believe in myself.” She said believing in herself helped her become one of the top students in the graduating class this year. She hopes to impart that wisdom to her fellow classmates at graduation, scheduled for 7:30 p.m. Saturday, June 1, at the Cintas Center on Xavier University’s campus, 1624 Herald Ave. Classmate and soonto-be fellow graduate Curtis Robertson said he was most impacted in high school by his calculus teacher Andy Schroeder. “Mr. Schroeder’s calculus class taught me the importance of being able to learn on my own and has prepared me for college-style learning,” he said.

high school will help her be successful when she attends Northern Kentucky University in the fall to study business informatics on academic and golf scholarships. In her four years at Oak Hills, she was a member of the National Honor Society, played varsity golf, basketball

and track and participated in various other clubs and mentor groups. In the next 10 years, she said she hopes to have made a name for herself. “I know I will be living my life on purpose,” she said. “Hopefully making a difference in the lives of others.”

SO LONG

High g Gas $$$ S Stress Traffic Tr Headaches

HELLO RideShare is a free program to help you find a better way to commute to and from work. We have a large database of commuters who, like you, are looking for carpool partners and a chance to SAVE $$$!

Oak Hills High School seniors Curtis Robertson, 18, left, and Mackenzie Laumann, 18, said they are looking forward to college. MONICA BOYLSON/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

The Delhi resident said he was tested in high school by time management. “The biggest challenge was balancing playing three sports and getting my school work done,” he said. The 18-year-old participated in soccer, swimming and track and was a member of the National

Honor Society and other extracurricular activities. “If I could start over I would try to manage my time more effectively,” he said. “I’ve done many assignments close to the deadline and it added a lot of unnecessary stress to my life.” He said he will be taking his own advice when

CALL 241-RIDE

or register online at rideshareonline.org

Mercy Health – West Hospital will make it possible for our patients to get the care they need without leaving their communities, their family and friends. We are bringing our patients comprehensive Heart, Cancer, Maternity, Women’s Health, Orthopaedics, and Emergency services –

some being offered for the first time on the west side of Cincinnati. West Hospital is our commitment to helping the residents on the west side of Cincinnati be well. To find out more about this one-of-a-kind addition to the Mercy Health network of care, visit us at mercywest.com.

THIS IS YOUR HOSPITAL MERCY HEALTH – WEST HOSPITAL OPENS THIS FALL

BE WELL. RIGHT HERE.

Hospitals | Primary Care Physicians | Specialists | HealthPlexes | Senior Rehabilitation | Urgent Care CE-0000553721

mercywest . com

FACEBOOK.COM/ OKIRIDESHARE


NEWS

A4 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • MAY 29, 2013

Seton’s top students grateful for their high school years

Oak Hills students partner with French students on project By Kurt Backscheider

kbackscheider@communitypress.com

in which to take Advanced Placement statistics – a class she said she enjoyed and knows will help her in the coming years. In addition to the varsity dance team, Gay said she was also a member of student council, National Honor Society, the art club and student ambassadors. Her only regret is not going on a mission trip, she said. “Many of my friends took advantage of those amazing and rewarding opportunities during the past four years, and I wish I had,” Gay said. She will attend the University of Notre Dame this fall, and she said she plans to major in business. Mersmann, daughter of Tina and Mark Mersmann of Delhi Township, went on those mission trips Gay wishes she would have taken. “I am beyond glad that I took a leap of faith my freshman year and went on my first extended service trip,” Mersmann said. “Although I knew no one else who was going, I made so many new friends, learned how to use power tools and had one of the most rewarding experiences of my life.” She said she’s been on four other mission trips since that first one, including one to Guatemala, and she will lead a trip this summer to Liberty, Ky.

By Kurt Backscheider kbackscheider@communitypress.com

Price Hill — Seton High School seniors Katarina Gay and Laura Mersmann said their high school experience has given them a solid foundation for the future. The students made the most of their four years at Seton, and as a result they earned the top two spots in the class of 2013. Gay is her class valedictorian and Mersmann is this year’s salutatorian. Gay, daughter of JoAnn and Steve Gay of Western Hills, said although it was a challenge to manage a schedule full of honors and Advanced Placement classes while also being a member of the school’s competitive dance team, she’s happy she was involved in extracurricular activities. “Having club meetings and dance practice pushed me to be efficient academically,” she said. “These activities also helped me establish friendships that made high school exciting and will surely continue after graduation.” She said she’s also glad she decided to test out of Spanish her freshman year, which allowed her to take Spanish all the way through Spanish IIII while still having an open slot on her schedule senior year

Green Twp. — The student exchange program between Oak Hills High School and the Lycee Aristide Briand school in Evreux, France, isn’t just about visiting landmarks and making friends. While the students involved in the exchange do forge global friendships and gain new cultural experiences, they also have to fulfill an academic element. Twenty-four students and three teachers are in town from France for two weeks, and they teamed up with Oak Hills students Tuesday, May 21, to explore the benefits of using sustainable energy sources. Meghan Sullivan, who teaches French and world history at Oak Hills, said the program was a continuation of a project students at the school started with their French counterparts when they visited France in March. “We have an exchange program, but in addition to the social aspect there is an academic partnership as well,” she said. When the 14 Oak Hills students involved in the exchange traveled to France, Sullivan said they worked with the French students on a project about nuclear energy. The program at Oak Hills revolved around the theme of renewable energy sources. About 400 Oak Hills stu-

The top two students in Seton High School’s class of 2013 are Laura Mersmann, left, and Katarina Gay. Mersmann is the salutatorian and Gay is this year’s valedictorian. THANKS TO CHRISTY SCHUTTE

“I have big plans in college for service work and I cannot wait to travel all over and help others,” she said. “And it all began with a leap of faith freshman year for me to discover my passion.” When she wasn’t on service trips, Mersmann said she was involved in National Honor Society, National Arts Honor Society, art club, varsity lacrosse, student council, student ambassadors, tutoring and campus ministry. She said the biggest challenge in high school was finding the perfect balance between work, school, friends, family and sleep. “I think by junior year I had it down, thankfully,” she said. Mersmann said what made the most difference in her high school experience was Seton itself. “The service work and mission trips I would not have been able to complete without Seton. I also

owe my academic and spiritual achievements to Seton, as every member of the staff and student body has been there for me and encouraged me to dream big and achieve my dreams,” she said. If she could start over, Mersmann said she would put herself out there more and not try to “fit in” to a stereotype. “I think it took me until my junior year to realize that I didn’t have to be the nerd, the jock or the nice girl, but I could do a little bit of everything,” she said. “Never compromise who you are to please who you aren’t.” She will attend the University of Cincinnati this fall, where she said she’s been accepted into the Carl H. Lindner HonorsPLUS program and plans to study marketing and international business. Seton students will graduate at 7 p.m. Thursday, May 30, at St. Peter in Chains Cathedral.

D E S U Y T I L A U D Q E C I R CARS P HT! RIG

Oak Hills High School students Lauren Williams, left, and Jessica Bruns hold up the solar oven they made during a cross-curricular, international project students took part in Tuesday, May 21. Oak Hills students worked with students from a high school in France for the project focused on sustainable energy. THANKS TO MEGHAN SULLIVAN

dents took part in the program, she said. Students gave presentations about topics like hydroelectric, wind, solar and geothermal energy. Sullivan said they also created solar ovens and used them to see who could bake the best tasting brownies. Oak Hills junior Brett Gerdes, who is enrolled in French III, said it was great working with the students from France. Rose Penley, an Oak Hills senior who is in Advanced Placement French, said she and her classmates have been looking forward to having an exchange program with students in France.

QUICK & FRIENDLY SERVICE CENTER BETTER FOR LESS!

513-574-5500

6315 Harrison Ave.

AUTO.COM QUALITY USED CARS PRICED RIGHT! WE SERVICE ALL MAKES & MODELS EXPLORER MUSTANG GT CHANGE OIL W/ MULTI-POINT INSPECTION THER ANOREAT ! G TION LOCA

FormerlyWullenweber Motors

1999 FORD

3,988

$

2000 FORD

$

EDDIE BAUER, EXTRA CLEAN!

2006

2005 LINCOLN

SCION tC

LS SPORT V8

8,988

$

EXCEPTIONALLY CLEAN, LOADED!

$

11,988

$

2007 JEEP

18,988

LOW MILES, GREAT CONDITION, FUN!

14,995

FULLY EQUIPPED, ONLY 40K MILES, GREAT CONDITION

2008 HUMMER

WRANGLER $

3-DOOR HATCH COMPARE & SAVE

CAMRY

SEBRING LTD COMPARE & SAVE

8,988

2009 TOYOTA

2010 CHRYSLER

$

8,988

CONVERTIBLE, NICE, BLACK ON BLACK

H3 4X4

$

19,988

NEW TIRES, EXTRA CLEAN

CREDIT CONCERNS? NO PROBLEM! GUARANTEED FINANCING!

24

ABLE AVAILAT THE ONLYRRISON HA ATION! LOC

$

95 See Advisor for Details Includes most makes & models

No Appointment Needed

Purchase 5 Oil Changes, Get The 6th One Free (see store for details) Retail purchases only. Up to five quarts of Motorcraft® semi-synthetic premium blend oil & Motorcraft® oil filter. Taxes, diesel vehicles & disposal fees extra. Includes free multi-point inspection Offer valid with coupon. See advisor for vehicle exclusions & details. Expires 5/31/13

EVERY 6TH OIL CHANGE IS FREE!

10

$

00

ABLE AVAILAT THE ONLYRRISON HA ATION! LOC

OVER COST ON ALL TIRES

NameBrandsIncluded! SAVEHUNDREDS ON A SET OF4TIRES

With purchase of needed service. See advisor for details. Must present coupon at time of write-up. Expires 5/31/13.

A/C INSPECTION

GET YOUR A/C READY FOR SUMMER!

49

$

Get it done today for only

95 See Advisor for Details

See Quick Lane® Manager for details. Expires 5/31/13

ABLE AVAILAT THE ONLY ISON! HARR TION LOCA

ABLE AVAILAT THE ONLY RISON HAR TION! LOCA

TIRES

We’ll Beat Any Competitors’ Price On Any Name Brand Tires!

LIFETIME BRAKES • FREE TIRE ROTATIONS W/ PURCHASE OF 4 NEW TIRES WE MATCH COMPETITORS COUPONS • FREE ‘CHECK ENGINE’ CODE READING


NEWS

MAY 29, 2013 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • A5

Delhi police sergeant says it’s ‘time to go’ By Monica Boylson

Anne G. Banta D.D.S. General Dentistry Offering New Patient Specials!

mboylson@communitypress.com

Delhi Township — Delhi

Township Sgt. Joe Middendorf said he never thought of his police work as a job but always considered it his career. Middendorf ends his 30-year police career when he retires Friday, May 31. “It’s always been a lifelong dream of someone that lives in Delhi who wants to be a police officer to work here,” the township resident said. “I’m 52 years old, at the age to retire and it’s just time for me to go ... there are so many high quality people at the door waiting for a job in Delhi Township.” He started as a corrections officer at the Hamilton County Sheriff’s Department in 1983; two years later had the opportunity to work in his backyard. “I got a call in1985 from (Chief Howard Makin) offering me the job starting on May 25 and I accepted,” he said. “I hung up the phone and remembered I was getting married May 25. I immediately called the chief back and he was amused. I asked him if I could start in June telling him I forgot my wedding because I was so happy about getting the job.” Middendorf said it was a running joke in the station that he was so excited to start he forgot his wedding. In his 28 years with the Delhi Police Department, Middendorf took on a lot of roles. He started as a patrolman and then began working as a DARE (Drug Abuse Resistance Education) officer teaching students first at St. Dominic and Delshire elementaries and then at C. O. Harrison and Delshire elementaries. He also spent time working with the Police Explorers program which gives teenagers a firsthand look at law enforce-

Anne G. Banta D.D.S., General Dentistry, is a state-of-the art practice focusing on high-quality dentistry and patient experience. The office is located at 5680 Bridgetown Rd., Suite B, Cincinnati Oh 45248.

The practice offers an array of oral health services for children and adults.

Delhi Township Sgt. Joe Middendorf, 52, is retiring after serving 28 years in the township. MONICA BOYLSON/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

ment. He also trained students in the Citizen’s Police Academy who later formed the Delhi Citizen’s Police Association, a nonprofit organization that funds items for the police department that are not in the department’s annual budget. “The best part about being a police officer is every day’s a surprise,” he said. “Every day is different. Every day you turn on your radio and there’s a different problem to solve, a different crime to go to, a different person in need. Some of the most satisfying time I spent in my career was in the schools, working with the kids.” As a DARE officer, Middendorf said he felt like a part of the faculty. He taught students about drugs and how to stay drug-free. “Helping kids and having kids 25 years later come up and say, ‘Officer Joe I had you when I was in Delshire, now my kids are going to Delshire. I stayed drug-free and did the right thing,’” he said. “Those are some of the most satisfying times in my career.” The sergeant has impacted more than students. Delhi Police Chief Jim Howarth said Middendorf will be hard to replace. “The Delhi community has been the center of Sgt. Middendorf’s heart for more than 28 years. He has done not only so much for the police department but

for the community as a whole,” he said. “He will be missed, but never forgotten.” He plans to pursue a job as an armed security officer, and when he’s not working, Middendorf said he wants to spend time with his family, play more golf, exercise and vacation in Cumberland, Ky. “I’ll miss wearing the uniform every day and representing Delhi Township,” he said. “ It’s been a great, fun and exciting career and time just flew by.”

• Professional cleanings and exams • Digital X-rays • Porcelain Veneers • Dental Sealants • Fillings

• Crown and Bridge • Oral cancer screenings • Implant • Complete and Restorations partial Dentures • Oral appliance therapy for treating • Teeth Whitening snoring and sleep apnea

Dr. Banta received her Doctor of Dental Surgery degree from The Ohio State University. She has been practicing dentistry in Greater Cincinnati for over 25 years, formerly an associate of The Dental Practice of Dr. Corbitt & Dr. Banta.

Dr. Banta was selected by her peers to be included in 2013 top Dentists™ which was featured in Cincinnati Magazine’s February issue.

For APPOINTMENTS CALL 513.574.2444 CE-0000557139

www.AnneBantaDDS.com

Bayley Adult Day Program Join the fun! Take advantage of programs and peer groups for older adults. The adults we care for deserve more than just us. They can truly thrive with new social opportunities and top of the line health services.

Supporting and Promoting Artists and the Arts Year-Round

Presents the 46th Annual Friday 2pm-8pm

Bayley Adult Day Program gives older adults the chance to spend time with others, enjoy planned activities, and have healthcare needs met during the day — all in a beautiful, safe environment.

Saturday 10pm-8pm Sunday 10am-5pm Rain or Shine

• On-site therapy • Prayer services

$10 Admission

Kids 12 & Under Free Free Parking Coney Island, Kellogg at I-275

FREE DAY Experience the benefits for yourself with a free day at Bayley Adult Day.

For advance online tickets and more information, visit:

Participating Sponsor

Summerfair.org

We invite you to join us for the You Matter - Caregiver Meeting. Every Friday morning from 9:30-10:45am.

facebook.com/ SummerfairCincinnati

Join us for the 3rd Annual LBD Event!

Call Chris at 513.347.5443.

&")+/,. !/, *( ' %#$-((#$

Summerfair

CE-0000549488

Cincinnati

• Transportation services • Field trips

bayleylife.org

Moonlite Gardens, Coney Island Tickets available online: http://2013lbd.eventbrite.com CE-0000548392


NEWS

A6 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • MAY 29, 2013

How does your urban farm grow? Sayler Park man tends to crops in neighbor’s yard

By Monica Boylson mboylson@communitypress.com

Sayler Park — Growing up in Sayler Park, Adam Hudepohl said he remembers the lot across the street from his parents’ Monitor Avenue home as a baseball field. “We used to come out here and play,” the 35-yearold said pointing to the corner of the lot. He said he never imagined that years later it would become an urban farm, let alone one he planted. Hudepohl and his wife Margaret, 30, live with his parents on 171 Monitor. They grow fruits and vegetables in his parents’ yard and tend to a farm on

his neighbor’s property. Neighbor Andrew Bradow, 50, said the proposition for Hudepohl to plant a 60-foot by 80-foot garden in his yard came while playing a game of cornhole. “He said something about how he had planted as much as he could in his father’s backyard,” Bradow said. “I told him, ‘You can plant in my yard because all I do is mow and I’d love to see it used for something productive.’” Bradow owns the house across the street from the Hudepohls as well as an empty lot next door. “At first I chuckled at him,” Hudepohl said of the proposition from his

Make an

neighbor. “I told him, ‘I don’t know if you know what you are getting yourself into by making me that offer.” The two worked out a deal. In exchange for Hudepohl using the land, he takes care of Bradow’s yard work and does other tasks. Bradow also has free range of the garden and can pick and eat anything from it. “I think it works out for both sides,” Hudepohl said. He started the urban farm in fall 2012 with hearty leafy vegetables such as spinach and kale which grew throughout the winter. Now, he grows a variety of fruits and vegetables including: let-

Difference for Kids!

©2013 Fox

Adam Hudepohl, 35, tends to his urban garden in Sayler Park. THE COMMUNITY PRESS/MONICA BOYLSON

tuce, spinach, peas, tomatoes and watermelons. Everything is grown organically and free of pesticides. “One of the main advantages of urban agriculture is that things that will benefit your garden are all around you such as vegetable waste and grass clippings and leaves,” he said. “In the fall, we went around in my dad’s pickup truck and picked up truckload after truckload of fall leaves.” He said that dead leaves can be used for soil enrichment. Leaves that sit over time form leaf mold or partially decomposed leaves which can be used as a mulch to add nitrogen to the soil. He added that he takes food waste such as orange peels and egg shells, grass clippings, sticks or straw and other biodegradable items to create a compost pile. After the items decompose, they become a natural fertilizer for the crops.

CLEVES

SELF STORAGE

513 257-0833

Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals appreciate your support in helping local kids get the care they need. Donate when you see our Miracle Balloon and help kids at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center.

Thank you to our generous corporate partners!

CE-0000557442

CORNER of 128 and CILLEY ROAD www.clevesstorage.com

CE-0000538654

cmnhospitals.org

MEISTER DENTAL GROUP FAMILY, COMPREHENSIVE AND COSMETIC DENTISTRY

All Patients in May and June at the Harrison Ave office will receive a

$

25 GIFT CARD

*

Can be used on any dental product or service that we offer.

Sayler Park resident Adam Hudepohl, 35, turns a pile of compost at his urban farm.

Another organic fertilizer, and one he used when he first started the urban farm, is manure. “I encourage any one who (grows crops) in their yard to do it organically,” he said. Hudepohl said that another advantage of urban farming is having fresh fruits and vegetables. “You can eat from your yard,” he said. “You haven’t tasted fresh vege-

tables until you’ve picked them yourself. Ninety percent of the produce we eat comes from the garden.” People who want to buy fruits or vegetables can stop by the garden on Monitor Avenue on Saturdays, Sundays and Mondays and Tuesday through Thursday mornings. For more information or to place an order, call Hudepohl at 926-9093.

“A Name You Can Trust”

C&orcoran Harnist Heating & Air Conditioning Inc.

Suggested Services/Products:

Brian M. Meister, DDS and Rachel Gold, DMD

• Cleanings

• Sonicare Toothbrush

• Crowns and Fillings

• Waterpik

• ZOOM! Whitening

• Invisalign

Serving Delhi & Western Hills for over 32 years.

Mention ad number MDG383 to receive Gift Card

*Certain restrictions apply, one per household, call for more information.

MOST INSURANCES ACCEPTED Call or go online to schedule an appointment

513.829.1100 | www.meisterdentalgroup.com

CE-0000555593

BRIDGETOWN

5520 Harrison Avenue Suite A Corner of Race

FAIRFIELD

5380 Pleasant Avenue Suite 3B Corner of Wessel

www.corcoranharnist.com

921-2227 CE-0000553281


SCHOOLS

MAY 29, 2013 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • A7

Editor: Marc Emral, memral@communitypress.com, 853-6264

ACHIEVEMENTS | NEWS | ACTIVITIES | HONORS

COMMUNITY

PRESS

CommunityPress.com

Mercy Beyond Borders founders talks with students

Pictured from front left are Molly Scherer, Jillian Kloepfer, Sarah Rosenberger, Rachel Schultz, Samantha Heyl, Alexis Lambers, Rose Davis, Rachel Zahneis and Kaley Kurzhals; second row, Sara Neumeister, Nina Wurzelbacher, Hannah Schwaeble, Mikaleigh Thai, Meghan Davis, Jordyn Gilday and Emma Bruggeman; third row, Aurdey Laiveling, Peyton McCarthy, Madeleine Peters, Sydney Vinel and Gabriella Kayse. /

Seton honors scholarship winners Seton High School recently welcomed 21 students from the class of 2017 to the Evening of Distinction, a celebration of student accomplishments in the areas of academics, faith, leadership and service. Students were joined by parents, family members, teachers and principals. Also in attendance to honor the students were members of the Seton administration and faculty. Each of the scholarship recipients are current eighth-grade students who will be enrolled in Seton in the fall. “These young women are

very deserving of the scholarships they have earned,” said Donna Brigger, principal and chief executive officer. “We know they will excel here at Seton High School and we are very excited to be welcoming them into the class of 2017.” The class will be the 90th graduating class. Receiving scholarships were: » Emma Bruggeman – Holy Family; » Meghan Davis, Audrey Laiveling, Sara Neumeister, and Molly Scherer – Our Lady of Victory;

» Rose Davis, » Samantha Heyl, » Gabriella Kayse, Alexis Lambers and Sydney Vinel – Our Lady of the Visitation; » Jordyn Gilday – St. Martin; » Jillian Kloepfer, Peyton McCarthy, Hannah Schwaeble and Mikaleigh Thai, St. Dominic; » Kaley Kurzhals, Sarah Rosenberger and Rachel Zahneis – St. Jude. » Madeleine Peters, Our Lady of Lourdes; » Rachel Schultz, St. Antoninus; and » Nina Wurzelbacher, who was homeschooled.

Sister Marilyn Lacey, founder of Mercy Beyond Borders, spoke to a Mother of Mercy High School all-school presentation March 20. Mercy Beyond Borders, formed in 2008, partners with displaced women and children in ways that alleviate their extreme poverty. Lacey shared her story of being a math teacher in Los Angles for several years before answering a simple bulletin board message asking for help with displaced refugees. From that moment on she has dedicated the past 30 years to working with refugees. When she founded Mercy Beyond Borders they began in South Sudan, which has one-quarter of the world’s displaced people, and later expanded to Haiti, where tens of thousands remain displaced since the 2010 earthquake. Mercy Beyond Borders states “Where Women Learn, Women Matter,” and their focus is on women and girls – whether promoting health, supporting economic development or providing formal schooling and scholarships. In the mix of sharing stories about her work with refugees and Mercy Beyond Borders, Lacey shared her belief that “the closer we get to God, the more attentive we become to others and the more merciful we become.” Attentiveness and compassion are two values she lives by. She shared examples

of becoming more aware of the brothers and sisters around her, which lead to compassion, noting “if you focus on the goodness within those around you amazing things will happen.” Following the all-school presentation, Lacey held a question-and-answer session with juniors and seniors in Kate Mitchell’s HerStory class, a women’s studies course that focuses on current issues, topics and concerns facing women of today, here in the United States as well as worldwide. Students have recently finished reading Lacey’s book “This Flowing Toward Me: A Story of God Arriving in Strangers.” Mother of Mercy’s connection with Mercy Beyond Borders began during the 2010-2011 school year when Student Council initiated a Global Action Project connected to its annual Student Walk. In the spring of 2011, a portion of funds raised was donated to Mercy Beyond Borders. The funds were designated for high school scholarships for two Sudanese refugee girls in the GO! (Girls’ Opportunities) Scholars program at $1,000 each, another $1,000 to provide health kits and medicine to Sudanese girls’ schools, and finally another $1,000 sent to the St. Bakhita School to support 10 primary school students for an entire school year. To learn more about Mercy Beyond Borders visit www.Mer cyBeyondBorders.org.

Scarlet Oaks students prepare for presentation “What will your guests see when they walk into our hotel?” asked Susan Grodecki of the Clermont County Convention and Visitors Bureau. Grodecki, a hotel industry veteran, challenged the Scarlet Oaks students. “Describe your vision for the event in strong detail, so that everyone sitting in the room can picture it. Make sure they see the colors and lighting, hear the music, and taste the flavors.” Grodecki was working with a team of students in the Lodging Management program at Scarlet Oaks Career Campus as they prepared for a trip to Orlando and the Lodging Management Professionals Competition. In this component of the competition, the students – Megan Coyle of Oak Hills High School, Armelle Kudatsi of Winton Woods High School,

Ann Murphy of Mason HIgh School, and Bryan Renz of Milford High School – will be given a scenario and then must create an event proposal. Over the two days of competition, students will also prepare a night audit, problem solve case studies, inspect guestrooms and compete in a knowledge bowl. Professionals, including American Hotel and Lodging Association members and college professors, will judge their efforts and those of their competitors. Their trip to the international competition is all the more remarkable because the students, all juniors, are in their first year in Lodging Management, a program that’s also in its first year. The program – officially called Lodging Management and Hospitality Services – prepares high school students to

become certified in the hospitality field and ready for a career when they graduate from high school. It was developed by Great Oaks along with area hotel and lodging managers to fill the need in the booming tourism industry in southwest Ohio. Scarlet Oaks instructor Deb Moy has high hopes for the first year team. “They’ve been preparing since October as the Ohio team and showing remarkable improvement. We are hoping to win some scholarships this year, but regardless of the outcome, they’ll meet people who may be future colleagues, mentors or employers. There’s a vibe, an excitement you feel by being around people in this industry, and these outstanding students will have that experience.” The competition is April 1012. Susan Grodecki of the Clermont County Convention and Visitors Bureau works with, from left, Ann Murphy, Megan Coyle and Armelle Kudatsi. PROVIDED

Sister Marilyn Lacey, founder of Mercy Beyond Borders, speaks to teacher Kate Mitchell’s HerStory class. THANKS TO JENNY KRONER-JACKSON

Winners picked in Mount art contest The College of Mount St. Joseph has announced the winners of its 2012 High School Art Contest. The first-place winner is Austin Schultz, a senior at Calvert High School in Tiffin, Ohio. His piece, “CAPS,” is a self-portrait made up of approximately 5,000 plastic bottle caps. Schultz collected bottle caps throughout the summer, and also had friends save them for him. The final piece is 4 feet by 5 feet and took about 50 to 70 hours to complete. Schultz said he was inspired by a similar project done by artist Mary Ellen Croteau.

Keith Kim, of Irvine High School in Irvine, Calif., won second place with his piece, “Stop Pollution,” and Daniel Zhou of Linn-Mar High School in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, won third place with “City Street.” “We’re very excited and proud of all of our winners,” said Trevor Griffith, project manager at the Mount. “Our hope with this contest each year is that it inspires high schoolers to stretch their limits and imaginations with their artwork, and we’re glad that we can give them a place to submit their work.”


SPORTS

A8 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • MAY 29, 2013

Editor: Melanie Laughman, mlaughman@communitypress.com, 513-248-7573

HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | RECREATIONAL

COMMUNITY

PRESS

CommunityPress.com

2013 a season of firsts for the Lady Highlanders By Tom Skeen

tskeen@communitypress.com

GREEN TWP. — Only one team ends its season without a loss. After reaching the regional semifinals last season, the Oak Hills softball team was hoping they would be that team in 2013. Unfortunately for the Lady Highlanders and coach Jackie Cornelius-Bedel that wasn’t the case. After stranding 12 runners on the base paths and allowing an unearned run in the first inning, Oak Hills fell to Fairfield 2-1, May 20 in a Division I sectional final at Harrison High School. “Things we have struggled with all year, but were still able to get by with hurt us,” Cornelius-Bedel said. “We left runners on base and in scoring position all year.” All was not lost for the team, as they recorded the school’s first 20-win season and brought home the school’s first Greater Miami Conference softball title. “They clearly set another mark,” the coach said. “Last year regional semifinals was their first mark and their second mark was being GMC champs. That was our first goal at the beginning of the season.” Those marks wouldn’t have been possible without the effort of the senior class. After going 11-36 in 2010-11, the seven-member class helped the Lady Highlanders to a 43-17 record over the past two seasons. “They are the reason the program has changed,” Cornelius-Bedel said of her sen-

iors. “They bought into what we asked them to do, what we taught and they believed in what we instilled in them. They all had a huge role on our team both on and off the field.” Senior pitcher Lauren Slatten set the tone for the Lady Highlanders. She led the GMC in wins, ERA and strikeouts in 2013 and in her two years with the program she struck out 711 batters – including a GMC record 390 in 2012. “I think Lauren gave the program hope,” her coach said. “Without a dominant pitcher you can’t compete in the GMC as a top team. Last year she gave us time for the kids to get caught up. … This year they came in ready and prepared.” The all-state and all-district honoree will head back home and continue her softball career at the University of Texas next season. A step in her career that Cornelius-Bedel knows will be a tough challenge for her ace. “Her future is up to her,” she said. “She has all the talent in the world and her future should be limitless as long as she continues to work as hard as she can and constantly push herself.” Graduating seven seniors isn’t easy for any program, but the foundation is set and Cornelius-Bedel believes the culture has changed from where her program was just two seasons ago. “… (The seniors’) discipline, intensity and leadership has been instilled in the younger players and I don’t think we will ever be where we were two years ago,”

Oak Hills senior pitcher Lauren Slatten tosses a strike to a Fairfield batter during their Division I sectional final loss May 20 at Harrison High School. TOM SKEEN/COMMUNITY PRESS Sammy Sagers of Oak Hills takes a cut during the Lady Highlanders’ 2-1 Division I sectional final loss to Fairfield May 20 at Harrison High School. TOM SKEEN/ COMMUNITY PRESS

Saints’ ride comes to an end

Saints suffer tough postseason exit By Tom Skeen tskeen@communitypress.com

PRICE HILL — Two minutes was the difference between a trip to the Division II regional finals or a trip home for the Seton lacrosse team. After leading for the majority of their regional semifinal game against Worthington Kilbourne, the Saints slipped in a two-minute rut that led to the end of their season with a 15-11 loss, May 21. “… Things were going great, we were leading the game and then had two or so minutes where we didn’t play well and they took over the lead and we couldn’t get it back,” coach Drew Burchett said. “They scored a couple goals and we couldn’t get the draw control and that was the key to the game.” The Saints finished the season 11-7 (5-1 GGCL) and were runners-up in the Girls Greater Cincinnati League. It was the team’s most wins since the 2009 season, but ultimately they fell short of their first goal. Burchett said winning the

Seton sophomore Carly Stagge (17) gets by Mercy's Jennifer Peterman during the Saints’ 12-8 win over the Bobcats this season. Stagge led the Saints in both scoring and assists in 2013. TOM SKEEN/COMMUNITY PRESS

GGCL would be huge for them. “We should have won it this year but we had one bad game,” he said. “That was our goal this year and we worked as hard as we could to do so.” Sophomore Carly Stagge led the team offensively in 2013. She played more of a support role last season in the shadow of Becca Meyer - who currently plays at St. Francis University – and used what she learned to have a breakout sophomore season. “… She stepped in and really took over the goal scoring and handling the ball,” the coach said. “She is definitely a big asset to have. She’s not very tall and not the biggest girl but if you put the ball in her hands she knows what to do with it.” Junior goalie Morgan Masminster finished atop the league

in saves and save percentage. She posted an unheard of 35 saves in a 5-2 win over St. Ursula, April 25. “… She played a big role in our success this season,” her coach said. “She played and started in more than half the games last year and we expect even better things next year.” When it comes to next year and the future of the program, Burchett believes things are heading in the right direction due to many players picking up the game at an early age. “… That makes a huge difference,” he said of his girls having experience before reaching the high-school level. “They have the basics down and we just have to teach them the more important stuff like speed and more of the game.”

Seton players, coaches and staff display the Division I district runner-up trophy following their loss to Northmont. TOM SKEEN/COMMUNITY PRESS

For the first time since 1998 the Seton Saints softball team found themselves in the Division I district finals. Unfortunately that is where their 2013 season came to an end after a 3-0 loss to Clayton Northmont, May 24 at Fairfield Middle School. The Saints finish the season 16-9, posting their first winning season since 2008.

Seton pitcher Abby Lamping hurls in a pitch to a Northmont batter. The sophomore tossed a complete game, allowing one hit but taking the loss.


SPORTS & RECREATION

MAY 29, 2013 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • A9

Oak Hills grad signs with White Sox The Florence Freedom announced the Chicago White Sox have purchased the contract of outfielder Josh Richmond, an Oak Hills graduate. Richmond, a 23-year old Cincinnati native, was the Freedom’s starting center fielder through the first five games of the 2013 season before the White Sox came calling. The outfielder marks the second position player picked up by the White Sox in the past two seasons. Chris Curley was signed by the White Sox in 2012 and is currently at High-A with the WinstonSalem Dash. “The White Sox are extremely pleased with Curley and they are turning to the Freedom again hoping Josh can be their next find here in Florence,” Freedom general manager Josh Anderson said. “Josh has the make-up of a guy that can go to the next level and have success. We wish him all the best.” Richmond was hitting .267 with a triple and a

TOURNAMENT HIGHLIGHTS By Tom Skeen tskeen@communitypress.com

Softball

» Seton advanced to the Division I district finals with a 6-1 victory over Harrison, May 20. Senior Anna Hetzer launched a home run for the Saints, while both Chelsea Zang and Abby Lamping went 2for-3. The Saints’ season came to an end after a 3-0 loss to Clayton Northmont, May 24 in the Division I district finals. Lamping tossed a complete game, allowing just one earned run.

Tennis

» The St. Xavier doubles team of Matt Santen and Matt Duma advanced to the Division I state tennis tournament, which begins May 31 at The Ohio State University Outdoor Varsity Tennis Courts in Columbus.

Josh Richmond signed with the Chicago White Sox. THANKS TO THE FREEDOM.

double for the Freedom through the team’s first five games. He also boasted a .389 on-base percentage. This will be his second stint in affiliated baseball. Richmond broke into professional ball with the

Texas Rangers when they took him in the 12th round of the 2010 draft out of the University of Louisville. The Freedom are members of the Independent Frontier League and play all home games at University of Cincinnati Medical

Center Stadium, located at 7950 Freedom Way in Florence, Kentucky. To see the Freedom live or for 2013 team information, visit FlorenceFreedom.com or call the Freedom box office at 859-594HITS (4487).

Track

The following individuals qualified for the regional track meet, which begins May 29 (Due to holiday deadlines, final results for Division II and III were not available): » Oak Hills - Kevin Konkoly, 400-meter dash; Blake Meyer, 1,600-meter run; Ross Frondorf, 1,600-meter run; Mitch Bischoff, 800-meter run; Derek Knabe, 3,200-meter run; Devin Moore, long jump; Zach Leftenant discus; girls’ 4x800 re-

SIDELINES Jr. golf league signup

Tournament and awards party is Tuesday, June 25. The league plays from 4-6 p.m. at Delhi Hills Par 3 Golf Course. Cost is $45 per child, and includes four rounds of golf and pizza/awards party June 25. Call Don at 922-0920.

Delhi Jr. Golf league is accepting signups for summer. The league gives an introduction to the game of golf to boys and girls ages 9 to 12 with emphasis on etiquette. Golf weeks are Tuesdays June 4, 11 and 18.

Indoor instructional T-ball

the instruction of volunteer parent coaches on indoor turf. Cost is $35 per child, or $400 per team. Session starts June 14 with a June 5 deadline. Call 264-1775, or e-mail chrism@riversedgeindoor.com. Visit riversedgeindoor.com for more information.

When outdoor T-ball is over, continue playing indoors at Rivers Edge Indoor Sports in Cleves. Sessions will be available for 4 and 5 year olds. Children will have 15 minutes of practice. Every child will bat twice under

0%

EXTENDED

FOR

AT

WALT SWEENEY FORD

F150

4X4 CREWCABS

28 UP TO

FOCUS SEDAN

47 UP TO

MPG

#332803

10 000 OFF MSRP ,

SEDAN

31 UP TO

2-DOOR, AUTO, A/C

$5,988

99

$

LEASE FOR

PER MONTH

PLUS TAX, TITLE & DELIVERY FEES 24 MO. TERM $2995 DOWN

$0 SECURITY DEPOSIT • 10,500 MILES PER YEAR

12 999

O BUY $ R FOR

NEW 2013 FORD

,

SUV

31

#C92332

139 LEASE FOR

$

PER MONTH

PLUS TAX, TITLE & DELIVERY FEES 24 MO. TERM $2995 DOWN

$0 SECURITY DEPOSIT • 10,500 MILES PER YEAR

18 659

O BUY $ R FOR

,

NEW 2014 FORD

NEW 2013 FORD

MPG

SUV

20 UP TO

COUPE

#C59239

139

$

LEASE FOR

PER MONTH

PLUS TAX, TITLE & DELIVERY FEES 24 MO. TERM $2995 DOWN

$0 SECURITY DEPOSIT • 10,500 MILES PER YEAR

18 995

O BUY $ R FOR

,

WALT’S

ADVANTAGE

169

$

2006 HYUNDAI TIBURON GS AUTO

$7,988

2003 TOYOTA CAMRY LE AUTO, A/C

$7,988

2006 FORD EXPLORER 4X4 EDDIE BAUER

$12,988

YOUR CHOICE YOUR CHOICE YOUR CHOICE ✦

LEASE FOR

PER MONTH

PLUS TAX, TITLE & DELIVERY FEES 24 MO. TERM $2995 DOWN

$0 SECURITY DEPOSIT • 10,500 MILES PER YEAR

24 999

O BUY $ R FOR

200,000 MILE COMPLIMENTARY WARRANTY

,

84K MILES, EXTRA CLEAN!

249

$

LEASE FOR

PER MONTH

PLUS TAX, TITLE & DELIVERY FEES 24 MO. TERM $2995 DOWN

$0 SECURITY DEPOSIT • 10,500 MILES PER YEAR

20 202

O BUY $ R FOR

200,000 MILE ROADSIDE ASSIST

LOW MILES, FULL POWER

$5,995

$7,988

KING RANCH, LOADED

LEATHER, MOONROOF, LOADED

2001 FORD F150 SUPER CREW

$7,988

1999 BMW 528ia

$7,988

2002 GMC YUKON XL DENALI

2006 INFINITI G35X

$8,988

$14,988

LEATHER, 4X4, LOADED

EX-L 2-DOOR

4X4, LOADED

2001 JEEP LIBERTY LTD

72K MILES, LOADED

2005 HONDA ACCORD

#231131

MPG

1999 BUICK 2004 HYUNDAI LESABRE CUSTOM XG350

ESCAPE EXPLORER MUSTANG

UP TO

» Elder played Cleveland St. Ignatius May 25 in the state quarterfinals after holiday deadline. Please visit cincinnati.com/preps for the latest postseason results.

#320841

YOUR CHOICE YOUR CHOICE ✦

$

FUSION

MPG

MPG

UP TO

2003 PONTIAC SUNFIRE SE

NEW 2013 FORD

NEW 2013 FORD

Volleyball

WE SERVICE ALL & MODELS! AKES M•BET TER FOR LESS!!!•

60

MONTHS

AVAILABLE ON MOST MODELS

NEW 2012 FORD

lay; boys’ 4x400 and 4x800 relay. » Elder - Andrew Sportsman, 100-meter dash; Logan Steiner. 1,600-meter run; Jonathon Reiter, 3,200meter run; Jaquon James, 300-meter hurdles; Joe Ratterman, pole vault; Nick Becker, long jump; A.J. Burdine, discus; 4x200 and 4x800 relay. » Seton - Kelsey Kurzhals, 100-meter dash; Jessie Woeste, 300-meter hurdles; Loretta Blaut, high jump; Alyssa Ramstetter, discus; 4x100 and 4x400 relay » Mercy - Quentaviana Mixon, 400-meter dash; Melina Artmayer, 800-meter run; Emma Hatch, 3,200-meter run; Haley Baker, pole vault, discus; 4x400 relay. » Gamble Montessori - Jazz Lovette, shot put; Jaalen Daniels, discus. » St. Xavier - Michael Hall, 800-meter run, 1,600-meter run; Michael Vitucci, 1,600meter run; Zach Lynett, 300-meter hurdles; Alex Kuvin, 3,200-meter run; Evan Stifel, 3,200-meter run; 4x400 and 4x800 relay.

,

$8,988

$10,988

COMPARE & SAVE

2006 FORD F-150 LARIAT

SUPER CREW, LEATHER, MOONROOF, HARD TONNEAU COVER

2012 FORD E-250 CARGO VAN

$16,988

$20,988

$20,988

2010 NISSAN PATHFINDER

2012 FORD ECONOLINE E-350 12-PASSENGER VAN, 18K MILES

$21,988

200,000 MILE ROAD HAZARD WARRANTY W/ FREE LOANER!

2011 BUICK ENCLAVE CXL 18K MILES, LOADED

$29,988

6K MILES, V8, AUTO, A/C

2009 CHEVY AVALANCHE LTZ

CREW CAB, FULLY LOADED, 34K MILES

$30,988

AVAILABLE ONLY AT WALT SWEENEY FORD

All pricing/payments plus tax,title,destination & fees. Consumer must finance with Walt Sweeney Ford for advertised prices and payments. All leases are 24 months with 10,500 miles per year. All lease are plus acq. fee & first payment. Leases based on 10,500 miles per year closed end lease with approved credit. Taxes, license, registration and acquistion fees not included in advertised payment. Total of lease equals payment x24 months plus down payment. Mileage charge of 20¢ per mile over 10,500 miles per year. Offers expire 5/31/13. Pictures may not reflect actual dealer’s stock. See dealer for complete details.

WALT SWEENEY.COM

WE SERVICE ALL MAKES 5400 GLENWAY AVE. & MODELS!

CREDIT CONCERNS? WE CAN HELP!

CALL OUR 24 HOUR HOTLINE:

866-812-9292


VIEWPOINTS A10 • PRICE HILL PRESS • MAY 29, 2013

COMMUNITY

PRESS

Editor: Marc Emral, memral@communitypress.com, 853-6264

EDITORIALS | LETTERS | COLUMNS | CH@TROOM

CommunityPress.com

Summer at library has superheroes and read-alongs Become a reading superhero by signing up for our Summer Reading Program, Power Up – Read! at the Delhi Township Branch Library. You can register today and start tracking your reading beginning Saturday, June 1, which is the day we also will have a special kickoff performance at 2 p.m. by the Frisch Marionettes. Throughout the day, kids can decorate their own superhero masks. The Summer Reading Program takes place June 1 through July 31 and is open to preschoolers through adults with some amazing prizes for all. Kids can attend free and fun programs at the Delhi Branch. There will be a Superhero

pete in an after-hour Training Camp at 11 Video Game Night from a.m. Saturday, June 8, 6:30-8 p.m. Friday, June for all junior super14. Other programs for heroes. Kids can teens to enjoy include show off their super designing their own talents by playing beach bags at 2 p.m. games and making Wednesday, June 19; crafts. The Amazing testing their chess skills Portable Circus Mag- Katy by signing up for the ic Show will visit at 11 Dettinger a.m. Saturday, June COMMUNITY PRESS annual Teen Chess Tournament at 1:30 p.m. Tues15, and is open to all GUEST COLUMNIST day, July 16; or learning ages. The Hamilton County Park District will bring to draw at Teen Basic Cartooning at 2 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. live animals to the library at 2 7. There will also be a Teen p.m. Tuesday, July 23, and Summer Book Club for grades Ronald McDonald will be stop6-12. Contact the Delhi Townping by at 2 p.m. Thursday, ship Branch for titles and to July 25. register for all teen programs. Teens will have plenty to do The adults won’t be left out at the Delhi Township Branch this summer. Our Delhi Branch this summer. They can com-

Book Club will meet at 7 p.m. Wednesday, June 19, to discuss “Devil’s Food Cake Murder” by Joanne Fluke and Wednesday, July 24, to discuss “Wench: A Novel” by Dolen Perkins-Valdez. New members are welcome! We’ve also invited local author Brian A. Klems to share from his book “Oh Boy, You’re Having a Girl: A Dad’s Survival Guide to Raising Daughters” at 7 p.m. Tuesday, June 11. A book signing will follow. Another real-life superhero, local author Keith Maginn, will visit at 7 p.m. Tuesday, July 9, to discuss his book “Goodwill Tour: Paying It Forward.” It is about his and Emily Buckley’s 3,000-mile road trip throughout

the South, practicing philanthropy and spreading kindness. A book signing will follow. Please call the Delhi Township Branch to learn more about the exciting Summer Reading Program, additional events for the entire family, and to register today. You can also stop in at the Delhi Township Branch or go online at www.CincinnatiLibrary.org/ SummerRead. Katy Dettinger is the Senior Children’s Librarian at the Delhi Township Branch of the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County, 5095 Foley Road; 513-369-6019. Email Katy.Dettinger@cincinnatilibrary.org.

Owed money? Consider small claims court

Small Claims court is for small cases where it may not be feasible to hire an attorney. If someone owes you money and won’t pay, take your case to small claims. A division of the Hamilton County Municipal Court, its purpose is to permit easy access to the court system for persons with disputes over relatively small amounts of money. Typical small claims cases are security deposit claims, car accidents and breach of contract actions. The most that you can sue for in small claims is $3,000.

case that involves By filing a small damage to a vehicle. claims case, you waive » You do not need your right to a trial an attorney if you before a judge or jury. represent yourself. A magistrate, a lawyer Your court date will appointed by the court, be approximately 28 hears these cases. days from the day you Here are some rules file. The trial occurs for filing: Brad at this first hearing so » You must know the Greenberg address of the party COMMUNITY PRESS be prepared and be on time. If you are late against whom you file GUEST COLUMNIST for court you may lose suit. your case. » The party filing the suit Small claims court only must prove his case by a predecides cases involving money. ponderance of admissible eviThe magistrate cannot order dence. either party to do anything » Only the owner may file a

How to keep children safe from dog bites

PRESS

A publication of

may need to file additional legal forms to try to collect your judgment. Winning a case against a defendant who cannot pay is often a hollow victory. Filing a small claims case costs $49.00. Visit the Clerk of Courts office located in the Hamilton County Courthouse at 1000 Main St. Room 115. The office is open from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday. Judge Brad Greenberg presides in Hamilton County Municipal Court. He is a Loveland resident.

Tips to help reduce smog

Each year millions of dog bites are their dog that good things happen around reported in emergency rooms across the their children. By recognizing dog body country. language, parents can monitor their pet’s What is more troubling is that children stress and warning signs to take steps for are most likely to get bitten and most of redirecting either their kids or their dog those incidents occur from the family dog from the situation. or a neighbor’s dog. Hugging, kissing, pinching, chasing, These bites do not happen out of the straddling, dressing in clothes, poking, blue. Dogs do not use human lying or straddling on, or chasing are language. They use their bodies just some of the activities kids to tell us when they are happy, should not do with or around their sad, frightened or angry. He dog. Children should never take may tell you he is content by anything – a toy, a shoe or a bone – having his mouth open and from their dog. swaying his tail gently back and The family dog should also have a forth. He may tell you he is unsafety spot like a crate, a bed or a comfortable by yawning, looking room where he knows he can go Lisa Desatnik away or closing his mouth and when he wants his own quiet “no tensing his muscles. If he still COMMUNITY PRESS disturb” time. Kids should be taught GUEST COLUMNIST cannot get you to leave him to leave him alone when he is there. alone, he may snarl or growl as a Additionally, parents and dog last resort before finally needing to resort caregivers need to remember that dogs to a bite to get him his much needed space. need both mental and physical stimulation. A dog will bite when there is a person If they do not receive those opportunities or another animal within biting range after from you, they will find their own way of he has tried to communicate non-aggresburning off their energy. sively that he is not comfortable, but he Set yourself and your pet up for success hasn’t been “listened to.” Biting is the last by training with positive reinforcement resort. Unfortunately once a dog has strategies that make learning fun. When learned that biting is what gets the scary you do that, you will not only be preventprovocative stimulus to move away, he will ing dog bites but strengthening your relabegin to use that behavior more often. tionship as well. Isn’t that why you got a Those bites can be prevented. dog in the first place? Socialization is so important from the For information about dog body lanmoment you bring your dog or puppy guage and other bite prevention informahome, setting him up to have nothing but tion, visit www.So MuchPETential.com positive experiences with a variety of where you will also find information about people and other dogs in a lot of different my upcoming educational programs for environments. Equally important is learnkids. ing how dogs communicate and how dogs Lisa Desatnik is a pet trainer and educator who like to be interacted with. combines behavior science with kindness, integParents should pro-actively supervise rity and fun to help pets and people succeed. Her while teaching their children how to rewebsite is www.SoMuchPETential.com. spect and empathize and play appropriately with their dog, as well as teaching

PRICE HILL

other than pay money. Therefore, you should have an idea of the specific value of your loss. It is helpful to bring estimates, receipts or other documents to prove your case. Be aware that if you file a small claims case, the defendant may file a counterclaim against you claiming that you owe him money. If the defendant wins you will have to pay him. Winning your case does not guarantee that you will get your money. If you win, you then have a valid judgment against the defendant. You

As summer weather quickly sudden stops as they increase fuel approaches, so does the potential of consumption. smog. The warm weather and in» Keep your vehicle maintained crease in sunlight can bake certain with properly inflated tires and chemicals forming ozone – one of timely oil changes. the primary pollutants in » Avoid use of gasolinesmog. powered lawn equipment. By making small » Avoid use of oil-based changes in our daily habits, paints and stains. we can all help improve air » Conserve electricity. quality. Consider taking the » Spread the word. following actions to reduce Smog can be harmful to smog formation: many sensitive groups such » Take the bus (METRO: as children, the elderly and Megan 513-621-4455 or TANK: those with respiratory conHummel 859-331-8265). ditions, and so it is impor» Carpool or vanpool COMMUNITY PRESS tant to know the air quality (RideShare: 513-241-RIDE). GUEST COLUMNIST forecast. You can receive » Ride a bike, in-line air quality notifications by skate or walk instead of driving. email by registering at www.Envi» Combine trips or eliminate roFlash.info. Current local air qualunnecessary vehicle trips. ity is also available at Southwest» Refuel your vehicle after 8 OhioAir.org. p.m.; do not top off when refueling Megan Hummel is the public relations and tighten the gas cap. coordinator for the Southwest Ohio Air » Do not idle your vehicle. Quality Agency. » Avoid quick accelerations and

MEETINGS » Cincinnati City Council meets at 2 p.m. every Wednesday in room 300 at Cincinnati City Hall, 801 Plum St. When there is a Monday holiday, all meetings including committee meetings are pushed back a day. City Manager: Milton Dohoney Jr. Mayor: Mark Mallory. » Cincinnati Public Schools Board of Education usually meets at 7 p.m. the second and fourth Mondays of the month at 2651 Burnet Ave. Board of Education phone: 475-7000. Superintendent: Mary Ronan. Board President: Eve Bolton. » East Price Hill Improvement Association meets the third Monday of each month at 7:30 p.m. at Holy Family Church, 814 Hawthorne Ave., Phone: 549-3744. Association President: Tom Gamel. » Delhi Township Trustees meet at 6 p.m. the second and last Wednesday of the month at

5556 Cheviot Road Cincinnati, Ohio 45247 phone: 923-3111 fax: 853-6220 email: pricehillpress@communitypress.com web site: www.communitypress.com

township offices, 934 Neeb Road. Phone: 922-3111. Administrator: Pete Landrum and President: Marijane Klug. » Oak Hills Local School District Board of Education members meet the first Monday of the month at 7 p.m. at various locations within the district. District office: 6325 Rapid Run Road. Phone: 574-3200. Superintendent: Todd Yohey. Board President: Jeannie Schoonover. » Price Hill Civic Club meets the second Tuesday of each month at 7:30 p.m. at Seton K of C Hall on West Eighth St. (across from St. William Church), Phone: 251-0880. Club President: Charles Bazeley. If you would like your meeting to be considered for this, send the information to memral@communitypress.com.

Price Hill Press Editor Marc Emral memral@communitypress.com, 853-6264 Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday See page A2 for additional contact information.


WEDNESDAY, MAY 29, 2013

LIFE

COMMUNITY PRESS

PEOPLE | IDEAS | RECIPES

First communicants from parishes throughout Greater Cincinnati participate in the eighth annual Family Rosary Rally.

WEST SIDERS PRAY THE ROSARY I

n the sun of May19, West Siders gathered to the eighth annual Family Rosary Rally West Siders are invited to an afternoon of prayer and music in the Pit at Elder High School. Green Township resident Frank Hoffman and three of his fellow Elder class of 1948 classmates â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Guy Langenbrunner, Donald Rowekamp and Bill Driehaus â&#x20AC;&#x201C; started the inspirational rally seven years ago to promote the praying of the rosary. The Most. Rev. Joseph Binzer, bishop of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati, was the cele-

brant. Hoffman said priests and deacons from parishes throughout Greater Cincinnati, first communicants, church and school choirs, several councils of Knights of Columbus and the Ancient Order of Hibernians took part, as well as the Blue Army, the Legion of Mary and some area Boy Scouts. An image of the Our Lady of Guadalupe also was on display this year. Photos by Beccky Butts/For the Community Press

Mary Freudiger recites the Glorious Mysteries during the Living Rosary. With her is Del Langenbrunner.

Gabriel Hirlinger places roses around the statue of St. Mary during the Procession of the Living Rosary.

An image of the Our Lady of Guadalupe was on display during the eighth annual Family Rosary Rally. Pam Bettner takes time to tell Mary Lee Stetter-Williams and others the history behind the famous image.

Angelo and Mona Caminiti take a moment after the Family Rosary Rally to visit with Bishop Joseph Binzer.

Many friends and family attended an afternoon of prayer and music during the eighth annual Family Rosary Rally in the Pit at Elder High School.

The Most. Rev. Joseph Binzer, bishop of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati, was the celebrant during the eighth annual Family Rosary Rally at Elder High School.


B2 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • MAY 29, 2013

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD THURSDAY, MAY 30

burgers, corn on the cob, City Barbeque and NYPD Pizza available. Rides, games and raffles. Beer garden with alcohol available for purchase with ID. Free. Presented by St. Bernard Church. Through June 9. 3534207; www.bernardfest.com. Colerain Township. Holy Family Church Festival, 6-11 p.m., Holy Family Church, 814 Hawthorne Ave., Food, games, entertainment, DJ Pau;, karaoke and bid-and-buy. Through June 9. 921-7527. East Price Hill.

Health / Wellness Sleep Disorders: Causes, Symptoms and Treatments, 6-7 p.m., Mercy HealthPlex Western Hills, 3131 Queen City Ave., Rooms A & B. With Dr. Shyamsunder Subramanian. Free. Registration required. Presented by Mercy Health Partners. 956-3729; www.emercy.com. Westwood.

FRIDAY, MAY 31 Art & Craft Classes

Music - R&B

Paint a State, 6:30-9:30 p.m., Broadhope Art Collective, 3651 Harrison Ave., All painting supplies provided. For ages 8 and up. $25. 225-8441; www.broadhopeartcollective.com. Cheviot.

SATURDAY, JUNE 8

Art Exhibits

Art & Craft Classes

Revealed: Reconsidered Substance, Shape and Form, 3-6 p.m., Flats Gallery, 3028 Price Ave., Exhibit about found objects, recycled industrial refuse, assemblages, materials re-formed and re-imagined. Four Cincinnati artists present unique interpretations of shape, form and color combinations, controlled variations of altered objects and singular impressions of layered material finds in carefully delineated compositions. Free. 244-4223; www.msj.edu/flats. East Price Hill.

Sewing 101, 9-11 a.m., Broadhope Art Collective, $50. Registration required. 225-8441; www.broadhopeartcollective.com. Cheviot.

Farmers Market

Basic Truth, 9:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m., Drew’s on the River, 4333 River Road, $3. 451-1157; basictruth.webs.com. Riverside.

Exercise Classes A wide variety of cars will be on display at this year’s St. Antoninus Cub Scout Car Show. The event is scheduled for 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, June 1, at St. Antoninus, 1500 Linneman Road. Registration is 9-11 a.m. with judging at 11:30 a.m. Benefits Cub Scout Pack 614. The cost is $15 to enter vehicle, free for spectators. For more information, call 921-7744 or visit www.saintantoninus.org. FILE PHOTO Recycling and Solid Waste District. 598-3089; bit.ly/11UQb9r. Green Township.

Recreation

Lettuce Eat Well Farmers Market, 3-7 p.m., Cheviot United Methodist Church, 3820 Westwood Northern Blvd., Special activity: Lettuce Eat Well, Lettuce Eat Seasonally, Lettuce Eat Locally. Market vendors will conduct demos using market food. Locally produced food items. Free. Presented by Lettuce Eat Well. Through Dec. 27. 481-1914; www.lewfm.org. Cheviot.

St. Antoninus Cub Scout Car Show, 9 a.m.-3 p.m., St. Antoninus Parish, 1500 Linneman Road, Registration 9-11 a.m. Judging 11:30 a.m. Trophy presentation 2:30 p.m. Awards for car owners, T-shirts, door prizes, split-thepot, raffles and food available for purchase. Music by disc jockey Brian Hellmann. Benefits Cub Scout Pack 614. $15 to enter vehicle, free for spectators. 921-7744; www.saintantoninus.org. Green Township.

Festivals

Religious - Community

St. Jude Bridgetown Festival, 6 p.m.-midnight, St. Jude Church, 5924 Bridgetown Road, Rides, games, bid-n-buy and more. Food available for purchase. Beer available with identification, wristband and tickets. Free. 574-1230. Bridgetown.

Take a Walk on the Wild Side, 11 a.m.-7 p.m., New Hope Community Church, 3707 Edgewood Drive, Musical drama; ventriloquist show; illusionist and the Extreme, Exotic, Exciting Animal Extravaganza. Concludes with music by Church Worship Band at 6 p.m. Free. 661-2428. Green Township.

SATURDAY, JUNE 1 Art & Craft Classes Sewing 101, 9-11 a.m., Broadhope Art Collective, 3651 Harrison Ave., Learn to sew on sewing machine. Leave with pillow you have sewn yourself. All materials provided. $50. Registration required. Through Sept. 7. 225-8441; www.broadhopeartcollective.com. Cheviot.

Art Exhibits Revealed: Reconsidered Substance, Shape and Form, 1-5 p.m., Flats Gallery, Free. 2444223; www.msj.edu/flats. East Price Hill.

Exercise Classes Spinning, 9-10 a.m., Western Sports Mall, 2323 Ferguson Road, Racquetball Center. Group cycling workout. Ages 14-99. $8-$10. Presented by SpinFit LLC. Through June 29. 451-4920; www.spinfitcincinnati.com. Westwood.

Festivals St. Jude Bridgetown Festival, 4 p.m.-12:30 a.m., St. Jude Church, Free. 574-1230. Bridgetown.

Garden Clubs Hillside Community Garden Regular Gardening Day, 9 a.m.-noon, Hillside Community Garden, 5701 Delhi Road, Garden together in unique hillside edible garden. All experience levels welcome. Dress for weather and bring water to drink. Work gloves and boots recommended. Other useful items are pruning shears and shovels. Free. Presented by Hillside Community Garden Committee. Through Nov. 2. 400-4511; hillsidegardendelhi.com. Delhi Township.

Home & Garden Hamilton County Recycling and Solid Waste District Yard Trimmings Drop-Off, 11:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Kuliga Park, 6717 Bridgetown Road, Hamilton County residents can drop off yard trimmings for free. Free. Presented by Hamilton County

SUNDAY, JUNE 2 Festivals St. Jude Bridgetown Festival, Noon-8 p.m., St. Jude Church, Free. 574-1230. Bridgetown.

Home & Garden Hamilton County Recycling and Solid Waste District Yard Trimmings Drop-Off, 11:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Kuliga Park, Free. 598-3089; bit.ly/11UQb9r. Green Township.

Schools Miami Heights Elementary School Closing, 1-2 p.m., Miami Heights Elementary, 7670 Bridgetown Road, Outside. Miami Heights Elementary closes its doors June 2. Celebrate 70-plus years of education. Students will be moving to Three Rivers Educational Campus next school year. Free. Presented by Miami Heights Elementary School. 467-3210. Miami Township. Charles T. Young School Closing, 2-3 p.m., Charles T. Young Elementary School, 401 N. Miami Ave., Outside. Charles T Young Elementary closes its doors June 2. Celebrate 80-plus years of education. Students will be moving to Three Rivers Educational Campus next school year. Free. 941-6400. Cleves. Three Rivers Middle School Closing, 3-4 p.m., Three Rivers Middle School, 8575 Bridgetown Road, Three Rivers Middle School closes its doors June 2. Celebrate 50-plus years of education. Students will be moving to Three Rivers Educational Campus next school year. Free. 941-6400. Cleves. Taylor High School Closing, 4-5:30 p.m., Taylor High School, 36 E. Harrison Ave., Outside. Miami Heights Elementary closes its doors June 2. Celebrate 80-plus years of education. Students will be moving to Three Rivers Educational Campus next school year. Free. 941-6400. North Bend.

Senior Citizens Over 55 Dance, 2-5 p.m., Delhi Senior and Community Center,

ABOUT CALENDAR To submit calendar items, go to www.cincinnati.com and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to life@communitypress.com along with event information. Items are printed on a spaceavailable basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to www.cincinnati.com and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page. 647 Neeb Road, Non-members welcome. Music by Nelson. $5. Presented by Delhi Seniors. 451-3560. Delhi Township.

2725; www.yogabymarietta.com. Delhi Township.

Religious - Community

TUESDAY, JUNE 4

Wednesday Night Solutions, 7-8:30 p.m., Vineyard Westside Church, 3420 Glenmore Ave., Weekly interactive DVD presentation hosted by Dr. Henry Cloud and Dr. John Townsend. Variety of topics addressing everyday issues such as communication, conflict and more. 922-7897; www.cloudtownsend.com/ resources/solutions. Cheviot. Free Community Meal, 5:306:30 p.m., Central Church of Christ, 3501 Cheviot Ave., Free. 481-5820; www.centralchurchofchrist1.com. Westwood.

Art & Craft Classes

Senior Citizens

Sewing 101, 11 a.m.-1 p.m., Broadhope Art Collective, $50. Registration required. 225-8441; www.broadhopeartcollective.com. Cheviot.

Zumba Gold, 1-2 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Modified Zumba for seniors and beginners with standing and chair participation. For seniors. $3, $25 for 10 classes. Presented by Deb’s Fitness Party. 205-5064; www.debsfitnessparty.com. Green Township.

MONDAY, JUNE 3 Exercise Classes Spinning, 5:45-6:45 p.m., Western Sports Mall, $8-$10. 4514920; www.spinfitcincinnati.com. Westwood. Zumba Fitness, 4-5 p.m., College of Mount St. Joseph, 5701 Delhi Road, EarthConnection. Fitness party. $3. Presented by EarthConnection. 288-6268. Delhi Township.

Farmers Market Sayler Park Farmers Market, 4-7 p.m., Nelson Sayler Memorial Park, Parkland Avenue and Monitor Street, Farmers Market with home-grown items like fruits, vegetables, desserts, salsas, relishes, jam and olive oil. Presented by Sayler Park Village Council. 675-0496. Sayler Park.

Health / Wellness What is Causing My Headaches? Causes and Treatment Options, 6-7 p.m., Mercy HealthPlex Western Hills, 3131 Queen City Ave., Rooms A and B. With Dr. Zainab Contractor. Free. Registration required. Presented by Mercy Health Partners. 956-3729; www.emercy.com. Westwood.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 5 Art & Craft Classes Sewing 101, 3:30-5:30 p.m., Broadhope Art Collective, $50. Registration required. 225-8441; www.broadhopeartcollective.com. Cheviot.

Exercise Classes Gentle Ashtanga Vinyasa Yoga, 7-8 p.m., EarthConnection, 370 Neeb Road, Moving meditation, increasing strength and flexibility, allowing for calming of mind and refreshing of spirit. Bring mat. $35 fiveclass pass; $8 drop-in. Presented by Yoga by Marietta. 675-2725; www.yogabymarietta.com. Delhi Township. Zumba Fitness, 4-5 p.m., College of Mount St. Joseph, $3. 288-6268. Delhi Township.

Health / Wellness Yoga Back Therapy, 6 p.m., EarthConnection, 370 Neeb Road, Gentle yoga postures to soothe the back. $30 for fiveclass pass or $7 drop-in. Presented by Yoga by Marietta. 675-

Support Groups Western Hills Job Search Satellite Group, 9-11 a.m., Westwood First Presbyterian Church, 3011 Harrison Ave., Community members welcome to learn from and support each other in job-seeking process. Speakers present valuable content about latest in electronic resumes, LinkedIn, effective networking, interview skills, available funding and community resources. Group members provide support and accountability to one another during this stressful time. Free. 6089359. Westwood.

FRIDAY, JUNE 7 Farmers Market Sayler Park Farmers Market, 4-7 p.m., Nelson Sayler Memorial Park, 675-0496. Sayler Park. Lettuce Eat Well Farmers Market, 3-7 p.m., Cheviot United Methodist Church, Free. 481-1914; www.lewfm.org. Cheviot.

Festivals St. Antoninus Parish Festival, 6 p.m.-midnight, St. Antoninus Parish, 1500 Linneman Road, Music by The Polecats. Wine available for purchase with ID and wristband. Music, airconditioned casino, games and rides. Alcohol with ID. Saturday and Sunday: petting zoo, pony rides and walking circus entertainment. Free. 922-5400; www.saintantoninus.org. Green Township. St. Bernard Summer Festival, 6 p.m.-midnight, St. Bernard of Clairvaux Church, 7130 Harrison Ave., Music by The Remains. Brats, metts, hot dogs, ham-

Spinning, 9-10 a.m., Western Sports Mall, $8-$10. 451-4920; www.spinfitcincinnati.com. Westwood.

Festivals St. Antoninus Parish Festival, 5:30 p.m.-midnight, St. Antoninus Parish, Texas Hold’Em Tournament in undercroft. Music by the Sullivan and Janszen Band. Adults only. Free. 922-5400; www.saintantoninus.org. Green Township. St. Bernard Summer Festival, 5 p.m.-12:30 a.m., St. Bernard of Clairvaux Church, Music by Ryan Broshear. Free. 353-4207; www.bernardfest.com. Colerain Township. Holy Family Church Festival, 5-11 p.m., Holy Family Church, 921-7527. East Price Hill.

Garden Clubs Hillside Community Garden Regular Gardening Day, 9 a.m.-noon 9 a.m.-noon, Hillside Community Garden, Free. 400-4511; hillsidegardendelhi.com. Delhi Township.

Home & Garden Hamilton County Recycling and Solid Waste District Yard Trimmings Drop-Off, 11:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Kuliga Park, Free. 598-3089; bit.ly/11UQb9r. Green Township.

Mini Pops Summer Strings, 6-8 p.m., Western Hills Music, 4310 Harrison Ave., Experience of an ensemble with popular music and opportunity to perform. Must have two years experience. Monday-Friday. Saturday dress rehearsal and performance. For ages 7-12 and adults. $125. Registration required. 289-2575; www.westernhills-music.com. Western Hills.

Summer Camps - Sports Soccer Unlimited Camps, 9 a.m.-noon, St. Antoninus School, 5425 Julmar Drive,Through June 14. Soccer Unlimited & Jack Hermans organize camps and clinics to improve/maintain your soccer talents by playing serious, training with intensity, and keeping the element of “FUN” involved at all times. $79. Presented by Soccer Unlimited. 922-2500. Green Township.

TUESDAY, JUNE 11 Art & Craft Classes Sewing 101, 11 a.m.-1 p.m., Broadhope Art Collective, $50. Registration required. 225-8441; www.broadhopeartcollective.com. Cheviot.

Farmers Market Sayler Park Farmers Market, 4-7 p.m., Nelson Sayler Memorial Park, 675-0496. Sayler Park.

Music Education Music for Munchkins, 10-11 a.m., College of Mount St. Joseph, 5701 Delhi Road, Weekly through July 16. CL25 in Music Department. Children ages 4-6 learn basic fundamentals of music through movement, rhythm, singing, group participation and playing instruments. $100. Registration required. 244-4235; www.msjmusicacademy.com. Delhi Township.

Senior Citizens 55+ Club for Seniors, 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Grace Lutheran Church, 3628 Boudinot Ave., Farbach-Werner presentation. Free. $8.75 for lunch. Registration required for lunch. 661-5166. Westwood.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 12 Art & Craft Classes Sewing 101, 3:30-5:30 p.m., Broadhope Art Collective, $50. Registration required. 225-8441; www.broadhopeartcollective.com. Cheviot.

Youth Sports

Exercise Classes

Youth Baseball League, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., Gamble-Nippert YMCA, 3159 Montana Ave., Weekly through July 27. Baseball field. Instructional league with goal of teaching fundamentals of baseball, such as hitting, throwing and basic game concepts. Ages 3-12. $90, $50 members. Registration required. 661-1105. Westwood.

Gentle Ashtanga Vinyasa Yoga, 7-8 p.m., EarthConnection, $35 five-class pass; $8 drop-in. 675-2725; www.yogabymarietta.com. Delhi Township.

SUNDAY, JUNE 9 Festivals St. Antoninus Parish Festival, 4-10 p.m., St. Antoninus Parish, Chicken dinner from “The Farm†5–7 p.m. Free. 9225400; www.saintantoninus.org. Green Township. St. Bernard Summer Festival, 2-10 p.m., St. Bernard of Clairvaux Church, Music by The Menus. Ron’s Roost Chicken dinner 1-7 p.m., $11. Free. 3534207; www.bernardfest.com. Colerain Township. Holy Family Church Festival, 3-10 p.m., Holy Family Church, 921-7527. East Price Hill.

Home & Garden Hamilton County Recycling and Solid Waste District Yard Trimmings Drop-Off, 11:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Kuliga Park, Free. 598-3089; bit.ly/11UQb9r. Green Township.

MONDAY, JUNE 10 Exercise Classes Spinning, 5:45-6:45 p.m., Western Sports Mall, $8-$10. 4514920; www.spinfitcincinnati.com. Westwood.

Summer Camps - Arts Western Hills Music School of Rock, 10-11 a.m., Western Hills Music, 4310 Harrison Ave., Group classes to explore basics of drums, bass, guitar, voice and keyboards with other budding rock stars. Monday-Friday. For ages 7-12 and 12-17. $75. Registration required. 598-9000; westernhills-music.com. Western Hills.

Health / Wellness Yoga Back Therapy, 6 p.m., EarthConnection, $30 for fiveclass pass or $7 drop-in. 6752725; www.yogabymarietta.com. Delhi Township. Shoulder Talks, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Beacon Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine-West, 6480 Harrison Ave., Dr. Robert Rolf speaks on options for shoulder pain relief. Includes refreshments. Free. Registration required. 354-7635; www.beaconortho.com. Green Township.

On Stage - Children’s Theater Wump Mucket Puppets, 10:3011:30 a.m., Cheviot Branch Library, 3711 Robb Ave., Puppet show full of original songs. Created and performed by puppeteer Terrence Burke. Free. Presented by Wump Mucket Puppets. 370-9803; www.wumpmucketpuppets.com. Cheviot.

Religious - Community Wednesday Night Solutions, 7-8:30 p.m., Vineyard Westside Church, 922-7897; www.cloudtownsend.com/resources/solutions. Cheviot. Free Community Meal, 5:306:30 p.m., Central Church of Christ, Free. 481-5820; www.centralchurchofchrist1.com. Westwood.

Senior Citizens Zumba Gold, 1-2 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, $3, $25 for 10 classes. 205-5064; www.debsfitnessparty.com. Green Township.

Support Groups Western Hills Job Search Satellite Group, 9-11 a.m., Westwood First Presbyterian Church, Free. 608-9359. Westwood.


LIFE

MAY 29, 2013 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • B3

Corn bread and detox bath – both make you feel good When I put in requests for ingredients in one bowl and recipes, I usually just put blend. Pour into a greased them in once, maybe twice. If 8-inch round or square pan and bake 25 minutes, until I don’t get a response from you or have nothing in my golden brown. files, I go on to the next request. But this one from Mark Cornbread from scratch Burnhimer has touched my Check out my Cooking with heart in a way that I am askRita blog for this recipe. Go to ing, once again, if any of you Cincinnati.Com/blogs. can help. Mark told me: “AfBuffet broccoli salad ter a minor health Broccoli was on sale issue, my caregiver at the grocery and I had had shared with me a craving for this salad. that he and his wife It’s not low fat or low really missed Zino’s sugar, but it’s always the and that he would be first to go on the buffet eternally happy if table. Rita someone had some of Salad Heikenfeld the old restaurant Mix together: recipes, including the RITA’S KITCHEN 1 large head of broccoli, cut Zino Burger. Have into florets (if stems are tender, you got anything that might use them, too, sliced thinly) resemble that in your file? I’d Generous 1⁄2 cup chopped red onion like to pay back someone for 2 cups shredded cheddar cheese the excellent care I received 1 ⁄2 pound bacon, cut up and while I was not at my best.” sautéed Mark has continued to follow up, asking if I’ve received Dressing anything. So if any of you can Whisk together: come even close, or can get 1 cup mayonnaise the recipe, do let me know. 1 ⁄2 cup sugar ⁄4 cup red wine vinegar or more to taste (I usually add more)

Kit Whiteman’s corn bread

1

“I’m such a fan and read your recipes every week. Here’s my recipe for corn bread. So quick and easy and tastes good, too,” Kit said. She’s right on all three counts. 1 box Jiffy Yellow Cake mix 1 box Jiffy Corn Bread mix

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Follow package directions for each box. Place all

Pour dressing over salad ingredients. Toss well. When serving, dig deep so that you get all the goodies that tend to fall to the bottom.

Tonya Fischer’s detox bath

After I shared recipes for natural scrubs, etc., I had more requests for natural bath soaks, especially ones

Rita says her broccoli salad is always the first to go on buffet tables. THANKS TO RITA HEIKENFELD.

using Epsom salts. I met Tonya during a presentation I did at Macy’s corporate offices on healthy living. She works with Executive Chef Rick Toennis. Rick and Tonya believe, as I do, in Mother Nature’s healing powers. She told me about a soothing detox bath she enjoys, and I asked her to share the recipe. “When I’m not feeling so good or after a long day at work or workout, I soak in this bath,” Tonya told me. I’m going to make this myself and soothe the sore muscles I now have after our car got hit with a 200-pound deer.

ginger 1 cup apple cider vinegar 10-20 drops Eucalyptus spearmint oil, or just Eucalyptus oil

⁄3 cup Epsom salt ⁄3 cup sea salt 1 ⁄3 cup baking soda 1 tablespoon powdered/ground

Tips from Tonya

1

1

Draw a bath with water as hot as you stand it. As tub fills, add all ingredients. Water will turn yellow/orange but don’t worry. Soak for about 40 minutes. While soaking, drink 24 oz. ice water. If you want, rub skin gently (always toward your heart) to stimulate lymphatic system and help clean out toxins. Dry off and drink another 24 oz. water as soon as possible, then relax. Epsom salt: Makes you sweat, reduces inflammation, relieves muscle aches.

Sea salt: Helps leach out toxins, soothes open sores or blemishes. Baking soda: Balances an overly acidic system, softens water, skin and helps eliminate chlorine. Ginger: Increases circulation, opens pores, makes you sweat. Vinegar: Restores acidalkaline balance, softens skin, helpful for acne. Massage oil: Relaxes body and senses. Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educator and author. Find her blog online at Cincinnati.Com/blogs. Email her at columns@communitypress.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Call 513-248-7130, ext. 356.

5815 DIXIE HWY (RT 4), FAIRFIELD

399

$

1

MO

XTS FWD SEDAN

39 MO LEASE $1995 DUE AT SIGNING

Premium Care Maintenance Standard on all 2011 and newer Cadillac vehicles, Premium Care Maintenance is a fully transferable maintenance program that covers select required maintenance services during the first 4 years or 50,000 miles.[1] Warranty Protection Cadillac Powertrain Warranty[2] is 30K miles more than Lexus and 50K more than BMW and Mercedes-Benz. The 4-year/50,000mile[1] Bumper-To-Bumper Limited Warranty covers repairs on your entire vehicle, including parts and labor, to correct problems in materials or workmanship.

1 AT THIS PRICE

New 2012 Cadillac

32

275 18

471

75

27

R RIVE

LEASE FOR

275 32 50

JeffWylerFairfieldCadillac.com

INTRODUCING THE NEW STANDARD OF LUXURY OWNERSHIP.

71

IO OH

New 2013 Cadillac

1-855-446-4339

75

RONALD REAGAN HWY

ER RIV

5 AT THIS PRICE

74

4

IO H O

TOLL FREE

FAIRFIELD 27

CTS COUPE

COURTESY CARS STARTING AT

31,995

$

PLUS

MSRP $39,800 WYLER DISCOUNT -$7,805 $31,995 SALE PRICE

0

% APR

Diagnostics by OnStar With best-in-class diagnostics from OnStar[3], maintaining your Cadillac can be as simple as checking your email or your OnStar MyLink mobile app. Every month you can receive an email with the status of key operating systems. All Cadillac models come with 1 year of OnStar service. STK# M42588

New 2013 Cadillac LEASE FOR

ATS

299

$

2

MO

2.5L SEDAN

2013 NORTH AMERICAN CAR OF THE YEAR!

39 MO LEASE $995 DUE AT SIGNING

Connections by OnStar Hands Free Calling capability from OnStar[3] allows you to safely make and receive calls from your Cadillac. With MyCadillac and OnStar MyLink[4] mobile apps, you can access and control your Cadillac from anywhere you have cell phone service. All Cadillac models come with 1 year of OnStar service. Emergency by OnStar In a crash, built-in sensors can automatically alert an OnStar[3] Advisor who is immediately connected into your Cadillac to see if you need help sent to your exact location. Other OnStar emergency services include Injury Severity Predictor and First Assist. All Cadillac models come with 1 year of OnStar service. Security by OnStar If you’ve reported your Cadillac stolen, OnStar[3] can use GPS technology to help authorities quickly locate and recover it. On most Cadillac models, an Advisor can send a Stolen Vehicle Slowdown® or Remote Ignition Block signal to help authorities safely recover it. All Cadillac models come with 1 year of OnStar service.

5 AT THIS PRICE

Navigation by OnStar Just push the OnStar[3] button and ask the Advisor to download directions to your Cadillac, and a voice will call out every turn. You can also plan routes from Google Maps™ or MapQuest.com® to your Cadillac. All Cadillac models come with 1 year of OnStar service. STK# M42595 (1) XTS closed end lease 39 months/10k per year lease $399 mo. $1,995 due at signing. Total of payments $16,524. (2) ATS closed end lease 39 months/10k per year lease $299 mo. $995 due at signing. Total of payments $10,764. (3) SRX closed end lease 39 months/10k per year lease $399 mo. $2,995 due at signing. Total of payments $13,284. All leases require credit approval and have $.25 per mile penalty for excess miles. Purchase option at termination. All offers are plus tax license and fees. See dealer for details. Vehicle / equipment may vary from photo. In stock units only, while supplies last. Expires 6/3/2013

STK# M42628 MODEL# 6DP47

2 AT THIS PRICE

New 2013 Cadillac

COURTESY CARS STARTING AT

31,995

$

PLUS

0% APR

Roadside Assistance Among leading automotive luxury brands, Cadillac is the only brand to offer standard 5-year Roadside Assistance that provides lock-out service, a tow, fuel, Dealer Technician Roadside Service and more. Courtesy Transportation During the warranty coverage period, this Cadillac program provides alternate transportation and/or reimbursement of certain transportation expenses if your Cadillac requires warranty repairs.

STK #M42659 MODEL# 6NG26

SRX FWD

$38,195 MSRP WYLER DISCOUNT -$6,200 $31,995 SALE PRICE


LIFE

B4 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • MAY 29, 2013

Friends tie for first in Girls on the Run 5K

ACADEMY GRADUATES

By Monica Boylson mboylson@communitypress.com

Delhi Twp. — Mady Nutter and Erica Schloemer had just yards to go to pass the finish line in the Girls on the Run 5K at Paul Brown Stadium. Exhausted the two knew they had to increase their speed to take first place in the girls race. “Mady told me to hold her hand and we crossed the finish line together,” Schloemer, 12, said. The girls finished the race together in 21 minutes, 22 seconds and were the first girls to cross the finish line. The race on Saturday, May 11, was for girls in grades third through eighth who participate in Girls on the Run of Greater Cincinnati, an afterschool program that encourages girls to be healthy and confident while incorporating running into the curriculum. There were more than 3,000 Girls on the Run racers and their running buddies, or anyone who wasn’t part of the program such as parents or friends, who

participated. “We were both feeling happy,” Nutter, 12, said. “It was the neatest feeling in the world.” “It was just so exciting to know that we had finished a 5K and won it,” Schloemer added. Schloemer got started in Girls on the Run last year in sixth grade at St. Dominic School and convinced Nutter to run this year as seventh graders. “We both signed up and we started running togeth-

SOUTHERN BAPTIST

PRESBYTERIAN

Liberty Missionary Baptist Church "Where Everybody is Somebody" 1009 Overlook Ave. 513-921-2502 Rev. Kendell Hopper Sunday School 10:00 am Sunday Morning Worship-11:00 am Sunday Evening 6:00 pm Wednesday Bible Study - 7:00 pm

UNITED METHODIST SHILOH

UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

5261 Foley Rd. / Cincinnati, Ohio 45238 513-451-3600 www.shilohumc.com WORSHIP TIMES Saturday @ 5:30 pm Sunday @ 9:30 am & 11:00 am

Mady Nutter, 12, left and Erica Schloemer, 12, took first place in the Girls on the Run 5K at Paul Brown Stadium Saturday, May 11. PROVIDED

OAK HILLS PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 6233 Werk Rd. (Enter off Werkridge) 922-5448 Rev. Jerry Hill 10:00 a.m Worship & Sunday School Nursery Care Avail.

Come and worship in a small casual church that emphasizes the fellowship and mission in the community and globally. www.oakhillspc.com

UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST St. Peter & St. Paul United Church of Christ

3001 Queen City Ave. 513-661-3745 Rev. Martin Westermeyer, Pastor Bible Study: 9 am Worship & Church School: 10 am Dial-A-Devotion 426-8957 www.stpeterandstpaulucc.org

er,” she said. “We both have the same pace which was good.” The girls in the club at St. Dominic meet twice a week after school for 75 minutes. Each meeting includes a lesson about how to love yourself, be a team player and part of the community and then includes a run. “We practiced running the Delhi hills,” physical education teacher and Girls on the Run coach Jan McReynolds, 51, said. “I told the girls a 5K would be nothing after training in Delhi.” As the Girls on the Run 5K approached, McReynolds said the coaches made sure the girls were running at least 3.2 miles, the distance of the race. “I feel really accomplished, knowing that I finished first,” Nutter said. The two plan to participate in Girls on the Run next year. “I want to win first for the whole thing and run it in 21 minutes,” Schloemer said. “I just love running.” Also participating in the race from St. Dominic School were: Abby Neumann, Ally Albertz, Analise Kandra, Mara Weaver, Maggie Geiger, A. J. Kirkendall. Absent from the race was Hannah Bacon. Coaches were McReynolds, Kelly Griffin, Mary Ann Romanello and Jenny Teepen.

The Hamilton County Sheriff's Office Basic Corrections Academy graduation class No. 108 are, in back, from left, Travis A. Buckmeier, Harrison; Ryan M. Braun, St. Bernard; Timothy S. Roy, West Chester; Derek S. Bischoff, Harrison; Benjamin B. Sukys, Mariemont; Bryan B. Burger, Norwood; Justin D. Thompson, Miamitown; Frank E. Shuber, Eastgate; Joshua S. Noel, Mason; and John B. Perry, Kettering; in middle, Nicholas R. Pittsley, Milford; Alexander C. Kramer, Lawrensburg; Eric D. Wagner, Anderson; Travis P. Schimmel, Hyde Park; Chad J. McGuffey, Colerain; John A. Boyd, Hamilton; Kiya L. Denmark, Norwood; Joshua P. Holden, Batavia; Evamaria A. Alcala, Colerain; and Lieutenant Daniel Ems; and in front, Daniel B. Erwin, Springfield Twp; Katie N. Vossler, Reading; Kelly M. Rodseth, Middletown; Alison M. Duebber, Delhi; Aerial E. Bryson, Harrison; Jennifer K. Henson-Arlinghaus, Batavia; Jamelia B. Durham, Forest Park; Dominique S. Bates, Clifton; Shane C. Wiseman, Colerain; and Stefan G. Endicott, Mariemont. THANKS TO JIM KNAPP

Harrison Ave. closing near Queen City If your trip into Cincinnati takes you down Harrison Avenue, then you will need to take a detour. As part of the City of Cincinnati’s ongoing Harrison Avenue Improvements project, the section of Harrison Avenue between Fairmount Avenue and Biegler Street is closed to all traffic. It will re-open Sept. 3, immediately following Labor Day. This section of roadway is being rebuilt to improve safety by straightening an S-curve between Fairmount Avenue and Biegler Street. The accident rate for the S-curve is nearly five times the city average. Other attempts to improve safety in this area – including reduced speed limits and flashing signals – have not reduced the accident rate.

HAVING TROUBLE PAYING YOUR MORTGAGE?

WE’RE HERE TO HELP.

The State of Ohio provides free assistance for homeowners to help them stay in their homes. Save the Dream Ohio is administered by the Ohio Housing Finance Agency and funded by the U.S. Department of the Treasury’s Hardest Hit Fund. It’s safe, secure and available at no cost.

APPLY NOW FOR UP TO $35,000. Note: Applicants must meet eligibility requirements related to income, assets and hardship. Participation is contigent upon mortgage service approval.

OHIO HOUSING FINANCE AGENCY CE-0000554336

CE-0000547805

“We certainly understand this presents an inconvenience, but we appreciate the public’s patience during this project,” said Michael Moore, director of the DepartmentofTransportation and Engineering. “The new roadway design should significantly lower the accident rate and really improve safety for everyone who uses Harrison Avenue.” The detour will be: Westbound: At the intersection of Harrison and Queen City avenues, westbound through traffic will be diverted west along Queen City Avenue, to north on LaFeuille Avenue, and back to Harrison Avenue. Traffic will be maintained on Harrison Avenue past the intersection with Queen City Avenue to the point of closure at Biegler Street, allowing access to residences,

businesses and streets east of Biegler Street. Eastbound: At the intersection of Harrison and LaFeuille avenues, through traffic will be diverted south along LaFeuille Avenue, to east on Queen City Avenue and Westwood Avenue, and back to Harrison Avenue. Traffic will be maintained on Harrison Avenue past the intersection of LaFeuille Avenue to the point of closure at Fairmount Avenue to allow access to residences, businesses and streets west of, and including, Fairmount Avenue. Drivers are encouraged to reduce their speed and use caution when approaching the closure area. For information about the Department of Transportation and Engineering, go to www.cin cinnati-oh.gov/dote.


LIFE

MAY 29, 2013 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • B5

New St. Xavier principal can’t wait to start work

NEW PILOT

By Monica Boylson mboylson@communitypress.com

Robert Muirheid of Cleves earned his commercial pilot certificate on Nov. 28. With his certificate, Muirheid is now approved by the Federal Aviation Administration to fly aircraft for compensation. He is enrolled in the Aviation Technology: Professional Pilot Program at the University of Cincinnati – Clermont College. The laboratory portion of the Professional Pilot Program is taught at the Clermont County Airport. When he completes the two-year program through, he will have also earned an associate of applied science degree. Muirheid, left, is with instructor Jeremy Henson immediately following his commercial check ride. PROVIDED

Park district hosting concerts with rock and classic country group, the Danny Frazier Band. Other artists include: » River City Rewind: June 15 at Fernbank Park; » Dejavu: June 29 at Sharon Woods; » Unbalanced: July 13 at Winton Woods Harbor Amphitheater; » The Mistics: July 27 at Winton Woods Harbor Amphitheater; » Hickory Robot: August 10 at Miami Whitewater Forest Harbor Point; » Systems Go & Prism Brass: August 21 at Sharon Woods Cardinal Mead-

Things are heating up this summer with the return of Hamilton County Park District’s Sizzlin’ Summer Concert Series, sponsored by Coors Light. Featuring free live music by talented local bands, concerts are held 7-9 p.m. Saturdays at different parks throughout the district. These familyfriendly events will also have food and ice cold drinks available for purchase, so the only thing you need to bring are your dancing shoes. » The series kicks off June 8 at Miami Whitewater Harbor Forest Point

ow. The Sizzlin’ Summer Concerts are free and open to the public. A valid Hamilton County Park District Motor Vehicle Permit ($10 annual; $3 daily) is required to enter the parks. Armleder and Fernbank Parks are cooperative ventures with the Cincinnati Park Board; a Motor Vehicle Permit is not required. For additional information, visit greatparks.org or call 513-521PARK (7275). Also, be sure to check out the district’s Facebook page and on Twitter.

When Terry Tyrrell starts his new job July 1, he says his children will think it is easy. “My kids think my job is to watch basketball and eat popcorn and M&Ms,” the father of three joked. “They think that’s all I do because when we go to school that’s what we do. That’s their grasp of things.” Tyrell, 37, was re- Tyrrell cently named as St. Xavier High School principal. The Chicago resident is now the assistant principal for student services for St. Ignatius College Prep in Chicago, Ill. “They also know that we’re moving to Cincinnati, that I’m going to be at St. Xavier and they know that girls aren’t allowed to be here,” he said. “They don’t think they can even come here so we’ll work on that but they’re excit-

ed.” Tyrrell’s wife is Marygrace and his three children are Mara, 5, Eleanor, 3, and Clarke who is 9 months old. He said he was happy to hear of the opening at St. Xavier. “Nobody wants to be a principal, you just get called to it,” he said. “I felt a calling to be principal and St. X has a great reputation within the Jesuit network, so I knew it to be a good school.” The principal position was available after former St. X Principal Dave Mueller took a job at Mercy High School last spring after 19 years. Then assistant principal Bill Sandquist stepped in as an interim principal to give the school time to find a permanent replacement. Sandquist had already announced that he would be retiring after 19 years at the school. “We formed a committee of faculty, trustees, alumni and parents and put together a posting and that committee then received applications and decided who to inter-

view,” St. Xavier President Fr. Tim Howe SJ said. Howe said, even though the school has had two lay principals, it is the first time in St. Xavier history that a lay principal is somebody who is new to St. X. “He brings a lot to the table and has a deep experience and affection for the Jesuit education,” he said. “He’s a product of the Jesuit education himself. But he also brings fresh eyes and can look at how we’re doing things here from a different perspective.” Tyrrell has also been the director of student activities and at St. Ignatius School in Chicago; taught social studies at St. Louis University High School, St. John’s College High School in Washington D.C. and Saint Ignatius; and was a resident school prefect at Georgetown Preparatory School in Bethesda, Md. “My own goals are to do what is best for the students,” he said. “The first year I will listen, look and learn the culture of St. X.”

Family owned since 1960

Happily accepting transfers from Remke Bigg’s customers! Looking for a Family pharmacy to take GREAT care of you with free delivery to Western Hills & Delhi?

Home of Lifetime FREE Oil Changes All Cars & Trucks Gas - Diesel Retail, Commercial, Fleet NO EXCEPTIONS

Hart Pharmacy 4861 Glenway Ave. Cincinnati, OH 45238 Phone: (513) 471-1605 Hours: Mon-Fri 9am to 10pm Sat 9am to 6pm Sun 9:30am to 2pm We offer: -

consultation

All in stock or special orders

900 West Eighth Street West Eighth Downtown Cincinnati Free Service Shuttle *

Linn

Downtown I-75

-

Hassle-free transfers.

-

Free Delivery 7 days a week.

-

Most insurance plans accepted including Express Scripts, Molina and TriCare.

352-5800

www.FullerisFord.com

Personal service and private pharmacy

-

Shingles and Flu Vaccines.

-

Individualized “HartPak” for weekly medication management.

Join Our Family CE-0000557255


LIFE

B6 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • MAY 29, 2013

BRIEFLY

The SouthWest Cincinnati Tea Party will host a town hall on the IRS situation – IRS IntimidationAre you next? National Town Hall to Review the Situation and Plan Next Steps – on Wednesday, May 29, at the Farm, 239 Anderson Ferry Road.

Holly Ann Grow

Celebrate the Delhi Police Department’s 50-year anniversary at Cops and Rodders, a cruise-in and sock hop sponsored by the Delhi Street Rodders and the Delhi Police Historical Association on Saturday, June 1, at the Delhi Senior Center. The cruise-in is 10 a.m.-2 p.m. and is free to the public. There will be grilled food and drinks available. The sock hop, from 7-11 p.m., is $15 per person and includes beer, soft drinks, snacks, music and raffles. Tickets are available in advance or at the door. Proceeds from the event will help pay to restore a Ford Galaxie, the first model of car the police station used. It will also fund other events to celebrate the department’s 50 years. For more information or to buy tickets for the sock hop call Joe Middendorf at 379-1905.

Mr. & Mrs. John Young & Mr. Richard Grow announce the engagement of their daughter, Holly Ann Grow to Sean Eric Hudson. The couple currently reside and work in Greenfield, Indiana. The Craw fish boil wedding will take place in benefits jazz festival Cincinnati, Ohio on August 17, 2013.

LEGAL NOTICE DELHI TOWNSHIP BOARD OF ZONING APPEALS CASE VA2013-2 The Delhi Township Board of Zoning Appeals will hear an appeal from a decision of Township Delhi the on Inspector Zoning evening, Tuesday June 11, 2013 at 7:00 PM at the Delhi TownAdministration ship at located Building, 934 Neeb Road, Delhi Hamilton Township, County, Ohio (Cincin nati, 45233). This appeal, filed by Jennifer Vatter (property owner), requests that a variance be granted so to permit the construction four/five foot (4’/5’) high, solid fences in the west rear yard extending into the north and south side yards at 149 Riverama subject The Drive. property is located in the "A" Residence District as shown on the Delhi the of maps Township Zoning ResZoning The olution. prohibits Resolution than greater fences four feet (4’) in height and/or those less than (50%) percent fifty open in side yards in all Residence districts. Anyone may appear in person or be represented by an attorney if they so wish. This request is on file at the Delhi Township Department of Develop ment Services, located Road at 697 Neeb Department (Fire Headquarters), Cincin nati, Ohio 45233, and can be reviewed during regular business hours (8:30 am to 4:30 pm) for at least ten days prior to the public hearing on the application. Thomas R.Stahlheber, Director Department Of Development Services 1762792 To place your BINGO ad call 513.242.4000

LEGAL NOTICE DELHI TOWNSHIP BOARD OF ZONING APPEALS CASE VA2013-1 The Delhi Township Board of Zoning Appeals will hear an appeal from a decision of the Delhi Township Zoning Inspector on Tuesday evening, June 11, 2013 at 7:00 PM at the Delhi TownAdministration ship at located Building, 934 Neeb Road, Delhi Hamilton Township, County, Ohio (Cincin nati, 45233). This appeal, filed by Harold (property Erdmann owner), requests that a variance be granted so to permit the continued situation of a four foot (4’) high, fifty percent (50%) open fence in the north rear yard the into extending west front yard at 398 The Drive. Viscount subject property is located in the "C" Residence District as shown on the maps of the Delhi Township Zoning Resolution. The Zoning Resolution prohibits fences greater than four feet (4’) in those and/or height less than seventy-five percent (75%) open in front yards in all Residence districts. Anyone may appear in person or be represented by an attorney if they so wish. This request is on file at the Delhi Township Department of Develop ment Services, located Road at 697 Neeb (Fire Department Headquarters), Cincin nati, Ohio 45233, and can be reviewed during regular business hours (8:30 am to 4:30 pm) for at least ten days prior to the public hearing on the application. Thomas R.Stahlheber, Director Department Of Development Services 1001762789

Mother Seton Knights of Columbus Grand Knight Toby Brauer and Cincinnati Police District 3 Capt. Russ Neville. PROVIDED

Organizers of the East Price Hill Jazz Fest are hosting a craw fish boil from 6-10 p.m. Saturday, June 1. The event is a fundraiser for the annual jazz festival. All are welcome for some craft beer and craw fish. Live craw fish will be flown in the day of the event. Other Louisiana fare will also be available. The craw fish boil takes place at the Warsaw Project Gallery, 3116 Warsaw Ave. Admission is only open to those 21 and older. The suggested minimum donation is $20 per person.

Neville honored by Mother Seton K of C

Cincinnati Police Capt. Russ Neville, District 3 commander, was named the “Blue Coat of the Year” by the Mother Seton Knights of Columbus. The award was presented during the Knights’ annual recognition dinner May 16. The council appreciates the hard work and many contributions made by Neville to the Price Hill community. Neville’s father, Gary, served as District 3 captain in the 1970s and was on hand for the ceremony.

Oak Hills grateful for support

The Oak Hills Local School District thanks community members, students, staff and parents who participated in the One Hope, One Heart volleyball competition at Oak Hills High School May 10. This year’s event raised more than $7,100, which will go to helping district families who have experienced tragic situa-

tions. Every school in the district took part in the competition. This year’s winning team was Delhi Middle School. Visit www.ohlsd.us for more information.

Color guard meeting

Sign ups for the the Elder High School Junior Color Guard will be 6-7 p.m. Thursday, May 30, in the Elder High School Band Room. The Elder High School Junior Color guard is open to boys and girls in grades five through eight looking for a fun activity and an opportunity to be part of a team and meet new friends from other local schools. Junior color guard members will learn a few routines on flag and perform them with the Varsity Color Guard at Elder’s football game on Grade School Night and will march in several local parades. No prior experience is necessary and there are no tryouts required. For information contact Jenny Meyer at 513389-3242 ext. 2303 or mrsjmeyer@hotmail.com or Becky Riegler at becky.riegler@gmail.com .

Seton student wins scholarship from Sisters of the Poor

Seton High School sophomore Brittany Oestreicher was the recipient of a Vocation Essay Contest scholarship from the Franciscan Sisters of the Poor. Oestreicher received $500 for her essay written about vocations. Her career goal is to be-

Sharonville, OH

Sewing ! Quilting ! Fiber Art

40!. +&1+$# *,+&

%)658!-("". 98!-.!2(8! 9.!2.5 7 ++&$$ 9).32.5 '86/

Vendor Shopping, Classes, Stage Presentations & Quilt Art Displays - Over 300 Items Bring a non-perishable food item to receive

2

$ 00

Marianne Fons Love of Quilting

Mary Fons

Joi Mahon

Love of Quilting Dress Forms Design Studio

off registration!

Invalid with other offers

Classes by these industry professionals plus many others! $ $ $ $ $

+== J9= TUJ=LJ PMQ>I?JL <QM OI8TJ8R:- L=58R:- 7R8J UR> ?MQ?9=J EU7= " )U7=L " &QQM CM81=L !.## LJU:= PM=L=RJUJ8QRL " !UL98QR +9Q5L +=5 U +=US !QM '9UM8J2 %8J9 FQ6=BI8TJ 'QRR=?J8QR Second Annual - Cincinnati’s Got Talent ,PMQR 'QSP=J8J8QR+PQRLQM=> @2 HURQS= " +=5N#12 +=58R: +JI>8QA '9=?7 J9= 5=@L8J= <QM MIT=LA $ ,T19=8S=M;L BI8TJ ,MJ #498@8J

HOURS: THUR-FRI 10 am - 5 pm, SAT 10 am - 4 pm 'TULL=L @=:8R UJ / US =U?9 >U2- M=:8LJMUJ8QR QP=RL UJ 0 US .=:8LJMUJ8QR* G0 =U?9 >U2 N GK3 SITJ8N>U2 (R>=M K3 !.##

www.originalcreativefestival.com or call 800-473-9464 CE-0000556888

#NSU8T* ________________________________________

Tea party meets on IRS

Cops, Rodders cruise-in, sock hop

DUS=* ________________________________________ ,>>M=LL* _______________________________________ C9QR=* ________________________________________

The Delhi Township Board of Trustees willmeet at 6 p.m. Wednesday, May 29, at the township administration building, 937 Neeb Road. The board is expected to vote on an amended fee schedule for the parks department which would charge all organizations and individuals for the use of the Delhi Park Lodge and the Delhi Township Community/Senior Center as well as identify field usage fees for all sports.

Dinner will be at 6 p.m. with the meeting beginning at 7 p.m. Agenda topics include: Attacks on the Tea Party, Congressional Action, and Obamacare. Confirmed speakers include George Brunemann, U.S. Rep. Steve Chabot and Jenny Beth Martin. More details are being finalized. For information, email George Brunneman at george@SWCTP.org.

Bring this ad to enter a $100 drawing!

Park issues on trustees agenda

Seton High School sophomore Brittany Oestreicher, middle, is presented a Vocation Essay Contest reward. At the presentationa re, from left, Maria Bonhaus Meyer, Franciscan Sisters of the Poor director of Spiritual Programs; Donna Brigger, Seton High School principal and CEO; Oestricher; Ruthy Trusler, Franciscan Sisters of the Poor director of Vocations; and Jo Ann Jackowski, SFP, Franciscan Sisters of the Poor director of Initial Formation. THANKS TO CHRISTY SCHUTTE

come an occupational and speech therapist.

St. Vincent de Paul offers ways to help tornado victims

The Society of St. Vincent de Paul is asking for help in bringing relief to the residents of Moore, Okla. following the devastation of Monday’s tornado. St. Vincent de Paul volunteers living in the affected area are already on the ground giving relief to their neighbors who have been impacted by the storm. We are asking for financial donations to directly support those local volunteers in their efforts. St. Vincent de Paul is also collecting personal care items and toiletries, cleaning supplies, first aid supplies, blankets and baby care products, partnering with Matthew 25 Ministries to deliver these items to the affected area. Here’s how you can help: » Make a financial donation online at www.SVDPcincinnati.org or by calling 513-421-4673. » Donate personal care items, cleaning supplies, first aid supplies, blankets and baby care products at any St. Vincent de Paul Thrift Store location or at our West End Outreach Center. Visit www.SVDPcincinnati.org for locations.

Covedale theater offers program for young performers

The Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, 4990 Glenway Ave., continues its Cincinnati Young People’s Theatre Prep Program this summer. Open to children ages 10 through13, the program prepares young performers who may wish to audition for the award-winning Cincinnati Young People’s Theatre teen program or audition for the Covedale theater’s regular season shows when they are old enough. Classes will encompass acting, improvisation, theater skills, music and a

final performance on the Covedale stage - all taught by experienced instructors and professional guest artists. The program offers two sessions this summer. The first session runs 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday, June 17, through Friday, June 21. The final performance, which is free and open to the public, is at 3 p.m. June 21. Session two is 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday, Aug. 12, through Friday, Aug. 16. The final performance for the second session is at 3 p.m. Aug. 16. Classes take place in the rehearsal studio at the Covedale theater. Tuition for the program is $100. A limited amount of funds, distributed on a confidential basis, are available to assist with the tuition fee. Call Jennifer Perrino at 241-6550 to learn more about applying for tuition assistance. The registration deadline for the first session is Monday, June 10. Registration for the second session must be completed by Monday, Aug. 5. For more information, call 241-6550 or visit www.cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com.

West High teacher inducted ino hall of fame

Western Hills University High School teacher and former Xavier University basketball player Anthony Hicks was inducted into the Greater Cincinnati Basketball Hall of Fame on Wednesday, May 8. Hicks was among 12 inductees. The Greater Cincinnati Basketball Hall of Fame is a nonprofit organization created in 1996 by the late George C. Spencer. The organization honors and recognizes people who have made significant contributions to amateur and professional basketball in the Cincinnati metropolitan and surrounding areas, nationally and internationally.

Certified Feline Master Groomer Certified Professional Pet Sitter Certified Canine Massage Therapist Certified Equine Massage Therapist Dog Grooming and Dog Training

20% off

Canine Massage Therapy ANGELA SEXTON

(513) 386-9793

www.angelaslovingtouch.com

(first time client) expires 6/30/13


LIFE

MAY 29, 2013 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • B7

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES If you have a volunteer opportunity you would like listed, email the information to memral@communitypress.com.

Animals/ Nature GRRAND – Golden Retriever Rescue and Adoption of Needy Dogs takes in needy displaced, abandoned or unclaimed stray golden retrievers and places them in volunteer foster homes until adoptive families are found. Call 1-866-981-2251 and leave your name and phone. Visit www.ggrand.org. email www.cincygrrand@yahoo.com. League For Animal Welfare – A no-kill shelter needs volunteers 16-and-older to help socialize cats and 18-and-older to socialize and walk dogs. Other opportunities available. Call 735-2299, ext. 3. Save the Animals Foundation – Needs people 18 and older to staff its shelter for homeless cats and dogs. Call 378-0300 for cats and 588-6609 for dogs. Spring Grove Cemetery and Arboretum – has a new horticulture volunteer program. Volunteer opportunities include working side by side Spring Grove’s nationally-renowned horticulture team at this National Historic Landmark. Groups of volunteers will be developed to help in the following areas: keeping the front entrance area looking spectacular, controlling invasive species, taking care of the tree and shrub collection. They are also looking for a volunteer, or volunteers, to help with the hybrid tea roses. New volunteers join the volunteer docents who are ambassadors for the cemetery and arboretum. Information sessions, conducted the last Saturday and first Wednesday of each month, will explain the volunteer opportunities. Sessions are at 10 a.m. in the Historic Office, just inside the main entrance to the cemetery. For more information, contact volunteer coordinator Whitney Huang, Spring Grove horticulturist, at 8536866. Tri State County Animal Response Team (CART) – Is at 11216 Gideon Lane in Sycamore Township. Meetings are open to

the public. Visit www.tristatecart.com for monthly subjects or more information. Call 702-8373. Winton Woods Riding Center – is in need of volunteers to assist with the Special Riders Program, which provides training and competition opportunities for children and adults with disabilities, and to help with barn duties, horse shows and a variety of other tasks. No experience is necessary and training is provided. Interested individuals ages 14 and older are invited to contact the Winton Woods Riding Center at 9313057, or at wwrc@greatparks.org.

Professional services Executive Service Corps of Cincinnati – Professionals can use their administrative skills to help a busy, growing nonprofit manage its projects and members. Executive Service Corps of Cincinnati is looking for someone with experience in Word, Excel, Power Point and Outlook to assist in the Blue Ash office. Volunteers set their own days and hours and enjoy nice working conditions and friendly, bright volunteers and staff. Help the ESCC help other nonprofits succeed. Contact Darlyne Koretos for more information at 791-6230, ext. 10. ESCC is located at 10945 Reed Hartman Highway, Suite 108.

Health/Wellness Crossroads Hospice - Volunteers are wanted to join the team of Ultimate Givers who strive to provide extra love and comfort to terminally-ill patients and their families in Brown, Butler, Clermont, Clinton, Hamilton, Highland and Warren counties. Volunteers are also needed to support signature programs inspired by Jim Stovall’s novel, “The Ultimate Gift” The Gift of a Day program asks patients what their perfect day is and staff and volunteers work to make it a reality. Ultimate Givers visit with patients in their homes, assisted living facilities and nursing facilities and help with clerical duties at the Crossroads office. They

provide emotional support and companionship to patients and family members, assist with errands or provide respite for those caring for terminally-ill loved ones. For more information or to sign up as an Ultimate Giver, call 793-5070 or compete an application online at www.crossroadshospice.com/ volunteering. Before becoming a Crossroads Hospice Ultimate Giver, participants must complete an application, TB skin test and training session lead by members of the Crossroads team. Volunteers must wait a minimum of one year after the death of an immediate family member or loved one before applying.

Education Change a life – Volunteer to tutor an adult with low-level literacy skills or GED preparation needs. Call 621-READ. Cincinnati Reads – a volunteer tutoring program working with K-4 students in Cincinnati Public Schools. Volunteers receive free training to work one-on-one with children who are struggling to read. Call 621-7323 or email Jayne Martin Dressing, jdressing@lngc.org. Great Oaks – currently recruiting volunteer tutors for its GED and ESOL classes. There are five hours of training required. The next dates are Wedmesdays, Aug. 22 and 29, at Scarlet Oaks in Sharonville. Numerous sites and times are available for volunteering. Call Kim at 6125830 for more information. Inktank – Group looking for volunteers to help children and adults improve their skills in writing-based initiatives across the city. Call 542-0195. Helping Young Mothers Mentors Inc. – is seeking individuals who are willing to give their time as a mentor to assist teen mothers in improving their quality of life and who are striving to make it in today’s society. If you are interested in helping to “create a self sufficient mom for a better tomorrow” in your community and interested in truly seeing results, become a mentor by calling 513-520-6960.

Winton Woods City Schools – Wants to match community members who are interested in volunteering in the schools with the students. Volunteer opportunities at Winton Woods Primary North and South, middle school and high school. Volunteers who would have one-on-one contact with students outside of a classroom are required to have a background check. To volunteer, contact Gina Burnett at burnett.gina@wintonwoods.org or 619-2301. The YMCA of Greater Cincinnati’s College Readiness Program – that inspires and encourages teens of color toward paths of success is looking for caring professionals who want to make a difference, and for young people who can benefit from positive adult role models. Part of a national YMCA initiative, the local program incorporates mentoring, career exploration and college readiness; and helps students develop a positive sense of self, build character, explore diverse college and career options. Volunteers, many of whom are sponsored by area companies, share their own personal insight and encouragement. Contact Program Director Darlene Murphy at the Melrose YMCA, 961-3510 or visit www.myy.org.

Entertainment Business Volunteers for the Arts – BVA is accepting applications from business professionals with at least three years experience, interested in volunteering their skills within the arts community. Projects average six to eight months in length and can range from marketing or accounting to Web design or planning special events. A one-day training program is provided to all accepted applicants. Call 8712787. Center for Independent Living Options – Seeking volunteers to staff Art Beyond Boundaries, gallery for artists with disabilities. Volunteers needed noon to 4:30 p.m. Tuesday through Friday, and noon to 5 p.m. Saturday. Call 241-2600.

Cincinnati Museum Center – Needs volunteers to work in all three museums, the Cincinnati History Museum, the Museum of Natural History and Science and the Cinergy Children’s Museum, and special exhibits. Call 287-7025.

families. Volunteers needed to visit with patients and/or assist in administrative and clerical tasks. Volunteers may provide care wherever a patient resides, whether in a private home or nursing facility. Call 1-888-8668286 or 682-4055. Heartland Hospice – is seeking volunteers to assist with our patients and their families. We will train interested persons who are needed to sitting at the bedside and providing vigils for persons without families available. We could also use some extra people to work in our office. Call Jacqueline at 513 831-5800. Hospice of Southwest Ohio – Seeks volunteers to help in providing hospice services, Call 770-0820, ext. 111 or email ajones@hswo.org. Hoxworth Blood Center – Hoxworth is recruiting people to help during community blood drives and blood donation centers in the area. Positions include: Blood drive hosts, greeters, blood donor recruiters and couriers. Call Helen Williams at 558-1292 or helen.williams@uc.edu. Wellness Community – Provides free support, education and hope to people with cancer and their loved ones. Volunteers needed to work at special events, health fairs, bulk mailings and other areas. Visit www.thewellnesscommu nity.org and click on “volunteer” to sign up. Call 791-4060, ext. 19.

Health care Ameircan Diabetes Association – Seeks volunteers in its area office downtown for clerical support, filling requests for educational materials from phone requests, data entry, special events support and coordinating the Health Fair. Call 759-9330. American Heart Association – Volunteers needed to assist with the American Heart Association’s cause campaigns, Power to End Stroke, Go Red For Women, Start!, and the Alliance for a Healthier Generation. Assignments include clerical work, event specific duties and community outreach. Contact the American Heart Association at 281-4048 or email ray.meyer@heart.org. Captain Kidney Educational Program – Needs volunteers one or more mornings or afternoons a month during the school year to educate children in first through sixth grades about kidney function and disease. Training provided. Call 961-8105. Crossroads Hospice – Seeking volunteers to assist terminally ill patients and their families. Call 793-5070. Destiny Hospice – is seeking caring and compassionate people to make a difference in the life of a person living with terminal illness. No special skills or experience needed; simply a willingness to help provide comfort and support. Orientation is scheduled to fit the volunteer’s schedule. Opportunities are available throughout the Cincinnati, Middletown and Butler County area. Contact Angie at 554-6300, or amclaughlin@destiny-hospice. com. Evercare Hospice and Palliative Care – is seeking volunteers in all Greater Cincinnati communities. Evercare provides care for those facing end-of-life issues and personal support to their

Miscellaneous Community Shares of Greater Cincinnati – Seeking volunteer campaign assistant to plan workplace employee giving campaigns and campaign project support volunteers to assist with campaigns. Call 475-0475 or email info@cintishares.org.

Government Hamilton County Republican Party – looking for volunteers for the presidential campaign to get in now on the ground floor. Anyone interested can call Lori Newsom at 382-1400 for more information.

We Service All Makes and Models!

Located at Walt Sweeney Ford

39

95

$

• SYNTHETIC BLEND OIL CHANGE • TIRE ROTATION & PRESSURE CHECK • BRAKE INSPECTION

• VEHICLE CHECKUP • FLUID TOP-OFF • BATTERY TEST • FILTER CHECK • BELTS & HOSES CHECK

Includes Up to 5 qts of Motorcraft, Semi-Synthetic Oil & Filter, Multi-Point Inspection, Top Off All Fluids. See Quick Lane® Manager for details. Offer valid with coupons. Expires 5/31/13

Eagle Savings

(513) 347-4958

Get up to $120 back in your pocket! GET UP TO

UP TO

60

$

Mail-In Rebate on four select name-brand tires*

120

$

60

$

COMBINED MAIL-IN REBATE

$60 rebate on Pirelli, $60 rebate on Goodyear, $50 rebate on Continental Tire & Yokohama, $40 rebate on Dunlop. Quicklane® installed retail tire purchases only. Limit one redemption per customer. Rebate must be submitted by 5/31/13. **Subject to credit approval. Valid on qualifying pruchase of $250 or more before tax. Complete purchase must be made on the Quick Lane Credit Card. See Quick Lane® Manager for details. Offer valid with coupons. Expires 5/31/13

SEEOURFULLSERVICECOLLISIONCENTER 12 ADVANTAGE OF WALT TIRES BRAKES TAKESWEENEY’S DRIVE-SURE PROTECTION PACKAGE We’l BeatAny OFFERED BY KREX Includes: Competitors’Price PERAXLE OnAnyName BrandTires! AFTER$25MAIL-INREBATE FOR UP TO

74

$ 95

See Quick Lane® Manager for details.

Some vehicles slightly higher. Machining rotors & drums not included. See Quick Lane® Manager for details. Offer valid with coupons. Expires 5/31/13

TO PAYYOUR MONTHS BODYSHOPDEDUCTIBLE NOINTEREST ORSERVICEREPAIRS

Roadside Assistance • Towing • Lock-Out Service • Tire Change • Winch-Out Service • Jump Start • Delivery of Gas & Other Fluids & Road Hazard Tire Protection up to 120 Days

QuickLaneTire&AutoCenter (513) Located at Walt Sweeney Ford 5400 Glenway Ave., Cinti., OH 45238

CE-0000556687

When you use the Quick Lane credit card*

347-4958

Monday-Thursday 7:30 am - 7:30 pm Friday 7:30 am - 6:00 pm Saturday 7:30 am - 3:00 pm

The Quick Lane Located At Walt Sweeney Ford Will Save You Money!!!


LIFE

B8 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • MAY 29, 2013

DEATHS Valerie Dine Valerie A. Dine, 48, College Hill, died May 10. She worked for AAA. Survived by brothers David (Debora), Steven (Maureen) Dine; nephews Andrew, Zachary, Casey, Jason Dine, Guy Young. Preceded in Dine death by parents Donald, Betty Dine. Arrangements by Ralph Meyer & Deters Funeral Home. Memorials to the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, Cincinnati Chapter, or Hospice of Cincinnati.

Jean Dotson Jean F. Dotson, 87, Price Hill, died May 10. She was a homemaker. Survived by sons John, Daniel, David Stammer; many grandchildren, Dotson great-grandchildren and great-greatgrandchildren. Preceded in death by husband George

Rinks Flea Market Bingo Follow us on... www.facebook.com/RinksBingo w twitter.com/RinksBingo

$4,000 Guaranteed Payout Each Night! $5 - 6-36 Faces $10 - 90 Faces Computer

Dotson, children Lexie Johnson, James, Robert Stammer, parents Henry, Agnes Sprouse, siblings Marion Gross, Margie Davis, John Sprouse. Services were May 13 at St. Joseph (New) Cemetery. Arrangements by Ralph Meyer & Deters Funeral Home.

Lewis Harrison Lewis Myron Harrison, 92, died May 1. He was an educator and school principal with Cincinnati Public Schools, serving as a principal at Morgan, Garfield, Riverside Harrison, Mount Adams and Fairview schools. He was an Army veteran of World War II, a member of Oak Hills Presbyterian Church and a volunteer at Children's Hospital. Survived by nephews Dan (Kathy), Kerry (Anita) Hofferth, Charles (Barbara), Tom (Karen) Kock, nieces Martha (Ed) Bacher, Holly (Klaus) Drees; sisters-in-law Ruth Hofferth, Louise Harrison. Preceded in death by wife Margaret Ann Harrison, parents Creed, Ethel Harrison, siblings Marjorie, Geneva, Creed. Services were May 27 at Oak Hills Presbyterian Church. Arrangements by Radel Funeral Home. Memorials to Oak Hills Presbyterian Church.

Patricia Holt Patricia “Rosie” Holt, 61, Price Hill, died May 12. She was a waitress for J&J’s Restaurant. Survived by husband Dale Holt; children Rose McKenzie, Holt Edward Holt; parents Fred, Jacqueline Jones; siblings Tom, Hank,

Darrel Jones, Julie Thompson, Carol Berling; sister-in-law Carol Holt; eight grandchildren; one great-grandchild. Preceded in death by sister Linda Stammer, brother-in-law Edward Holt. Services were May 18 at Holy Family. Arrangements by Ralph Meyer & Deters Funeral Home. Memorials to the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Cincinnati or to any animal rescue organization.

Michael Hoyes Michael J. Hoyes, 61, died May 18. He was a retired union and freelance painter. Survived by sons Matt, Nick (Mary Schehl) Hoyes; grandchildren Lane, Elliot, Olivia Hoyes; mother Patricia Hoyes Yaccharil; siblings Edward Jr., Donna Hoyes; niece Jody Brinck; niece and nephews Kylee, Kameron, Kenyon. Preceded in death by father Edward Hoyes. Services were May 22 Hoyes at St. Joseph (New) Cemetery. Arrangements by Rebold, Rosenacker & Sexton Funeral Home. Memorials to: American Cancer Society, 2808 Reading Road, Cincinnati, OH 45206.

Ronald Kellinghaus Ronald V. Kellinghaus, 84, died May 16. He was an officer for the Cincinnati Police Department. He was a Navy veteran of World War II. Survived by daughter Barbara (Robert Jr.) Hettesheimer; granddaughters Rachel, Rebecca Hettesheimer. Preceded in death by wife Sallie Kellinghaus.

Services were May 20 at St. Joseph (New) Cemetery. Arrangements by Radel Funeral Home. Memorials to: Hospice of Margaret Mary Community Hospital, 321 Mitchell Ave., Batesville, IN 47006.

Leslie Lamps Leslie A. Lamps, 53, Delhi Township, died May 15. She was a secretary at Elder High School. Survived by husband Thomas Lamps; children Anthony, Nicole Lamps; mother Darlene Carovillano; brother Dean (Stacy) Carovillano. Preceded in death by father Nicholas Carovillano. Services were May 18 Lamps at St. William. Arrangements by Ralph Meyer & Deters Funeral Home. Memorials to Elder High School or the Msgr. Kennedy Scholarship Fund at St. William Church.

Joseph Mueller Joseph C. Mueller, 52, died May 20. Survived by wife Vicki Mueller; children Rebecca, Daniel Mueller; siblings Jane (Jeff) Schoenfeld, Steve (Robyn), Bill (Maria) Mueller; parents-inlaw Mary, Joseph DePollo; aunt Hilda Mueller. Preceded in Mueller death by parents William, Catherine Mueller. Services were May 25 at St. Lawrence Church. Arrangements by Meyer & Geiser

ABOUT OBITUARIES Basic obituary information and a color photograph of your loved one is published without charge. Call 248-7128 for a submission form. To publish a larger memorial tribute, call 242-4000 for pricing details. Funeral Home. Memorials to the Joe Mueller Benefit Fund in care of Fifth Third Bank for the benefit of his children’s education.

Sharon Scott Sharon Simmons Scott, 64, Price Hill, died May 15. She was a clerk for the Internal Revenue Service. Survived by sons Jack (Rachel), Mark (Elaine) Fay; grandchildren Jeffrey, Robert, Matthew, Thomas, Monica, Drew, Logan, David, Eli, Ethan; siblings Barb, Connie, Rosemary, Patty, Jerry, Tommy, Danny; several nieces and nephews. Preceded in death by husband John Scott. Services were May 22 at Holy Family. Arrangements by Vitt, Stermer & Anderson Funeral Home. Memorials to: Holy Family Church, 814 Hawthorne Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45205.

Matthew Smith Matthew Paul Smith, 33, died May 10. Survived by wife Missy Meyers; parents Don, Connie Smith; siblings Ryan Smith, Julie (Joel) Pinnix; nephew Grant Pinnix; aunts and uncles Linda Hacker, Tim Smith, Peggy, Jack Smith (Debbie) Cronin; many cousins. Arrangements by Meyer & Geiser Funeral Home. Memorials to a charity of the donor’s

Fri, Sat Nights/www.RinksBingo.com

513-931-4441 • 513-931-0259

choice.

Winona Teschner Winona Kidwell Teschner, 85, died May 12. She was a waitress at the Cricket Restaurant. Survived by children Carla Conroy, Regina (Bill) Joseph, Shawn, Richard, Steven (Vickie), Dennis (Pam), Keith, Michael, Bev Teschner; brothers Michael (Barb), Shawn (Carol) Kidwell; sister-in-law Joann Kidwell; 11 grandchildren; 21 great-grandchildren; one great-great-grandchild. Preceded in death by husband Carl Teschner. Services were May 15 at Radel Funeral Home. Memorials to: St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, 501 St. Jude Place, Memphis, TN 381051942.

Millie Yorukoff Millie Anastasoff Yorukoff, 90, died May 16. Survived by sons James, Thomas (Pat), Edward Yorukoff; sister Kay Haggis; nephew and nieces George Haggis, Diane SkelYorukoff ton, Barb Taylor. Preceded in death by husband Edward Yorukoff. Services were May 20 at Gloria Dei Lutheran Church. Arrangements by NeidhardMinges Funeral Home. Memorials to: Manna Outreach Inc., P.O. Box 5141, Cincinnati, OH 45205.

POLICE REPORTS CINCINNATI DISTRICT 3 Arrests/citations Ferew Kebede, born 1978, selling liquor to a minor, 3409 W. Eighth St., May 8. Maggie Keyes, born 1995, larceny, 3201 Warsaw Ave., May 8. Mandeep Singh, born 1992, selling liquor to a minor, 3406 Warsaw Ave., May 8. Kayla Castellini, born 1994, possession of drug abuse instruments, 3600 Warsaw Ave., May 9. Stacy C. Smith, born 1989, possession of drugs, 2704 Maryland Ave., May 11. Nadine C. Sweet, born 1960, disorderly conduct, 3601 Warsaw Ave., May 12. Rodica Witcher, born 1981, simple assault, 2700 Price Ave., May 12. Amberly Poff, born 1995, telecommunication harassment, 3201 Warsaw Ave., May 13. Cheston Brenner, born 1987, felonious assault, 1655 Atson

ABOUT POLICE REPORTS The Bethel Journal publishes the names of all adults charged with offenses. The information is a matter of public record and does not imply guilt or innocence. To contact your local police department, call: » Bethel, Chief Mark Planck, 722-6491 » Clermont County Sheriff’s Office, Sheriff A.J. “Tim” Rodenberg, 7327500 Lane, May 13. Jessica J. Nicely, born 1980, theft under $300, 2550 Ring Place,

May 13. John Wehr, born 1984, obstructing official business, possession of drug abuse instruments, 800 Wells St., May 13. Tabitha Thompson, born 1981, possession of drug paraphernalia, 3700 Warsaw Ave., May 13. Brandon Creech, born 1986, aggravated burglary, kidnapping, obstructing official business, 1042 Covedale Ave., May 14. James Vincent Harrison, born 1963, domestic violence, 3788 Westmont Drive, May 14. Jimmy D. Bowling, born 1972, assault, 6313 River Road, May 14. Jose Morales, born 1989, assault, 3201 Warsaw Ave., May 14. Markell S. Peoples, born 1994, 1023 Winfield Ave., May 14. Terry Beasley, born 1988, assault, 3531 Glenway Ave., May 14. Thomas Sims, born 1992, possession of drugs, 3326 Warsaw

See POLICE, Page B9

How’s Your

Bath Tub? E... BEFOR

& AFTER!

CE-0000557874

Cincinnatus NMLS # 405658 Jackie Czanik NMLS# 931250

$275.00

Lifetime Warranty Available Expires 6-30-13 Bath Tub & Tile Reglazing Tile Regrouting & Sealing LIFE TIME WARRANTY CE-0000551437

Or pick one up at a local retailer.

As a seasoned loan originator, Jackie Czanik offers her clients over 20 years of mortgage and retail sales knowledge and problem solving. Jackie’s specialty is working closely with her clients, and using her expertise to find the perfect lending solution for you. Call Jackie today at 513-371-5750, for all of your lending needs.

513-507-1951 859-341-6754


LIFE

MAY 29, 2013 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • B9

POLICE REPORTS Continued from Page B8 Ave., May 14. James Edward Sweet, born 1967, disorderly conduct, possession of an open flask, resisting arrest, 1026 Ross Ave., May 15. Jasmine Clark, born 1995, disorderly conduct, 2144 Ferguson Road, May 15. Steven Senteney, born 1988, aggravated burglary, 1042 Covedale Ave., May 15. Davane Sims, born 1989, theft under $300, 3201 Warsaw Ave., May 16. Jessica Nicole Trentman, born 1984, child endangering/neglect, 3201 Warsaw Ave., May 16. Nakia Stacy, born 1980, possession of drug abuse instruments, possession of drug paraphernalia, 3402 Warsaw Ave., May 16. Timmy Young, born 1981, criminal trespassing, 1023 Gilsey Ave., May 16. Christopher Mathews, born 1988, domestic violence, 2691 Lehman Road, May 18. Demetrius Flemings, born 1987, drug abuse, misdemeanor drug possession, possession of drug paraphernalia, tampering with evidence, trafficking, 901 Grand Ave., May 19. Gojuan Spurling, born 1988, domestic violence, 932 Enright Ave., May 19. Shalyn R. Carter, born 1984, criminal damaging or endangering, felonious assault, 529 Elberon Ave., May 19. Stephen Adkins, born 1956, violation of temporary protection order, 4375 Ridgeview Ave., May 19. Tia Michelle Thompson, born 1981, criminal damaging or endangering, simple assault, 529 Elberon Ave., May 19. Christopher O. O’Neal, born 1988, criminal damaging or endangering, 1310 Manss Ave., May 20.

Incidents/reports Aggravated burglary 2550 Ring Place, May 14. Aggravated menacing 1023 Winfield Ave., May 14. Aggravated robbery 4730 Green Glen Lane, May 10. 1674 First Ave., May 11. 1110 Rulison Ave., May 15. 983 Elberon Ave., May 16. Assault 733 Grand Ave., May 11. 302 Crestline Ave., May 13. 3745 Westmont Drive, May 13. 3531 Glenway Ave., May 14. 3738 Warsaw Ave., May 14. 2144 Ferguson Road, May 15. Breaking and entering 1870 Sunset Ave., May 10. 828 McPherson Ave., May 11. 4846 Prosperity Place, May 12. 744 McPherson Ave., May 14. 1260 Sliker Ave., May 15. 4435 W. Eighth St., May 9. Burglary 3422 Price Ave., May 11. 3339 Lehman Road, May 14. 1621 Minion Ave., May 14. 4638 Joana Place, May 14. 4423 Ridgeview Ave., May 15. 1849 Provincial Court, May 16. Criminal damaging/endangering 3219 Lehman Road, May 10. 1630 First Ave., May 11. 6400 Gracely Drive, May 12. 676 Enright Ave., May 13. 1280 Sunset Ave., May 14. 1005 Rosemont Ave., May 15. 1066 Overlook Ave., May 15. 2416 Ferguson Road, May 15. 808 Pedretti, May 15. 1023 Gilsey Ave., May 16. 3923 S. Clerose Circle, May 16. 4628 Joana Place, May 16. Domestic violence Reported on Iliff Avenue, May 10. Reported on Twain Avenue, May 11. Reported on Glenway Avenue, May 14. Reported on Westmont Drive, May 14. Reported on Green Glen Lane, May 9. Felonious assault 1655 Atson Lane, May 10. 1020 Seton Ave., May 16. Gross sexual imposition Reported on Mickey Avenue, May 19.

REAL ESTATE

Menacing 1739 Gellenbeck St., May 11. 3951 W. Eighth St., May 11. 3745 Westmont Drive, May 13. Murder 545 Elberon Ave., May 15. Rape Reported on Ring Place, May 14. Robbery 930 Hawthorne Ave., May 10. 3609 Warsaw Ave., May 14. 562 Davenport Ave., May 15. 1000 Rosemont Ave., May 8. Theft 1235 Ross Ave., May 10. 3219 Lehman Road, May 10. 1061 Rosemont Ave., May 10. 538 Enright Ave., May 11. 85 Twain Ave., May 11. 4222 W. Eighth St., May 11. 3609 Laclede Ave., May 13. 2144 Ferguson Road, May 13. 1012 Grand Ave., May 14. 2628 Maryland Ave., May 14. 2810 Maryland Ave., May 14. 420 Elberon Ave., May 14. 6314 Hillside Ave., May 14. 3433 Bassett Road, May 15. 1757 Gilsey Ave., May 15. 533 S. Delridge Drive, May 16. 591 Trenton Ave., May 16. 4517 Glenway Ave., May 9. Vandalism 4944 Western Hills Ave., May 9.

DELHI TOWNSHIP Arrests/citations Joshua R. Drain, 22, 3248 Stanhope Ave., driving under suspension at 6600 Hillside Ave., May 7. Randall Tett, 34, 150 First Ave., driving under suspension at 5101 Cleves Warsaw Pike, May 8. Cameron Smith, 28, 776 Delhi Road, driving under suspension at 4000 Delhi Road, May 9. Rhonda D. Hodges, 40, 3814 River Road, driving under suspension at 4000 Delhi Road, May 9. Crystal Henson, 34, 798 Delhi Road, driving under suspension at 502 Pedretti Ave., May 10. Clinton W. Steelman, 30, 421 Sunaire Terrace, driving under suspension at 6000 Rapid Run Road, May 10. Erin D. Doherty, 22, 5572 Hillside Ave. Apt. 4, driving under suspension at 500 Rosemont Ave., May 11. Eddy Perez, 28, 820 Rosemont Ave., driving under suspension at 5062 Foley Road, May 11. Erik L. Bolen, 22, 4648 Rapid Run Road, driving under suspension at 4400 Delhi Road, May 12. Cheryl Dearwester, 19, 7430 Buena Vista Drive, theft at 5025 Delhi Road, May 13. Nathaniel Cipriani, 19, 9522 Mount Nebo Road, drug offense at 7101 Cleves Warsaw , May 13. Jimmy Wayne Perry Jr., 18, 1969 Faywood Drive, drug offense at 585 Neeb Road, May 18.

Incidents/reports Breaking and entering Unknown person forced entry into business and stole items at 6113 Cleves Warsaw Pike, May 13. Theft Tote with beautician supplies stolen from vehicle at 4787 Basil Lane, May 14. Electronic cigarette and quarters stolen at 4553 Foley Road, May 14. Backpack stolen from vehicle, window smashed at 554 Claymore Terrace, May 14. Money stolen from vehicle at 728 Candleridge Drive, May 15. Van stolen that contained vacuums, cleaning supplies and 15 sets of keys at 1092 Timbervalley Court, May 15. Purse stolen from vehicle at 6509 Mapleton Ave., May 15.

DELHI TOWNSHIP

4274 Copperfield Lane: Bank of America NA to Gausvik, Martin and Regina; $69,000. 583 Covedale Ave.: TDA Investments LLC to Temple, Danielle S.; $114,500. 4420 Delhi Pike: Wollenhaupt, Amy to Bank of New York Mellon The; $48,000. 5391 Delhi Pike: Langenbrunner, Amy l. to Fluke, Kevin T. and Shay M.; $125,250. 5441 Dengail Drive: Voreis, Andrea l. to Harnist, Lynda; $195,000. 4928 Duebber Drive: Mattingly, Michelle l. to Federal Home Loan Mortgag Corp.; $36,000. 1082 Fashion Ave.: NAPA Investments Inc. to Day, Dennis; $118,000. 321 Glen Oaks Drive: Wahoff, Elizabeth to Arch Bay Holdings LLC; $66,500. 5434 Hillside Ave.: Brenner and Jansen Properties Inc. to Western Wildlife Corridor Inc.; $10,000. 566 Jonas Drive: Connley, Bryan M. to Conrad, Amy E. and Michael J. Miller; $126,000. 6713 Kentford Court: Guardian Savings Bank FSB to Mergard, Melvin C. Jr.; $112,500. 5342 Lilibet Court: Sung, Than to Everbank; $70,000. 5139 Mt Alverno Road: Ball, Terry G. and Victoria l. to U.S. Bank NA; $58,000. 837 Neeb Road: Pennington, James to Heckman, John l.; $85,000. 184 Penfield Lane: Garvin, Laura l. to Jones, Steven M. and Mary A.; $180,000. 5497 Revmal Lane: Haas, Joseph R. and Jennifer l. Groh to Garrison, Kristin; $155,000. 672 Sundance Drive: Menninger, John W. and Marcia to Hahn, Angela l.; $243,000. 4399 Valence Drive: Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. to TDA Investments LLC; $45,000. 949 Villa View Court: Burress, Amber R. to Jennison, Judith l.; $72,000. 1146 Wilderness Trail: Fannie Mae to Simpson, Brandon; $93,400.

EAST PRICE HILL

1214 Blanchard Ave.: Teetor, Gregory M. to Bank of America NA; $22,000. 918 Elberon Ave.: Mendleson, Dennis to Federal National Mortgage Corp.; $36,000. 920 Fairbanks Ave.: Warsaw Federal Savings and Loan Association to Tran, Thuy Le Hong; $6,000. 810 Matson Place: Guardian Savings Bank FSB to Vogt Properties LLC; $35,000. 763 Wells St.: Holley, Wilma to Bank of America NA; $20,000. 1526 Beech Ave.: Federal National Mortgage Association to Mills, Cherie; $9,500. 1528 Beech Ave.: Federal National Mortgage Association to Mills, Cherie; $9,500. 2714 Eighth St.: Kimme, Y. Sean to Federal National Mortgage Association; $4,000. 1244 Fairbanks Ave.: Krastev, George to Kaeff, James R.; $15,000. 3718 Glenway Ave.: Mlea Properties LLC to Burns Holdings LLC; $22,000. 582 Grand Ave.: Cole, Katherine A. to Young, Charles; $17,000. 525 Hawthorne Ave.: Stockman, Juliane to Federal National Mortgage Association; $60,000. 1105 McPherson Ave.: Toll, Tanya and James to Federal National Mortgage Association; $12,000. 1740 Minion Ave.: Cooper, Helen

ABOUT REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS Information is provided as a public service by the office of Hamilton County Auditor Dusty Rhodes. Neighborhood designations are approximate. M. to Wells Fargo Bank NA; $30,000. 1766 Patrick Drive: PNC Bank NA to Sestokas, Warren J. and Kathryn M.; $17,911. 1107 Purcell Ave.: MandT Bank to 1107 Purcell Ave Land Trust; $6,900. 1614 Quebec Road: Jackson, Cassandra E. to Federal National Mortgage Association; $34,000. 1029 Sturm St.: Dove, Patricia H. to Re Worldwide One Ltd.; $9,500. 1020 Underwood Place: Infinity Ventures LLC to G. Vinnie LLC; $24,000. 2558 Warsaw Ave.: Ireland Russell W. and Tana L. to Ramundo, John; $15,000. 3220 Warsaw Ave.: Perkins, Ralston Curtis to Dubose, Charles; $10,000. 331 Crestline Ave.: Lewinski, Daniel J. to Glatthaar, Bradley J.; $21,000. 998 Delhi Pike: Kochyan, Parnak to Homesnow 24 LLC; $671. 3200 Lehman Road: Thames, Marvin and Tamela to Bank of America NA; $26,000. McPherson Ave.: Federal National Mortgage Association to Harbour Portfolio VII LP; $2,249. 1726 Minion Ave.: Vanstee, Jill to Federal Home Loan Mortgag Corp.; $16,000. 941 Olive Ave.: Hastings, Mary J. to Federal Home Loan Mortgag Corp.; $24,000. 2715 Price Ave.: Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. to Baker, Agnes and Mary B. Vidourek; $18,800. 837 Wells St.: Guardian Savings Bank FSB to Aikens, Sheria M.; $13,500. 1029 Wells St.: Federal National Mortgage Association to Harbour Portfolio VII LP; $2,249.

LOWER PRICE HILL

topher and Katey to Burger, Tracey and Ronald; $10,000. 6762 Parkland Ave.: Lynch, Peter S. to Ayers, Megan K.; $85,000. 6801 Gracely Drive: Reedy, Brian to U.S. Bank NA; $60,000. 6677 Jersey Ave.: Noppert, Marie to Clark, Earl W.; $80,000. 130 Monitor Ave.: Bank of New York Mellon The to KBMC Properties LLC; $60,299.

WEST PRICE HILL

1118 Carmania Ave.: Gossett, Jeffery A. and Deborah M. to Jennings, Phillip D,; $78,000. 4501 Glenway Ave.: Federal National Mortgage Association to Jiang, Dashu; $25,000. 4738 Hardwick Drive: Lautz, Joseph Jr. and Doreen Alicia Lautz to Rowe, Deborah; $39,900. 5275 Highview Drive: Johnson, Julie M. to Steiner, Nichole L.; $86,000. 1698 Ashbrook Drive: University Investments LLC to Plappert, Christina R.; $63,750. 4930 Cleves Warsaw Pike: Rumpke, Jason N. to Sininger, Maurice L. and Susan L. Fritsch; $117,500. 1736 Dewey Ave.: Hartmann, Olivia M. to Hall, Marcus J.; $22,000. 1231 Gilsey Ave.: McCann, Kelly A. to Cincy Investment III LLC; $2,200. 1646 Gilsey Ave.: Harbour Portfolio VI LP to Grandstaff, Quentin A.; $30,000. 4781 Hardwick Drive: Bradshaw, Terry D. and Judith D. to Citimortgage Inc.; $46,000. 4767 Highridge Ave.: Arendash, David J. to WF Financial L. L C.; $40,000. 1655 Kellywood Ave.: Schrage, Joshua D. to Koprowski, Thomas J.; $86,000. 4127 Liberty St.: Mack, Agnes to Third Federal Savings and Loan Association of Cle; $30,000. 4782 Prosperity Place: Jackson, Keeshna to Bank of America NA; $28,000. 1051 Rosemont Ave.: Carpenter, Angelo D. and Inice to Fannie Mae; $36,000. 4534 Roth Ave.: JPMorgan Chase Bank NA to Wright, William;

$17,000. 1052 Schiff Ave.: Wilson, Vinnie B. to Federal National Mortgage Association; $96,120. 937 Seton Ave.: 937 Seton Avenue Land Trust to Greenharbor Holdings LLC; $45,000. 1236 Sliker Ave.: Harbour Portfolio VII LP to Bowman, Thomas M.; $16,500. 1229 Sunset Ave.: Ahern, Christopher to M. and T. Bank; $20,000. 620 Trenton Ave.: Toon, Donald J. and Gina K. to Bank of America NA; $118,531. 5016 Willnet Drive: Dieckmann, Eric to Federal Home Loan Mortgag Corp.; $58,000. 1703 Ashbrook Drive: Roark, Kenneth Jr. and Carol A. to Federal National Mortgage Association; $34,000. 4728 Clevesdale Drive: Evans, Marianna l. and Kathy S. Nogle to Deutsche Bank National Trust Co. Tr.; $54,000. 1215 Coronado Ave.: Kappa, Kevin M. and Nancy Jo to Kappa, Michael J. and Jessica K.; $91,000. 515 Delridge Drive: Schmitz, Carol to GW Investments Group LLC; $54,000. 956 Edgetree Lane: Binder, Joseph M. to Klingenbeck, April; $76,500. 3977 Fawnhill Lane: Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. to Rauck, Joseph; $20,500. 1840 First Ave.: Smith-Jackson, Marlo P. to Bank of America NA; $26,000. 830 Hermosa Ave.: Beeler, Paul W. to Federal National Mortgage Association; $50,000. 1225 Iliff Ave.: Pennington, Philip A. to U.S. Bank NA Tr.; $30,000. 4793 Prosperity Place: Roark, Kenneth Jr. and Carol A. to Federal National Mortgage Association; $34,000. 4732 Rapid Run Road: Khan, Mohammed to McMillan Capital Group Ll; $12,500. 907 Rosemont Ave.: Fourth Power Investments LLC to Tshibambe, Joel and Gustave; $18,000. 826 Rosemont Ave.: Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. to Engle, Christopher; $15,500.

Trusted Senior Home Care Assistance with: Personal Hygiene Cleaning Cooking Laundry Med. Reminders Transportation

809 Depot St.: River Harbor Properties Ltd. to UGFT LLC; $43,000. 811 Depot St.: River Harbor Properties Ltd. to UGFT LLC; $43,000. 658 State Ave.: Fannie Mae to Harbour Portfolio VII LP; $351.

SAYLER PARK

6629 Hillside Ave.: Kumpf, Donald J. Sr. and Mary A. to Oleary, Patrick; $87,250. 114 Ivanhoe Ave.: Lewis, Tammie Taylor to Federal Home Loan Mortgag Corp.; $30,000. 114 Meridian St.: CR Capital Group LLC to Boyles, Casey A.; $9,000. 119 Catalpa Road: Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. to S. Bill LLC; $50,000. 149 Whipple St.: Leopold, Edwin and Anna Roberts to Federal National Mortgage Association; $48,000. 6446 Hillside Ave.: Carter, Matthew D. and Stefanie R. to Western Wildlife Corridor Inc.; $80,000. 132 Meridian St.: French, Melody C. to Federal Home Loan Mortgag Corp.; $36,000. 155 Meridian St.: Holland, Chris-

REMAIN at HOME! 2010, 2011 & 2012 Cincinnati Chamber “Small Business of the Year” Finalist

Call: 574-4148 www.ACaringChoice.com

CE-0000557617

Do You Have Ulcerative Colitis?

Is it hard to control your symptoms using your current medication? What

This study will evaluate whether the study medication, budesonide MMX®, is safe and effective in people with ulcerative colitis that is not well controlled using anti-inflammatory medications known as 5-aminosalicylic acids (5ASAs). Budesonide MMX®, is approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA). This study is looking to see whether budesonide MMX® (given by mouth as tablet) and 5-ASA medication used together can better control the symptoms of ulcerative colitis.

Who

(859) 904-4640 www.bryanthvac.com

Standard Funeral Service: $

No Breakdown A/C Tune-up

2,995

$64.95

If your system breaks down during the next six months, we will REFUND you the cost of the tune-up guaranteed*

*Offer expires 6/12/13. Some restrictions apply. Call for details. $64.95 refunded per system serviced. Breakdown must be diagnosed and repaired by Bryant HVAC, Inc. Not valid with any other offers or promotion with existing customers. CE-0000556384

Want to make sure you’re getting the best funeral costs? You’ve got ours, now we invite you to compare. CE-0000547622

(859) 904-4640

All Professional Service • One Day & One Night Viewing

Prices subject to change.

7401 Hamilton Avenue ~ Mt. Healthy

Adults 18-75 years old who have been diagnosed with mild or moderate ulcerative colitis (UC) and continue to have symptoms even when taking a 5-ASA medication (such as Asacol® and Lialda®) to treat UC.

Pay

Participants will be compensated for time and travel. All medication will be provided at no cost to participants.

Details

For more information, contact Lauren Plageman at 513-558-5529 or lauren.plageman@uchealth.com

513.521.7800

www.niehardsnowfuneralhome.com Proudly Serving Greater Cincinnati and surrounding areas

CE-0000557266


LIFE

B10 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • MAY 29, 2013

MITSUBISHI

GRAND OPENING

SALES EVENT

BRANDNEW2013LANCERES, GTANDSPORTBACK

BRANDNEW2013OUTLANDERSPORTS ANDOUTLANDER TAKE YOUR PICK!

3,000OFF

3,000OFF

$

$

HURRY!

2013OUTLANDER SPORTES 5 SPEED, A/C, PW, PL, 18” ALUMINUM WHEELS

MSRP $19,995 DISC. $2,000 REBATE $1,000

SALE PRICE

THESE OFFERS END 6/1/13

16,995

$

SALE PRICE

MSRP $17,850 DISC. $2,000 REBATE $1,000

14,850

$

2013 LANCERES 5 SPEED, A/C, PW, PL, CD

#D1012

#D4501

2 FLORENCE FREEDOM TICKETS WITH TEST DRIVE...YOU PICK THE GAME!

AMERICA’S#1SELLING VEHICLESONSALENOW!

2010 TOYOTA CAMRY LE CHOOSE FROM 7, LOW MILES LOADED WITH EQUIPMENT, 30+ MPG

15,885

$

2010 HONDA ACCORD BURG., AUTO AC, PW, PL

14,985

$

2011 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY GOLD, V6, ALUM

WHEELS, PW, PL, REAR BACKUP CAMERA, CD

18,775

$

SALES HOURS: Mon-Thu 9-8:30 Fri 9-6 • Sat 9-5:30

www.joekiddauto.com

2012 FORD MUSTANG CONVERTIBLE RED, V6, AUTO, A/C, LEATHER, READY FOR SUMMERTIME..... WAS $23,988 NOW

$21,985 2012 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN V6, STOWING, PW, PC, CD #C8132 ...................... WAS $22,995 NOW $20,985 2012 MITSUBISHI ECLIPSE CHOOSE FROM 2, AUTO, A/C, PW #C8149................... WAS $16,488 NOW $15,885 2011 DODGE CARAVAN CREW V6, AUTO, A/C, PW, PL............................................. WAS $20,988 NOW $19,985 2011 CHEVROLET HHR LT RED, AUTO, A/C, PW, CD ................................................. WAS $13,988 NOW $13,485 2011 JEEP COMPASS AUTO, A/C, PW, PL, CD, LOW MILES #C8169 ........................ WAS $16,988 NOW $16,285 2010 MAZDA 6i GRAND TOURING, RED, LEATHER, SUNROOF, LOADED, 29K MILES........... WAS $17,488 NOW $16,885 2010 FORD FOCUS SES BLACK, AUTO, A/C, SUNROOF, 11K MILES #D8085 .................... WAS $15,295 NOW $14,882 2010 CHEVROLET COBALT SILVER, AUTO, A/C, PS, PB #C8092 ............................... WAS $11,988 NOW $11,685 2010 FORD FUSION 4 CYL, AUTO, A/C, LEATHER, NICE #C8139............................... WAS $16,988 NOW $16,285 2010 FORD ESCAPE XLT 4X4, V6, AUTO, A/C, CLEAN............................................... WAS $18,988 NOW $17,972 2009 CHRY. TOWN & COUNTRY TOURING BLACK, V6, AUTO, PW, PC #C8080 ........ WAS $17,988 NOW $16,985 2009 MAZDA CX7 AUTO, A/C, LEATHER, SUNROOF, 57K MILES ............................... WAS $17,988 NOW $17,285 2007 PONTIAC G6 RED, SUNROOF, V6, ALUM WHEELS #C8170 .............................. WAS $10,995 NOW $10,688 2004 DODGE RAM 2500 SLT HEMI, 4X4, QUAD CAB, CHROME TUBES ................... WAS $14,595 NOW $13,988 2003 NISSAN 350z ORANGE, AUTO, A/C, LEATHER, ALUM WHEELS......................... WAS $14,995 NOW $14,588 1998 CHEVROLET CORVETTE RED, REMOVABLE GLASS TOP, 5.7V8, 6 SPEED #C80572........................................WAS $14,995 NOW

$13,988

BUDGET BUYS!

2008 NISSAN SENTRA AUTO, A/C,PW,PL .............................................................................................. $9,985

2007 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY HAUL THE FAMILY, V6, AUTO, A/C ........................................... $9,985

2006 TOYOTA CAMRY LE SILVER, AUTO, A/C, GREAT SCHOOL CAR ............................................ $8,995 2001 CHEVY BLAZER 2 DR, AUTO,PS,PB................................................................................ ONLY

$3,885 2002 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN V6, AUTO, A/C, PS .............................................................. ONLY $4,675 1992 FORD TEMPO COUPE ONE OF A KIND, 42K MILES, COLD A/C .................................................. $4,485

513-752-1804

1065 OHIO PIKE JUST 3 MILES EAST OF I275, EXIT #65


Price hill press 052913