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PRICE HILL PRESS

Your Community Press newspaper serving Price Hill and Covedale

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WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2013

ANNIVERSARY B10 Couple celebrating 60 years.

BECAUSE COMMUNITY MATTERS

Karuna forges global friends By Kurt Backscheider kbackscheider@communitypress.com

Kaden Karuna will never forget the month he just spent in Costa Rica. The 11-year-old Covedale resident had the experience of a lifetime and made lasting friendships while in the Central American country as part of the Children’s International Summer Villages program. “I met a lot of new friends,” said Karuna, a sixth-grader at Dater Montessori School in Westwood. “It has inspired me to travel to new places and visit new

friends.” Jody Curren, Kaden’s mother, said Children’s International Summer Villages (CISV) is an organization established here in Cincinnati in the 1950s to create lifelong global friendships and promote world peace. It was founded on the belief that peace is possible through friendship, and a real difference can be made by starting with children, she said. Curren said when she was a child she participated in an exchange program the organization offers. “I did an exchange with a girl from Canada,” she said.

Kaden took part in the organization’s village program, a four-week international camp that was the original CISV program and is still its flagship. He returned from his four-week trip at the end of January. He said the camp in Costa Rica hosted 48 boys and girls from 12 different countries. In addition the the U.S. and Costa Rica, he said the other countries represented were Guatemala, Mexico, Brazil, Columbia, Canada, Denmark, Germany, Norway, Sweden and Japan. “We did a lot of activities,” Karuna said. “Some of them were just for fun and others

were educational.” The activities and games were designed to help the children become friends, break stereotypes and learn about everyone’s culture, he said. Each country had a night to themselves in which the children from that country gave a presentation to the group about their home culture, he said. He and the three other children from the U.S. who were there did a sports-themed presentation, he said. They talked about baseball and handed out popcorn and Oreo cookies for See KARUNA, Page A2

Covedale resident Kaden Karuna, a sixth-grader at Dater Montessori School, looks through the souvenirs he brought home from his one-month trip to Costa Rica. He traveled there with Children’s International Summer Villages, an organization focused on promoting world peace. KURT BACKSCHEIDER/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Oak Hills sings, dances along on ‘42nd Street’ By Kurt Backscheider kbackscheider@communitypress.com

Oak Hills High School sophomore Ella Rivera said she definitely identifies with the character she portrays in the school’s winter musical. The Delhi Township teen stars as leading lady Peggy Sawyer in the Oak Hills theater department’s upcoming production of “42nd Street.” “She really wants to be on Broadway,” Rivera said of her character. “We share the same dream and hunger to perform on the stage.” Rivera and roughly 60 of her fellow Highlanders will take the stage for five performances beginning Thursday, Feb. 14. Shows are at 7:30 p.m. Feb. 14; Friday, Feb. 15; Saturday, Feb. 16 and Sunday, Feb. 17. There is also a 3 p.m. matinee show Feb. 17. Performances are in the Ione Holt Auditorium at the high school, 3200 Ebenezer Road. Rupert Spraul, an Oak Hills See DANCE, Page A2

Oak Hills High School sophomore Ella Rivera, center, performs a number from “42nd Street.” Rivera stars as the show’s female lead, Peggy Sawyer. KURT BACKSCHEIDER/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

OLV’s Mecher is a 2013 distinguished teacher of year By Monica Boylson mboylson@communitypress.com

Our Lady of Victory teacher Mary Ann Mecher prepares a lesson for her fourth grade science class. MONICA BOYLSON/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Our Lady of Victory teacher Mary Ann Mecher was recently named a 2013 Distinguished Teacher by the National Catholic Educational Association. The fourth-grade math and science teacher joins 11 others in the nation for the award and represents the National Catholic Educational Association’s sixth district which includes Catholic schools in Ohio and Michigan. “I was overwhelmed and in awe that I was chosen,” she said. Mecher was nominated by school principal Kathy Kane who said she couldn’t imagine a more deserving person for the award. “She is an exceptional teacher,” Kane said. “She’s passion-

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ately, lovingly and prayerfully dedicated to the development of the students’ faith.” The principal said that it was Mecher not only Mecher’s humbleness but her faith in God that made her a good candidate for the award. “She makes the faith come alive in her classroom,” she said. Nominees for the award were required to have worked in a Catholic elementary school for at least10 years, be a teacher with a clear, integrated philosophy of Catholic education, be held in high regard by peers, students and parents and be an individual or institutional mem-

ber of the National Catholic Educational Association Department of Elementary Schools. Mecher had to fill out a questionnaire about herself, her teaching style and how she incorporates the Catholic faith into her instruction. She was also required to get a letter of recommendation from the principal, a peer and a parent of a student she teaches or has taught. “I didn’t think it was possible to win,” she said. “There are so many other teachers who are more deserving.” Mecher has been teaching at Our Lady of Victory School for 26 years, 19 of which she taught first grade. “I like to teach and be with my students,” she said. Green Township resident Jill

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McGrail wrote a letter of recommendation to the National Catholic Educational Association in hopes that Mecher would be chosen. Mecher taught her son Bryan and has her daughter Maggie is in her class now. “I wouldn’t have wrote the letter if I didn’t think she was deserving,” she said. “We have a lot of great teachers at our school so I was happy to do it.” McGrail said she’s witnessed the teacher’s passion for education from spending time as a homeroom mother and as a chaperone for a recent field trip. “She’s an outstanding teacher, does a lot of hands-on things in classroom and she works so hard,” she said. “She does so much above and beyond. It’s See MECHER, Page A2

Vol. 86 No. 6 © 2013 The Community Press ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


NEWS

A2 • PRICE HILL PRESS • FEBRUARY 13, 2013

Carson performs for Seton High School About three dozen students at Carson School brought “Yes, Virginia” musical to life on the stage Dec. 20 at Seton High School. The play is based on the story of 8-year-old Virginia O’Hanlon, who wrote a letter to the New York Sun newspaper in 1897, asking whether Santa Claus exists. In celebration of the fifth anniversary of its holiday “Believe” campaign, Macy’s provided a grant to underwrite the production. Two Cincinnati Public schools, Carson School and Midway School, were among 100 schools across the country to receive the grant. Macy’s made the script and score for “Yes, Virginia The Musical” available royalty-free to the schools and created a free, digital toolkit on yesvirginiamusical.com. The children in the play were treated to the whole experience of a professional production—from full makeup (provided by Macy’s makeup artists) to costuming. Macy’s Facili-

ties and Visual team designed, built and decorated the entire stage set. Staff members of FamiliesFORWARD’s After-School Program, as well as Carson teachers, parents and Price Hill community supporters, guided the children through practice, rehearsal and the play itself. Students involved in the production: Tamika Acoff, Michara Allen, Ryan Atkins, Ja’dah Brown, Keaira Brown, Paige Brown, Paul Brown, Delandrea Chenault, Nicoya Craig, Nicolette Estes, Lee Asia Foster, Richard Gallagher, Blake Griffis, Brooke Griffis, Makayla Hammons, Amaya Harris, Alisha Hart, Kamiya Hubbard, Randall Johnson, James Martin, Iyana Mincey, Kristina Montgomery, Leon Norman, Brianna Reynolds, Zion Reynolds, Denetria Robinson, Keona Spencer, Camiya Starr, Gianna Twitty, Jada Waites, Kyria Walker, Julia Waltner, Miavanni Williams and Moriah Williams.

Dance

Karuna

Continued from Page A1

Continued from Page A1

junior from Green Township, said “42nd Street” is a classic Broadway show with great music and dancing. Set in the 1930s around the Great Depression, Spraul, who plays one of the leading male characters, Billy Lawlor, said the show tells the story of smalltown girl Peggy Sawyer who gets her chance to be a star on the Great White Way. “We’ve been rehearsing for about a month and a half,” Spraul said. “I think we’re going to put on a good show.” Oak Hills senior Marek Haile, a Delhi Township resident, said “42nd Street” marks his 10th show at the high school. He stars as Julian Marsh, a famous but notorious Broadway director. “I feel like I’m my best self when I’m on stage acting and singing,” Haile said. “It’s a passion of mine and it’s so much fun.” He said audiences should enjoy the upbeat music, drama and comedy in the show.

the other children to eat. “I learned that people from other countries aren’t that different from people here in the U.S.,” he said. One of his favorite parts of camp took place every night before going to bed. Karuna said they all sang a good night song and then said “good night” in the language of every country there. “I know how to say good night in 12 languages,” he said. Curren said she was able to keep up with Kaden’s adventures through emails and updates posted to a blog CISV has for parents.

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Oak Hills High School students, from left, senior Marek Haile and sophomores Ella Rivera and Johnny Dennis take direction while rehearsing a scene from “42nd Street.” Students in the school’s theater program will present the show Feb. 14-17. KURT BACKSCHEIDER/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

“It’s a good allaround show,” he said. “They’ll love the laughs in the comedic scenes and they’ll feel the tension in some of the more dramatic scenes.” Rivera said she enjoys all the dancing in the show, especially the tap dancing. She and her classmates have worked hard to put on a great performance, and she said she hopes the theater is filled with people. “I hope everyone comes to see it,” she said. Tickets are $10. For more information, call the high school at 9222300.

Mecher Continued from Page A1

nice to see something good happen to someone who deserves it. The award was well deserved and well earned.” Mecher said she’s happy to work in a Catholic school. “I love having the freedom to talk to my kids at Christmastime about Jesus and to talk about if we live our lives modeling af-

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“I was a little nervous,” she said about allowing him to go on the trip. “I didn’t know if he was ready to be in a foreign country on his own.” She said being able to see photos of the group having fun at places like the beach and a children’s museum, and knowing the children were with dependable junior counselors and adults, helped put her at ease. And she’s happy Kaden had the opportunity to be part of the program, she said. Kaden is too. “I recommend it,” he said. “I wish everyone could do it.” He plans to keep in touch with his new friends through email and, when he gets a little older, through Facebook. ter Jesus’ life, we wouldn’t have all the messes in the world today,” she said. Mecher grew up in Kentucky and attended St. Vincent de Paul School in Newport. She said it was the nuns at the school that inspired her to pursue teaching in Catholic schools. “Because of those nuns and because of my faith, I love teaching religion,” she said. “I want the students to understand how important their faith is.” She is the first teacher from Our Lady of Victory to win the teaching award which was started in 1982. Mecher said she was honored and humbled by the award and will continue to be passionate about teaching. “I never say, ‘Do I have to go to school today?’” she said. “I really love what I do.” Mecher will receive her award in APril at the National Catholic Educational Association convention in Houston.

Index Calendar .................B2 Classifieds ................C Deaths ...................B8 Food ......................B3 Police .................... B9 Schools ..................A7 Sports ....................A8 Viewpoints ............A10

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FEBRUARY 13, 2013 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • A3

5 sites at top of list for new District 3 station Cincinnati officials shared with the public a list of 11 potential sites for the construction of a new West Side police station last week, singling out five sites that meet the most criteria laid out for the project. The five sites favored lots larger than six acres, positioned in western parts of the city where police get the most calls and are within a half-mile walk from a neighborhood business district – the latter a major tenet of the city’s new comprehensive plan. “We’d like to get this project under way quickly,” Assistant City Manager Scott Stiles told the room of roughly 100 residents and a few City Council members at Elder High School. “Police want this opened yesterday.” City Manager Milton Dohoney Jr. made completion of the project a top priority in his recommended budget this year. City Council agreed to appropriate $16 million to build the station, approving a slight property tax increase to pay for it. The project budget was “refined” from an earlier figure of $23 million, said the city manager’s spokeswoman, Meg Olberding. The five locations are: » 1046-1048 Considine Ave. , East Price Hill; » 1945 Dunham Way, West Price Hill; » 2300 Ferguson Road, Westwood; » Dempsey Park, near Hawthorne and Price avenues, East Price Hill; and » Former Midway School site, off of Queen City and Midway avenues, Westwood. The current station, at 3201 Warsaw Ave. in East Price Hill, opened in 1908 has been technologically and structurally obsolete for years, Stiles and police officials explained. The city hopes “to open a month before the AllStar Game in Cincinnati” in the spring of 2015, Stiles said. District 3 covers 20 square miles – the second-

largest of the city’s six districts, including the Central Business Section – and is home to 95,000 people, nearly 32 percent of the city’s population. The new station must be built where it can have the greatest effect on crime in the district, which has risen over the last decade, District 3 Commander Capt. Russ Neville said, and must support new and future technologies. It will also be built considering its use to the community, said Neville, who says he’s talked to neighborhood community councils about what residents want and envisions a room where Citizens on Patrol and other community groups can meet. “I want everyone who has an affiliation with District 3 to feel like a part of

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this,” Neville said. After the presentation held in Elder’s Schaeper Center, visitors wrote notes to city planners on maps of the five sites. On the map of the Dunham option, where a city recreation center also sits, one concerned resident wrote: “Please don’t destroy these recreational and green spaces.” Stiles said comments

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NEWS

A4 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • FEBRUARY 13, 2013

First-grade celebrates 100th school day Collect items for food pantry

Parento said. “We started thinking about some easy ways to do nice things for people and the kids really came up with most of the idea. They wanted to help people who don’t have food.” To accompany the 100 days celebration, Parento and fellow first-grade teachers Amy Mueller and Lynne Maloney thought it would be good to set the goal for the class to collect 100 items for the pantry. “We colored in a 100chart which was great for them to see how many more items we needed to get to our goal,” Parento said. The class exceeded their goal, bringing in 195 items for the pantry.

By Monica Boylson mboylson@communitypress.com

First-graders at Sayler Park School celebrated their 100th day of school in a unique way. The students came up with an idea to give back. They helped organize a drive to collect non-perishable food items and toiletries to give to Serving Sayler Park, a food pantry managed by the Eden Chapel United Methodist Church. “We had just gotten done studying Martin Luther King and how he was kind to others,” firstgrade teacher Jennifer

The Sayler Park School first grade collected items for the Serving Sayler Park food pantry. Pictured, front row, from left, are Isaiah Hensley, Mariah Curtis, Kaylin Vogt, Noal Abel, Andrew Clark, Kanye Hensley, Jayden Weber and Pierre Hill; second row, Mariah Hurley, DeMarice Rush, Kaitlyn Voll, Samantha Rodriguez, Kameron Hensley, Anabelle Hicks, Malakai Graves, Keller Drahman, Josh Wright, Kaydence Perkins and Andrew Campbell and; back row, Brianna Dodd, Riley Pack, Paige Moore, Kohen Drahman, Caelin Lentz, Austyn Childers, Kennedy Simes, Christian Treat, Kylie Lee, Carmen Jetter, Kensley Cunningham, Lazura Duncan, Jordan Hoskins, Joey Harbin, Aleasea DeMoss, Errol Peart, Zachary Grau and Emma Moore. THANKS TO JENNIFER PARENTO.

“They were very enthused,” principal Gary Vale said. “They were excited about sending the items to the food pantry.” Vale said that in addition to the donations the first grade collected, they added items that the school donated during a

Super Bowl canned goods drive. Even more impressive, Parento said, was how many items were collected in a short time. She said that they started collecting things Jan. 23 and the 100th day was Feb. 1.

“It was very rewarding and they were so proud of themselves to give to others who have less than them,” she said. Eden Chapel United Methodist Church pastoral assistant Bev Eiding said they were thrilled to receive donations from

the school. “It’s great to have Sayler Park School supporting us,” she said. “We appreciate it and we thank them for their efforts and I know the people of the community who use the pantry thank them too.”

Firefighters, police helping first responders hit by Hurricane Sandy by members of the Green Township Professional Firefighters Local 2927, Cincinnati Fire Fighters Local 48, Colerain Township Firefighters Local 3915, Cincinnati Police Fraternal Order of Police and the Hamilton County Sheriff Fraternal Order of Police. As the country watched Hurricane Sandy unleash its wrath upon the East Coast in late October, Raker said first responders in New York and New Jersey left their homes and families to serve their communities and assist their neighbors. She said in the aftermath of the storm, many

By Kurt Backscheider kbackscheider@communitypress.com

Area firefighters and police officers are coming together to help fellow first responders who lost their homes to Hurricane Sandy. “This is important,” said Kelly Raker, a Cincinnati police officer who lives in Miami Township in Hamilton County. “We need to help our brother and sister officers and their families, and who better to take care of them than first responders.” Raker is chairwoman of the upcoming 1st Responder Rescue Fundraiser, an effort initiated

first responders took hard hits that left their lives in complete devastation. In Breezy Point, N.Y., alone, she said 90 first responders’ homes were burned to the ground. “They came home to ashes and foundations,” Raker said. “They lost everything.” This past fall she said she was with a group of friends who are all police officers or firefighters, and they got to talking about the officers, firefighters and paramedics in New York and New Jersey who were affected by the hurricane. She said as they all counted their blessings

police officers who had their homes destroyed,” Gunn said. “We thought it would be great to get a large group of people together and see how much money we can send their way.” He said the 1st Responder Rescue Fundraiser is 7 p.m. to midnight Saturday, Feb. 23, at The Woodlands reception hall, 9680 Cilley Road. Tickets are $25 per person, which includes dinner, draft beer and entertainment by a professional DJ. The fundraiser also features split-thepot, a silent auction and basket raffles. “I think it’s a bargain

they realized they needed to do something to help their East Coast brethren. “Every day they leave what is left of their homes and go to work, and every night they come home to attempt to rebuild their shattered lives,” Raker said. Green Township Fire Lt. Patrick Gunn, who serves as president of the township’s firefighter union and is helping organize the fundraiser, said 100 percent of the proceeds from the event will go to first responders in New York and New Jersey who need assistance. “These are all firefighters, paramedics and

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NEWS

FEBRUARY 13, 2013 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • A5

Students send Christmas gifts to mission

Wrapping gifts, from left, are Kayla Roll, Joe Pappas, Emily Wieczorkowski and Morgan Maloney. THANKS TO TRICIA DITULLIO.

Our Lady of Victory sixth-graders collected and wrapped gifts to send to the St. Francis Mission on the Rosebud Reservation in South Dakota. Thirty students stayed after school to wrap toys from games to puzzles and even mittens and hats. The students also donated money to help pay for shipping, one student gave $20 of his own savings.

Making sure children get a gift for Christmas are, clockwise, from left, Eric Moser, Tommy Doerflein, Emily Flowers, Jake Kelly and Robert Evans. THANKS TO TRICIA DITULLIO.

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Free tax preparation program returns to Elder By Kurt Backscheider kbackscheider@communitypress.com

Volunteers will once again be manning computers and calculators at Elder High School to help working families prepare their taxes. The school’s Schaeper Center is again serving as the site for the West Side free tax preparation program. In its eighth year, the program enlists the help of volunteers who work to make sure low- to moderate-income families are returned every tax dollar they deserve. “We’ll prepare state and federal income tax returns free of charge,” said Ken Smith, executive director of Price Hill Will and coordinator of this year’s tax site. “We want people to get everything they’re eligible for, and not have to pay a for-profit tax service to get their money back.” Kristin Suess, manager of the Price Hill Fi-

nancial Opportunity Center, which is a sponsor of the program, said the goal is to help working families keep their money in their pockets. “The refunds they get go directly toward helping them pay their bills,” she said. Smith said an average of 20 volunteers are on hand each Saturday at Elder to help prepare taxes. All the volunteers have undergone training and are certified by the Internal Revenue Service, and all forms are doublechecked before being submitted, he said. “We do everything we can to be accurate,” he said. Taxes are filed electronically, allowing for quick returns. Smith said the program served 303 people last tax season, and a total of $480,558 was returned to those individuals and families. He said about 40 percent of those served last

year were eligible for the Earned Income Tax Credit, and those clients were returned a total of nearly $200,000. “People are generally pretty pleased with the process,” he said. “It really is a helpful program.” The West Side free tax preparation site, 4005 Glenway Ave., is open by appointment only from 9 a.m. to noon the following Saturdays: Feb. 9, 16 and 23, and March 2 and 9. To make an appointment, or to learn more about the program, call 587-6920, extension 306. Those interested can also send an email to freetaxprep@santamaria-cincy.org. Organizations sponsoring this year’s site include Santa Maria Community Services, The Women’s Connection, Urban Appalachian Council, Sisters of Charity Ministry Foundation, United Way, Elder High School, Price Hill Will and Price Hill Financial Opportunity Center.

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NEWS

A6 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • FEBRUARY 13, 2013

Seton Highlighters third at national dance championships Seton High School’s varsity dance team, the Highlighters, competed in the National Dance Team Championships in the Orlando, Fla., recently. The Highlighters competed in both Small Varsity Jazz, placing 14th, and Small Varsity Pom categories placing third. The Highlighter’s

bronze medal is the highest any local team has ever placed in Small Varsity Pom at the National Dance Team Championships. In recent years the Highlighters have placed in the top 10 dance teams in the nation in the Small Varsity Pom category. In 2011 the team finished fourth but had never received a medal placing.

In the Small Varsity Pom competition 77 teams competed while 64 teams competed in the Small Varsity Jazz competition. “This team has worked very hard, and have been very consistent in their performances this season,” said Theresa Chiodi, varsity coach. “They gave their best performance of

West Price Hill hosts first Beer Fest

OF

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man and Beth Sunderhaus; juniors include Megan Kelly, Rice Klauke, Samantha Monahan and Christa Woelfel; sophomores Cece DiGiacomo and Cassidy Giglio; freshmen Emily Berning and Sara Monahan. The varsity dance team is coached by head coaches Theresa Chiodi and Jill Lamey and assis-

tant coach Kelsey Schweizer, who all are Seton alumnae. Their routines were choreographed by Steven Thorton. The Seton Highlighters began as a drill team in 1976. Throughout the years the team evolved into a dance team, in 2003 the current coaching staff took over the dance team.

BRIEFLY

ANNOUNCING THE GRAND OPENING

• Professional cleanings and exams • Digital X-rays • Porcelain Veneers • Dental Sealants • Fillings

the year on that finals floor on Sunday night.” Those at the competition commented that the team’s performance in the finals showcased the young women’s control and professionalism while under pressure. The varsity team includes seniors Jessica Dattilo, Ashley Doyle, Katarina Gay, Morgan Quat-

The inaugural West Price Hill Beer Fest is set for 4-8 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 17, at Price Hill Chili. Attendees will be able to sample more than 20 different micro brews and craft beers. Tickets are $20 per person. Tickets are available at Price Hill Chili, 4920 Glenway Ave.

Read to Bella the pug at the library

Children are welcome to share their favorite book with Bella the pug at the Price Hill Branch Library. The library will host Tales to Tails from 1-1:45 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 23. The program is open to children of all ages. For more information, call the library at 3694490. The Price Hill branch is at 3215 Warsaw Ave.

Classes for future home buyers

Have you always wanted to own a home? There are free classes on home

buying 8:30 a.m.- 1 p.m. Saturday Feb.16 and 23, at McKie Recreation Center, 1655 Chase Ave., Northside. Discussed will include: Credit and how it affects your ability to buy a home. How to find a mortgage that is right for you. For more information, call 513-541-4109.

Delhi offers Safe Sitter courses

The Delhi Township Fire Department has become a registered Safe Sitter teaching site and now offers a babysitting training program for adolescents 11 years of age and older. Participants will learn about safety and be taught infant and child choking rescue techniques, CPR and how to run their own babysitting business For more information, call the fire department at 922-2011.

Day of reflection

Sister Karen Elliott, CPPS, will present Called to be Holy: A Day of Reflection on Discipleship from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Satur-

day, Feb. 23, at the Sisters of Charity Motherhouse, 5900 Delhi Road. This day of reflection will provide biblical instruction on the writings of St. Paul. The fee for the day is $40 ($10 non-refundable registration fee applied to total cost). For additional information email spirituality.center@srcharitycinti.org or cal 513-347-5449. Registration required.

Elder’s Lottman is merit finalist

Elder High School senior Caleb Lottman was recently named a National Merit Finalist. Lottman will continue in the competition with the winners of the National Merit Scholarship Program will be announced this spring. Lottman was named a National Merit Semifinalist this past fall for his high score on the PSAT. Seniors Drew Dresmann, Blake Hughey and Jacob Lindle were recognized as commended scholars by the National Merit Scholarship Program.

YOUR

Connect with CAROLYN WASHBURN Editor & Vice President editor@enquirer.com @carolynwashburn

I’m a fourth-generation Cincinnatian. I grew up watching my dad voraciously reading newspapers. And then I found journalism at McAuley High School. I have lived in Michigan and Idaho and New York and Iowa, and have invested myself in every place I’ve lived. But there is no place like home – like the river and the neighborhoods and the ballpark and Graeter’s and goetta. Leading my hometown paper is a humbling responsibility that I take very seriously.

In the halls of McAuley High School.

HOMETOWN EDITOR

IT’S NEVER BEEN EASIER TO LEARN WHAT’S GOING ON AND GET ENGAGED. TELL US WHAT YOU NEED.


SCHOOLS

FEBRUARY 13, 2013 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • A7

Editor: Marc Emral, memral@communitypress.com, 853-6264

ACHIEVEMENTS | NEWS | ACTIVITIES | HONORS

COMMUNITY

PRESS

CommunityPress.com

Oak Hills teams wins at mock trial The Oak Hills Mock Trial teams won nine nine outstanding witness or attorney awards at the University of Cincinnati Invitational Jan. 13. They competed with 24 other teams from across Southwest Ohio. The Oak Hills Highlander team took the gavel winning first place in the competition against two strong competitors. Those team members are Mario Hristovski, Corey Buschle, Katelyn Wauligman, Chloe Herzog and Montell Brown. The Oak Hills Tartan team finished in third place in the competition. Those members include Chris Rosing, Julia Greve, Emma Cliffe and Chloe Hassett. Those winning outstanding witnesses were: » Chloe Herzog, Mick Wesley and Katelyn Wauligman. » Emma Cliffe won a double award, meaning she was the top witness in the entire competition. » Outstanding attorney was won by Chris Rosing and Katelyn Wauligman. » Paul Greve won a double award as well, making him the top attorney in the competition.

Part of the winning mock trial teams from Oak Hills High School were, from left, Chloe Herzog, Zach Bahorik (legal adviser), Corey Buschle, Mario Hristovski, Katelyn Wauligman and Montell Brown PROVIDED

HONOR ROLLS ELDER HIGH SCHOOL

The following students have earned honors for the second quarter of the 2012-2013 school year.

Freshmen First honors: Keith Adler, Zachary Amend, Joshua Antone, Adam Bailey, Jacob Bailey, Matthew Bailey, Samuel Barsan, Leonard Belew, Zachary Birri, Ryan Boehm, Brady Bohan, Andrew Buller, Mark Burger, Matthew Burwinkel, Matthew Carroll, Steven Catania, Anthony Ciarla, Stephen Comarata, Jack Dee, Adam Deuber, Antonio DiLonardo, Benjamin Dirr, Nathan Duke, Nathan Farwick, Kurt Fortman, Michael Frietsch, Brady Goins, Stan Groszek, Nicholas Hall, Zachary Haufler, Bradley Hegman, David Heisel, Michael Hilvert, Brennan Hirth, Frank Hofmeyer, Zachary Huesman, Brian Huhn, Austin James, Nikolaus Johnson, Kyle Kehling, Duncan Kelley, Brian Klayer, Thomas Kraemer, Kyle Kroeger, Andrew Le, Tanner Lockwood, Jacob Luebbe, Dominic Lynd, Andrew Mack, Jared Malott, Jared Marsh, Brannen Martin, Adam Melvin, Samuel Middendorf, Michael Nicolaci, Nicholas Nortmann, Patrick O’Conner, Keith Orloff, Eric Ostertag, Samuel Paff, Robert Pepper, Jacob Perrmann, Clay Pragar, Bradley Quatman, Peyton Ramsey, Robert Rentz, Alexander Richmond, Jakob Richter, Jacob Rinear, Rocco Salamone, DeWayne Sayles, Andrew Schramm, Andrew Seiler, Matthew Stacklin, Daniel Sullivan, Michael Townsley, Collin Truitt, Jack Vetter, Brandon Vornhagen, Jacob Wahoff, Justin Ward, Mitchell Ward, Bryce Wauligman, Elliot Wegman, Alexander Wertz, Alex Willenborg, Robert Wynn and Kobe Young. Second honors: Ryan Bengel, Thomas Brogan, Benjamin Carroll, Connor Dermody, Stephan Deutenberg, Maxwell Dresmann, Benjamin Feldman, Samuel Florian, Zachery Flower, Jarod Frey, Jacob Geiser, Christian Gleason, David Guck, Kevin Hericks, Patrick Herren, Joshua Hertsenberg, Jacob Hoeting, Philip Hunsche, Andrew James, Spencer Kandra, Kyle King, Spencer Laird, Alexander Mastruserio, Joseph Merkle, Max Merritt, Brandon Meyer, Jarred Meyer, Troy Moore, Kyle Nelson, Daniel Nortmann, Joseph Onorato, Robert Oswald, Benjamin Pflum, Michael Ridder, Benjamin Schneider, Joseph Schroer, Brett Singler, Ryan Sullivan, Jacob Tedesco, Samuel Telles, Alec Uhlhorn, Mitchell Westerkamp and Tyler Wuebbolt.

Sophomores First honors: Kyle Ackerman, Thomas Becker, Jacob Bono, Richard Breidenstein, Gregory Cappel, Robert Conda, Nicholas Duke, Frank Ellert, David Eubanks, Andrew Fieler, Jacob Frey, Nicholas Gibbs, Julian Gregory, Maxwell Hammersmith, Joseph Haverkos, Christopher Henry, Ryan Huesman, Eric Huff, Adam Hughes, Jacob Humphrey, John Igel, Jordan Jacob,

Benjamin James, Riley James, Dylan Janszen, Luke Jett, Andrew Klenk, Michael Klopp, Brady Kraemer, Harry Laiveling, Benjamin Lee, Benjamin Luebbe, Avery Madden, Mark Meier, Benjamin Merk, David Meyer, Craig Mullen, Bradley Murphy, Brett Neal, Spencer Niehaus, Michael O’Brien, Jeffrey Otis, Noah Peterson, Nicholas Rackers, Joshua Rhoads, Anthony Robb, James Robb, Nicholas Rolfes, Thomas Ruwan, Nicholas Schinkal, Mitchell Schoener, Collin Schwiers, Ryan Schwiers, Kevin Siemer, Jonathon Smith, Ian Sonntag, David Stamper, David Stein, Thomas Sullivan, Michael Tenbrink, Brett Tierney, Michael Trotta, Zachary Vorherr, Alexandrew Walling, Nickolas Wells and Erick Williams. Second honors: Marcellus Abel, Benjamin Bartholomew, Benjamin Bischof, Emmett Bold, Joshua Bonavita, Gage Brock, William Browning, William Brueggemeyer, Brian Caminiti, Nathaniel Campbell, John Capannari, Samuel Coffaro, Rawley Cook, Evan Deller, James Dowd, Ethan Duwell, Chase Gaskins, Jacob Gerke, Jacob Gilday, Alex Hoffman, Andrew Humphries, Thomas Imhoff, Adam James, Nicholas Jamison, Joseph Keilholz, Zachary Korte, Andrew Lammers, Jordan Lindsey, Andrew Lovell, Evan Mallory, Christian Marlman, Noah Maurmeier, Nicholas Meade, Mitchell Moorhead, Joseph Morand, William Neiheisel, John Nolan, Kyle Orloff, Nicholas Pangallo, Matthew Peters, Stephen Rodgers, Michael Rogers, Nicholas Ryan, Zachary Smith, Kevin Spurlock, Ryan Stewart, Andrew Taylor, Samuel Tepe, Adam Vale and Richard Witte.

Juniors First honors: Anthony Bauer, Zachary Bauer, Brandon Bell, Kyle Berndsen, Brent Bethel, Noah Burbrink, Joshua Byrne, Michael Caldwell, Bryan Cullen, Michael Eilerman, Joshua Enginger, Lucas Feist, Daniel Fishburn, Adam Gardner, Bradley Gerhardt, Michael Griswold, Nicholas Harp, Benjamin Hayhow, Jack James, Michael Kay, Holden Kelley, Kyle Koppenhoefer, Timothy Kramer, Nicholas Kroger, Nicholas Marcheschi, Kyle Marenco, Noah Mastruserio, Michael Murphy, Matthew Murray, Nicholas Peters, Austin Porta, Joseph Ratterman, Jonathan Reiter, Kyle Rickett, Tyler Rickett, Michael Rohrkasse, Timothy Schiller, Alec Schramm, Christopher Schroer, Thomas Schulz, Nicholas Siegmundt, Christopher Smedley, Andrew Sportsman, Graham Swink, Michael Tomlinson, Austin Walsh, Austin Wessels and Jonathan Williams. Second honors: Andrew Berger, Jonathan Boiman, Thomas Brunner, Jonathan Brunst, Nicholas Carnevale, Andrew Cole, Christopher Collins, Jacob Conners, Sean Conway, Zachary Deters, Timothy Diener, James Dirr, Patrick Doll, Collin Dugan, Joseph Dunajcik, Dominic Faillace, Nicholas Feldman, Benjamin Flick, Gunnar Fox, Austin Gleckler, Brian Guck, Kory Ham-

DELHI MIDDLE SCHOOL HONOR ROLLS mann, David Harbin, Andrew Harvey, Christopher Henkel, Nathaniel Herdeman, Jacob Hoferer, Brian Kelly, Timothy Kemen, Matthew Kenkel, Brandon Kerley, Austin Koch, Jacob Lammers, John Lammers, Nicholas Lamping, Adam Laub, Tyler Leppert, Matthew Listermann, Jacob Luebbe, Benjamin Macaluso, Steven Maurer, Anthony Mazza, Matthew Medberry, Tyler Metzner, Matthew Meyer, Joseph Middendorf, David Miller, Evan Morgan, Matthew Nortmann, Ryan Ostertag, Devin Pike, Andrew Price, Montana Ramsey, Davis Rensing, Craig Roberto, Tyler Rosemeyer-Lucas, Nicholas Roth, Gian Salamone, Dominic Scarlato, Ian Seithel, Jacob Siry, Clayton Sohngen, Logan Steiner, Patrick Sullivan and Ryan Wilbur.

Seniors First honors: Stuart Adler, Ryan Albers, Benjamin Beall, Nicholas Becker, Clay Benjamin, Colt Benjamin, Jake Brunner, Alex Butler, Matthew Cahall, Robert Capannari, Michael Caroway, Anthony Comarata, Drew Conroy, Hayden Cook, Zachary Davis, Andrew Dresmann, Anthony Faillace, Kyle Federmann, Samuel Feist, Jacob Fields, Keith Gaskin, Joseph Giovanetti, Brent Gribbins, Adam Guck, Jeffrey Harpenau, Thomas Heil, Jacob Hills, Nathanael Hornback, Blake Hughey, Benjamin Jaeger, Nicholas Jeannet, Ian Jennings, Thomas Kondash, Justin Korte, Kevin Laiveling, Nicholas Lanza, Steven Leesman, Kevin Leugers, Jacob Lindle, Adam Lipps, Caleb Lottman, William Macke, Joseph Maly, Nicholas Marsh, Joseph Martinelli, Scott Maurer, Paul Mazza, Justin McDonald, Andrew Meyer, Ryan Murphy, Tyler Nieberding, Samuel Otis, Jonah Paff, Ryan Parnell, Marc Paustian, Joseph Pieper, Bon Pinzon, Thomas Reckers, Miguel ReyesMartinez, Jeremy Rieskamp, Dylan Rolf, Eric Rolfes, Michael Rolfes, Raymond Roll, Gregory Schloemer, Tyler Schumann, Kory Smith, Gunnar Smyth, Adam Sponaugle, Anthony Stacklin, Alexander Stautberg, Gregory Suer, Ian Sullivan, Henry Voellmecke, Alexander Wendling and Trent Younts. Second honors: Benjamin Anderson, Mitchell Asman, Nicholas Beard, Peter Bengel, Nicholas Bley, Dominic Bonavita, Sam Bono, Joseph Breidenstein, Justin Brown, Autrie Burdine, Alexander Cassiere, Nicholas Coon, Dane Deller, Brian Fohl, Kyle Fortman, Ryan Gates, David Genis, Alexander Gramke, Bradley Griffith, John Hartfiel, Matthew Hensley, Simon James, Kevin Johnson, Benjamin Klayer, Alex Kloepfer, Zachary Koopman, Kevin Kurzhals, Simon Kwiatkowski, Patrick Laake, Christopher Leisring, Michael Luebbe, Zachariah Maurmeier, Austin Moody, Joshua Moore, Joshua Murphy, James Nagel, Andrew Neiheisel, Nicholas Rosfeld, Joseph Sansone, Zachary Theders, Jacob Tope, Samuel Uchtman, Jeffrey Vollmer, Michael Wagner, Brennen Walsh, Zachary Willmes and Jonathan Witte.

The following students earned honors for the second quarter of the 2012-2013 school year.

Sixth grade Highest honors: Nicholas Bartholomew, Kilen Bilodeau, Molly Blome, Payton Borgman, Kasey Bryant, Meredith Deel, Kaitlyn Delaney, Hailey Eisenmann, Jayna Gilkey, Ryan Inskeep, Hunter Keller, Alisa Kolcova, Kayla Korn, Josephine McKinney, Kevin Nguyen, Tegan Oppelt, Isabella Panguluri, Dustin Prue, Daniel Rauch, Megan Rauch, Nicholas Rohr, Samuel Seibert, Alaina Smith, Alexa Stortz, Nathan Todd, Sarah Truett, Ethan Williams, Joel Yates and Emmanuel Zagorianos. High honors: Jaden Addis, Maya Andrews, Sydney Applegate, Alexandra Azucena, Kate Bailey, Kaycee Barnett, McKenzie Becker, Andrea Biel, Brooklyn Boyle, Morgan Butts, Mitchell Carter, Andrew Cole, Zoe Day, Tess Duwel, Deanna Glaser, Alaa Habbas, Corbin Hancock, Mackenzie Harbin, Connor Hilvert, Olivia Hilvert, Hannah Howie, Alyssa Hunley, Jaclyn Jasper, Brittany Kuhling, Jacob Lane, Hannah Mansu, Mya McCreary, Ashley Mueller, Makaila Olthaus, Jordan Peddenpohl, Jacob Peracchio, Bria Perkins, Ian Perry, Hanna Powell, Jacob Rauch, Hannah Records, Maiah Niesha Ruado, Joseph Ryan, Ashley Silz, Karen Stolze, Jenna Tharrington, Khady Thiero, Isabella Vitatoe and Amali Zade. Honors: Abigail Baker, A’lycia Baldrick, Kylie Bohanan, Hailey Bunner, Jennifer Caplinger, Tyler Chandler, Derek Cox, Liam Earley, Gary Flaugher, Hailey Fredrick, Emma Gabbard, Mya Gillman, Kody Graham, Danielle Hayes, Jacob Hetzel, Kayla Holbrook, Jaicey Hollyfield, Richard Jankowski, Jack Lamping, Carter Loewenstine, Kamra Lunsford, Gage Meador, Katelyn Meagher, Colleen Meyer, Emilee Murphy, Gabrielle Murray, Madison Plavsic, Ryan Poff, Chloe Ramsey, Kylee Redding, Lauren Reinhardt, Paige Robson, Julie Scott, Kaylan Seaman, Olivia Sinnard, Brianna Snapp, Ravin Swafford, Gaige Weikel, Dale Widmeyer and Skylar Willis.

Seventh grade Highest honors: Rebecca Binkley, Mitchell Brodbeck, Samantha Burke, Sicily Calouro, Samuel Carlson, Derrik Deidesheimer, Olivia Earhart, Amanda Eisenmann, Elizabeth Eisenmann, Aidan Flanigan, Kamryn Fleming, Alexis Gerke, Hannah Knight, Abagayle Kromme, Lindsey Lawrence, Meghan Lloyd, Sydney Longbottom, Katie Ludwig, Lauren McCarthy, Jayson Mitchell, Hailee Murphy, Dominic Niederkorn, Johnathon (Ian) Piersall, Michael Radcliffe, Anthony Records, Samantha Reese, Brianna Rhoton, Lauren Rippy, Dylan Roach, Autumn Shelton, Abigail Turner, Austin Wilfert, Nathan Young and Maria Zalot. High honors: Jacob Abbott, Abraham Alnajar, Hannah Anderson, Alexandria Antrobus, Mitchell Baines, Courtney Boehmer, Ashley Britt, Joshua Burke, Sydney Cardullias, Dominique Cole, Alyssa Coleman, Paul Collins, Kaitlin Ann Cordell, Kimberlea Czulewicz, Tommie Davenport, Sarah Davis, Hallie Ernette, Katrina Essen, Cameryn Fee, Timothy Flanigan, Brandon Fuller, Anna Gates, Cassandra Ginter, Torrey Gough, Maria Hendrickson, Emily Hess, Joshua King, Torri King, Hannah Lewis, Robert (Paul)

Loudermilk, Barbara Lubbers, Erica Mahoney, Madison Mitchell, Steven Pohlmann, Katelyn Powers, Joshua Presnell, Katlynn Pristas, Andrew Records, Haley Roberts, Natalie Rowe, Chance Schneider, Justin Schumacher, Hope Snapp, Andrew Stevens, Jacob Stevens, Chandler Trennepohl, Abigail Voss, Jessica Ward, Christian White, Tristan Worsham and Olivia Young. Honors: Madison Adkins, Katelin Allen, Felix Bangert, Cameron Barge, Tyler Barkalow, Russell (Gavin) Best, Taylor Boeh, Janelle Chambers, Tyler Clark, Betelhem Daniel, Tyler Doyle, Joshua Dull, Logan Haden, Lane Hafner, Matthew Hale, Dylan Hammerlein-Caylor, Elijah Harris, Johnathan Hauck, Anthony Hilvert, Antonio Hollingsworth, Devin Keyes, Collin Loewenstine, Skyler Mansu, Katlynn McKee, Neil Meyer, Blake Michaelis, Joseph Monahan, Timmy Nguyen, Mya Patrustie, Skylar Pickering, Konstantinos Psihountakis, Brittney Sajna, Allison Sanker, Elyse Schulte, Michael Schwaller, Dakota (Cody) Stolze, Cory Thacker, Tiffany Thomas, Caitlin Venturini, Kenneth Warby, Brennan Wells, Ethan White, Maileesha Winslow and Megan Woytsek.

Eighth grade Highest honors: Holly Ahrman, Morgan Beare, Michael Bill, Marisa Fink, Hannah Hale, Hope Hollandsworth, Kylee Howard, Megan Kappen, Susan Macdonald, Donna Nguyen, Tyler Parrish, Jacob Schaub, Devin Ulrich, Kaylei Wilcox and Keajea Williams. High honors: Nicholas Ashwell, Paige Bailey, Shelby Barnell, Maxwell Bartholomew, Ryan Batte, Jossie Belcher, Brooke Bellomo, Jeffrey Bill, Aliyah Boeh, Ashley Brinkerhoff, Karen Connelly, Haley Cox, Lydia Cox, Ethan Cundiff, McKenna Curry, Abby Daugherty, Hannah Davenport, Chelsea Davis, Makenzie Deidesheimer, Bethany Dodge, Jessica Essert, Holly Feucht, Keyrstin Fisher, Chase Gilkeson, Julia Gomien, Sandy Habbas, Kenyon Hairston, Lindsey Hale, Elizabeth Hoffman, Alexis Hutchinson, Keith Kaiser, Jodi King, Jayden Kirchner, Paige Knorr, Ryan Leming, Mya Lipps, Brianna Lunsford, Danielle Martini, Sidney McElroy, Faith Mealor, Trevor Might, Hope Mitchell, Kaylee Morris, Saed Musaitif, Jackson (Cade) Petrich, Justin Pickerell, Kaitlyn Records, Taylar Sabath, Madison Schaefer, Alexander Schoenlaub, Cierra Sellers, Sheldon Slayback, Shelby Spitzfaden, Sarah Spraul, Selina Sunderman, Cierra Tarter, Sarah Urban, Alyssa Vaughn, Melissa Vollhardt, Austin Watson and Jonah Yates. Honors: Jenna Baker, Joseph Bardonaro, Mariah Bayalan, McKenna Belmont, Taylor Biggs-Specht, Jaela Boone, Madison Boyers, Cheyenne Clift, Robyn Combs, Shiann Cox, Alexander (Lex) Drees, Tobias Dreyer, Victoria Essen, Brandon Feldkamp, Nicholas Felty, Shayla Gee, Jordon Green, Taylor Hibbard, Karrah Holman, Deasia Huckleby, Dominic Johnson, Joshua Jones, Cailyn Kleisinger, Nathan Madden, James Maltry, Brianna Messer, Kyle Montag, Monet Murray, Timothy Neale, Ethan Osburne, Jason Pangallo, Brandon Prom, Madison Raabe, Ryan Reed, Zachary Siemering, Emma Sinnard, Colleen Suhr, Caleb Thacker, Timothy Tope, Abriana Walker, Ryan Ward, Gavin Wiggs, Zachary Willenborg, Alisseia Wissemeier, Madison Young and Howie Zade.


SPORTS

A8 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • FEBRUARY 13, 2013

Editor: Melanie Laughman, mlaughman@communitypress.com, 513-248-7573

HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | RECREATIONAL

COMMUNITY

PRESS

CommunityPress.com

SIGN OF THE TIMES

Just as recruits did across the country, local student-athletes signed national letters of intent to play athletics at their respective colleges next season. Oak Hills senior Jake Richmond rises and hits a jump shot as the Highlanders 56-51 loss at Sycamore Feb. 8. Richmond, who is averaging 21.3 points per game this season, finished with 21 points. TOM SKEEN/COMMUNITY PRESS

Oak Hills High School students signing their letters of intent Feb. 6: From left, Olivia Kilgore (soccer, Tusculum), Darien McDowell (football, Morehead State), Zach Leftenant (football, Ashland University), Liam Sallquist (football, University of Connecticut), Mackenzie Laumann (golf, Northern Kentucky University) and Blake Meyer (cross country, Northern Kentucky University). THANKS TO OAK HILLS HIGH SCHOOL

Richmond takes his game to new heights By Tom Skeen tskeen@communitypress.com

From left: St. Xavier’s Joe Barrett (football, Lehigh University), Dominic Iori (football, Morehead State University), Ben Carroll (football, Lafayette College), Robbie Ries (football, Yale University), Alex Kuvin (cross country, University of Dayton), Cameron Dunn (football, Columbia University) and Trey Kilgore (football, Michigan State University) celebrate after signing their National Letters of Intent Feb. 6. THANKS TO ST. XAVIER HIGH SCHOOL

Five Elder High School seniors sign letters of intent to participate in collegiate athletics. From left are Nick Marsh (Brown, football), Zach Willmes (Ohio Dominican, golf), Brennen Walsh (Cincinnati, golf), Jake Hilvert (Miami, football), and A.J. Burdine (Miami, football). THANKS TO J.P. OWENS

Erika LaRosa of Seton, bottom, middle, sits with her parents, Mike and Lisa, while her sister, Olivia, and grandfather, Buddy, look on as she signs her National Letter of Intent to play soccer at Xavier University. THANKS TO SETON ATHLETICS

Mercy’s Melina Artmayer, left, signs to run cross country and track at the University of Cedarville, while Nicole Stephan signs to play soccer at the University of St. Francis Feb. 6 at Mercy High School. THANKS TO MERCY ATHLETICS

Seton senior Allie Glatt, second from the right, sits with her mom, Cathy, sister, Emily, and father, Mike, while she signs her National Letter of Intent to play soccer at Hiram College Feb. 6 THANKS TO SETON ATHLETICS

Seton’s Jocelyn Evans signs her National Letter of Intent Feb. 6 to play soccer at the University of Indianapolis with her mother, Katie, and father, Robert, by her side. THANKS TO SETON ATHLETICS

GREEN TWP. — You could see the disappointment on Jake Richmond’s face after his Highlanders lost to Sycamore 56-51, Feb. 8. The Oak Hills senior and his teammates have battled through many highs and lows this season. The Highlanders (8-12, 5-8 Greater Miami Conference) have defeated Fairfield and Lakota West – both of whom are ranked in The Enquirer Division I area coaches’ poll – but have lost to an 8-12 Hamilton team and a 7-13 Colerain squad. “It definitely gets frustrating, but right now we are just still getting better,” Richmond said. “Each day we are getting better and better, and it’s just a process and we just aren’t quite there yet.” While the Highlanders are struggling to find consistency as a team, Richmond is having his best individual season as a Highlander. He is second in the GMC in scoring at 21.3 points per game and has scored in double digits in 17 of the Highlanders’ 20 games, including 10 games where he has scored 20 or more points. “I think I definitely have been doing pretty well, better than I expected,” the senior said. “But that comes from the people I have around me.” His performance on the court this season has brought about the question as to whether he can play at the next level. According to Richmond, he is officially signed to play baseball at the University of Cincinnati next season, but basketball is still in the picture. “Yeah, it is,” Richmond said about basketball being a possibility at the collegiate level. “It’s on my mind.” While his basketball future is up in the air following this season, one thing that is for certain is how happy the senior is about staying home for college. The self-proclaimed “momma’s boy” likes what he has seen from UC to this point. “It means a lot,” Richmond said about staying home to play at UC. “I’m a big momma’s boy so it’s nice to be home and be with my friends. … The offer I got (from UC) wasn’t bad. I like the coaches. Coach (J.D.) Heilmann and (head) coach (Brian) Cleary are great.” Richmond still has a full high school baseball season ahead of him and a few more basketball games as they prepare for the postseason. “No doubt we can make a run,” he said. “It just matters what we want to do with it and what we want to do with the rest of our season. … After you beat Princeton, beat Fairfield (and) beat Lakota West, that’s the only message you have to send. We can beat anybody; we just have to go to the tournament and play.”


SPORTS & RECREATION

FEBRUARY 13, 2013 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • A9

PRESS PREPS HIGHLIGHTS tskeen@communitypress.com

Sectional swimming

The sectional swimming and diving meets commenced Feb. 4-9 at Keating Natatorium and Mason High School. The following individuals advanced to districts. » Elder: 1-meter diving, Mitch Godar, Bryce Wauligman, Kevin Briggs; 50-yard freestyle and 100-yard freestyle, Scott Maurer; 200-yard freestyle relay; 400-yard freestyle relay; 200-yard individual medley. » Oak Hills: 1-meter diving, Parker Dennis; 100-yard freestyle, Curtis Robertson; 500-yard freestyle, Hunter Busken;100yard backstroke, Nathan Smith; 100-yard breaststroke, Michael Gladfelter; 200-yard individual medley, Brian Walker; boys 200-yard freestyle relay; boys 400-yard freestyle relay; boys 200-yard individual medley. » Mercy: 1-meter diving, Taylor Hayes; 500yard freestyle, Rachael Hester; 200-yard individual medley, Megan Buse; 100-yard breaststroke Rachael Hester, Megan Buse; 200-yard freestyle relay; 200-yard medley relay; 400-yard freestyle relay. » Seton: 1-meter diving, Mo Carolin; 50-yard freestyle, Emily Hayhow; 100-yard freestyle, Lindsey Niehaus;100-yard butterfly, Emily Hayhow; 100-yard backstroke, Lindsey Niehaus; 100yard butterfly, Emily Sedler; 100-yard breaststroke, Kelly Kraemer;

Wrestling

» St. Xavier lost to Moeller 55-9, Feb. 6 in the Division I Region 8 State Team Tournament Championship. Ryan Gordon (126 pounds) and Ben Heyob (132) earned victories for the Bombers.

Boys basketball

» Elder got 12 points from Devin Pike in its 5031 loss to Withrow Feb. 5. Elder took La Salle into overtime but lost to the Lancers 52-45, Feb. 8. Thomas Autenrieb led with 15 points. » Western Hills lost to Summit Country Day 6959, Feb. 6 despite 15 points from Dejuan Sherman. » Gamble Montessori lost to Oyler 51-59, Feb. 4 despite 20 points from senior Chris Martin. Gamble took down Immaculate Conception Academy 69-31, Feb. 8. Martin finished with 19 points.

Girls basketball

» Seton lost to Ursuline 52-37, Feb. 5. Senior Marisa Meyer scored 11 points. » Oak Hills got 15 points from Mackenzie Laumann in a 35-27 victory over Harrison Feb. 6. » Mercy escaped with a 55-52 overtime victory over McAuley Feb. 5. Kelley Wiegman scored a game-high 22 points. Mercy jumped all over McNicholas early, leading 33-18 at the half on the way to a 65-37 victory Feb. 7. Wiegman led with 18 points.

» Western Hills outscored Aiken 33-18 in the second half of their 50-29 victory Feb. 7. Kamya Thomas scored a gamehigh 24 points.

Boys bowling

» Junior Kyle Helmes rolled a 508 high-series to lift Oak Hills over Northwest 3,105-2,490, Feb. 5. » Oak Hills Athletics is hosting Dynamite Sports Recruiting Seminar Feb. 27 at 7:30 p.m. at Oak Hills High School room 126. Parents and student athletes are invited to attend this free seminar that explains the college recruiting process, academic requirements for college and much more.

FOCUS

SE, SEL OR TITANIUM SEDAN OR HATCHBACK

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» Ryan Lengerich, has been named the College of Mount St. Joseph men’s volleyball head coach. He becomes the third head coach for the men’s program, which was founded in 2009-2010. “The Mount is a special place with top-tier academics and a clear mission of community service,” Lengerich said in a press release. “I am humbled to have the chance to lead the men’s volleyball program, and look forward to the opportunity to build a championship-level team in a region where men’s volleyball has exploded in talent and popularity over the last decade.” As a player, Lengerich led the 1999 Elder High School team to its first volleyball state championship and earned All-

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VIEWPOINTS A10 • PRICE HILL PRESS • FEBRUARY 13, 2013

Editor: Marc Emral, memral@communitypress.com, 853-6264

EDITORIALS | LETTERS | COLUMNS | CH@TROOM

I have lived on the West Side of town all my life. From birth until I was 14, I lived at Eighth and State. We who lived there considered that to be the length of State Avenue and down River Road to Mount Hope and West Eighth Street from the west side of Mill Creek to the foot of the old incline and up Glenway Avenue to Wilder avenue. At no time did I ever consider myself to be from Lower Price Hill. It was an insult. Lower Price Hill started where Glenway and Warsaw met Wilder Avenue. The way up the two roads was Lower Price Hill and ended at Grand. That was it. East Price Hill started at Elberon and State and ended at West Eighth on top of the hill and extended about two blocks to either side of Elberon. Price Hill started at Grand and ex-

ABOUT LETTERS AND COLUMNS We welcome your comments on editorials, columns, stories or other topics important to you in The Community Press. Include your name, address and phone number(s) so we may verify your letter. Letters of 200 or fewer words and columns of 500 or fewer words have the best chance of being published. All submissions may be edited for length, accuracy and clarity. Deadline: Noon Friday E-mail: memral@communitypress.com Fax: 853-6220 U.S. mail: See box below Letters, columns and articles submitted to The Community Press may be published or distributed in print, electronic or other forms.

tended to Rapid Run Avenue. Form there on you were in the Western Hills Area. It encompassed the rest of Price Hill, Covedale, some of Green Township and a touch of Westwood. That is how I saw it. There was never a West Price Hill. Some things to think about: There is a Western Hills Viaduct, Western Hills Country

Club, Western Hills High School, Western Bowl, Western Hills Shopping Center, and a Western Hills Avenue. I also recall Covedale Merchants baseball team, Covedale School, Covedale Theater and Covedale Avenue. I cannot think of anything that took the name of West Price Hill. So whoever coined the name and got it installed, would you

please take the West off the phrase and go somewhere else with it. Also, driving home from jury duty this week on West Eighth, I saw the sign at Eighth and State saying welcome to Lower Price Hill. It made me sad. It is still an insult. To those of you what are engineering the destruction of the western side of town, I hope you are done. Go do West Hyde Park or West Mount Adams. See how they like it.

Hershel Jim Davis Delhi Township

Plowshares

This letter is directed to Mr. (Paul) Ashworth about his recent article about a society without guns. Just one line and unfortunately its not mine but very fitting. “Those who beat their swords into plowshares will plow for those who don’t.”

Steve Hays Delhi Township

New committee will look over East Asia In the last Congress, I had the honor of serving as chairman of the House Foreign Affairs Subcommittee on the Middle East and South Asia. The so-called Arab Spring began the month I took over as chairman (just a coincidence I assure you!). It was an incredible experience during a tuSteve Chbot multuous peri- COMMUNITY PRESS od in this alGUEST COLUMNIST ways volatile region of the world. I had the opportunity to visit with our brave troops in Iraq, meet with Israeli and Palestinian leaders in Jerusalem and the West Bank, and witness firsthand the results of revolutions in Egypt, Yemen and Libya. In retrospect, perhaps my saddest experience was spending the better part of two days in Tripoli, Libya, with our coura-

geous ambassador, Chris Stevens, who would be murdered by terrorists in Benghazi, Libya, one month later. In Washington, my committee held numerous substantive hearings on regional developments in the Middle East, and heard testimony from key State Department officials, scholars, and think tank professionals. Last week, the Foreign Affairs Committee met for the first time in this new Congress, and I was formally appointed chairman of another panel – the Subcommittee on Asia and the Pacific. It’s an assignment that I believe will prove to be equally interesting and challenging. It’s interesting to note that President Obama announced awhile back, with considerable fanfare, his administration’s intention to pivot U.S. attention and resources from the Middle East to East Asia and the Pacific. His reasoning is that as U.S. commitments in Iraq and Af-

ghanistan wind down, thwarting the expansionist tendencies of our real strategic world rival, China, must be stepped up. My committee will have jurisdiction over U.S. policy in an area that spans almost half the Earth’s surface, and contains more than half the world’s population. It stretches as far north as Mongolia, and south to New Zealand, from Pakistan in the west to the Pacific island nations in the east. The Asia-Pacific region includes countries such as India, the world’s largest democracy; Indonesia, the world’s largest Muslim nation; and China, the world’s most populous country. And the Asian-Pacific economy accounts for more than 50 percent of world trade. Some of the critical issues I expect to deal with are the following. Challenging political transitions in China, Japan, and South Korea. North Korea

continues to belligerently push forward on its nuclear program. China continues to act aggressively toward its neighbors, and against American influence. India dominates South Asia and this democracy should be a natural ally of the United States. However, considerable work remains to improve this relationship. And then there’s Pakistan. Even though we have provided nearly $25 billion in aid over the last 10 years, Pakistan remains an unreliable ally in suppressing Islamic extremism. This relationship must improve as Pakistan will be critical in the Afghan reconciliation process. An ancient Chinese proverb says “May you live in interesting times.” That is likely to be the case in the Asia-Pacific region into the foreseeable future. Republican Steve Chabot represents the 1st District.

Kerosene lamps once lighted the way around town Kerosene lanterns were the only source of light for many people before electricity. They were made from tin-plated sheet steel, or brass and copper. There were three types: dead-flame, hot-blast, and cold-blast. Each lamp worked differently. A deadflame lantern drew in fresh Betty air directly Kamuf below the burner, while COMMUNITY PRESS GUEST COLUMNIST the hot exhaust air came out of the top of the lantern. The hot-blast design collected hot air from above the globe and fed it through metal side tubes to the burner, to make the flame burn brighter. The cold-blast design was similar to the hot-blast lamp, but the cold fresh air was drawn in from around the top of the globe. Then it was fed though the metal side tubes to the flame, making it burn brighter

Samuel Johnson remembered doing his homework by a kerosene lantern that put out a pale yellow light. As an adult he looked for something better. In 1905, he found a German kerosene mantle burner called the Practicus. It burned 60 candles bright, but with its single wire mantle support, often went out of adjustment, requiring constant adjustment. And the slim chimneys cracked. So Johnson worked to improve it. The solution came when he found a center-draft burner from the Plume and Atwood Manufacturing Co. of Waterbury, Conn. Now he was ready to manufacture his own lamps, which he named Aladdin, for the famous story Aladdin, where a magician offered new lamps for old. The company started off with model 1 with three table lamp versions, two hanging lamp versions, a wall mounted lamp and an oil pot lamp because the tooling was already there and the parts. The initial sales of the Aladdin lamp blew all other lamps

PRICE HILL

PRESS

A publication of

PRESS

CommunityPress.com

LETTER TO THE EDITOR Where the West come from?

COMMUNITY

out of the water, and made them obsolete. The International Exposition in San Francisco firmly established the Mantle Lamp Co. as the dominant leader in the field. Johnson opened a small research department and the company constantly came out with new developments in illumination and safety. World War I stopped shipments of the German-made burners, wicks, mantles and chimneys. By the war’s end only a few companies were left using American made parts. Aladdin was a leader in marketing and was always offering new promotions. By 1919, the electrification of homes began to eat into Samuel Johnson’s profit, the company needed products that would sell year around. Johnson formed Aladdin Industries to make vacuum technology products. And he opened offices in other countries to sell his products. His lamps became a seasonal item. In 1926, The Mantle Lamp Co. bought the Lippincott Glass Co. in

Alexandria, Ind., and built a new factory, where they could now manufacture the whole lamp. During World War II Aladdin contributed to the war effort. Electrification of homes stopped because of a copper shortage, so Aladdin lamps were used. The Aladdin kerosene burner powered the Servel and Electrolux refrigeration units which preserved serum and plasma on the battlefields. V. S. Johnson died 1943, and his son V. S. Johnson Jr. took over. The company is still in business today headquartered in Nashville, Tenn., producing Aladdin thermos bottles. The production of Aladdin lamps ceased in 1956. Fifteen models of Aladdin lamps have been made in the United States since 1909. Many of them are collector’s items. Betty Kamuf is a winner of Griffin Yeatman Award for Historical Preservation. She lives in Sayler Park. You can email her at westnews@communitypress.com.

5556 Cheviot Road Cincinnati, Ohio 45247 phone: 923-3111 fax: 853-6220 email: pricehillpress@communitypress.com web site: www.communitypress.com

School levy keeps status quo On Wednesday, Jan. 23, the Oak Hills Board of Education approved a resolution to place a 4.82 mill emergency operating levy on the May 7 election ballot. It has been 16 years since the school district has asked voters to approve new revenue for school Todd Yohey operations. COMMUNITY PRESS We have GUEST COLUMNIST many parents, staff, and community members with little to no school levy experience. In fact, the last three graduating classes from Oak Hills High School never experienced a school levy during their K-12 time with us. Sixteen years off of the ballot speaks to the conservative manner in which we approach school finances and demonstrates the outstanding fiscal management of your tax dollars. This levy will provide the Oak Hills school district the funding needed to continue operations at its current level. We do not plan on increasing staff. We do not plan on new, elaborate programs. We do not plan to deviate from our sound fiscal practices. Passage of this levy will allow us to continue status quo offering a higher than average education for a lower than average cost. Our goal over the next three months is to make sure that our taxpayers have the information they need to make an informed decision on May 7. With that in mind, we have a page linked from our district and building websites with information addressing frequently asked questions. We have also posted a podcast to inform our voters about the need. Please visit our website at ohlsd.us. If you do not have access and would like a copy of the FAQ document, please call our district office at 598-3200 and we will mail you a copy. I encourage everyone to exercise your right to vote on May 7. Todd Yohey is superintendent of Schools of the Oak Hills Local School District.

Price Hill Press Editor Marc Emral memral@communitypress.com, 853-6264 Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday See page A2 for additional contact information.


WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2013

LIFE

COMMUNITY PRESS

PEOPLE | IDEAS | RECIPES

McAuley students learn about IT careers

Six McAuley students attended the eight annual Women in Technology Conference Nov. 16. This conference was presented by the INTERAlliance of Greater Cincinnati and sponsored by Citi, Fifth-Third Bank, GE, Great American Insurance, and Procter & Gamble, along with Miami University, the University of Cincinnati, and Xavier University. The conference was an opportunity for female high school students to get answers to any questions about careers in the field of IT or to simply explore what this field offers and whether it might for them. Highlights of the conference

included: » Interactive sessions where students learned, through discussions with both academic and corporate professionals, the broad spectrum of career opportunities in IT, as well as the range of degree programs they can pursue in college to carve out a career in IT. » Opportunities to network with college students who have already made the choice to pursue IT as their career. They gave advice on how to make the best of one’s college experience. » Opportunities to talk to women from Citi, Fifth-Third, GE, Great American Insurance, P&G, and more, about their ca-

reers in IT and about employment opportunities in these companies in the field of IT. The McAuley students who took advantage of this special day were Melissa Jose,Abigail Meeks, Selah Meyer, Allison Moning, Samantha Rauh, and Abigail Sander. Senior Allison Moning, the daughter of Joseph and Cheryl Moning of White Oak said, “ We did a fun activity at the IT conference where we came up with technological strategies to improve sales and customer satisfaction in a school cafeteria.” morning will major in computer science next year at either Thomas More College or the University of Cincinnati.

Attending the eight annual Women in Technology conference from McAuley High School were, from second from left, Melissa Jose, Samantha Rauh, Abigail Sander, Abigail Meeks, and Allison Moning. Also attend from McAuley was Selah Meyer was at a different table. PROVIDED

CANDY CARE PACKAGE

This year’s Great Oaks Education Foundation’s Great Oaks Career Campus distinguished alumni are, from left, Gary Gilbert, Joan Junker and Bradley George. THANKS TO JON WEIDLICH

Great Oaks honors distinguished alumni Each year, the Great Oaks Education Foundation chooses successful Great Oaks Career Campus graduates as Distinguished Alumni. The award recipients are honored at a banquet prepared by Scarlet Oaks Culinary Arts students and planned and served by Scarlet Oaks Lodging Management students. This year’s honorees are the and two local business owners and the Paint Creek Joint EMS/ Fire District chief. » Gary Gilbert, Diamond Oaks, carpentry, graduated 1979 Gary Gilbert exemplifies Great Oaks. In his personal and professional life, he practices the Great Oaks values of honesty, trust, respect, quality and equity. He also used the skills he learned at Great Oaks to be successful in his career in construction. Gilbert started as a co-op laborer with HGC Construction; he worked his way up to his current position as vice president and part owner of the company. Through the years, he has given back to the schools which gave him his start. He serves on the Diamond Oaks Business/Industry Advisory Council for the construction program and also sits on the Oak Hills High School Advisory Board. He is active in SkillsUSA, employs Great Oaks students, and regularly speaks to potential students and parents. Even as a company owner, Gilbert continues to grow and expand his skills. He stays on the forefront of green building

technology and has become LEED certified. He’s also involved in professional organizations, and was named 2008 Estimator of the Year by the Cincinnati Chapter of the American Society of Professional Estimators. » Joan Junker, Diamond Oaks, cosmetology, graduated 1979 Junker has been a successful businesswoman almost from the day she graduated in 1979 as one of the youngest cosmetologists in Ohio. After 18 years of building a reputation and clientele, she became a business owner in 1997. Her popular salon, Hair Management on Bridgetown Road, has grown five-fold through her expertise and passion. She shares that expertise, too – with potential cosmetologists at Diamond Oaks, Empire Education Group, and the International School of Beauty, and also informally with other salon owners trying to expand their businesses. She is a member of the Diamond Oaks Cosmetology Business/Industry Advisory Council, she proctors state cosmetology licensing exams, and she regularly speaks to classes. Junker’s community activities are numerous. A Girl Scout leader and Sunday school teacher, she also involves her business in the community by supporting individuals and organizations through fundraising activities at Hair Management. She has organized evenings at her salon for mothers with special needs and mothers of children with

special needs. Junker was honored in 2005 for her work in employing teenagers with developmental disabilities » Bradley George, Laurel Oaks, firefighting, graduated 1988 George has spent his entire career protecting and helping people. He started in his home town of Greenfield, and also volunteered on his days off with the Greenfield Area Life Squad as an EMT. Rising through the ranks as a member of the county dive team and fire investigator, he became assistant chief in 1997. Not content to serve his community only as a firefighter, he completed Ohio peace officer training in 1991 and worked for a number of years as a Highland County Sheriff’s dseputy and as an officer for the Leesburg Police Department. After a stint with the State Fire Marshall’s Office, he was chosen to become the first chief of the newly-formed Paint Creek Joint EMS/Fire District in December 2009. A tireless community volunteer and high school swim team coach, it has been written about George: “He has managed to make his professional life personal to him, which in turn benefits his community and the areas served by the fire district.” The photos and stories of each year’s distinguished alumni are mounted in the halls of the four Great Oaks campuses to serve as an inspiration for current and future students.

The second-grade class at St. Teresa of Avila gave more than 800 pieces of their Halloween candy to WeCare, a non-profit organization that uses the candy to help pack care packages for troops overseas. From left are George Hazelbaker, Wilson Chun and Jacob Roth. PROVIDED.

Elder Band walking with cakes The Elder Band will host its second Cake Walk from 7-10 p.m. Saturday, March 2, in the Elder High School wrestling gym. A cake walk is like musical chairs, but with a twist. The rules are simple: People pay a small fee, line up in a circle, walk at the sound of music and stop when it stops, and then sit on the nearest chair. Each chair is numbered and if a walker’s numbered chair matches the number drawn by the emcee, that person is awarded a cake. “Last year we gave away over 200 cakes” according to Tracy Rottenberger, Elder Band’s Cake Walk chairperson. “We modeled our event on the Deer Park Band Cake Walk. Deer Park has been holding their cake walk for over 50 years, and it has become a great annual event for the Deer Park community. We hope that Elder Band’s Cake Walk will become an annual tradition for the Elder/Seton community and the

Cake Walkers wait for the music to stop during last year’s Elder Band Cake Walk. Walkers went home with hundreds of baked goods at last year’s event. PROVIDED

people of Price Hill.” In addition to the Cake Walk, with music performed by various student groups, there will also be split-the-pot, basket raffles, and food by City BBQ. Admission is $3 for adults, $2 for high school students, and $1 for grade school students. Walk tickets are 25 cents each or 5 for $1.

THANKSGIVING FEAST

Preschoolers at St. Dominic School dressed as Native Americans and Pilgrims for a Thanksgiving feast. Pictured from left are Caelen Classens, Will Fettig and Joshua Smith. PROVIDED.


B2 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • FEBRUARY 13, 2013

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD THURSDAY, FEB. 14

$14; $12 students, seniors and groups of 10 or more. 588-4988; www.sunsetplayers.com. West Price Hill.

Health / Wellness Free Hearing Screenings, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., The Place for Better Hearing, 3302 Westbourne Drive, Free. Reservations required. 922-0123; www.hearingbetter.net. Green Township.

SUNDAY, FEB. 24 Art & Craft Classes Paint a State, 1-3 p.m., Broadhope Art Collective, 3651 Harrison Ave., Ages 12 and up, or 8 and up with adult. $25. 225-8114; www.broadhopeartcollective.com. Cheviot.

On Stage - Student Theater 42nd Street, 7:30 p.m., Oak Hills High School, 3200 Ebenezer Road, Auditorium. Classic song and dance extravaganza with cast of more than 60 students. $10. 922-3200; jlfox@fuse.net. Green Township.

Education Dave Ramsey’s Financial Peace University, 7-8:30 p.m., Vineyard Westside Church, Real Estate and Mortgages. $99. Registration required. 922-7897; www.daveramsey.com/fpu/preview. Cheviot.

On Stage - Theater Broadway Bound, 8 p.m., Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, 4990 Glenway Ave., Part three of Neil Simon’s acclaimed autobiographical work. $23, $20 students and seniors. Through Feb. 17. 241-6550; www.cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com. West Price Hill.

Youth Sports Instructional Basketball, 4:305:30 p.m., Sayler Park Community Center, 6720 Home City Ave., Classes are introduction to basketball skills presented in informative, fun and healthy way. Kindergarten-second grade. $10, plus $2 membership. Through Feb. 28. 941-0102; www.cincyrec.org. Sayler Park.

FRIDAY, FEB. 15 Dining Events Fish Fry, 4:30-7:30 p.m., St. William Church, 4108 W. Eighth St., Fried and baked fish, fried shrimp, crab cakes, pizza, mac and cheese and soup of the week. Desserts and beverages available. Live entertainment weekly. Drive-thru available 4-7:30 p.m. $1-$8. 921-0247. West Price Hill. Fish Fry, 5-7 p.m., St. Antoninus School, 5425 Julmar Drive, Fish sandwich, grilled salmon, pizza, grilled cheese, fresh homemade desserts and assortment of sides. Dine in, carry out and drivethrough. Benefits Boy Scout Troop 614. Price varies. Presented by St. Antoninus Boy Scout Troop 614. 922-2500; saintantoninus.org. Green Township.

Exercise Classes FitChixx, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Sayler Park Community Center, 6720 Home City Ave., Full-body workout consisting of weights, cardio and core work. All ages and abilities welcome. $45 per month. Presented by FitChixx. 205-9772; www.fitchixx.com. Sayler Park.

Farmers Market Lettuce Eat Well Winter Farmers Market, 3-7 p.m., Cheviot United Methodist Church, 3820 Westwood Northern Blvd., Locally produced food items. Free. Presented by Lettuce Eat Well. 661-1792; www.lewfm.org. Cheviot.

Health / Wellness Free Hearing Screenings, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., The Place for Better Hearing, Free. Reservations required. 922-0123; www.hearingbetter.net. Green Township.

Music - Concerts The cast of “42nd Street” rehearse at Oak Hills High School. The school presents the musical at 7:30 p.m. nightly Thursday, Feb. 14, through Sunday, Feb. 17, and a matinee at 3 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 17, in the high school auditorium, 3200 Ebenezer Road. PROVIDED edale Center for the Performing Arts, $23, $20 students and seniors. 241-6550; www.cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com. West Price Hill.

SATURDAY, FEB. 16 Art & Craft Classes Print Your Own Scarf, 11 a.m.-1 p.m., Broadhope Art Collective, 3651 Harrison Ave., Make jersey knit scarf individualized with block print design. Messy class. For ages 8 and up. $20. 225-8114; www.broadhopeartcollective.com. Cheviot.

Exercise Classes Spinning, 9-10 a.m., Western Sports Mall, 2323 Ferguson Road, Racquetball Center. Group cycling workout. Ages 14-99. $8-$10. Presented by SpinFit LLC. 451-4920; www.spinfitcincinnati.com. Westwood.

Health / Wellness Free Hearing Screenings, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., The Place for Better Hearing, Free. Reservations required. 922-0123; www.hearingbetter.net. Green Township.

On Stage - Student Theater 42nd Street, 7:30 p.m., Oak Hills High School, $10. 922-3200; jlfox@fuse.net. Green Township.

2-5 p.m., German Heritage Museum, 4790 West Fork Road, Presented by Jeanine Kreinbrink, adjunct lecturer, Northern Kentucky University and board member of the James Ramage Civil War Museum. Free. Presented by German-American Citizens League of Greater Cincinnati. 574-1741; www.gacl.org. Green Township.

Music - Religious Lenten Sacred Concert, 2:30-4 p.m., Sisters of Charity of Cincinnati, 5900 Delhi Road, Motherhouse Chapel. With Mike Davis. $10. Registration required. 347-5449; www.srcharitycinti.org. Delhi Township.

On Stage - Student Theater 42nd Street, 3 p.m. and 7:30 p.m., Oak Hills High School, $10. 922-3200; jlfox@fuse.net. Green Township.

On Stage - Theater Broadway Bound, 2 p.m., Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, $23, $20 students and seniors. 241-6550; www.cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com. West Price Hill.

MONDAY, FEB. 18 Exercise Classes

Broadway Bound, 8 p.m., Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, $23, $20 students and seniors. 241-6550; www.cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com. West Price Hill.

FitChixx, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Sayler Park Community Center, $45 per month. 205-9772; www.fitchixx.com. Sayler Park. Spinning, 5:45-6:45 p.m., Western Sports Mall, $8-$10. 451-4920; www.spinfitcincinnati.com. Westwood.

SUNDAY, FEB. 17

TUESDAY, FEB. 19

On Stage - Theater

Education Dave Ramsey’s Financial Peace University, 7-8:30 p.m., Vineyard Westside Church, 3420 Glenmore Ave., Retirement and College Planning. Learn to get rid of debt, manage your money, spend and save wisely and more. Price is per household for lifetime membership. $99. Registration required. 922-7897; www.daveramsey.com/fpu/preview. Cheviot.

Faith-Based Yoga, 6:45-7:45 p.m., Vineyard Westside Church, 3420 Glenmore Ave., Second Floor Green Room. Faith-based yoga class open to all levels. Free, donations requested. 295-5226; www.tailoredfitonline.com. Cheviot.

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 20 Clubs & Organizations

42nd Street, 7:30 p.m., Oak Hills High School, $10. 922-3200; jlfox@fuse.net. Green Township.

A Sinatra Valentine, 4-8 p.m., Willie’s Sports Cafe, 6380 Glenway Ave., Music of Frank Sinatra by Matt Snow. Drink specials. Free. 922-3377; www.willieswesternhills.com. Green Township.

Pioneer Antique & Hobby Association Monthly Meeting, 7:30 p.m., Nathanael Greene Lodge, 6394 Wesselman Road, Mulberry Room. Speaker is Abraham Lincoln portrayer Stan Wernz. Guests welcome. Presented by Pioneer Antique & Hobby Association. 451-4822. Green Township.

On Stage - Theater

Lectures

Dance Classes

Broadway Bound, 8 p.m., Cov-

Northern Kentucky Germans in the 23rd Kentucky Infantry,

Dance Class, 4:30-8:30 p.m., Douce Dance Studio, 3772 Shady Lane, Dance instructions. Ages 2 1/2-adult. Tap, ballet, jazz/hiphop, gymnastics, baton twirling. $25 monthly. Registration required. 941-0202. North Bend.

On Stage - Student Theater

Holiday - Valentine’s Day

Education Shoulder Pain: What Are Your Options for Relief?, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Beacon Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine-West, 6480 Harrison Ave., Learn about surgical options. Presentation followed by question-and-answer session. Free. Reservations required. 354-7635; www.beaconortho.com. Green Township.

Exercise Classes Last weekend for the Covedale Center for the Performing Arts’s “Broadway Bound,” a Neil Simon play, at the theater, 4990 Glenway Ave. Jason Endicott, left, plays Stan and Matthew Wilson plays Eugene. The last four performances are 8 p.m. Thursday-Saturday, Feb. 14-16, and 2 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 17. Tickets $23, $20 students and seniors, at 241-6550; www.cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com. THANKS TO HOLLY YURCHISON

FitChixx, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Sayler Park Community Center, $45 per month. 205-9772; www.fitchixx.com. Sayler Park.

Health / Wellness Yoga Back Therapy, 6-6:45 p.m., EarthConnection, 370 Neeb Road, Gentle yoga postures to soothe the back. $30 for five-class

ABOUT CALENDAR To submit calendar items, go to www.cincinnati.com and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to life@communitypress.com along with event information. Items are printed on a spaceavailable basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to www.cincinnati.com and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page. pass or $7 drop-in. Presented by Yoga by Marietta. 675-2725; www.yogabymarietta.com. Delhi Township. Shoulder Pain? What Are Your Options for Relief? Presentation, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Beacon Orthopaedics & Sports MedicineWest, 6480 Harrison Ave., Boardroom. Learn about surgical options. Refreshments provided. Free. Reservations required. Presented by Beacon Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine. 354-7635; www.beaconortho.com. Green Township.

Religious - Community Wednesday Night Solutions, 7-8:30 p.m., Vineyard Westside Church, 3420 Glenmore Ave., Weekly interactive DVD presentation hosted by Dr. Henry Cloud and Dr. John Townsend. Variety of topics addressing everyday issues such as communication, conflict and more. 922-7897; www.cloudtownsend.com/ resources/solutions. Cheviot. Fr. Norman Langenbrunner Lenten Series, 6:30-8 p.m., Sisters of Charity of Cincinnati, 5900 Delhi Road, $10, $30 for four-week series; $10 registration fee applied to total cost. Registration required. 347-5449; www.srcharitycinti.org. Delhi Township.

Support Groups Western Hills Job Search Satellite Group, 9-11 a.m., Westwood First Presbyterian Church, 3011 Harrison Ave., Community members welcome to learn from and support each other in job-seeking process. Speakers present valuable content about latest in electronic resumes, LinkedIn, effective networking, interview skills, available funding and community resources. Group members provide support and accountability to one another during this stressful time. Free. 608-9359. Westwood.

THURSDAY, FEB. 21 Health / Wellness Pre-Diabetes Class, 1-3 p.m., Mercy Hospital Western Hills, 3131 Queen City Ave., Information on making healthy food choices, exercise and blood sugar control and monitoring blood sugar levels. $20. Presented by Mercy Health Partners. 956-3729; www.e-mercy.com. Westwood. Chest Pains: Indigestion or a Heart Attack?, 6-7 p.m., Mercy HealthPlex Western Hills, 3131 Queen City Ave., Rooms A and B. Dr. Abhijit Desai, cardiologist with Mercy Health: The Heart Institute, discusses cause of chest pains and teaches attendees what to do when they have them. Free. Reservations required. Presented by Mercy Health Partners. 956-3729; www.e-mercy.com. Westwood.

Schools Preschool Registration, 6-7:30 p.m., Cheviot United Methodist Church, 3820 Westwood Northern Blvd., Preschool. For families who have not previously been enrolled. $75 registration fee. 389-3060; www.cumcpreschool.com. Cheviot.

Youth Sports Instructional Basketball, 4:305:30 p.m., Sayler Park Community Center, $10, plus $2 membership. 941-0102; www.cincyrec.org. Sayler Park.

FRIDAY, FEB. 22 Art & Craft Classes Reversible Apron, 6-8 p.m., Broadhope Art Collective, 3651 Harrison Ave., Make reversible apron, perfect for cooking or entertaining. All materials provided. For ages 12 and up. $35. 225-8114; www.broadhopeartcollective.com. Cheviot.

Dining Events Fish Fry, 4:30-7:30 p.m., St. William Church, $1-$8. 921-0247. West Price Hill. Fish Fry, 5-7 p.m., St. Antoninus School, Price varies. 922-2500; saintantoninus.org. Green Township.

Exercise Classes FitChixx, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Sayler Park Community Center, $45 per month. 205-9772; www.fitchixx.com. Sayler Park.

Farmers Market Lettuce Eat Well Winter Farmers Market, 3-7 p.m., Cheviot United Methodist Church, Free. 661-1792; www.lewfm.org. Cheviot.

Music - Acoustic Charlie Runtz, 6:30-9 p.m., Aroma’s Java and Gelato, 6407 Bridgetown Road, Variety of music for all ages. Free. 574-3000; www.aromasgelato.com. Green Township.

Music - Blues Chuck Brisbin & the Tuna Project, 10 p.m.-2 a.m., J’s Sports Bar, 4862 Delhi Ave., Free. 2446111. Delhi Township.

On Stage - Theater

Westwood First Presbyterian Church Concert Series, 3 p.m., Westwood First Presbyterian Church, 3011 Harrison Ave., With Heather MacPhail, organ and piano. Free, donations accepted. 661-6846, ext. 107; www.wfpc.org. Westwood.

MONDAY, FEB. 25 Exercise Classes FitChixx, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Sayler Park Community Center, $45 per month. 205-9772; www.fitchixx.com. Sayler Park. Spinning, 5:45-6:45 p.m., Western Sports Mall, $8-$10. 451-4920; www.spinfitcincinnati.com. Westwood.

TUESDAY, FEB. 26

Faith-Based Yoga, 6:45-7:45 p.m., Vineyard Westside Church, Free, donations requested. 295-5226; www.tailoredfitonline.com. Cheviot.

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 27 Dance Classes Dance Class, 4:30-8:30 p.m., Douce Dance Studio, $25 monthly. Registration required. 9410202. North Bend.

Exercise Classes FitChixx, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Sayler Park Community Center, $45 per month. 205-9772; www.fitchixx.com. Sayler Park.

Health / Wellness Yoga Back Therapy, 6-6:45 p.m., EarthConnection, $30 for fiveclass pass or $7 drop-in. 675-2725; www.yogabymarietta.com. Delhi Township.

Religious - Community Wednesday Night Solutions, 7-8:30 p.m., Vineyard Westside Church, 922-7897; www.cloudtownsend.com/resources/solutions. Cheviot. Fr. Norman Langenbrunner Lenten Series, 6:30-8 p.m., Sisters of Charity of Cincinnati, $10, $30 for four-week series; $10 registration fee applied to total cost. Registration required. 347-5449; www.srcharitycinti.org. Delhi Township.

Support Groups Western Hills Job Search Satellite Group, 9-11 a.m., Westwood First Presbyterian Church, Free. 608-9359. Westwood.

THURSDAY, FEB. 28 On Stage - Theater

Moonlight & Magnolias, 8-10 p.m., Arts Center at Dunham, 1945 Dunham Way, Auditorium. Three weeks into the production of "Gone With the Wind," legendary producer David O. Selznick closes the set and fires director George Cukor. With just five days to get back on track, Selznick hires famed screenwriter Ben Hecht to write a new script from Margaret Mitchell’s bestselling novel. $14; $12 students, seniors and groups of 10 or more. Presented by Sunset Players Inc. 588-4988; www.sunsetplayers.com. West Price Hill.

Why Do Fools Fall In Love?, 8 p.m., Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, 4990 Glenway Ave., Show reaffirms that, during life’s struggles, friendship will unveil its everlasting strength. $23, $20 students and seniors. 241-6550; www.cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com. West Price Hill.

SATURDAY, FEB. 23

FRIDAY, MARCH 1

Exercise Classes Spinning, 9-10 a.m., Western Sports Mall, $8-$10. 451-4920; www.spinfitcincinnati.com. Westwood.

Music - Blues Chuck Brisbin & the Tuna Project, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Poppy’s Tavern, 5510 Rybolt Road, Free. 574-6333. Green Township.

On Stage - Theater Moonlight & Magnolias, 8-10 p.m., Arts Center at Dunham,

Youth Sports Instructional Basketball, 4:305:30 p.m., Sayler Park Community Center, $10, plus $2 membership. 941-0102; www.cincyrec.org. Sayler Park.

Dining Events Fish Fry, 4:30-7:30 p.m., St. William Church, $1-$8. 921-0247. West Price Hill. Fish Fry, 5-7 p.m., St. Antoninus School, Price varies. 922-2500; saintantoninus.org. Green Township.

Exercise Classes FitChixx, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Sayler Park Community Center, $45 per month. 205-9772; www.fitchixx.com. Sayler Park.


LIFE

FEBRUARY 13, 2013 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • B3

Cherries, chocolate go together in Feb. “I love you” chocolate covered cherries

To store: Store in tightly covered container in frig. Bring to room temperature before eating. Cake pops: Recipe on my blog. Fun for kids. Check out photo of grandson, Jack, decorating cake pops he made.

These are amazingly easy to make and look stunning in a heart shaped box. This recipe is appropriate for Presidents’ Day, too. Remember the story of George Washington admitting to chopping down his Dad’s cherry tree because he couldn’t “tell a lie.” 1 jar l0 oz., maraschino cherries with stems Drain cherries very well for several hours. They must be dry for fondant to adhere. Fast Fondant Not a true fondant, but an easy one. You’ll have fondant leftover. Freeze fondant up to a month. 3 tablespoons butter, softened 3 tablespoons light corn syrup 2 cups powdered sugar 12 ounces or so melted chocolate

Mix butter and syrup, then mix in powdered sugar. It will look a bit dry but will come together as you knead it smooth. If too soft to

Heart healthy vegetarian red beans and rice

These “I love you” chocolate covered cherries are easy to make and make a good Valentine’s Day gift. THANKS TO RITA HEIKENFELD.

handle, chill for 15 minutes. (Mixture can also be made a week ahead and brought to room temperature). Shape 1⁄2 to l teaspoon mixture around each cherry, fitting the fondant closely to the cherry, enclosing the base of the stem as well. Roll in your palms to smooth fondant. Place

on baking sheet and chill until firm. This is necessary for the chocolate to adhere. Melt chocolate. Let cool a bit – chocolate will be still be warm and very liquid. Dip cherry into chocolate. Seal completely or juice could leak out. Place on sprayed baking sheet. Chill until firm.

When you pair rice with beans, you have a nice, protein filled dish. Try brown rice which is nutritionally better than white. It will take longer to cook, and is absorbed more slowly in your system you feel full longer. 1 generous cup chopped onion 1 generous teaspoon garlic, minced 1-2 teaspoons cumin 1 teaspoon chili powder or more to taste 2 cups rice 2 cans, approx. 16 ounces ea., red beans, drained 4 cups low sodium, fat free vegetable or chicken broth Salt and pepper to taste

The rainy season begins – homeowners beware The winter and spring typically brings excessive precipitation. For homeowners, this season can mean wet or damp basements and/or crawl spaces. In many cases, these issues may be resolved with some economical corrections, but the homeMichael owner Montgomery COMMUNITY PRESS should get the GUEST COLUMNIST correct professional advice before spending thousands of dollars for unnecessary repairs. Since I have been inspecting homes for over 15 years and 9,000 inspections, I have seen many expensive improper repairs and have heard tremendous amounts of bad information provided by some of the foundation repair and waterproofing companies.

Some of the contractors use scare tactics and tell homeowners the foundation is about to collapse and you must sign their contract now. Foundations that are about to collapse will have major cracks, such as 1-inch or wider, or the walls may have bulged or leaned inward 3 inches or 4 inches or more. It is normal for basement slabs to crack, and the slab normally is slightly raised at the crack due to slab curl, a normal concrete curing process. This does not confirm that water is under the slab or soil has washed out from under the slab. Storm water under the slab is fairly uncommon. Contractors sometimes use a hammer to tap the top of the basement slab along the foundation wall. If the slab has curled, this will result in a hollow sound under the slab. The homeowner is told the soil has washed out from under the slab. Since most basement slabs are

placed on top of the footing, there is no soil under the slab along the foundation wall to wash out. The hollow sound is due to slab curl, which slightly lifts the slab from the footing. If the slab is tapped away from the foundation wall, the slab probably doesn’t have a hollow sound. If a waterproofing company uses test strips to prove the house has a mold issue, become very wary of them. Some companies use these presumed sampling methods and tell you this confirms there is a mold problem. This most likely is a scam to scare you. All molds are not a health concern. Only a certified mold expert should advise you on mold issues, not the contractor selling a waterproofing system. A typical moisture control method may include installing fiberglass reinforced panels over foundation cracks to drain the leak into an under-slab drain line connected to a sump

pump. This method does cover the crack, but hides what is happening behind the panels, is conducive to mold growth and doesn’t address the cause of the crack. The installation of an under-slab drain pipe and sump pump for concrete foundation walls is probably a waste of money. Concrete leaks only in rare occasions. Concrete foundation walls can leak at cracks. Concrete block and stone foundations are more susceptible to leaking through the wall. Some economical repairs may include: 1 – Regrading the yard to slope away from the foundation. 2 – Regrading the yard to redirect storm water runoff before it gets near the foundation. 3 – Repairing leaking downspout piping. 4 – Repairing foundation cracks. Free estimates from contractors can be very expensive if you sign a contract without knowing the cause of the leaks.

Gardening sessions along the Delhi hillside (directions at www.HillsideGardenDelhi.com) Join a group as they “wipe the cobwebs’ from the garden. Help prepare the site for our upcoming Terrace Building Workshop, and even start some seeds. Dress for the weather, be ready to get muddy – boots and work gloves are preferable. One of the jobs is clearing honeysuckle stumps, so bring an axe and mattock if you have them (not required). Free. Check the garden’s Facebook page for weather cancellations. » Terrace Building Workshop Saturday, March 9, 9 a.m.-noon at Hillside Community Garden. Do you have a sloping area in your yard? Would you like to stop soil erosion? This is the third year of terrace building at the garden where you can learn about the ways the

garden grows food while stabilizing the hillside and mitigating soil erosion. Come for a brief lecture on the topic (outdoors – dress warm), and stay to participate in the next

phase of terrace building. Work gloves and boots are recommended. Suggested donation: $10. Check for weather cancellations. Rain date is Saturday, March 16, 9 a.m.-noon.

HOME HEATING HELP

Film bottom of pan with olive oil. Add everything but beans and broth. Cook over medium heat until garlic smells fragrant. Don’t let onions and garlic get brown. Stir in beans and broth. Cover and lower to a simmer and cook until rice is tender. Tip from Rita’s kitchen: Beans are called cancer-licking legumes – high in fiber and protein and low in fat. What about salt? Too much is bad for the heart! Himalayan pink sea salt is my salt of choice. Absolutely pure, sans toxins or any other bad stuff, unlike other salts that we commonly use. Check out my blog for timely info on this pretty and tasty salt. Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educator and author. Find her blog online at Cincinnati.Com/blogs. Email her at columns@communitypress.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Call 513-248-7130, ext. 356.

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Applications are available for Ohio’s Home Energy Assistance Program (HEAP). The program helps low-income Ohioans pay heating bills. Income example: Up to $22,340 a year for a single person ($30,260 a year for couples).

Seniors can get applications and help completing forms by calling Council on Aging at (513) 721-1025.

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The Hillside Community Garden, on the campus of the College of Mount St. Joseph, is having sessions on gradening, sponsored by the Hillside Community Garden Advisory Committee and the Civic Garden Center of Greater Cincinnati. » Demystifying Seed Selection, 7-8 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 19, at EarthConnection, 370 Neeb Road. Hybird, Heirloom, OP, GM – what does that mean? Learn about the seed choices available, and how to make them work for you and your vegetable garden. Receive a free seed packet and have a chance for a door prize gifted by Baker Creek Seeds. Suggested donation is $5. » First Gardening Day, 9 a.m.-noon, Saturday, Feb. 2, 9 a.m.-noon at Hillside Community Garden

Garnish: Thinly sliced green onions, chopped tomatoes

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So much happening in February! It’s Heart Month, Lent starts, Valentine’s Day is here and so is Presidents’ Day. Let’s start with something for Valentine’s Day since that is one of my favorite special days. Rita When I Heikenfeld was a kid, RITA’S KITCHEN sweets were a real treat, due in part to Mom’s lean budget and her and my Dad’s desire to feed the nine of us children a healthy diet. So when I was 16 and received my first Valentine box of candy from my boyfriend, Jim, I was in chocolate heaven. I’ve gotten lots of Valentine’s treats since then, but none can take the place of that first heart of drugstore chocolates. Reach out this Valentine’s Day by remembering those folks who would benefit from a fun card, a phone call or a plate of goodies.

www.corcoranharnist.com

921-2227 CE-0000540842


LIFE

B4 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • FEBRUARY 13, 2013

If the check’s in the mail, it may be phony Why would someone send a check for several thousand dollars to a total stranger? Although it sounds crazy, it happens every day. But if you get one those checks and Howard deposit it Ain you could HEY HOWARD! end up losing thousands of dollars. Sending checks to strangers has been going on for years with the sender giving a wide variety of reasons for the check. But all these scams have one thing in

common – the checks they send you are phony and the money you are to send them will be real. Katelin Willman of Brookville received one of these checks after she advertised for a job on the Internet. “I’ve received several different job offers. Most of them seem to be scams but this one in particular told me I could advertise on my car so it seemed really good, easy money. All I have to do is drive around,” Willman said. Willman told that emailer she was interested. “All of a sudden he sent me a check in the mail for more than $2,400. The job offer was

only for like $300. It seemed a little fishy to me and that’s when I contacted you,” Willman said. I asked if she was supposed to keep the extra $2,100 as some kind of advance on her salary, but she said no. Willman said she was told, “Put it in my bank account, then get a money order for the extra money and send it out.” “The check looked legitimate and real but it just sounded weird,” Willman said. Another sign this was a scam is the sender didn’t enclose the placard with the ad that was to be placed on the side of her car. All she received was the phony check. It

Decorative artists planning annual retreat What painter wouldn’t enjoy a total getaway to a comfortable retreat center nestled in the woods, spending three fun days learning painting techniques, sharing ideas, eating deliciously prepared meals and enjoying fun activities with friends old and new. Every April, this painting retreat becomes reality thanks to the efforts of the Greater Cincinnati Decorative Artists (GCDA) who carefully plan every detail in order to provide the best painting and learning opportunities for decorative painters. The retreat is scheduled

for Friday-Sunday, April 19-21, and this year’s theme is “Painting is a Picnic.” Held at he Higher Ground Conference Center in West Harrison, Ind., the painting retreat offers classes in all painting and drawing mediums, for all experience and skill levels and incorporates a wide variety of design styles, from realistic art to decorative and crafty. Registration is open to anyone who is interested in decorative painting. A catalog of painting classes and registration form are available on the GCDA website. To view the painting pro-

jects that will be taught and to download the registration form, go online to gcdapainters.org/ and click on the Painting Retreat Tab. The registration fee is scheduled to increase effective March 1, so there is still time to take advantage of the current lower rate. More information about GCDA is available on this website as well. In addition, visit GCDA on Facebook at facebook.com/Great erCincinnatiDecora tiveArtists. The 2013 retreat chairman is Jo Ann Heurich who can be contacted at 513367-9757 or by email at tulip@zoomtown.com.

seems very clear all the sender was interested in was the money. When Willman emailed the sender saying she knew it was a scam, he wrote back. “He said the FBI was after me because I cashed their check and I better send the money or else they’re going to come after me … The sad thing is a lot of people are going to fall for it and they’re going to have their bank accounts drained,” Willman said. Unfortunately, Willman is correct; a lot of people have fallen for this scam. In fact, the Federal Trade Commission says fake checks are being used in a growing number of fraudulent

schemes, including secret shopper scams, foreign lottery scams, check overpayment scams and Internet auction scams. That’s why, even though it cost the scammer nearly $19 for express mail postage in Willman’s case, he can afford to pay it. He sends out lots of these phony checks and, even if only a handful of recipients fall for the scam, he can make a lot of money. Sometimes the phony checks look like legitimate cashier’s checks or postal money orders, but they are never real. In all cases you are told to deposit the check into your bank account. Then you must send them your good money via Western

Union or Money Gram – and that money can’t be traced. In fact, the thieves can pick up the money at just about any location, often outside the United States. Phony checks can take weeks to discover and you are responsible for any funds you withdraw from the bank against that check. Remember, once you sign the back of a check and deposit it, the bank will hold you responsible if that check doesn’t clear. Howard Ain answers consumer complaints weekdays on WKRC-TV Local 12. Write to him at 12 WKRC-TV, 1906 Highland Ave., Cincinnati 45219.

Search on for outstanding senior volunteer

The search is on for Ohio’s outstanding senior volunteer. The Salute to Senior Service program, sponsored by Home Instead Inc., the franchisor of the Home Instead Senior Care network, honors the contributions of adults 65 and older who give at least 15 hours a month of volunteer service to their favorite causes. Nominations for outstanding senior volunteers will be accepted through and March 31. State winners then will be selected by popular vote at SalutetoSeniorService.com. Online voting will take place from April 15 to April 30. From those state winners, a panel of senior care experts will pick the national Salute to Senior Service honoree.

Home Instead Inc. will donate $500 to each of the state winners’ favorite nonprofit organizations and their stories will be posted on the Salute to Senior Service Wall of Fame. In addition, $5,000 will be donated to the national winner’s nonprofit charity of choice. “We all know seniors who do so much for our community,” said Deborah Ronson, general manager of the Home Instead Senior Care office serving Warren, Butler and Northwest Hamilton counties. “These silent heroes give selflessly, expecting nothing in return. And yet, their contributions often make a difference not only to the organizations they serve, but in changing how the public

views growing older.” Senior care professionals and those who work at hospitals, senior care facilities and other places where seniors volunteer are encouraged to nominate older adults. So, too, are family caregivers and the adult children of aging parents. Older adults also may self-nominate. To complete and submit a nomination form online for a senior age 65 or older who volunteers at least 15 hours a month, and to view the contest’s official rules, visit SalutetoSeniorService.com. For more information about Salute to Senior Service or the Home Instead Senior Care network’s services, call 513-701-3141.

If you can’t find a car here, you shouldn’t be driving. Are you planning to purchase a new vehicle? Maybe you simply like to kick the tires of new vehicles, with the latest cutting edge options and technology. Either way, the 2013 Enquirer Media and Cars.com Cincinnati Auto Expo is a convenient, relaxed environment to see and compare vehicles from your favorite manufacturers and favorite local dealers.Where else can you experience over 400 new car smells from more than 30 manufacturers under one roof?

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LIFE

FEBRUARY 13, 2013 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • B5

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES Animals/ Nature

GRRAND – Golden Retriever Rescue and Adoption of Needy Dogs takes in needy displaced, abandoned or unclaimed stray golden retrievers and places them in volunteer foster homes until adoptive families are found. Call 1-866-981-2251 and leave your name and phone. Visit www.ggrand.org. email www.cincygrrand@yahoo.com. League For Animal Welfare – A no-kill shelter needs volunteers 16-and-older to help socialize cats and 18-and-older to socialize and walk dogs. Other opportunities available. Call 735-2299, ext. 3. Save the Animals Foundation – Needs people 18 and older to staff its shelter for homeless cats and dogs. Call 378-0300 for cats and 588-6609 for dogs. Spring Grove Cemetery and Arboretum – has a new horticulture volunteer program. Volunteer opportunities include working side by side Spring Grove’s nationallyrenowned horticulture team at this National Historic Landmark. Groups of volunteers will be developed to help in the following areas: keeping the front entrance area looking spectacular, controlling invasive species, taking care of the tree and shrub collection. They are also looking for a volunteer, or volunteers, to help with the hybrid tea roses. New volunteers join the volunteer docents who are ambassadors for the cemetery and arboretum. Information sessions, conducted the last Saturday and first Wednesday of each month, will explain the volunteer opportunities. Sessions are at 10 a.m. in the Historic Office, just inside the main entrance to the cemetery. For more information, contact volunteer coordinator Whitney Huang, Spring Grove horticulturist, at 8536866. Tri State County Animal Response Team (CART) – Is at 11216 Gideon Lane in Sycamore Township. Meetings are open to the public. Visit www.tristatecart.com for monthly subjects or more information. Call 702-8373. Winton Woods Riding Center – is in need of volunteers to assist with the Special Riders Program, which provides training and competition opportunities for children and adults with disabilities, and to help with barn duties, horse shows and a variety of other tasks. No experience is necessary and training is provided. Interested individuals ages 14 and older are invited to contact the Winton Woods Riding Center at 931-3057, or at wwrc@greatparks.org.

PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

Executive Service Corps of Cincinnati – Professionals can use their administrative skills to help a busy, growing nonprofit manage its projects and members. Executive Service Corps of Cincinnati is looking for someone with experience in Word, Excel, Power Point and Outlook to assist in the Blue Ash office. Volunteers set their own days and hours and enjoy nice

NichelleWoolfolk Pre-BusinessAdministration

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working conditions and friendly, bright volunteers and staff. Help the ESCC help other nonprofits succeed. Contact Darlyne Koretos for more information at 791-6230, ext. 10. ESCC is located at 10945 Reed Hartman Highway, Suite 108.

HEALTH/WELLNESS

ries through scrapbooks and crafts in facilities all over the Cincinnati area; to sit vigil with patients as they are passing to ensure that no patient dies alone; and perform office tasks in Red Bank office. Training required. For more information, e-mail volunteer coordinator Amber Long at 4707officestaff2@hcr-manorcare.com.

WANT A LISTING? If you have a volunteer opportunity you would like listed, email the information to memral@communitypress.com.

Crossroads Hospice – Volunteers are wanted to join the team of Ultimate Givers who strive to provide extra love and comfort to terminally-ill patients and their families in Brown, Butler, Clermont, Clinton, Hamilton, Highland and Warren counties. Volunteers are also needed to support signature programs inspired by Jim Stovall’s novel, “The Ultimate Gift” The Gift of a Day program asks patients what their perfect day is and staff and volunteers work to make it a reality. Ultimate Givers visit with patients in their homes, assisted living facilities and nursing facilities and help with clerical duties at the Crossroads office. They provide emotional support and companionship to patients and family members, assist with errands or provide respite for those caring for terminally-ill loved ones. For more information or to sign up as an Ultimate Giver, call 793-5070 or compete an application online at www.crossroadshospice.com/ volunteering. Before becoming a Crossroads Hospice Ultimate Giver, participants must complete an application, TB skin test and training session lead by members of the Crossroads team. Volunteers must wait a minimum of one year after the death of an immediate family member or loved one before applying. Heartland Hospice – Volunteers needed in bereavement department, making six-month follow-up grief calls, assisting with mailings and other tasks in the Red Bank office; to visit and sit with patients all over the Cincinnati area who may not have family available to visit; to help patients preserve memo-

Change a life – Volunteer to tutor an adult with low-level literacy skills or GED preparation needs. Call 621-READ. Cincinnati Reads – a volunteer tutoring program working with K-4 students in Cincinnati Public Schools. Volunteers receive free training to work one-on-one with children who are struggling to read. Call 621-7323 or email Jayne Martin Dressing, jdressing@lngc.org. Great Oaks – currently recruiting volunteer tutors for its GED and ESOL classes. There are five hours of training required. The next dates are Wedmesdays, Aug. 22 and 29, at Scarlet Oaks in Sharonville. Numerous sites and times are available for volunteering. Call Kim at 612-5830 for more information. Inktank – Group looking for volunteers to help children and adults improve their skills in writing-based initiatives across the city. Call 542-0195. Helping Young Mothers Mentors Inc. – is seeking individuals who are willing to give their time as a mentor to assist teen mothers in improving their quality of life and who are striving to make it in today’s society. If you are interested in helping to “create a self sufficient mom for a better tomorrow” in your community and interested in truly seeing results, become a mentor by calling 513-520-6960. The Salvation Army – The Salvation Army issued an appeal today for volunteers to assist with its youth development programs. The Salvation Army offers After-School and Summer Enrichment programs, providing children

from at-risk neighborhoods with development opportunities throughout the year. The Salvation Army offers these programs at Community Centers across Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky, providing localized opportunities for volunteers to engage with these critical programs. The Salvation Army seeks those who have interest volunteering in one or more of the following roles: assisting children with homework, being a reading buddy, playing learning games with the children, assisting with skill drills, playing sports and gym games with the children, helping with snacks and meals provided to the children, being a good listener and role model. The Salvation Army’s Afterschool program serves children ages 6 to 12 years throughout the school year, from August to May, generally three to five days a week in the 2:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. time frame. Program elements include tutoring, homework help, computer literacy, conflict resolution and character training, spiritual development, recreation, sports and arts & crafts. The Salvation Army’s Summer Enrichment program functions for eight weeks, five days per week, in the 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. timeframe. The itinerary entails sports and recreation, field trips, computer literacy, arts and crafts, character training, spiritual development and academic maintenance. Volunteers are sought to help with any and all components of these wonderful youth programs. Volunteers are generally high school age and older. It is preferred that volunteers can be present at least one hour

SOUTHERN BAPTIST

UNITED METHODIST

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DELHI HILLS BAPTIST CHURCH

“Come Hear The Story of Jesus” 5421 Foley Rd. • 513-922-8363 Rev. Bob Overberg Sunday School..................................10:00a.m. Sunday Morning Worship ..................11:00a.m. Sunday Evening ..................................6:00p.m. Wednesday Evening Bible Study .........6:00p.m.

Liberty Missionary Baptist Church "Where Everybody is Somebody" 1009 Overlook Ave. 513-921-2502 Rev. Kendell Hopper Sunday School 10:00 am Sunday Morning Worship-11:00 am Sunday Evening 6:00 pm Wednesday Bible Study - 7:00 pm

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CHEVIOT UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 3820 Westwood-Northern Blvd. Kerry Wood, Senior Pastor Lois Schalk-Hartley, Associate Pastor

9:20 a.m. Traditional Worship 10:20 a.m. Sunday School for All Ages 11:20 a.m Contemporary Worship Service 662-2048 www.cheviotumc.org

per week for the duration of the program (i.e., the school year, or summer). For more information or to volunteer with The Salvation Army’s youth programs, please contact Melanie Fazekas at 762-5671, or Melanie.fazekas@use.sal vationarmy.org. Winton Woods City Schools – Wants to match community members who are interested in volunteering in the schools with the students. Volunteer opportunities at Winton Woods Primary North and South, middle school and high school. Volunteers who would have one-on-one contact with students outside of a classroom are required to have a background check. To volunteer, contact Gina Burnett at bur nett.gina@wintonwoods.org or 619-2301. The YMCA of Greater Cincinnati’s College Readiness Program – that inspires and encourages teens of color toward paths of success is looking for caring professionals who want to make a difference, and for young people who can benefit from positive adult role models. Part of a national YMCA initiative, the local program incorporates mentoring, career exploration and college readiness; and helps students develop a positive sense of self, build character, explore diverse college and career options. Volunteers, many of whom are sponsored by area companies, share their own personal insight and encouragement. Contact Program Director Darlene Murphy at the Melrose YMCA, 961-3510 or visit www.myy.org.

ENTERTAINMENT

Business Volunteers for the Arts – BVA is accepting applications from business professionals with at least three years experience, interested in volunteering their skills within the

OAK HILLS PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 6233 Werk Rd. (Enter off Werkridge) 922-5448 Rev. Jerry Hill 10:00 a.m Worship & Sunday School Nursery Care Avail.

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arts community. Projects average six to eight months in length and can range from marketing or accounting to Web design or planning special events. A one-day training program is provided to all accepted applicants. Call 8712787. Center for Independent Living Options – Seeking volunteers to staff Art Beyond Boundaries, gallery for artists with disabilities. Volunteers needed noon to 4:30 p.m. Tuesday through Friday, and noon to 5 p.m. Saturday. Call 241-2600. Cincinnati Museum Center – Needs volunteers to work in all three museums, the Cincinnati History Museum, the Museum of Natural History and Science and the Cinergy Children’s Museum, and special exhibits. Call 287-7025.

HEALTH CARE

Ameircan Diabetes Association – Seeks volunteers in its area office downtown for clerical support, filling requests for educational materials from phone requests, data entry, special events support and coordinating the Health Fair. Call 759-9330. American Heart Association – Volunteers needed to assist with the American Heart Association’s cause campaigns, Power to End Stroke, Go Red For Women, Start!, and the Alliance for a Healthier Generation. Assignments include clerical work, event specific duties and community outreach. Contact the American Heart Association at 281-4048 or email ray.meyer@heart.org. Captain Kidney Educational Program – Needs volunteers one or more mornings or afternoons a month during the school year to educate children in first through sixth grades about kidney function and disease. Training provided. Call 961-8105.


LIFE

B6 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • FEBRUARY 13, 2013

Leave it to volunteers to Parks teaching winter survival skills brighten gray days How to make it through the cold Nothing like a test of survival skills to motivate people to get outdoors. The Winter Challenge will cover all that adults need to know in making it through winter in the wild. The program will be offered Saturday, Feb. 23 at 2 p.m. through Sunday, Feb. 24 at 11 a.m. at Winton Woods Adventure Outpost. Saturday evening will cover survival techniques such as creating fire, building a shelter, signaling for help, locating and purifying water, cooking over a fire, orienteering (using map and compass to navigate) and basic first aid. The evening will also feature a night navigation course. To get the full experience, adults are invited to stay overnight in a basic cabin at Adventure Outpost. After breakfast on Sunday morning, participants will take part in survival challenges to test their skills. It is required that participants wear proper clothing and shoes to withstand the winter elements. The cabins are unheated, therefore it is required that those who stay bring warm clothes and winter bedding. Compasses will be provided. Cost for the Winter Challenge is $50 per

The Hamilton County Park District will teachwinter survival skills in Winton Woods Park Feb. 23 and 24. PROVIDED

adult. Registration is required by Feb. 19 at GreatParks.org. A valid Hamilton County Park District Motor Vehicle Permit ($10 annual; $3 daily) is required to enter the parks. For additional infor-

mation, visit GreatParks.org or call 513-521PARK (7275). Also, be sure to check out the district’s Facebook page and follow it on Twitter to find out more about what’s happening at the parks.

Well, we’ve had snow, so as far as I’m concerned, all snow bunnies should be happy for the next year. During these short, dreary winter days the memory of a gorgeous November morning Evelyn Perkins takes me back to a COLUMNIST time of sunshine and brightly colored leaves. Volunteers from Valley Temple in Wyoming came to rake my leaves and clean my gutters. Saturday is their Sabbath, so they arrived on Sunday right on the dot. They were kind enough to agree to let me take a photo, and Jeannie Hiller interrupted her busy schedule to share information. Valley Temple, once a school for Judaism, now has a laundry list of social activism. If you look at their website you’ll find that they do everything from cooking and serving at the Over-The-Rhine Soup Kitchen, to providing handmade blankets for hospitals, babies, teens, fire and police departments and shelters around the city, as well as reaching out to those within the Jewish faith. You would be surprised at the number of events

the Temple hosts including pre-school classes and the Valley Interfaith Food and Clothing Mitzvah Bag Food Drive. They helped me through the work they do for People Working Cooperatively. They participate in a rake weekend, a city-wide event sponsored by PWC held in November where Jeannie once volunteered. When she became active on Valley Temple’s Social Action Committee, she got the Temple involved. Jeannie asked to serve Woodlawn because it is so close to the Temple. Volunteers usually rake for two or three hours and can get three to four yards done. For 15 years she has watched children who participated grow up and pass volunteering lessons on to their children. Jeannie’s own three children, now ages 23, 27 and 30 have benefitted greatly from the biblical teaching of planting, watering and thus increasing by good deeds. Jeannie says, “The Temple talks about giving back to the community all the time. Rabbinic interns usually stay two years while learning to become a rabbi, and one of the things they help with is the youth group. Usually seventhand eighth-graders rake, but sometimes high

school kids help. If the family has younger children, they gladly pitch in. Parents and children get good feelings from their deeds. All kids take life lessons from volunteering. It is important for me to be active in my community. “It is important to teach young people to give back. In Hebrew, the words “Tikkun Olam” mean 'repairing the world' and one way to do this is by doing Mitzvot – which means commandments, but it also means good deeds. In Judaism we believe that is very important.” Jeannie grew up in Delhi Townhip. Her husband is from Memphis and they have been members of Valley Temple for 33 years. Jeannie is a jewel. Sweet enough to call me ahead of time, she didn’t know that I needed my gutters cleaned, and I didn’t know that the group was only coming to rake leaves. She said she would see what she could do, and doggone if she didn’t show up with a full crew plus equipment and her neighbor’s ladder. They were great! Everyone was enthusiastic and finished in no time flat. And, what a professional job! Then it was off to the next yard. Evelyn Perkins writes a regular column for the TriCounty Press.

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LIFE

FEBRUARY 13, 2013 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • B7

Count clerk offers help to prevent fencing stolen property Hamilton County Clerk of Courts Tracy Winkler addressed the Hamilton County Police Chiefs Association Feb. 6 to offer the assistance of her office in the prevention of the fencing of stolen property. New provisions of state law allow the Clerk to provide a “do not buy”

list to police chiefs who, in turn, provide that information to pawn shops and scrap metal dealers in their jurisdiction. The list includes people with prior convictions for theft-related offenses. Pawn shops and scrap metal dealers who receive this information are prohibited by law from doing busi-

ness with the listed persons. “My office stands ready to assist local law enforcement agencies with timely, accurate information to help dramatically slow the growth of theft and expedite the process of prosecution of these types of property crimes, “ said Winkler.

“This is just another example of the resources this office provides and cooperation I pledge to partner with law enforcement.” The list will be available to agencies so they can provide the appropriate list to the pawn shops and scrap metal dealers in their jurisdiction.

Hamilton County Clerk of Courts Tracy Winkler presents Hamilton County Sheriff Jim Neil presents a list of “persons known to be thieves or receivers of stolen property” at the Hamilton County Police Chiefs Association meeting.

Summit students’ illustrations in book Sixteen works of art from 15 Summit Country Day School students are published in a new picture book, “Cincinnati, Our City, Our Story,” which made its debut at the recent Books by the Banks: Cincinnati USA Book Festival. The book is a guided tour of Cincinnati people, places and history. Out of 250 submissions of artwork from children age 7 to 13, 44 illustrations of family-friendly scenes from across the Tristate were chosen to be in the book. A panel of childrens' librarians judged the artworks in categories representing locations in the city – such as the zoo, the ballpark, the Museum Center, etc. Photos were selected based on the quality of the illustration as well as alignment with text and layout of the book, said Heather Muzumdar, a spokeswoman for the project. "When we later compiled the list of finalists for the book we noted several finalists attend Sum-

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Among the 15 Summit Country Day School students whose artwork is featured in "Cincinnati, Our City, Our Story," are, in front, from left, Eric Meeks, Jamie Gieseke, Caroline Kubicki and Maya Mehlman; and in second row, Grace Anderson, Mia Semler, Evan Hunt and Grace Gilligan. THANKS TO DARREN WEIGL

mit Country Day and live in many different parts of town," she said. "We are pleased that so many neighborhoods and destinations around Cincinnati are represented in the book." Summit students whose work will be displayed in the book include fourth-graders Eric Meeks, Hyde Park; Gabrielle Burns, East Walnut Hills; and Jamie Gieseke, Hyde Park; sixth-graders Noor Amir, Mason; Grace Anderson, Villa Hills, Ky.; Grace Gilligan, Hyde Park; Evan Hunt, Delhi Township; Caroline Kubicki, Montgomery; Maya

Mehlman, Clifton; and Mia Semler, Hyde Park; and seventh-graders Margherita Favagrossa, Hyde Park; Garrison Herfel, Hyde Park; and Mary Towell, Anderson Township. Works by former Summit students Kendall Kearney, Clifton, and Emma Rademacher, Loveland, also appear in the book. Text in the book has been written by awardwinning author Louise Borden. The book is available at bookstores and all proceeds will go to Every Child Succeeds.

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LIFE

B8 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • FEBRUARY 13, 2013

DEATHS Larry Abel Lawrence S. “Larry” Abel, 54, of Price Hill died Feb. 5. He was a self-employed Title Examiner Survived by his wife Tina M. (nee Fiasco) Abel; children Christine Nicole Abel, Joseph W. (Nancy) Abel, Carol A. (John) CarrahAbel er, Marsha L. (Mike ) Lamping; mother-in-law Mildred E. (nee Louden); and many nieces and nephews. Preceded in death by parents Joseph Abel and Virginia (nee Espelage) Abel; and father-inlaw Leo J. Fiasco. Mass of Christian Burial was Feb. 8, at St. Lawrence Church. Memorial donations may be made to the family, in care of the funeral home. Ralph Meyer & Deters Funeral Home handled arrangements.

Janet Cook Janet Mae (nee Teboe) Cook, 83, of Montgomery died Feb. 1. She was a teacher for the Cincinnati Public Schools. Survived by son Mark A. (Sandra) Lemon; grandchildren Rachael (James) O’BaCook nion, Daniel Lemon, and Mindy Lemon; three great-grandchildren; stepsons Michael Cook, David Cook, Thomas Cook and Timothy Cook. Preceded in death by husbands Jerome Cook and William Lemon; daughter Denise Lemon; father Wilmer Teboe, and mother Mildred (nee Armstrong) Teboe. Services were Feb. 5 Church of the Saviour United Methodist Church Memorial donations may be made to: Church of the Saviour

United Methodist Church, 8005 Pfeiffer Road, 45242. Ralph Meyer & Deters Funeral Home handled arrangements.

Lillian Doland Lillian Kritikos Doland, 72, died Feb. 2. Survived by children George (Lynn) Doland, Evelyn (Bud) Stephenson, Maria (Aaron McGill) Ruwan, Stephanie (Michael) Hogue; grandchildren Nick (Faye) Doland, Eric Doland, Doland Carly, T.J. Ruwan, Taylor, Jake Hogue, Macy Stephenson; siblings Potoula Zarokostas, Georgia Alexandris, Spiro Kritikos, Linda Dinamidis. Preceded in death by husband Ernest Doland, brother Demetrios Kritikos. Services were Feb. 6 at Holy Trinity-St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church. Arrangements by Meyer & Geiser Funeral Home. Memorials to: Susan G. Komen for the Cure, 522 Cincinnati Mills Drive, Suite B248, Cincinnati, OH 45240.

Anna Eldridge Anna M. (nee Foster) Eldridge, 70, of Price Hill died Jan. 30. She was a supervisor for Ohio Periodicals. Survived by husband James Eldridge; son James Eads; and one grandson. Eldridge Preceded in death by parents George Foster and Ruth (nee Eads) Foster. Ralph Meyer & Deters Funeral Home handled the arrangements.

Shirley Evelin Shirley (Gilbert) Evelin, 77, of Palestine, Ill., formerly of Cincinnati, died Jan. 29. Survived by her husband

ABOUT OBITUARIES Basic obituary information and a color photograph of your loved one is published without charge by The Community Press. Please call us at 853-6262 for a submission form. To publish a larger memorial tribute, call 242-4000 or pricing details. Dean; children Angie, John and Mike; brother Sam (Ruth) Gilardi; sister Rosemary (late Toni) Mallonia; many grandchildren, great-grandchildren, nieces and nephews. Proceeded in death by daughter Rose Marie and brother-in-law Terry McCoy. Memorials to St. Rita School for the Deaf, 1720 Glendale Milford Road, Cincinnati, OH., 45215.

Sereta Babst. Preceded in death by son Chuckie May, brother Edward Babst. Services were Feb. 8 at Our Lady of Victory. Arrangements by Meyer Funeral Home. Memorials to: St. Rita School for the Deaf, 1720 Glendale Milford Road, Cincinnati, OH 45215 or Greater Cincinnati Police Museum, 959 W. Eighth St., Cincinnati, OH 45203.

Michael Lenahan

Normaleen McCool

Michael J. Lenahan, 91, Delhi Township, died Jan. 31. He was a Navy veteran of World War II. Survived by children Pat (Sandy), Dave (Ginny), Dan Lenahan, Karen (Jeff) Hebeler; grandchildren Kevin, Bridget, Brian, Katie, Justin, Jenna. Preceded in death by wife Dorothy Lenahan, grandson Russell, sisters Alice, Margaret. Services were Feb. 5 at Our Lady of the Visitation. Arrangements by Mihovk-Rosenacker Funeral Home. Memorials to: Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, 4420 Carver Woods Drive, Cincinnati OH 45242.

Normaleen K. McCool (nee Bauer), 72, of Elizabethtown, died Feb. 2. She was a longtime administrative assistant in the Howard Seaver Insurance Agency. Survived by companion Edward A. Cook; daughMcCool ter Janice K. Vaughn (David Lester); grandchildren Celestie, Cynthia, Anthony, Crystal, Kara (Jeremy), Kyle, Matthew, Michael and Brayden; great-grandchildren Abigail, Cheyenne, Chastity, Lou, Emma, Ryley, Timothy Jr. and Desiree; and siblings William Bauer Sr. and Janice Dieringer Bauer. Preceded in death by son Eugene I. “Butch” Ronan (Jo Ann), parents Kathryn (nee Earhart) and Stanley K. Bauer Sr., and brother Stanley K. Bauer Jr. Services were Feb. 6 at Dennis George Funeral Home. Memorials may be directed to the American Diabetes Association.

Mary Ann May Mary Ann Babst May, 78, Green Township, died Feb. 3. Survived by husband Charles May; children Kim (Tom) Chappell, Nancy Stout, Jeff (Terri) May; grandchildren Lisa (Dave), Payten, KrisMay ten, Andy, Allie; greatgranddaughters Makenna, Hannah; sister Marlene (the late Harold) Brokaw; sister-in-law

Earl Oakes Earl L. Oakes, 84, died Feb. 4. He was a member of Covedale Athletic Association, Kiwanis

Club, FMCA, retired from C.S.X Railroad, and former local chairman of United Transportation Union. Survived by his wife Mary Ann Moeller Oakes; children Sue (William) Culpepper, Charles (Linda) Oakes, Catherine Luttmer, Deborah Oakes, MiOakes chael (Kelly) Oakes; grandchildren Leslie, Ivy, Nichole, Rebecca, Zachary, Allison, Samantha; and greatgrandson William. Preceded in death by nine brothers and sisters. Services were Feb. 4, Meyer & Geiser Funeral Home. Remembrances may be made to Precious Secrets Sheltie Rescue, 6690 Hamilton Road, Middletown, OH, 45044; or Kiwanis Club of Price Hill/Western Hills, 689 Heavenly Lane, Cincinnati, OH, 45238.

Glen Pratchard Glen T. Pratchard, 88, of Westwood died Jan. 22. He was a truck driver and a U.S. Army veteran of World War II. Ralph Meyer & Deters Funeral Home in charge of arrangements.

Roy Riehle Roy J. Riehle, 80, of Harrison died Jan. 29. He was a fork life operator for Kahn’s for 32 years. He was a Marine veteran of the Korean War. Survived by daughter Mary White; grandchildren Jack White Jr., Jammie Allen, Riehle Ronald Smith, six greatgrandchildren; and sister Virginia Stephens. Preceded in death by his wife Betty (nee

Stephenson) Riehle; siblings Charles, Louis, Edward, Earl, Fred, Jack, Daniel, Gert O’Breck, Helen O’Banion, Ruth Vaughn, Dorothy Riehle and Evelyn Huff, and by four infant siblings. Services were Feb. 4 at Ralph Meyer & Deters Funeral Home.

Mary Lee Rinear Mary Lee Taylor Rinear, 54, Green Township, died Feb. 4. Survived by husband Rick Rinear; sons Matthew, Alex Rinear; mother Margaret Taylor; parents-in-law Bob, Carole Rinear; brothers Tim (Joan), Jack (Shirl Nelson) Taylor; sister-inlaw Patricia Taylor; brothers- and sisters-in-law, nieces, nephews and cousins. Preceded in death by father John Taylor, mother-inlaw Beverly Rinear, brother Michael Taylor. Services were Feb. 9 at Our Lady of the Visitation. Arrangements by Meyer Funeral Home. Memorials to: Holy Family Food Pantry, 3006 W. Eighth St., Cincinnati, OH 45205 or Hospice of Cincinnati Inc., c/o Bethesda Foundation Inc., P.O. Box 633597, Cincinnati, OH 452633597.

Norma Ronnebaum Norma Lee Ronnebaum, 59, of Sayler Park, died Jan. 31. She worked for Plastic Moulding Corp. Survived by children Michael (Amber Holland) Ronnebaum, Kim (Myron Terry) Ronnebaum, Ronnebaum Crystal Burnett, Lisa Burnett and Katie Ronnebaum, 23 grandchildren; three greatgrandchildren; siblings Veda Grigsby, Joyce Paolin and Roland Gribsby; and former husband Thomas Burnett. Preceded in death by husband Paul Ronnebaum; brother Verlan Grigsby; and parents Ellis Grigsby and Mahala (nee Begley) Grigsby.

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LIFE

FEBRUARY 13, 2013 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • B9

POLICE REPORTS DELHI TOWNSHIP Arrests/citations Jason Quinn Leach, 26, 901 Hermosa, driving under suspension at 4801 Foley Road, Jan. 28. Mark D. Rinier, 35, 4146 Mill Crest, driving under suspension at 4400 Delhi Road, Jan. 28. Kerri D. Carroll, 26, 301 Wyoming, driving under suspension at 4701 Foley Road, Jan. 28. Ruth Burke, 39, 530 Hibernia Drive, driving under suspension at 400 Greenwell Ave., Jan. 28. Tabetha Dickerson, 43, 3244 Central Parkway, Apt. 203, driving under suspension at 4701 Foley Road, Jan. 28. James W. Staley, 49, 1036 Lockman Ave., driving under suspension at 500 Pedretti Ave., Jan. 28. Jerome M. Wray, 24, 527 Elm Ridge Court, driving under suspension at 4800 Delhi Road, Jan. 28. Kyle A Matthew, 20, 1143 Anderson Ferry Road, drug offense at 475 Pedretti Ave., Jan. 29. Joshua Foster, 26, 3638 Glenway Ave., driving under suspension at 500 Rosemont Ave., Jan. 29. David Fox, 47, 397 Elaine, driving

Deaths Continued from Page B8 Services were Feb. 6. at Ralph Meyer & Deters Funeral Home.

Sister Lila Sandoval Sister of Charity of Cincinnati Lillian (Lila) Sandoval, 88, died Feb. 2. She was a Sister of Charity of Cincinnati for 69 years. For more than 30 years Sister Lillian taught in schools in Ohio, Colorado and New Mexico. When Sister Lillian came to the Motherhouse to retire in 1994 she continued to serve, first at Holy Family School, where she taught creative arts. She also assisted in Mother Margaret Hall’s library before working in the tutoring program for Sister of Charity employees. Survived by sisters Anna

under suspension at 4701 Foley Road, Jan. 29. Jerome M. Wray, 24, 527 Elm Ridge Court, driving under suspension at 5400 Rapid Run Road, Jan. 31. Christa Espich, 29, 216 Rockaway, driving under suspension at 5100 Delhi Road, Jan. 31. Chad E. Craft, 40, 933 Sunset , driving under suspension at 5200 Rapid Run Road, Feb. 1. Roni L. Rue, 40, 1529 Woodburn Ave., driving under suspension at 5200 Rapid Run Road, Feb. 1. Lora E. Addis, 31, 282 Francisridge Drive, driving under suspension at 500 Pedretti Ave., Feb. 1. Marc A. Williams, 33, 1212 Gilsey Ave., driving under suspension at 4301 Foley Road, Feb. 1. Kelly C. Tritt, 22, 4075 Mardon Place, driving under suspension at 500 Rosemont Ave., Feb. 1. Roger D. Tucker Jr., 26, 467 Pedretti Ave., Apt. 12, driving under suspension at 4900 Delhi Road, Feb. 2. Angela R. Norman, 27, 8130 Daly, driving under suspension at 476 Greenwell Ave., Feb. 2. Todd A. Mount Jr., 21, 4823 Fehr Road, driving under suspension at 502 Pedretti Ave., Feb. 2.

Shinville and Betty Campbell; brothers Charles, Kenneth, John and Peter; and many nieces and nephews. Preceded in death by Sandoval brothers Rudy and Joseph, and sister Mary Ellrodt. Services were Feb. 11 in the Heritage Room of the Sisters of Charity Motherhouse, Mount St. Joseph. Memorials may be made in Sister Lillian Sandoval’s name to the Sisters of Charity of Cincinnati Retirement Fund, 5900 Delhi Road, Mount St. Joseph, Ohio 45051.

Harry Smith Harry Stephen Smith, 89, West

ABOUT POLICE REPORTS The Community Press publishes the names of all adults charged with offenses. The information is a matter of public record and does not imply guilt or innocence. To contact your local police department: » Delhi Township: Chief Jim Howarth, 922-0060 » Cincinnati District 3: Capt. Russell A. Neville, 263-8300

Incidents/reports Breaking and entering Copper pipes stolen at 474 Morrvue Drive, Jan. 29. Theft GPS, sunglasses and CDs stolen from vehicle at 5030 Donlar Drive, Jan. 28. DVD players stolen from unlocked vehicle at 507 Woodhurst Court, Jan. 28. Copper pipes stolen at 4878 Delhi Road, Jan. 28. Remote control helicopter stolen from vehicle at 4939 Duebber Drive, Jan. 28. Hunting gear stolen from vehicle at 4353 Glenhaven Road, Jan. 29. GPS and cell phone stolen from vehicle at 4341 Cloverhill Terrace, Jan. 29.

Price Hill, died Jan. 28. He was a driver and worked at Radel Funeral Home. He was a Navy veteran of World War Smith II. Survived by wife Thelma Smith; grandson Thomas Smith II; daughter-in-law Sharon Smith; many nieces and nephews. Preceded in death by sons William, Thomas Smith. Services were Feb. 5 at St. William. Arrangements by Radel Funeral Home.

William Striet William H. Striet, 65, Green Township, died Feb. 2. Survived by wife Karen Striet; children David (Patrice), Patrick

Electronics, weapon and medication stolen at 4325 Valence Drive, Jan. 29. Rings stolen at 6210 Cleves Warsaw Pike, Jan. 29. Vehicle stolen at 1063 Bandanna Drive, Jan. 30. Laptop stolen at 448 Kitty Lane, Jan. 30. Stereo stolen from vehicle at 5412 Casual Court, Jan. 31. Various items stolen from vehicle at 4735 Shady Lawn Terrace, Feb. 2. GPS, sunglasses and badge stolen at 5540 Revmal Lane, Feb. 3. Tools stolen from vehicle at 4410 Glenhaven Road, Feb. 3.

CINCINNATI DISTRICT 3 Arrests/citations

Striet, Rebecca (Tom) Schoenauer; grandchildren Cora, Claire Striet, Nicholas, Veronica Schoenauer; siblings Caroline (Robert) Striet Peters, Diana (Ron) Poston, Janice Breen, Ralph (Cathy), Jeff (Terry) Striet; mother-in-law Mary Jane Lockard. Services were Feb. 9 at St. Jude Church. Arrangements by B.J. Meyer Sons Funeral Home. Memorials to: Wounded Warriors Project, P.O. Box 758517, Topeka, KS 66675.

Tom Tierney James H. “Tom” Tierney, 86, died Jan. 31. He was president for 10 years

Mark Jeffries, born 1982, assault, criminal damaging or endangering, 3201 Warsaw Ave., Jan. 23. Ronald Dion Smith, born 1984, receiving stolen property, 3201 Warsaw Ave., Jan. 24. Burton J. Spaulding, born 1956, theft under $300, 3201 Warsaw Ave., Jan. 24. Joseph Guthrie, born 1972, possession of drug paraphernalia, 3016 Glenway Ave., Jan. 24. Keith Ballman, born 1984, telecommunication harassment, 3201 Warsaw Ave., Jan. 25. Desean J. Stewart, born 1986, misdemeanor drug possession, 1130 Grand Ave., Jan. 28. Matthew Sexton, born 1993, burglary, 1748 Grand Ave., Jan. 28. Samuel Whitt, born 1976, violation of a temporary protection order, 1412 Manss Ave., Jan. 28. Richard Killings, born 1993, burglary, 1372 Covedale Ave., Jan. 28. James Pierson, born 1978, menacing, 1601 Manss Ave., Jan. 29. Lisa Price, born 1965, obstructing official business, 1059 Schiff Ave., Jan. 29. Cathy Doyle, born 1987, traffick-

ing, 1400 Covedale Ave., Jan. 29. Jessica D. Dielkes, born 1984, domestic violence, 508 Virgil Road, Jan. 30. Marvette J. Hooten, born 1989, criminal damaging or endangering, domestic violence, 1012 Woodbriar Lane, Jan. 30. Samatha Ayers, born 1987, burglary, drug abuse, 411 Hawthorne Ave., Jan. 31. Craig Rice, born 1988, theft $300 to $5000, 3201 Warsaw Ave., Jan. 31. Matthew Sexton, born 1993, aggravated armed robbery, 3201 Warsaw Ave., Jan. 31. John Raymond Slovacek, born 1984, domestic violence, 4437 Ridgeview Ave., Jan. 31. Justin Clifton, born 1982, receiving a stolen firearm, 1870 Sunset Ave., Jan. 31. Aaron Jacobs, born 1983, domestic violence, criminal damaging or endangering, 3900 W. Liberty St., Feb. 1. Justin Johnson, born 1972, felonious assault, aggravated burglary, 908 Sunset Ave., Feb. 1. Jeremy Stigall, born 1993, menacing, 3050 Mickey Ave., Feb. 2.

of Elder High School Dads Club, president of Mack Volunteer Fire Department and a member of the Ancient Order of Hibernians. Tierney Survived by wife Betty Tierney; children Patrick (Ruth), Timothy (Anne), Colleen, Maureen Tierney; grandchildren Jill, Sean, Bridget, Ross, Brett, Matthew, Ryan, Cody, Tyler, Marlee; seven greatgrandchildren. preceded in death by sister Dorothy Tierney. Services were Feb. 5 at St. Teresa of Avila. Arrangements by Meyer & Geiser Funeral Home. Memorials to: Elder High School, 3900 Vincent Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45205, American Diabetes Association, 644 Linn

St., Suite 304, Cincinnati, OH 45203 or Bayley, 990 Bayley Place Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45233.

Raymond Weber Raymond R. Weber, 66, Westwood, died Feb. 3. Survived by wife Sue Weber; children Raymond C. Weber, Tina Weber Walker; brother Carl (Eleanor) Weber Jr.; sister-in-law Arleen Weber. Preceded in death by brother William Weber. Services were Feb. 8 at St. Teresa of Avila. Arrangements by B.J. Meyer Sons Funeral Home. Memorials requested in the form of Masses.

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LIFE

B10 • DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS • FEBRUARY 13, 2013

Delhi couple celebrating 60 years Two wed on Valentine’s Day in 1953 By Monica Boylson mboylson@communitypress.com

Dick and Ginny Tenoever attribute a happy marriage to unconditional love and faith in God and on Feb. 14 the couple will celebrate their 60th wedding anniversary. “We want it to be something small,” Ginny Tenoever, 85, said. “We just want it to be just family.” But with six children, 15 grandchildren and six great-grandchildren it will be anything but a small affair. The Delhi Township residents first met on a blind date. “There are two stories,” Ginny said. “Dick’s first wife died and my mother-in-law and Dick were praying that he would find a mate for himself and a mother for his two kids. I was about 23. I wasn’t married and I was considered an ‘old maid,’ so my mother and I were praying to the Infant of Prague that I would find a good husband.” She said it was either the Infant of Prague or mutual friends who set them up, but either way she was glad they met. Ginny laughed as she remembered their first real date together. She said they went to see a Ma and Pa Kettle movie and then had a drink. Their whirlwind romance found the two at

Ginny and Dick Tenoever flip through their wedding album. The two were married Feb. 14, 1953. MONICA BOYLSON/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

the altar just nine months after they met. “You were really after me,” Dick, 88, said and smiled an playful grin. Dick proposed to Ginny on Thanksgiving in 1952, and they were married Feb. 14, 1953, at Resurrection Church in Price Hill. “I always teased when I was growing up that I wanted to be married on Valentine’s Day and it just so happened that that year Valentine’s Day was on a Saturday,” she said. Sixty years later the couple flips through their wedding album. Every picture has a story and every story is a memory. “We found a hall above a fire station on Warsaw Avenue,” she said about their wedding reception. “We had a bartender who got drunk before the thing even started. We had to get one of my brother’s friends to tap a keg and serve the beer. A lot of times the families would just make things and

bring it to the reception. It wasn’t like it is nowadays.” Ginny pulled out a photo album which included pictures from their honeymoon to Potawatomi Inn at Pokagon State Park in Indiana. “The room was $90 a week including three meals. Boy, I thought I was so rich. I get to go away for a whole week,” she said. “But when we got there the room was so small. It had a bed against the wall, one little window in it and we had to go down the hall, like they do in college, to go to the bathroom.” She said that even a small room couldn’t damper their spirits. “Dick looked out the window and said, ‘It’s snowing,’” Ginny said. “I didn’t know if he was teasing or not. It snowed so we were able to go tobogganing, skiing and ice skating. They didn’t have a pair of ice skates big enough for Dick, because

Dick and Ginny Tenoever on their wedding day Feb. 14, 1953. THANKS TO GINNY TENOEVER.

he wears a size 13, so he couldn’t go ice skating. By the time we went home the snow was gone. They had that snow and toboggan just for us.” For nearly an hour they

shared their memories from raising four girls and two boys to family vacations to tips for a longlasting marriage. “Never say no,” Dick joked.

But he said faith in the Lord will ensure a good marriage. “The Lord’s been good to us,” he said. “Always keep the good Lord in your life.”

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