Page 1

OLDTIMERS B1

The Price Hill Baseball Oldtimers will induct six new members and award three Andy Gallagher Awards to student-athletes from Elder, Oak Hills, and Western Hills.

Online community Find your community’s Web site by visiting Cincinnati.com/ local and looking for your community’s name in the “Ohio communities” menu. You’ll find local news, sports, photos and events, tailored to where you live. You can even submit your own articles and photos using Share, our online submission tool.

Collection time In the next few days your Community Press carrier will be stopping by to collect $2.50 for delivery of this month’s Price Hill Press. Your carrier retains half of this amount as payment for his or her work. If you wish to add a tip to reward the carrier’s good service, both the carrier and The Community Press appreciate your generosity. This month we’re featuring Elder High School students Cameron, a senior, and Cameron Holden Kelley, a sophomore. Both brothers are members of the Cincinnati Heat baseball team, involved with Elder’s Glee Club and Holden vocal ensemble, lifeguards at Gamble-Nippert YMCA and performed in the Seton-Elder production of “Hello Dolly.” Cameron will attend Transylvania University beginning this fall, majoring in premedicine. Holden also is a member of Elder’s wrestling team. If you have questions about delivery, or if your child is interested in becoming part of our junior carrier program, call 853-6263 or 853-6277, or e-mail circulation manager Sharon Schachleiter at sschachleiter@communitypress.com.

Contact The Press

News .........................923-3111 Retail advertising ............768-8196 Classified advertising ........242-4000 Delivery ......................853-6263 See page A2 for additional information

Vol. 85 No. 16 © 2012 The Community Press ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

PRICE HILL PRESS

Your Community Press newspaper serving Price Hill and Covedale

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2012

50¢

BECAUSE COMMUNITY MATTERS

Price Hill homes opened

Buyers can can tour several up for sale

This home at 840 Suire Ave. is one of the homes participating in the spring Price Hill Showcase of Homes on Sunday, April 29. Homes for sale throughout the neighborhood will be on display during the event. THANKS TO MATT

By Kurt Backscheider kbackscheider@communitypress.com

Several homes on the market in Price Hill are opening their doors for prospective buyers during a communitywide open house. Price Hill Will is hosting its spring Showcase of Homes from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday, April 29. Matt Strauss, director of marketing and community outreach for Price Hill Will, said the showcase highlights homes for sale throughout East, West and Lower Price Hill. He said this is the eighth installment of the showcase. The organization tries to host a neighborhood open house each year in the spring and fall.

STRAUSS

This spring’s event comes on the heels of the recent grand opening of the renovated Elberon Senior Apartments at the corner of West Eighth Street and Elberon Avenue. “The Elberon had been a big hole in the community for years,”

Strauss said. “Having that building looking spectacular and taking in tenants has jump-started interest throughout the neighborhood. The showcase will piggyback on that success and many others across Price Hill.” He said the event has been growing in attendance, even as the number of homes on display shrinks. “A lot of sellers have been staying on the sidelines recently, waiting to list when the market rebounds, but those who are out

there and participating in the showcase have been thrilled with the results,” he said. “We’ve had dozens of people go through a single home in one day as a result of the showcase.” There have even been instances in which more than 50 people have gone through a single home during the event, he said. “We’re getting people through houses, and sales have come out of it,” Strauss said. “It’s a formula that works so we haven’t changed it.” Refreshments and a map of the homes on display will be available at Price Hill Will’s office, 3724 St. Lawrence Ave., beginning at 10:30 a.m. the day of the showcase. Maps with the addresses and opening times of the listings will also be available that weekend at www.PriceHillLiving.com.

Former Bengal impacting students Cobb tells kids to set goals, work By Kurt Backscheider kbackscheider@communitypress.com

A former Cincinnati Bengal is showing students at Resurrection School the benefits of setting goals and working hard. Marvin Cobb, who played defensive back for the Bengals from 1975 through 1980, is the Midwest program director for Goals For Life, and he spends every Monday at the Price Hill school working with students to teach them life skills. “It’s just a neat program,” he said. Cobb said Goals For Life is a nonprofit organization that was founded more than 20 years ago in the Greater Los Angeles area by Reggie Berry, who played football for the San Diego Chargers. The program enlists former NFL players to teach children goal-setting techniques and show them the benefits and rewards of hard work, focus, teamwork and self-discipline. The aim of the program is to provide students with successful character building alternatives to such temptations as truancy, bullying, academic apathy, gang involvement,

Former Cincinnati Bengals defensive back Marvin Cobb, standing, works with a group of fourth-graders at Resurrection School as part of the Goals For Life program. The students are, from left, De'ovay Glenn, Jacob Schwab and Billy Johnson. KURT BACKSCHEIDER/THE COMMUNITY PRESS crime and drug and alcohol use. Cobb started volunteering with Goals For Life two years ago in Los Angeles, and he said he moved back to Cincinnati this year to oversee the program’s first expansion effort outside of L.A. He said the plan is to eventually expand the program to even more NFL cities. Here in Cincinnati, he is working with former teammates David Fulcher, Mike St. Clair and Mike Martin, and they direct the

program in five area schools – Resurrection, Roselawn Condon School, Pleasant Hill Academy, Lincoln Heights Elementary School and Princeton Community Middle School. Jim Forte’, assistant principal and junior high teacher at Resurrection, said the program has been a great success under Cobb’s leadership. Students now understand how to set goals, as well as how to achieve those goals, Forte’ said. “The students learned if they

have no goals, they have no map to success. With goals, they can achieve more than they thought possible,” he said. “That’s huge in the academic and social development of any student.” Cobb said he works with fourth-, fifth-, sixth- and seventhgrade students at Resurrection, and they take part in sessions with titles like “Winners Never Quit” and “Fail to Plan, Plan to Fail.”

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NEWS

A2 • PRICE HILL PRESS • APRIL 25, 2012

Artists to display works at Covedale fair By John Seney jseney@communitypress.com

WEST PRICE HILL — Artists will display and sell their original works at the 11th annual Arts & Crafts Fair at the Covedale Center for the Performing Arts. “This is the one event we do each summer as an outreach to the community,”

said Jennifer Perrino, business manager of the performing arts center. The Aug. 18 fair is free to the public and for the artists displaying their works, Perrino said. “It has been very successful in the past,” she said. The fair will feature the works of 60 artists special-

izing in media such as oil painting, water colors, acrylics, pottery, jewelry, woodworking, glass, fiber art, graphic art, enamel painted iron tiles, ceramics and photography. The outdoor fair will be 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 18, at the Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, 4990 Glenway Ave. submissions by artists of various media who want to display at the fair.

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People attend the 2011 Arts & Crafts Fair at Covedale Performing Arts Center. FILE

Find news and information from your community on the Web Covedale • cincinnati.com/covedale Price Hill • cincinnati.com/pricehill Hamilton County • cincinnati.com/hamiltoncounty

News

Marc Emral Senior Editor ...............853-6264, memral@communitypress.com Heidi Fallon Reporter ...................853-6265, hfallon@communitypress.com Kurt Backscheider Reporter ............853-6260, kbackscheider@communitypress.com Melanie Laughman Sports Editor ......248-7573, mlaughman@communitypress.com Tom Skeen Sports Reporter .............576-8250, tskeen@communitypress.com

Advertising

Debbie Maggard Territory Sales Manager ...............859-578-5501, dmaggard@nky.com Patti Lancaster Account Executive ....687-6732, plancaster@communitypress.com

The guidelines for artists: » Artists will need to provide their own displays, booths or tables. » Artists must provide three clear photos of the work to be displayed. The photos are not returnable. » Registration forms are due by Friday, July 13. The forms can be downloaded at the web site: www.cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com. » The center will be able to select only about 60 artists for the fair. » Artists will be notified of their selection no later than Monday, July 30. Leah Tuscany of Oxford, Ohio, plans to participate in the fair this year for the first time. She specializes in working with glass to make beads for jewelry, buttons and other purposes.

Index

Delivery

Calendar .................B2 Classifieds ................C Food ......................B3 Life ........................B1 Police .................... B7 Schools ..................A5 Sports ....................A6 Viewpoints .............A8

For customer service...................853-6263, 853-6277 Sharon Schachleiter Circulation Manager ..................853-6279, sschachleiter@communitypress.com Stephanie Siebert District Manager.......................853-6281

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APRIL 25, 2012 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • A3

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St. Antoninus students have all the moves during the school’s Chess club meeting. The sixth-graders competed in the Queen City Classic Chess Tournament and the team of seven won the sixth-grade non-rated section beating 13 other schools. There were more than 600 participants this year, it was first year St. Antoninus competed at the tournament. The club practices at the school with other grades involved as well.

Brady Holcomb makes his move during a chess game with Andrew Schmutte as the two fourth-grader mix it up at St. Antoninus. TONY JONES/THE COMMUNITY PRESS.

Robert Nussman had some dance moves and chess moves at St. Antoninus during the Chess Club meeting. TONY JONES/THE

Claire Busken, left, watches Scott Holcomb make his moves during a chess game with sixth-graders at St. Antoninus. TONY JONES/THE COMMUNITY PRESS.

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NEWS

A4 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • APRIL 25, 2012

Two women attacked in Delhi Twp. Sunset Players Inc. Gannett News Service DELHI TWP. — – Police are asking the public to help find two intruders who terrorized women and tried to assault them sexually in separate home invasions just minutes apart and about a mile away from each other. Officers recently released composite sketches of the suspects in hopes that someone will recognize the men and share information with investigators, but as of Thursday police had not yet identified the attackers. Police Chief Col. Jim Howarth said home invasions are rare in this community, and he viewed them as a strange coincidence. Investigators, though, think the crimes

Sketches of suspects in home invasions on Foley Road and Plumridge Drive.

Sketch of second suspect in home invasion and sexual assault attempt.

are unrelated and the similarities were coincidental, he said, adding, “It’s two totally different suspects.” Both incidents were reported during the predawn hours of April 1. In the first incident, reported at 3:38 a.m. at a condominium in the 4500 block of Foley Road, “the victim awoke to an un-

known white male telling her to wake up, while pointing a gun at her,” a news release said. The man demanded money and jewelry and ordered her to roll over, but the woman struggled. “The suspect got scared and ran out of the condo. He was last seen running east, from the condo, towards Pedretti Road,” police said. The attacker was a

white male wearing black jeans, a black leather jacket and a black bandanna. He had brown eyes and short brown hair. He stood about 6 feet tall, weighed around 200 pounds and was around age 30 or 40. He also spoke with an accent or Southern drawl. The second incident occurred around 3:40 a.m. in the 5300 block of Plumridge Drive. “The victim awoke … to find an unknown African-American male entering her bedroom,” police said. The intruder apparently entered her residence through an unlocked rear kitchen window. Howarth asks anyone with information about either incident to contact Delhi police at 513-9220060 or to provide an anonymous tip to Crime Stoppers at 513-352-3040.

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plans to create arts center at Dunham

By Kurt Backscheider kbackscheider@communitypress.com

Members of Sunset Players Inc. are hard at work preparing the Dunham Arts Building for renovation. The community theater group has called the arts building at the Dunham Recreation Complex home for more than 30 years, and its members have a plan to take ownership of the building and transform it into the Arts Center at Dunham. “We’re really excited about it,” said Christina Yearout, a Westwood resident who handles publicity for the Sunset Players. “The West Side doesn’t have a true place for all the arts.” The group has been working with the Price Hill Civic Club, Price Hill Will, the Dunham Advisory Board and the Cincinnati Recreation Commission to renovate the now vacant arts building and create a fully realized arts center. Yearout said the arts building, an historic Art Deco facility built in 1937, suffered some roof damage a couple of years ago. The Sunset Players moved to a temporary performance space at Midway School in Westwood while the roof damage was being assessed, and she said group members began discussing the possibility of taking over the arts building. She said the Sunset Players expect to sign a

lease with the city in April or May and move forward with establishing the Arts Center at Dunham. The group’s goal is to create a place where the visual arts, photography, painting, sculpture, music, dance, theater and children’s art can all be under one roof. Yearout said the upper level of the building will contain a performance venue and the lower level can be made into art studio space. The auditorium will not only be used for Sunset Players Inc. shows, but for concerts and art shows as well, she said. When completed, she said the facility will be the West Side’s very own center truly focused on the arts. The Sunset Players just have a lot of work to do to accomplish it. She said the building needs a new roof, needs to be cleaned inside, needs fresh paint and a new heating and air conditioning system. She said the renovations are estimated to cost about $60,000. Another $100,000 will be needed when the group is ready to replace the heating and air conditioning system. “There’s a lot of work to do at the building,” Yearout said. “We’re pursuing grants and doing some fundraising.” The Sunset Players anticipate transforming the facility into the Arts Center at Dunham will be a multiple year project, but she said they do plan to be able to be presenting shows in the building this fall.

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SCHOOLS

APRIL 25, 2012 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • A5

Editor: Marc Emral, memral@communitypress.com, 578-1053

ACHIEVEMENTS | NEWS | ACTIVITIES | HONORS

COMMUNITY

PRESS

CommunityPress.com

Elder alumni hand out five awards Begun in ’93, group still seeking more nominees

The Elder High School Alumni Association had its annual Alumni Award ceremony recently. Begun in 1993, the awards recognize members of the Elder community for their contributions in the following areas: Christian Leadership – Presented to Walt Amrein ‘56 for exemplifying the Christian values upon which Elder is based. Amrein is active in his parish and many community activities including the Knights of Columbus where he has twice served as Grand Knight. Professional Distinction – Presented to Tom Davoran ’56, a teacher of English, reading, and dramatic techniques at Elder for more than 40 years. His professional achievements fostered superior performance in his peers as well as the men of Elder. Cultural Enrichment – Presented to Paul Vollman ’80 for advancing the appreciation of culture in society. A painter, Voll-

man’s works are in many public and private collections around the country. In 2008, he opened Paul Vollman Gallery in the Pendleton Art Center in Over-the-Rhine. Athletic Excellence – Presented to Bill Krumpelbeck ’72 for embracing the values of fair competition and whose tenacity and sacrifice have advanced the Elder athletic tradition. Krumpelbeck attended the University of Cincinnati on a baseball scholarship and is now both a highly-regarded high school biology teacher and baseball coach at Covington Catholic in northern Kentucky. Spirit – Presented to Leslie Lamps for her unselfish enthusiasm that is the Elder experience. Mrs. Lamps has been a secretary in the Elder school office for 15 years. In a world where recorded greetings are the norm, those who call Elder find their experience to be different because of the friendly reception they receive from Lamps. The Alumni Association is always seeking nominations for its awards. To nominate someone, please send details to alumni@elderhs.org.

HONOR ROLLS

DENTAL LESSON

Kindergarten students from St. Lawrence Grade School learned about dental health and the role of milk in promoting healthy teeth. A grant from the Greater Cincinnati Foundation made it possible for the children to have a milk, cheese or yogurt snack three time a week.

Back row Andrea McAllister and Katherine Delk-Calkins, RN; middle row: Stacey Stewart, Jayonna Beamon, Henry Velasques-Solis, Michael Williams, Trinity Thrasher, Jordan Thompson, Kailey Dattilo; front row: Kyler Long, Cody Corbett, Hannah Caster, Michael Haverbusch, Austin Showalter, Antonio Smith, and Rylei Scully. PROVIDED.

Connor Eichhorn, Arianna Lorenzo-Hernandez, Andrew Long, Ayla Thompson, Katherine Delk-Calkins, RN; middle row: Beth Wolf, Abner Morales, Mario Berduo, Torrance Jones, Jacob Schlachter, Angel Antonio Wheelright-Soriano, Brianna Cook; front row: Bradin Young, Isabela Swis, Deanna Nguyen, Shaunice Wade, and Rebecka Esterkamp. PROVODED.

COLLEGE CORNER Dean’s list

Elizabeth Griffes was named to the fall semester dean’s list at Shawnee State University.

Scholarships

Mother of Mercy High School senior Caroline Walsh has received a Dean’s Award from Xavier University. Walsh, the daughter of Jennifer and James Walsh of Delhi Township, plans to major in athletic training. All incoming first-year students are evaluated for Trustee and Presidential scholarships and Dean’s and Schawe awards. Award levels vary. ■ Oak Hills High School senior Amber Kiley has received an

Presented the Elder High School Alumni Association awards were, from left, Paul Vollman, Walt Amrein, Bill Krumpelbeck, Leslie Lamps and Tom Davoran.

$11,000 Wilmington College Academic Achievement Award and a $2,500 Pathways Grant. Kiley plans to major in premedicine. She is the daughter of James and Stephanie Kiley of Delhi Township. ■ Seton High School senior Lindsay Berting has received a Presidential Scholarship from Xavier University. Berting is active in National Honor Society, tennis and as an ambassador. The daughter of Barbara & William Berting, she plans to major in biology. All incoming first-year students are evaluated for Trustee and Presidential Scholarships and Dean’s and Schawe Awards. Award levels vary.

SETON HIGH SCHOOL

The following students earned honors for the third quarter of the 2011-2012 school year.

Freshmen First honors: Hannah Ammon, Megan Awad, Savannah Bacon, Sam Ballachino, Allison Broderick, Cassie Bullock, Greta Busche, Gabrielle Doll, Madeline Ernst, Faith Flowers, Jennifer Fohl, Libby Gramann, Megan Groll, Ashley Grooms, Andrea Hannan, Sydney Haussler, Gabriel Hirlinger, Megan Igel, Kaitlyn Jacobs, Isabella Jansen, Shannon Kaine, Allison Kampel, Samantha Kingdom, Caroline Klopp, Emily Klumb, Gabrielle Kraemer, Leigha Kraemer, Kelsey Kurzhals, Abby Lamping, Lauren Lipps, Krista Murphy, Megan Nguyen, Carly Niehauser, Phuong Phan, Victoria Pollack, Allyson Radziwon, Amy Rapien, Emily Reuss, Jessica Rieskamp, Sydney Riser, Abbigail Sandmann, Allison Schmitt, Suzanne Schultz, Rachel Seaman, Haley Sponaugle, Carly Stagge, Natalie Ulmer, Maggie Walroth and Brooke Zentmeyer. Second honors: Raina Aull, Allison Bailey, Samantha Biggs, Emma Bohan, Courtney Burns, Isabella Burton, Katherine Cole, Grace Davis, Mary Cecelia DiGiacomo, Maria DiTullio, Hannah Fricke, McKenzie Frommeyer, Celia Garnett, Savannah Geiger, Emily Geigle, Cassidy Giglio, Kathryn Grace, Emily Hatting, Molly Henderson, Melissa Henry, Olivia Hess, Laura Hofmeyer, Ashley Hoinke, Amy Hopkins, Amanda Jacobs, Cassandra Johnson, Kalie Kaimann, Kourtney Keller, Jenna Kohler, Kayla Krommer, Lindsey Lanzillotta, Jessica Lauber, Natalie Morrison, Madelin Murphy, Laura Nie, Brittany Oestreicher, Anna Ostendorf, Alyse Peck, Alyssa Reiring, Samantha Roth, Kelly Shields, Marisa Stavale, Kelsey Stock, Olivia Tepe, Margaret Thiemann, Maria Torok, Melissa Trentman, Emma Voss and Hannah Wegman.

Sophomores First honors: Julie Alder, Christine Anneken, Allison Bailey, Taylor Beiersdorfer, Megan Bisher, Diana Bolton, Molly Brauch, Elizabeth Bruewer, Kendall Cappel, Julie Chastang, Allyson Cox, Elizabeth Day, Corrine Deutenberg, Rebecca Freese, Maggie Freudiger, Jessica Frey, Mikayla Hartoin, Jennifer Healey, Karly Heinzelman, Samantha Hissett, Charity Jamison, Sarah Kammer, Rice Klauke, Julia Kohler, Katherine Lehan, Monica Lepper, Juliana Lucas, Michelle Moehring, Hannah Nartker, Susan Nussman, Ashley O’Brien, Colleen O’Connor, Christine Oswald, Rachel Richter, Quinn Scheiner, Brooke Schleben, Cayla Schmitt, Victoria Scholl, Leanne Shinkle, Samantha Smith, Sarah Specker, Kirby Sullivan, Halie Sunderman, Jewel Thompson, Catherine Tuttle and Olivia Wetsch. Second honors: Penelope Abe, Alissa Allison, Molly Beck, Hannah Becker, Samantha Bedel, Loretta Blaut, Kaylie Brown, Magalynne Browne, Haley Daugherty, Marcella Driehaus, Key’Vonya Edwards, Abigail Felix, Kelly Gallagher, Jessica Gilmore, Lauren Godsey, Samantha Goodwin, Cassidy Gramke, Ellen Hahn, Victoria Hancock, Lindsey Hendricks, Taylor Hirth, Rachel Hobbs, Alexandra Hoffmann, Olivia Klumb, Lauren Knolle, Kelley Kraemer, Molly

Kraisinger, Lauren Lind, Katherine Lobono, Sydney Loebker, Abigail Ludwig-Rollinger, Allison Luebbering, Alyssa Lyons, Morgan Masminster, Brittany Maxwell, Anna McGowan, Sarah Mellott, Allison Mohan, Samantha Monahan, Taylor Morano, Jessica Moses, Katie Nanney, Alexandra Neltner, Lindsey Niehaus, Abigail Pace, Samantha Pragar, Courtney Reed, Taylor Richards, Carley Roberto, Nicole Ruffing, Kelly Sagers, Courtney Schriefer, Sydney Schultz, Brianna Studt, Elizabeth Waite, Olivia Wall, Rachel Watkins, Macy Wauligman, Christa Woelfel, Jessica Wuebbolt and Chelsea Zang.

Juniors First honors: Jessica Anevski, Shelby Ashcraft, Abigail Awad, Nicole Behler, Amanda Boeing, Morgan Doerflein, Danielle Drinkuth, Jocelyn Evans, Katarina Gay, McKenzie Grace, Elizabeth Griswold, Kelsey Groll, Molly Hartig, Emily Hayhow, Sarah Hilvert, Karly Hyland, Ashley Jacobs, Maggie Keyes, Hayley Kirley, Kathleen Koch, Erika LaRosa, Stephanie Little, Adelaide Lottman, Jenna Martini, Laura Mersmann, Holly Meyer, Alexandra Moehring, Paige Moorhead, Lindsey Mullen, Kelsey Murphy, Emily Reiring, Samantha Riser, Haley Rollison, Christina Schultz, Stefanie Schwarm, Emily Sedler, Laura Sollmann, Andrea Toth, Sydney Vollmer, Allison Walke, Erin Wanger, Jessica Woeste, Rachel Zieverink and Kourtney Zigelmier. Second honors: Lindsey Ackerman, Arianna Alonzo, Melanie Autenrieb, Jessica Beamer, Ashley Bretnitz, Elizabeth Butler, Maureen Carolin, Kimberly Conrady, McKenzie Davis, Lisa Dlima, Morgan Doll, Kristin Eversole, Kaitlyn Feeney, Kaitlyn Finfrock, Anna Freudiger, Shelby Fritsch, Allison Glatt, Haley Gooderson, Erin Grace, Emily Gramke, Alison Gruber, Emma Hand, Emily Heine, Anna Marie Hetzer, Emily Hofmeyer, Kelli Holwadel, Kara Hunsche, Hannah James, Taylor Kuhl, Grace Laiveling, Hannah Lanzillotta, Margaret Leisgang, Julie Lindeman, Caitlin Lopez, Cheyenne Martinez, Emilie Mattei, Meghan McGregor, Marisa Meyer, Mary Grace Moore, Stephanie Myers, Jennifer Nguyen, Nicole Nie, Emma Nienaber, Colleen O’Brien, Morgan Quatman, Kara Rattermann, Pamela Redden, Kara Ridder, Allison Roell, Madison Rosenacker, Christin Rottenberger, Christine Rowland, Helena Sabato, Jordan Schmidt, Katelyn Schoster, Jaime Smith, Regina Squeri, Anna Stagge, Nicole Stemler, Rachel Stock, Emma Summers, Elizabeth Sunderhaus, Maria Svec, Ashley Tettenhorst, Emma Thiemann, Christina Torok, Jacqueline Tran, Morgan Vogel, Jaclyn Waller and Rachel Wink.

Seniors First honors: Lindsey Allgeyer, Alexandra Averbeck, Sarah Banfill, Samantha Beeler, Olivia Bernard, Lindsey Berting, Lauren Bihl, Taylor Bittner, Anna Combs, Alexis Cranley, Erin Davoran, Olivia Dulle, Ashley Eversole, Rebecca Ewald, Jessica Fox, Anne Goettke, Madeline Haney, Emily Henkel, Danielle Hoffman, Emily Igel, Alyssa Kaine, Vanessa Klawitter, Jordan Lipps, Kari Lockwood, Maria McDonald, Haley Meister, Brooke Moorhead, Jessica Mueller, Ashley Niemann, Anne Pace, Jennifer Rodgers, Noelle Rogers,

Natalie Rudolf, Mollie Ruffing, Melissa Schenkel, Emily Stautberg, Maria Tepe, Lauren Ulmer, Shelby Wauligman, Rachel Weber and Alisha Wilk. Second honors: Melissa Alexander, Molly Arnold, Jessica Bailey, Mariah Becker, Nicole Bell, Allison Briede, Julie Buttelwerth, Kaitlyn Cappel, Victoria Cipriani, Sarah Clark, Leah Dickman, Danielle Flanigan, Sara Frey, Taylor Fricke, Andrea Gau, Jaynee Goines, Carly Graman, Rachel Gregory, Maggie Hauer, Bailey Haussler, Shanna Hickey, Ally Jasper, Sarah Kathmann, Olivia Klawitter, Amber Knolle, Emma Lindle, Jourdan Lyons, Alexis Marcelo, Emily McDonald, Katherine McHale, Andrea Metzger, Lauren Meyer, Rebecca Meyer, Jennifer Morand, Alexi Murray, Leanne Nieberding, Alison Norman, Alyssa Pohlman, Alexandra Polly, Stacey Radziwon, Colleen Ryan, Laura Sagers, Emily Seibel, Kylee Siefke, Allison Smith, Samantha Southard, Lauren Tepe, Chelsey Williams and Cassy Woelfel.

ST. URSULA ACADEMY

The following students have earned honors for the third quarter of the 2011-2012 school year.

Freshmen First honors: Anna Arar, Claire Berding, Lydia Breitenstein, Caitlyn Cappel, Natalie Danenhauer, Christina Diersing, Katelyn Ferguson, Elena HelmersWegman and Nicole Kitko. Second honors: Katlyn Colvin, Hanna Earley, Abigail Engelhardt, Carolyn Knollman, Anna McManus, Sydney Springer and Claudia Vollman.

Sophomores First honors: Allison Budde, Laurel Cappel, Sarah Clark, Samantha DiTullio, Megan Huber and Madeline Kiehl.

Juniors First honors: Katherine Berding, Danielle Chin, Emily Engelhardt, Sarah Kelley, Grace Liesch, Maria Moore, Julia Springer and Alison Younts. Second honors: Anne Dixon, Elise Earley, Lucy Gaynor, Elizabeth Kehling, Elizabeth Kelly, Donai Long and Priya Mullen.

Seniors First honors: Lauren Ashley, Abigail Bettner, Kathleen Byrne, Megan Devoto, Maria Diersing, Stephanie Franer, Mary Hofmann, Francesca Jansen, Chloe Pfander, Samantha Ramstetter and Samantha Stine. Second honors: Danielle Duesing, Alli Lamping, Maria Napolitano and Alexandra Wuest.

URSULINE ACADEMY

The following students earned honors for the third quarter of the 2011-2012 school year.

Juniors First honors: Heather Knorr.

DEPAUL CRISTO REY HIGH SCHOOL

The following students earned honors for the third quarter of the 2011-2012 school year.

Freshmen Second honors: Jordan Handorf.


SPORTS

A6 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • APRIL 25, 2012

Editor: Melanie Laughman, mlaughman@communitypress.com, 513-248-7573

HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | RECREATIONAL

COMMUNITY

PRESS

CommunityPress.com

Washington runs circles around competition

Speed a gift for Western Hills athlete By Tom Skeen tskeen@communitypress.com

Western Hills High School junior Cameron Washington looks in a fly ball during practice April 18. The speedster leads the Mustangs with 16 stoles bases through 16 games and is hitting .386 on the season. TOM SKEEN/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

WESTERN HILLS — There are myths out there about how fast some athletes are. People drool over 40-yard dash times these days. Well, Western Hills High School right fielder Cameron Washington has some speed stories of his own. Last season, on a one hopper back to the pitcher, he beat the throw to first base. Earlier this season on a ground ball to first, he beat the first baseman to the bag. According to his coach, James Holland, Washington runs a 4.5 second 40-yard dash. With a Los Angeles Dodgers

scout in the crowd last season, he gave Washington a business card and recognition solely based on his speed. “He’s really an amazing kid when it comes to speed,” Holland said. “He’s probably the best pure athlete that I’ve coached. He’s fast, one of the fastest kids I’ve coached.” As you would think, he leads the Mustangs in stolen bases this season with 16 through 16 games after totaling 22 all of last season. “It’s just playing (that helps me),” he said. “But I need to work on reading the pitchers and stuff like that, but it’s just playing and trying to hustle.” The junior is a two-sport athlete. He is the starting quarterback for the football team and finished last season second on the team with 516 rushing yards. It’s his time on the field and in

the weight room that help him on the baseball diamond since he is unable to play summer baseball. “He’s a football guy,” Holland said. “So what benefits him is that he is always in the weight room and we try to use Cam as an example to our other kids about being in the weight room. He is one of the few kids who can play the game and not play summer ball.” While in between sports, he goes to someone many go to for advice and practice. “My dad practices with me swinging when baseball season is near,” he said. “When football season is over, he talks to me about baseball and we just work out.” While speed may be his specialty, it’s not the only thing he brings to the team. He leads the Mustangs with a .386 average, 15 RBI, 17 hits and

17 runs scored. “On the field he is real quiet and just goes about his business,” Holland said. “He’s a great kid. He’s real, real raw, but he definitely has the skills to play this game. He’s quietly our team leader and just leads by his actions and his play on the field.” Being a two-sport athlete and finding a balance between athletics and academics takes a special person, and Washington is doing whatever it takes to get it done on and off the field. “It’s incredible (to play two sports),” he said. “I just keep telling myself to not give up and to keep doing what I have to do.” While still only a junior, Holland knows that no matter the challenge, he can count on his speedster to get it done. See MUSTANGS, Page A7

PRESS PREPS HIGHLIGHTS By Tom Skeen tskeen@communitypress.com

Baseball

» Western Hills beat Hughes 17-1, April 16. Senior Andre Murray went 3-3 with a triple and three RBI. » Oak Hills beat Sycamore 11-4, April 16. Senior Thomas Connolly got the win and improved to 3-0 on the mound this season. » Elder defeated Oak Hills 5-1, April 17. The Panthers move to 13-5, while the Highlanders drop to 10-5 on the season. » La Salle’s Paul Spaulding improved to 4-0 as the Lancers beat Fenwick 4-3 April 18.

Softball

» Mercy beat Alter 25-0, April 16. Senior Anna Eggleston got the win, striking out nine. » Oak Hills lost to Fairfield April 16, 11-3. Junior Devan Colebank went 3-4. » Seton lost 9-3 to Colerain April 17. Junior Stephanie Little went 3-4 and scored two

runs.

Boys tennis

» Oak Hills defeated Finneytown 3-2, April16. The doubles team of Michael Raabe and Zach Thomas won 6-0, 6-0. » Elder defeated Summit Country Day 5-0, April 17. All five Panther matchups were won in straight sets.

Boys volleyball

» Elder came back from down two sets and defeated Alter April 17, 25-20, 21-25, 1325, 25-18, 15-9. » Oak Hills lost in straight sets, 25-20, 25-13, 25-14, to Lakota West April 17.

College signing

» Oak Hills’ Matthew Funk signed to play soccer at the College of Mount Saint Joseph next season. Funk is a sweeper and was named a team captain last season.

Tweets from the beat

» @MikeDyer: Boston College offered La Salle junior CB Jaleel Hytchye, says La Salle coach Tom Grippa

SAINTS TAME BOBCATS

Seton’s Anna Stagge swings at a pitch with the Mercy bench looking in the Saints’ 4-3 loss to the Bobcats April 20 as a part of the Best of the West showdown at Delhi Park. Stagge is second on the team in hitting at .452 and is tied for the team lead with nine RBI. TOM SKEEN/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Saints poised for best season in years

Seton has big wins for 1st-year coach By Tom Skeen tskeen@communitypress.com

Seton senior Taylor Fricke approaches the net and attempts a shot on goal during the Saints 17-7 win over Mercy April 17. TOM SKEEN/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

PRICE HILL — The last time the Seton softball team had a winning season was 2008. From 2010-2011, they combined for just nine total wins and went a combined 0-20 in the Girls Greater Cincinnati League. This season, it appears as though a new leaf has been turned over with first-year varsity coach Jay Villing taking over the job. The Saints are 7-7 overall and 3-3 in the GGCL, in third-place, with wins over Ross, Mercy, McAuley and Mount Notre Dame already this season. Ross is currently ranked No. 3 in the Enquirer Division II-IV coaches’ poll, while McAuley is No. 4 in the Division I poll.

“I think the girls have played with confidence and they head into every game believing they can win that game,” Villing said. “They know they are as good as the other team. They respect the other team, but they think they are as good as them. That is what we preach and they have bought it.” Villing attributes a lot of his success and knowledge of the game to Ross coach Paul Fernandez, and believes the Saints victory over the Rams set the tone for their season. “He is a legend,” Villing said. “He was actually very helpful to me giving me advice. We took the success (of beating Ross) and a couple days later beat McAuley, who is tremendous. The one sort of led to the other and we just have to keep it going. With young players, their psyche is fragile, so we must go forward and keep the consistency and confidence.” A lot of the Saints success can

be attributed to senior pitcher Danielle Hoffman. She ranks third in the GGCL with a 0.82 ERA and sits at 7-3 on the season with 55 strikeouts and two shutouts in 68 innings. “Her poise on the mound is great, she’s unflappable,” Villing said. “Nothing gets her rattled or upset. When we make a mistake, it doesn’t bother her. She’s just been very controlled and never lets anything get the best of her.” At the plate, it is juniors Stephanie Little and Anna Stagge leading the way. Little leads the team in hitting at .469, runs scored with 13, 15 hits and 13 stolen bases. Stagge is hitting .452 with 14 hits and is tied for the team lead with nine RBI. “(Little) has been our table setter,” Villing said. “Her nickname is ‘Straw’ because she is the straw that holds us together. When she gets on base, good things happen See SETON, Page A7


SPORTS & RECREATION

APRIL 25, 2012 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • A7

We Service All Makes and Models!

MARLIN MAGIC

SIDELINES

The Cincinnati Marlins Swim Team won a third consecutive Ohio State Junior Olympic title. Both 9-10 relays finished first and set a new Ohio State record in the 200-yard medley relay, breaking the previous record by more two seconds. The boys 9-10 team won the team High Point Award. Pictured, from left: Back, Kellen Roddy of Cincinnati, Jacob MacDonald of Mason and Ian Brann of Union, Ky.; middle, Drew Morstadt of Mason and Carson Foster of Montgomery; first, Christian Wall and Nathan Wall, both of Western Hills, and Aaron Sequira of Cincinnati. Not pictured is Colton Stephany of Alexandria, Ky. THANKS TO JOE BRANN

Seton

Golf league signups

Continued from Page A6

Delhi Junior Golf League signups for boys and girls ages 9 to 12 are 5:30-6:30 p.m., Thursday, May 24 and May 31, at Delhi Hills Par 3. Cost is $45 per child and includes four rounds of golf and a pizza and awards party at the end of the tournament. Golf weeks are Fridays, June 8, 15 and 22 and tournament and awards party is Friday, June 29. Call Don at 922-0920 with questions.

for us. It’s big for us to score first, we’ve won every game but one when that happens and she is a big reason for that. (Stagge) played junior varsity for me last year and she hit well, but not to her full potential. It’s very nice to see her doing that this year at the varsity level.” With a tough schedule

Mustangs “He is the one kid we can count on when playing a Fairfield or an Oak Hills or whoever, that he is going to get the three hits because he eats that stuff up. He lives for the challenge.”

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remaining, Villing knows that it’s still early and with a young team, they have to continue with what has been successful for them so far. “We have to continue to come together as a team,” he said. “When we face adversity, which we will, we have to take it and let it make us stronger instead of letting it set us back. We are still pretty young and new to things, so how we handle adversity will determine our success, but we will be a tough out.”

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VIEWPOINTS A8 • PRICE HILL PRESS • APRIL 25, 2012

COMMUNITY

PRESS

Editor: Marc Emral, memral@communitypress.com, 853-6264

EDITORIALS | LETTERS | COLUMNS | CH@TROOM

CommunityPress.com

Portman would make a good VP

It’s pretty clear at this point that Mitt Romney is going to be the Republican nominee for President. And one of the most important decisions that Romney will have to make in his quest for the presidency, is who to Steve Chabot select as a COMMUNITY PRESS running mate. GUEST COLUMNIST For what it’s worth, I think that Rob Portman would be a great choice. He’d be a tremendous vice presidential candidate, and if God forbid, tragedy befell a Romney administration and the vice president had to step up and fill the position of president, no one, in my opinion, would be more prepared to take on the awesome responsibilities of that office than Rob Portman. I’ve been fortunate enough to know and work with Rob Portman for more than 20 years now. We represented adjoining Congressional dis-

U.S. Rep. Steve Chabot thinks U.S. Sen. Rob Portman, with Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney in Newtown in February, would make a good vice president. AMANDA DAVIDSON/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

tricts in the House of Representatives for more than a decade. Sharing the responsibilities of representing Greater Cincinnati in Congress gave me considerable insight into the real Rob Portman. He’s honest, hard-working, smart, detail-oriented and dedicated to his family. Perhaps his greatest asset is his wife Jane, who is a leader in her own right. Perhaps most importantly, the Romney campaign won’t have to worry about getting Rob Portman up to speed to fulfill his role as a vice presidential candidate. He knows the issues inside and out. In fact, he’s so knowledgeable and such a good debater that when the Bush/Cheney and McCain campaigns were looking for a top-notch debater, they chose Rob Portman to play that critical role. Cheney

Why do we need blood collections?

Why do we need blood drives? Simply stated, science has not yet found a way to manufacture blood. This is one thing that can’t be outsourced – we need you! Hoxworth Blood Center needs about 350 individual blood donors and 35 platelet donors every day to supply 31 local area Joe hospitals Binder with the COMMUNITY PRESS blood they GUEST COLUMNIST require. At some point, these donations could and will be used to help save the life of a loved one, a friend, co-worker, neighbor or maybe even you. Statistics show that in any given year only about 2 percent of adult Americans donate blood. If you are not one of the 2 percent, why not? Donating a unit of blood only takes about an hour. True, it isn’t sexy or fun, but what else are you ever going to do that is guaranteed to save a life in as little as 60 minutes? Are you one of the 2 percent? If so, thank you for donating. If you have not donated recently, please consider donating again soon. You are eligible to donate every eight weeks if you gave a unit, or after 16

weeks if you last donated a “double-red.” Can’t give during the week? I am a member of a group, Westwood Works, which is hosting a Hoxworth Blood Drive on Saturday, May 12, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. at Westwood First Presbyterian, 3011 Harrison Ave. (near Montana, next to Westwood School). To register for this drive, please visit the Hoxworth web site www.hoxworth.org/groups/westwoodworks then click the Donor Portal graphic and our Group Code is A770. Or you can call Hoxworth at 513-4510910 and mention the Westwood Works blood drive. Please come out Saturday, May 12, the day before Mother’s Day, and donate. Take an hour to donate and make your mom proud! We can use volunteers for this drive and Hoxworth is always looking for volunteers. To volunteer for this drive, please email me at jbinder3@fuse.net – we would only need about an hour of your time. If this blood drive is inconvenient, please consider donating through any of Hoxworth’s eight neighborhood donor centers again soon. You can reach them at 513-451-0910 or at www.hoxworth.org Remember, we need you! Joe Binder is a member of Westwood Works.

PRICE HILL

PRESS

A publication of

even commented that Portman was a tougher (and better) opponent than Joe Liberman! Also importantly, Rob Portman has already been vetted for his job in the executive branch of the government – twice. First, when he was confirmed by the U.S. Senate for the cabinet level position of

U.S. Trade Representative, after leaving Congress. And then when he was again confirmed by the United States Senate to fill the critical position of director of the OMB (Office of Management and Budget.) And when you consider how critical it is that we get our $16 trillion plus budget

debt under control, experience in this area is very important. On the political front, as is often said, no Republican has ever been elected President without carrying Ohio. And there’s no question that Rob Portman will be key in seeing that Ohio goes for Romney this November. Looking back at Rob’s own Senate race in 2010, Lt. Gov. Lee Fisher was leading Rob by double-digits when that race got under way. By the time election day rolled around, Rob Portman had turned his underdog candidacy into an 18 point victory, and carried 82 of Ohio’s 88 counties. Look, there are some other great candidates Mitt Romney will consider to be his running mate, among them Marco Rubio, Chris Christie and Mitch Daniels, to name but a few. But after he’s considered the pros and cons of each one, I would submit that the best choice he could make is Sen. Rob Portman. Steve Chabot is the U.S. representative from the 1st District.

Spring has sprung into time of seasonal allergies Although many Cincinnatians are enjoying the early spring weather, it is unfortunately causing problems for those of us who suffer from allergies. The Southwest Ohio Air Quality Agency monitors the levels of airborne allergens daily and shares the information on our website SouthwestOhioAir.org Allergy season begins this time of Maria year because Butauski of all the COMMUNITY PRESS blooming GUEST COLUMNIST plant life. Pollens differ throughout the country, but in the Southwest Ohio region, winds spread pollen from many types of plants starting as early as February and continuing into October. Unusually warm weather conditions have caused trees to pollinate at higher levels than is common for this time of year. Some of the most prevalent sources of allergens in abundance right now are plants like oak, cedar, maple

ABOUT LETTERS AND COLUMNS We welcome your comments on editorials, columns, stories or other topics important to you in The Community Press. Include your name, address and phone number(s) so we may verify your letter. Letters of 200 or fewer words and columns of 500 or fewer words have the best chance of being published. All submissions may be edited for length, accuracy and clarity. Deadline: Noon Friday E-mail: memral@community press.com Fax: 853-6220 U.S. mail: See box below Letters, columns and articles submitted to The Community Press may be published or distributed in print, electronic or other forms.

and elm trees. Ragweed is another significant source of pollen that blooms from August until the first week of October. Ragweed produces an alarming amount of pollen during these months, often crippling the noses and eyes of people suf-

fering from allergies. Because so many people suffer from seasonal allergies, we analyze inundating pollen and mold samples and report the results on our website every business day from February through November. This is a good resource for allergysufferers to use when planning any outdoor activities during allergy season. Living with allergies can be miserable, so when pollen and mold counts are high, here are some things you can do to help your allergies: » Avoid areas with freshly cut grass and lawn care activities. » Minimize outdoor activity between 5 a.m. and 10 a.m. » Close windows and use air conditioning. » Contact an allergist or doctor for medical advice. To learn more about pollen and mold counts, as well as living with allergies, please visit SouthwestOhioAir.org or call the pollen and mold hotline at 513-946-7753. Maria Butauski is a public relations intern with Southwest Ohio Air Quality Agency.

MEETINGS » Cincinnati City Council meets at 2 p.m. every Wednesday in room 300 at Cincinnati City Hall, 801 Plum St. When there is a Monday holiday, all meetings including committee meetings are pushed back a day. City Manager: Milton Dohoney Jr. Mayor: Mark Mallory. » Cincinnati Public Schools Board of Education usually meets at 7 p.m. the second and fourth Mondays of the month at 2651 Burnet Ave. Board

of Education phone: 475-7000. Superintendent: Mary Ronan. Board President: Eve Bolton. » Delhi Township Trustees meet at 6 p.m. the second and last Wednesday of the month at township offices, 934 Neeb Road. Phone: 922-3111. Administrator: Thomas R. Stahlheber. Board president: Mike Davis. » Price Hill Civic Club meets the second Tuesday of each month at 7:30 p.m. at Seton K of C Hall on

5556 Cheviot Road Cincinnati, Ohio 45247 phone: 923-3111 fax: 853-6220 email: pricehillpress@communitypress.com web site: www.communitypress.com

West Eighth St. (across from St. William Church), Phone: 251-0880. Club President: Mark Armstrong. » East Price Hill Improvement Association meets the third Monday of each month at 7:30 p.m. at Holy Family Church, 3006 W. Eighth St., Phone: 549-3744. Association President: John Schlagetter. To be considered for this list send your information to memral@communitypress.com.

Price Hill Press Editor Marc Emral memral@communitypress.com, 853-6264 Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday See page A2 for additional contact information.


WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2012 GETTY IMAGES/

LIFE

COMMUNITY PRESS

PEOPLE | IDEAS | RECIPES

OLDTIMERS GIVE PROPS TO WEST-SIDE ‘DIAMONDS’

THINKSTOCK.COM

Group inducts 60th Hall of Fame class, honors students By Tom Skeen tskeen@communitypress.com

P

RICE HILL — An organization

with roots that date back more than 70 years is on the brink of inducting its 60th Hall of Fame class. The Price Hill Baseball Oldtimers will induct six new members and award three Andy Gallagher Awards to student-athletes from Elder, Oak Hills, and Western Hills. The Gallagher Award recipients will receive a $500 college scholarships from the Oldtimers and its contributing members. This year’s recipients are Austin Kron, Daniel Schwarz and Stoney Sutton. Kron is a pitcher at Oak Hills who has won the Highlander Award and Best Pitcher Award. He is undecided as to which college he will attend, but plans on majoring in meKron chanical engineering. He boasts a 3.82 GPA and has been a member of the National Honor Society for two years. The senior is an AP Scholar, a member

Bill Rothan was named MVP of the Mustangs baseball team in 1969 and 1970. He went on to play baseball for the Anaheim Angles and St. Louis Cardinals.

of the honor roll and is ranked 74th out of 642 in his graduating class. Schwarz is a four-year varsity golfer and finished fourth at state in 2011 for Elder. He was named Southwest Ohio Player of the Year the same season. He is also a threeyear varsity baseball player and was a member of the 2010 squad that finished second at state. The senior will attend Miami University next Schwarz year and was accepted into the Business Honors Program. Schwarz is a member of the Honors Program and is ranked fifth in his class out of 221. He made first honors for 14 consecutive quarters and is a member of the National Honor Society. Sutton is an all-around athlete for the Mustangs. He ran track for three years, played football for two and has wrestled for three years. He was given the Student-Athlete Award in track and wrestling, as well Sutton as being named Mr. Mustang as part of the wrestling squad. The senior boasts a GPA of 3.49 and has made Grade A Honors all four years. He is eighth in his class and will major in mechanical engineering at the University of Cincinnati next year. Sutton was given the Engineering Award, as well as being a member of the National Honor Society and the Ariston Paidh Honor Society for Boys. The six Hall of Fame inductees are John “Jack” Faecher, Don Jostworth Jr., Bill Reusing, Bill Rothan, Cliff Polking and Herm Wehmeier. Faecher played baseball for Elder. The Panthers won two state championships in his four years, and he was named FirstTeam All-City in 1957. He signed a professional contract with the New York Yankees, but only played one season due to an arm injury. Faecher pitched for the fourth Army team at Ft. Sam Houston for two years and pitched for the

Boerne White Sox of the SpanishAmerican League in Texas until age 38. Jostworth also attended Elder where he played Faecher baseball and basketball. He was named captain of the basketball team for the 1968-69 season, MVP of the baseball team in 1969 and was selected to the Greater Catholic League and city All-Star baseball teams. After high school, Jostworth played baseball at Xavier University where he was a team captain, twotime MVP in 1972 Jostworth Jr. and ‘73 and was a Stan Musial and Cincinnati Reds Award recipient. Later in life, Jostworth became a teacher and baseball coach at Harrison High School, where he was named Hamilton County League Coach of the Year twice in his five years of coaching. Reusing is also a member of the Western Hills High School Hall of Honor. He pitched for the Mustangs and was a key contributor for the Public High School League runners-up his senior year. Reusing played college ball at the University of Virginia primarily as a relief pitcher. He co-chaired the Western Hills Stadium Fund, was Reusing president of the Western Hills High School Boosters and founded the Association of Western Hills Alumni Athletes. He was also president of the Oak Hills Boosters. Rothan attended Western Hills where he was chosen team MVP in 1969 and 1970, selected Public High School League Pitcher of the Year and was a member of the All-Ohio team in 1970. He signed a professional contract with the Anaheim Angels and spent six seasons in the organization. Rothan tossed a nohitter in 1974 in the California League and was selected to the AllStar Team. He was traded to St. Louis and spent three years with their minor league organization, where he was chosen MVP of their AAA Springfield team in 1978. Rothan is also a member of the Western Hills High School Hall of

Herm Wehmeier graduated from Western Hills. He went on to sign with the Reds, but also played for the Phillies, Cardinals and Tigers. In 2011, he was voted No. 25 on the area’s top 50 baseball players list. THANKS TO PRICE HILL OLDTIMERS Honor. Polking attended Central Vocational High School and played for numerous teams around Cincinnati, including the national runnerup Cincinnati Moose and National Champion R.B. Clothes teams. He went on to coach the Acme Glass team who was the 1955 National American Legion Champions. Polking went on to umpire in amateur and pro leagues, as well Polking as being a scout for the Cincinnati Reds and Houston Astros, where he had a hand in signing Pete Rose and Jimmy Wynn. Wehmeier attended Western Hills where he was an outstanding pitcher. During his amateur pitching career, he posted a 54-game winning streak. Wehmeier signed with the Reds prior to the 1945 season and was called up to pitch two games that season. He played for the Reds, Phillies, Cardinals and Tigers, winning 92 games. In 2011, he was voted No. 25 on the area’s top 50 baseball players list. Wehmeier is also a member of the Western Hills High School Hall of Honor. The induction ceremony will take place May 2 at 6 p.m. at The Farm in Delhi. The guest speaker is former Red and Reds Hall of Famer Jim O’Toole. For ticket information, contact Dick Kuehn at 484-2496.

Community Open House Monday, May 7th, 4-7pm 3325 Glenmore Avenue Food and drink ! Parents, educators, business and community leaders ! Learn about the support we offer parents and children

COME AND JOIN THE FUN!


B2 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • APRIL 25, 2012

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD THURSDAY, APRIL 26 Exercise Classes Spintensity, 5:45-6:45 p.m., Western Hills Sports Mall, 2323 Ferguson Road, Cycling combined with boot camp and strength training moves. Ages 14 and up. Family friendly. $8.50$10 per class. Presented by SpinFit LLC. 451-4905; www.spinfitcincinnati.com. Westwood.

Health / Wellness Knee and Shoulder Arthritis Seminar, 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m., Bayley Community Wellness Center, 401 Farrell Court, Dr. Robert Rolf of Beacon Orthopedics speaks on causes, symptoms and treatment options for those living with knee or shoulder arthritis. Refreshments and snacks provided. Free. Reservations required. 347-5510. Delhi Township.

Music - Choral College Chorale, 4-5 p.m., College of Mount St. Joseph, 5701 Delhi Road, Free. 244-4863; www.msj.edu. Delhi Township.

On Stage - Student Theater Annie Jr., 7 p.m., Our Lady of Victory, 810 Neeb Road, $9. Presented by Our Lady of Victory School. 347-2072. Delhi Township.

Sullivan Janszen Band Live, 9 p.m., Holy Grail Tavern & Grille West, 1278 Ebenezer Road, Drink specials. Free. 941-5555. Delhi Township.

On Stage - Student Theater Annie Jr., 7 p.m., Our Lady of Victory, $9. 347-2072. Delhi Township.

On Stage - Theater Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat, 8-10:30 p.m., Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, $23, $20 students and seniors. 2416550; www.cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com. West Price Hill. The Crucible, 8 p.m., Westwood Town Hall Recreation Center, 3017 Harrison Ave., Pulitzer prize-winning play by Arthur Miller features dark and disturbing look at the Salem witch trials of 1692. For ages 12 and up. $15. Presented by The Drama Workshop. Through May 5. 598-8303; www.thedramaworkshop.org. Westwood.

Recreation Zumba for a Cure: Relay for Life West Side, 6-8 p.m., Veterans’ Park - Green Township, 6231 Harrison Ave., Free, donations accepted. Presented by Deb’s Fitness Party. 205-5064; www.relayforlife.com/westside. Dent.

On Stage - Theater

Religious - Community

Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat, 8-10:30 p.m., Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, 4990 Glenway Ave., Biblical, all-sung saga of Joseph and his coat of many colors. $23, $20 students and seniors. Through May 13. 241-6550; www.cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com. West Price Hill.

The Art of Marriage, 7-9:30 p.m., New Hope Community Church, 3707 Edgewood Drive, Video-based marriage conference built on same biblically based content as the Weekend to Remember Getaway. Child care not offered. $34. Registration required. 661-2428. Green Township.

Seminars The Changing Climate of Global Warming, 7-8:30 p.m., Parkland Theater, 6550 Parkland Ave., Discussion of documentary that is a dialog that provides a balance to Al Gore’s monologue. Documentary explores all sides of the global warming issue, not just the side of the Green Lobby and radical environmentalists. Free. Reservations required. Presented by Empower U Ohio. 250-4116; www.empoweruohio.org. Sayler Park.

Senior Citizens Movement Class for Seniors, 11 a.m.-noon, Guenther Physical Therapy, 5557 Cheviot Road, $6, first class free. 923-1700; www.guenthnerpt.com. Monfort Heights. Exercise to Music, 10-11 a.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, $1. 385-3780. Green Township. Open Bridge, 12:15-3:15 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Free. 385-3780. Green Township.

FRIDAY, APRIL 27 Benefits Fundraising Gala, 6-11 p.m., The Woodlands, 9680 Cilley Road, North Hall. Music by the Remains. Emcee Sheree Paolello of Channel 5 News. Buffet dinner and cash bar. Live auction, basket raffle, cocktail attire/coat and tie. Ages 18 and up. Benefits Living Hope Transitional Homes. $30. Reservations required. Presented by Living Hope Transitional Homes. 598-6333, ext. 206; www.lhth.org. Whitewater Township.

Farmers Market Lettuce Eat Well Winter Farmers Market, 3-7 p.m., Cheviot United Methodist Church, 3820 Westwood Northern Blvd., Moving back to Harvest Home Park for May 4 market. Locally produced food items. Free. Presented by Lettuce Eat Well. 661-1792; www.lewfm.org. Cheviot.

Music - Acoustic Charlie Runtz, 7-9 p.m., Aroma’s Java and Gelato, 6407 Bridgetown Road, Runtz sings variety of music. Family friendly. Free. 574-3000; www.aromasgelato.com. Green Township.

Music - R&B Basic Truth, 9:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m., Drew’s on the River, 4333 River Road, $3. 451-1157; basictruth.webs.com. Riverside.

Music - Rock

Senior Citizens Pinochle, Noon-4 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, 385-3780. Green Township. Arthritis Exercise, Noon-12:45 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Workout to videos geared to help lessen arthritis symptoms. For seniors. Free. 385-3780. Green Township. Taking Off Pounds Sensibly, 10-11 a.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Weight loss support and accountability. For seniors. $28 annual fee. 385-3780. Green Township.

SATURDAY, APRIL 28 Benefits Rollin on the River, 7-11 p.m., St. William Church, 4108 W. Eighth St., Night of music and entertainment. Music by vocal ensembles of Elder High School and Seton High School with the Starlight Band. Silent and live auction, basket raffle, major award raffle and split-the-pot chances. Benefits The Women’s Connection. Ages 21 and up. $20. Reservations required. Presented by The Women’s Connection. 471-4673; www.thewomenconnection.org. West Price Hill.

Civic Clean-Up Delhi Day, 9 a.m., Delhi Senior and Community Center, 647 Neeb Road, Parking lot. Proof of residency required. Residents must be in line at 1 p.m. to participate. No yard waste, computer equipment, hazardous chemicals, paint, liquids, batteries or closed drums accepted. Rain or shine. Free. Presented by Delhi Township. 922-8609. Delhi Township. Shred Safe Day, 9-11 a.m., St. Ignatius of Loyola School, 5222 North Bend Road, Bring confidential documents, tax returns, checks, manila folders and all the papers cluttering your home. No newspapers, magazines, hanging file folders or cardboard. Remove all metal and plastic bindings, binder and paper clips and other items unable to be shredded. 3893242; www.sainti.org. Monfort Heights. Yard Trimmings Drop-off, 11:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Kuliga Park, 6717 Bridgetown Road, Hamilton County residents may drop off yard trimmings. Free to all Hamilton County Residents. Bring proof of residency. Landscapers and commercial establishments not eligible to participate. Free. Presented by Hamilton County Recycling and Solid Waste District. 946-7766; www.hamiltoncountyrecycle-

The Frisch Marionettes present “Hansel & Gretel” at 11 a.m. Saturday, April 28, at the Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, 4990 Glenway Ave. The performance is part of Covedale’s Saturday Morning Children’s Series. Tickets are $5. For more information, call 241-6550 or visit www.cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com. PROVIDED.

MONDAY, APRIL 30

ABOUT CALENDAR To submit calendar items, go to www.cincinnati.com and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to life@communitypress.com along with event information. Items are printed on a spaceavailable basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to www.cincinnati.com and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page. s.org. Green Township.

Education GED Practice Test, 10 a.m.-3 p.m., Miami Township Branch Library, 8 N. Miami Ave., Determine if you are ready to take the Official GED test. Ages 18 and up. Free. Registration required. Presented by Public Library of Cincinnati & Hamilton County. 369-4570. Cleves.

On Stage - Children’s Theater Saturday Morning Children’s Series, 11 a.m., Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, 4990 Glenway Ave., “Hansel and Gretel,” The Frisch Marionettes. $5 per show or $24 for all six. Presented by Cincinnati Landmark Productions. 241-6550; www.cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com. West Price Hill.

On Stage - Student Theater Annie Jr., 7 p.m., Our Lady of Victory, $9. 347-2072. Delhi Township.

On Stage - Theater Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat, 8-10:30 p.m., Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, $23, $20 students and seniors. 2416550; www.cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com. West Price Hill. The Crucible, 8 p.m., Westwood Town Hall Recreation Center, $15. 598-8303; www.thedramaworkshop.org. Westwood.

Religious - Community The Art of Marriage, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., New Hope Community Church, $34. Registration required. 661-2428. Green Township. Mother and Daughter Retreat Day, 9:30 a.m.-3 p.m., Sisters of Charity Spirituality Center, 5900 Delhi Road, Facilitator Judi Sauerbrey uses presentations, interactive discussions and allows time for sharing to give opportunity for growing together in understanding. For mothers and daughters ages 15 and up. $45 per person. Registration required. Presented by Sisters of Charity of Cincinnati. 347-5449; www.srcharitycinti.org/spirit.htm. Delhi Township.

Runs/Walks Help Haiti 5K, 9 a.m.-noon, Oak Hills High School, 3200 Ebenezer Road, Includes cookout, Kids

Zone, face painting and music. Benefits Kids Against Hunger. $20, $15 students; T-shirts: $6. Registration required. Presented by Oak Hills French Club. 3194569. Green Township.

Shopping Girl Scouts Toy and Clothing Sale, 9 a.m.-noon, St. Antoninus School, 5425 Julmar Drive, Church undercroft. Gently used children’s clothes, toys, movies, books, strollers, furniture and accessories. Family friendly. Free. Presented by St. Antoninus Girl Scouts. 520-8053. Green Township.

Special Events Recycling Carnival, 10 a.m.noon, Imago Earth Center, 700 Enright Ave., Carnival games created completely out of recycled materials. Families create games from provided ideas or invent own. All materials provided. Participants play games once they are created. Followed by lunch and picnic. Family friendly. $20 per family. 921-5124; www.imagoearth.org/ home/public_programs.html. East Price Hill.

SUNDAY, APRIL 29 Civic Yard Trimmings Drop-off, 11:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Kuliga Park, Free. 946-7766; www.hamiltoncountyrecycles.org. Green Township.

Music - Classical Symphonic Band, 3-4:30 p.m., College of Mount St. Joseph, 5701 Delhi Road, Free. 244-4863; www.msj.edu. Delhi Township.

On Stage - Theater Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat, 2-4:30 p.m., Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, $23, $20 students and seniors. 241-6550; www.cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com. West Price Hill. The Crucible, 3 p.m., Westwood Town Hall Recreation Center, $15. 598-8303; www.thedramaworkshop.org. Westwood.

Tours Price Hill Showcase of Homes, 11 a.m.-3 p.m., Price Hill Will, 3724 St. Lawrence Ave., Neighborhood-wide open house. Dozens of homes for sale open doors at same time. Pick up map at Price Hill Will; also available online. Ages 21 and up. Free. 251-3800, ext. 105; www.pricehillliving.com. Price Hill.

Community Dance Arabian (Belly) Dance, 6:307:30 p.m., Westwood Town Hall Recreation Center, 3017 Harrison Ave., Ballet/Piano room, second floor. Learn foundation steps common in Arab dances throughout Northern Africa and the Middle East. Taught by Irene Mirci in classic Egyptian style, also known as Dance Oriental. $40 for four classes. Registration required. 662-9109; cincyrec.org/ search/facility.aspx?id=40. Westwood.

Exercise Classes Yoga for Rookies: An Introduction, 7-8 p.m., EarthConnection, 370 Neeb Road, For participants who have never tried yoga. Class introduces each practitioner to a progression of Pranayama (breathing techniques), focus of Gaze and Asanas (postures) leading to a unique practice for each participant. Family friendly. $8 drop-in, $35 for 5-class pass, $50 for 10-class pass. Presented by Yoga by Marietta. 675-2725; www.yogabymarietta.com. Delhi Township.

Health / Wellness Zumba, 5:30-6:30 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Wear comfortable workout attire and gym shoes. Bring water. $5. Presented by Deb’s Fitness Party. 205-5064; www.debsfitnessparty.com. Green Township.

Home & Garden Gardening Seminar: What’s New for 2012?, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Monfort Heights Branch Library, 3825 West Fork Road, Annual, perennials, trees and shrubs. With White Oak Garden Center. Free. Presented by White Oak Garden Center. 385-3313; www.whiteoakgardencenter.com. Monfort Heights.

Senior Citizens Chair Volleyball, 10 a.m.-noon, Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, 385-3780. Green Township. Indoor Cornhole, 10 a.m.-noon, Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, 385-3780. Green Township. Pinochle, Noon-4 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3853780. Green Township.

TUESDAY, MAY 1 Exercise Classes Spinning, 5:45-6:45 p.m., Western Hills Sports Mall, 2323 Ferguson Road, Cycling class. First class free. Ages 14 and up. Family friendly. $8.50-$10 per class. Presented by SpinFit LLC. 451-4905; www.spinfitcincinnati.com. Westwood.

Farmers Market

Sayler Park Farmers Market, 4-7 p.m., Sayler Park, Parkland Avenue and Monitor Street, Farmers Market with homegrown items like fruits, vegetables, desserts, salsas, relishes, jam and olive oil. Presented by Sayler Park Village Council. 675-0496. Sayler Park.

Health / Wellness Lunch and Learn, Noon-1 p.m., Guenther Physical Therapy, 5557 Cheviot Road, Learn about topics on improving your health and wellness. Free. 923-1700; www.guenthnerpt.com. Monfort Heights. Yoga for Healing, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Westwood Town Hall Recreation Center, 3017 Harrison Ave., Begin journey of healing physically, mentally and emotionally with certified yoga teacher, Michelle HsinYi, through mixed yoga styles to bring more strength and flexibility to the body and learn various breathing techniques to restore balance in the mind. First class free. $8. Registration required. 662-9109. Westwood. Dinner and Learn: Understanding Fibromyalgia, 6-7 p.m., Aroma’s Java and Gelato, 6407 Bridgetown Road, Dinning Room. Learn about safe and natural alternative methods for addressing Fibromyalgia and symptoms. Ages 18 and up. Free. Registration required. Presented by Foundation for Wellness Professionals. 574-3000. Green Township.

Music - Concerts Simple Gifts, 7:30 p.m., College of Mount St. Joseph, 5701 Delhi Road, College Theater. Cincinnati Metropolitan Orchestra. Performance featuring music students from College of Mount St. Joseph. Selections include vocal arias by Puccini and Mozart, Grieg’s Piano Concerto, Copland’s Fanfare for the Common Man, Variations on a Shaker Melody (aka “Simple Gifts”) and Bizet’s L’Arlesienne Suites 1 and 2. Free. Presented by Cincinnati Metropolitan Orchestra. 941-8956; www.gocmo.org. Delhi Township.

Senior Citizens Movement Class for Seniors, 11 a.m.-noon, Guenther Physical Therapy, $6, first class free. 923-1700; www.guenthnerpt.com. Monfort Heights. Quilting, 9:30-11:30 a.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Make blankets to donate to Project Linus and Children’s Hospital. For seniors. 385-3780. Green Township. Exercise to Music, 10-11 a.m., Green Township Senior Center, $1. 385-3780. Green Township. Ceramics, 11:30 a.m.-3 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, 385-3780. Green Township.


LIFE

APRIL 25, 2012 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • B3

Refrigeration helps Subway clone cookies Ever since I was a little girl “experimenting” in the kitchen, I have been fascinated with the Rita science of Heikenfeld food. RITA’S KITCHEN Many happy hours were spent with my sister, Judy, underneath our huge wild cherry tree making mud pies. Years later, I was going to bake chocolate chip cookies and had the dough ready to be portioned out. Something came up and I couldn’t bake the cookies right away. In fact, the dough sat for two days in the refrigerator. Well, that was a blessing in disguise. Those cookies were better in flavor than usual, and the texture was wonderful: soft, chewy and crisp in different parts of the cookie, just like a bakery cookie! Quoting Shirley Corriher, my food science guru, “What happens is the dough and other ingredients fully soak up the liquid, in this case, eggs, which makes the cookie bake to a better consistency.” In fact, Mrs. Wakefield,

the originator of the Toll House cookie, chilled her dough overnight. That information was never put in the recipe for this iconic cookie. The reason I’m sharing these nuggets of foodie information is because the recipe for the Subway cookie clone recommends – guess what – refrigerating the dough!

flour mixture ½ cup at a time while beating. Stir in chips and nuts. Refrigerate 1-3 hours in a covered bowl. Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Drop cookie dough onto parchment paper-lined sheet. (Tip from Rita’s kitchen – there is no amount given for how large the cookies should be, so I would use a very generous tablespoon or small scoop – enough to fit about eight cookies on each sheet). Bake 10-12 minutes, checking frequently towards end of baking for a golden brown appearance.

Betsy Davis’ clone of Subway cookies.

Tips for Subway cookie variations

ON MY BLOG Crazy Cake (soy- and egg-free) from Regina Martin.

Betsy said she found this on the Internet a couple of years ago and think’s its pretty close to Subway’s. This is for Sarah, who wanted the recipe to freeze. To bake from frozen state, leave cookies frozen and bake at the same temperature a bit longer. I did buy a couple Subway cookies to sample.

2¾ cups all-purpose flour 2 teaspoons baking powder 1 cup light brown sugar, packed ½ cup granulated sugar 1 tablespoon vanilla extract 1 teaspoon salt ½ cup butter ½ cup vegetable shortening, butter flavor

Use M&Ms instead of chocolate chips. For macadamia white chocolate chip cookies, use white chocolate chips and macadamia nuts. Rita offers a recipe for roasted rhubarb, rather than using the sour stalks for the usual pie. THANKS TO RITA HEIKENFELD. Place butter and shortening in bowl and microwave, stopping and stirring every 15 seconds. Stop when butter mixture is more of a paste (about 45-60 seconds). Pour over sugar mixture and beat well. Add each egg separately, beating until creamy. Add

2 large eggs 2 cups chocolate chips – see tips below 1 cup chopped walnuts (optional)

Combine flour and baking powder in a small bowl, set aside. Combine sugars, salt and vanilla in mixing bowl, set aside.

Roasted sweet rhubarb topping Rhubarb is called “pie plant” because most folks make a rhubarb and strawberry pie with it. Rhubarb is good for our skeletal system. It’s really sour, though, so some sweetener is necessary. 1 pound rhubarb Zest and juice of a large orange 1 ⁄3 to ½ generous cup sugar

or equivalent substitute Couple shakes cinnamon (optional)

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Cut rhubarb into chunks. Toss with zest, juice and sugar. Put in small baking dish, cover with foil and roast 20 minutes. Remove foil and roast until the juices get a bit syrupy. Add cinnamon. Serve hot, warm, room temperature or chilled or as a topping for cake and ice cream.

Tip from Rita’s kitchen

Only the stalks of rhubarb are edible, not the leaves.

Can you help?

Like Busken’s brown bread for John Meier, a Covington reader. “It was served at their old Sixth Street location. Somewhat sweet, but not overly so. It was dense, but not heavy.” John ate it with cream cheese and strawberries and it was one of his favorite lunches downtown.

Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educator and author. Email her at columns@communitypress.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Call 513-248-7130, ext. 356.

It’s time to focus on fall prevention May is Older Americans Month and this year’s theme is “Never Too Old to Play.” The focus on play is an opportunity to re-visit one of the most frequent causes of injury and even death to seniors – falling. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), one in three adults age 65 and older falls each year. Among this group, falls are the leading cause of injury death. They are also the most common cause of nonfatal injuries and hospital admissions for trauma. Falls are also a significant driver of healthcare costs, according to the CDC. Direct medical costs of falls totaled more than $19 billion in the most recent year studied. As our population ages, these numbers are likely to increase. “Like many of the diseases and injury conditions we deal with, falls are largely preventable,” says Tim Ingram, Hamil-

ton County health commissioner. “With preparation, information and education, we can reduce the incidences of falls and ultimately, help seniors to maintain active and fulfilling lifestyles.” Following are five easy things you can do to prevent falls: 1. Increase your physical activity. Simple exercise, like walking or swimming at least 15 minutes a day can help build muscle strength and improve balance, which can prevent falls. Exercise programs like Tai Chi that increase strength and improve balance are especially good. 2. See your eye doctor once each year. Age-related eye diseases, such as cataracts, macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy, can increase the risk of falling. Early detection is key to minimizing the effects of these conditions. 3. Review your medications. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist about

the medicines you are taking and whether they may cause drowsiness or dizziness. Discuss things you can do to ensure you are taking your medicines safely. 4. Remove environmental hazards. Look around the house for anything that could increase the risk of falls, including poor lighting, loose rugs, slippery floors and unsteady furniture. Remove or modify these hazards. 5. Think, plan and slow down. Many falls are caused by hurrying. Slow down and think through the task you are performing. Be mindful of risks and act accordingly. Seniors can also lower their risk of hip fracture by: » Getting adequate calcium and vitamin D from food and/or supplements; » Performing weight bearing exercises; » And getting screened and treated for osteoporosis.

For additional information, visit www.hamiltoncountyhealth.org or the Fall Prevention Task Force site, www.fallpreventiontaskforce.org.

NORTH CAROLINA

EMERALD ISLE. Ocean Front luxury vacation homes with community pool. Call for free brochure. 1-252-354-5555 Spinnaker’s Reach Realty www.SpinnakersReach.com

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SOUTH CAROLINA

FLORIDA Beautiful Seagrove Beach Rent & Relax. Nr Destin, between famous Seaside & Rosemary Beach. Cozy Cottages to Gulf Front Condos. Web Specials. 1-800-537-5387 www.garrettbeachrentals.com

Expires Expires 5/8/12 9/1/2011

513-771-8827

CLEARWATER TO ST. PETE BEACHES Gulf front & bay side condos. All prices & sizes! Florida Lifestyle VAC. 1-800-487-8953. Jan. 2013, Monthly Discounts • www.ourcondo.com

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at select resorts

N. MYRTLE BEACH Coastal Condos, Inc. 1-4 bdrm oceanfront & ocean view units. Call 1-800-951-4880 or visit www.coastalcondos.com DESTIN. Luxury 2 BR, 2 BA oceanfront condos. Heated pool, spas, kids’ pool & tennis. Sleeps 6. Local owner. www.us-foam.com/destin . D- 513-528-9800, E- 513-752-1735

Your All-Inclusive vacation includes Roundtrip Airfare from Cincinnati, Hotel Accommodations, All Meals, All Drinks, Transfers and more! Dreams Tulum Resort & Spa

GOLDENåååååå Unlimited-Luxury® VALUE PLUS: Two Kids 12 yrs and under Fly, Stay, Play and Eat for $ 699* per child, plus, FREE Non-Stop Transfers (a $60 value per couple)! 7 nts $1349* Thu, June 30-August 9 departures Other departure dates available. Prices may vary.

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NORTH MYRTLE BEACH. Oceanfront condos. 1, 2 & 3 bedroom units with pools, spas & tennis. Hi-speed Internet, kiddie waterslide. 800-345-5617 www.oceancreek.net

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▲Now Sapphire and Dreams Punta Cana: $200 Resort Coupons per room per stay (restrictions apply), plus, FREE Non-Stop Transfers (a $60 value per couple)! *Prices are per person, based on double occupancy and include Non-Stop ROUNDTRIP airfare via Frontier Airlines, U.S. certified air carrier, hotel transfers, hotel tax, resort baggage handling, fuel surcharges, all pre-collected U.S. and foreign taxes and fees including September 11th Security Fee and $10 late booking fee if applicable (for bookings within 14 days of departure). $10 Dominican Republic tourist card fee is payable in cash at the airport in resort. Checked bag fees apply—1st checked bag FREE, 2nd is $20. Please see the individual air carrier's website for a full detailed description of baggage charges before making your purchase. Holiday/weekend surcharges may apply. Restrictions/blackout dates may apply. All packages are based on the lowest hotel/air classes available at time of publication, capacity controlled and subject to availability and change without notice. Cancellation policies apply. Kids Fly, Stay, Play and Eat promotion valid when sharing a room with two adults. Offer valid with charter airfare via Frontier Airlines. Apple Vacations not responsible for errors or omissions. See Apple Vacations’ Fair Trade Contract. nad_542_042212_cvg_cl

GULF FRONT û SIESTA KEY Condo complex directly on Crescent Beach. All amenities. Best value on the Key. Available now through fall. Cincy owner 513-232-4854

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Go to AppleVacations.com, call 800-517-2000 • HOLIDAY CRUISE & TRAVEL Open Sundays 513-388-3600 • VICTORIA TRAVEL 513-871-1100 CE-0000507335

HILTON HEAD ∂ Ocean Palms 2BR, 2BA, luxury 1st fl. villa in Port Royal and Westin. View of lagoon & golf. Free tennis & golf. Avail June, Aug, Oct. Local owner 859-442-7171

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kids, fly, stay, play and eat from *

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HILTON HEAD • Great 1BR condo on beach, sleeps 6. Low weekly rent: April-May/Sep-Oct $600; Jun-Aug $750. Also Marriott timeshares avail. 513-829-5099 www.hhiseasidevilla.com

Prices advertised available through applevacations.com. Some travel agencies listed above may charge service fees.

MANHATTAN--NYC HOTEL $129/2 persons. Singles $124. Suites $139-$159. Lincoln Ctr area, Hudson River views, 18 flrs, kitchenette, 5 mins to midtown, safe, quiet, luxury area. RIVERSIDE TOWER, Riverside & 80th St. Call 1-800-724-3136 or visit: www.riversidetowerhotel.com

SEABROOK EXCLUSIVES Villas & Private Homes. Ocean, golf, tennis, equestrian. Pet friendly rentals. Free brochure. Book online! 888-718-7949. www.seabrook-vacations.info

TENNESSEE

1-7 Affordable, Deluxe Chalets & Cabin Rentals. Pigeon Forge in the Smokies. Vacation/Dollywood Specials. Free brochure. Call 1-800-833-9987. www.firesidechalets.com


LIFE

B4 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • APRIL 25, 2012

DEATHS Pat Anderson Patricia L. “Pat” Anderson, Delhi Township, died April 8. She was an administrative assistant at St. Dominic Church. Services were April 12 at St. Dominic. Arrangements by Vitt, Stermer & Anderson Funeral Home. Memorials to the St. Dominic chapter of the St. Vincent de Paul Society or Hospice of Cincinnati.

Bud Bill James J. “Bud” Bill, 93, West Price Hill, died April 17. He was a carrier for the United States Postal Service. He was a World War II veteran. Survived by wife Mary Bill; children Thomas (Jo Ann), James (Theresa), Janet (the late Alan) Haubner, Nancy (Brian) Stall; grandchildren Beverly Claypool, Tommy (Kelli), Jon (Jenni), Kevin Bill, Jenny (Jon) Broxterman, Brian Stall; great-grandchildren Zackary, Hayden, Kyle Bill, Sydney, Wyatt Claypool, Bailey, Casey, Colin, Brayden Broxterman; sisters-in-law Margaret, Patricia Lammert; nieces Mary Carol Adam, Margie Roedersheimer, Lynn Steinriede, Lisa Lack. Preceded in death by parents Elmer, Mary Woestman

Bill, sister Virginia Brabender. Services were April 21 at St. Teresa of Avila. Arrangements by Radel Funeral Home. Memorials to St. Teresa of Avila Church or Elder High School.

Dorothy Burgun Dorothy DeLong Burgun, 90, Delhi Township, died April 15. Survived by children Gary (Paula), Jeffrey (Janice) Burgun, Bonnie (Cliff) Haberstroh, Cynthia (John) Cruze; 12 grandchildren; 11 great-grandchildren. Preceded in death by husband Richard Burgun. Services were April 23 at Dalbert, Woodruff & Isenogle Funeral Home. Memorials to: American Parkinson’s Disease Foundation, Cincinnati Chapter, 260 Stetson St., Suite 2300, Cincinnati, OH 45267.

Angela Carpinello Angela Daria Carpinello, 108, Delhi Township, died April 13. She was a homemaker. Survived by daughter Evelyn (Martin) Shields Bennett; brother

Carpinello

GUMP-HOLT Funeral Home

Burying The Hatchet

We wouldn’t be human if we, at some time or another, did not disagree with another person. We are all individuals; we have our own personal ideas and beliefs; our thoughts of right and wrong . . . As we all know, this can and does lead to quarrels and arguments. And, yes, they can be small or they can be“humdingers”. According to this ‘tale’ this is how early Indians resolved their quarrels - “Burying the hatchet” is an old expression, said to have originated from an Indian custom.They believed that evil spirits in the air caused people to quarrel and put hatred in their hearts. Therefore, whenever a dispute was settled between the parties involved,the hatchet,the symbol of hatred, was placed where it could have no power. At the burying of the hatchet those quarreling would stand over the hole and talk out their grievances, pacifying their souls that they buried their grievances with the hatchet. This is superstition, of course, but the Indians firmly believed that it ended all personal Marilyn Holt troubles between them.

3440 Glenmore Avenue, Cheviot 661-0690 www.gumpholtfuneralhome.com CE-0000503762

CINCY SENIOR CORNER April 2012

ABOUT OBITUARIES Basic obituary information and a color photograph of your loved one is published without charge by The Community Press. Please call us at 853-6262 for a submission form. To publish a larger memorial tribute, call 242-4000 or pricing details. Robert Daria; daughter-in-law Ruth Carpinello; 24 grandchildren; 49 great-grandchildren; 39 great-great-grandchildren. Preceded in death by husband Nicola Carpinello, daughter Malvina Wolfzorn, son-in-law Norbert “Butch” Wolfzorn, sons Anthony, Melvin Carpinello, parents Antonio, Anna Marie Daria. Services were April 20 at St. William Church. Arrangements by Ralph Meyer & Deters Funeral Home. Memorials to a charity of the donor’s choice.

“Betty” Dewar; children Donald Jr. (Liz), Douglas, David (Cindy), Stephen, Debbie (Steve Heitfeld), Gregory Dewar, Lisa Dewar, Marcia Frese; grandchildren Michelle Boldt, Samantha (Alex) Shaw, Stephanie, Chris Schmidt, Bill Frese, Chris, Nick, Jamie Dewar, Rachel Lyons; five greatgrandchildren. Services were April 19 at St. Teresa of Avila. Arrangements by B.J. Meyer Sons Funeral Home. Memorials to: St. Teresa of Avila Educational Fund, 1175 Overlook Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45238.

Charles Cassidy

Patricia Fehr

Charles E. “Skeeter” Cassidy, 77, died April 10. He was a truck driver for the Central Carton Company. He was an Army veteran of Korea. Survived by wife Rosetta Cassidy; son Charles D. (Darlene) Cassidy. Services were April 13 at Radel Funeral Home.

Patricia Childers Fehr, died April 17. She was a traffic clerk with Hamilton County Juvenile Court. Survived by children Thomas (Joyce), Steven (Nancy) Fehr, Sue Ann (Fred) Buop; grandchildren Jeff (Patty), Stacey Fehr, Christina (Jeff) Stautberg, Michael Buchheid; step-grandchildren Frank Palmisano, Freddie, Jeffrey, Tony, Amanda Buop, Jennifer Emerson; great-grandchildren Abigail, Jake Stautberg, Addison Fehr; step-great-grandchildren Stephanie, Sarah, Kirsten, Wade,

Donald Dewar Donald D. Dewar, 93, Covedale, died April 15. Survived by wife Elizabeth

Maury’s

Most seniors live in older houses, which become harder to maintain over time and may not have helpful features such as a first-floor bedroom and laundry room. Still, it may be more cost-effective to customize the home for a senior’s needs than to move. Begin by evaluating each room and ask these questions. Consider the kitchen, for example: • Is it safe? Slip-proof rugs will reduce the risk of falls. • Can the senior reach and work everything? A stovetop or oven with well-designed controls will simplify cooking and diminish danger. • Does anything need to be adapted? Countertops may need to be lowered for ease of food preparation by someone who is sitting.

Some changes are simple. Well-lit rooms and hallways help the senior get around without obstruction. Levered handles make it easier to open and close doors. Bathroom grab bars facilitate safety.

Mary Lou Eschenbach Grant, Delhi Township, died April 18. She was an accountant. Survived by husband Marvin Grant; children Jean (James) Hemsath, Joseph (Stacie), Julie, Linda Grant, Nancy (Brian) Crabbe, Lori (Michael) Farrar; brothers Frank (late Joyce), Ronald (Lynne) Eschenbach; 11 grandchildren; four greatgrandchildren. Preceded in death by siblings John (Darleen) Eschenbach, Jean (Ralph) Walters. Services were April 21 at St. Dominic. Arrangements by Vitt, Stermer & Anderson Funeral Home. Memorials to Holy Cross High School or St. Dominic Church.

Margaret Mary Klett Margaret Mary Rieskamp Klett, 96, died April 6. She was a member of St. Martin of Tours Parish. Survived by children Thomas (late Elizabeth), James, Daniel (Susan), Joseph (Denise), Jerome Mary Klett Klett, Nancy (Phil) Kroeger; grandchildren Kathy (Stephen) Knizner, Tim, Mike (Stacey), Caroline, Bethany,

After 63 years, Maury’s still appreciates our guests.

Guest Appreciation Certificate

$10.00 OFF

90th Birthday

A $40.00 PURCHASE FOR TWO

Expires June 13, 2012 Not Valid on Holidays or with any other discount.

Maury’s

Railings on both sides of a staircase provide stability.

SOUTHERN BAPTIST

DELHI HILLS BAPTIST CHURCH

Other modifications can be costly. Adding a chair or wheelchair lift allows two- or three-story living. Installing a walk-in tub enables bathing without help. Replacing kitchen cabinets can keep dishes within easy reach. Widening doorways make it easier to operate a wheelchair or walker.

“Come Hear The Story of Jesus” 5421 Foley Rd. • 513-922-8363 Rev. Bob Overberg Sunday School..................................10:00a.m. Sunday Morning Worship ..................11:00a.m. Sunday Evening ..................................6:00p.m. Wednesday Evening Bible Study .........6:00p.m.

Some ideas to get started:

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF DENT 6384 Harrison Ave. - 574-6411

Dorothy Menninger Happy Birthday. May 16th, 2012 With all our love, Your Family.

• For help assessing a home, look for and use a complete checklist. The Fall Prevention Center of Excellence is a non-profit organization that offers one. Its website is www.homemods.org. • As with any home updates, it’s advisable to use a handyman, contractor or remodeling company that a family member or friend recommends. The area Council on Aging may offer referrals to contractors that offer reduced rates or charge based on a senior’s ability to pay. • People Working Cooperatively, Inc. helps low-income, elderly and disabled homeowners with critical repairs. (www.pwchomerepairs.org)

Trusted Senior Home Care Call for a No Cost Assessment! 574-4148 www.ACaringChoice.com

Bible Study ........................... 9:30am Sunday Worship ................. 10:30am Wed. Youth Service .............. 7:00pm Wed.Pray Sevice .................. 7:00pm

“Reflecting Christ...the Light of the World” %'#"(("&!$!!$#("

UNITED METHODIST NORTH BEND UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

123 Symmes Ave. North Bend, OH 45202 One block off Route 50, Phone 941-3061 Small, friendly, casual, blended music, Bible based messages that connect with real life. Sunday School 9:30am Worship 10:30am

SHILOH UNITED METHODIST

Anderson Ferry & Foley Roads 513-451-3600 www.shilohumc.com 9:30 a.m. Traditional Worship and Sunday School 11:00 a.m. Praise Celebration and Junior Church nursery provided for both services

PRESBYTERIAN OAK HILLS PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 6233 Werk Rd. (Enter off Werkridge) 922-5448 Rev. Jerry Hill 10:00 a.m Worship & Sunday School

Happy Birthday Annabelle 65th Anniversary

Nursery Care Avail.

Liberty Missionary Baptist Church "Where Everybody is Somebody" 1009 Overlook Ave. 513-921-2502 Rev. Kendell Hopper 10:00 am Sunday School Sunday Morning Worship-11:00 am Sunday Evening 6:00 pm Wednesday Bible Study - 7:00 pm

UNITED METHODIST CHEVIOT UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 3820 Westwood-Northern Blvd. Craig D. Jones, Senior Pastor Lois Schalk-Hartley, Associate Pastor

9:20 a.m. Traditional Worship 10:20 a.m. Sunday School for All Ages 11:20 a.m Contemporary Worship Service 662-2048 www.cheviotumc.org

Come and worship in a small casual church that emphasizes the fellowship and mission in the community and globally. www.oakhillspc.com

Presbyterian USA / U.C.C.

UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST St. Peter & St. Paul United Church of Christ

513-661-3745 3001 Queen City Ave. Rev. Martin Westermeyer, Pastor Bible Study: 9am Worship & Church School: 10am Dial-A-Devotion 426-8957 www.stpeterandstpaulucc.org

Marielies Meierjohan Marielies Hemme Meierjohan, 84, died April 11. She was a homemaker. Survived by childrern Carmen (John Harmon), Bernard (Fayetta), Ralph (Susan) Meierjohan; grandchildren Jacob, Serena, Ryan, Luke; brother Meierjohan Ernst (Ruth) Hemme. Preceded in death by husband Carl Meierjohan. Services were April 16 at St. Martin of Tours. Arrangements by Vitt, Stermer & Anderson Funeral Home. Memorials to St. Martin of Tours or Vitas Hospice. Mary Lou Ott Parker, 83, died April 16. She was a secretary for Cincinnati Bell. Survived by siblings Ethel Grace, James (Charlotte) Ott; niece and nephews Alec, Stephen, Anthony, James, Michael Ott, Bonnie Vignale, Reggie Burke; friends Jeff Klug, Velia Asimus. preceded in death by husband Donald “Butch” Parker. Services were April 20 at St. Lawrence Church. Arrangements by Radel Funeral Home. Memorials to: St. Lawrence Church Building Fund, 3680 Warsaw Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45205.

Lois Taylor

TINY COVE

3908 Harrison Avenue • Cincinnati, OH 45211 513.662.2683 • maurys-restaurant.com

Maxwell, Margaret Klett, Amy (Dan) Kuderer, Mark (Nancy) Kroeger, Julie (Gary) Schloemer, Sarah (Joe) Ruwe, Alison (Kurt) Shimala; step-granddaughters Kim (Paul) Cowens, Lisa (David) Rodgers; great-grandchildren Kyle, Emily, Alex, Erica, Noah, Matthew, Hannah, Kaitlyn, Andrew, Austin, Adam, Jonathan, Gemma; nieces Mary Ann (Joe) Ray, JoAnn (Chuck) Wilson, nephew Ron Klett; friends Nancy Dittman, Jimmy Binsbacher. Preceded in death by husband Elmer Klett, parents Elizabeth, John Rieskamp, siblings Henry, Catherine Rieskamp, cousin Angela Nelson. Services were April 14 at St. Martin of Tours. Arrangements by Rebold, Rosenacker & Sexton Funeral Home. Memorials to: St. Martin Adopt-a-Student Fund, 3729 Harding Ave., Cheviot, OH 45211 or a charity of the donor’s choice.

Mary Lou Parker

Anna Burwick

For more information on

CE-0000507653

Mary Lou Grant

TINY COVE

Home should be haven, a place of refuge; but for many elderly, home can be a hazard. However, with some forethought and planning, a home can be adapted for senior living. These changes can help elders stay where they are most comfortable – in their homes – safer and longer.

Max Buop; sister Betty (Elmer) Jauch. Preceded in death by husband Robert Fehr. Services were April 20 at Our Lady of Victory. Arrangements by Vitt, Stermer & Anderson Funeral Home. Memorials to Evercare Hospice.

Frank and Dorothy Gentile of Finneytown will celebrate their 65th anniversary. They were married April 26, 1947 at Martini UCC in Cincinnati. They have 2 children: Dave (Millie), Deb and Sharon; 1 Jennifer granddaughter (Steve) Brettschneider and 2 great-granddaughters, Emily and Abigail.

Lois Hofmann Taylor, 70, died April 17. She was a chaplain at Bayley Place. Survived by children Beverly (Jerry) Davis, Daniel (Allie Riley), Mark Taylor, Cynthia (Michael) McCann; grandchildren Bryan Davis, Julie (Luke) McCoy, Michael, Molly, Megan, Alexander Taylor, Lahna, Kayla McCann; nieces Marlene (the late Don) Olliges, Phyllis (Roger) Wehrman; aunt Jackie (Joe) Dold; many Taylor nieces and nephews. Preceded in death by husband James Taylor, sister Georgeana Hofmann. Services were April 20 at St. Jude Church. Arrangements by Meyer & Geiser Funeral Home. Memorials to: Bayley Pastoral Care Fund, 990 Bayley Place Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45233 or St. Jude Endowment Fund, 5924 Bridgetown Road, Cincinnati, OH 45248.

Cecilia Yetter Cecilia Mauch Yetter, 97, died April 17. Survived by daughter Cecilia (Edward) Kleemeier; grandchildren Kathy (Steve) Kroeger, Jim (Debbie), Ken (Renee) Kleemeier; great-grandchildren Sherri (Jason) Summers, Matt (Christy) Kroeger, Tracy (Max) Noel, Robert (Jennifer), Kelly, Ben, Sam Kleemeier, Katie (Jireh) Loreaux; great-greatgrandchildren Justin, Katie Cecilia Yetter Summers, Ethan, Jacob, Liam Kroeger, Madison Noel; sister Mary Lou Greer. Preceded in death by husband Robert Yetter. Services were April 21 at St. Martin of Tours. Arrangements by Meyer Funeral Home. Memorials to: Hospice of Cincinnati Inc., c/o Bethesda Foundation Inc., P.O. Box 633597, Cincinnati, OH 45263-3597 or Cincinnati Association for the Blind, 2045 Gilbert Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45273-9798.


LIFE

APRIL 25, 2012 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • B5

Boaters help charities Hamilton County offering North Bend Yacht Club is a non-profit organization in Western Hill. Managing the organization are Norb Guetle and Tom Lameier along with 12 additional board members. North Bend Yacht Club began in January 2010 as a way to raise funds for local charities. It has grown from 50 members into an organization with more than 200 members and is recognized by the IRS as a tax exempt organization, with 100 percent of all donations, whether it be cash or staples, going to support local communities. North Bend Yacht Club was also accepted into the prestigious Yachting Club of America. Every month North Bend Yacht Club selects a West Side charity to support. For April the club chose The Pregnancy Center West, a Christian pro-life ministry providing education regarding positive alternatives to abortion and offering assistance with pregnancyrelated services serving women in Cincinnati Since 1981. If you are interested in becoming a member, or are interested in your charity participating in receiving funds and support, contact:North Bend Yacht Club, P .O. Box 55, North Bend, Ohio, 45052; Email webmaster@nbyc.us for more information, or visit www.nbyc.us.

recycling bins as loaners High school graduations, community festivals, and neighborhood parties are just some of the best parts of the upcoming spring season. These events accumulate significant amounts of trash, and of course, recyclables. The Hamilton County Recycling and Solid Waste District offers a container loan program for any organization sponsoring an event in

Making a presentation to Pregnancy Center West are, from left, Tom Lameier, North Bend Yacht Club commodore; Bill Robbe, yacht club charity chairman; and Sue Ulmer, of Pregnancy Center West. THANKS TO NORB GUETLE.

POLICE RECRUIT EXAM

CASE ZC2012-1 The Delhi Township Zoning Commission will hold a public hearing on a proposed Motion to amend the text of the Delhi Township Zoning Resolution on Thursday evening, May 10, 2012 at 7:30PM at the Delhi Township Administration Building, located at 934 Neeb Road, Delhi Township, Hamilton County, Ohio (Cincinnati, 45233). The proposed amendment would modify existing language of Sections 171-9 and 184.8-5-2 of the Resolution as they pertain to fences. After conclusion of the public hearing before the Delhi Township Zoning Commission this matter will be submitted to the Delhi Township Board of Trustees for its action. This amendment application is on file at the Delhi Township Department of Development Services, 697 Neeb Road (Delhi Township Fire Headquarters), Delhi Township, Hamilton County, Ohio (Cincinnati, 45233), and can be reviewed between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. on regular business days for at least ten days prior to the public hearing on this application. As Zoning Inspector/Administrator, Thomas R. Stahlheber is responsible for giving notification of this hearing by publication.

EXAM DATE:

Saturday, June 23, 2012

EXAM TIME:

9:00 a.m. or 1:00 p.m. *Choose your exam time when you apply on-line* ne*

APPLICATION DEADLINE: FRIDAY, JUNE 1, 2012, 5:00 P.M.

APPLICATIONS FOR THIS POSITION WILL ONLY BE ACCEPTED ONLINE www.cincinnati-oh.gov CE-0000507865

ELEVEN DAYS OF GLOBAL HARMONY IN CINCINNATI USA.

The 2012 World Choir Games

sponsible for collecting and recycling all materials. The container loan program can help you make your event more sustainable. For more information about what can be recycled visit www.HamiltonCountyRecycles.org. Contact the District today to request containers for your upcoming community event at 513-9467737.

BECOME A CINCINNATI POLICE OFFICER TAKE THE

LEGAL NOTICE DELHI TOWNSHIP ZONING COMMISSION

Thomas R. Stahlheber, Director Department of Development Services 1001700826

Hamilton County. These special recycling containers are designed specifically for events as they are easy to spot in a crowd. The containers are very large and easily recognizable as a means for recycling. These convenient bins make it easy to pick up after any event because recyclables will already be separated from the trash from the event. Those borrowing the bins are re-

July 4-14

See hundreds of choirs from Africa, Asia, Europe, Australia, North America and South America competing in 23 categories over 11 thrilling days. There will be parades, singing in the streets, dramatic competitions and exciting ceremonies. For tickets or to get the latest updates on choirs, venues and other breaking news, visit Presenting Sponsor

www.2012WorldChoirGames.com.

COMPETITION CATEGORIES SESSION 1 (July 5-7) SESSION 2 (July 11-13) Female Choirs Folklore Jazz Male Choirs Mixed Boys Choirs Mixed Choirs Mixed Youth Choirs Musica Sacra Popular Choral Music Young Males Choirs Youth Choirs of Equal Voices

Barbershop Children’s Choirs Female Chamber Choirs Gospel Male Chamber Choirs Mixed Chamber Choirs Music of the Religions Musica Contemporanea Scenic Folklore Show Choir Spiritual Young Children’s Choirs

Order Early For Best Tickets!

For tickets and information, visit www.2012WorldChoirGames.com. CE-0000499475

Just visit www.2012WorldChoirGames.com or call (513) 977-6363 Awards Ceremonies: July 7, 13 7:00 p.m. Opening Ceremony: July 4 July 8, 14 Competitions: July 5-7 and July 11-13 Celebration of Nations: July 10 Celebration Concerts: July 5,6,8,11,12 7:30 p.m. Free Downtown Parade & Party Champions Concerts: July 8, 14 2:00 p.m. Closing Ceremony: July 14

7:30 p.m. 10:00 a.m. 6:00 p.m. 7:00 p.m.


LIFE

B6 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • APRIL 25, 2012

Meet Shukoor Ahmed. After running for state House of Delegates, he noticed the process had a few kinks to work out, so he developed technology to improve the absentee voting system. Now he’s the CEO of a tech company. As an education provider for many of corporate America’s leading companies, Strayer University is a magnet for enterprising types like Shukoor. If you’re a born leader, a hard-earned degree from Strayer could be in your future. For more information, visit discover.strayeruniversity.edu or call 1.866.324.5917.

CINCINNATI Ohio Reg. number: 10-05-1933B; 2135 Dana Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 44230

FLORENCE

MASON CE-0000507969


LIFE

APRIL 25, 2012 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • B7

POLICE REPORTS Arrests/citations Dorothy A. Lynch, born 1961, aggravated menacing, 3201 Warsaw Ave., April 2. James H. Davis, born 1937, building code violation, 390 Rosemont Ave., April 3. Anthony W. Mitchell, born 1975, assault, 930 Woodlawn Ave., April 4. Tyrell Davenport, born 1984, criminal damaging or endangering, 1007 Winfield Ave., April 5. Brian Clark, born 1980, telecommunication harassment, 3201 Warsaw Ave., April 6. Roy Lee Orling, born 1953, building code violation, board of health violation, 3201 Warsaw Ave., April 6. Yvonne P. Trollinger, born 1954, assault, 3201 Warsaw Ave., April 6. John C. Davis, born 1959, possession of drugs, 3721 W. Eighth St., April 7. Tomy Elder, born 1994, possession of drugs, 1700 Grand Ave., April 8. Antonio Smith, born 1985, domestic violence, 2554 Ring Place, April 9. Darrell Walker, born 1962, theft under $300, 3609 Warsaw Ave., April 9. Ireese Joseph Kennedy, born 1985, carrying concealed weapons, having a weapon under disability, 3714 Warsaw Ave., April 9. Thomas William Alwell, born 1982, burglary, 184 Richardson Place, April 9. David Everett, born 1987, complicity to commit burglary, 567 Elberon Ave., April 10. Deborah A. Behymer, born 1956, city income tax, 3201 Warsaw Ave., April 10. Katrina Creamer, born 1980, burglary, 944 Olive Ave., April 10. Mario Dukes, born 1989, resisting arrest, 1424 Manss Ave., April 10. Chistopher A. Bock, born 1982, menacing by stalking, 1006 Kreis Lane, April 11. Corey J. McFinley, born 1980, criminal damaging or endangering, assault, 3201 Warsaw Ave., April 11. David Wayne Roach, born 1975, telecommunication harassment, 503 Enright Ave., April 11. Edward Harris, born 1992, carry-

ABOUT POLICE REPORTS The Community Press publishes the names of all adults charged with offenses. The information is a matter of public record and does not imply guilt or innocence. To contact your local police department: » Delhi Township: Chief Jim Howarth, 922-0060 » Cincinnati District 3: Capt. Russell A. Neville, 263-8300 ing concealed weapons, 1751 Ashbrook Drive, April 11. John D. Greenlee, born 1984, possession of drug abuse instruments, 4400 Rapid Run Pi, April 11. Shannon Braley, born 1983, unauthorized use of a motor vehicle, 6935 Gracely Drive, April 11. Shaquille Hendley, born 1993, misdemeanor drug possession, having a weapon under disability, possession of drug paraphernalia, trafficking, 3633 Glenway Ave., April 11. Alisha Boone, born 1991, aggravated menacing, 1000 Fairbanks Ave., April 12. Demarco Sims, born 1994, disorderly conduct, 2144 Ferguson Road, April 12. Douglas Helton, born 1986, trafficking, 4164 W. Eighth St., April 12. Harold Lynn, born 1989, trafficking, 936 Hawthorne Ave., April 12. Jennifer Wysinger, born 1988, aggravated menacing, 1909 Wyoming Ave., April 12. Michael Williams, born 1984, trafficking, drug abuse, 1651 Iliff Ave., April 12. Rahsean Wales, born 1991, possession of drugs, 1000 Woodlawn Ave., April 12. Stephanie A. Bowens, born 1961, burglary, criminal trespassing, 1757 Gilsey Ave., April 12. Stephanie R. Cain, born 1979, aggravated menacing, 939

Wells St., April 12. Ashley Kelley, born 1992, complicity to commit burglary, 1741 Sunset Ave., April 13. Devonte Manor, born 1988, burglary, 1710 Tuxworth Ave., April 13. Dominic Stivender, born 1990, misdemeanor drug possession, burglary, 1741 Sunset Ave., April 13. Jesse Whited, born 1982, building code violation, 3521 Warsaw Ave., April 13. Michael C. Smith, born 1968, possession of criminal tools, possession of drug abuse instruments, burglary, 659 Roebling Road, April 13. Ronald L. Cain, born 1966, violation of a temporary protection order, 939 Wells St., April 13. Shamel Thorton, born 1980, possession of criminal tools, 810 Matson Place, April 13. Rickey A. Morgan, born 1976, domestic violence, 4431 W. Eighth St., April 14. Anthony Lamb, born 1980, domestic violence, 2824 Sterrett Ave., April 15. David W. Stewart, born 1976, possession of drug abuse instruments, 3738 Warsaw Ave., April 15. Gabrielle Beckham, born 1988, assault, 1237 Purcell Ave., April 15. Jose Lopez, born 1985, falsifica-

tion, disorderly conduct, 4412 Glenway Ave., April 15. Kenny Killings, born 1961, theft under $300, 3410 Warsaw Ave., April 15.

Michael Maloney, born 1989, assault, 818 Purcell Ave., April 15. Montez Walker, born 1981, drug abuse, tampering with evi-

dence, resisting arrest, 3479 Glenway Ave., April 15.

See POLICE, Page B8

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LIFE

B8 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • APRIL 25, 2012

POLICE

945 Seton Ave., April 6. 3753 Westmont Drive, April 6. 4431 W. Eighth St., April 6. 3612 Warsaw Ave., April 7. 3832 Glenway Ave., April 7. 3424 Kensington Place, April 8. 4373 W. Eighth St., April 8. 4995 Glenway Ave., April 8. Breaking and entering 1010 Winfield Ave., April 4. 1306 Beech Ave., April 4. 2144 Ferguson Road, April 3. 2144 Ferguson Road, April 4. 3107 Bassett Road, April 3. 3309 W. Eighth St., March 30. 4112 Weber Lane, April 1. 1045 Purcell Ave., April 12. 1312 Purcell Ave., April 12. 6900 Gracely, April 12. 1282 Quebec Road, April 6. 810 Grand Ave., April 6. 4539 Glenway Ave., April 7. 570 Purcell Ave., April 8. 1700 Grand Ave., April 9.

Continued from Page B7

Incidents/reports Aggravated menacing 1000 Fairbanks Ave., April 10. 1035 Purcell Ave., April 6. 3910 W. Liberty St., April 7. Aggravated robbery 520 Woodlawn Ave., April 12. 4651 Rapid Run Pike, April 13. Assault 4729 Guerley Road, March 30. 558 Woodlawn Ave., April 1. 6700 Home City Ave., April 5. 841 Fairbanks Ave., March 31. 860 Nebraska, April 2. 926 Enright Ave., March 31. 3310 Lehman Road, April 10. 920 Seton Ave., April 10. 800 Enright Ave., April 6.

Burglary 1014 Fisk Ave., March 30. 1205 Amanda Place, April 2. 1234 Dewey Ave., April 1. 2915 Price Ave., April 6. 3417 Osage Ave., March 31. 395 Purcell Ave., March 30. 3971 Fawnhill Lane, April 2. 4652 Joana Place, April 3. 4725 Rapid Run Road, March 31. 4945 Shirley Place, April 6. 5015 Willnet Drive, April 5. 567 Elberon Ave., March 30. 3301 Lehman Road, April 10. 3310 Lehman Road, April 11. 4336 W. Eighth St., April 11. 1757 Gilsey Ave., April 12. 701 Trenton Ave., April 12. 362 Elberon Ave., April 6. 944 Olive Ave., April 6. 1000 Overlook Ave., April 6. 4354 W. Eighth St., April 6. 184 Richardson Place, April 8. 6833 Parkland Ave., April 8.

1293 Rutledge Ave., April 8. 6471 Revere Ave., April 9. Criminal damaging/endangering 1000 Overlook Ave., April 1. 1007 Winfield Ave., April 5. 1221 First Ave., April 5. 1227 First Ave., April 3. 3424 Kensington Place, April 3. 4373 W. Eighth St., March 30. 4600 Guerley Road, March 31. 4716 Rapid Run Road, April 3. 4899 Glenway Ave., April 1. 4945 Shirley Place, April 5. 6832 Sayler Ave., March 31. 6898 Home City Ave., April 1. 150 Dahlia Ave., April 10. 1214 Blanchard Ave., April 6. 3753 Westmont Drive, April 6. 3832 Glenway Ave., April 7. 4725 Rapid Run Road, April 7. 6235 Ashtabula St., April 8. 2140 Quebec Road, April 9. 3422 Price Ave., April 9.

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3733 Laclede Ave., April 9. 5100 Highview Drive, April 9. 830 Greenwich Ave., April 9. Criminal mischief Reported on River Road, April 3. Domestic violence Reported on Beech Avenue, April 2. Reported on Chateau Avenue, April 3. Reported on Elberon Avenue, April 5. Reported on Grand Avenue, April 1. Reported on Sunset Avenue, April 2. Reported on West Liberty Street, April 1. Reported on Winfield Avenue, April 10. Reported on McPherson Avenue, April 6. Reported on Ring Place, April 7. Reported on Ring Place, April 8. Reported on West Eighth Street, April 8. Reported on Price Avenue, April 9. Felonious assault 3424 Kensington Place, April 8. Interference with custody 1707 First Ave., April 3. Making false alarms 611 Trenton Ave., April 4. Menacing 1007 Winfield Ave., April 5. 4373 W. Eighth St., March 30. 540 Considine Ave., April 5. 3422 Price Ave., April 9. Murder 3414 Osage Ave., April 7. Rape Reported on Warsaw Avenue, April 6. Robbery 6650 Parkland Ave., April 6. 3759 Westmont Drive, April 7. Theft 1020 Carson Ave., April 4. 1030 Regina Ave., March 30. 120 Revere Ave., April 4. 1212 Beech Ave., April 2. 1228 Considine Ave., April 4. 124 Huey Ave., April 4. 1304 McKeone Ave., March 31. 1310 Carson Ave., April 2. 162 Richardson Place, April 4. 1634 Iliff Ave., March 31. 1713 Grand Ave., April 4. 173 Monitor Ave., April 3. 1813 Provincial Court, April 2. 3021 Warsaw Ave., April 1. 3211 Warsaw Ave., April 5. 3609 Warsaw Ave., March 30. 3749 Glenway Ave., April 2. 3901 Glenway Ave., April 2.

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DELHI TOWNSHIP Arrests/citations Dominique Lewis, 27, 2217 Victory Parkway No. 3A, driving under suspension at 500 Pedretti Ave., April 11. Timothy Edmund, 30, 5270 Old Oak Trail, driving under suspension at 5000 Delhi Road, April 13. Tyrey Smith, 21, 1033 Jonquil Lane, driving under suspension at 500 Pedretti Ave., April 14. Christina Mccoy, 26, 2998 Wardall Ave., driving under suspension at 5801 Cleves Warsaw, April 15. Elim Thomas, 18, 4717 Hamilton Ave., receiving stolen property and carrying concealed weapon at 6700 Hillside Ave., April 9.

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